of 1

A male employee complains to his supervisor. The employee is gay.

Published on 2 weeks ago | Categories: Games & Puzzles | Downloads: 2 | Comments: 0
52 views

Onica James posted Sep 6, 2017 11:32 AM A male employee complains to his supervisor. The employee is gay. He says another employee - who is straight - says things whenever the gay employee passes the straight employee's cubicle. The gay employee says the straight employee makes sexually suggestive remarks to him: The Equal Employment Opportunity interprets and enforces Title VII's prohibition of sex discrimination as forbidding any employment discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation. These protections apply regardless of any contrary state or local laws. "Through investigation, conciliation, and litigation of charges by individuals against private sector employers, as well as hearings and appeals for federal sector workers, the Commission has taken the position that existing sex discrimination provisions in Title VII protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) applicants and employees against employment bias" ("What You Should Know: EEOC and Enforcement Protections for LGBT Workers," n.d.). An example of LGBT related claims that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) views as unlawful sex discrimination includes harassing an employee because of his or her sexual orientation, for example, by derogatory terms, sexually oriented comments, or disparaging remarks for associating with a person of the same or opposite sex. Sexual harassment is an unwelcome sexual advance or conduct on the job that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment. "Workplace sexual harassment ranges from repeated offensive or belittling jokes to a workplace full of offensive pornography (creating a hostile work environment) to an outright sexual assault" ("Fighting Sexual Harassment | Nolo.com," n.d.). Sexual harassment is most often seen as men harassing women; it can happen to men and women, gay and straight as it relates to this situation. Sexual harassment is an equal opportunity offense. 2. Sheree Bolding posted Sep 7, 2017 1:22 PM A male employee complains to his supervisor. The employee is gay. He says another employee - who is straight - says things whenever the gay employee passes the straight employee's cubicle. The gay employee says the straight employee makes sexually suggestive remarks to him: The Law Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - "illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex" (Laws Enforced by EEOC, n.d.). Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates this act. Conditions that meet sexual harassment criteria include, but not limited to: The harasser can be anyone of the same or opposite sex The harasser can be anyone that brings unwelcomed sexual advances ("supervisor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee" (Facts About Sexual Harassment, n.d.)) A victim can be anyone affected by the offensive conduct "May occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim" (Facts About Sexual Harassment, n.d.) The conduct must be unwelcomed The Facts Both employees are maleGay male employee (victim) Straight male employee (harasser) The unwelcomed conduct is being brought by a co-workerThe straight male employee is another employee (coworker) The victim is effected by the conduct"The gay employee finds this behavior offensive; he is in a long-term relationship and has no interest in the straight employee" "He finds it offensive to have pictures of these handsome athletes shoved in his face along with suggestive comments." The conduct is not causing any economic or physical harm to the employeeThe harasser is making comments such as, "nice buns, nice basket, or "I'd let you 'do' me, even if I am straight." Other comments include, "I bet you wouldn't throw him out of bed for eating crackers! or I bet you'd like to see his baseballs!" The conduct is unwelcomedThe victimized employee demands the harassment stops. This indicates the comments are unwelcomed. Based on the law and facts above, the gay employee has the right to file suit based on the criteria outlined in the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Comments

Content

Onica James posted Sep 6, 2017 11:32 AM A male employee complains to his supervisor. The employee is gay. He says another employee - who is straight - says things whenever the gay employee passes the straight employee's cubicle. The gay employee says the straight employee makes sexually suggestive remarks to him: The Equal Employment Opportunity interprets and enforces Title VII's prohibition of sex discrimination as forbidding any employment discrimination based on gender identity or sexual orientation. These protections apply regardless of any contrary state or local laws. "Through investigation, conciliation, and litigation of charges by individuals against private sector employers, as well as hearings and appeals for federal sector workers, the Commission has taken the position that existing sex discrimination provisions in Title VII protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) applicants and employees against employment bias" ("What You Should Know: EEOC and Enforcement Protections for LGBT Workers," n.d.). An example of LGBT related claims that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) views as unlawful sex discrimination includes harassing an employee because of his or her sexual orientation, for example, by derogatory terms, sexually oriented comments, or disparaging remarks for associating with a person of the same or opposite sex. Sexual harassment is an unwelcome sexual advance or conduct on the job that creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working environment. "Workplace sexual harassment ranges from repeated offensive or belittling jokes to a workplace full of offensive pornography (creating a hostile work environment) to an outright sexual assault" ("Fighting Sexual Harassment | Nolo.com," n.d.). Sexual harassment is most often seen as men harassing women; it can happen to men and women, gay and straight as it relates to this situation. Sexual harassment is an equal opportunity offense. 2. Sheree Bolding posted Sep 7, 2017 1:22 PM A male employee complains to his supervisor. The employee is gay. He says another employee - who is straight - says things whenever the gay employee passes the straight employee's cubicle. The gay employee says the straight employee makes sexually suggestive remarks to him: The Law Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 - "illegal to discriminate against someone on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex" (Laws Enforced by EEOC, n.d.). Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates this act. Conditions that meet sexual harassment criteria include, but not limited to: The harasser can be anyone of the same or opposite sex The harasser can be anyone that brings unwelcomed sexual advances ("supervisor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee" (Facts About Sexual Harassment, n.d.)) A victim can be anyone affected by the offensive conduct "May occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim" (Facts About Sexual Harassment, n.d.) The conduct must be unwelcomed The Facts Both employees are maleGay male employee (victim) Straight male employee (harasser) The unwelcomed conduct is being brought by a co-workerThe straight male employee is another employee (coworker) The victim is effected by the conduct"The gay employee finds this behavior offensive; he is in a long-term relationship and has no interest in the straight employee" "He finds it offensive to have pictures of these handsome athletes shoved in his face along with suggestive comments." The conduct is not causing any economic or physical harm to the employeeThe harasser is making comments such as, "nice buns, nice basket, or "I'd let you 'do' me, even if I am straight." Other comments include, "I bet you wouldn't throw him out of bed for eating crackers! or I bet you'd like to see his baseballs!" The conduct is unwelcomedThe victimized employee demands the harassment stops. This indicates the comments are unwelcomed. Based on the law and facts above, the gay employee has the right to file suit based on the criteria outlined in the Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close