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Adjusted Instructional Design Document

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Key Assessment L_Brantley
Part 1: Identification of Learning Problem
General Audience:
Secondary teachers of academic content at Savannah Arts Academy in the SavannahChatham County Public School System or SCCPSS who are experts in their field of study are
those that teach history, English, math, foreign language, and sciences to a student population
that is over 45% identified gifted. Seventy five percent of the teachers have advanced
degrees and have been teaching for over 15 years. They teach 9-12 grade honors classes.
Any teacher that desires the training will be eligible to participate.
Problem Identification:
We teachers were seeing a trend based on several factors at Savannah Arts Academy; we
were required to deliver more content due to the Georgia Common Core Curriculum mandate
with the same planning time, EOCT’s were now 20% of a student’s grade instead of 15%,
and as a school we were accepting more students who entered with lower grade point
averages in middle school than in previous years. Our failure rate for certain classes had
increased. For example, for the first time in our school’s history, we needed to provide an
online credit recovery program during Spring 2013 for students to recover credits from failed
classes in the Fall 2012 and get them ready to take the Georgia End of Course Tests (EOCT)
conducted at the end of the 2012-2013 school year for Coordinate Algebra, Math II, Physics,
Chemistry, and Biology respectively. This program called “Twilight,” dictated and funded by
the SCCPSS, was held for our students at our school site with our teachers after school for
ten weeks. The students accessed curriculum primarily through an online module (A+Plus
curriculum) with lessons and tests to complete daily. Our students were engaged with the
content and received Carnegie Unit credit, as well as a high pass rate on their respective
EOCT’s. Because of our success with Twilight, Our teachers and administration considered
more seriously using an online model as one of the many teaching strategies available to use

for all of our students which leads to and supports our particular interest with the Flipped
Classroom model.
After experiencing firsthand the Twilight success where students used the video lessons and
the teachers were seen as a resource to conduct in class lab activities and answer individual
questions like the flipped classroom, several of our teachers attempted to “flip” their
classroom this past Fall 2013 in an effort not only to improve the achievement in the
classroom, but for students to enjoy the learning process and take more responsibility for
their learning of the content. The Flipped Classroom offers a way to deliver instruction that
is filmed for students to review multiple times thus saving class-time for questions, labs and
other activities led by the teacher that reinforce content increased achievement for the
students. Data from a current Flipped Classroom report a 20-25% increase on tests averages
as well as opportunities for differentiation. For example, Emily Kroutil, Physics, reports the
following:
“We've noticed that the usually lower-performing students have seen the biggest
improvement. The advanced students have appreciated the go-at-your-own-pace aspect
because they can do what they need to do and then work on other schoolwork. Quite a
few have gotten into the habit of even taking their tests early.”
Thus, the flipped classroom is an efficient way to deliver content to the students while
addressing multiple learning styles and the student’s motivation. Keeping this definition in
mind and acknowledging our insights gained from the Twilight experience, in order for this
to become a School-Wide strategy teachers would need formal training. The teacher leaders
who tried the flipped classroom this past Fall 2013 reported that they used much of their
personal time setting up the classrooms for the first time. In addition, these were teacher
technology leaders and had already had adequate informal and formal training in using the
devices and web sites required for flipping a classroom. Considering these factors, formal
training would be necessary for the rest of the staff who might be interested in this strategy
but may not possess the degree of expertise as the teachers referenced who started their
flipped classroom in the Fall of 2013. Training on lesson plan scripts, filming, editing,
uploading film, and organizing a flipped classroom would be necessary to consider and use

this delivery system and strategy for students. Offering this training would support our goal
of increased academic achievement and excellence in the classroom by taking responsibility
for getting trained on a promising teaching strategy.
Instructional Goals:







Teachers will write a script of their lesson and gather materials needed
Teachers will make an account with You Tube.
Teachers will film themselves delivering their lesson.
Teachers will upload film to I-movie and edit their lesson
Teachers will upload film to You Tube and provide students with links on class jump
or another website of their choice.
Teachers will link videos to their class web- site and create an organized schedule for
their class.

Part 2: Learner Analysis
Introduction:
The target audience is my own colleagues in the academic fields I have worked closely with for
the past 8 years. There are 32 teachers that I have co-taught, collaborated, and consulted on a
variety of issues that affected the students we serve. There are 13 men and 19 women ranging
between ages 30 to 55. Having been in all of their classrooms, I am very familiar with their
styles and skills. Much of my experience and interviews with them serve to supply reliable
analysis. To undergird this, I used an edited a technology survey and summarized the results.
More basic information came from www.classjump.com, Advanced Ed SACS information, my
school secretary, US News and World Report, and state of Georgia K-12 report card to give
insight into the population of students we serve.
Entry Skills and Prior Knowledge:
There are varying degrees of technology knowledge among the 32 teachers. Concerning the
flipped classroom specifically only 3 of the 32 are actively using the concept and that is in its
first year. All but one learner uses a mounted projector to assist in the delivery of lessons: one
teacher uses an overhead projector. All use email, Microsoft Office Suite, and have the basic
skills to Google and research a topic on the Internet. Most use the web site Class Jump,
www.edmodo.com, their own websites and 2 use Weebly website in their classrooms.

Attitude Towards Content and Learner Motivation
Most have a positive attitude towards technology but do not want to be pushed to use it. They
are results oriented and will try new things when they see that there is solid student achievement
data and experience behind it. The majority agreed that integrating technology in their
curriculum is important for student success and felt that they were confident in their ability to
integrate multiple technologies. They did cite in the survey several times that the district
network is slow at certain times of day and this poses a problem to using the internet on a regular
basis.
Educational Ability Levels
Our faculty of 54 teachers includes 32 academic, 22 arts/PE related, and one special education
teacher. I chose to focus on the 32 academic teachers who are experts in their field. Eighty
percent of these 32 academic teachers hold graduate degrees in their field and all are highly
qualified under the NCLB certification standards. In addition, most are gifted certified.
General Learning Preferences
As adult learners, they do not wish to waste any time at all. An online module is a good choice
for this group as they are independent and appreciate others respecting their time and
preferences. Because of their perceived and acknowledged abilities in technology proficiency,
an online module fits this group.
Attitude Towards Teachers and School
For the most part, their attitude towards training is tolerant. They will allow themselves to be
taught as long as the trainer is prepared and respects them as professionals in their field. They
enjoy their jobs and coming to school to teach a population that is over 45% percent gifted
identified by the state of Georgia. They consider it a privilege to work at Savannah Arts
Academy though like any public school teacher, they do not like the paperwork, standardized
testing, and extraneous duties that take away from their primary focus: their subject matter.
Group Characteristics

As a group, these teachers have an average of 18 years of experience in the classroom. Over half
of them are gifted certified and 4 of them have earned their doctorate degrees. Two of them
found teaching as their second career. The AP teachers who teach to the College Board AP tests
have scores that are among the highest on the East Coast and the country with an individual
student pass rate of 74% and a student participation rate of 80%. 14 out of 32 academic teachers
teach an AP course. They are driven, and have time constraints as the AP tests are given in May
and school ends the first week in June in Chatham County. Most of the AP teachers work in the
summer perfecting their course. Generally speaking, I have not found a more dedicated group
of educators.
Part 3: Task Analysis
Objectives of Training:







Learners will write a script of their lesson and gather materials needed
Learners will make an account with You Tube.
Learners will film themselves delivering their lesson.
Learners will upload film to I-movie and edit their lesson
Learners will upload film to You Tube and provide students with links on class jump
or another website of their choice.
Learners will link videos to their class web- site and create an organized schedule for
their class.

I chose a Procedural Task Analysis following the instructional objectives above closely because
the steps to get to the performance goal of running a flipped classroom lesson are in a sequential
order. There are tasks that you must do before others to get an effective result. When consulting
with teachers and in doing research on setting up a Flipped Classroom, the reality is that there are
many ways to complete the task. I had to narrow the training down to one way through
YouTube, for example. I used I-Movie but some teachers may be well-versed in Movie-Maker
for their PC. Given the learner’s technological knowledge, they can adapt these steps to their
liking and proficiency with specific software.
1.

Gather materials needed to script lesson.
1.1 Ask what Performance Goal or objective do you want your students to master at the
end of the lesson.
1.2 Decide how about how much time the lesson will take
1.3 Open Microsoft Office Suite/PowerPoint
1.4 On each slide order the points of the lesson that you desire to communicate

1.5 Save document
2. Make an account with www.youtube.com
2.1 Sign in in the upper right corner of YouTube.
2.2 Do you have a Google account?
2.3 Sign in with your Google Account email address and password
2.4 Don’t have a Google account, click create Account.
2.5 Enter basic information and new username. This is for your new Gmail email address
only, not for your public name on YouTube
3. Film lesson through PowerPoints (independent) or I-Phone Camera (requires another
person or tri-pod)
Through PowerPoints:
3.1 Connect your microphone and headphones to your computer
3.2 For Macs, you can use the built in microphone if needed.
3.3 Pull up your scripted PowerPoint
3.4 Click the "Slide Show" tab on the ribbon at the top of the screen.
3.5 Click Record Narration
3.6 Recording Quality Box will pop up. Check quality and adjust or press OK
3.7 Select the Slide you would like to start with and begin talking
3.8 Press the space bar to prompt to the next slide. Narrate each slide as you wish.
3.9 Go to the next slide until you have finished.
3.10 You will see how many seconds or minutes you spoke on each slide
3.11 Replay and Adjust to your liking.
3.12 The prompt at the top will say click to exit.
3.13 You are then back at the slide show menu
3.14 Go to Press Save As, name your lesson and save
Through I-Phone or I-Pad Camera:
3.15
Ask someone to help you film using the Phone or I-pad.
3.16
Brief them on what you are trying to accomplish in the lesson
3.17
Brief them on where to focus, on you, the board and when
3.18
They will need to Press the Camera Icon
3.19
Make sure it is on Video and not the Still Camera Icon
3.20
Press The camera record icon and record
3.21
Press the Camera icon to stop recording
3.22
Review Video and make sure it is to your liking
4. Upload Video to I-Movie
4.1 Plug in your Apple device with a USB cord
4.2 Pull up I-movie application
4.3 Follow the prompts on the Mac to upload video to I-movie
4.4 Edit out pauses and mistakes so that the video is as short as possible
4.5 Save your project according to the lesson name
5. Upload Video from I-Movie to YouTube Account.
5.1 Launch I-Movie and open the project. Click Share then YouTube from the toolbar located
across the top of the screen.
5.2 Mark Video as unlisted
5.3 Copy link
6. Upload PowerPoint or Copied Video Link to Your Class Website

7. Using your Course pacing guide, construct a calendar of videos to coincide with each Lesson and
unit.
7.1 Include this calendar in your website
7.2 Include technology tutorials to assist students.
7.3 You can make your videos as you proceed through the year or spend a summer creating them.
Subject Matter Expert (SME)
I, Lauren Brantley, will serve as the primary Subject Matter Expert. I have a Bachelor of Science in
Education from the University of Georgia with a major in Special Education/Intellectual Disabilities. I
am certified to consult and adapt special and general curriculum with the regular Education teacher K-12
in the state of Georgia. My job requires me to be in and out of different classroom where I see many
different styles of teaching and are exposed to a variety of resources that I help evaluate. I am now
pursuing my degree in Instructional Technology at Georgia Southern University with an add-on online
teaching endorsement through Valdosta State University.
Expertise in executing the flipped classroom requires a level of technical and educational expertise of
which I possess equal amounts of both components. The online teaching endorsement course through
Valdosta State University requirements included producing a fully online Professional Development
Learning Module which included designing a module for a target group of learners and executing that
lesson through the WIMBA course delivery system and developing a Knowledge Management System
which included a wiki, website, and database organizing all manner of learning resources. In addition,
my coursework through Georgia Southern required me to produce a instructional video and an
Instructional Screen Cast using Camtasia, flip cameras, I-Movie editing software and using Web 2.0
programs like Voice Thread to produce projects. I have ten years of direct classroom experience working
and consulting with secondary teachers of content. Three of the six classroom teachers I serve with
currently are using and developing their flipped classroom each in their own individual way. I have been
able to work with them as they have developed their courses. As a resource for the students, I have also
matriculated through these flipped courses and advised the teachers from a student’s perspective. The
teachers are Amy Durden and Emily Kroutil who teach Honors Physics and Cynthia Hicks who teaches
Honors Chemistry. All three have slightly different ways they approached the flipped classroom and have
been excellent resources in my pursuit of developing a Professional Development Course on the Flipped
Classroom.
Click on the Icon below for the Task Analysis Flow Chart:

Flow Chart.pdf

Part 4: Objectives
Terminal Objective 1: To understand the concept of the Flipped Classroom
Enabling Objectives:
1A. To identify a working definition of the flipped classroom
1B. To identify the benefits of a flipped classroom
1C. To choose which delivery system will fit their course
Terminal Objective 2: To prepare to film lessons for use with the Flipped Classroom
Enabling Objectives:
2A. To identify materials needed to complete a scripted lesson
2B. To write a script of their lesson
2C. To rehearse their script of their lesson.
Terminal Objective 3: To record themselves delivering a lesson
Enabling Objectives:
3A. To use PowerPoints to record their voice delivering a lesson
3B. To film themselves delivering a lesson
3C. To evaluate their product using a rubric
Terminal Objective 4: To prepare materials for upload for use with the Flipped Classroom
Enabling Objectives:
4A. To upload film for editing
4B. To make an account with YouTube
4C. To implement instructor’s feedback provided in previous lesson.
Terminal Objective 5: To organize links and lessons for student ease of use
Enabling Objectives:
5A. To use the course pacing guide to construct a calendar for lessons

5B. To upload links to website.
5C. To add helpful student links to website
Classification of Instructional Objectives:
2.Design and Develop Digital Age Learning Experiences and Assessments Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessment
incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the
NETS·S.
a. Design or adapt relevant learning experiences that incorporate digital tools and resources to promote student learning and creativity
3. Model Digital Age Work and Learning Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and work processes representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital
society.
a. Demonstrate fluency in technology systems and the transfer of current knowledge to new technologies and situations.
c. Communicate relevant information and ideas effectively to students, parents, and peers using a variety of digital age media and formats
5. Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership Teachers continuously improve their professional practice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their
school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources .c. Evaluate and reflect on current research and
professional practice on a regular basis to make effective use of existing and emerging digital tools and resources in support of student learning

ITSE-T Standards

Relationship between Instructional Objectives and ITSE-T Standards:

Part 5: Assessments
Lesson one uses Criterion based assessments that are mainly knowledge based. The video was
made from a top Education researcher and is broad in scope. The discussion component allows
the students to become aware of the different angles others may take on this concept relative to
their field of expertise. It is important to go into the performance based assessments with an
adequate base of common knowledge of the flipped classroom and the skills you need to set it up
so with that understanding, I employed performance based assessments for Lessons 2-5 as the
material lent itself to this kind of assessment. Constructing a sample lesson for use in the flipped
classroom as well as evaluating the final product and model websites allows students to use their
knowledge in a real context and demonstrate their skills in a creative, practical way.
Lesson 1: Introduction to the Flipped Classroom
Objective: To understand the concept of the Flipped Classroom
1A. To identify a working definition of the flipped classroom
1B. To identify the benefits of a flipped classroom
1C. To choose which delivery system will fit their course
Assessment #1.1
What is a Flipped Classroom (in 60 Seconds)? Mini Criterion Based Assessment on the Video
by Julie Schell. Learners watch the video and take the assessment. They can go back and watch
the video to make sure they have the correct answers. They send the answers in electronically.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2b7GeuqkPc By Julie Schell
1. The Flipped Classroom is unique in that students get their first exposure to course
content out of the class or ________ class.
2. Students prepare to ________ in class activities.
3. ____________ class, students are ideally __________ and practicing concepts while
getting _________ from the teacher and their peers.
4. __________ Class, Students further their understanding and _______ their learning.
5. After Class, students are ______________ concepts they found difficult.
6. Throughout this process the predetermined __________ of the lessons are streaming
throughout the before, during, and after process.
Answer Key to What is a Flipped Classroom (in 60 Seconds) http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=r2b7GeuqkPc By Julie Schell
1. The Flipped Classroom is unique in that students get their first exposure to course content
out of the class or before________ class.
2. Students prepare to __participate______ in class activities.

3. _During__ class, students are ideally __applying______ and practicing concepts while
getting _feedback/interaction___ from the teacher and their peers.
4. __After__Class, Students further their understanding and __expanding__ their learning.
5. After Class, students are __practicing____________ concepts they found difficult.
6. Throughout this process the predetermined __GOALS____ of the lessons are streaming
throughout the before, during, and after process.
UDL: Providing multiple means of representation, the printed web link is embedded into the
page for quick audio reference of the material and differentiation. Not all learners will need to
refer back to the video for review but some who may need to hear the video multiple times and
the link will be provided to accommodate learning differences and varying background
knowledge on the concept.
Assessment #1.2
Students list benefits of the Flipped Classroom including their subject matter into the answer
through the discussion portal through a Course Management System like Schoology, Moodle, or
Wimba or others.
Suggested Answers: Anything close to these answers with their subject matter included:
1. You are creating a record of teachings students can go back and refer to if they didn’t get
it the first time/Students are able to stop the presentation and watch it at their own pace
(helpful for difficult Chemistry and Physics problems).
2. Students are previewing the material before they get to class at their own pace leaving
more time for feedback/learning/reviewing/extending the concepts in the classroom
(Ideally a review of the video and then a Biology lab could be conducted).
3. Struggling students who may give up on homework have the support system to persevere
through difficult problems (Calculus problems now have an instant support system
through Peers and the teacher).
UDL: Using the discussion portal provides learners an interactive way to express their
knowledge of the Flipped Classroom with their classmates. Differentiation takes place in that
some learners will list one benefit and others will list multiple benefits and that is ok.
Assessment #1.3
In addition, Learners choose delivery system through the discussion portal.
For example a learner may post “I will be using the PowerPoint as my primary delivery model
for my flipped classroom.”
Or

“I will be using the filmed model using a flip camera or another kind of camera and a tri-pod to
film my lessons.”
UDL: Text on the screen in Verdana font (recommended font for learners with dyxlexia)
provides multiple means of representation. Learners have choices (multiple means of
expression) in their delivery system inherent in this lesson. They are not told exactly how to do
this project in their classroom by design and in considering their learner characteristics.
Lesson 2: Preparing Materials to Film
Objective 2: To prepare to film lessons for use with the Flipped Classroom
Enabling Objectives:
2A. To identify materials needed to complete a scripted lesson
2B. To write a script of their lesson
2C. To rehearse their script of their lesson.

Assessment 2
Learners send instructor the materials/logistics form below that identifies materials and Lessons
as well as their rehearsed script as an email attachment.
PowerPoint Script Model is included below.
The Filming Script Example is included below
Example Materials/Logistics Form for PowerPoint Option:
Lesson

Length

Materials

Genetics

2 minutes

TextbookChapter 8
computer
Completed
PowerPoint on
Genetics
Script in Notes
section
completed and
rehearsed
microphone
Example Materials/Logistics Form for Filming Option

N/a

Lesson

Length

Other Help

Materials

Other Help?

Location and
time
My classroom
after school

Location and

How to Use a
Flipped Camera

5 minutes

2 Flipped
Cameras
Extra double A
batteries

time
Make sure
After school at
theater and sound SAA
box are openCheck with
custodian or
admin the day
before and day of
filming

tripod

UDL: 2. Learners complete a materials/logistics form that identifies materials and written script.
Learners send this to instructor as an email attachment. Instructor will give personalized
informal electronic feedback on the document. Learners also have access to an assessment
example of a PowerPoint script (title called Prelude to Genetics) or a filmed script (title called
How to Use a Flip Camera) embedded below. Learners have choice in their written script and
this assessment optimizing relevance, value, and authenticity (this exercise directly relates to
their classroom)
Models:

Lesson 3: Learning to Film and Record
Objective 3: To record themselves delivering a lesson

3A. Learners use PowerPoints to record their voice delivering a lesson
3B. Learners film themselves delivering a lesson
3C. Learners evaluate their product using a rubric
Assessment 3
*PowerPoint Learners send a PowerPoint lesson including their voice with self-assessed rubric
below to instructor.
Instructor Assessment Model for PowerPoint Presentation with Audio:

Or
*if Learners are filming themselves, they send a filmed lesson to instructor using the same rubric
Assessment Filming Model Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCqVoPLUIGc
See rubric below: Assessment Rubric for PowerPoint and Film Presentations

Exemplary 4
Organization

Subject
Knowledge

Information
presented in
logical,
interesting
sequence

Accomplished
Developing 2
3
Information in
Difficult to
logical sequence follow
presentation-student jumps
around

Beginning 1
Cannot
understand
presentation-no sequence of
information

Demonstrates
Demonstrates
full knowledge
by answering all Full knowledge
without
potential class
elaboration
questions with
explanations
and elaborations

Uncomfortable
Does not have
with information a grasp of the
and is able to
information.
address
rudimentary

Graphics

Explain and
reinforce screen
text and
presentation

Relate to text
and presentation

Occasionally
uses graphics
that rarely
support text and
presentation

Uses
superfluous or
distracting
graphics or no
graphics

Research

Uses a variety
of sources in
reaching
accurate
conclusions

Uses a variety
of sources in
reaching
conclusions

Presents only
evidence that
supports a
preconceived
point of view

Does not
justify
conclusions
with research
evidence

Screen Design

Includes a
variety of
graphics, text,
and animation
that exhibits a
sense of
wholeness.
Creative use of
navigational
tools and
buttons

Includes a
variety of
graphics, text,
and animation.
Adequate
navigational
tools and
buttons

Includes
combinations of
graphics and
text, but buttons
are difficult to
navigate. Some
buttons and
navigational
tools work

Either
confusing or
cluttered,
barren or stark.
Buttons or
navigational
tools are
absent or
confusing

Oral
Presentation

Maintains eye
contact and
pronounces all
terms precisely.
All audience
members can
hear

Maintains eye
contact most of
the time and
pronounces
most words
correctly. Most
audience
members can
hear
presentation

Occasionally
uses eye contact,
mostly reading
presentation,
and incorrectly
pronounces
terms. Audience
members have
difficulty
hearing

Reads with no
eye contact
and incorrectly
pronounces
terms. Speaks
too quietly

Elocution/Eye
ContactEye Contact not
applicable for
PowerPoints.

Content.

19-24= Exemplary
13-18=Accomplished
Presentation Totals: __

7-12=Developing

0-6= Beginning

UDL: Providing choices provides multiple means for action and expressions by letting learners
have choices in their presentations. In addition, this assessment provides options for monitoring
progress through models and rubrics thus enhancing executive functions
Lesson 4: Upload Film, Edit, and Recordings
Objective 4: To prepare materials for upload for use with the Flipped Classroom
4A. Learners who chose to film will upload and edit film.
4B. Learners who chose to film will make an account with YouTube.
4C. All Learners will implement instructor’s feedback provided in previous lesson.
Assessment 4.1
PowerPoint Learners have the opportunity to implement instructor feedback for their final link.
They send in their improved link to a classmate who will then use the rubric, Assessment Rubric
for PowerPoint and Film Presentations, for peer evaluation.

PowerPoint Model Available:
Filmed Learners have the opportunity to implement instructor feedback for their final link. They
send in their improved link to a classmate which has been uploaded to YouTube. Classmates use
the rubric, Assessment Rubric for PowerPoint and Film Presentations for peer evaluation
Filmed Model Available: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCqVoPLUIGc
UDL: Providing options for monitoring progress through rubrics and models thus enhancing
executive functions and providing multiple means of expression through performance referenced
assessment choices.
Lesson 5: Learners will organize links and prepare website for Student Use
Objective 5: To organize links and lessons for student ease of use

5A. Learners will use the course pacing guide to construct a calendar for lessons.
5B. Learners will upload final links to their website
5C. Learners will add helpful student links to website
Assessment 5.1
Learners evaluate model websites and upload a 200 word reflection to instructor citing what they
saw as valuable and useful to the organization of their Flipped Classroom and how they can
incorporate the positive aspects of the websites into their classroom.
Example:
All the sites were informative and were great examples of how you can set up your
website for ease of use. I teach Coordinate Algebra and Geometry. I would like to have my own
website but very clean and simple. I liked the direct links to the videos in www.saaphysics.com.
There were 4 links I could set up for my two different classes, the calendar, all the units covered,
the current unit, and the Haiku Learning Management System which I am not ready to
incorporate yet in my math classes.
The calendar feature was easy to use. It was exactly like the Google calendar which
students are accustomed to and was easily opened. Having a link for the current unit was
especially helpful as students can go directly to what they are learning. Once opened to the
current unit, all the videos are lined up with clear documentation and titles to where the
accompanying documents were located. The graphic display was clear and not cluttered with
items that could distract students. This seemed like a perfect fit for my classes.
Model WebsitesCindy Hicks-Chemistry: http://www.classjump.com/c/cindyhicks/?what=links
Ms Hicks uses the YouTube links through the site ClassJump. Her videos are through the “links”
shortcut. All of her Chemistry classes are using the flipped model.
Amy Durden- Physics: http://saaphysics.com/
Ms. Durden uses a tablet and her flipped classroom example is her Honors Physics.
Emily Kroutil- Secondary Sciences: http://www.mrskscience.com/
Ms Kroutil uses a tablet and PowerPoint and her flipped classroom example is Honors Physics.
Assessment 5.2

Learners will submit final links to their website to instructor for review of the website as a
whole.
UDL: Providing options for sustaining effort and persistence by providing models, supports, and
contacts for future questions

Part 6:
Instructional Sequence
Sequenc
e
1
2
3
4
5

Description
Introduction to the flipped classroom
Preparing Materials to Film
To Film or Record delivering a lesson
To Prepare Materials for upload
To Organize Links and lesson for student ease of use

Objectiv
e
1A, B, C
2A, B, C
3A,B,C
4A,B,C
5A,B,C

The sequencing strategy used is the prerequisite strategy which is based on the fact that the skills
required are dependent on other skills learned before you can proceed. One must master the
prerequisite skills before moving forward so the sequence is very logical and matches the task
analysis. Prerequisite Skills and orienting concepts are taught first before moving on to more
difficult and complicated skills.
PreInstructional Strategy: An online pretest will be given to give learners a preview to the
material. Since learners have some familiarity with the content, questions will be meaningful
and will prepare learners to assimilate the content into their own situation.
*UDL-Lesson 1 activates or supplies background knowledge, highlight patterns, critical features,
big ideas, and relationships.
Strategy Reference Morrison et.al. page 162 Table 8-1
Lesson 1: Introduction to the Flipped Classroom
1A. Learners will correctly identify a flipped classroom.
1B. Learners will identify benefits of a flipped classroom.
1C. Learners will choose which delivery system will fit their course and content to start their
flipped classroom.
Initial Presentation:

Learners will listen to a 60 second definition of the flipped classroom via YouTube-Julie SchellBy PowerPoint Presentation Instructor elaborates on the definition and tells which types of tools
are needed accomplish and prepare their classroom by presenting a graphic organizer of the
choices to accomplish the task. They may use a PowerPoint with audio lesson or strictly film
using the whiteboard in the classroom.
*UDL- Lesson 1 provides text on the screen in Verdana font which will also accompany the
audio with PowerPoint and transcript for the YouTube presentation.
Strategy Reference: Morrison et.al. page 144 Definition
Cavanaugh page 133 Multiple means of expression and engagement (Verdana font recommended
by the Dyslexic Association)
Motivational Strategy:
Upon presenting a graphic organizer stating the benefits of the Flipped Classroom, the Instructor
asks Learners to stop and think of one benefit to the flipped classroom relative to the specific
content they are teaching. Instructor gives the Learners the opportunity to type this benefit
through a discussion portal where feedback can be given from peers and instructor.
*UDL- Further exploration by video links with vignettes show examples of secondary content
flipped classroom, science and math specifically. Learners can choose and view which examples
they feel apply to their situation and solidify their understanding if they are feeling like they need
that.
Strategy Reference: Morrison et.al. page 149 feedback and 162 Table 8-1 Graphic organizer
Cavanaugh page 134 Graphic representations and page 127 supplemental material
Generative Strategy:
Learners watch the PowerPoint example and the filming example provided and complete a short
survey geared to helping learners analyze the examples in terms of which example will fit best
with their respective course and the current resources available for execution of their flipped
classroom.
After this strategy, Learners are equipped to inform instructor if they are using PowerPoint or
Filming. Instructor gives feedback according to their situation.
*UDL- Graphic representations with human voice and pointer reading the graphic and pointing
out choices are included.
Strategy Reference: Cavanaugh page 146 Validating Student understanding and page 134
multiple means of representations
Lesson 2: Preparing Materials to Film
2A. Learners identify materials needed to complete a scripted lesson
2B. Learners write a script of their lesson
2C. Learners rehearse their script of their lesson.

Initial Presentation: Instructor provides audio and visual checklists of materials needed to script a
lesson with explanative instruction on this process. The instructor models the process of
identifying materials, writing and rehearsing their script.
*UDL-Lesson 2 provides multiple means of representation through audio and visual material.
Strategy Reference: Morrison et.al page 149 Checklist/instruction and psychomotor modeling
Generative Strategy: Learners write a script of a lesson and practice timing themselves reading
and rehearsing the script.
*UDL-Lesson 2 optimizes relevance, value, and authenticity (this exercise directly relates to
their classroom).
Strategy Reference: Morrison et. al page 149 Active rather than passive learning
Lesson 3: Learning to Film and Record
3A. Learners use PowerPoints to record their voice delivering a lesson
3B. Learners film themselves delivering a lesson.
3C. Learners evaluate their product using a rubric.
Initial Presentation: Learners watch an audio guided video with screen shots of how to record on
a PowerPoint. Learners who are filming watch an instructor created video on the use of a flipped
camera to record.
*UDL-Lesson 3 offers alternatives for auditory and visual information presented.
Strategy Reference: Kerr Include multiple sources of content page 29
Generative Strategy: Learners choose a PowerPoint presentation to record themselves with the
time constraints in mind. Learners who choose to film themselves create a 2 minute video.
Learners use a rubric to self-assess themselves.
*UDL-Lesson 3 optimizes individual choice and autonomy.
Strategy Reference: Kerr Provide opportunities for student choice page 29
Lesson 4: Upload Film, Edit and Recordings
4A. Learners who chose to film will upload and edit film.
4B. Learners who chose to film will make an account with YouTube.
4C. All Learners will implement instructor’s feedback provided in previous lesson.
Initial Presentation: PowerPoint step by step audio and visual directions for uploading film and
editing basics. After each slide a question is posed to Learners directly relating to content.
Answers and feedback are given to each question after Learners view each slide with audio

*UDL-Lesson 4 provides options for comprehension through listening, looking, and answering
relevant questions with immediate feedback
Strategy Reference: Morrison et.al. Psychomotor modeling page 149
Generative Strategy: Learners are then asked to minimize their screen for reference and upload
their example PowerPoint presentation or two minute video to a website. Those who chose to
film will need to make basic edits using the information in the initial presentation as a guide.
*UDL- Lesson 4 provides options for expression and communication by using multiple tools for
construction and composition with graduated levels of support.
Strategy Reference: Kerr, authentic learning experiences page 30
Lesson 5: Learners Will Organize Links and Prepare Website for Student Use
5A. Learners will organize links according to their lesson plan
5B. Learners will upload final links to their website
5C. Learners will add helpful student links to website
Initial Presentation: Learners will follow a PowerPoint presentation with audio where the
instructor provides an example and model of a secondary flipped classroom website that has used
best practices to organize their links according to a pacing guide and calendar. This site provides
lessons for an entire school year.
*UDL-Lesson 5 provides options for executive functions which support planning and managing
information and resources.
Strategy Reference: Kerr, Including a real model of the final product page 30
Generative Strategy: Learners will have the opportunity to go to two different websites
themselves and ask questions to the instructor and to the creator of the websites. The instructor
will provide feedback through the discussion portal or an email exchange.
*UDL-This lesson provides options for sustaining effort and persistence by fostering
collaboration and community
Strategy Reference: Kerr, Including a real model of the final product and creating authentic
learning experiences page 30
Motivational Strategy: The creators of the website are secondary Learners of content like the
learners. Emailing and discussing questions with secondary Learners of content provide
relatable resources.
*UDL- Lesson 5 provides options for sustaining effort and persistence by fostering collaboration
and community.
Strategy Reference: Kerr, Considering the power of social networking page 30
Rao et.al, Encouraging interaction among and between faculty and Learners page 2

Reference List
Cavanaugh, C., & Blomeyer, R. (2007). What works in k-12 online learning. (1st ed.). Eugene,
Oregon: International Society for Technology in Education, 133-135.
Kerr, S. (2011). Tips, tools, and techniques for teaching in the online high school classroom.
TechTrends, 55(1), 28-30. doi: DOI: 10.1007/s11528-011-0466-z
Morrison, G., Ross, S., Kemp, J., & Kalman, H. (2013). Designing effective instruction. (7th
ed.). John Wiley & Sons. 144-146.
Rao, K., & Tanners, A. (2011). Curb cuts in cyberspace: Universal instructional design for online
courses. Journal of Postsecondary Education and Disability, 23(3), 211-229.
Rose, D., & Gravel, J. (2013). Curricular opportunities in the digital age. Learners at the Center;
Teaching and Learning in the era of the common core, a jobs for the future project.

Part 7 with Assessments Table Included
Lesson 1Introduction to
the Flipped

Lesson 2
Preparing
Materials to

Lesson 3
Learning to Film
and Record

Lesson 4
Upload Film, Edit and
Recordings

Lesson 5
Learners will organize links
and prepare website for

G
o
a
l
s

Classroom
>YouTube/Julie
Schell
PowerPoint
Presentation with
Graphic Organizer
and audio
>Learners name
benefit
>Learners inform
instructor what
system they are
using

Film
>Instructor
provides audio
and visual
checklists of
materials
needed to script
a lesson with
explanative
instruction on
this process.
The instructor
models the
process of
identifying
materials,
writing and
rehearsing their
script.

> Students watch a
audio guided video
with screen shots of
how to record on a
PowerPoint. Students
who are filming
watch a instructor
created video on the
use of a flipped
camera to record.
> Learners choose a
PowerPoint
presentation to
record themselves
with time constraints
in mind. Learners
who choose to film
themselves create a
2 minute video.

> PowerPoint step by step
audio and visual directions
for uploading film and
editing basics. After each
slide a question is posed to
Learners directly relating to
content. Answers and
feedback are given to each
question after Learners view
each slide with audio
> Learners are then asked
to minimize their screen for
reference and upload their
example PowerPoint
presentation or two minute
video to a website. Those
who chose to film will need
to make basic edits using
the information in the initial
presentation as a guide.

Student Use
> Learners will follow a
PowerPoint presentation with
audio where the instructor
provides an example and model
of a secondary flipped
classroom website that has
used best practices to organize
their links according to a pacing
guide and calendar. This site
provides lessons for an entire
school year.
Students will have the
opportunity to go to two
different websites themselves
and ask questions to the
instructor and to the creator of
the websites. The instructor will
provide feedback through the
discussion portal or an email
exchange

To provide
Learners with a
basic working
definition of the
flipped classroom.

To get Learners
to think about
what they need
to construct a
lesson.
For Learners to
decide which
lesson they will
script and then
follow through
on that process.
2A. To identify
materials
needed to
complete a
scripted lesson

To instruct Learners
how simple recording
can be and stress the
importance of time
constraints and
general filming tips
for a successful and
efficient presentation

To gain knowledge on how
to upload material to the
internet for editing and use.

To view the entire process as a
whole and organize links for
easy use by students.
To think about what you need
to include in your website to
complete the process.

3A. To use
PowerPoints to record
their voice delivering
a lesson

4A. To upload film for
editing

5A. To use the course pacing
guide to construct a calendar
for lessons

To highlight the
many benefits of
flipping your
classroom
O
b
j
e
c
t
i
v
e
s

1A. To identify a
working definition
of the flipped
classroom
1B. To identify
the benefits of a
flipped classroom
1C. To choose
which delivery
system will fit
their course

2B. To write a
script of their
lesson
2C. To
rehearse their
script of their
lesson.

3B. To film
themselves delivering
a lesson
3C. To evaluate their
product using a
rubric

4B. To make an account
with YouTube
4C. To implement
instructor’s feedback
provided in previous lesson.

5B. To upload final links to
website.
5C. To add helpful student
links to website

A
s
s
e
s
s
a
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t
s

*1. Criterion
Referenced quiz n
parts of Graphic
Organizer
assessing
knowledge from
the Video on the
Flipped Classroom
*2.Learners
name flipped
classroom
benefits to their
classmates on in
the discussion
portal.

*Learners send
instructor the
materials/logisti
cs form below
that identifies
materials and
Lessons as well
as their
rehearsed script
as an email
attachment.
Assessment
Models are
included for
both options.

*PowerPoint Learners
send a PowerPoint
lesson including their
voice with selfassessed rubric to
instructor.
Instructor
Assessment Model for
PowerPoint
Presentation with
Audio is available

PowerPoint Learners have
the opportunity to
implement instructor
feedback for their final link.
They send in their improved
link to a classmate who will
then use the rubric,
Assessment Rubric for
PowerPoint and Film
Presentations, for peer
evaluation.

Or
*if Learners are
filming themselves,
they send a filmed
lesson to instructor
using the same rubric
Instructor
assessment model
for filmed
Presentation is
available.

Filmed Learners have the
opportunity to implement
instructor feedback for their
final link. They send in
their improved link to a
classmate which has been
uploaded to YouTube.
Classmates use the rubric,
Assessment Rubric for
PowerPoint and Film
Presentations for peer
evaluation

Providing
multiple means
of
representation
through audio
and visual

Providing Multiple
sources of content
and models
Providing Choices

Provide options for
comprehension through
listening, looking, and
answering relevant
questions with immediate
feedback

*3. In addition,
Learners choose
delivery system
through the
discussion portal.
They can choose
to deliver their
lessons by
PowerPoint or by
Filming
themselves.

U
D
L

Extension:
Instructor
provides extra
videos to expand
on knowledge and
experience
Text on the screen
in Verdana font
provides multiple
means of
representation
Providing support
website link for
support and
review

Optimizing
relevance,
value, and
authenticity
(this exercise
directly relates
to their
classroom)

Part 8: End of course Evaluation

Provide options for
expression and
communication by using
multiple tools for
construction and
composition with graduated
levels of support.

Learners evaluate model
websites and upload a 200
word reflection to instructor
citing what they saw as
valuable and useful to the
organization of their Flipped
Classroom and how they can
incorporate the positive aspects
of the websites into their
classroom.
All Learners will submit final
links to their class website to
instructor for review of the
website as a whole.

Provide options for executive
functions which support
planning and managing
information and resources
Providing options for sustaining
effort and persistence by
fostering collaboration and
community

An end of the course survey on survey monkey where I can collect the data from all
participants and evaluate the responses will be employed. The three teachers that have model
sites will evaluate my online module as the Subject Matter Experts as they are proficient in the
technology and have actually been the teachers that have used the flipped classroom for at least
one year. They know as much or more than I do in certain areas what might be missing from my
content even though I am very familiar with the content and have had first- hand experience in
supporting all of them in their classroom because they are the ones who have started and finished
the process. They are also technology leaders at my school. They would fill the survey out and
we could go over the answers together.
Subject Matter Expert Survey Questions: Please explain in detail where you are able to do so.
Your expertise and feedback is valued and needed in order for improvements to be implemented
for future courses on the Flipped Classroom. Thank you!
1. Was the time allotted for this training sufficient to cover the content?
2. Was the overall content too detailed or was it too broad in scope?
3. Was there an alternate approach or design to explaining the content or parts of the content
that was not used in this training that could be used in the future?
4. Was there critical content left out that you felt was important? Please explain in a few
sentences.
5. Was there content you felt should have been left out that was included? Please explain in
a few sentences.
6. As a subject matter expert, what content seemed confusing and unclear?
7. Did the content presented match the objectives put forth?
8. What objective needed more instructional breadth than was given?
Learner Evaluation Survey: Please answer the following questions about this course in as
much detail as possible. Your experience and feedback will help make improvements in future
courses on the Flipped Classroom. Thank you for taking the time to do this.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Was the content of this course what you expected? If not, how so?
What class activities were most helpful?
What class activities were not helpful and could be avoided during the next course?
Where the instructions clear for activities and assessments?
Did the links and technology work correctly for you?
Were the models helpful?
Was this content helpful to your subject matter?
What suggestions can you make to improve the course?

Considering my learners are people that I have worked with for as much as ten years, I
think the best feedback would be anonymous. My survey would be online and anonymous. I
think my learners would take the time to write a few sentences which I believe would be
more helpful than a rating scale. I would like to know details of how I could structure the

course to meet the needs of this educated audience. I could list the questions in a table and
visually evaluate any repeated responses and keep the feedback organized for years to come.
Learner Evaluation Answers Feedback Table
Question

Participant
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Was the
content of
this
course
what you
expected?
If not,
how so?

What
class
activitie
s were
most
helpful?

What
class
activitie
s were
not
helpful
and
could be
avoided
during
the next
course?

Where the
instructions
clear for
activities and
assessments?

Did the
links and
technology
work
correctly
for you?

Were
the
models
helpful?

Was
this
content
helpful
to your
subject
matter?

What
suggestions
can you make
to improve the
course?

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