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AusRAP Report 2011

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The Australian Automobile Association's latest report on the state of Australia's national highways.

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how Safe are our Roads?
Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk
benchmarking the performance of australia’s roads in the Decade of action

2011

an average of four people are killed on australia’s roads each day

Road crashes cost our community $74 million every day

Engineering measures to improve safety don’t have to be high cost ones and best of all - they last decades

Everyday drivers making everyday mistakes should not die or be seriously injured as a consequence of an unsafe road

a road system where we have five star drivers in five star cars on five star roads should involve no deaths

ausRaP aspires to help australia become a nation free of high risk roads.

The roads assessed in this report represent just three per cent of australia’s road length, but recorded over 15 per cent of all fatalities

over 20,000 kms of australia’s highways have been rated for risk

Just nine per cent of roads assessed qualify as a most improved road

17 per cent of the roads assessed have shown little or no improvement and are persistently high risk

Contents
Why Road Safety is Important ................................... 2 About AusRAP ............................................................ 3 Simple Measures Save Lives ..................................... 4 Rating Australia’s Network for Risk .......................... 5 How Safe are our Roads? Results ............................. 7 Tracking the Safety Performance of Australia ............................................................. 10 New South Wales ................................................ 12 Victoria ................................................................ 16 Queensland ......................................................... 20 South Australia ................................................... 24 Western Australia ............................................... 28 Tasmania............................................................. 32 Northern Territory .............................................. 36 Australian Capital Territory ................................ 40 Appendix – Complete Results.................................. 42

Exclusion of liability The material in this report is not intended to be relied upon as advice, and in particular the Authors and Publishers accept no responsibility for loss or injury suffered by any person as a consequence, direct or indirect, of anything contained in this report.

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Why Road Safety is important

many road crashes involve sudden loss, untold suffering and financial hardship, and they change the lives of people forever. Safe personal travel should be a key feature of modern society but unless road tragedy personally touches us or our loved ones, we sometimes don’t reflect on how big a problem it is. Across Australia around 1,400 people are killed each year and more than 32,500 are hospitalised. This averages four deaths and nearly 90 serious injuries on Australian roads and costs our community $74 million each and every day. Most crashes occur when ordinary people make everyday human mistakes. It has been estimated that around 1 in 500 driving decisions can be wrong, involving a mistake, an error of judgement, a missed signal or the like. Sober, drug-free, responsible drivers obeying the speed limit and wearing seatbelts frequently die on our roads. Safe roads minimise the chances of these crashes happening, and if they do occur, they minimise the severity of the crash. Engineering measures to improve safety don’t have to be high cost and best of all, they last decades! We need to create a genuinely safe road system, in which improving the safety of drivers, vehicles and roads is of mutual importance. A road system where we have five star drivers, in five star cars on five star roads should involve no deaths. It is estimated that of all road fatalities which can be avoided through improved safety, half of these would be achieved through road upgrades including investment in new road construction and expenditure on safetyrelated works. Australia’s National Road Safety Strategy 2011-2020 recognises the critical need to improve road infrastructure, particularly those road features which are designed to reduce run-off-road, intersection and headon crashes.

Making this happen requires the commitment of politicians, based on support from the public, funding from treasury, road authority action, and the design and construction skills of road engineers. The Australian Road Assessment Program (AusRAP) is here to help all of these stakeholders, and aspires to help Australia become a nation free of high risk roads.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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about ausRaP

ausRaP is a program run by the australian automobile association and State and Territory motoring clubs, dedicated to saving lives through advocating for safer road infrastructure. AusRAP’s objectives are to: • reduce deaths and injuries on Australia’s roads by systematically assessing risk and identifying safety shortcomings that can be addressed with practical road-improvement measures; and • put risk assessment at the heart of strategic decisions on road improvements, crash protection and standards of road management. AusRAP works in partnership with government and nongovernment organisations to: • inspect national and state highways and develop Star Ratings and Safer Roads Investment Plans; • track road safety performance through risk maps so that funding agencies can assess the benefits of their investments; and • explain the benefits of safer road infrastructure to the community by describing why some roads are safer than others. AusRAP uses two complementary methods—or protocols— for assessing the safety of roads: Star Ratings and Risk Mapping. Risk Mapping is a measure of the real-life performance of a road network because it is based on crashes which have actually occurred. These crashes are a result of factors related to driver behaviour, the vehicle and the safety of the road infrastructure (see page 5 for more detail). Comparing two risk maps over time is known as Performance Tracking, which is the focus of this report. Star Ratings measure the inherent safety of a road’s infrastructure – that is, the degree to which built in safety

features prevent crashes from occurring and reduce the severity of those crashes which do occur. Each road is then assigned a Star Rating, which tells us how safe the road itself is. For more information on Star Ratings visit www.ausrap.org.

ausRaP – contributing to the Decade of action
The Global Plan for the Decade of Action for Road Safety 20112020 encourages all countries to set a target of ‘Eliminating High Risk Roads by 2020’. AusRAP aspires to help Australia become a nation free of high risk roads. This vision will be achieved through working with governments and government agencies, motoring Club Members and the wider community, peak national and state road user groups and the research community to highlight road safety infrastructure issues and potential solutions. AusRAP will extend road assessments and monitor the implementation of road improvements across Australia’s National Highway Network (about 22,000kms) and many State and Territory highways during the Decade of Action for Road Safety. AusRAP’s membership and close ties to iRAP, the International Road Assessment Program, opens the door to a world of best practice and innovative safety improvements internationally. AusRAP is a valued member of the iRAP Board and the Global Technical Committee. As a founding iRAP program, AusRAP is a leader in the iRAP Asia Pacific Region and through our relationship with iRAP and FIA, we will continue to assist emerging RAP programs in our region.

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Simple measures Save lives

The safety of road infrastructure depends on many factors including the width of the road, whether there are curves and crests, line marking, the presence and type of any intersections, roadside hazards, overtaking provision and whether head-on collisions are avoided

through the use of medians and safety barriers, rather than relying on a splash of white paint. The safety features of a road are not always obvious to motorists but they do make a huge difference as explained below.

Undivided roads with only one lane in each direction make it riskier to overtake. Freeways with wide medians and safety barriers can safely handle much higher traffic volumes with virtually no chance of a head-on crash.

Roadside killers such as trees, poles and steep embankments can turn what would be a minor crash into a severe one. If these hazards can’t be removed, installing safety barriers can dramatically lower the risk.

If a driver moves out of their lane, sealing shoulders offers extra space to recover. Unsealed or narrow shoulders are unforgiving of simple mistakes, and can lead to loss of control, running off the road, or head-on into traffic.

Roads with lots of intersections are less safe because of an increased risk of crashes with side-road traffic. Low risk intersections have separate turning lanes and are clearly visible day and night. The best intersections have freewaystyle on and off ramps.

Line marking and signs provide guidance to drivers about the road direction and assists the driver to make appropriate decisions.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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Rating australia’s network for Risk

in total, we have analysed more than 20,000 km of highways which represents three per cent of the total road network in australia. These carry over 15 per cent of the nation’s road traffic and experienced 1,170 road crash deaths, or 15 per cent of all road deaths in australia during the period 2005-2009. This AusRAP analysis focuses on casualty crashes that occurred between 2005 and 2009 on rural sections of the National Land Transport Network and significant connecting roads. These are generally defined as being those with a speed limit of 90km/h or more, though some lower speed limit sections are included where they form an integral part of an otherwise higher speed route. The results of this report are presented in six parts: • performance tracking • national risk maps • summary of results • State and Territory risk maps • best and worst links • complete results

Performance tracking
Performance Tracking uses the data compiled for each risk map to assess how the risk on the network, as a whole, and on individual road sections, had changed over time. It is a way of measuring success and the effectiveness of investment in safer roads. This report looks at how risk on the Australian Network has changed from 2000-2004 to 2005-2009, as well as identifying the ‘most improved’ and ‘persistently higher risk’ roads.

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To achieve a ‘most improved’ rating a road link for this study requires two criteria to be met. These are as follows: 1. There must be a significant reduction in casualty crashes from the first period (2000 – 2004) to the second period (2005 – 2009), at the 98 per cent level. This is effectively an indicator for performance of the collective risk. 2. The risk rating for individual risk should show a reduction in the rating and must be no higher than a medium score for the latest period. To be identified as having a ‘persistently higher risk’, a road link must satisfy the following two criteria: 1. There is no significant reduction in casualty crashes from the first period (2000 – 2004) to the second period (2005 – 2009) at the 98 per cent level. 2. The calculated risk score for individual risk in both analysis periods is in the Medium-High or High risk rating range. a fatality between States and Territories (that is, death occurs within 30 days of the crash), jurisdictions report the severity of non-fatal crashes differently. In addition, the way a person’s injury is actually categorised at the crash scene can vary. To address this definitional problem, the risk maps presented in this report measure ‘casualty crashes’. A casualty crash is defined here as any road crash in which at least one person is killed or injured and this includes serious injuries which typically represent one third of casualty crashes.

Summary results
This report presents national and State and Territory maps. For each State and Territory, the length of road analysed, numbers of casualty crashes and number of deaths that occurred on each highway during 2005-2009 are also provided in a table. The summary results also provide a brief overview of some of the major highway upgrades that have been completed recently, or are planned by State/Territory and Federal Governments. The focus is on projects that are likely to improve the safety of the national network.

national risk maps
AusRAP uses two types of colour coded risk maps to illustrate relative levels of risk throughout road networks: • Collective risk maps show the density, or total number, of casualty crashes over a given length of road. Collective risk is calculated by dividing the number of casualty crashes per annum by the length of highway. • Individual risk maps show the casualty crash rates per vehicle kilometre travelled – and so effectively represent the risk faced by an individual driver. Individual risk is calculated by dividing the frequency of crashes per annum by the distance travelled on each section of highway per annum. The colours and thresholds used in the maps to denote relative levels of risk are shown below in Table 1. Previous risk mapping reports provide further details on the specific method used to produce the risk maps. These reports are available at www.ausrap.org. The crash and traffic volume data used in risk map reports was obtained from the road authority in each State and Territory. While there is consistency in the definition of
TablE 1: ColouRS anD ThRESholDS uSED in RiSk maPS Risk rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

best and worst links
The collective and individual risk measures are particularly useful when used together to tell a ‘combined story’. Roads that score poorly on both measures—having relatively high collective and individual risk—might be considered as candidates for investment, and as roads where drivers should exercise extra care. The ‘best’ links are those that are in the low or lowmedium band for both collective and individual risk. The ‘worst’ links are those that are in the high or medium-high band for both collective and individual risk.

Complete results
Complete, detailed results are provided at the end of this report in an Appendix. These results include information on lengths of road, carriageway type, traffic volume, casualty crashes, deaths and risk ratings for individual sections of each highway.

Collective risk (average annual casualty crashes per km) < 0.03 0.03 – 0.10 0.10 – 0.17 0.17 – 0.29 > 0.29

individual risk (average annual casualty crashes per 100m veh-km) < 6.85 6.85 – 9.56 9.56 – 12.34 12.34 – 16.44 >16.44

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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how Safe are our Roads? Results

Tracking the Safety Performance of australia’s Roads
Since 2005, AAA and the State and Territory Motoring Clubs have been mapping the rate of death and serious injury on Australia’s main highways. This year, for the first time, and to coincide with the start of the Decade of Action, we have tracked how these risk rates have changed across Australia. For this report, crash and traffic data for the period 2000-2004 has been compared to 2005-2009. Figure 1 shows the number change in collective risk between the two periods. It is pleasing to see that in 2005-2009 more of the network rated as low risk than in 2000-2004. However, more of the network also rated high risk in 2005-2009, which is a concern for Australian motorists. Figure 2 shows the change in individual risk between the two periods. The results show that less of the network rated in the two highest risk categories in 2005-2009. The overall risk has dropped substantially in the medium-high risk (down by 15 per cent) and high risk (down by six per cent) categories.

Australia’s Collective Risk Rating
50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 50% 25% 45% 20% 40% 15% 35% 10% 30% 5% 25% 0% 20% 15% 10% 5% Figure 1: 0% % of network % of network 46% 39%

2000-2004 2005-2009

Australia’s Collective Risk Rating
46% 39% 26% 21% 11% 26% 21% Low Low-medium Medium 11% 9% Risk Rating Medium-high 11% 11% 9% 11% 11%

2000-2004 2005-2009

12%

14%

14% High 12%

Tracking the performance of Australia’s highways for collective Low Low-medium Medium High risk (average annual casualty crashes per km) Medium-high 2000-2004

Australia’s Individual Risk Rating Risk Rating
30% 27%

2005-2009

35% 30% % of network % of network 25% 20% 35% 15% 30% 10% 25% 5% 20% 0% 15% 10% 5% 0% Low Low-medium 15% Low 12% Low-medium Medium Risk Rating 15% 12% 23% 19% 20% 15% Medium-high 27% 23% 17% High

Australia’s Individual Risk Rating 23%
19% 20% 30% 15%

2000-2004 23% 2005-2009 17%

Medium Risk Rating

Medium-high

High

Figure 2: Tracking the performance of Australia’s highways for individual risk (average annual casualty crashes per 100 M veh-km)

8 ‘most improved’ Sections of highway
‘Most improved’ sections of highway are those where there has been a significant reduction in the number of fatal and serious crashes over time. Just nine per cent of the kilometres analysed this year qualified as an improved road. The top 15 ‘most improved’ sections of highway are shown in Table 2. On these highways alone, the number of casualty crashes dropped from 963 to 424 – a 56 per cent drop.
TablE 2: ‘moST imPRovED’ SECTionS of highWay
Casualty crashes individual Risk Rating Casualty crashes individual Change in Risk casualty Rating crashes

Rank

State

highway

from-to

Type

2000-2004 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 =8 =8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Northern Territory Victoria Tasmania Victoria Victoria Victoria Queensland Northern Territory Northern Territory Western Australia Victoria Northern Territory South Australia New South Wales New South Wales New South Wales Victoria Highway Princes Highway East Bass Highway Calder Highway Calder Highway Calder Highway Flinders Hwy Barkly Highway Stuart Highway Timber Creek to WA border Pakenham to Warragul [1] Forth River Bridge to Knights Rd Sunraysia Hwy to Mildura Woodend to Pyrenees Hwy Wedderburn to Culgoa Richmond to Julia Creek Wunara to QLD border Pine Creek to Katherine Single Dual Single Single Dual Single Single Single Single Single Dual Single Single Mixed Dual Dual 18 high 157 medium 33 54 mediumhigh mediumhigh

2005-2009 4 low 36 low 9 low 18 low 21 low 9 low 11 medium 10 20 mediumhigh lowmedium -77.8% -77.1% -72.7% -66.7% -63.2% -60.9% -60.7% -60.0% -60.0% -57.1% -54.1% -45.7% -43.2% -42.7% -42.5% -39.8%

57 medium 23 mediumhigh

28 high 25 high 50 35 mediumhigh mediumhigh

Great Northern/Victoria NW Coastal T/Off to Highway Sandfire Roadhouse Princes Highway West Stuart Highway Dukes Highway Hume Highway Pacific Highway F6 Freeway Little River to Geelong Katherine to Daly Waters Tailem Bend to Keith Coolac to Tarcutta Nabiac to Taree Waterfall to Bulli

15 low 28 low 25 medium 54 low 55 low 50 lowmedium

61 low 46 mediumhigh

95 medium 96 87 98 lowmedium mediumhigh lowmedium

59 low

[1] This segment has been shortened from previous years to exclude the Pakenham Bypass which opened in December 2007, as this section is now considered more urban in nature. Ranked by percentage reduction in the number of casualty crashes between 2000-2004 and 2005-2009; significant reduction in the number of casualty crashes between data periods at the 98% confidence level; section lengths are greater than 7km; AusRAP Risk Rating based on the number of casualty crashes per 100 million vehicle km travelled: black (high risk), red (medium-high risk), orange (medium risk), yellow (low-medium risk), green (low risk).

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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‘Persistently higher Risk’ Sections of highway
‘Persistently higher’ risk sections of highway are those rated high or medium-high risk in both data periods surveyed. They have shown little or no change over time. Nineteen per cent of the kilometres analysed this year qualified. Of the top 15 listed in Table 3, casualty crashes have risen by an average of three per cent.
TablE 3: ‘PERSiSTEnTly highER RiSk’ SECTionS of highWay
individual Casualty Risk crashes Rating 2000-2004 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12 14 15 Queensland Northern Territory South Australia Queensland New South Wales South Australia Queensland South Australia Queensland Tasmania Queensland South Australia Tasmania South Australia Western Australia Warrego/Landsborough/ Barkly Hwy Stuart Highway Dukes Highway Warrego/Landsborough/ Barkly Hwy Great Western/Mitchell Highway Stuart Highway Flinders Hwy Eyre Highway Bruce Highway Bass Highway New England/ Cunningham Hwy Sturt Highway Bass Highway Stuart Highway Great Northern/Victoria Highway Mt Isa to NT border Alice Springs to SA border Bordertown to VIC Border Winton to Flinders Hwy Lapstone to Katoomba NT Border to Coober Pedy Julia Creek to Barkly Hwy Yalata to Fowler Bay St Lawrence to Sarina Victoria Bridge to Forth River Bridge Kalbar to Warwick Barmera to Berri Nine Mile Rd to Stowport Rd Woomera to Port Augusta Fitzroy Crossing to Halls Creek Single Single Single Single Mixed Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Dual Single Single 30 high 41 12 27 mediumhigh mediumhigh mediumhigh Casualty crashes individual Change in Risk casualty Rating crashes

Rank

State

highway

from-to

Type

2005-2009 43 high 50 high 13 high 23 high 397 high 45 high 15 high 11 high 89 high 48 98 12 33 38 29 mediumhigh mediumhigh mediumhigh mediumhigh mediumhigh mediumhigh 43.3%
43.3% 22.0%

8.3%

-14.8%

405 high 41 high 17 high 16 high 78 mediumhigh

-2.0%

9.8% -11.8% -31.3% 14.1% 6.7%

45 high 89 high 8 mediumhigh

10.1%

50.0%

31 high 46 high 29 high

6.5%

-17.4%

0.0%

Ranked by AusRAP Risk Rating 2005-2009; no significant reduction in the number of casualty crashes between data periods; section lengths are greater than 7km; AusRAP Risk Rating above average of the medium-high (red) category or high risk (black) category in both data periods; AusRAP Risk Rating based on the number of fatal or serious crashes per 100 million vehicle km travelled: black (high risk), red (medium-high risk), orange (medium risk), yellow (low-medium risk), green (low risk); Some of the roads listed may have had measures implemented since 2009.

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australia

The map below presents the collective risk rating for the network assessed across Australia. The map on the following page presents the individual risk for the network assessed across Australia.

CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, auSTRalia, 2005-09
FIguRe 3: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low w low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated [1] 46% 21% 9% 11% 14%

[1] Throughout this report, percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, auSTRalia, 2005-09
FIguRe 4: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 23% 19% 27% 15% 17%

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new South Wales

Ten highways were assessed in new South Wales, totalling 3,706km in length. The length of each highway and the number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are shown in Table 4.
TablE 4: highWayS RaTED in nEW SouTh WalES highway from - to length km Barton Hwy F3 F6 Federal Hwy Great Western / Mitchell Hwy Hume Hwy New England Hwy Newell Hwy Pacific Hwy Sturt Hwy Total Hume Highway to ACT border Hawkesbury River to New England Highway Waterfall to Wollongong (via Mt Ousley Rd) Hume Highway to ACT border Lapstone to Dubbo Narrellan Rd to Albury Branxton to QLD border VIC border to QLD border Hexham to Chinderah Hume Highway to Mildura 38 105 39 66 305 485 499 986 611 572 3,706 % 1% 3% 1% 2% 8% 13% 13% 27% 16% 15% 100% Casualty crashes 2005-2009 48 563 236 108 1,040 769 535 456 1,596 249 5,600 % 1% 10% 4% 2% 19% 14% 10% 8% 29% 4% 100% Deaths 2005-2009 6 21 5 6 39 56 40 59 128 30 390 % 2% 5% 1% 2% 10% 14% 10% 15% 33% 8% 100%

The 3,706km long network in New South Wales represents 18 per cent of the total network assessed and the 390 deaths that occurred on these sections of the New South Wales network during 2005-2009 account for 33 per cent of the national network total. The collective risk map on the following page shows that many of NSW’s highways are rated as medium-high or high risk, with only the Newell Highway and Sturt Highway rating better than this for most of their length. In terms of individual risk, NSW highways fare much better with the majority rating low or low-medium. Exceptions to this include the Great Western / Mitchell Hwy and the Sturt Highway from the Hume Highway to Narrandera, although some sections of the Hume Highway and Pacific Highway rated as medium-high or high risk. NSW continues with major upgrade work across the highway network, most prominent are the Hume and Pacific Highways. Since 2007 the following major upgrades have been completed on the Hume Highway: • The 17 kilometre Albury Wodonga Hume Freeway links the Hume Freeway in Wodonga with the Hume Highway at Ettamogah, north of Albury

• The Sheahan Bridge has been duplicated over the Murrumbidgee River at Gundagai, immediately upstream of the existing crossing • Construction of 12 kilometres of dual carriageway, including reconstruction of four kilometres of northbound carriageway between Muttama Creek and the Dog on the Tuckerbox • Duplication of 67 kilometres of Hume Highway from the Sturt Highway to Table Top. In addition the towns of Tarcutta, Holbrook and Woomargama all have bypass construction underway; upon completion this will see the Hume Highway duplicated from Sydney to the Victorian border. Significant upgrades continue across the NSW network with the Pacific Highway in particular slowly working toward a fully duplicated highway. The evidence is clear that where parts of the highway have been upgraded to dual carriage ways crashes have dramatically reduced along these routes. As at 30 of June 2011, 337 kilometres were completed dual carriageway, 67 kilometres are under construction, and about 128 kilometres are being prepared for construction. About 51 percent of the highway length of 664 kilometres is now duplicated.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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nEW SouTh WalES CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 5: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 6% 31% 14% 12% 37%

14 nEW SouTh WalES inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 6: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 38% 34% 14% 8% 7%

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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best and worst links in new South Wales
There are 13 links in New South Wales that can be classified in the best category, as shown in Table 5. Of these, the best is the Sturt Highway from Hay to Balranald to Euston.
TablE 5: bEST linkS in nEW SouTh WalES highway Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Newell Hwy Sturt Hwy Sturt Hwy Sturt Hwy from-to VIC border to Jerilderie Narrandera to West Wyalong West Wyalong to Forbes Forbes to Parkes Parkes to Dubbo Brocklehurst to Gilgandra Gilgandra to Coonabarabran Coonabarabran to Narrabri Narrabri to Moree Moree to QLD border Narrandera to Hay Hay to Balranald Balranald to Euston Collective Risk Rating low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low low individual Risk Rating low-medium low-medium low low-medium low-medium low low-medium low-medium low low low low low

There are nine links in New South Wales which can be classified in the worst category, as shown in Table 6. Whilst the two major highways experience significant funding for upgrading, other NSW roads are struggling under the strain of lack of major upgrade and maintenance. The NSW network is in urgent need of funding to maintain and improve safety, in an attempt to reduce risk for motorists.
TablE 6: WoRST linkS in nEW SouTh WalES highway Great Western / Mitchell Hwy Great Western / Mitchell Hwy Great Western / Mitchell Hwy Great Western / Mitchell Hwy Hume Hwy Hume Hwy Pacific Hwy Pacific Hwy Sturt Hwy from-to Lapstone to Katoomba Katoomba to Lithgow Lithgow to Bathurst Wellington to Dubbo Goulburn to Yass Holbrook to Albury McLean to Ballina Ballina to Byron Bay Hume Highway to Wagga Wagga Collective Risk Rating high high high high high high high high high individual Risk Rating high high medium-high high medium-high medium-high medium-high medium-high high

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victoria

Eight highways were assessed in victoria, totalling 1,724km in length. The length of each highway and the number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are shown in Table 7.
TablE 7: highWayS RaTED in viCToRia highway from - to

length
km % 30% 8% 17% 8% 7% 6% 23% 2% 100%

Casualty crashes 2005-09 340 104 433 276 291 20 592 476 2,532 % 13% 4% 17% 11% 11% 1% 23% 19% 100%

Deaths 2005-09 23 19 26 15 15 2 22 5 127 % 18% 15% 20% 12% 12% 2% 17% 4% 100%

Calder Highway [1] Goulburn Valley Highway [2] Hume Highway [3] Princes Highway East [4] Princes Highway West [5] Sturt Highway Western Highway Western Ring Road Total

Western Ring Road to Mildura Seymour to NSW border Craigieburn to NSW border Pakenham to Sale Western Ring Road to Colac Mildura to SA border Western Ring Road to SA border Princes Highway West to Hume Highway

515 141 293 131 114 110 395 26 1,725

[1] The Ravenswood duplication (completed May 2005) and Harcourt duplication (completed April 2009) means that crash numbers are likely to reduce in future years. [2] The Arcadia duplication (opened in February 2008) is included, so crash numbers are likely to reduce in future years. [3] This includes the Craigieburn bypass (opened in December 2005), so results for this section are from 2006-2009 only. The analysis has been extended to include the Albury/Wodonga bypass (completed March 2007). While this is likely to slightly underestimate the total number of crashes, any underestimate is likely to be small as no crashes were recorded on the bypass from 2007-2009. [4] This segment has been shortened from previous years to exclude the Pakenham Bypass which opened in December 2007. [5] Geelong to Colac was added to the National Network in 2009, however five years of data has been used.

The 1,725km long network in Victoria represents eight per cent of the total network analysed throughout Australia and the 127 deaths that occurred on these sections of the Victorian network during 2005-2009 account for 11 per cent of the national network total. The Western Hwy experienced the highest level of road trauma on the Victorian network, accounting for 23 per cent of the casualty crashes and 17 per cent of the deaths. Both the Calder Hwy and Hume Hwy experienced a similar number of deaths as the Western Hwy, but fewer casualty crashes. This indicates that crashes are occurring more often on the Western Hwy, yet the severity outcome is similar to roads with a lower crash rate. The collective risk map on the following page shows that the majority of Victoria’s highways rated as medium-high or high risk. Both the Princes Hwy East and the Western Ring Road are rated high risk for their entire lengths. For the Western Ring Road this can partly be attributed to its urban nature, with high volumes and stop-start traffic resulting in a high number of rear-end crashes. The individual risk map, which takes into account traffic volumes, shows that the majority of highways are rated as a low or low-medium risk. However the Western Hwy

from the Western Ring Road to Melton, the Princes Hwy East from Strzelecki Hwy to Traralgon and then Rosedale to Sale, all rated medium-high. No roads in Victoria rated high for individual risk. Substantial upgrades to the network have been completed during the rating period including on the Calder Hwy which is now dual carriageway from Melbourne to Bendigo. Other significant upgrades undertaken include: • Goulburn Valley Hwy Murchison section (opened February 2003) and Arcadia section (opened February 2008) • Hume Hwy Craigieburn bypass (opened December 2005) and Albury/Wodonga bypass (opened March 2007) • Princes Hwy East Pakenham bypass (opened December 2007) • Western Hwy Deer Park bypass (opened April 2009) Most of the above infrastructure upgrades have not been in place for the entire 2005-2009 rating period. It is expected that the benefits of these improvements will become more apparent over time, as the investment in improving the safety of the road translates into fewer and less severe crashes into the future.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011 Attention is drawn to investment made subsequent to the close of the current data period. Since 30 December 2009, Federal and State Governments have funded the following works to improve Victoria’s roads and these improvements are not reflected in the data presented in this report: • Geelong Ring Road (completed June 2009) • Goulburn Valley Hwy Nagambie bypass (due for completion mid 2012) • Princes Hwy East duplication Traralgon to Sale (being carried out in stages. The first stage was completed in January 2011

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• Princes Hwy West duplication Waurn Ponds (due for completion in 2014) • Western Hwy Ballarat to Stawell upgrade (being carried out in stages. The first stage will be completed in 2012 with the final stage due for completion in 2016) and Anthony’s Cutting realignment (due for completion in early 2012) • Western Ring Road upgrade (due for completion early 2014).

viCToRia CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 7: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 12% 27% 11% 24% 26%

18 viCToRia inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 8: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 51% 35% 11% 3% 0%

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

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bEST anD WoRST linkS in viCToRia
There are seven links in Victoria which can be classified in the best category as shown in Table 8. The best of these is the Calder Highway from Wedderburn to Culgoa to Sunraysia Highway.
TablE 8: bEST linkS in viCToRia highway Calder Highway Calder Highway Calder Highway Calder Highway Sturt Highway Western Highway Western Highway from-to Bendigo to Wedderburn Wedderburn to Culgoa Culgoa to Sunraysia Hwy Sunraysia Hwy to Mildura Mildura to SA border Horsham to Nhill Nhill to SA border Collective Risk Rating low-medium low low low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium

individual Risk Rating
low-medium low low low low low-medium low-medium

There are three links in Victoria which can be classified in the worst category as shown in Table 9. The worst links represent just over three per cent of the road network assessed in Victoria but experienced nearly nine per cent of the state’s road deaths. The Princes Highway East is being duplicated from Traralgon to Sale, so it is likely that this will reduce the
TablE 9: WoRST linkS in viCToRia highway Princes Highway East Princes Highway East Western Highway from-to Strzelecki Hwy to Traralgon Rosedale to Sale Western Ring Road to Melton

risk on the Rosedale to Sale section in future years. The analysis of the Western Highway does not include the Deer Park Bypass which opened in April 2009, and we expect the benefit of this improvement to be reflected into the future.

Collective Risk Rating high high high

individual Risk Rating medium-high medium-high medium-high

20

Queensland

Six highways on the rural network in Queensland were assessed, totalling 4,784km in length. The length of each highway and number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-09 are shown in Table 10.
TablE 10: highWayS RaTED in QuEEnSlanD highway from – to length km Bruce Hwy Flinders Hwy Gore/Leichhardt Hwy New England/ Cunningham Hwy Pacific Motorway [1] Warrego / Landsborough / Barkly Hwy Total Brisbane to Cairns Townsville to Barkly Highway Toowoomba to NSW border Ipswich to NSW border Gateway Motorway to NSW border Cunningham Highway to NT border 1,553 756 219 216 78 1,961 4,784 % 32% 16% 5% 5% 2% 41% 100% Casualty crashes 2005-09 2,869 131 110 291 1,340 943 5,684 % 50% 2% 2% 5% 24% 17% 100% Deaths 2005-09 204 13 10 23 25 58 333 % 61% 4% 3% 7% 8% 17% 100%

[1] This link may include crashes on the Pacific Motorway section that was replaced by the Tugun Bypass, prior to the bypass opening in June 2008

The 4,784km long network in Queensland represents 23 per cent of the total network analysed throughout Australia and the 333 deaths that occurred during 200509 represents 28 per cent of the national network total. The Bruce Highway experienced the highest level of road trauma on the Queensland national network, accounting for 50 per cent of casualty crashes and 61 per cent of deaths during 2005-09. In fact, the Bruce Highway accounted for more than 17 per cent of deaths on the entire national network. It is not surprising then, that the collective risk map on the following page shows that the Bruce Highway is medium-high and high risk along much of its length. The individual risk map, which takes account of traffic volumes, demonstrates that the risk of being involved in a crash is also rated medium-high and high along much of

its length. This makes the Bruce Highway one of the more ‘risky’ roads identified in this report. Significant investment is required for infrastructure improvements along the Bruce Highway to address safety deficiencies and to cater for increasing traffic demand. Recent Federal funding has been announced for 50 overtaking lanes, fixing black spots and installing audible line markings. However there is still a backlog of projects required to achieve the desired road safety benefits.

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QuEEnSlanD CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 9: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 35% 17% 13% 19% 15%

22 QuEEnSlanD inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 10: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 1% 12% 27% 23% 37%

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bEST anD WoRST linkS in QuEEnSlanD
There are three links that can be classified in the best category as shown in Table 11. The best of these are the Flinders Highway between Hughenden and Richmond and the Warrego/Landsbough/Barkly Highway between Morven and Barcaldine.
TablE 11: bEST linkS in QuEEnSlanD highway Flinders Hwy New England/Cunningham Hwy Warrego / Landsborough / Barkly Hwy from - to Hughenden to Richmond Warwick to Stanthorpe Morven to Barcaldine Collective Risk Rating low low-medium low individual Risk Rating low-medium low-medium low-medium

Fifteen links can be classified in the worst category as shown in Table 12. The worst of these are on the Bruce Highway, Sarina to Mackay and Innisfail to Cairns as well as the Warrego Higway from the Cunningham Highway to

Gatton. The worst links represented less than one percent (0.7%) of Queensland’s total road network but experienced almost 12% (200) of the state’s road deaths.

TablE 12: WoRST linkS in QuEEnSlanD highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway Bruce Highway New England/Cunningham Hwy New England/Cunningham Hwy Pacific Motorway Pacific Motorway Warrego / Landsborough / Barkly Hwy from - to Cooroy to Gympie Gympie to Childers Childers to Miriam Vale Miriam Vale to Rockhampton Sarina to Mackay Mackay to Proserpine Proserpine to Ayr Townsville to Ingham Ingham to Innisfail Innisfail to Cairns Ipswich to Willowbank Kalbar to Warwick Gateway Motorway to Logan Motorway Smith Street Fwy to NSW border Cunningham Hwy to Gatton Collective risk rating high high medium-high medium-high high medium-high medium-high high medium-high high high high high high high individual Risk Rating medium-high medium-high high high high high high medium-high medium-high high medium-high medium-high medium-high medium-high high

24

South australia

Six highways on the rural network in South australia were assessed, totalling 2,641km in length. The length of each highway and number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are shown in Table 13.
TablE 13: highWayS RaTED in SouTh auSTRalia highway from – to

length
km % 7% 36% 10% 3% 35% 9% 100%

Casualty crashes 2005-09 82 93 218 115 112 144 764

Deaths % 27% 14% 19% 5% 18% 18% 100%

% 2005-09 11% 12% 29% 15% 15% 19% 100% 23 12 16 4 15 15 85

Dukes Highway Eyre Highway Pt Augusta / Pt Wakefield Road South East Freeway Stuart Highway Sturt Highway Total

Tailem Bend to VIC border WA border to Port Augusta Port Augusta to Old Port Wakefield Rd Crafers Interchange to Tailem Bend NT border to Port Augusta Gawler Bypass to VIC border

191 941 272 85 926 226 2,641

The 2,641km long network in South Australia represents 13 per cent of the network analysed throughout Australia and the 85 deaths that occurred during 2005-09 represents seven per cent of the national network total. The Dukes Highway accounted for 23 deaths, or 27 per cent of all deaths on the National Highway Network in South Australia. This figure is relatively high, considering the highway length is just seven per cent of the National Highway Network in the state. The proportion of deaths on the Dukes Highway is noticeably higher than the proportion of casualty crashes (11 per cent), suggesting that crash outcomes on this highway are often more severe than on other highways. A similar case exists for the Stuart Highway, which experienced 18 per cent of the deaths on the network assessed in South Australia but only 15 per cent of the casualty crashes and the Eyre Highway which experienced 14 per cent of deaths in South Australia, but only 12 per cent of the casualty crashes. By comparison, the proportion of deaths on Port Augusta / Port Wakefield Road (19 per cent) is perceptibly smaller than the percentage for casualty crashes (29 per cent). This is evidence that crashes on the Port Augusta / Port Wakefield Road tend to be less severe than crashes on other highways.

Overall, South Australia accounts for a relatively small percentage of the crashes on the entire national network, and this is reflected in the collective risk map on the following page with the majority of the network being rated as low-medium or low risk. Conversely, the individual risk map shows a reasonably large percentage of the highways in South Australia are rated as having medium to high risk. Three sections of highway were rated as high individual risk, namely the Eyre Highway between Yalata and Fowler Bay, the Stuart Highway between the Northern Territory border and Coober Pedy and the Dukes Highway between Bordertown and the Victorian border. Since the release of the last AusRAP report, the Commonwealth and South Australian Governments have completed upgrades on the Sturt Highway, and works are in place for the safety upgrades along Dukes Highway. The Sturt Highway upgrades include duplicating a section near Gawler, realignment of bends, protection or removal of roadside hazards, intersection upgrades and shoulder sealing. As the Sturt Highway project was only completed in 2010, and the Dukes Highway upgrade is currently underway, we expect that future risk maps will progressively illustrate the road safety benefits of investing in safer road infrastructure.

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SouTh auSTRalia CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 11: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 63% 18% 15% 1% 3%

26 SouTh auSTRalia inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 12: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 24% 19% 31% 7% 19%

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bEST anD WoRST linkS in SouTh auSTRalia
There are eight links in South Australia that can be classified in the best category, as shown in Table 14. The best of these is the Eyre Highway from the WA border to Yalata. This link is 279km long, carried an average of around 380 vehicles per day and experienced 10 casualty crashes and one death between 2005 and 2009.
TablE 14: bEST linkS in SouTh auSTRalia highway Eyre highway Eyre highway Eyre highway Eyre highway from - to WA Border to Yalata Ceduna to Kyancutta Kyancutta to Lincoln Hwy Lincoln Hwy to Port Augusta Collective Risk Rating low low low low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium low-medium individual Risk Rating low low-medium low-medium low-medium low low low low

Pt augusta / Pt Wakefield Road Port Augusta to Port Pirie Sturt highway Dukes highway Dukes highway Paringa to VIC Border Tailem Bend to Keith Keith to Bordertown

There are no links in South Australia that can be categorised in the worst category.

28

Western australia

Six highways on the rural network in Western australia were assessed, totalling 4,682km in length. The length of each highway and number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are listed below.
TablE 15: highWayS aSSESSED in WESTERn auSTRalia highway from - to

length
km % 11% 4% 15% 66% 2% 2% 100%

Casualty crashes 2005-09 213 25 41 282 23 192 776 % 28% 3% 5% 36% 3% 25% 100%

Deaths 2005-09 10 1 6 42 3 25 87 % 11% 1% 7% 48% 4% 29% 100%

Great Eastern Highway [1] Coolgardie - Esperance Highway Eyre Highway Great Northern Highway Victoria Highway Perth – Bunbury Highway Total

Mundaring to Coolgardie Coolgardie to Norseman Norseman to SA Border Muchea to Kununurra T/ off Wyndham T/off to NT border Dawesville to Bunbury

522 164 721 3,100 88 87 4,682

[1] The section from Mundaring to The Lakes uses data for a three-year period only (2007-2009) due to a road realignment carried out in September 2006.

The 4,682km long network in Western Australia represents 23 per cent of the total network analysed throughout Australia and the 87 deaths that occurred during 2005-09 represents seven per cent of the national network total. Whilst the Great Northern Highway represents 66 per cent of the National Highway Network in Western Australia by length, it experienced only 36% of the casualty crashes (282) and 48% of the recorded fatalities (42). Conversely, the 87 km of Perth – Bunbury Highway, whilst making up only two per cent in terms of length, recorded a quarter of the casualty crashes and 29% of the fatalities. Due to the remote nature of much of the National Highway Network in WA, both traffic volumes and crashes are generally low. As a consequence of this, the AusRAP methodology results in many of the links being several hundred kilometres in length. This methodology is based on a minimum number of casualty crashes (i.e. a desireable 20 crashes per link), but when this results in such long links, it is unlikely that the crashes will be evenly distributed. Consequently, the risk rating will show an average value along the link, whereas in reality, some portions of the link may be significantly better or worse than this value.

Upgrades to the network which have been completed during the rating period include: • Great Eastern Highway which was duplicated between Sawyers Valley and The Lakes and completed in September 2006 by Main Roads Western Australia. • Eyre Highway upgrades which opened in December 2006 between Caiguna East and Balladonia West and in January 2008 between Heartbreak Ridge & Balladonia West • Great Northern Highway upgrade which opened between Walebing and Bindi Bindi in March 2009 • Perth-Bunbury Highway infrastructure upgrades on the Preston Beach to Bunbury section as part of a larger project to build a new section of highway from Pinjarra Road to Old Coast Road which opened in September 2009. None of the above infrastructure upgrades have been in place for the entire 2005-2009 rating period. It is expected that the benefits of improvements, particularly those implemented in the later part of the assessment period, will become more apparent over time, as the investment in improving the safety of the road translates into fewer and less severe crashes into the future.

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WESTERn auSTRalia CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 13: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 82% 15% 0% 1% 2%

30 WESTERn auSTRalia inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 14: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 33% 10% 34% 15% 9%

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bEST anD WoRST linkS in WESTERn auSTRalia
Of the 18 links assessed, there are five links as shown in Table 16 that can be classified in the ‘best links’ category. Four of these are part of the Great Northern Highway. These links are all between 280 and 500km long, carried an average of less than 800 vehicles per day and experienced between 15 and 52 casualty crashes over the 2005-09 period. However, of the casualty crashes recorded on the Meekatharra – Newman and Newman to NW Coastal t/off links, there were a higher number of fatalities (six on each). As noted above, the averaging effect of assessing these long links may mask certain sections within these links that do not perform as well.
TablE 16: bEST linkS in WESTERn auSTRalia highway Eyre Hwy Great Northern Hwy Great Northern Hwy Great Northern Hwy Great Northern Hwy from-to Caiguna to SA border Wubin to Meekathara Meekathara to Newman Newman to NW Coastal Hwy turn off NW Coastal Hwy t/off to Sandfire Roadhouse Collective Risk Rating low low low low low individual Risk Rating low low low low-medium low

It should be noted that Individual Risk is a measure of the risk for individual drivers (per 100 million vehicle kilometres travelled), and as such, traffic volume is a key variable in the calculation of this rating. As shown on page 50, traffic flows on many of the National Network links in Western Australia are only a few hundred vehicles per day. With traffic data only being collected in certain locations, and then on an irregular basis, it can be seen that small changes in traffic flow data can have a large effect on the subsequent ratings. Two links can be classified, in the ‘worst links’ category as show in Table 17. These are on the Great Eastern Highway between Mundaring and The Lakes and then the adjacent
TablE 17: WoRST linkS in WESTERn auSTRalia highway Great Eastern Highway Great Eastern Highway from - to

link from The Lakes to Northam. These links are 14km and 42km long respectively. Due to a road realignment completed in September 2006, the data for Mundaring to The Lakes covers a three-year period only (2007-09). The Mundaring to The Lakes link carried approximately 9,400 vehicles per day and experienced 21 casualty crashes and no deaths from 2007 to 2009. The Lakes to Northam link carried 4,688 vehicles per day and experienced 47 casualty crashes and five deaths from 2005 to 2009. These two ‘worst links’ represented six per cent of the total number of deaths on the surveyed links and 0.5 per cent of the 634 road deaths in the State of WA from 2007 to 2009.

Collective Risk Rating high medium-high

individual Risk Rating medium-high medium-high

Mundaring to The Lakes The Lakes to Northam

Although not rating in the ‘worst links’ category due to high traffic volumes reducing the Individual Risk results, the two links on Perth – Bunbury Highway both rated High on Collective Risk, and exhibited crash and fatality figures far in excess of their length, pro rata.

32

Tasmania

five highways were assessed in Tasmania, totalling 371km in length. The length assessed of each highway and number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are shown in Table 17.
TablE 17: RoaDS aSSESSED in TaSmania highway from - to

length
km % 43% 37% 11% 4% 5% 100% 158 139 41 16 17 371

Casualty crashes 2005-09 184 253 67 70 187 761 % 24% 33% 9% 9% 25% 100%

Deaths 2005-09 36 32 2 1 3 74 % 49% 43% 3% 1% 4% 100%

Midland Highway Bass Highway East Tamar Highway Tasman Highway [1] Brooker Highway [1] Total

Rifle Range Rd to Howick Street Midland Highway to Stowport Road Alanvale Connector to Bell Bay Rd Macquarie St to Holyman Ave Burnett St to Granton

[1] These links were added to the National Highway Network in 2009, however five years of data has been used.

The 371km network in Tasmania represented two per cent of the network analysed throughout Australia and the 74 deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 represents six per cent of the total national network assessed. The 36 deaths that occurred on the Midland Highway represents almost half (49 per cent) of the total number of deaths on the Tasmanian network. The Bass Highway accounted for 43 per cent of the deaths on the Tasmanian network with the other highways accounting for less than ten per cent combined. The collective risk map on the following page shows that the entire network analysed is rated medium risk or worse, although much of the network performed better under the individual risk analysis, which takes specific account of traffic volumes. Only a comparatively small part of the overall network the East Tamar Highway has a high risk rating so recent upgrades are welcome. In particular, the completion of the $60 million Dilston Bypass project in June 2011 will significantly reduce risk on this poorly-performing link. The Bass Highway has undergone substantial upgrades in recent years including duplication of some high-volume sections. In addition, the Tasmanian Government has committed to rolling out audible-tactile profiled edge and centre markings where required on single carriageway

sections of the Bass Highway between Launceston and Devonport, which will help mitigate the high incidence of single vehicle run-off-road type crashes prevalent on the Tasmanian network. The Midland Highway is Tasmania’s major north-south freight and transport corridor. However, the southern section of the highway passes through a number of towns, including Brighton (a regional service centre), Pontville and Bagdad with significant conflict between intrastate and local traffic. The $176 million Brighton Bypass, scheduled for completion in June 2012, will provide a new dual carriageway highway, grade-separated interchanges and local service roads on the highest-volume section between the East Derwent Highway at Bridgewater and the existing Midland Highway north of Pontville, substantially improving the current high-risk traffic conditions through Brighton and Pontville. In addition, the Tasmanian Government has signed a partnership agreement with local government to develop a plan to guide the implementation of safety upgrades to the Midland Highway over two-, five- and ten-year-plus timeframes to upgrade it to a pre-determined minimum standard identified by the common vision. We would expect that as these major projects are completed on the Tasmanian network, the risk maps will progressively illustrate the road safety benefits of investing in safer road infrastructure.

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TaSmania CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 15: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 0% 0% 19% 43% 39%

34 TaSmania inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 16: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 15% 26% 25% 20% 13%

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bEST anD WoRST linkS in TaSmania
There are no links in Tasmania that can be classified in the best category. There are eight links that can be classified in the worst category, as shown in Table 18. The worst of these are the East Tamar Highway between the Alanvale Connector and Bell Bay Rd and the Brooker Highway from Burnett St to Berriedale Rd.
TablE 18: WoRST linkS highway Midland Highway Midland Highway Bass Highway Bass Highway Bass Highway East Tamar Highway East Tamar Highway Brooker Highway from - to Lower Marshes Rd to Sorell Springs Rd Evandale Main Rd to Howick Street Parramatta Creek to Victoria Bridge Victoria Bridge to Forth River Bridge Nine Mile Rd to Stowport Rd Alanvale Connector to Dalrymple Rd Dalrymple Rd to Bell Bay Rd Burnett St to Berriedale Rd Collective Risk Rating medium-high high high high high high high high individual Risk Rating medium-high medium-high medium-high medium-high medium-high high high high

The Bass Highway is undergoing substantial upgrades to sections at Round Hill and other locations east of Burnie. This should reduce risk in the Nine Mile Road to Stowport Road link. Works include installation of flexible barrier, upgraded junctions and road realignment, and some permanent speed limit reductions. The construction of the $60 million Dilston Bypass at Dilston on the East Tamar Highway during the period is expected to improve the safety of this poorly-performing link between Alanvale Connector and Bell Bay Road. Separation using flexible barrier over nine kilometres as well as upgraded junctions, weather stations to inform variable speed limits,

and wider sealed shoulders will achieve risk reduction. On the Brooker Highway, the installation of new centre barrier and some edge flexible barrier and upgraded delineation on the link between Elwick Rd and Berriedale Rd since the last report will have reduced risk, and we expect this to become more apparent in the results of future risk mapping. The Tasmanian Government is focusing on the Howard Road Roundabout and the Elwick Road junction as their two key priority projects to improve efficiency and safety in this Brooker Highway link.

36

northern Territory

Three highways were assessed in northern Territory, totalling 2,652km in length. The length assessed of each highway and number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are shown in Table 19.
TablE 19: RoaDS aSSESSED in noRThERn TERRiToRy highway from - to

length
km % 16% 66% 18% 100%

Casualty crashes 2005-09 23 468 23 514 % 4% 91% 4% 100%

Deaths 2005-09 1 65 6 72 % 1% 90% 8% 100%

Barkly Highway Stuart Highway Victoria Highway Total

Stuart Hwy to QLD border Darwin to SA border Katherine to WA border

434 1,749 469 2,652

The 2,562km network in Northern Territory represented 13 per cent of the network analysed throughout Australia and the 72 deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 represents six per cent of the total national network assessed. The Stuart Hwy experienced the highest level of road trauma on the Northern Territory network, accounting for 91 per cent of the casualty crashes and 90 per cent of the deaths, but just 66 per cent of the network assessed in the Northern Territory. The collective risk map on the following page shows that the majority of Northern Territory’s highways rated as low or low-medium risk. However the Stuart Hwy from Darwin to Pine Creek rated medium-high. The individual risk map shows that the majority of Northern Territory’s network rated as medium risk. It is however a concern that 43 per cent of the network in the Northern Territory rated as medium-high or high.

A number of works have been carried out to improve Northern Territory roads since 2005. Significant works include: • Stuart Highway overtaking opportunities Darwin to Katherine • Work to widen the road pavement on various sections of the Stuart, Victoria and Barkly Highways • Various intersection improvements on these three highways • Infrastructure Road Safety initiatives including fatigue management on Stuart, Victoria and Barkly Highways (truck parking bays/rest areas) • Easing access to Darwin with Tiger Brennan Drive off Stuart Highway. The speed limit on these highways was reduced to 130km/h from 1 January 2007.

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noRThERn TERRiToRy CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 17: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 69% 24% 0% 7% 0%

38 noRThERn TERRiToRy inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 18: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 7% 14% 40% 21% 18%

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bEST anD WoRST linkS in ThE noRThERn TERRiToRy
There are three links in the Northern Territory which can be classified as the best links as show in Table 20. Of these the best is the Victoria Highway from Timber Creek to the WA border. This link recorded four casualty crashes resulting in two fatalities over the 184 km length.
TablE 20: bEST linkS in noRThERn TERRiToRy highway Stuart Hwy Victoria Hwy Victoria Hwy from-to Pine Creek to Katherine Katherine to Timber Creek Timber Creek to WA border Collective Risk Rating low-medium low low individual Risk Rating low-medium low-medium low

Only one link in Northern Territory meets the criteria for a worst link as shown in Table 21. This is the Stuart Highway from Darwin to Pine Creek which recorded 262 casualty crashes, along the 192 kilometre length. This link is only seven per cent of the network rated in the Northern Territory, but recorded over 50 per cent of the total crashes on the network.
TablE 21: WoRST linkS in noRThERn TERRiToRy highway Stuart Hwy from-to Darwin to Pine Creek Collective Risk Rating medium-high individual Risk Rating high

40

australian Capital Territory

Two highways were assessed in the australian Capital Territory, totalling 20km in length. The length assessed of each highway and number of casualty crashes and deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 are shown in Table 22.
TablE 22: RoaDS aSSESSED in auSTRalian CaPiTal TERRiToRy highway from - to

length
km % 60% 40% 100% 12 8 20

Casualty crashes 2005-09 37 13 50 % 74% 26% 100%

Deaths 2005-09 1 1 2 % 50% 50% 100%

Barton Highway Federal Highway Total

ACT border to Federal Highway ACT border to Antill Street

The 20km network in Australian Capital Territory represented less than one per cent of the network analysed throughout Australia and the two deaths that occurred during 2005-2009 represents less than one per cent of the total national network assessed.

The collective risk map on the following page shows that the network in the ACT rated high risk. For individual risk, the network rated low or medium. In the past five years there has been no significant change to the national road network in the ACT.

auSTRalian CaPiTal TERRiToRy CollECTivE RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 19: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 0% 0% 0% 0% 100%

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auSTRalian CaPiTal TERRiToRy inDiviDual RiSk RaTingS, 2005-09
FIguRe 20: AVeRAge ANNuAL CASuALTy CRASHeS PeR 100M VeH-kM

Risk Rating low low-medium medium medium-high high

Percentage of kms rated 40% 0% 60% 0% 0%

bEST anD WoRST linkS in ThE auSTRalian CaPiTal TERRiToRy
There are two links in the Australian Capital Territory, neither of which can be classified as best or worst.

42

appendix Complete Results

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

nEW SouTh WalES
barton hwy Hume Highway to Murrumbateman Murrumbateman to ACT border f3 Hawkesbury River to Calga Interchange Calga Interchange to Wyong Wyong to Ryhope Ryhope to New England Highway f6 Waterfall to Bulli Bulli to Wollongong (via Mt Ousley Rd) federal hwy Hume Highway to Collector Collector to ACT border great Western / mitchell hwy Lapstone to Katoomba Katoomba to Lithgow Lithgow to Bathurst Bathurst to Orange Orange to Wellington Wellington to Dubbo Mixed Mixed Mixed Single Single Single 42 37 51 47 89 40 29860 12900 10800 9400 5520 5600 397 165 158 99 108 113 16 1.88346 high 7 0.89348 high 7 0.62317 high 4 0.42359 high 2 0.24293 medium-high 3 0.56524 high 17.28 high 18.98 high 15.81 medium-high 12.35 medium 12.06 medium 27.65 high Dual Dual 24 42 12700 11550 54 54 5 0.44738 high 1 0.25765 medium-high 9.65 medium 6.11 low Dual Dual 20 19 35200 54450 59 177 3 0.58212 high 2 1.87273 high 4.53 low 9.42 low-medium Dual Dual Dual Dual 14 29 33 30 76150 61050 36450 29700 139 193 142 89 5 2.04068 high 5 1.35121 high 7 0.86280 high 4 0.59286 high 7.34 low-medium 6.06 low 6.49 low 5.47 low Mixed Single 17 21 7750 8500 19 29 5 0.21938 medium-high 1 0.28152 medium-high 7.76 low-medium 9.07 low-medium

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from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

nEW SouTh WalES
hume hwy Narrellan Rd to Berrima Berrima to Goulburn Goulburn to Yass Yass to Coolac Coolac to Tarcutta Tarcutta to Holbrook Holbrook to Albury new England hwy Branxton to Singleton Singleton to Muswellbrook Muswellbrook to Scone Scone to Blandford [1] Blandford to Tamworth Nemingha to Armidale Armidale to Guyra Guyra to Glen Innes Glen Innes to QLD border newell hwy VIC border to Jerilderie Jerilderie to Narrandera Narrandera to West Wyalong West Wyalong to Forbes Forbes to Parkes Parkes to Dubbo Brocklehurst to Gilgandra Gilgandra to Coonabarabran Coonabarabran to Narrabri Narrabri to Moree Moree to QLD border Pacific hwy Hexham to Karuah Karuah to Bulahdelah Bulahdelah to Coolongolook Coolongolook to Nabiac [1] Dual Mixed Dual Dual 19 45 22 18 19600 16250 11050 13550 112 106 36 16 7 1.16137 high 12 0.47049 high 1 0.33147 high 1 0.17374 medium 16.23 medium-high 7.93 low-medium 8.22 low-medium 3.51 low Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 51 106 132 109 30 95 57 91 114 89 113 1852 1145 2310 3353 3032 2997 3067 2730 2655 3895 3478 12 22 44 37 15 47 21 38 49 32 35 1 0.04727 low-medium 2 0.04147 low-medium 6 0.06680 low-medium 4 0.06815 low-medium 0 0.10053 low-medium 6 0.09843 low-medium 2 0.07343 low-medium 4 0.08371 low-medium 7 0.08626 low-medium 2 0.07216 low-medium 3 0.06190 low-medium 6.99 low-medium 9.93 medium 7.92 low-medium 5.57 low 9.08 low-medium 9.00 low-medium 6.56 low 8.40 low-medium 8.90 low-medium 5.08 low 4.88 low Mixed Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 20 40 20 33 91 96 33 55 109 18500 14050 12600 8600 4600 5750 4200 3750 3100 77 82 50 29 73 91 30 38 65 7 0.75730 high 4 0.40649 high 3 0.49946 high 3 0.17447 medium-high 7 0.15961 medium 7 0.19014 medium-high 3 0.17964 medium-high 0 0.13918 medium 6 0.11877 medium 11.22 medium 7.93 low-medium 10.86 medium 5.56 low 9.51 low-medium 9.06 low-medium 11.72 medium 10.17 medium 10.50 medium Dual Dual Dual Dual Mixed Mixed Mixed 73 78 65 84 61 67 58 35850 20850 7450 10900 11200 8150 9050 161 166 109 67 55 71 140 6 0.44173 high 11 0.42655 high 13 0.33783 high 3 0.15907 medium 3 0.18066 medium-high 10 0.21310 medium-high 10 0.48410 high 3.38 low 5.60 low 12.42 medium-high 4.00 low 4.42 low 7.16 low-medium 14.66 medium-high

44

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

nEW SouTh WalES
Nabiac to Taree Taree to Coopernook Coopernook to Oxley Hwy Oxley Hwy to Kempsey Kempsey to Macksville Macksville to Sawtell Coffs Harbour to Grafton Grafton to McLean McLean to Ballina Ballina to Byron Bay Byron Bay to Yelgun Yelgun to Chinderah Sturt hwy Hume Highway to Wagga Wagga Wagga Wagga to Narrandera Narrandera to Hay Hay to Balranald Balranald to Euston Euston to Mildura Single Single Single Single Single Single 34 91 169 128 80 69 5150 1900 2000 1750 3100 6500 93 60 31 18 10 37 1 0.53927 high 9 0.13234 medium 6 0.03658 low-medium 5 0.02813 low 2 0.02504 low 7 0.10689 medium 28.69 high 19.08 high 5.01 low 4.40 low 2.21 low 4.51 low Dual Mixed Mixed Single Mixed Mixed Mixed Mixed Single Mixed Mixed Dual 21 19 49 40 50 47 76 43 84 29 22 27 16050 14500 12650 13950 13150 14600 21400 12100 10900 17250 17850 25650 50 30 108 96 92 119 279 64 206 132 64 86 2 0.47481 high 3 0.31491 high 8 0.44040 high 6 0.47548 high 4 0.36823 high 18 0.50316 high 22 0.73900 high 6 0.29858 high 17 0.49335 high 11 0.91403 high 6 0.58845 high 4 0.63293 high 8.10 low-medium 5.95 low 9.54 low-medium 9.34 low-medium 7.67 low-medium 9.44 low-medium 9.46 low-medium 6.76 low 12.40 medium-high 14.52 medium-high 9.03 low-medium 6.76 low

[1] Traffic volume has been estimated based on volumes on adjoining sections as there is no data for this length of road during the period 2005-2009.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

45

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

viCToRia
Calder highway Western Ring Road to Diggers Rest Diggers Rest to Woodend Woodend to Pyrenees Hwy Pyrenees Hwy to Bendigo [1] Bendigo to Wedderburn Wedderburn to Culgoa Culgoa to Sunraysia Hwy Sunraysia Hwy to Mildura goulburn valley highway Seymour to Nagambie Nagambie to Arcadia [2] Arcadia to Shepparton Shepparton to Numurkah Numurkah to NSW border hume highway Metropolitan Ring Road to Hume Highway (Craigieburn bypass) [3] Craigieburn to Seymour Seymour to Euroa Euroa to Winton Winton to Springhurst Springhurst to NSW border [4] Princes highway East Pakenham to Warragul [5] Warragul to Trafalgar Trafalgar to Strzelecki Hwy Strzelecki Hwy to Traralgon Traralgon to Rosedale Rosedale to Sale Dual Dual Dual Dual Single Single 36 18 21 14 20 23 16300 17300 18500 19500 12100 7900 36 44 40 66 47 43 1 3 1 3 4 3 0.20230 medium-high 0.49075 high 0.38624 high 0.95316 high 0.48187 high 0.37315 high 3.40 low 7.77 low-medium 5.72 low 13.39 medium-high 10.91 medium 12.94 medium-high Dual Dual Dual Dual Dual Dual 14 73 48 56 58 44 17200 18000 9100 9100 10400 12300 41 148 58 55 56 75 2 4 8 4 7 1 0.71185 high 0.40807 high 0.24294 medium-high 0.19556 medium-high 0.19267 medium-high 0.34091 high 11.34 medium 6.21 low 7.31 low-medium 5.89 low 5.08 low 7.59 low-medium Mixed Mixed Mixed Single Single 20 25 19 30 46 7200 5700 7900 4700 2600 18 15 23 24 24 3 3 4 4 5 0.18038 medium-high 0.11782 medium 0.23590 medium-high 0.16146 medium 0.10442 low-medium 6.86 low-medium 5.66 low 8.18 low-medium 9.41 low-medium 11.00 medium Dual Dual Dual Dual Single Single Single Single 17 42 32 36 68 98 117 105 45600 18300 9600 10600 2800 1800 700 2000 97 84 21 69 32 9 10 18 4 5 2 5 2 2 1 2 1.17433 high 0.39769 high 0.13125 medium 0.47678 high 0.09400 low-medium 0.01831 low 0.01706 low 0.03432 low-medium 7.06 low-medium 5.95 low 3.75 low 12.32 medium 9.20 low-medium 2.79 low 6.68 low 4.70 low

46

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

viCToRia
Princes highway West Western Ring Road to Hoppers Crossing Hoppers Crossing to Little River Little River to Geelong Geelong to Winchelsea [6] Winchelsea to Colac [6] Sturt highway Mildura to SA border Western highway Western Ring Road to Melton [7] Melton to Ballan Ballan to Ballarat (Sunraysia Hwy) Ballarat (Sunraysia Hwy) to Beaufort Beaufort to Ararat Ararat to Stawell Stawell to Horsham Horsham to Nhill Nhill to SA border Western Ring Road Princes Highway West to Western Highway Western Highway to Calder Highway Calder Highway to Hume Freeway Dual Dual Dual 8 8 10 103100 107900 110700 91 132 253 0 2 3 2.27087 high 3.35314 high 4.87231 high 6.03 low 8.51 low-medium 12.06 medium Dual Dual Dual Mixed Single Single Single Single Single 19 38 44 36 41 24 60 69 63 43500 20700 13400 5300 4800 5400 4100 3200 2300 238 114 59 24 26 19 54 34 24 5 4 3 2 0 0 4 0 4 2.46650 high 0.59267 high 0.26812 medium-high 0.13479 medium 0.12672 medium 0.15700 medium 0.17937 medium-high 0.09861 low-medium 0.07636 low-medium 15.53 medium-high 7.84 low-medium 5.48 low 6.97 low-medium 7.23 low-medium 7.97 low-medium 11.99 medium 8.44 low-medium 9.10 low-medium Single 110 1600 20 2 0.03645 low-medium 6.24 low Dual Dual Dual Single Single 12 17 18 29 38 124700 50100 43200 7700 5800 149 41 28 35 38 5 4 1 2 3 2.58437 high 0.47442 high 0.31158 high 0.23891 medium-high 0.20074 medium-high 5.68 low 2.59 low 1.98 low 8.50 low-medium 9.48 low-medium

[1] The Ravenswood duplication was completed in May 2005 and the Harcourt duplication was completed April 2009, so crash numbers are likely to reduce in future years. [2] The Arcadia duplication opened in February 2008, so crash numbers are likely to reduce in future years. [3] Analysis is for a four year period only as the Craigieburn bypass opened in December 2005. [4] This link has been extended to include the Albury/Wodonga bypass which was completed in March 2007. While this is likely to slightly underestimate the total number of crashes this is likely to be small as no crashes were recorded on the bypass from 2007-2009. [5] This segment has been shortened to exclude the Pakenham Bypass which opened in December 2007 and is considered to be a metropolitan road. [6] These links were added to the National Highway Network in 2009, however five years of data has been used. [7] The Deer Park Bypass opened in April 2009. While this has been excluded for this analysis, it is likely to lead to a reduction in crashes in future years compared to the Western Hwy/Ballarat Rd link.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

47

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

QuEEnSlanD
bruce highway Bald Hills to Caloundra Caloundra to Cooroy Cooroy to Gympie Gympie to Childers Childers to Miriam Vale Miriam Vale to Rockhampton Rockhampton to St Lawrence St Lawrence to Sarina Sarina to Mackay Mackay to Proserpine Proserpine to Ayr Ayr to Townsville Townsville to Ingham Ingham to Innisfail Innisfail to Cairns flinders hwy Townsville to Charters Towers Charters Towers to Hughenden Hughenden to Richmond Richmond to Julia Creek Julia Creek to Barkly Hwy gore/leichhardt hwy Toowoomba to Yandilla Yandilla to NSW border new England/Cunningham hwy Ipswich to Willowbank Willowbank to Kalbar Kalbar to Warwick Warwick to Stanthorpe Stanthorpe to NSW border Pacific motorway Gateway Motorway to Logan Motorway Logan Motorway to Smith Street Fwy Dual 15 109100 370 441 11 2 5.01246 high 2.51104 high 12.59 medium-high 6.46 low Dual Single Single Single Single 18 37 68 57 36 18700 5200 4900 3700 3000 100 39 98 29 25 2 1 16 3 1 1.11440 high 0.20900 medium-high 0.28823 high 0.10158 low-medium 0.13841 medium 16.33 medium-high 11.01 medium 16.12 medium-high 7.52 low-medium 12.64 medium-high Single Single 64 155 3100 1700 46 64 3 7 0.14272 medium 0.08263 low-medium 12.61 medium-high 13.32 medium-high Single Single Single Single Single 122 245 117 148 123 2200 700 500 400 400 59 37 9 11 15 7 4 1 0 1 0.09663 low-medium 0.03016 low 0.01534 low 0.01487 low 0.02443 low 12.03 medium 11.80 medium 8.40 low-medium 10.18 medium 16.73 high Dual Dual Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 61 41 40 138 152 164 165 118 25 118 160 74 100 137 60 50500 27700 14800 8000 3000 4000 2500 2500 8700 4200 2900 5200 6600 3900 5400 623 245 155 271 202 206 107 89 108 153 163 78 183 144 142 17 5 24 28 14 15 17 8 6 15 13 9 10 14 9 2.03327 high 1.20642 high 0.77634 high 0.39223 high 0.26614 medium-high 0.25088 medium-high 0.12940 medium 0.15139 medium 0.84829 high 0.26005 medium-high 0.20374 medium-high 0.21178 medium-high 0.36612 high 0.20995 medium-high 0.47499 high 11.03 medium 11.93 medium 14.37 medium-high 13.43 medium-high 24.31 high 17.18 high 14.18 medium-high 16.59 high 26.71 high 16.96 high 19.25 high 11.16 medium 15.20 medium-high 14.75 medium-high 24.10 high

Dual

35 106500

48

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

QuEEnSlanD
Smith Street Fwy to NSW border [1] Dual 29 71000 529 12 3.70661 high 14.30 medium-high

Warrego / landsborough / barkly hwy Cunningham Hwy to Gatton Gatton to Helidon Helidon to Toowoomba Toowoomba to Dalby Dalby to Roma Roma to Morven Morven to Barcaldine Barcaldine to Winton Winton to Flinders Hwy Flinders Hwy to Mt Isa Mt Isa to NT border Dual Dual Dual Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 55 20 16 74 262 175 413 285 334 131 195 23700 12600 17600 5800 1600 800 400 500 200 1400 500 404 29 63 94 156 29 28 29 23 45 43 20 1 2 14 7 3 1 0 0 9 1 1.46190 high 0.28852 high 0.76867 high 0.25510 medium-high 0.11898 medium 0.03320 low-medium 0.01355 low 0.02036 low 0.01376 low 0.06847 low-medium 0.04412 low-medium 16.90 high 6.27 low 11.97 medium 12.05 medium 20.37 high 11.37 medium 9.28 low-medium 11.16 medium 18.85 high 13.40 medium-high 24.17 high

[1] This link may include crashes on the Pacific Motorway section that was replaced by the Tugun Bypass, prior to the bypass opening in June 2008.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

49

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

SouTh auSTRalia
Eyre highway WA Border to Yalata Yalata to Fowler Bay Fowler Bay to Ceduna Ceduna to Kyancutta Kyancutta to Lincoln Hwy Lincoln Hwy to Port Augusta Stuart highway NT Border to Coober Pedy Coober Pedy to Woomera Woomera to Port Augusta Pt augusta / Pt Wakefield Road Port Augusta to Port Pirie Port Pirie to Bute Bute to Port Wakefield Port Wakefield to Old Port Wakefield Rd Sturt highway Gawler Bypass to Daveyston Daveyston to Truro Truro to Blanchetown Blanchetown to Barmera Barmera to Berri Berri to Renmark Paringa to VIC Border South East freeway Crafers Interchange to Verdun Interchange Verdun Interchange to Mt Barker Interchange Mt Barker Interchange to Tailem Bend Dukes highway Tailem Bend to Keith Keith to Bordertown Bordertown to VIC Border Single Single Single 126 46 19 3650 2650 1900 54 15 13 18 4 1 0.08592 low-medium 0.06556 low-medium 0.13535 medium 6.45 low 6.78 low 19.52 high Dual Dual Dual 9 8 67 33800 22800 9250 49 15 51 2 0 2 1.07104 high 0.36720 high 0.15158 medium 8.68 low-medium 4.41 low 4.49 low Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 16 26 48 88 15 12 22 7950 4650 2800 2900 2750 7450 1700 21 21 26 48 12 12 4 2 0 1 7 2 2 1 0.26482 medium-high 0.16349 medium 0.10915 medium 0.10874 medium 0.16140 medium 0.20287 medium-high 0.03651 low-medium 9.13 low-medium 9.63 medium 10.68 medium 10.27 medium 16.08 medium-high 7.46 low-medium 5.88 low Single Single Single Dual 82 73 50 68 3250 3300 3500 8150 24 50 32 112 1 5 4 6 0.05841 low-medium 0.13746 medium 0.12877 medium 0.33053 high 4.92 low 11.41 medium 10.08 medium 11.11 medium Single Single Single 391 365 170 370 370 800 45 29 38 11 1 3 0.02302 low 0.01588 low 0.04472 low-medium 17.04 high 11.76 medium 15.31 medium-high Single Single Single Single Single Single 279 95 106 219 219 23 380 380 690 610 710 2400 10 11 15 23 26 8 1 1 6 2 1 1 0.00716 low 0.02318 low 0.02833 low 0.02104 low 0.02373 low 0.06905 low-medium 5.16 low 16.71 high 11.25 medium 9.45 low-medium 9.16 low-medium 7.88 low-medium

50

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

WESTERn auSTRalia
great Eastern / Coolgardie Esperance / Eyre highway Mundaring to The Lakes [1] The Lakes to Northam Northam to Southern Cross Southern Cross to Coolgardie Coolgardie to Norseman Norseman to Caiguna Caiguna to SA Border great northern / victoria highway Muchea to Wubin Wubin to Meekathara Meekathara to Newman Newman to NW Coastal T/Off NW Coastal T/Off to Sandfire Roadhouse Sandfire Roadhouse to Broome T/Off Broome T/Off to Fitzroy Crossing Fitzroy Crossing to Halls Creek Halls Creek to Kununurra T/Off Wyndham T/Off to NT Border Perth-bunbury highway Dawesville to Preston Beach Preston Beach to Bunbury Mixed Dual 35 53 8907 11207 60 132 11 14 0.34612 high 0.49981 high 10.65 medium 12.22 medium Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 216 493 414 447 281 286 362 289 312 88 1206 757 757 727 470 370 370 370 387 697 54 26 24 52 15 19 29 29 34 23 7 1 6 6 1 7 6 5 3 3 0.04991 low-medium 0.01055 low 0.01159 low 0.02328 low 0.01069 low 0.01329 low 0.01602 low 0.02008 low 0.02181 low 0.05257 low-medium 11.34 medium 3.82 low 4.19 low 8.77 low-medium 6.23 low 9.84 medium 11.86 medium 14.87 medium-high 15.44 medium-high 20.67 high Mixed Single Single Single Single Single Single 14 42 278 188 164 371 350 9416 4688 1633 1055 549 400 400 21 47 96 49 25 26 15 0 5 4 1 1 4 2 0.48679 high 0.22450 medium-high 0.06918 low-medium 0.05215 low-medium 0.03044 low 0.01402 low 0.00858 low 14.16 medium-high 13.12 medium-high 11.61 medium 13.55 medium-high 15.20 medium-high 9.60 medium 5.88 low

[1] The section from Mundaring to the Lakes uses data for a three year period only (2007-2009) due to a road realignment carried out in September 2006.

how Safe are our Roads? Rating Australia’s National Network for Risk – 2011

51

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

TaSmania
midland highway Rifle Range Rd to Quoin Rd underpass Quoin Rd underpass to Lower Marshes Rd Lower Marshes Rd to Sorell Springs Rd Sorell Springs Rd to Campbell Town Campbell Town to Evandale Main Rd Single Single Single Single Mixed 17 22 24 36 49 10 6400 4400 4400 4600 6000 15200 23 18 28 29 48 38 11 3 2 5 12 3 0.27059 medium-high 0.16364 medium 0.23333 medium-high 0.16111 medium 0.19592 medium-high 0.76000 high 11.58 medium 10.19 medium 14.53 medium-high 9.60 medium 8.95 low-medium 13.70 medium-high

Evandale Main Rd to Howick Street Single bass highway Midland Hwy to Hagley Station St overpass Hagley Station St overpass to Railton Rd Railton Rd to Parramatta Creek Parramatta Creek to Victoria Bridge Victoria Bridge to Forth River Bridge Forth River Bridge to Knights Rd Knights Rd to Nine Mile Rd Nine Mile Rd to Stowport Rd East Tamar highway Alanvale Connector to Dalrymple Rd Dalrymple Rd to Bell Bay Rd Tasman highway Macquarie St to Holyman Ave [1] brooker highway Burnett St to Berriedale Rd [1] Berriedale Rd to Granton [1] Dual Dual Dual Dual Dual Mixed Mixed Single Single Single Single Single Dual

23 32 17 22 12 11 14 8

9900 8200 7600 10700 13400 13000 14300 14700

26 42 26 55 48 9 14 33

3 3 10 2 6 1 0 7

0.22609 medium-high 0.26250 medium-high 0.30588 high 0.50000 high 0.80000 high 0.16364 medium 0.20000 medium-high 0.82500 high

6.26 low 8.77 low-medium 11.03 medium 12.80 medium-high 16.36 medium-high 3.45 low 3.83 low 15.38 medium-high

20 21

5100 4400

35 32

2 0

0.35000 high 0.30476 high

18.80 high 18.98 high

16

34300

70

1

0.87500 high

6.99 low-medium

9 8

38100 25400

162 25

3 0

3.60000 high 0.62500 high

25.89 high 6.74 low

[1] These links were added to the National Highway Network in 2009, however five years of data has been used.

52

from-to

Type

length km

Traffic vehicles per day

Casualty crashes 2005-09

Deaths 2005-09

Collective Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per km

individual Risk Rating annual average casualty crashes per 100 m veh-km

noRThERn TERRiToRy
barkly highway Stuart Hwy to Wunara Wunara to QLD border Stuart hwy Darwin to Pine Creek Pine Creek to Katherine Katherine to Daly Waters Daly Waters to Helen Springs Helen Springs to Barkly Hwy Barkly Hwy to Stirling Stirling to Alice Springs Alice Springs to SA border victoria hwy Katherine to Timber Creek Timber Creek to WA border Single Single 285 184 500 200 19 4 4 2 0.01334 low 0.00434 low 7.31 low-medium 5.95 low Single Single Single Single Single Single Single Single 192 90 271 260 117 281 249 290 1300 1300 500 400 400 400 1000 400 262 20 25 23 12 30 46 50 28 3 5 2 1 6 8 12 0.27324 medium-high 0.04469 low-medium 0.01847 low 0.01772 low 0.02044 low 0.02135 low 0.03697 low-medium 0.03444 low-medium 57.59 high 9.42 low-medium 10.12 medium 12.14 medium 14.00 medium-high 14.62 medium-high 10.13 medium 23.59 high Single Single 281 153 220 230 13 10 1 0 0.00926 low 0.01306 low 11.54 medium 15.56 medium-high

auSTRalian CaPiTal TERRiToRy
barton highway ACT border to Federal Highway federal highway ACT border to Antill Street Dual 8 18000 13 1 0.32500 high 4.95 low Dual 12 16800 37 1 0.61667 high 10.06 medium

For more information or copies of AusRAP reports contact: Australian Road Assessment Program (AusRAP) C/O Australian Automobile Association (AAA) 103 Northbourne Avenue, Canberra ACT 2601
Email

[email protected]

WEb

www.ausrap.org or www.aaa.asn.au

PhonE

+61 2 6247 7311

Alternatively, contact the Automobile Club in your state or territory. Material in this publication may be reproduced or quoted provided AAA is acknowledged. © Australian Road Assessment Program (AusRAP) 2011

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