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Cebes Tablet

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PA

3948
C2

1904

KEBHTOS DINAH.

Ce.be s

CEBE8' TABLET,
INTRODUCTION, NOTES, VOCABULARY, AND

GRAMMATICAL QUESTIONS.

BY

RICHARD PARSONS,
PROFESSOR OF GREEK, OHIO WESLBYAN UNIVERSITY.

Si), ipa.fj.fv

d0d.va.T6s tffTiv
a.fj.a.

y

roia^rrj

.

.

.

re

Kal Saifiovet.

PLATO, Laws.

BOSTON,

U.S.A.:

GINN & COMPANY, PUBLISHERS.
1904.

P/9

;H

Entered, according to Act of Congress, In the year 1887, by

RICHARD PARSONS,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at

Washington.

TYPOGRAPHY BY

J. S.

GUSHING

&

Co., BOSTON, U.S.A.

PRESSWORK BY GINN

&

Co., BOSTON, U.S.A.

PREFACE.

THIS

little

volume has arisen from a

belief that Cebes'
it

Tablet deserves a higher recognition

than

has received

from educators.

In confirmation of this claim, texts edited

from more modern data and research have recently appeared
in

Germany and England.
In
its

preparation the works of Schweighatiser, Simpson,

Drosihn, Btichling, and Jerram have been consulted, besides

some minor editions prepared for school and gymnasium use. The monographs of Drosihn (!>ie tyit bt$ $mar.) and of Dr.
Carl Mtiller on the manuscript authorities

(De

arte critica

ad

Cebetis

Tabulam adhibenda) have been
is

of service.

under great obligations to Professor John Williams White of Harvard University for favors kindly
editor
also

The

extended and gratefully received.
December, 1886.

INTRODUCTION.

I.

THE STORY OF THE MANUSCRIPTS.

IN both ancient and modern times this little work has inspired its readers with more than ordinary admiration. Described by Lucian, translated into Latin verse by a relative of Tertullian, praised by Gronovius as the book which
he ever kept before his eyes or upon his person, commended by Milton, and utilized by Bunyan, the Tabula needs no other testimony to its worth than that already furnished by

numerous friends, its multiplied editions and translations, and the beauty and purity of its philosophy. Unfortunately, however, the worth and popularity of the work have not availed to insure its preservation in complete form in any Greek manuscript known still to exist. The concluding sentences have been preserved only by means of an Arabic paraphrase, made in the ninth century, which, translated by Elichmann into Latin, was published in 1640. This Latin version, however, is of no great value for critical purposes, as the Arabic translator had in some places
its

misapprehended the meaning of the original. Another Latin version is that of Odaxius,
at

first

published

Bologna

in 1497.

While neither

of these

versions

is

of

any independent

authority, that of Elichmann has been of some service in suggesting the correct reading in places where the Greek

manuscripts were plainly wrong.

6

INTRODUCTION.
Of these
latter,

twelve in

all,

but two are of great author-

These are the Paris manuscript marked A, and dating from the eleventh (from the twelfth, Schweig.), and the
ity.

Codex Vaticanus, of the fourteenth century. Three other Paris manuscripts, designated B, C, and D, respectively, and all other extant manuscripts, are judged by Dr. C. Mtiller to be mere copies of the Vatican manuscript.
This latter manuscript is therefore the best authority from -n-porepov, 1. 431 (where Paris manuscript unfortunately ends,

A

in consequence of a mutilation) to the close of the Greek text. Some editions of Cebes contain references also to a supposed

manuscript from which Meibomius

may have

derived read-

ings given in his edition of 1711. The labors of Dr. Miiller have proved that the readings of the Meibomian manuscript (?) were derived from various
sources, especially from Paris manuscript C, and therefore not of any higher authority than that very corrupt apograph of

the Vatican manuscript.

II.

EDITIONS.

The Latin

ably preceded the

translation by Odaxius, already mentioned, probfirst impression of the Greek text. The

earliest edition in the original (editio princeps) according to

Schweighaiiser is one without designation of place or year, but probably printed at either Venice or Rome near the beginning of the sixteenth century. This and all the early
editions were published in connection with other works, frequently forming one volume with the Enchiridion of Epicte-

An Aldine edition of 1512 contained the Tabula in Greek and Latin, a treatise on Greek grammar, the Sermon on the Mount, a list of abbreviations used in Greek, the Gospel of John, the Golden Verses of Pythagoras, the Salutation
tus.

to the

Most Blessed Virgin, the Symbols

of the Apostles, the

Poems

of Phocylis, an Introduction to the study of

Hebrew,

INTRODUCTION.

7

etc., all designed, evidently, as a panoply of moral and grammatical purity. The most scholarly of early editions was that published at

first raised.

Basle by Wolf (1560), in which the question of authorship was In this work the Tabula and Manual of Epicte-

tus formed a part of the first of three volumes. Many of the ingenious emendations suggested by this editor have been confirmed by manuscripts not known to him. Successive editions were issued in Germany by Caselius from

1594 on, showing no improvement upon Wolfs works. In there appeared, in 1640, a posthumous work Leyden, however, of Elichmann's, supplied with a preface by Salmasius.
This edition contained, besides the Greek text, an Arabic paraphrase, probably of the ninth century, accompanied with
a Latin translation.
the

The paraphrase

carried the dialogue of
;

Tabula farther than any Greek manuscript then read
this fact

and

gave occasion for suspecting this concluding por-

ground

There is, nevertheless, no sufficient tion not to be genuine. for such suspicion, and the concordant and logical

nature of this sequel has disarmed objection. The greater portion of the additional matter has since been found in other Greek manuscripts. The Amsterdam edition of Gronovius

(1689) contained corrections from three Paris manuscripts This work, although defective in its consulted first by him. criticism of the Tabula on a higher plane. references, placed

Toward the close of the following century (1798) appeared work of Jno. Schweighauser, published from Leipsic, including the Manual of Epictetus. This is far the best of all German editions, evidencing This was edited later patience and consummate scholarship. by G. Schweighauser, without notes but with the same importance attached to the Meibomian readings as in the larger edition. This work of Schweighaiiser's has formed the text of numerous German editions intended for the gymnasia. The principal French editions have been those of Coraes,
the large

8

INTRODUCTION.

highly reputed, and Diibner, mainly a reprint of Schweighaiiser.

Of English
ford)
is

editions that of

Jerram (Clarendon

Press, Ox-

much

the best.

III.

THE PLAN OF THE WORK.

The Tabula is cast in the form of a dialogue describing and explaining an allegorical picture represented as deposited in a temple as a votive offering. From the thirty-third chapter to
the close a discussion and enlargement of the teachings given is carried on by the same two persons who began the conversation.

Briefly told, the story is as follows As certain young strangers stand perplexed by the quaint design and strange figures of the picture, an aged man stand:

'

ing near volunteers the information that the offering was presented by a stranger of understanding and great wisdom who had dedicated both temple and picture to Kronos. request

A

for

an explanation
is

is

complied with, after he has warned them
circles,

that there
'

a danger attending the understanding.
separated by walls and com-

The three concentric

municating through gates, represent Life. great throng at the outer gate seeks to enter, while an old man, Genius, gesticulates and holds out a chart of directions. These, passing

A

him

to a woman, who, from her throne beside the drink to all who enter. Her name is Deceit, her gate, gives drink Ignorance and Error.

by,

come

'

THE OUTER
is

titude

attracted

Enjoyments.
1

Having passed the gate, the mulby women, who are Opinions, Desires, and These flatter and mislead the unreflecting crowd
CIRCLE.

by promising happiness to each. Yonder blind woman, standing upon a round stone rollShe is deaf and raving ing in every direction, is Fortune. mad. She tosses her gifts promiscuously amid the crowd, and

INTRODUCTION.
some are
gratified,

9

fail and groan in anguish. from those who win and tosses to away others, who rejoice, calling her Good Fortune, while those who lose stretch forth their hands and revile her as Evil For-

while others

Again, she takes

Incontinence, Beyond her stand four other women, Profligacy, Greed, and Flattery. 'These watch to see who obtain Fortune's gifts, and such they embrace and flatter and prevail upon to live with themselves lives full of delight, as they say, and free from toil and
tune.
suffering.

'But though for a while their victim is pleased, yet his enjoyment is gradually diminished, his means at last spent, and then he is forced to commit most violent crimes by these

wantons who have enslaved him. They at last deliver him to Retribution and her gaunt and ragged crew, Sorrow, Anguish, Lament, Despair. These torture him and cast him into the

House
'

of

Woe

!

no escape, unless haply Repentance meet him. She will give him other opinions, of which may one will conduct him to True Learning, but the other, to
this there is

From

False Learning.

'THE SECOND CIRCLE. There, just at the entrance to the Neat and trim she second enclosure, stands False Learning. appears, so that men admire her and think her the true
Learning.
closure, too,

But she does not save them, for within this enyou see the same forms of evil and error, though these tempters are not so common in this stage. But they will not depart till the man sets forth on that rough and steep path leading upward to True Learning. Few tread that narrow way and reach that great high rock. 'The sisters who from the summit hail the approaching traveller are Temperance and Fortitude. They encourage him to be brave and patient, as he will soon find the path Then descending to his aid, they draw the pilgrim up, easy. as there is no other way to reach the top. They bid him rest.

10

INTRODUCTION.
is

and impart strength and courage, assuring him that he
the right course. ' From them the road
sun-lit plain,

in

now

passes through a flowery and

and everywhere

is

smooth and

delightful.

Finally the path terminates at the gate of the third wall, where True Learning stands in dignity on a firm, square stone.

'THE THIRD CIRCLE.

She gives those who enter her purifying potion. Purged this from all deluding fancies and desires, the traveller He is welcomed by a band of fair passes within the gate. and her sisters Courage, Righteousness, women, Knowledge,
'

by

Honor, Temperance, Order, Liberty, Self-Control, Gentleness. They conduct him to their mother, Happiness, enthroned on To each who reaches the propylaeum of the acropolis.
this goal she gives

a crown of victory, for he has overcome his

Under the care of the Virtues he is afterward conducted to the place whence he came, and beholds there men sunk in that low and wretched estate from which he has Henceforth nothing can harm him, but he been rescued.
greatest foes.

becomes a welcome help to
'

all.

On

the contrary, these

whom you

see descending the

diffi-

have been rejected by Learning, and, wretched in wander aimlessly. The women who pursue them are heart, Grief, Despair, and Ignorance. Returning, they revile the
cult path

seekers of True Learning as mean and wretched creatures who do not enjoy life and its goods. But you see others to return with great joy, having crowns on their heads, and
these are they

Learning.

The women you

Opinions who but may not themselves enter her presence. Do you ask again what directions the Old
'

the only True serving as guides are the conduct travellers to the gate of Knowledge,
see

who have sought and found

Man

without

the gate of Life gives ? These That they should put no trust in Fortune, nor ever believe her gifts to be permanently
:

their own.

But, as she blindly gives and takes away, neither

INTRODUCTION.
to

11

rejoice

when
as

she

away.

But he bids
all

gives, nor to despair though she take to take from False Learning her science

and
is

letters

then with

conveniences, not at all as necessities, and speed to urge toward True Learning, whose gift
1

sure, permanent, unchanging Knowledge. Knowledge, The remainder of the dialogue discusses the value of the These, it is argued, pursuits included under False Discipline.

have no real worth, since they make men no

better.

Those

who avoid
Knowledge

the arts and sciences altogether may arrive unto as well as those who become proficient in such

Yet they yield some advantage to those who purbranches. sue them, though all such are in great danger of bestowing too much time on such occupations.
" In response to the question, Why are not the gifts of Fortune good?" the reply is that Life is not of itself good

or evil, but good or evil only as it is spent nobly or basely. As the gifts of Fortune do not of themselves conduce to right
living,

they

may

prove to be a positive injury, being obtained
life.

by wrong-doing, from which nothing good can ever come. The Tabula, then, unfolds the philosophy of a true

With

the question of a future state it is in nowise concerned. It is strange, therefore, that Suidas, the lexicogcould describe the work as "an account of things rapher,
in

Hades, and other matters."
"

Faulty also

is

the statement

of Eschenburg,

It treats of the state of souls before their

union with bodies;

of

the

character and destiny of

men

during

life

;

of their exit

from the world."

IV.

THE AUTHORSHIP.

Since even the subject-matter of the Tabula has been misrepresented by careless writers, it is not strange that the more difficult question of authorship has been handled with some
vagueness.
is

The Tabula bears the name

of Cebes.

As

there

no ground whatever to attribute its authorship to the Cyzicene Cebes, and since there is but one other philosopher

12
of

INTRODUCTION.

any great fame bearing that name, the assumption has been that he that is, the Theban friend and disciple of

Socrates
question.

One

should be regarded as the author of the work in of the twelve Greek manuscripts extant bears

To this manuscript (C) no "r)(3du)v" as part of the title. can be given, as we possess another manuscript, earlier weight
by two centuries, the Vatican, of which C is an apograph. This Vatican manuscript, and nearly all the others, has the
title

As the name of the writer is not in KC/^TOS." the sole question is whether the Cebes of Thebes was dispute, the Cebes of the Tabula.
"IIiva

The Theban Cebes

is

at best

an indistinct

historical figure.

He
istic

is

(I. 2.

mentioned by Xenophon twice in his Memorabilia 48, III. 11. 17), but so casually that nothing character-

In

Orito,

can be ascertained beyond his irreproachable probity. however, Plato shows him as ready to offer his

property for the rescue of his loved master. In the Phaedo he bears a prominent part in the conversation upon immortality.

Socrates speaks to

him

as a disciple of the philoso-

pher Philolaus (of Crotona), and speaks of him as one not In this diaeasily convinced by the arguments of others.
logue Cebes strenuously opposes the doctrine of the immortality of the soul, but at last yields to the arguments of
Socrates.

Perhaps,

if

we regard him

as the author of the

Tabula,
tioning

shall better understand his work, not as questhe soul's immortality, but rather as ignoring the

we

Cebes subject of death as an accident unworthy of mention. is mentioned also in the epistles of Plato as living in Athens.

From
period

the time of Plato there
of about
five

is

no mention of Cebes
is,

for

a

centuries; that

until

the time of
"

Lucian,
its

who mentions him
1

twice as

"

that fam.ous Cebes

K/3/;s exetvos).

The reference

to the

Tabula

is

(6 so clear that

A.D.

author cannot be placed later than this period; i.e., 160 This is also confirmed by Tertullian, a contemporary
1

Lucian,

De

mere. cond.

c.

42; rhaet. praec.

6.

INTRODUCTION.
of Lucian, who speaks of a kinsman of his the Tabula into Latin hexameters. 1

13

who

translated

Incidentally Cebes

is

mentioned by Plutarch, Pollux, and

Diogenes Laertius, the latter of whom says that he was a n/a, 'E/JSo/u,^, Theban, and author of three dialogues,
$pwt;(os,

which

also

were ascribed to him by the lexicog-

rapher Suidas.
the Tabula
then, of the Socratic inspiration of extremely remote, and we wonder how a period to that from the time of Chaucer to our own day could equal elapse with no mention of the Theban Cebes or his works.
is

The external evidence,

On the other hand, we must remember that omissions of this kind are not so uncommon in classic writers; Plato, for instance,

making no reference to the Memorabilia of Xenophon. The question of authorship must, therefore, be decided mainly

on the internal evidence.
If the writer of the Tabula was a pupil of Socrates, we should expect to find its sentiments to accord with those ascribed to that philosopher by Plato and by Xenophon. On this point the Tabula leaves nothing further to be desired.

Compared

in

thought and expression with the works

of the apologists of Socrates, the correspondences are many and marked. The doctrines of the pre-existence of souls, the loss of knowledge at birth, the insufficiency of mental

acquirements to produce virtue, the identification of virtue with knowledge, are all familiar to the readers of Plato and Xenophon. When, in the closing chapters of the Tabula, we pass from the descriptive to the argumentative part of
the work, the method of confutation is a fine example of Socratic dialectics. As a whole, indeed, the production is

such as
Socrates.
.

we should expect from a
:

friend

and

disciple of

the

To be more particular Plato argues in the Phaedo and in Meno that knowledge is a reminiscence, the soul retain1

Tertullian,

De

praescrip. haer.

c. 39.

14

INTRODUCTION.

from a state preceding its presing its ideas of the abstract ent bodily existence; in the Tabula the "Daemon" imparts of this life. knowledge to the soul before it enters the gate

The daemon

of Socrates coincides with the

daemon

of Cebes

and self in being a restraining influence making in the is ignorant of virtue In the Meno, man control. of the cup of Ignorance and Error. Tabula, all partake
for virtue
;

That passion

is

inherent in

human

nature,

and man the most

savage of animals, are truths found in the Laws; the tendency of man to become the slave of passion is set forth by a lively picture in the Tabula. the Lysis the duty of education

In the Protagoras and
is

in

fully
;

presented, and

in the

in the Tabula, True the goal towards which he must press who will receive the crown of deliverance from Ignorance and PasIn the Memorabilia, Xenophon represents Socrates as sion.

Laws, Ignorance
is

is

the cause of crime

Culture

In disapproving speculation in geometry and astronomy. the Tabula the sciences are held to be mere conveniences

In the Orito, man should not be the journey of life. concerned about living, but should be anxious only to live well; in the Tabula, ill living is shown to be an evil, and In the philosophy of Socrates, right living the only good.
in

and induction played a most important part; the with an argument for lofty living based on distinction and analogy. Socrates drew his belief in the dignity of life from Pythagoras, and was indebted to Parmenides for the doctrine of
definition

Tabula

closes

These beliefs are intertwined the fallaciousness of opinion. in the Tabula by Cebes, the pupil of Philolaus, the Pythagorean, who would have delighted in the teachings of his
great Italian countrymen. It might not be inapt to add that the terms

denoting

abstract quality seem to be used in the same sense in the Tabula as in Plato, and that correspondences in expression are not infrequent.

INTRODUCTION.
The
Tabula
of

15

arguments
rest partly

urged against the authenticity of the on alleged anachronisms, partly on the

form of the work, and in part on the occurrence words and constructions not known as Attic Greek. In support of the first objection it has been claimed by Drosihn and others that since Plato is quoted as an authority
allegorical

(chap. 33), and

quotation

is

Cebes must

work (the Laws) from which the the last composed of Plato's works, have lived almost to the age of one hundred
as

the

made was

This years in order to have been the author of the Tabula. argument is based by Drosihn partly on the application of the term -jrpea-/3vrfpo<; to Cebes and others in the Memorabilia
(I.
2. 48).

Xenophon, however, uses the terms
to

vewrepos
life,

irpeo-fivTepos

designate the entire period of
to

and and it

would be unfair

found an argument on terms so general.

is spoken of in the Phaedo as one of the vtavLa-Kw, a term which would hardly be applied to a man much older than thirty years. At the death of Plato, then, which occurred about fifty years after that of

On

the other hand, Cebes

his great master,
his

Cebes would not have passed much beyond

Moreover, the reference to the Laws eightieth year. lacks the definiteness of an exact quotation, and may be a

mere allusion to some current saying attributed to Plato. It seems improbable that any writer with the philosophical skill to construct such a work as the Tablet should have laid his
If his deto suspicion by an apparent blunder. were to obtain the sanction of a great name for his sign production and views, would he not be careful to avoid a

work open

possible anachronism in the only citation introduced

?

The same pleading cannot, however, be employed for the defence of the terms 'HSovt/col, Kpmrot, and HepiTrarrjTtKol in
sible to

If these words are genuine, it is imposchapter thirteenth. account for their appearance in a work reputed to

belong to the period of Plato.
deed, to question, as
revisers

Kpmxoi is not so open, inand compilers of works are

16

INTRODUCTION.
era.

found in every historical
sarily challenged, since

Nor

is 'HSovi/cot

to be neces-

by the epithet the school of Aristippus be designated, whose teachings were, as is well known, may repugnant to the followers of Socrates. But in UfpnrarrjTiKol

we have an undeniable anachronism, although Schweighatiser
thought
it

might be read

HepnraTiKol,

which he further

as-

sumed might have been applied to walking philosophers in the time of Socrates (Mem. I. 2. 10). Both emendation and are untenable. The word must be admitted to assumption
be an interpolation, or a later period conceded to the Tabula. For a very different reason we are surprised to find in the
context the mention of AioAexTt/coi
False Learning.

among

the

devotees of

That a pupil of Socrates should throw any discredit upon the dialectic art, wherein that philosopher We cannot suppose that attained supreme skill, ^is strange. condemnation of so important an instrument of investiany

may also remember that "poets" gation was intended. " and " rhetoricians are not condemned as suck, but only as
classes,

We

whose pursuits tend

to lead
It

them

to overestimate the

value of intellectual culture.
of

may

be that the followers

vexed by charlatans who professed his methods and claimed this title. If this supposition be conSocrates were
sidered improbable, we may still remember that the occurrence of a few later or doubtful terms is by no means

uncommon
sometimes

is

in either scriptural or secular manuscripts, and only an evidence of the wide diffusion and pop-

ularity of the production.

Drosihn found the allegorical form of the work ground arguing that it must be the product of an age in which a passion for allegorical description and
to suspect its late origin,

instruction

bore sway

;

such, for instance, as that of

among

the Latins, or Lucian

among

the Greeks.

Ovid While the

great number and variety of the allegorical characters in the Tabula naturally suggest such comparisons, they by no means necessarily ally the Tabula to the time of such pro-

INTRODUCTION.
ductions.
If

17

we

consider

it

an outgrowth of the Choice of

Hercules, surely a period of four centuries was not required to expand the apologue of Prodicus into the allegory of
Gebes.

the materials furnished by the English translation of the Scriptures far less time sufficed to produce the matchless allegory of John Bunyan and the noble epic of Milton. But Drosihn also observes resemblances between the char-

From

and those mentioned in a discourse of Dio Chrysostom (De reg. iv. p. 85), and argues that therefore the Tabula must be referred to a period subsequent to the works of Chrysostom, and antecedent to those of Lucian
acters of Cebes
;

i.e.,

to the latter half of the first or the earlier half of the

second century after Christ.

Gronovius, on the other hand,

had deemed that Chrysostom imitated Cebes, and from casual resemblances no argument can be held conclusive for either
side.

Lastly, the existence in the Tabula of late words is claimed a strong reason for assigning its origin to a period approximating the Christian era. The industry of Drosihn has
to be

prepared a list of sixty-six words, phrases, and exceptional meanings which were designed to form the concluding evidence in the work unfortunately left uncompleted at his
death.

In regard to

many

of these, the earliest authority

(as Jerram has shown) is wrongly given in the list. Nearly one-half of the whole number are quoted from writers not later than Demosthenes. Deducting these classes, and such forms as d/Je/foicos, euTTopevros and others, which are either formed correctly or only slightly differ from those found in good writers, there still remain some eight or ten words for which we can find no classical authority; i.e., avavrifaw,
avTi<f>dpiJ.oiKOVt

eyyi'&iv,

Oefia,

Kcvoota,

i/'euSoTraiSeia,

with

</>iAo-

n/AU)s in the sense of

the sense of

"

in extremely," and the use of lira. and the construction of oTmrw with superior to,"

"

a following genitive.

18

INTRODUCTION.

From

these words

and constructions we are forced

to sus-

pect that the present form of the book is more recent than that in which it originally appeared. Nevertheless, we shall

do well to keep in mind two facts. One of these is, that peculiar compounds are to be expected in works of an alleIf the genuineness of the Pilgrim's Progress gorical form. should be hereafter disputed, many compound words might

be adduced in evidence, such as By-Ends, Money-Love, LiveLoose, Facing-Both-Ways, etc.
It is quite clear that if these

names should not be used again ment for a later date might be
respect to such

for centuries, that an argu-

compounds

So, too, with plausible. as KevoSofta, i/^evSoTraiSeia, etc., it

may

be said that they are expressions sanctioned by allegorifact to be

cal requirements.

The second

remembered
is

is,

author was a Theban.

Reference

made

that the reputed in the Phaedo to

If his pronunciation the Boeotian pronunciation of Cebes. was provincial, doubtless his diction was not altogether Attic.

Unfortunately
of his

we cannot determine how

far

the Boeotian

day was removed from the Aeolic dialect. speech Thebans like Simmias and Cebes might write purely Attic forms and idioms, while unconsciously retaining words yet in
local use only.

If these words, during or after the

supremacy

of Thebes, should be carried into the
dravT^eiv

common

speech, or, like

and Qipja, should first occur in Plutarch, also a Boeotian writer, an argument based on their occurrence might be fallacious. At least we may observe that the only myth in the Tabula, the story of the Sphinx, is a Theban one.
While not attaching any great importance to what might easily be a mere coincidence, on the other hand we can hardly overestimate the evidence that the work in spirit and essence (and possibly in form) is thoroughly and genuinely Socratic.

CEBES' TABLET.

niNAB.
I.

'ErvyxdVojuez/ TreptTrarovVres eV r<5 rov

Kpovov

lepat, lv <5

TToXXa pev /cat aXXa aVa^rj/Aara e#e<oaW/cetro Se /cat TT'IVO.% TIS efJiTrpoa'Oei/ Yov
ypa<f)-ij

>,

eV

w ^v
ov?

rts ^eVry, /cat

pvOovs e^ovcra
6

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ravry

/ceXevet,

<f>if),

/cat fiejBauov

/ai^Sei/

vojJiL&Lv /x>;Se

dcr^aXe?
015

o rt

ai/ Trap'

avr^s

Xa^

rt?, /u,7y8e

tSta

o"^at.

ovSei^

Kal erepw
etv. /cat

yap Sowat

KooXvei iraXiv

ravra d
etw^e
TTOI-

TroXXaKt?

yap rovro

8 id TavTyv ovv rrjv air Lav /ceXeuei Trpo? Tas Trap* avTrjs Secret? d^rnfrov? yiyvevOai, KOL
555/xTyTe -^aipeiv

orav 8tSw

/aifre

aOvpeiv orav d
eTraweiv.
/cat a>5

rat, /cat /xT^re i/;eyeu> avTrjv

pyre

yap
ovz^

Trotet /xerd Xoytcr/xov,

dXX'

et/CTj,

Trolvra,

axTTrep

irporepov vplv eXe^a.
/a?)

Std rovro
rt
di/

TO Aaifjioviov /ceXevet
/cat

Oav^dtfiv o

560 irpaTTr) avrr), ju,7^8e

yiyvecrOai 6/u,otovs rot? /ca/cot?
yd/3
e/ceu/oi,

T/aaTre^trat?.

ora^

/aet'

Xd^8a)crt
/cat

TO apyvpiov Trapa T0)v dvOpuiruv, ^atpovcrt,
tStoi' vofj.L^ovarLV etfat.

orai/ 8e aTratTOtJvrat,

dya-

vaKTOvcrL, /cat Set^d olovrai TrtirovOevai
565 vevovres, oTt eVt TOVTCO

ov

fjLvrjjj,o-

eXa/8o^ Ta

K(o\vav rov

Oepevov iroXiv roivvv /ceXevet %iv TO Aatju.ot'tov
/cat

/cat

7T/3O5

T^V

Trap* avTTy? Socrtv
ffrvo-iv 17

fjivy/JLOveveiv,

on

ToiavTyv e)(L
570 Xe'cr^at,
/cat

Tv^,

wcrTe

a

Se'Sw/ca>

d^>-

Taew?

TrdXtv

Sowat

TToXXaTrXdcrta,

THE NEVER-FAILING
av$t9 Se d<eXecr0at a
/cat
TO,

GIFT.

41

Se'Sw/cei'

ov povov

Se,

dXXa

TTpovTrdp-^ovra.

a yovv

8tSa>o-t

/ceXevet

XaySeu' Trap* avrfjs, /cat <rwro/x<u9 (WeX^etz' e^oi'Tas
77/369 TT)Z/ fieftcLLav /cat

dcr^aXrj Bocriv.
;

XXXII.
II.

H. iroiav Tavrrjv
rrj?

e<j>r)i>

eyw.
17^
8ta<Tft>-

675

^ \y\frovTcu irapa
e/cet.

HatSeta?,

6 Sid iv
.

auri^ ou^ rt?
17

II.
,

d\r)0r)s 'ETrtcrr^/ai;,

/cat

a<T(^)aX^9 Socrt? /cat /3e/8ata /cat

aperde/ceu/a9,

580

^8X17705.
nyt'

<f)tvyew ovv

/ceXevet CTU^TO/AW? 77/309 rav77/309 ra,9 yui'at/ca9

/cat orai^

IX^wcrt

<X9 /cat

Trporepov elTrov ort 'A/c/oao"ta /cat 'H8i'77a^eta
/cat

/caXowrat,

VTev0ev /ceXevet

cru^roju,(y9

a77aX/n-^Se^ 685

-

Xarreo-^at
<U9
at'

/cat /XT) 77tcrTevti/ /i-^Se
r

raurat9

77/309

TT)I>

^ u8o77atStai'

d<f)LK(t)VTCLl.

/ceXeuet

ow
elra

avrov9 \povov riva ev^iarpl^ai,
at'

/cat

Xa/Seu' o rt
Sioi>

/SovXw^rat

77a/3*

avr^9, axnrep e^>oT7?i>

evTevffev a.TTievai 77/369

'A\r)0ivr)v

IlatSetai/ cru^ro/x&)9.

ravr'

ecrrti',

a

77/3ocrraTTt 590
rt 77Oter,
17

TO Aat/xwto^.

oo~Tt9 rolvvv trap*

avra

TrapaKovei, a/n-oXXurat /ca/co9

/ca/ca>9.

XXXIII.
7rtva/ct

*O

/xei>

817

[JLvOos, a>
et

4voi,

6 eV T&J

rotouro9

i7/xu>

icnlv.

Se Set rt Trpoarirv-

ya/3 v/xu/

(f)pd<T(o.

'AXXa rt 3. /caXa>9 Xeyet9, 6(^17^ eyw. avrov9 ro Aat/xdt'toy \aftelv Trapd rrjs

42
600
II.

KEBHTO2 HINAH.
raJvO*
a.

So/cet

ev^p^crra
;

eifat.

B. ravr*
II.

ow

TtVa eVrt

ypdfjLjjLara,

e^,
/XT)

/cat rail'

dXX&w

a
605

/cat

nXarajv

<j>r)(rlv

aicravtl
ets

\a\Lvov TWOS
et /xeXXei
;

e)(etv TOIS veois,

wa

erepa

H. TTorepov Be avdyKT) ravra XaySet^,
rts 17^1^ 7T/3O?
II.

r^
fjiev

*AXr)6ivr)v IlatSeta^,
ouSeyiua, e^ry

^ ou

dvdyKr)

^/D^crt/xa jaeVrot

8e TO ^SeXrtov? yev4dda.i ouSet' crv/aTr/ao? ravra. /SaXXerat
eort.
610

B. ouSei> apa, e^i^, Xeyets ravra xpyjaifJia etvat TO ySeXriov? yevecrOai avftpas ; II. ecrTt yap /cat avev TOUT&H/ ySeXTtou? yevea-Oai.
Se ou/c a^p^crTa /cd/cet^a ecrnv.
o~v/a^8ciXXojLtv
TO, a>g

yap

Si*

Xeyo^evd
/cat

irore,

615 /iei/rot

ye

ov/c axprjcrTOV r\v rjfjias

avrov?

di^ Tt O-VVTJKCL(j)0)vr)v etSeVat (d/cpiySe'crTepoi' yap ovT6> /cat dz/ev TOUTOJI' TWI/ fjLaOrjfJidTtov ovSev /xev)

,/c<wXvet

yevecr^at.

XXXIV.

620 jaa^/u-aTt/cot Trpo?

B. irorepov ov8e 7rpoe)^ovo-tv ouTot ot TO /SeXTtou? yei/eo-^at TOJ^ dXXtyz/

II.

TraJs

/xeXXovcrt Trpoe^etv, CTretSdi'

r)ir<xrr)p,evoL Trepl

dya0a>v

/cat /ca/cwv, e5o~7rep /cat ot
ird(rrj<s

dXXot,
625

/cat

ert

/caTe^o/te^ot VTTO

/ca/cta?

;

ovSeV

yap

/co)Xvet etSeVat /ta> ypdfjLf^ara /cat /caTe-

TO. fjLaQtjfJLCLTa, ^ett'

irdvTa, 6/xot&)5 Se

pAOwov

/cat

elfat, /cat <f>i\dpyvpov /cat dSt/co^ /cat Trpo-

p,

/cat

TO Trepa? d<j>pova,

SCIENCE DOES NOT SAVE.
E.
II.

43

d/xe'Xct
7T<ws

TToXXovs rotovrovs ecrru/
e<f>r),

t

ovV ourot irpoe^ovcriv,

et?

TO /SeXrt-

630

ovs dvSpas yt.vecrda.1 eVe/ca TOVTCW r&v /xa#r?/xa-

XXXV.
Xoyou.
o/
T<W

H. ovSa/u,<s (^atVerat
rt

e/c

rovrov row

'AXXa
Sevrepo)

eor>, e^yi'

ey&>,

ro atrto^,

on

TrepijSoXu

Scarp r/3oucru>,

cyyt^ovre? Trpos T^V a\-r)6ivriv IlatSeta^ ; II. /cat TI TOVTO ax^eXet avrou?, e^r/, ore TroXXaKt? eo'rtt' tSeti/ Trapaytyvo/xeVov?
e/c

rov Trpwrov
640

irepi/36Xov
/ctas et?

r^
77

GLTTO rrjs 'A/cpao-tas Kat r^9 aXXiy? Karo^ rpiTOv trepifiokov 77/309 r^ IlatSeiat' 'AXry^tf^, ot rourovs rov? /xa^/xart/cous
;

7TapOL\\a.TTov<Tiv

a>CTT, TT&i? ert Trpoe^ovcrLV

;

apa

aKLvrjTOTepOL

rf

Svcr/xa^eVrepot

eto~t.

H.
II.

7ra>9

rovro,
ot
/aei/

e^v
ez>

eyw

;

on

rw

Trpcora)

7repLJ36\a>

ov irpoei'

645

O"7rotov^rat eVtVracr^at

a OVK

otSao'U', ot 8'

ra>

oturepw

TreptySdXaj,

et /xi^Sef

aXXo, TrpocrTToiowrat
ea)5
8'

ye CTrtVrao-^at
Tj]v

a

ov/c otSacru'.

a
etra 650

Sd^a^, OLKLVTJTOVS aurou? dfayfoj
Trpos

ro

6pfj.au>

r^ 'AXyQivyv

IlatSeta^.
e'/c

TO

ere/aol/

ov^

6/3as, ort /cat at

Ad^at

rou TT/OWTOU
6/xota>s
e'ai/
;

Trept^SdXou
e5a"re
/cat

elcnroptvovTai TT/SO? ouSey ourot eKciwv /SeXrt'ou?

avrovs
eto-ti/,

/xr)

rovrot?

oa>^

17

Mera/xe'Xeta, /cat TTeLvOaxTLv ort
St* 77? 655

ov ITatSeiW e\ov(Tiv, dXXa ^evSoTratSetav,
.

ourw 8e
/cat

Sta/cet/xei'ot

ov/c

ai/

TTOTC

v/xet9

rotVvf,

a)

Iwot,

0^17,

ovrw

44
TTOtetre,
ai>

KEBHTO2 HINAE.
KOI eVStaTpt^Sere rot? Xeyo/AeVot?, c^w Xd/S^Te. dXXd Trept TGJV avrwv TroXXd/as
eVtcr/coTreu',
/cat
/AT)

660 Set

StaXetVew
Se
/on),

ra Se dXXa

Trdpepya TjyTfcracrflat. / > V f eorat oiv vvv a/coueTC.

et

ovSeV o^eXos v/

XXXVI.

B. irorf<ropa>.

TOVTO Se

&

mSs dyaOd, ocra \anfidvovcrw ot 665 Trot Trapd TT^S Tv^? ; otoi' TO Efiv, TO vyiaivew, TO
ou/c ecrTtv
TrXouTeti',

TO euSo^eti/, TO reKva e^etv, TO VLKO.V, /cat ocra TOVTot? TrapaTrXi^crta ; i) irdXti', TO, evavria
s*

y

V

/

/

\

/

/*

c

*^

670

/cat a7rtcrTov So/cet TO Xeyd/xevov. v II. roivw, 6^)77, Tretpw aTro/cptVacr^at

Aye

TO

^>aiv6^.voi> vrept cbv

av

o~e epwTto.
(f)r)v

B. dXXd
II.

Troit]o-(o

TOVTO,

eyto.
77,

irorepov ovv, edv /ca/cw? Tt?
77^
;

dya^of

e/cet-

vo)

TO

676

B. ou
II.

/aot So/cet,

dXXa

/ca/cw

6^)77^ eyo5.
77^,
(^77,

7TW9

ow

dya66v
/

eoTt

TO

etirep

TOVTW

eCTTt KO.KOV

3. OTt Tot?
ea/at
(>80

//,e^ /ca/cai

^aicrt /cat /ca/coV /u,ot So/cet

Tots Se /caXai?, dya06v.
/cat
;

II.

KaKov dpa Xeyet? TO

77^,

/cat

ayaOov

etvat

B. eycoye.

XXXVII.
yap
av
685 eu>ai.
177,

II. /AT)

ow a.Tn6dva)<s Xeye.
/cat oK^eXt/Aoi' /cat

dSvparop

TO auTo Trpdy/aa d/aa Kat Kanov

/cat

dyadbv

OVTW
/cat

/net'

yap

/3\aj3epbv

atpeTW

/cat

fyevKrov

apa

act.

IS

DEATH AN EVIL?
.

46

5. airLBavov
<5

dXXa

TTW? ou/c, et TO Ka/ca>?

ay
,fjv

KOLKOV rt virdp^ei avro), KO.KOV
<TTLV
;

avro TO
II.

aXX ov TO
y~
'

avro,
.

(77,
,

VTrap^ct TO
,'

77^

T<U 690

*
77

KOLK(O$ ^TfV

OV

*

O~Ot <pGLiV.TGLL

3
II.

dfteXet ovS' e/aot So/cet TO avro etvat.

TO

/ca/ca>9

TOLWV
et

tfiv KO.KOV eo~Tt

TO 8e
wcrt

^i/

ov

/ca/cdv.

eVet,

17^

KOLKOV,

Tot?

/caXais

KCLKOV av VTTYJp^ev,
OTTC/>

eTrel

TO

^i/

avrot? VTrfjpy(v, 695

eo~Tt KOLKOV.
/xot So/cet? Xe'yet^.
II.

H. a\r)0yj

XXXVIII.
^t
>

eVet roivvv d/x(^oTe^ots o~v/i/8ata>o~t

TO
*

'WK ay

/cat 17^, v y
177

Tots /caXai?
/)\
\
j

/cat

Tot? /ca/cws,
/

OVTC ayauov TO

^y

ovTe KOLKOV axnrep

y

v

700

ovSe TO TCfiveiv /cat /catety e^ Tots appcoa'Tovcriv 4o~n vo<repov /cat vytetyoy, [aXXa TO TTW? refjiveiv ] ov<ovz> OVTO) /cat eTrt TOV ^y, ov/c eo~Tt KOLKOV avro
TO
17^,

dXXd TO

/ca/cai?

77^.

3.
II.

ecrTt

TavTa.
Trorepov av y8ov/caXa>9 /cat

706

o~v roivvv ovrot)
77^ /ca/cwg,
'

Xoto

3. OLTToOavelv eya>ye /caXa)?. II. OVKOVV ovSe TO aTToOavetv KO.KOV
aiperdtTepov B ea*Tt TavTa.
.

CCTTLV,
77^.

eo~Tt TToXXd/cts

TO airouavtlv TOV

710

II.

ov/cow 6 avro? Xoyo?

/cat

7re/3t

TOV vytatVety

TToXXd/ct? -yd/3 ov o~v/i^>e/)et vytaa/eu',

aXXa rovvavTLov, orav
S. aXr)6rj Xeyets.

17

ire/jtorao-ts
715

46

KEBHTO2 HINAH.

XXXIX.
eVrti>
tSeu',

II.

aye

ST), o~Ke\//<yjote0a /cat

irepl

rov

TrXovretv ovrcog

etye 0ewpeti> icrnv,

a? 7roXXa/as
Ka/c<Ss

virdp^ovrd nvi irXovrov,
/cat aO\L(o<s.

8e

^a)vra_TovTov
720

H. v^ Ata, TroXXov? ye. II. OVKOVV ovSev Tovrot? 6 TrXovros ySo^et

ets

TO

aurol yayo <f>av\oC etcrtv. S. ou ^ai^erat II. OVKOVV ro (TTTOvSatov? etvai ov^ 6 TrXovros
725 iroiet,

dXXa

17

IlatSeta.

S.
II.

et/cd? ye,

CK TOVTOV apa rov Xoyov. ovSe 6 TrXovros aya#dV ZCTTLV, tLTrep ov

0el rot? exovcnv avrov els ro ySeXrtov? etvat.

730

IT.

S. <^atverat ovrcus. ovSe (TVfjufrepet, apa eVtbts

TrXoi^rea',

orav

eVtoTCDzrai

rw TrXovrw
/xot.

^prjcrdai.

H. 8oKet
II.

TTWS oui/ rovro av rt? KyotVetev
crvfJi<f>epeL

ayaOov

o TToXXa/cts ov
735

vTrdp-^eiv

;

S. ovSa/xoi?.
II.

OUKOW

et

/x,eV

rt?

eVurrarai

r&>

7rXoi/ra>
et

XpfjcrOai KaXai?
/x,^, /ca/co>9.

/cat e/xTret/xys,

eu /8ta5o"erat

8e

740

H. aX^eVrara /xot So/cets XL. II. /cat ro o~uVoXoi>

rovro
Se'

Xeyeti'.

ecrrt

ro

rt/xaV

ravra
8'

a>s

ayaOa

ovra,

y

drt/ia^etv a>? /ca/ca, rovro

eort ro rapdrrov rov? di>0pa>7rov<s /cat fBXaTTTOv ort, e'ai/ rtjawcrt /cat olojvrai 8ta TOVTMV ^ovotv eTvat

ro

evSat/Ltovetv,

/cat

irdv0' v7ro/xeVovo-t

irpdrreiv

THE ONE GOOD.
eW/ca TOVTCDV,
/cat

47

ra

dcreySecrraTa /cat

ra

ala~)(p6- 745

rara OOKQVVTCL

eu>at

ira<J^ov(rt 8ta Tr)i> yap on ov yiyverai

ov TrapatToiWat. rou dya#oi> ayvoiav.
e'/c

ravra oe
dyvoovcn
TT\OVTOV
/ca/cwz/

KOLKWV dyadov.
e/c

oe ecrrt TroXXov? /cr^trajueVous i8e?v epyojv
/cat
/cat

/cat
/cat 750

olov \4yoi
dvftpo^oveLv,
e'

e/c

rou TrpoStSwat,
(rvKo^avreiv,
/cat

/cat

/cat

aXXwi/ TroXXwv

fjLo^irjpc^v.

B.

ecrrt

raura.
et

XLI.

II.

v, ato-Trep et/cos,

epyojv, dvdyKr)

^

Toivvv yiyvercuL e/c /cd/cov ayaObv TrXovros 8e ytyverat e/c KCLKUV 756
eivai

dya0bv rbv

irXovrov.

B.
II.

crvfji/SaiveL OVTCDS

K TOVTOV TOV Xoyov. dXX* ou8e TO <j>povelv ye ovSe oiKaLOirpayeiv
/crifcracr^at e/c

OVK eort

KCLKMV epyatv
e'/c

axravrw?
760

8e ovSe TO d8t/cet^ /cat d<f>poi>li>

/caXaiv epyotv

ovSe vndpxeiv a/xa TO) avTw StVaTat. TrXovTOi' 8e /cat oai/ /cat TO VLKOLV, /cat T<X XotTra ocra Tovrot?
Trap(nr\T]cria, ovoev /ccuXvet virdp^eiv Ttvt d//,a /XCTCI

Ka/cta? TToXX^?.

(5o"T

ov/c

av

etiy

TavTa dyadd,

ovoe

/ca/cct

ctXXa TO <f>povelv fjiovov dyaOov, TO 8e 766

d<j>povelv KO.KOV.

B.

'l/cai'&ig /xot 8o/cets

\4yew,

e<f>ijv.

Sequel,

in the Latin version of the Arabic paraphrase. See Introduction, p. 6.

found

Et profligavimus earn opinionem, qua
actionibus esse creduntur.

ilia

a pravis

XLTI. Senex. Utique multum hoc est et idem atque illud, quod diximus, talia neque bona neque mala esse,

48

KEBHTO2 HINAE.
si

idque eo niagis, quod,
provenirent, essent

ea ex

soils

actionibus pravis
!Sed

mala tantummodo.

ab utroque

diximus ea nee genere omnia proficiscuntur, ideoque bona esse nee mala, sicuti somnus et vigilia nee bona Et similiter, mea quidem sententia, sunt nee mala.

ambulare et sedere

et reliqua,

quae accidont unicuique

eorum, qui aut intelligentes sunt aut ignorantes. Quae autem propria sunt alterutri, eorum alterum bonum alterum malum est sicuti tyrannis et justitia, quae duae res accidunt uni aut alteri idque quia justitia perpetuo
;
;

adhaeret intelligentia praeditis, et tyrannis nullos

nisi

ignorantes comitatur. Nee enim fieri potest, id quod supra diximus, ut uni eidemque uno eodemque temporis

moniento res duae ad istum
dant, ita ut

modum

se habentes acci-

homo

unus,

idemque eodem temporis movigilans,

mento,

sit

dormiens et

utque

sit

sapiens et

ignarus simul, aut aliud quidlibet eorum, quae parem rationem habent.

Hospes.

Ad
te

haec ego

:

Toto hoc, inquam, sermone
inquit,

rem omnem

jam

absolvisse autuino.

XLIII. Senex. Haec autem omnia, procedere ab illo principio vere divino.
Hospes.
nuis?

ego dico
in-

At quodnam

illud est,

inquam, quod tu

Senex. Vita et mors, inquit, sanitas et aegritudo, divitiae et paupertas, ac cetera, quae nee bona nee mala esse diximus, accidunt plerisque hominibus a non malo.

Hospes. Plane conjicimus, inquam, id necessario ex hoc sermone sequi, talia nee bona nee mala esse, ita tamen ut haud firmus sun in judicio de istis.
Senex.

Hoc

fit,

inquit, ideo,

quod longe abs te abest

Itaille, quo earn sententiam animo concipias. rerum usum, quern paulo ante vobis indicavi, tote que

habitus

A KIND MENTOR.

49

vitae vestrae curriculo persequimini, ut ea quae vobis dixinms infigantur animis vestris eaque re vobis accedat habitus. Quodsi de aliquo istorum adhuc dubitaveritis, revertimini ad me, ut ea de re id ex me cognoscatis, cujus auxilio dubitatio a vobis discedat.

QUESTIONS.

What
H.f
;

is

523. 9.

the simple stem of fTvyxd.vop.ev ? G.* 108. v. 2 Explain the form of its fut. ind. G. 109. 8,
;

b (2) H. 421. a, c. In forming the present stem what letter is inserted in the simple stem? What letters are added?

Which

is

participle ?

the more important word, this verb or the following G. 279. 4 H. 984.
;

What kind
111.

of a

Which

is ev as regards accent ? G. 29 H. three prepositions are proclitics, and what case
;

word

does each govern

?

Antecedent of w?

Can you give a dual

for TroXvs ?

G. 70

;

H. 247.

How

does oAAa differ from the adversative conjunction
of action
is

similar in form?

What kind
H. 829.

expressed by fOe^pov^ev

?

G. 200

;

Is haste or leisure implied ?

these sentences as slightly opposed? bine them ? (KOI . icol).
.
.

Which Which

particles particles

mark
com-

Rule
627.

for

the case of vcw?
its

G. 182. 2;

H. 757.

What

word takes

number and gender from7riva?
augment

G. 151; H.

What
N. 2
;

peculiarity in the
b.

H. 355.

May we

translate this

G. 100. 2. of ^8wa/u.e0a ? word as an auxiliary
differences

verb?
Tense of <n^/?aAe?v?
* G.
State

two

between

this

=

Goodwin's Gr. Grammar (Rev.

ed.).

f Allen'8 Hadley.

52
form and that of the

CEBES' TABLET.
pres. inf. act.

Name

its

object.

What

clause exegetical of that object? Is the interrogative or the compound relative more common in indirect questions ? G.
149. 2
;

H. 700.
rjo-av? 2.

Tense of

H. 932.
N. 2;

any other permissible here? G. 243; Might any other mode have been used ? Is the
Is

use of this tense for such constructions

common?

G. 243.

H. 936.
TTO'AIS ?

Syntax of

G. 136. N. 3 (a)

;

H. 614.

Why

does

it

precede the subject? G. 53. i. N. 2 H. 201.
;

What peculiarity of accent has TroAts? What rule of accent is thus violated ?
is

G. 22

;

H. 100.
53.

b.

What
3
;

euphonic change

observed in

yeypa/A/AeVov ?

G. 16.
article

H.

How may this
?

participle
;

and the preceding
f

be translated

G. 276. 2

H. 966.

Is it better to translate ev

by in or by within

Distinguish between crepes and oAXos. What rule requires the accent of eVepovs and be on the penult? G. 22; H. 100. I.
la 8uo declinable?

7re/H/3dA.ovs to

G. 77

;

H. 290. H. 253. H. 236.

Compare
than /ui'&o?

/m'a>.

G. 73. 4
2. N. 1
;

;

What
;

is

a fuller form

G. 72.

Of which

class is eSoVa ?

G. 108. vn.

H. 509.
?

3.

Which

tenses of contract verbs undergo contraction

G. 98; H. 409.

What

verb is added to form the pres. stem? were a pure verb, what would the future tense be ? Tense of e^eo-ravai? G. 124. 2; H. 351. Any rule of accent G. 26. N. 3 (1) H. 389. d. for infinitives of that ending?
letter in this

If this

;

Account

for

<

in e^eoTws.

G. 17. 1

;

H.

82.

II.

Construction of

i/fuiv?
first in

G. 183; H. 970.

Could ovv stand

the sentence

?

What

construction has xpovov?

G. 161

H. 1048. 2. H. 720.
;

QUESTIONS.

53
G. 127. 7

What form
H. 491.
6. a.

is

more common than

oiSao-i ?

and

N.

;

Could the optative be used in place of Swaroi ? H. 932. Case of TI'? G. 158 H. 711.
;

G. 243

;

has e^AwKws no reduplication? G. 101. 2; H. 365. What peculiarity in the tense-stem of avtOijKt? G. 110. 3.

Why
;

N. 1

H.

432. G. 184. 3; H. 767.

Const, of KpoVo)? Office of Ti-oTepov?

G. 282. 5; H.
line 94.)

1017.

Is the sentence

^/w in any form begin a sentence ? What Latin verb resembles it in position and meaning ? What circumstance is expressed by opa/<a>s? G. 277. 2;
H. 969.
a.

complete? (Comp. Tense of $77^ ? Can

How

then should

it

be translated

?

Give the difference of meaning between avrbv before TOV G. 145 H. 680. 1 and 682. av8pa and avrov before xpoW.
;

III.

Why
Is

Tt's

has

it

expressed ? the interrogative or the indefinite pronoun the acute accent? G. 28. 3. N. 2 H. 117.
is eyo>
;

?

Why

Does

TI

have accent

for the
)

same reason
G. 83. N. 2

?

Why
How
follow.

has

TI (before lx

no accent?

G. 28. 2
;

Explain the form of rovrl.
is

H. 114. H. 274.
; ;

<rwT/o-T

compounded ?
in

G. 127. in.

H. 476.

Name
which

two pairs of opposites

the predicate adjectives
ei

What kind
cl

of sentences are the ones beginning
;

/xv and

B

rf

?

G. 221

H. 893.
?

\Vliy

is IOTI

so accented

G. 28.
777770-1?

What do
G. 129.

the suffixes of

3. N. 1 H. 480. 2. and cuViy/wm each denote?
;

Has

o the

3,4; H. 551. 1 and 553. 1. same accent as the article f

54

CEBES' TABLET.

Does the
save

article in the

forms

6,

rj,

oi,

ai

ever take an accent
;

when followed by an enclitic ? Which prepositions do not suffer
G. 105; H. 360. a.

G. 29. N. 2

H. 272.

b.

elision before c in

a comIf
?

pound verb?

Why
221

is

the diaeresis not written over

e

in Trpoe/JaAAcro ?

contraction took place, what diphthong would oe produce Classify the sentences beginning t ftev ovv and ct Se ^17.
;

G.

H. 893.

Why
is

should one apodosis have the imperfect,
?
;

but the other the aorist tense

What What

relation

position has oAo> ?

expressed by virb? G. 197. 1 H. 818. G. 142. 4. N. 5 H. 672. c.
;

a.

Classify the sentences which begin with 894. B. 1.

eav.

G. 225

;

H.

What

position has iravrl ?

Can we decide the mode of Trpoo-e^Te from the form ? What word in the sentence determines the mode of both verbs ? G. 254 H. 1019. Does /? then belong to both verbs?
;

IV.
In which case
is

'Hpa^Xcts?

G. 52.

2. N.

3

;

H. 194.
G. 110.

What change
iv. b. 5;

appears in the stem of e^eySA^xas?
in ravff ?
its

H. 448. c. What two changes
Is 2x in

agreement with
agree
?

subject?

Does H. 480.

IO-TIV

Why

so accented ?

G. 135. 2; H. 604. G. 28. 3. N. 1, end

;

2.

Explain the forms ovrus and What is such a form as av

OVK.

G. 13.

2,

3

;

H. 88.
G. 226.

a, c.
2.

<#ai/ois called ?

b

;

H. 872.

What
389.
a.

rule of accent for 'AvaXafiw ? G. 26. N. Give the simple stem of the simple verb.
TIV& ?

3,

2;

H.
is

What

the pres. act. part.?

Gender of

Give the subject of 8r.

G.

259

;

H. 602.

d. a.

QUESTIONS.
Is eiSeVcu the infinitive of otSa or of e?8ov ?

55

What

is its

sub-

ject?

Its object?

What
2.
b,

G. 109. 1. N. peculiarity in the inflection of KoXew ? What construction has it? G. 136. R., 166; 504. 5.
b.

H. 726 and

How many How may
H. 846-966.
Is it

articles
it

has o^Xos ?

Their functions ?
G. 135. 3
?
;

Does

its

verb agree with

in

number ?

H. 609.
3,

ot /xe'AAovres

be translated

G. 148. N.

118. 6

;

proper to render
a

Set

aurous personally ?

G. 134. N. 2

;

H. 949.
Is us av

common phrase?
;

What

letters in 8et,Kvvet

G. 216. i. N. 2; H. 882. belong only to the present system ?

G. 108. v. 4

H. 528.
V.

Kulefor6S6v?

Stem
does
it

of 7T7rXao-/ii^ ?

G. 159; H. 715. G. 108. iv.

1.

N.

;

H. 516.

6.

Why

reduplicate, since the stem begins with two consonants? What case might ^0os have had instead of the dative ? G-.
;

160. 1

H. 718.
;

Rule of accent

What

for x pt? G. 25. 3 H. 172. does the suffix of iror^piov mean ? G. 129. 8 Give the subject of eVnv.

;

H. 558.

G. 277. 1;

Does the participle H. 856.
;

TrioWes express time, cause, or condition ?
Is this the present participle?

G. 108.

vm.

H. 521.

3.

Why

does ov receive an accent

?

G. 29

;

H. 112.

VI.

What
;

H. 824. a. 13. 1 H.

G. 205. 1 significance has the tense of mvova-tv ? What is the last letter of this word called? G.
87.

;

Which vowels add

v

movable

?

How
5.

is

an

affirmative reply given in this sentence ? What positive has TrXtwv 9 G. 73. 8
:

H. 254.

56

CEBES' TABLET.

have the perispomenon accent? G. 68. H. 105, 242. Does the form alone of draTr^Suio-iv determine its mode? What does? G. 225 H. 894. 3. 1.

Why

does

expvo-Stv

N., 16. 6. N.

;

;

Is

8cu/Ao'vie

What
277.

the adjective or the noun? circumstance or relation does ws
;

agova-at.

express?

G.

6. N. 2. (a)

H. 978.
ircirtaKao-i?

Whence
109.
1,

Explain the gender of ov. the long stem vowel in
110. iv.
b.

G. 108. VIII.,

1

;

H. 447.

b,

521. 3.

If is

were placed before

/OH,

what words would change

case?

VII.
Construction of n's?
G. 136; H. 614. used? G. 151. N. 3

In what sense

is <5v

Signification of TWV

avrw ?

G. 79. 2

;

H. 654. H. 679.
;

d.

How

is Sio

Is auriys

compounded ? the same word as avrq
is

in line

120

?

What
G. 129.

are the

differences ?

On what verb
viii.

the noun eKTrraxms built?

3,

108.

H. 506. 4. Of what class 233; H. 914. b.
;

is

the final sentence of the chapter?

G.

VIII.

order.

Arrange the words of the first sentence in a more regular What effect have they as they stand ? What construction has IKCUTTOS ? G. 137. N. 2 H. 624. d. Syntax of avrdv? G. 167. 6 H. 729. e.
; ;

What
108. in.
;

strengthening letter in the present of pwrrei? G. H. 513. 13. In which two tenses alone does that

letter occur?

What form
H. 382.

is

cKTcraKores
is

other active participles

letter existing in the in this tense? G. 117. 2; lacking
?

What

QUESTIONS.

57
like

Have any
cs ?

G. 101. N.

other verbs a perfect augment H. 366.
;

that of

What

is

the direct object of /coAowriv?
?

What
76.

the prediis

cate accusative

Give the

full

form of r5XAa.

G. 11

;

H.

What
its

the

contraction called?

What

is

the

mark beneath
show

the accent?

How
G. 253
;

should

we
1.

translate yevtafieOa to

use here

?

H. 866.

IX.
Is the

augment

'Eo-TTfKao-ii/

G. 104; H. 359. of e'ua6a<ri. temporal? has the meaning of what tense? G. 200. N. 6;
is

H. 849.

What

time

expressed by TruaOrj?
<fo>s

G. 225

;

H. 894.

1.

Does the clause beginning
relative in construction ?

av differ from a conditional
;

G. 239. 2

H. 923.

How

does

it

compare with the clause beginning with orav? What kind of a verb by derivation is SouAevav? H. 571.

G. 130:

How many
is

What

such verbs in this chapter ? the difference between avrbv SovXova-i and aural
G. 130. N. 3
?
;

SovXevowiv?

H. 571. 1 and

4.

Antecedent of aurovs

With what
tense in

Does the aorist subject does cTriA-iVr; agree f G. 202. 1 the dependent modes express time ?
;

H. 851. X.

What
62.

adjectives have a in the nom. fern, sing., as

Trota ?

G.

2

;

H. 138.
has
e'oriv

tence following, which

In the senG. 28; H. 115. a. the interrogative word? H. 1015. a. G. 60. 5, 7 H. 216. 4. Is ywaiKes regular in inflection ? What peculiarity of augment has ^/x^tctr/xei/at ? G. 105. N.

Why

no accent?
is

;

3; H. 361.
cally

What

letters of its present
1.

stem are euphoni-

added?

G. 125. 5; H. 526.

58

CEBES' TABLET.

How
not
N.

are verbs accented?
G. 22. N. 1

short or long?
a-vvflvoL
;

G. 26; H. 386. Is at final H. 102. a. Why, then, does throw the accent back to the antepenult ? G. 26.
;

3

H. 389.

d.

Syntax

of aSrcu?

G. 134.

1,

137. N. 2

;

H. 601, 624.

d.

euphonic change in the nom. sing, of i-pi^as? G. 17. H. 74. a. Is eavrfc the limit of rpi'xas ? G. 2. N., 60. 12 142. 4. N. 3 H. 692. 3. What kind of a genitive is it, if not
; ;

What

adnominal

?

G. 174

;

H. 748.

What
voice
?

construction have verbs like KaXelrai in the active G. 166
;

H. 726. What construction in the passive ? H. 726. b. What verbs have the termination 01 in the pres. ind. act. 3d sing. ? G. 98 H. 325. From what preposition and noun is o-u/t/Stoi formed ? With what euphonic change ?
G. 136
;
;

XL
What kind
;

of a sentence

is

the

first

question here?

G.

225 H'.' 894. 1. Does K mean out of, or only from the side of? What difference between ayoucrav and aowai/ ?

Why
What
H. 906.

the present tense in o-o>cTai? is the negative accompanying

ei

or idv ?

G. 219. 3

;

XII.

Has /neyas the predicate or the attributive position ? Which has oXAos? oSros? Irepov? e*ceu/ov? G. 142. 3, 4; H. 670, 673. Which one of these words is the predicate of a
neuter verb ?
Is ftov\ofiai

a middle or a passive deponent ?
act. of

G. 88.

2. N.

;

H. 497?

What

accent has the imperative

iXBuv ? G. 26. N.

3.

2

;

QUESTIONS.
H. 539.
2.

59

Is the future

of this verb

much used

in Attic

prose? G. 200. N. 3 (); H. 539. 2. a. What words are understood in the last question ? See line 94.
XIII.,

XIV.

What two forms What is its sing. ?
N.

has the pres. ind. of oto/xcvoc in the 1st pers. only form in the 2d pers. sing.? G. 113. 2.

2

;

H. 384.

From what verb is HOOTCH' formed ? 'Pifro/oes? AioAexTtKoi? From what noun does MOUO-IKOI come? 'A/st^/xi/rt/cot? KpiTMCOI ?

What word governs the case of rovrois ? G. 186 H. 773. What degree does Treats lack ? G. 73. 2 H. 255. What meaning have the suffixes in ird/na, ayi/oia, d^poo-un; ?
;
;

G. 129. 4, 7 H. 553, 556. of the last substantives.
;

Give the signification of the prefix
G. 257
;

Explain the double negative ou /).
Construction of

;

H. 1032.
g.

roiW?
their

G. 180. 1

H. 753.

Which verbs have
these

modes determined by

orav

?

Do

verbs stand in ordinary conditional or in relative What is a relative clause ? Explain the forms of clauses ?
protasis

and apodosis. G. 232. 3 H. 916. are xaxa and vavra each governed use the relative pronoun after irdvra?
;

How

?

Did the Greeks

of the adjectives belonging to KaKiav

In what construction are 8o'as, ayvotav, and /ca/a'av ? Which is in the attributive and
in the predicate position ?

which

Does /U-C'VOVTCS mean becaicse they remain, or as long as they remain f Does ovSev destroy the previous negative o8 ?

XV.
Has
TTOUX

a correlative ?
five

G. 87. 1

;

H. 282.
2.

Of which

words does 6Sos determine the gender? G. 100. the aorist. Give the future stem of <epov<ra
:

60
N.

CEBES' TABLET.
4

;

H. 539.

6.

Are the various

roots of this verb modifi-

cations of one form, or of different origin, supplying the deficiencies of one another ?

What adverb

relates to TOTTOV ?
oirov

Does a relative adverb like
tive if a definite antecedent
is

expressed

usually have the indica? H. 909. G. 230
;

What

correlative adverb

might have replaced

TOTTOV

and

its

modifiers?

G. 87. 2;

H. 283.
SOKCI.

Give the subject of

Government of Ovpav? How many nouns add some form of the indefinite pronoun?
nouns imply that the picture
attention to
/Luicpiv ? is

in this chapter

G. 37.
is

some new object? 2. N. 2 H. 138.
;

Do these proor do they call imperfect, Quantity of a in Ovpav and
Does
this relative
;

What

the antecedent of
its

77x15?

always

agree with

G. 151. N. 2 (b) H. 630. What principle applies to the case of Tpaxeias and TrerpwSovs? G. 136. N. 3; H. 614.

antecedent?

On what word

does

Trpoo-iSeiv

depend ?

G. 261. 2

;

H. 952.

XVI.

What part of speech is the first KCH? the second? When a conjunction, what place in the sentence does it generally
occupy
6
?

Explain the euphonic changes in
;

eVi-eTaKao-i.

G. 109. 4,

H. 448.

a, b.
is

What
G. 143
;

early use of the article H. 653.
is pi),

retained in

r)

/*cv

.

.

.

17

8e ?

Why
Does

rather than

ov,

used before dTroSeiAiSv?
o>s ?

Xe'yo)
;

always take the construction with on or

G.

260. 2. N. 1

H. 946.

b.
.

What
Are

does the

eiva/ScuWnv denote?
avTT/v

apodosis of such a sentence as oVav G. 233; H. 914. b.

.

,

and

avrai pronouns of the

same class?

QUESTIONS.
Give the antecedents of avrovs and auras.
Is

61

a in
7.

StSoWtv a part of the root?
is

G.

121.

2.

d\ H.

385.

By what

figure

68ov

made

the object of the principal

verb rather than' the subject of the subordinate ? [Prolepsis.] Does woTre/3 conform to the general rule of accent ?

XVII.
Gender of
e&o-os?

G. 58. 3

;

H. 164.
;

b.

Derive olK^piov.

G. 129. 6
is etev ?

H. 561.

1.

Of what number

See note.

XVIII.

Why
What
Rule

is

TTvXyv not rather in the dative case ?

letter is
;

dropped from the stem in the form
b.

''

KCKpipevr)

G. 109. 6

H. 448.

for

^Wa?

G. 189; H. 782. G. 55
;

What What
G. 142.

is ace. is

sing, of Iletlu ?

H.

197.
?

1.

the position of TT^OS avrrjv with reference to 68os H. 666. c. N.
;

What

construction has
it

irofleiv?
;

G. 258, 167; H. 959, 728.

Why

does

have oV?

G. 211

H. 964.

XIX.
Does
riVos
2j/e/cev

differ in

meaning from simple

'?

What

force has the clause beginning with OTTWS?

G. 215. A;

H. 881. Does the sentence beginning ei Tts denote a real case, or only an imaginary one? What meaning has the imperfect here in the protasis ? G. 222 H. 895. What office has tnW ? G. 226 H. 902. In which part of a conditional sentence may py stand?
; ;

Why?
Office of

eiSeti?

H. 906.

62
Syntax of
ots ?

CEBES' TABLET.
G. 153 and N. 1

;

Translation of TOV airrov?

G. 79. 2

H. 994, 996. H. 679.
;

Syntax of rpmovl

G. 160. 2; H. 719.
in ?

What
1,

tense

is tfepaTrevei

Why ?

G-.

225, 233

;

H. 894.

914.

b.

How

is

x<av often to

be translated?

H. 968.

b.

XX
is the masculine noun corresponding to dSeA</>al? G. 129 H. 551, the suffixes of these proper names. Explain Give the comparative of KoAAwrre. How formed? 552, 556.
;

What

G. 16.

7.

c;

H.

66.

XXI.
Tense of
TrapoAa/Saxriv ?

How many

letters in the present

stem of the simple verb ? In the simple stem ? Is there any difference of time between the present and the aorist in
subordinate modes
?

What

is

the difference

?

G. 202. 1

;

H. 851.
Is its

Case of p.r)Tpa ? Which cases are syncopated in this noun ? nominative accented like the nom. case of the common
for father ?

Greek word
gen. sing. ?

Are they

different in accent in the

Name
is

omitted in some forms

the component parts of KaiOrjTai.. What stem letter ? G. 127. v. H. 483.
;

Tense of

KeKocr/t^/xei^ ?

Of

e<TT^>avo)ften; ?

Explain

differ-

ence of augment. Do these forms throw the accent forward to the penult because the final syllable is long ?

XXII.
Construction of dywvas? G. 159. R.; H. 716. a. Rule for lavrov? G. 175. 2 H. 749.
;

What kind
Tense of
Latin
?

of action

is

vevfiajKe?

expressed by KaTrjo-Oie ? By eKoXae ? Is this tense ever indefinite, as in

[Rarely.]

QUESTIONS.
tense is used have verbs of augment

63

What

for the perfect in dWppu/rev ?

What
a.

this

kind

?

G. 15. 2

;

H. 355.

Government of

CKCI'VOIS?

XXIII.,

XXIV.

tion the

Syntax of fcyo>v? G. 173. 3; H. 761. Has the interjecsame form in this exclamation as before the vocative ? How does elire differ from the same tense of the ind. in the
sing. ?

3d

Give the stem and
latter.

suffix

of o0cv,

and the meaning of the
?

G. 61

;

H. 217.
G. 266
;

What
953.

does oxrre with the infinitive denote

H.

What two
i

changes were made to form the present stem of
;

?

G. 108. vin.

H. 953.

11.

XXV., XXVI.

What synonymes
348.

of 8ta TI have

we met?

Lines 338,

What meaning
H. 827.

has the present of ^KW?
of oTSa?

The pluperfect

G. 200. N. 6

G. 200. N. 3 (a) H. 849. c.
;

;

Classify the conditional

sentences near the

beginning of

Chap.

XXVI.
are
TTOI

How
What

and

oirot

related ?
is

part of speech
G. 218;
avriav

oT?

G. 87. 2

;

H. 283.

Which modes and
^ojSemu?
00/Setrai ?

conjunctions are used with verbs like H. 887. Which is the true object of

May
is

VTT*

in the active voice ?

be translated by them, although the verb Does this come from a passive mean-

ing in the verb?

Would

"suffered under Pontius Pilate"

imply agency

?

Government

of

Am ?

G. 163

;

H. 723.

64

CEBES TABLET.
1

XXVII., XXVIII.

Why
What
Rule

is OVTOI

expressed

?

letter has

been dropped to make the form
G. 171

G. 16.4;

H.

61.
;

for

air^?

H.

739.
?

KaKws Xeyova-t be translated as one word H. 712. G. 165. N. 1 construction.

May

Give

its

;

What What
H. 910.

relation does

o>s express? G. 277. N. 2 (a) conjunction might replace the relative of?

;

H. 978.
G. 238;

of an optative is cwrot S.v ? G. 226. 2. b H. 872. Of what verb is elvai the object? May such an infinitive have a subject and a predicate of its own ? Is it modified by
;

What kind

adverbs or by adjectives?

G. 258;

H. 938.

c.

XXIX., XXX.

What
N. 4,

is
;

102

the reduplication of ayayovo-ai called ? G. 100. 2. H. 368-436. Where does its temporal augment
is

fall?

What
969.
c.

circumstance

added by
?
;

afovo-cu ?

G. 277. 3

;

H.

How

is

the article ai used here

H. 659. H. 743.
-?

Construction of cSXXwv?

G. 172

What meaning
H. 658.

has the article before x^P

&

141. N. 2;

Use of the article before yvwuKo? G. 141. c; H. 673. Does eiirov retain the diphthong in the subordinate modes ? G. 104. N. 2 H. 436. a.
;

XXXI.
Syntax of ravrg ? Give the object of
xeXevct.

are the forms of /; used in the sentence ? H. 1023.

Why

G. 283. 3

:

QUESTIONS.

65
?

What

constructions

may

/cwXuet
?

take

G. 263

;

H. 963.

in deriving the

governed changes are made stem from the simple? present Tense of ITUX*? I n what sense is that tense used here?
is yiyviadcu.
;

How

What two

G. 205. 2

H. 840. Government of rpav^raus ?

What meaning

G. 186; H. 773. has the phrase e<' <S? G. 267; H. 999.
Ko/u'o-ao-0tu ?

a.

Why
Why

the middle voice in Oep-cvov and
of /xi^oi/eveiv ?

Government

are different voices used for

Se'Sw/ccv

and d<eAr0ai ?

XXXIL, XXXIII.
Of Distinguish between fjv and ty. G. 219. 2 H. 860.
;

what words

is

the latter

compounded ?

What
G. 226.

principle
3.

is

illustrated

by the mode
fjaj

of enraAXaTTeo-flai?
it

How

do the derivatives of
;

following

affect

the negation ? G. 283. 9 H. 1030. How does Aa/?eu/ differ from Aa/x/Javeiv in meaning H. 851. in indirect discourse? G. 202. 1
;

when

not

Syntax of e<o'Stov? Of amevat? differ from that of d^/u ?
Rule
for

How

does this infinitive

number

of eoriv ?

.

What meaning has irapa generally with the accusative? What meaning might be involved in going to one side of an
object,

but not reaching the goal? Define the use of ly/uv. G. 184.
?

3. N.

6

;

H. 770.
is

Construction of <0oVos
possessor?

What pronoun

supplied for the
avdyK-r) ?

In what case?

What word is omitted as copula for the predicate What may fu'AAei ^v be called ? G. 118. 6 H. By what principle is /3e\rtbvs in the accusative ?
;

846.

Explain the marks upon KO.KUVO.. Has OVK S-xp-qovov an affirmative force
[Litotes.]

?

What

figure

is

this?

66

CEBES' TABLET.

XXXIV.

Why
What
here?

does Trpoexouow precede

of av6p<air<ov ? Construction of TO ire/oas?

Government

its subject? G. 175. 2; H. 749. G. 160. 2 H. 719.
;

part of speech was

d/xe'A

originally

?

How

is it

used

XXXV.
What is the appositive of TO alnov ? What difference between w^eXei and What kind of a clause is ore
. .

oi<e\ei ?
irpocnroiovvTai ?

.

What

mode

generally used in such clauses? G. 250; H. 925. Mention the object of TTPOO-TTOIOUVTCU. Of rioTao-0ai. Of
is

Case rule for fecuw?
Case of /JeATiovs ?
73; H. 254.
775.

G. 175; H. 755.
is

What word

used as

its

positive ?

G.

Government

of TOIS Aeyo/Aows ?

G. 187;

H.

Does the form alone of TTOICITC determine its mode ? If we had a prohibition instead of this command, what would show the mode ? G. 283. 2 H. 1019.
;

What
Has

is

the idiomatic translation of

vp.lv

lorat

?

been assimilated to the case of the missing antecedent, or does aKovert govern this case ?
a>v

XXXVI.
Whence the long vowel in What sentence Object of e&fyrjo-ai?
object of
ffiyrjcrai.

is

exegetical to the

?

Are

aye and

-n-eiput

in the

same mode ?

In the same voice ?
?
;

Does av permit

epwrSt to

be an indicative

Is Zfiv a regular contraction?

G. 98. N. 2
?

H. 412.

How

are /ca^ws and KoAws compared

QUESTIONS.

67

XXXVII.
Meaning of TO auro?
G. 79. 2; H. 679.

What kind What kind

of clauses are the

of condition

is

two beginning with eVei? denoted by the words cf r/v KO.KOV

?

G. 222; H. 895.

XXXVIIL, XXXIX.
Is the first sentence

&pure conditional?

G. 227

;

H. 901.

Syntax of lyuye ? What change of accent ? is TOV gqv in the genitive ? What office here has o-Kei/w/Aefla ? G. 253 H. 866. a.

Why

;

What two

objects has tSetV?

Is the first

one the name of

a person or a thing? In the English translation which will it be? G. 184.4; H. 768.
Is Kpivaev the

commoner form?

G. 119. 13; H. 434.

In which two tenses are liquid verbs peculiar in inflection ? What common characteristic have those tenses in pure and
in

mute verbs

?

XL., XLI.

What

construction has TO <rvvo\ov?
of o>s?

Meaning

G. 277.

6. N. 2.
is

Since the accent of the verb have the accent on the penult ?

G. 160. 2; H. 719. a; H. 978. recessive, why does rapdrrov
2.

G. 26. N.

NOTES.

It accords with the allegorical TOU Kpovov up<3. of the Tabula, to lay the scene in no special place. character Compare the opening sentence of Bunyan's Pilgrim's Prog1.

lv

T<5

ress.

As Kronos was

identified

by the Greeks themselves

with Saturn, the Time Deity, we may suppose the name to be chosen as being appropriate to a description of Human The writer makes no attempt to peer beyond the limit Life.
of Time.
2. ava6rjp.a.Ta
:

ful recognition

very commonly

in a temple, in grateof deliverance or victory. Votive gifts are mentioned, as in Horace, Od. 5

"

"

offerings

set

up

:

Me

tabula sacer

Votiva paries indicat uvida Suspendisse potent! Vestimenta maris deo.

Ancient temples were generally built on high are often referred to as being visible far out ground. They at sea. Perhaps their height led to the use of the preposition
3.

aveKfiTo.

avd in such words as fodiaufuu and avaTiOruu. notice that K<U throws emphasis 5. rtVes KOI Trore T)<rav " "What they ever were is better expressed by TTOTC. upon
:

What they might possibly be." The Greek idiom here resembles our own in changing the tense, not the mode, after
a verb of asking or saying in a past tense.
14.
lating.
fi.<f>a<riv

"

An

eTrotet "was emphasizing," i.e., was gesticuemphasis of action is meant by this unclassical
:

idiom.
18.

ouSev Sewov irdarxtrf.

While the word

Sfivos originally

NOTES.

69
the idea
of

meant power

terrible, or
it

dire, it

subsequently, from

implied,

as I<rxyp6<; in

came to mean mighty, able. Other words, " " Greek, and awful in English, show a similar
it

tendency.

Here, however,
"

has rather the sense of astonish-

Yours is no strange experience." ing, or strange. 21. If it had been a production of their own city (TTO\LTIKOV),
local pride

might have aroused
Sewbs
Trepl

curiosity.
<ro<iav.

22.

e/A<pwv KOI

By

the

first

epithet

.speculative

power, and by the second

skill in application, is

meant.

Socrates, in the Phaedo, furnishes a notable

example

of the correctness of this description. our " terrible to talk."
23.

8v6s
. . .

Aeyetv resembles

TlvOayopeiov TWO.

KCU IIap//,evt8etov

fftov.

Socrates

did great service in presenting to his countrymen the views of these great philosophers, corrected and enlarged by his

own

reasoning.

In Plato's Parmenides we have an account

of a discussion
32.
el p.r)
.
.

between that philosopher and Socrates. " ova-a if you do not happen to have some
.
:

important business." Notice the derivation of " school." its relation to our word
36.
ovSeis <0oVos:

d.crxp\ia,

and

"no envy"

fully, without reluctance.

46.

UTTO T?S

2<iyyos.

(i.e., of the time); so, cheerconventional expression. The Sphinx, according to the poets,

A

hill overlooking Thebes. She every Theban, who passed by her abode, this proposed " riddle What being with four feet has two feet and three

was a monster who occupied a
to
:

and only one voice but most it is weakest?" When
feet
;

its

feet vary,

and when

it

has

rect answer,

Man,

Oedipus gave the corThe she threw herself from the rock.
at last

consequences to Oedipus, however, were much more frightful, and form the basis of Sophocles' great tragedies, Oedipus

Tyrannus and Oedipus Coloneus.
61.

OVK av

"
.
. .

8ir)yovp.(vo<;

:

Really,

you could not be too

shall attend heartily (not slightquick since the recompense is of that kind." ingly), especially
in explaining, as

we

70
73.

CEBES TABLET.
1

Aotfuov.

This word generally refers, not to the person

of a particular god, but to the Divine Power, or a disembodied spirit. In the former sense it was used as early as

Homer's time. 80. The first Kara means
81.
TreTrAaoyteVj; TO> r)0u
o>
:

"

opposite; the second, through. affected in manner."

107.

8a.ifi.6vie,

etc.

The

admiration,
reproach. describest
113.
"
!

though in

Homer

adjective is used here to express the word oftener expresses

"Ah. marvellous!

How
:

dire
"

the potion thou

those who have preThe present is here thrown backward, viously entered." making a perfect tense, by the force of the adverb. dAAa
TOVS Trporepov eio-Tropeuo/x.o'ovs
/xot

7ra\ai Trpa.yp.aTa Trape^ei

"
:

he has been pestering
"
:

me

long."

Plat.

Phaed.
So

63. 3.

148.

Trapa TOIS TroAAois avOpwiroi<;
Trapa /fao-tAei:
I. 2.

in the estimation of the
at

many."
court.

"in the estimation of a king,"

Xen. Anab.

27.

154.

This question

is left

unanswered

lest the orderly de-

It is resumed in line 537. scription of the picture be marred. An old word in a new 155. eK7ro7o-ei "it will suffice." " " I will make out," or it will do." sense, resembling our
:

174.
185.

p-*xP l

P-* v

Tlvos

"
:

avrcws emXiTrrj.

U P to a certain time." The plural replaces the

singular here

not by any design, but suggested, perhaps, by the preceding
infinitives.

205.

o>Se

.

.

.

KaTao-T/3</>

&Se

mean

thus.

Translate

"
:

nowhere in this work does Here he ruins his life."
:

213.

*w8o7rai8av.
is

We

have

in

word, of which this
duction.

the earliest

this compound a new known use. See Intro-

232.
234.

wSe, hither.

"
fy.

The imperfect

refers to the

moment

the mis-

the thing was really of the nature it has turned out to be, though it seemed to be of a contrary

take was

made when

NOTES.
nature."
" Jelf's

71
"

Grammar, 398.
:

Is

there

then no other

way
245.

(as I

thought there was). 'AorpoXdyoi not astrologers, but those
fv T<3
:

who

discourse

on the laws of the
255.
cis

stars, i.e., speculative astronomers. while we might have Trpwro) TrepiftoXta
cv,

had

in

place of

the

idea

of

remaining determined the

The common reading has dv Either reading makes a clear sentence, but tLv is so rarely employed with the future indicative, With oV the that the text as given here is to be preferred.
after TOTC in place of &/.
817

preposition and the case. 266. Tore 8r] OVTIO a-wOija-ovTai..

sentence means they can on no other condition be saved with the idea is they will be saved not until that very time. Herodo281. /3owos TIS: the usual Attic word is Ao<os.
;

word /Jowos in describing the hilly country of Gyrene (4. 199). Perhaps the resemblance of the word to /Jovs, and a mistaken etymology, might account for its
tus introduced the

currency. 315. Our attention

is

now

directed

to

the most
lies

distant

part of the background, where the path beyond the cliff of Temperance and

which

above and
leads

Fortitude

on

through a radiant meadow. 326. (lev. This particle

is

used in Attic conversation to

waive a matter, sometimes with impatience. you declare the place to be beautiful."
329.
KaXr]
/cat

"Be

it

so,

that

Ka6t<rTr)Kvla

TO TrpocrwTrov

:

"noble and digni"

fied in countenance."

330.

/Lit'cn/

8e

/cat

Kf.KpLfj.ivri

r^Sr]

rfj 1/A.i/aa

:

and now, havrftrj

ing come
force like

to an age of maturity "

and

discretion."

gives a

having attained."
"
:

351.

Swa/xtv

efficacy."

This word

is

here used in a

new

sense.
:

This word seems to have 355. <iAoTifia>s "exceedingly." a strained sense, coming from the extreme to which ambition
runs.

72
357.
:

CEBES' TABLET.
"

" he would have cast out (by the physiav ee/?a\e cian's aid). Observe that av is expressed prematurely with ws, and must not be mistaken for the av, which belongs to a final

particle.

This repetition of the word
II. 5. 18.
.
.
.

is

WOT'
also

av, ei aflevos Aa/3oi)U,t Srj\u>cra.ifjC av.

Soph. Elect. 333.
"
:

not very rare, as See
:

Xen. Anab.
ei

359.

8e

/AT;

wo

TT/S

voo-ou

but

if

he would not

submit to what he (the doctor) enjoined, rightly rejected, I deem (ST/TTOV), he would perish by the disease."
390.
feeling

!/ Trepuroirio-rjo-O'
is

<5v

dxoveTe.

As moral and

religious

prone
'

to

satisfy itself

with mere

talk, Socrates,

recognizing this danger, said, just before drinking the fatal

hemlock
KO.T

:

Eav

8e

i>fj.(av

/lev

avraiv d/xe\^TC,
ev

/cat

p.rj

OfXrjre Sicrirtp

"x^

/cara T

wv TC uptjfjiiva. /cat TO

TW

ip-TrpocrQiv

XP

vt?

Vl v >

ovS* av TroAAa ofJLoXoyTj&rjTt ev r<S irapovri KOI <r<j>68pa, oiSev TrAt'ov
"
aTrcpic/jytos
:

406.

eAev^epws
i.e.,

KOI

freely (like

a free-born

woman,
414.

a lady) and artlessly."
TOVS
/xeyi'oTov?
"

veviKfjKOTa

dywvas

:

having won the

greatest contests,

dywvas ouroi evi/cwv.
Oqpia..

Xen.

Mem.

II. 2. 26.

417.

ra

/Aeyto-ra

In the ninth book of the Re-

public the

is represented as a compound of a He who indulges monster, a lion, and a man. many-headed his passions is said to nourish the monster and the lion at the

human

soul

man while he who lives a righteous and takes the lion (or spirited part of his nature) for his ally, and brings the multiform beast under subjection." Jerram. " 449. c <Sv wherefore."
expense of the
life
;

sober

'

'

:

"which, forsooth." The use of 8*7 an intensive and ironical force to the relative.
460.
8v
:

817

is

to give

469.

TO

Kwpwiov

avrpov.

Strabo describes both the Cory-

and the one on Mt. Parnassus referred to here. The mountain contained caverns and other places which were reverenced, lori yvajpt/xwrarov TC *cai KaAAtorov TO
cian cave of Cilicia

NOTES.
Ktopv/aov

73

It was named from the nymph J/V/A^WV avrpov. and was deemed an inviolable retreat in war. Corycia, 482. 01 exioSrjKToi. The allusion seems very plainly to be to

who permit themselves to be bitten because having in their possession an adequate remedy for It is, however, a mooted passage, for the various the venom.
those serpent-trainers,

be consulted. Drosuggestions on which the Appendix may sihn even regards IxioSrjKTot, as the interpolation of some
Christian reader,

As

there

is

and suggested by Numbers, 21st chapter. no manuscript authority whatever for the word

he prefers (o^toyeveis), and as the connection of the passage with the bitten Israelites seems strained, his theory must be judged a very remarkable one.
485.

OUTW Kai TOVTOV,

etc.

In his

cell

surrounded by his

friends, as described in

the Phaedo, Socrates drank the fatal

draught (TO <ap/za/cov). But having attained to True Knowledge, he possessed an antidote (TO avTi<ap/*aKov), so that the
poison injured
of Theodota,
(TOV 1/SoV
Tf.

him not. So, too, he replied to the solicitation when Cebes was present, ecu/ /AT? TIS <f>L\wrepa
:

517.

TO

vwxo-0at

"to be entertained."

This word was

thought by
as

Socrates to be properly applied only to such food

was
537.

easily digestible
TI
Tr/Doo-TaTTel,

and readily procured. Mem. III. 14. etc. We now resume the question

7.

of

and enter upon the practical application of the dialogue, which forms the second part of the work. 539. Oappiiv. dAAo. Oappelv xpr)- Phaedo, chap. 64, e.
line 154,

545.
or

rjv

would take the

infinitive,

but as
use.

CITTOV

requires 6Vi

d>s, an anacoluthon ensues by were retained, CITTOV would mean, "

its

If the infinitive
"
:

I

commanded."
having

573.

l^ovTas Trpos rrjv fteftaiav Kal a(r<f>a\fj 86<nv

regard to her stedfast and unfailing gift." 591. Trap' avrd: "in violation of them."
592.
603.

Odaxius* Latin version has miser miserrime moritur.
Plato in the seventh book of the

Laws

says that a

74

CEBES TABLET.
1

boy

is

the most unmanageable of wild animals, needing
bit.
is,

many

an application of the
604.
s trepa
:

that

to other pursuits,

which are of them-

selves evil.

618. 625.
all

Supply from
flSevai,

line 611.

etc.

:

"to know

all

literature,

and

to master

the sciences."

642.
error
;

as

apa seems ironical, and sharpens the exposure of the " if he said, They are superior only in stolidity or
aKivriTovs Trpos TO "

obtuseness."

649.
651.

Besides,

unmoved to set out." Qpnav do you not observe the additional fact
:

"

that? "etc.
653.
OVTOL refers to those in the

second enclosure in love

with False Learning; exeiWv, to the victims of Fortune in the first enclosure.
654.
"

"

"

Mera/Ae'Aeia

:

After-purpose

is

the same as Meravoia,

After-thought," Repentance. " 672. dAXa: why," indicates the transition.
687.

dAXa

TTWS OVK, KT\.

"
:

but how,
it, is

if evil

living

is

an

evil

possession to

him who

possesses
"
:

not

life itself

an evil?"
those

694.

CTTCI, ei rjv

KCUCOV, KT\.

since

if it

were

evil, to

living well, evil
to them,

would have belonged,

since life did belong

709. tion
is

OVKOW

which (by hypothesis) is evil." is strictly an interrogative

particle,

but a quesa

so often one in

form

only that the

word acquired

strong affirmative force. 726. Notice the very emphatic position of apa. " it is 740. ICTTI TO Ti/Aav possible to prize."
:

rn TO rapaTTov, etc. " and this is what harasses and harms men." " 758. But by no means is it possible to acquire (for one's self) understanding or righteousness from evil practices."
741.

TOVTO

8'

:

763.

vn-dpxeiv rtvl

"
:

any one

to possess."

VOCABULARY.
NOTE.

The "principal parts" of Greek verbs should be sought Catalogue of Verbs given in the Grammar in use.
A.
s,

in the

a!a9dvofj.ai,

f.

^<rojuai, to

perceive.

adv., inconstantly,
6v,
f.

aiaxpts,
aiTtca,

a, 6v,

shameful.
to

s, 4i,

good.
-fiffta,

f. -f)ffw, f.

demand.
to

ayavaxTtu,

to be

incensed,

alrido/j.ai,

7iffo/j.ai,

blame.

to feel grieved.
liye,

alrla, as, (^),

a cause.
unmoved,
to follow. hear.

imp. of &yw used adv., come,
f.

afoios, la, iov, causing.

well.

aKtvijTos,
fiffu, to
(r)~),

ov,

uninflu-

ayvotu,

be ignorant

of.

enced.
aKO\ovOe<i>,
O.KOVW,
f. f.

ayvoia, as,

ignorance.

-fiffu,

ayu,

f.

&w,
iavos,

to lead, to strive.

(Tofj.a.1,

to

aydv,
test.

(6),

a
a

striving,

a con-

aKpaala, as, (^), intemperance,
s, ts,

strengthless,

weak,

(i,~),

sister.

s, e's,
s,

precise, perfect,

tw,

f.

-fiffu,

to

act

unjustly, to

adv., clearly, precisely.

wrong.
&SIKOS, ov, unjust.

aKp6iro\is, (us, (^),

a

citadel.

a\aCovfla, as, (^), vainglory, boastrepute.

a$oia, as, (^),

ill

fulness.
a.\i'i9eia,

aMvaros,

ov, impossible.

as, (^), truth.

ad, adv., always.
O^TTTJTOJ, invincible.
&6\ios, la, iov, wretched.
d#Xi'wj, adv.,

a\rj0Tis, 4s, true.

a\T\6iv6s, 6v, true, real, right.

a\\d, but, yet.
a\\-()\uv, pro. rec., one another.

aBvfiew,
&0ufi(a
tion.

f. -flaw,

wretchedly. to be discouraged.
dejec-

&\\os,

TJ,

o,

other,

any

other.

(^), discouragement,

&\(ros, ovs, (T<{),
a/jia,

a grm>e.

adv., together.
s,

alviyfj.a, ros, (r6~),

a riddle.
to

fs,
f.

unlearned.
-fiffu,

alvlrrofjiai,

f.

i'|o ua/,
;

put forth a

jit\fw,

to

riddle.

imp. used as adv.,
6v, to

be indifferent; &/uc'Af(, doubt-

aiptr6s,

i] t

be chosen, desirable.

less.

76
s,

CEBES' TABLET.
ov, unalterable.
to clothe

aira\\drr<a,
self.

f.

o|w, to escape.

aiiupievi'v/j.i, tffu,

ones

airas,

awaaa,
f.

atrav, all together,

a/j.(p6Ttpos, (pa, epov,

both,

airardu,

^(7a>, to

deceive, to beguile,

av,

cond. adv.

[See

Grammar.]
to

airdrij, TJS,
aireifjii,

(^), deceit,

&v, coat, for el &v.

to

go away,
simply.
-

vw,
ts,

f.

-fM)ffo/jiai,

go up.
to

aireptepytas, artlessly,

oy, (^),
f.

an

ascent.
to

-f^fvffofiai, to depart,

avayyf\\(i>,

-ayye\w,

inform,

s,
s,

ov, incredible.

proclaim.
avayitdfa,
i,

adv., incredibly.

[ble.

f.

dffw, to constrain,

s,

ov,
s,

untrustworthy, incredi
unfashioned, natural,
[greed.
as,

rjr,

(^), necessity,

ov,

a,

aroj, (rJ),

an

object set

up

genuine.
air\r}<TTta,

(avaTjfljj/u)

in a temple, a votive
tyu, to return, to

(^),

covetousness,

offering.
avaitd/j.irT(a,
f.

air\ovs,

rj,

ovv, simple.

wan-

curd, prep.,

from, out
f.

of.

der.
avdicft/jiai, to lie

airoftd\\{a,

-&a\u,

to

throw away,

ava\afj.0dvca,

f.

up, to be dedicated. -X^i|/o^at, to take up.

to lose.
airoyiyvtaffKta,
to
f.

-yvwffopat, to reject,

avdXrityis, ecus, (^),

a raising up, a
to

repudiate.
f.

recovery.
ava\iffKw,
i.

airo5ei\idca,

data,

to

shrink back,

-\6au,

squander.

to flinch.
ta, f.

wavi\(f>(i>, f. -vf$(a, to

recover sobriety.

-Oa.vovp.ai, to die.

a.vdTia\iv, adv.,
ava.irr)$da>,
f.

on the contrary.
to

s,

ov, steep.

-(jffw,

leap up.
to fill

u,

f.

vu, to choose; mid., to

OJ/OTTiyUTrXTJ/XI, f.

-V^ffW,

Up.

answer.
airo\avca,
airo\flir(a,
a.it6\\vfj.i,
f.

avariOr)/j.t, f. -6-f)ff(a, to set

up.

-\avaia, to enjoy.
^a>, to leave, to

arfpeia, as, (^), courage.
avBpeltas, adv.,

f.
f.

abandon.

avSpoipovew,

f.

manfully. -fjffw, to murder.

-\tffu, to destroy.

airo\v(a, -\vff<o, to free.

&vev, prep., without,
avfip, avSpds, (o),

&TTOVOS, ov,

avOptairos, ov,

a man. Lat. vir. (o), a human being.
a trackless waste.

avoptw,

f.

free from toil, fio-u, to be perplexed,

to

dispute.
airopptirru,
f.

Lat. homo.
avoSia, as, (^),

^w,

to

throw away.

'AAa),
pfia,

f.

Aw, to send away,

avTKpdpfjia.Koi', ov, (T<{),

an

antidote,

avrpov, ov, (T({),

a

cave,

f. fiffu, to plunder. uAeuToj, ov, heedless,

avw, adv., upward.
ai6a>,
f.

airuffew,
to

f. -fiffat,

to

push

off,

to reject.

dxrw,

to

deem worthy,

apa, conj., then, consequently,

claim, to urge,
airdyw,
f.

apyvptov, ov, (T($), silver, money.
apfT'fi, rjs,

-aw,
f.

AiraiTf'w,

lead away. fow, to demand back.
to

(^), courage, virtue,

man-

liness.

VOCABULARY.
s,
4\,

77
a Ai

6v, skilful

in

num-

0ovv6s, ov, (6),
v,

bers; as sub.,

an

arithmetician.

adv., shortly.

aprdfa,

f. dffa>,
f.

to rob.

appuo-Ttto,

fata, to be

weak.
r.

Upri, directly, just

now.

impious,
vws, willingly, gladly.
offTftydvcuTos, ov,

7dp, conj.,/or, since. adv., at least, certainly.
f. ff<D, f.

uncrowned.

ao-Tpo\6yos, ov
a<r<(>d\eia, as,

(6),

an astronomer.

7,

ye\dca,
yf/jilfa,

to

laugh.
load, to fill.

(^), safety.

aa>, to (6),

d<7<paA^s, es, safe, secure.
aff<t>a\>s, adv., safely.

ytpwv, OVTOS,

an old man.
a measurer of land,
become.

curxw-ovtw,
cently.

f.

-fiffw,

to

behave inde-

yee/j.fTpi]s, ov, 6,

a geometer.
ylyvofjiai,
f.

ycvfio-o/Mt, to

air\o\!a, as, (^), business.
aaearia, as, (fi), profligacy.
&.ripdfa,
f.

ytyv<&o~K(a, yvwffo/j.ai, to

know.

data, to

dishonor.

y6vv, ydvaTos, (TO), a knee. yovv (-ye o5c), at least then, also.
ypd/jifj.a,

aTpv<f>fpos, ov, inexpensive.

TOS (T^),

a

letter

;

in plur.,

a0is, adv., again.
avros, ty
6>
;

self, etc.

pron., he, she, it, him6 aiirds, the same.
to take

learning, literature.
ypaty-fi, ris,

(^),

a writing, a drawportray. naked, without an

ing,

an
f.

aQaipfu,

f. -fiffu,
f.

away,

to rob.
ypd<t>a>,

inscription.

^w,

to write, to

aupMVfoft.a.1,

t|oyuat, to

arrive.
yvfjivfo,
4\,

6v,

cupo&ia, as, (^), fearlessness.

iuppovtu,

f. -fiffw,
),

to

be foolish.
[foolish.

outer garment.
yvrfi,

ywatKJs, (^), a woman.

rjs,

(fy, folly.

v,

ov,

devoid

of intelligence,

&XP'n ffros > ov > useless.
8atfj.dvi.os, ov,

A.

pertaining

to

a demon

B.
3a5i^a>,
f.

or genius, strange. walk.
Balfjuav, ovos,

ov/j.a.1,
!>,

to

(i),

a god, a genius, a
and.
it

Badvs, da,

deep.

demon.
Sf, conj., but, yet,
Se?,
f.

3a<rt\e/a, as, (^),

a kingdom.

0e0aios, afa,
Qlos, ov, (6),

o,

stedfast, firm.

Seiijo-ei,

imp. verb,

behoove!

life.

(one should).
SftKvvw,
Sttvds,
f.

Pidw,

f.

&iwffOfj.a.i, to live.

5e/{w, to show.
6v, fearful, strange,

0\afl(p6s, d, 6v, injurious.

<?,

won-

/3\dVr,
ftoridfu,

f. f.

|/w, to

injure.

derful.
Stvpo, adv., hither.
cattle.

ffffu, to

aid.

B6fficr)fi.a,

TOS, (r&),

a herd of
wigA.

ScvTcpos, (pa, tpov, second.
8(<a,
f.

jSoi'iXouai, f. 7?fT(i,uai, /O

STJCTUI,

to bind.

CEBES TABLET.
1

or],

now,

quite, particularly,

cer-

(s,

slow

to learn.
gift.

tainly.
di)\ov6Ti, forsooth, certainly.

Swpov, ov, (rf),

a

oi)\6w,

f.

87)Ac60-o>, to

make

E.

plain, to
idv, conj., if

manifest, to assure.

(l

&v).
ref.,

dfaov, adv., doubtless, surely.
Sid, prep.,

fawrov,
;

TJS,

ov,

pro.

himself, etc.

with gen., through
of.

with

iyyifa, to approach.
tytcpdreia, as, (^), self-control.

ace.,

on account
f.

5ia.Kti/j.at, f. -KtlffOfj.au,

to be disposed.

tyd, pro. pers.,

/,-

%ywye,

I,

for

my

oiaXtyu,
to

{,

to select, to converse,

part.
0w, perf., etu6a, as pres., to be wont.

argue.
f.

dia\e'nr<a,

<Jw, to leave

an

interval

el,

conj.,

if.

of space or time, to wait, to omit. 5ia\e/cTJKos, ri, ov, skilled in controversy.
Siavairatxa,
Siaffdify,
f. f. ffia,

efye, conj., if indeed.
elcv, opt. pres.

[granted,

3d sing, of tlpl, be it so,

fltcaios, ata, atov, heedless.

to rest

a while.
safely

eiKTj,

adv., recklessly, rashly.
f.

aw,

to

bring

tfaco,

?(,

perf. foiKa, perf. part.

through; pass.,
Siarpipii,

to arrive safely.

(iKws, (tKv'ta, diets, similar, probable, natural,
ei/jii,
f.

W>
f.

(*j)

pastime,

dalli-

ance.
Siarpiftw,
SiSoifj.1, f.

fffOfjLai,

to be.

tjw, to

pass time.
to explain.

ttirep, conj., if elirov,
fls,

at all events.

Scacria,

to give.

2 aor.,

I said, I spoke,
to

8ie'{ej/xi,

to

go through,
f. f. TJCTCO,

prep., into,
f.

Siriytofuu,

-rjyftffonai, to

narrate.

dffdyw,
tiffdira.%,
,

(,

lead in.

SuceuoTrpayew,
dtKaioffvvi],

to

do right.
uprightness,

adv., at once.
to enter in.
,

i)s,

(^),

righteousness.
Si6, conj.,
AIO'J,

f.

-e\fv<ro/jLou, to

go

into.

wherefore.

ffooSos, ov, (^),
flcriroptvco,
f. ffta,

an
to

entrance.
to enter.

see Zeus.
f.

bear into,

SioxXew,
5o/c6o>,
f.

-fiffoi,

to disturb, molest.

fto<a,

adv., within.

(w, to seem, to think.

etra, adv., thereupon.

86a,

ijs,

(^),

a notion, an opinion,

clwOa, see fOu.
tic (e'(),

good reputation, honor. toss, (^), a gift. 8ov\fv(a, o-fti, to be a slave,
,

out

of.
dffTri,

[every.

tKaarov,

each.

to serve.

u,
t"i,

f.

-0a\a,

to cast forth.

Sov\os,

ij,

ov, servile.
fjiro/j.ai,

[nify-

adv., there, thither.
,

Svva/j.a.1, f.

to be able, to sig-

adv., thence.
iKflvrj,
ticfivo,
it.

dvvafus,

(tas,

(^),

power,

might,

fivos,

pro.

dem.,

efficacy.
5i5o,

that, he, she,
ftirt,

adj.
s,

num., two.
fs,

adv., thither.
,

misshapen, deformed.

f.

apw, to cleanse, to purify.

VOCABULARY.
, f.

79
,

ffu, to loose, to free.
f.

L o\u,
is

to

destroy.

The

,

^(rw, to

make out

of,

to

2d aor. mid.

passive in force.

bring out.
Jf/cTTTwens, fus,

{), adv., out, outside.

(^),

a falling, a fail-

tirayyf\\<e,

f.

Aw, io announce

to,

ure.

[middle]
f.

to

promise.
praise.
^ITW, to

tKTflvw,

vu, to stretch out.

fu,

f.

tffu, to
f.

iXdrruv,

ov,

used as comp. of o\lyos,

4iraKo\ov6fu,
tirdvci,

pursue.
to.

smaller.
t\eu6epia, as, (^), liberty.
t\evOep<as, adv., freely.
f\K<a,
f.

above, superior

twel, conj.,

when,

since.

(iretddv (tirei

8^ &v}, whenever, as

{w, to draw.
f.
\J/o>,

soon as, since.
tireiirtp,
tiri,

rw,
s,

<o omti, to leave.

Sos, (^), hope.

conj., on,

adv., especially since. upon, against, toward..
set

w,

f.

-jSaAcD, to

put in,

to incite,

^TTjfluyuecj, to

the h

<rt

upon,

to

to inspire.

long for.
fTrt6u/j.ia, as,
fta,

tfMTftpws, adv., skilfully, wisely.
<t(j.TTpo(T0ev,

(^), desire, longing.
to

adv., before.
-<pavu,
to

dwell upon.

tn<paivu,

f.

show,

to

make
rw,

os, ov,

dangerous.
f.

evident.
^H<paffis, ews, (T;),

tiri\avOdvo/j.ai,

-\-fiffOfiai, to

forget.

a demonstration,

f.
f.

(Jwj to fail.
-fiffw,

a

gesture.

Kfw,
tiruroOeia,

to

commit perjury.
tO

fyippwv, ov, sagacious, wise.
iv, prep., in.

r,ffu>,
{.

to

long for.

lltlffKOTTfW,

-ffKf^OfJ.01,

Watch

tvavrlos, la, lov, opposite.
ta, f.

over, to care for.

//o,

<o

spend time with.

iviffrafwu,
&riffT^uij,

f. -arrfiffOfjiai,

to

know.

adv., within.
^w,
a,
f.

ris,

(^), knowledge, under-

trco,

<0

doubt.
of.

standing.
^Trirdrru,
f.

prep.,

on account

|w, to enjoin upon, to

f,

adv., thither.

command.
4iri.rifi.iov,

adv., Aence.
at, a,
,

ov, (j6*),
f.

a recompense.
happen

some.
<A<z<

(iriTvyxdvu,
^>iace

-rfv^o^ai, to

adv., tAere, in

on, to meet.
jrtx>pios, t&, LOV, native.

',

adv., thence.
f.

tyaffrris, ov, (6),
-e

o

lover,

a

devotee.

fa>,

^j<rw,

2d aor.

tpyov, ov, (T<$), work,
s, y, ov,

office.

ou<, to choose.
,

desert, solitary.

f.

pw, to raise, to rescue.
i,

vs, (us, (d),

an

interpreter.

f.

-(iffofiat,

to

bring out,

to

i,

f.

iKfvvoiJMi, to go, to come.
f\ff<a,

explain.
i%t)yT)<ns t tus, (^),
{is,

tp<ard.<t>, f.

to ask.

an explanation.

iffOlw,

f.

toofutt, to eat, to feast.

ews, (^), a habit.

6rw, adv., inside.

80
^
courtesan.

CEBES' TABLET.
o companon, a
&\6a>,
to
f. d>ffu>,

to covet,

to emulate,

pursue eagerly.
H.

trepos, /pa, fpov, other; rb frepov,

further.
ij,

(TI,

z&v.,

conj., or;
f.

tj

.

.

.

fj,

either ... or.

still,

further.
riyeoficu,
ijtiri,

el, adv., well.

^ffo/xai, to lead, to

hold,

ev .vQj]s, 4s, well-flowered, flowery.

adv., already, now.
(fy, pleasure, sense-grati-

evyfveia, as,
bility.
fvSaifJ.ovf<a,

(^),

high birth, noto

f)5orfi, rjs,

fication.
f. "fjffdi,

be fortunate.

flSjviKJs,

-ft,

6v,

pleasing, voluptuous.

tvda.tfj.ovia, as, (f)),

good fortune.

}]Svird8fia, as, (^),
fiSvs, eia, v,
?lOos,

luxury.

evdaifj.oviK6s,

4

6v,

making happy,

pleasing, gratifying. ovs, (jf), custom, character.
??a>, to

blessing.
?IKW,
evT>alu.<av, ov,
f.

come.

tu5o|w,

f.

fortunate, happy. fi'Tia, to be held in esteem.
well-formed, graceful. 4,ffo>, to be in good health.

i)\u<ia, as, (^), age,
tjv

time of

life.

(tdv~), conj., if.
T/s,
,

[cules).

eueiSrjs, es,

fous, (6),

Heracles (Herless.

evexTfco,

f.

adv. (^TTay), worse,
e.

fvOvs, fia,

i',

straight.

tv\6yeas, adv., reasonably, rightly.
tviropevTos, ov, easy to travel.
fvpiffKdi,
f.

Oivaros, ov, (d), death.

pi]<ru>,

to find.

Oapptw,

f.

i<ru>, to

dare, to be of good

tvraKTos, well-arranged, neat.
fitratfa,

cheer.
,

as,

(^),

good

order, pro-

ovs, r6,
f.

daring, courage,

priety.
,

fy,
f.

ffu, to

admire, to wonder

avv, to rejoice,
TJS,

at.
Otfia, ros, (T({),

vvn,

(ji),joy.
serviceable, useful.

a

deposit.

s, ov,

Oefus, iSos, (^), right, justice,
eepcnrevai,
f.

tvooxfo,

f.

foto, to feast.
iriffTTi(T(a, to

evffw, to serve, to heal.

t<t>lffTr)/j.i,

f.

stand at or

Bfcapeta,

f.

^ffw, to see, to observe.

near.
t<f>6dios, ov,

Oripiov, ov, (T<{),

a wild animal.

requisite for travelling

;

fy'l. rptxds, (^), hair.

as

sub.,

rb

i.,

travelling con-

Bpivos, ov, (6),

venience.
^XirfSijKTos, ov, serpent-bitten.

6aydri)p, rp6s, (rf),
Buffos,

a throne. a daughter.
the
soul, passion,

ov,

(6),

?X*>

f-

|w or <rx^ aa> i %x flvi
t

to have, to

pos-

wrath.
di'pa, as,

sess; ovrtas

^ e 80 -

(^),

tus, conj., until, as long as.

Bvpiov, ov, (T<$),

a door. a small door.

(dw,

f.

C^ffw

to live.

Iarp6s, ov, (i),
I

ZejJj, Airfy, (6),

Zeus.

ISttv,

2 aor.,

to

a physician. se.

VOCABULARY.
ftjoj, la, ov,

81
f.

private, peculiar, one's
[pie.

Kd/n.v<a,

KainSi, to
f.

own.
Iep6s, d, ov,

Kaprtpeu,
dure.

-fxrfa,

to

be sick or weary. be strong, to en-

holy

;

Lpo<rv\(a>,

f.

-fiffw,

rb Iep6v, the ternto rob a temple.
suffi-

Kaprtpia, as,
tience.

(^),

endurance, pa-

iKavus,

adv.,

conveniently,

ciently, fittingly.

Kara, prep, with gen.,

down from;
after,

I\ap6s, d, 6v, joyous.
Iva, conj.,
i,

with accus., against,
site.

oppo-

in order that, that.
to

f.

ffTr,ff(a,

stand.

KaTa&i&pdiffKta,
Ka.raKpa.Tfd>,
f.
f. f.

f.

-Ppdffca, to devour.

s,

vos, ($), strength,

might.

^<ro, to
tyu, to

overpower.
to

Kara\d/ATrw,
K.

illumine.
to

Karavofw,

^au>,

observe,

mark.
Ka.6a.ipa>, f.

apw,

to

purge,

to

purify.

Kaddtrtp, coT\j.,just as.
Ka.6a.pios, ov,

KaraffTpfQu, f. if<, to bring to ruin.
KaratpQetpw,
f.

destroy,

to

neat.

-<pOcp<a, to

corrupt, to

Ko.6o.p6s, d, ov, clean,

pure.

destroy.
KarfffOiw,
f.

KaOapriKos, $, ov, purifying.
t,

-e'So/uot, to

devour.

-f8ov/j.ai, to sit.
, f.

Karexu,
trol.

f-

Kaf)e<a, to possess, to con-

Ka.raarr\au>, to establish.

Ka6fo-ri)K<os, v?a, os,

dignified,

com-

KfTpai,

f.

KfiaofMi, to

lie,

to recline.

posed.
Kal, conj.,
Kaloi,
f.

voi, f. ffw, to

command.

and;
(^),

adv., also.

,

as,

(^), idle fancy, vain

Kavffai, to

burn.

glory.
Ke<pd\aiov, ov,
tir\

Kaicta, as,

evil.

KaKodaifJtovla, as, (^), evil fortune,

Kt<f>a\aiov, in

(r), the substance; a word.
head.

unhappiness.
KaKooal/ uav,ov,unfortunate,wretched.
L

K6</>oA^, ys, (^), the

Kiv'owos, ov, (d), danger.
tfXai'a', f.

KaKovd6fia, as,

(77), distress,

misery,

K\avo~ofjLat, to wail.

hardship.
Koxoiroi.(<a,
f.

[harm.
Tjtroi,

KvrnjLi\, r>s, (r)~),

the leg.

to

distress,

to

Ko\dfa,

f.

ffo>,

to check, to
(if), flattery.

punish.

Koac6s,

4),

ov,

bad,

evil.

Ko\aKfla, as,

Ka\(w,

KUKWS, adv., badly. f. is w, to call, to name.
f.

Ko\aKevu,
KOfiifa,
f.

f.

era),

to flatter.

<reo,

to

carry
to

;

in mid., to

Ka.\\(airloi,

iau, to

paint the face.
personal deco-

receive again, to recover.
KOfffjitw,
f.

Ka\\uirt.o-fj.6s, ov, (6},

foco,

adorn, to paint
to

ration, especially artificial com-

the face.
ta,
f.

plexion. Ka\oKayaOia, as, (^) , rectitude, honor.
KoArfy, ^, 6v, beautiful, fair, noble.

4j<r,

to

overpower,

conquer.
,

adv.. beautifully, nobly.

,

f.

ov, (4), a precipice. Kptvu, to judge.

82

CEBES TABLET.
1

6vt qualified to judge,
critical; as sub.,

/tteV,

conj. (followed
the one hand.

by S)>

indeed,

a

critic.

on

Kp6vos, ov, (6), Cronus, Saturn.
KTaoyttai,
f.

(ifvToi,

foo/jiai, to

acquire.

fjifvce, f. /j.fvu>,

adv. conj., moreover. to remain.
ov,

KVK\OS, ov, (6),
Kvptevu,
f.

a

circle.

IJLfcros, 77,

middle.

evo-o), to

be lord, to rule.

perd, prep, with gen., with; with
ace., after.
,

KW\VW,

f.

ffw, to

hinder.

KwpvKios,
Kw<p6s,
ii,

a, ov,

Corycian.

(^), repentance.

6v, blunt, deaf.
i,

as, (^), repentance.

adv., until; before a vowel,

A.
\afi0dviD,
f. \r]\l/o/j.ai,

to take. to speak, to

.i],

adv., not;

as conj., that not;
lest,

Xiyu, Aea>, mention.

to choose,

after verbs of fearing,
e',

that,

conj.,
' .
.

andnot, nor yet, neither;
/trjSe,

Xet/iwc, Sivos, (6),
\fifjuavoei8-fis, es,

a meadow.

.

neither

.

.

.

nor.

meadow-like.

Hi)8eis, /njSeyu/o,

pySfv, no one, noth-

\cvr6s,
\ift fa,

-ft,

6v,

gaunt.
plunder.
stone.

ing.
/j.rivv<i>, f.

f.

ffw, to

ffw, to reveal.

\tOos, ov, (6),

a

\ni\Ti\o, fj.rjTp6s,

(^),

a mother.
/caroi
fj.iKp6v,

\ntap6s,

d, 6v,

\oyifffj.6s,

shining, radiant. ov, (<5), reflection, consid-

HiKpos,
little

d,

6v,

small;

by

little.
f.

[member.
to recall, to re-

eration.

ji.vri/jiov(v(a,

fvcrcc,

\6yos, ov, (d), reason, speech, word.
\our6s,
\virfw,
-ft,

p.6vos, y, ov, alone.
),

6v,

remaining.
to

ijs,

(ri),form.
ov,

f.

-ftffu,

pain,

to grieve.

s, it,

musical; as sub., a

\vm),

ris,

(ft),
4s,

pain,

grief.

musician.
poxOripts, d, 6v, wretched, vile.
jj.v6o\oyia, as, (^),

\vffnc\4\s t

profitable.

M.
jua,

adv. of swearing, by.
OTOS,
(T<J),

fable, the significance of

a narration of a a story
a poetical

fj.ddri/j.a.,

learning,

a

or picture.
fivffos, ov,

branch of learning.
/ua07j/xaTiK(Js,
i\, oi>,

(5),

a

legend,

skilled in learn-

story,

an

allegory.

ing; as sub., a scholar.
/j.aivu>, f. /j.avu,

N.
val, adv., truly, really.

to rave.

blessed. fj.aKa.pios, la, ov,
fi.d\a,

adv.,

very,

extremely;
lash.

Kal

vavaytw,

f.

^ffca, to

suffer shipwreck.

/td\o,

in very truth.
(^),

vavs, vt>s, (^),

a

ship.

^t((7Tt{, -yos,

a

vfavlffKos, ov, (d),

a young man.

Heyas, jifydhi],
s,

/xe'^o,

great.
,

vtos, a, ov,

young.

ov,

drunken.

vcds,
irfj,

tti,

(6~),

a

temple.

v,

f. -fiffta.

to intend, to be about.

adv. of swearing, yes. by

-

VOCABULARY.
vindo>,
f.

88

viK'fiffia,

to

conquer.

6p8ws, adv., rightly.
6p/j.d<a,
f.

vlKti, rts, (T)),

victory.

tjerw,

<o

move toward,
out for.

to

viK-n^a, O.TOS, (rd), victory, the

price

strive for, to set
os, %,
'6,

of victory.
vo/j.ifa,
f. lffu>

rel.

(<),

to believe, to

hold

offos,

TJ,

ov, as
tfirep,

pron., who, which, what. great as, as much as.
Sirtp,

as

an
f.

opinion.
be sick.

oo-irtp,

which,

which

vofffpos, d, ov, hurtful, sickening.

same.
SffTis, ?ins,

vofftw,

i]a<a, to
f.

on, whoever, who.
adv., whenever.

voo-oirotfu,
v6ffos, ov,

fiffu, to

cause sickness.

OTCLV, conj.

(^), sickness, disease,

ore, conj.,

when, since (637).

vvv, adv.,

now.
E.

on, conj., that, because.
ov
as
(ou/c,

ovx), adv., not.
adv., in no

ov, adv., vjhere.
ov$af4.<os,

(eVoj,

i),

ov,

strange, foreign;

sub.,

a

manner.
nor yet;
.
.

stranger.
ovSf, conj.,

and

not,
.

oiiSf

O.
6,
fi,

.

.

.

oitde,

neither

nor.

TO, art.,

Me.

[that one.
s^e,

ovSeis, ov8efj.la, oiiSev,

no one, noth-

oat, IfSe, T($3e,

68 6s, ov,
oSvvrj,

dem. pron., Ae, (^), a way, a path.
(^), J^ne/, pain.
(d), lamentation,

ing.
oiiSfTTOTf, adv., never.

rjs,

ovSfTrw, adv., not yet.

6Svp/j.6s, ov,

com-

plaining. SOtr, adv., whence.
oTSa,

no longer. OVKOVV, conj., not then* therefore.
ovKtrt, adv.,
ovv, conj., so, therefore.

2

perf., (o

^now.

ovre, conj.,

and
. .

not; ofoe

.

.

.

ovrt,

oiKijr-fipiov, ov,

ohos,
ofyuai,

ov, (6),
f.

(T), a dwelling. a house.
think.

neither

.

nor.

ovros, avrti, rovro, pron. dem., this,
he, she,
it.

ol^ffof^ai, to

olos, ota, olov,

of which kind.
whole.

oSru(s'), adv., thus.

6\tyos,

rj,

ov, little.

oux(0
oxXf'w,

a(iv., not,

(same as

ou).

8\os,

77,

ov, entire,
TJ,

o<f>f\os, ovs, (T({), use, profit.
f.

6/j.a\6s,
'6/j.otos,

6vt even, smooth.

fiffw,

to

crowd,

to tread.

oia, otov, like.

ox^os,

ov, (<5),

a crowd.
n.

6/j.olws,
Sfitas,

adv., in like

manner.

conj., yet, nevertheless.

owlacD, adv.,

backward, behind.

Ttatdela,

as,

(T^),

education,

disci-

Swot, adv., whither.

pline.
ird\ai, &dv., formerly. ird\tv, adv., back,

ov6ra.v, adv. conj., whenever.
oirov,

adv., where.

again,
of all kinds,

OTWI, adv., whereby, in order that,
that.
Apdte,
f.

vavraxov, adv., everywhere.
iravToSavos,
4\,

ov,

ityo/ucu, ^0 .?<.

irdw, adv., very, altogether.

84

CEBES TABLET.
w,
f.

wapd, prep, with gen., from the side
of;

fitrv, to

make

about,

i*

with

dat., beside;

with

ace.,

form.
jr(puropevo/j.ai,
f.

unto, opposite.
irapayiyvo/jiat,
f.

fvffo/j,ai,

to

go

-ytvfiffOfjLai, to

arrive.

around,
irtpurirdw,
f.

wapa.8i5cu/jLi, f. -Suxru, to deliver.

d<ru, to

draw away.
a circumstance, to run a

irapddoos, ov, unexpected, strange. irapa.ntofj.a.1, f. -fiffofiat, to be entreated

affts,

evs, (^),
f.

exto,

5pa/uoC^a<,

from,

to avoid.
f.

[exhort.
to

around.
irtrpa, as, (ji),
TTsrpeiSrjs, ts,

irapa.Ka\t<o,

wapaKovw,
vain.

f.

encourage, to -aKovyo/jLai, to hear in
fffca,

a

rock,

cliff.

rocky.

iri&av6s,
f.

-fi,

6v,

persuasive, alluring.

Trapa\apl3dvu,
irapa\eiirw,
f.

-X^o/uu,
omit.
to

to receive.

triKpSs, d, 6v, bitter, hateful.

fyw, to
f.
,

irlva%, aKos, (6), to

a board, a
drink.

tablet,

irapa\\drru,

change,

a picture.
trivia, f. wio/jiai, to

avoid, to pass by.
irapair^ffios,
iraparriptta,
f.

ot>,

near, like,
to

iriffTcvw,

f. f.

tru, to trust.
T\au>,

-fiffta,

watch eagerly.

ir\ava<a,
ceive.

to

wander,

to de-

irapaxpy/J-a, adv.,

irdpepyos,

ov,

straightway, secondary, subordi[lessly.

ir\dvos, ov, (<5), error, deceit.

nate,

irXdrrw,

f.

ffw, to

form,

to

mould.

irapfpyus,
Trapfpxofiat,

adv.,
f.

slightingly,

care-

TlXdruv, ovos, (6), Plato.
irKtKta,
f.

-f\ev<rofj.at, to

iraplffTiifj.1, f.

-yrl\ffw, to

pass by. stand by.

|CD, to

entwine, to embrace.

ir\ij0os, ovs, (T 6), fulness,
irXoi/Tea),
f. i]ffta,

multitude.

.

Uap/jieviSeios, a, ov,

Parmenidean.
to experience, to

to be rich.

iras, travel, irav, every, all.

wKovros,
Tror,

ov, (6), wealth, riches.
f

irdffxw,

f-

iT(iffo/j.ai,

adv., whither
f. -fiffta,

suffer.
velOto,
f.

iroifu,
itflffca,

to

make,

to do.

to

persuade;

raid.,

irotTjT^s, ov, (6),

a poet.
off as sub.,

to obey.
ireiQA, ovs, (^),

TroFos, oia, o'tov,

what kind

persuasion.

TToXe/xios, la, lov, hostile;

an

jTtipdv,

f.

dffu, to attempt,

enemy.
*6\is,
irtpas, at
tots, (T>),
-ft,

irevla, as, (^),
IT f

poverty.

a

city,

a

state.

pas, ros, (r6),
last.

end; rb

*o\i.rtK6s,

6v,

pertaining

to

a

city.

TroXXa/ftj, adv., often,

many

times.

irepl,

around, about,
f.

iro\\air\dffios, ov,

manifold.

irtpidyw,

{,

to

lead about.

iro\vs, iroXX^, iro\v,

wtplfto\os, ov,
circuit.

(4),

an

enclosure,

a

V&IJM, ros, (TO),

many, much. a drink.
carry; in pass..

voviipSs, d, 6v, evil, wicked,
f.

vtpiirarew,

fata, to
ov,

npMrarjTjK(k,
philosopher.

walk about. (&"), a Peripatetic

iroptvo!,

f.

fvffu, to

to

proceed.
,

ever, once.

VOCABULARY.
wfoepos, epa, fpov, which of the two f irorepov, -TJ, whether ...or; v6rty,

86
wvoi, (d), <Ae tower o/ <A tAe gateway.

^rate,

pov ovv, pray, then.
xorfipiov, ov, (TO*),

TTWJ, adv.,

Aow /

;Ay
P.

.'

irorlfa,

f.

(<rw,

cup. to give drink.
pdfidos, ov, (if),
[esty.
1

a

iroT&v, ov, (TO*), drink.

a

staff,

irpay/Aa, TO*, (TO*),

a

deed.

pdnos, owj, (T<$),
p'fjTtap,

irpaoVTjs, TITOS, (^), mifoJness,

moa

-

opos,

a rag. (o), a speaker, a pro
to

trpdrru,
to

f.

,

to (to

;

KO.KUS irpdrrw,

fessional teacher of oratory,

fare badly.

pivrw,

f.

(J/a>,

throw, to hurl.

xpeo-frvTris, ov, (d),

an

a^ec?

man.

pvTrap6s, d, 6v, filthy.

Tpo", prep., before.

w/>oj3aXXa>,

f.

-aAa>,

to t/irow; out, to
ai\p.alvo!,
f.

S.
aj/w, to

propound.
wpoSltiw/jLt,
f.

point out,

to

st<j>-

-Stacru,

to

give up, to

ni/y.
v, ov,

betray.
w/wS^TTjs,
traitor.
ov,

(re ), a

1

sigrn,

an emblem,

(6), a

betrayer,

a

i,

f.

^oyua, to ezawiine.

ffK\rip6s, d, 6v,
*'

*7>o^x
n-poOv/jiws,

to prefer, to excel.

ffKoretvds,
o~o(pta, as,
aifa.v(a>s,

(],

ov,

hard, rough. dark.

adv., eagerly, zealously.

(^), wisdom.

vp9irv\atov, ov, (rJ),
irp6s,

a

vestibule.

adv., seldom, sparingly.
aia,

prep., near, at, toward, unto.
f.

ffirovtiatos,

euov, earnest,

excel-

Tpo<r5t'xo,ucu,
ir/>oo-/x

-S{o/iat, <o accept.
^

lent.

w

f-

''.

direct, to apply,

<TT(v6s,

i^,

ov,

narrow.

to attend.
irpoffKaTaffatvoi,
f.

ffTtcpavos, ov, (6),
-jS^trojuai,

a crown.
to

<0

aV-

ffrf<pavow,
ffro^-f), ijs,

f.

<affa>,

crown.

scenc?/or.
irpoffopdw,
wpoffiroifQ),
f.
f.

(^),

a

robe.

-ttyojttai,

^0 /'"/.

upon.
pro-

ffrpaToireSov, ov, (T($),

a camp.

^o-w, to claim, to

ffrpoyyv\os,
(TV,

r],

ov,

round.

fess.
irpoffirwOoLvofjiat,
f.

pro. pers., thou.
f.

-irt&rojuai, to in-

o-vKo<pavT({ii,

f)ff<a,

to

accuse falsely
to

quire further.
Ttp6ffra.yp.a, ros,

o-vp&aivca,

f. -0-fiffOfj.at,

accompany,
belong
to.

(r6} t

an

injunction,

to follow, to befall, to

a command.
irpmrdTTta,
f.

o-vfj.0d\\w,

f.

{w, to enjoin upon.

gether, to

gather toapprehend, to conduce
to live with.

Pa\u,

to

itp6<r<airov ) ov,

(rd), countenance.

to contribute.
ff\ifj.&i6<a, f. uaofj.a.1,

wpA-rtpos, (pa., epov,

former.

vpovirdpxu,f. (w, topossesspreviously.
irptoros,
TI,

ffvu.x\tK<a,

f.

{,

to

tunne together

;

ov, first.

ia mid., to embrace.
(Tvfja^epta,
it
f.

UvQayopetos, a, or, Pythagorean.
TJS,

ffwotffta, to serve;
;

(n), a

jrate.

profits

rek <r

,

as imp., the useful.

86
ffvvavrdu,
f.

CEBES TABLET.
1

V<"

to encounter.

rrvvfifu, f. -eVo/xat, to be

with, to asso-

a place. r6rt, adv., then, at that time.
TOTTOS, ov, (i),
i,
s>

ciate with, to congregate.
ffvvlri/Mi,
f.
-fiffw,

ov, (5),
v,

a banker.
to

to

put
to

together, to

ex>

rough, harsh.

comprehend.
trvviffTrifj.i, f. -0Trj<rctf,

Tpi/3a>,

f.

^w, to rub,

wear away,
[manner,
disposition,

introduce.

to beat.

o~vvo\os,

rj,

ov, all together.
f.
fiffia,

rpiros,

-n,

ov, third.

ffvvofniKfw,
S,

to associate.

rpoiros, ov, (6),

a turn,
to

|, 2<t>iyy6s,

adv., briefly, speedily. the Sphinx, a fabled

TVYx&vte,

f.

Tfv^ofj.a.1,

chance, to

happen,

to obtain,

monster.
fftify,
f. ff<!>ffu>,

rvpavvis, loos, sovereignty, despotism.
to save, to rescue
;

in

rvtf>\6s,

-f],

oV) blind.

pass., to arrive safely.
0-wfj.a,

T5xJ,

W,

(ft, fortune.
T.

TOS,

(T),
TJS,

the body.

o-uQpoo-vvy,

(ft,

temperance,
vftpifa,
f.

courtesy.
T.
ra\alirtt>pos, ov,

lo-u, to insult.

vyialvu, avS>, to be in health.
vyleia, as, (?)), health.

wretched, miserable,
to trouble, to disturb,

vyifivos,

ii,

ov,

healing.
to begin, to

rapd-rru,

f. {o>,

virdpxw,

f.

{>

belong;

rapax'fli ys> (ft, trouble, confusion.

TO virdpxovra, goods.
inrtpij<t>dveta, as,

Tf, conj.,

raxfus, adv., swiftly, quickly. and; re ... Kai, both

(ft, pride.
gen., under,

.

.

.

inr6,

prep, with
dat.,

by;
ace.,

and.
TtKvov, ov, (T<{), a child.
rep.v(a,
f.

with
Tf/J.w, to cut.

under;
to

with

toward, beneath.
irrrodfx<>nai,
f.

|o/*(u,

receive,

to

uvos, ov, four-angled, square.
,

welcome.
inro\afj.0dv<e,
f.

f.

0-fio~o>>

to set, to deposit.

-\^if o/ua, to take

un-

co, f.

TiXw, to pluck out.
Ttyu^o-co, to
f.
'fiffoi,

der protection.
inrofj.fv<a, f. -fievw, to

utta,

f.

honor,

to prize.

abide, to endure,

jiwpeu,

to

punish.

to

submit.
"ft,

fo, as,

(^), retribution.

fyri\6s,

ov, high.

rls, T(,

pron. interr.,

whof which f
[tain one.
<palva>,
f.

what f
rls, r\,

#.
<t>av&, to

pron. indef., any one, a cer-

seem, to appear.

roi, verily.

<pav\os, bad, wicked,
fytpw,
f.

roiyapovv, conj., so then, for then,
surely.
rolvvv, then, further.

offfoa, to
f.

bear, to carry.
to flee.
adj.,
to

<t>fvyw,

(f>fvo/ui.ai,

<t>fvKr6s,

fa

4v>

verb,

be

TOIOVTOS,

atJrrj,

ovro,

of that kind,

shunned.
(, f.

of such character.

<pt)o-u>,

to say, to affirm.

VOCABULARY.
(pddvw,
f.

87
>

<p(M}ffo/j.ai,

to

get before, to
[tance.

X

'P>

x flP& s
f.

(^)> th

hand.

anticipate.
<t>06vos, ov, (6),

X<>pAs, ov, (6),

a chorus.
to use.

envy, grudge, reluc-

Xpao/xai,

fiffo/j.ai,

<pt\apyvpla, as, (?j), avarice.
<f>i\dpyvpos, ov, avaricious.
<tn\oTl/*.a>s,

Xpfotnos, ov, useful.
Xpovos, ov, (6), time.

&dv., jealously, extremely.
to fear.

V.
tytyu,
f.

<f>of3to(j.ai, f. iiffofjun,

{&>, io

ipoprlov,

ov,

(r^), a

burden, mer-

'VevSoSo^ia, as,

blame, to reproach. (^), False Opinion.

chandise.
a, f. <ru>,

VevSoiraiSfia, a.s,(ji),false discipline.
to say, to

explain.

f<a, f. 'fiffw,
<pp6vt.fj.os,

to think, to reflect.

n
"n, &, oh!

ov, wise,

<pv(ris, ecus,

prudent. (^), nature, natural

0!
conj., so, thus, as; that,

dis-

3>Se,

adv., thus, here.

position.
(peavfi, ijs,

us, adv.

and

(^), a sound, a language.

so that, because,
wffavel, adv.,

<t>ws,

<p<ar6s,.(r6), light.

as

if.

waavrus, adv., similarly.
X.
X^po>>
f-

&a"!Tp, adv., just as.
Sio-re,

foca, to rejoice.
i],

conj., so that, consequently,
f.

vnXt-n-os,

ov,

hard, grievous.

wtpfhfw,

fi<To>,

to aid, to serve.

vos, ov, (6),

a

bridle.
roll.

a<j>f\tfjios, ov,

serviceable, useful.

ns, ov, (<J),

paper, a

APPENDIX
OF IMPORTANT VARIANTS AND EMENDATIONS.

represents the best Paris manuscript B, C, and D represent inferior Paris manuscripts represents a reading of Meibomius V, the Vatican manuscript.
; ;

A

M

;

The

title

which adds rjft<uov, the reading, A has no inscription.
1.

stands Ke/fyros Uivat; in all manuscripts save 0, also, of Odazius' version.

For Kpovov C has

^Xibv.

3.

C has

ei/e/ceiTO

for dve/cciro.

28.

A

has TroAvxpoviWos, which Schweighauser judged to

be shortened from TroAvxpiwrepov. 42. Drosihn suspects -mKpol KO.L

ap.a.0ei<; to be a gloss coming The into the text from a marginal note explaining amoves. words are superfluous, but all manuscripts contain them.

54. The manuscripts have KaOdircp ol Im. Ti/iwpia StSo/xevot, which seems to anticipate the introduction of rt/Awpta in a

similar expression in 185.

who
97.

she

is,

As the guest only then (186) asks the words mentioned are properly rejected by
favors eratpuiv, but the version

Drosihn.

The manuscript evidence

of

Elichmann has "diversarum mulierum."

114. OTTOI av rvxn is the reading approved by Schweighauser, but omitted by Drosihn as a mere gloss. has orroi av rv^ot,

A

though TVXH

is

the correct form.

While Drosihn's objection

APPENDIX.
that the

89
ewd/ is well

words are a repetition of

urged, there

seems on the other hand to be no warrant for rejecting them. 116. After rts the words ai /xa^ofiei/^ are added by the These words clearly belong in 119. If they manuscripts.
are placed here, dAAa in 119 should come after fi.aivofj.evr). 132. 6 Se o^Xos TWV ai0p<a7T<av, 6 TroAus OUTOS (M), 6 Se rS>v
a^Aos, 6 TroAus ouros (A), 6 8e o^Aos 6 TroAus OUTOS As in lines (B, D), 6 Se ran/ avOpwrrw TroAvs o^Aos ovros (C). 10, 15, 69, etc., o^Aos is used without TCDV avdpuirw, and, as it
ai'OpwTTLov

means
187.

"

a crowd of men," the unnecessary words are omitted
Odaxius'
version

as in Drosihn.

has

"

quandam
rv)(r}

veluti

bestiolam,"

mistaking

QupLov for Oqpiov.
fjirj

206. 'Eai/
avTy<ra.<ra.

ri

Merai/oia avrw airo

IK 7rpoaipe<rea>s (ruv-

(A).

Drosihn thinks

CK TrpoatpeVews to

be a gloss

by some Christian. The reading given in the text It is not altogether is one proposed by Johnson (Jerram). but the passage seems hopelessly corrupt. Other satisfactory,
inserted

manuscripts have euro 1-775 TV^S or OLTTO ru;c;s. 211. All editions and manuscripts have the words
emdvfuav after Ao'av.
lead

*ai

men

the ground that 'E7n0ufu'a cannot to True Learning, Drosihn brackets the words as

On

out of place here, and Jerram rejects them from the text. As lin&vp.ia has not a bad meaning necessarily, I have not thought it necessary to remove the words.

Jerram, following Miiller, gives owe, a very happy emendation, though no Greek manuscript has the word. " Elichmann, however, has Minime, inquit, non habent," etc. 246. I have thought best to bracket the text, as I have
serious

236.

They

are

doubts respecting the genuineness of these words. found in all existing manuscripts and versions.

A, D and Meibomius' edition have TrepwrariKoi', which reading Schweighatiser saw fit to adopt and dofend, on the ground that TrepiVaTos, in Socrates' time, not only designated the place of philosophical discussions, but also the discussion

90

CEBES' TABLET.

itself (Aristophanes' Frogs, 942). I think, however, that we are forced either to a rejection of the word or to a denial of

the Socratic inspiration of the Tabula. 289. A, only, has TWO..
314.

See Introduction.

e/t<otV is the reading of all manuscripts, and proba contraction. (Drosihn.) ably " 330. Odaxius' version has indiscretam aetatem," another

curious mistake.

The manuscripts have this reading with <rro\r)v and and some have re before icot. This oiTrXrjv interchanged, awkward linking of a noun and an adjective is avoided by
331.

Jerram's suggestion adopted in the text.

Drosihn has Wolf's
"
is

emendation of
ciently plain.

"
d/caAAwTrMr/AoV.

Simplex munditiis

suffi-

407.
TroiKiXu)

Drosihn retains the beautiful reading of Meibomius, for KoXw (A), or KoAGs, which is contained in the
manuscripts.

other

Odaxius

has

"

corona

florentissima

must be -n-porepov A ends, and dependence on inferior manuscripts for the remaining chapters. placed 434. B, C, and D have <rre</>avow, which Jerram receives. Simpson, Schweighaiiser, and Drosihn have ore^avovo^cu from
the Vulgate. 447. ol Sk, B, C,
482.

eleganter." 431. With

D Irepoi &, M. " a All manuscripts have (xi68r)KToi. Odaxius has morsi aliquando fuerint," which must mean that a vipera person so bitten was held to be unharmed by future attacks.
;

Caselius serpent-hunters." Casaubon, exiosuggested o^toyevet?, adopted by Drosihn.

Salmasius approved

"

Ixt-oOrjpoi,

SfiKTai, serpent-exhibitors.

Coraes, cxt-oXtKrai,

serpent-collec-

tors; Schneider, extoS^rot, serpent-charmers. thu reference is to a tribe in the Hellespont,

Drosihn thinks

who were com-

monly believed to be impregnable to danger from serpents. This people is described by Pliny in his natural history
C7. 2).

See also Strabo.

APPENDIX.
Manuscripts emendation.
498.

91
This
is

485.

have

TOVTO.

Schweighaiiser's
"
"

Manuscripts omit OVK, which in Elichmann.
518.
Aauo-tv

is

supplied from

neque

and four other manuscripts, have airoThe text is a reading of Meibomius, pzyivTwv ayaOuv.
V, B,
0, D,
T/aoTru to T/JOTTOV,

his generally adopted, changing

the reading

of all manuscripts.

554.

B, D, and

V
is

have

ctyTTj/rous,

which

lo-ous before yiymr&u, in place of Wolf's conjecture only, and generally is
.

adopted.
585.
548,

has ^TTOUS, which
Kal
. .

worse.

Drosihn brackets

/^Se'v as

an interpolation from

adding that " nullum certe in pinace exemregarded as a parenthesis, plum invenitur talis parenthesis," which seems to be no valid
if

and a disturbing element

in the sentence,

objection.

616. V, B, and D have the same reading as the text. C, with Meibomius, reads rrjv <f><avr)v aKpt/Jeore/oav x ll/ "" Tt <rw>;/caju,ev, an unclassical use of av.
>

618.
res."

Manuscripts all lack has KoAu<r.

/StArt'ovs.

Odaxius gives "melio-

645. All manuscripts have a lacuna here arising from the fact that the eyes of the scribe wandered from the first ort ev r<S ircpiftoXu to the second, so that the sentence reads
:

7T/3CUTO)

TTpl(36\.W,

fl

/AT/So/

aXXo

8'

TTpOCTTrOLOVVTai

y

fTTiCTTa(r0aL

OVK

oiSao-iv.

The

correction

was made from the text of Odax-

ius, Schweighauser not placing the corrected form in his text, but satisfying himself by indicating it in his notes. The

supplied words in this text are Drosihn's. 666. fvSoetv, C evSoia/mv, B, D.
;

689.

aurw TO

TTV,

D

;

avro TO

>/v,

C.

V

is

repetitious

and

corrupt. 744. eTrop.evw<s, manuscripts mann 's version.

;

vrro/xevowi, Miiller,

from ElichIt

745.

Jerram drops Ta

ato-xpoVaTa as an unusual form.

92
seems better to retain

CEBES' TABLET.
it

to

supplement
in

TO.

do-e/Se'oraTa.

Xen.

Anab.
747. 761.
763.

II. 5, 20.

ayvoiav

is

the last

word

manuscript C.
TO.

TW

auT<3 is Schweighaiiser's conjecture.
is

avra, B, D.
for

a/xa

another conjecture

of

Schweighatiser's

<iAAa (B, D).

INDEX".

t,

17.

Daemon, of
Wl, 72.

Socrates, 14.

tt^TTTJTOJ, 91.

euVxp^rara, an
tive, 91.

unusual superla-

Dialectics, 16.

Dio Chrysostom, resemblances
Tablet to

in

iAArf, 74.
&v, double,

characters in

a dis-

72

;

with

infinitive, 61.

course

cf, 17.

avavytptiv, 18.
6Li>a.Qr\u.a.Ta,

Drosihn, editor of Tablet, 15, 16, 17,
Preface.
Svvafj.is,

68.

a.vd.KfifM.1,

68.

as medical term, 71.

avTupdppaKov, a non-Attic word, 17;
significance
of, 73.
,

17.
6.

Arabic paraphrase of Toilet,
'AffTpo\6yot, 71.

5.

Editions of Tablet,
el*", 71.

Aristippus, a Greek philosopher, 16. of
Jto&Zei

flvov, 73.

Authorship
11-18.

discussed,

tKirorfiffzt,

70. Tablet,

Elichmann, translator of
5,7.

/3ow(J.>,

Boeotian sub-dialect, 18. introduced by Herodotus,
71.

ts,
,

meaning

of, 68.

allegorical use, 17.

evTuS, 17.

Bunyan

utilized Tablet, 5, 17,

68

j,

73.

w,
Cebes, author of Tablet, 12, 13.

62.

Choice "f Hercules, 17. Coraes, editor of Tablet, 7.

viKol, 13.

Corycian cave.,

73.

,

17.

Cronos, god of time, 68.

False Learning,
s,

9.
8.

70.

Forttuv, a bliiid woman,

&a(uuv, 70.
y,

corrupted meaning

of,

68.

Horace, quotation from, 68.

94

CEBES' TABLET.
Parmenides, a philosopher, 14,
Perfoct tense,
irepnra.TT}TiKi,i,

Imperfect tense, with meaning of
pr sent, 70.

69.

meaning
15, 1C.

o.',

62.

Jerram, edition of Tablet by,

8.

itiplaTa.Gis, 74.

Philolaus, teacher of Cebes, 17.

Kfvo8oia, allegorical term, 17.
KtKpifJL/JLfVOS,

</>:Aorf/is,

derived meaning

of, 71.

71.

KptriKot, 15.

Lacuna, in Tablet, 91. Late words in Tablet,
Latin versions,
5.

Plato, the philosopher, 12. Plato's Orito, 12. " Epistles (pseudo), 12. "

Laws,

14, 15.

17.

" " " "

Lysis, 14. Meno, 14.

Learning, False, 9. True, 1
Litotes, 65.

Parmenides, 69.

'.

Phaedo, 12, 15,
Protagoras, 14.

73.

"

Lucian, mention of Ccbes by, 12.

Prodicus, apologue of, 17. Pythagoras, the philosopher, 14, 69.

Manuscripts of Tablet,
72, 73.

6.

Memorabilia, Xonophon's, 12,
MerajueAeta, 74.

13,

Riddle of the Sphinx, 69.

Schweighauser, edition
Socrates, 16, 73.

of, 7.

Meidvoia, 74.

Sc^ratic
VIKO.W,

principles of

Tablet,

13,

construction

of, 72.

14, 18.

Suidas, a description of Tablet by,
aitiau),

construction

of,

17

11.

ovtcovv, 74.

0V

yUTJ,

59.

Xenophon, Anabasis of, Memorabilia
72, 73.

70, 72.
of, 12, IS,

PRESSWORK BY GINN

&

Co., BOSTON.

DATE DUE

PBINTEDINU.S.A.

GAYLORD

A 000714180

7

186

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