of 8

College Method of Writing

Published on June 2016 | Categories: Types, Instruction manuals | Downloads: 14 | Comments: 0
873 views

a better and faster way to write college essays

Comments

Content

College Method of  Writing 
a faster and more efficient way of writing  essays 

 
 brought to you by Free Testbank 

Intro 
Writing college essays is mostly bullshit. If you’re in an English class, than your  professor is grading you on how well you can follow directions. However, if you’re  in an elective class than your essay will be graded on domain knowledge. This  guide is focused on how to write “A‐grade” papers for your English classes, think  freshman level composition, literature classes, etc.   This guide is not for everyone and is intended to help freshman get better grades  in composition class, while getting their essays done as quickly as possible.  Background  When I was a little freshman, my first college class was composition. Thinking I  was a talented writer, I spent most of the time developing my thoughts and doing  proper research and then spending the proper time making sure those ideas were  communicated properly to my professor. My first essays got B’s. After some help  from the writing center on campus, a graduate student finally shared with me a  little tip “your professor is going to grade you backwards on how many mistakes  you make, you should spend more time on making sure your grammar and form is  correct”.  This tip is what helped me develop this method and worked very well for  me until I wrote a paper on chauvinism for a feminist professor, which is another  story all together. 

The Process 
Research  Find your sources and turn them into usable quotes  Organize  Put your quotes in a logical order, organized as main points  Develop  Write around your quotes and develop your essay  Finish  Add any finishing touches and double‐check your quality

Research 
1. Finding your sources  a. If your professor directly gives you the sources for your essay, go ahead and  skip to step 2.  b. If you are supposed to do your own research, then following directions (ex.  If you need three database sources) find appropriate sources.   Tip: When doing research this is my hierarchy for sources  “Peer‐edited” journals  School databases  Newspaper articles (online or offline)  Books  Websites  Tip: Wikipedia is a great source to get ideas from, but not to quote as a source  2. Quoting your sources  Read through your sources, scouring for important quotes that take a side.  Personally when I do it I look for what seems to be the easiest side to take either  the positive or negative and then skim only for quotes that support that side (even  if I don’t necessarily agree with them). Copy and paste or write the quotes into a  word document like so:    Ex. “Free Testbank is the best testbank out there.” (http://kiwigrove.com) 

Make sure in parenthesis to include your source, also depending on how your  citing your sources, Chicago, MLA, etc. make you include paragraph number,  author, or whatever you need to.   Tip: If you don’t know how to cite sources in your format properly, google it, ask  your professor, or even look it up in your composition book. 

Organize 
1. Organize your quotes  Let’s do some math. Figure out how long you want your paper to be, in example,  five pages. With this method ~3‐4 paragraphs make up a page on Times New  Roman, 12 point font, double‐spaced. Each quote we get is going to turn into it’s  own paragraph. On a five page paper we need 20 – 2 (the introduction and  conclusion don’t need the quotes), so 18 quotes. Group these quotes into main  points or overlying ideas to make it easier on you.  Make sure in your word document you started that you have that many quotes.  Now organize them in a logical sense that you feel you can string together. We  now have a barebones paper.  2. Write your thesis  Most professors are going to tell you to start with the thesis, as it is the most  important part of your paper. They are right that it is the most important part, but  you should do the research first because you need knowledge of the topic your  going to write about BEFORE you make a judgment and write a paper about it.   Look at your quotes and see the natural argument that they make.  Take this and  form it in your own words to an overlying assumption. In example, if you have  quotes supporting gay marriage and your quotes hit on the topics of human rights,  adopting kids, and existing laws a good thesis might be:  Gay marriage should be legalized because it should be protected by the bill  of rights, couples could adopt kids that otherwise would not find a home,  and there are already existing laws that conflict with our national system.   Your goal is to write a statement that is strong in the sense that you either  completely agree or completely disagree and that your statement can be proven  with your underlying points.  Put your thesis as the first thing on your paper and let’s move on. 

Develop 
Now your paper should be a thesis statement with quotes under it, here is where  the magic happens. You are going to expand your quotes in to paragraphs almost  instantly. When writing an essay most of your time is spent “thinking about what  comes next” by eliminating this and sticking to a logical flow, we can write faster  and more concisely.  1. Open for your quote. Use a quick sentence to introduce the quote and put  it into the context of your paper.  2. Embed your quote, chop a piece off and write some in your own words or  add a bit to make it say exactly what you want it to say.  3. Explain the significance of the quote, in high school they want you to be  able to find information, in college they want you to explain why the  information is important. The next sentence after your quote, in your own  words, describes why it is important.   4. Transition to the next paragraph. Find a way to connect the two thoughts  together.  Overall a paragraph is going to look like this:  A similar problem rises again when Rivoli discusses the unintended  consequences of Congress’ legislation that intends to support American  jobs. The specific example is “that of CBTPA and that “this “yarn forward”  requirement actually often handicaps American yarn spinners, who are  discouraged from both exporting their yarn to the Caribbean and from  shifting production to more cost‐efficient locations.” (143) If the legislation  we are passing is not even helping, than why do we waste time in the first  place? The time and money wasted on preserving obsolete jobs could easily  be used to educate and fund educational programs for displaced workers.  What is hard for me to understand is that we know it is an uphill battle that  cannot be won, and yet like the habitual lottery player we always think we  can beat the impossible odds.  Actual example from one of my A papers for International Politics (Senior  level course)  Follow this process for the rest of your quotes. With this format you should be  spending less time thinking and more time writing.   The example paragraph is from a book review in International Politics. It was a  nine page paper that I read a 400 page book, well more like skimmed, and wrote a  twelve page paper in less than five hours.   

Finish 
Here are a few tips that should help you finish your paper and make it A‐quality  Introduction   When writing your introduction, you want to use a story. Go back to your sources  and find a story you can summarize in less than three sentences and put it before  your thesis. Now you can simply connect your story to your thesis and be done  with it. You do this to give your thesis context and use the story to show why your  thesis is relevant.   Conclusion  Your conclusion should restate your entire paper. Use an introduction sentence re‐ explaining why your paper is significant or refer to the story in your introduction.  Then restate each of your main points in one sentence. Finally, restate your thesis  in different words.  Bibliography  Use http://easybib.com for your bibliography page to make it as easy as possible  for you.  Formatting  Do not worry about formatting until the very end of the paper. It is much easier to  use the select all tool, and format the entire paper than to continually edit the  paper as your going along.   Writing Center  If your campus has a writing center, use it. My grammar is terrible and used to be  even worse. By knocking out a paper in an hour or so and then taking it in to the  writing center, I saved myself having to go from rough draft to final paper. Just  talked to a graduate student who knew how to use semi‐colons and learned a good  amount in the process. Just make sure when you go to bring your laptop and make  the changes while you are going through the paper. This will save you even more  time and energy. 

Conclusion 
By spending the twenty minutes or so to read this and apply it you will save your  self many hours of writing useless papers your freshman year.   If you want to save even more time look for your notes, exams, and other student’s  essays at http://FreeTestbank.com   About the author  Alex Baldwin is a co‐founder of FreeTestbank.com and an undergraduate student.  He got a B in his first freshman composition class because of a feminist professor  and lack of writing skills from high school. He loves to drink tea, canoe, make  websites, and frat hard.  You can e‐mail him suggestions for this guide at  [email protected]  

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close