of x

Comprehensive School Counseling Program

Published on May 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 13 | Comments: 0
193 views

This is a sample of a comprehensive school counseling program that I designed in the fall of 2011. The program is evidence based and includes an appendix section with NAEP school report information, a parent newsletter, and a brochure for the program.

Comments

Content

THE
 WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM A
 Comprehensive
 Model
 For
 Change Perry
 Dripps
 
 


 


 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 
  INTRODUCTION
  In
 2006,
 ABC
 news
 show
 20/20
 created
 a
 news
 documentary
 entitled,
  “Stupid
 In
 America:
 How
 We
 Cheat
 Our
 Kids.”
 The
 question
 presented
 in
 the
 

2
 
 


 


 

documentary
 was,
 “Are
 America’s
 school
 systems
 failing?”
 Responses
 varied
 greatly
  among
 parents,
 teachers,
 students,
 and
 school
 administrators.
 While
 students
  claimed
 they
 were
 learning
 nothing
 in
 their
 classrooms,
 teachers
 remained
  complacent
 about
 their
 abilities
 as
 educators.
 
  Results
 however
 from
 statewide
 standardized
 achievement
 tests
 such
 as
 the
  Massachusetts
 Comprehensive
 Assessment
 System
 (MCAS)
 make
 it
 clear
 that
  schools
 are
 failing.
 The
 implementation
 of
 No
 Child
 Left
 Behind
 (NCLB)
 in
 2001
  made
 federal
 funding
 dependent
 on
 student
 performance.
 Thus,
 school
 systems
  have
 become
 increasingly
 under
 pressure
 to
 close
 the
 achievement
 gap
 for
 a
 very
  diverse
 group
 of
 students
 (Dollarhide
 &
 Lemberger,
 2006).
 
  School
 counseling
 programs
 utilize
 empirical
 data
 and
 evidence
 based
  programs
 in
 order
 to
 help
 students
 overcome
 barriers
 that
 affect
 learning.
 Race,
  poverty,
 and
 low
 parental
 involvement
 (Lee
 &
 Bowen,
 2006),
 along
 with
 poor
  physical
 health
 (Efrat,
 2011),
 are
 just
 a
 few
 of
 the
 many
 barriers
 that
 lead
 students
  to
 poor
 academic
 outcomes.
 School
 counselors
 are
 working
 in
 collaboration
 with
  teachers,
 administrators,
 and
 members
 of
 their
 surrounding
 communities
 to
  address
 these
 issues.
  School
 environments
 have
 also
 become
 more
 violent
 (Song
 &
 Stoiber,
 2008).
  Research
 identifies
 a
 lack
 of
 accountability
 in
 addressing
 this,
 which
 poses
 a
 clear
  threat
 to
 students’
 social
 and
 emotional
 development
 (Reinke
 et
 al.,
 2011).
 With
 the
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  rise
 of
 digital
 media,
 technology,
 and
 the
 ever-­‐expanding
 breadth
 of
 information
  available,
 students
 must
 also
 navigate
 an
 increasingly
 complex,
 and
 often
 violent,
  environment
 (Byrne,
 2009).
 Fortunately,
 many
 barriers
 can
 be
 overcome
 with
 the
  help
 of
 a
 comprehensive
 coordinated
 school
 counseling
 program.
 

3
 
 


 


 

The
 following
 is
 a
 framework
 for
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
 at
 The
 West
  Tisbury
 School,
 a
 rural
 public
 K-­‐8
 institution
 in
 Massachusetts.
 West
 Tisbury
 School
  requires
 systemic
 changes
 to
 address
 issues
 in
 achievement,
 school
 bullying,
  obesity,
 and
 the
 media
 literacy
 issues
 aforementioned.
 
  THE
 COMPREHENSIVE
 COORDINATED
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  Schmidt
 defines
 the
 comprehensive
 and
 coordinated
 school
 counseling
  program
 as,
 “An
 orchestrated
 program
 of
 responsive
 services
 and
 activities
 that
  compliment
 the
 instructional
 program
 of
 the
 school”
 (Schmidt,
 2008,
 p.
 55).
 These
  programs
 address
 student
 development
 in
 three
 domains:
 educational,
 career,
 and
  personal/social.
 By
 creating
 a
 program
 that
 is
 developmental
 in
 theory
 and
  preventative
 in
 practice,
 school
 counselors
 can
 lead
 students
 in
 becoming
 successful
  contributors
 to
 society.
 
  In
 the
 past,
 restructuring
 school
 programs
 has
 been
 carried
 out
 in
 a
 two-­‐ component
 (Instructional
 and
 Management)
 model
 (Adelman
 &
 Taylor,
 2002).
 This
  framework
 addressed
 various
 ways
 to
 improve
 student
 learning,
 but
 school
  counselors
 largely
 managed
 programs
 with
 a
 disjointed
 array
 of
 services
 that
 were
  not
 properly
 accounted
 for
 (Adelman
 &
 Taylor,
 2002).
 In
 their
 recent
 model,
  Adelman
 and
 Taylor
 (2002)
 have
 added
 a
 third
 Enabling
 component.
 Enabling
  utilizes
 an
 interconnected
 continuum
 of
 school
 and
 community
 resources
 to
 help
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  students
 overcome
 a
 variety
 of
 barriers,
 which
 has
 been
 done
 in
 response
 to
 NCLB
  (Adelman
 &
 Taylor,
 2002).
 These
 resources
 vary
 in
 need
 and
 cost
 for
 individual
  students
 and
 can
 be
 categorized
 in
 the
 following
 three
 interconnected
 systems.
 

4
 
 


 


 

These
 are
 1)
 Systems
 for
 positive
 development
 and
 systems
 of
 prevention
 (low
 end
  need/low
 cost
 programs
 such
 as
 parental
 involvement),
 2)
 Systems
 of
 early
  intervention
 (moderate
 need/moderate
 cost
 programs
 such
 as
 providing
 shelter
 for
  students)
 and
 3)
 Systems
 of
 care
 (high
 end
 need/high
 cost
 programs
 such
 as
 special
  education)
 (Adelman
 &
 Taylor,
 2002).
 Programs
 that
 utilize
 all
 three
 components
  (Instructional,
 Management,
 and
 Enabling)
 help
 students
 improve
 in
 their
  educational,
 career,
 and
 personal/social
 domains.
  With
 such
 a
 wide
 range
 of
 issues
 facing
 schools
 and
 their
 counseling
  programs,
 school
 counselors
 require
 a
 guide
 to
 help
 them
 strategically
 implement
 a
  curriculum
 that
 facilitates
 student
 progress.
 The
 American
 School
 Counseling
  Association
 (ASCA)
 has
 created
 a
 national
 model
 that
 is,
 “Comprehensive
 in
 scope,
  preventative
 in
 design
 and
 developmental
 in
 nature”
 (ACSA,
 2005,
 p.
 13).
 The
 ASCA
  model
 has
 been
 created
 to
 provide
 counselors
 with
 a
 reliable
 framework
 to
 help
  them
 develop
 more
 effective
 programs.
  The
 model
 is
 divided
 into
 four
 major
 systems:
 Foundation,
 Delivery,
  Management,
 and
 Accountability.
 The
 Foundation
 describes
 what
 students
 should
  know
 and
 will
 “be
 able
 to
 do”
 with
 the
 program
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 22).
 This
 begins
  with
 establishing
 the
 beliefs
 and
 philosophy,
 which
 are
 outlined
 in
 an
 all-­‐ encompassing
 mission
 statement.
 The
 mission
 establishes
 a
 vision
 for
 the
 school
 to
  adhere
 by.
 These
 competencies,
 goals,
 and
 skills
 are
 then
 linked
 with
 the
 ASCA
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  National
 Standards
 in
 visual
 chart
 called
 a
 “crosswalk”
 in
 order
 to
 ensure
 the
  counseling
 program
 addresses
 the
 academic,
 career,
 and
 personal/social
  development
 needs
 of
 all
 students
 (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 D).
 
 

5
 
 


 


 

The
 Delivery
 system
 explains
 how
 the
 implementation
 process
 is
 carried
 out
  and
 is
 comprised
 of
 four
 main
 components
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 39).
 These
 are
 the
 school
  guidance
 curriculum,
 individual
 student
 planning,
 responsive
 services,
 and
 system
  support
 (ASCA
 2005,
 p.
 42).
 
 The
 Management
 system
 occurs
 in
 parallel
 with
 the
  Delivery
 system
 and
 utilizes
 initial
 pilot
 data,
 collaboration,
 and
 consultation
 to
  determine
 how
 and
 when
 specific
 services
 will
 be
 carried
 out.
 Management
  agreements
 that
 outline
 how
 the
 program
 will
 be
 maintained
 are
 established
 and
 an
  advisory
 council
 is
 formed
 to
 ensure
 the
 program
 is
 effective.
 The
 advisory
 council
  ensures
 the
 implementation
 of
 the
 program
 is
 consistent
 with
 the
 mission
 and
  values
 of
 the
 school
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 47).
 
  Finally,
 the
 Accountability
 system
 outlines,
 “How
 students
 are
 different
 as
 a
  result
 of
 the
 school
 counseling
 program”
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 59).
 School
 counselors
 use
  data
 in
 order
 to
 ensure
 the
 framework
 is
 effective
 and
 that
 the
 services
 being
  provided
 are
 helping
 students
 accomplish
 the
 intended
 goals.
 The
 Accountability
  system
 also
 outlines
 the
 School
 Counselor
 Performance
 Standards,
 which
 ensures
 the
  counselor
 fulfills
 his
 expectations
 and
 obligations
 as
 a
 professional.
 Finally,
 a
  program
 audit
 is
 used
 to
 assess
 how
 the
 current
 model
 compares
 with
 the
 ASCA
  model
 and
 areas
 that
 require
 improvement
 are
 identified
 and
 addressed
 (ASCA,
  2005,
 p.
 66).
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  The
 following
 describes
 the
 comprehensive
 and
 coordinated
 school
  counseling
 program
 for
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 in
 Massachusetts.
 The
 most
  pertinent
 needs
 of
 the
 school
 are
 outlined
 here.
  WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 NEEDS
 ASSESSMENT
  The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 is
 a
 small
 K-­‐8
 public
 school
 comprised
 of
 320
 

6
 
 


 


 

students
 in
 a
 rural
 town
 on
 the
 island
 of
 Martha’s
 Vineyard.
 The
 school
 day
 at
 West
  Tisbury
 runs
 from
 7:20AM
 until
 2:20PM
 and
 the
 school
 employs
 40
 full-­‐time
  teachers,
 99.4%
 who
 are
 licensed
 in
 their
 teaching
 assignment,
 and
 100%
 who
 are
  highly
 qualified
 (Massachusetts
 Department
 of
 Elementary
 and
 Secondary
  Education
 Website
 [MDESE],
 2011).
 
  88.4%
 of
 students
 at
 West
 Tisbury
 are
 Caucasian,
 4%
 Asian,
 2.8%
 Hispanic
 

or
 Latino,
 5.9%
 Multi-­‐race
 (non-­‐Hispanic),
 1.9%
 Native
 American,
 and
 1.0%
 Native
  Hawaiian
 or
 Pacific
 Islander.
 1.8%
 of
 students
 have
 limited
 English
 proficiency
 and
  2.2%
 are
 English
 language
 learners
 (ELL),
 which
 are
 significantly
 lower
 than
 the
  state
 average
 (refer
 to
 Appendix
 A).
 There
 is
 a
 48:52
 male
 to
 female
 ratio.
 26.4%
 of
  students
 qualify
 as
 special
 needs,
 which
 is
 significantly
 higher
 than
 the
 state
 average
  (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 A).
 Student
 socio-­‐economic
 status
 varies
 greatly,
 with
 household
  incomes
 for
 a
 family
 of
 four
 ranging
 from
 roughly
 $22,000
 to
 $300,000+
 per
 year.
 
  Student
 academic
 performance
 is
 high
 compared
 to
 other
 state
 public
  schools.
 The
 West
 Tisbury
 has
 met
 its
 AYP
 quota
 for
 seven
 consecutive
 years
 and
  65-­‐75%
 of
 West
 Tisbury
 students
 have
 scored
 proficient
 or
 higher
 on
 the
 math
 and
  verbal
 sections
 of
 the
 Massachusetts
 Comprehensive
 Assessment
 System
 (MCAS)
  over
 the
 last
 two
 years.
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  A
 concern
 however
 is
 the
 gap
 in
 achievement
 scores
 between
 special-­‐needs
  and
 regular
 education
 students.
 Last
 year,
 only
 12%
 of
 4th
 grade
 special
 needs
  students
 scored
 proficient
 or
 higher
 on
 the
 MCAS
 verbal
 whereas
 almost
 65%
 of
  regular
 education
 students
 received
 this
 same
 standing.
 Similar
 findings
 were
 also
  true
 in
 math,
 with
 13%
 of
 special-­‐needs
 students
 and
 75%
 of
 regular
 education
  students
 scoring
 proficient.
 
 

7
 
 


 


 

The
 National
 Assessment
 of
 Educational
 Progress
 (NAEP)
 is
 an
 achievement
  test
 commonly
 used
 to
 help
 confirm
 the
 results
 of
 other
 statewide
 assessments
 such
  as
 the
 MCAS
 (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 B).
 The
 results
 from
 the
 2009
 NAEP
 are
 consistent
  with
 the
 aforementioned
 MCAS
 results.
 8th
 grade
 students’
 NAEP
 scores
 indicate
 this
  gap
 increases
 during
 middle
 school
 (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 C).
 This
 is
 consistent
 with
  findings
 from
 current
 research
 (Efrat,
 2011).
 Only
 9%
 of
 8th
 grade
 special
 needs
  students
 scored
 proficient
 on
 last
 year’s
 MCAS
 verbal
 section.
 The
 West
 Tisbury
  counseling
 program
 is
 in
 need
 of
 restructuring
 in
 order
 for
 all
 students’
  achievement
 scores
 to
 improve.
  A
 major
 health-­‐related
 concern
 for
 the
 school
 is
 almost
 30%
 of
 students
 in
  the
 school
 are
 obese.
 Although
 more
 research
 is
 needed
 to
 confirm
 suspicions,
  probable
 influences
 point
 to
 1)
 decreased
 activity
 and
 involvement
 during
 gym
 and
  recess
 periods,
 2)
 decreased
 student
 participation
 in
 after-­‐school
 sports
 programs,
  and
 3)
 poor
 nutritional
 intake
 throughout
 the
 school
 day.
 
  Providing
 students
 with
 a
 healthy
 lunch
 should
 begin
 to
 address
 the
 problem.
  Students
 who
 do
 not
 bring
 healthy
 lunches
 from
 home
 only
 have
 the
 option
 of
 foods
  with
 high
 calorie,
 fat,
 sodium,
 and
 sugar
 content,
 with
 little
 protein.
 Lunch
 periods
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

8
 
 


 


 

are
 also
 short,
 which
 makes
 students
 eat
 quickly.
 It
 is
 also
 unclear
 if
 student
 families
  and
 school
 staff
 are
 aware
 of
 the
 issues
 around
 the
 lack
 of
 healthy
 choices
 in
 the
  school
 cafeteria.
 
  Another
 concern
 for
 West
 Tisbury
 is
 the
 large
 number
 of
 reported
 bullying
  incidents.
 Physical
 bullying
 and
 relational
 aggression
 have
 become
 commonplace
  both
 on
 and
 off
 school
 grounds,
 with
 more
 than
 30%
 of
 students
 reporting
 being
  bullied
 during
 the
 2010-­‐2011
 academic
 school
 year.
 Many
 of
 these
 incidents
 are
  reported
 during
 school
 lunch
 time.
 Therefore,
 there
 is
 an
 increased
 need
 for
  supervision
 in
 the
 lunchroom.
 
  A
 fourth
 prevalent
 issue
 in
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 is
 low
 media
 literacy.
  Media
 literacy
 involves
 the
 ways
 that
 people
 are
 able
 to
 process
 the
 media
 they
 view
  and
 make
 connections
 from
 what
 is
 fictional
 to
 more
 realistic
 applications
 to
 daily
  life.
 West
 Tisbury
 students
 find
 it
 difficult
 to
 discriminate
 between
 virtual
 violence
  (what
 they
 see
 on
 television)
 and
 real,
 physical
 violence
 with
 peers
 (i.e.
 hitting).
  This
 is
 an
 increasing
 issue,
 for
 example,
 during
 IT
 classes
 where
 teachers
 have
  reported
 students
 who
 were
 viewing
 violent
 media
 that
 subsequently
 engaged
 in
  violent
 behaviors.
 The
 school
 counselor
 will
 implement
 a
 school-­‐wide
 program
 that
  includes
 media
 literacy
 in
 its
 framework;
 ergo,
 this
 will
 hopefully
 reduce
 aggression,
  and
 other
 related
 issues
 such
 as
 bullying.
  FOUNDATION
  The
 school
 counselor
 has
 created
 a
 student
 counseling
 team
 in
 order
 to
  implement
 the
 coordinated,
 comprehensive
 program.
 This
 group
 includes
 the
 school
  counselor,
 school
 psychologist,
 special
 education
 teacher,
 regular
 education
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  teachers,
 the
 school
 principal
 and
 administrators.
 The
 team
 has
 had
 a
 meeting
 to
  make
 initial
 assumptions
 about
 the
 needs
 of
 students
 and
 this
 has
 led
 to
 the
  development
 of
 the
 following
 beliefs.
 The
 counselor
 has
 ensured
 these
 statements
  are
 consistent
 with
 the
 ASCA
 national
 model.
  Philosophical
 Statement:
  The
 counselor
 in
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 Elementary
 School
 believes:
  • • • All
 students
 have
 dignity
 and
 worth
  All
 students
 have
 the
 right
 to
 participate
 in
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
  All
 students’
 ethnic,
 cultural,
 racial,
 gender,
 sexual,
 ability/disability,
 and
  individual
 identities
 are
 important,
 and
 are
 considered
 in
 planning
 and
  implementing
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
  •

9
 
 


 


 

All
 students
 shall
 have
 access
 to
 a
 full-­‐time,
 state-­‐certified,
 master’s-­‐degree-­‐ level
 school
 counselor
 to
 deliver
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
 

• •

The
 counselor
 is
 a
 part
 of
 a
 team
 who
 lead
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
  He/she
 requires
 the
 help
 of
 students,
 teachers,
 faculty,
 families,
 and
 other
  members
 of
 the
 surrounding
 community
 in
 order
 to
 deliver
 the
 counseling
  program
 
 

And
 that
 the
 comprehensive
 school
 counseling
 program
 should:
  • • Be
 based
 on
 the
 needs
 of
 all
 students
  Be
 planned
 in
 collaboration
 with
 teachers,
 faculty,
 administrative
 staff,
 and
  other
 school,
 parent/guardian/family,
 and
 community
 representatives
  • Establish
 a
 yearly
 curriculum
 that
 affects
 all
 students
 
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  •

10
 
 


 


 

Utilize
 school-­‐wide
 and
 community
 resources
 in
 order
 to
 maximize
 impact
  on
 students
 



Use
 data
 and
 evidence-­‐based
 research
 in
 order
 to
 help
 direct
 program
  development
 
 



Be
 evaluated
 annually
 by
 the
 school
 principal
 to
 on
 specified
 program
 goals
  and
 agreed-­‐upon
 student
 competencies
 



Actively
 involve
 counseling
 team
 members
 to
 monitor
 student
 progress
 

And
 that
 the
 counselor
 in
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 School:
  • Abides
 by
 the
 professional
 school
 counseling
 ethics
 as
 advocated
 by
 the
  American
 School
 Counselor
 Association,
 the
 American
 Counselor
  Association,
 Family
 Educational
 Rights
 and
 Privacy
 Act,
 and
 state
 and
  federal
 laws
  • Actively
 participates
 in
 professional
 development
 activities
 essential
 to
  maintain
 a
 quality
 school
 counseling
 program
 
  • Fosters
 a
 passion
 for
 maintaining
 and
 improving
 the
 school
 counseling
  program
  Mission
 Statement:
  West
 Tisbury
 School
 District
 
  The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 strives
 to
 provide
 students
 with
 an
 academic
 foundation
  and
 a
 love
 of
 learning,
 to
 prepare
 students
 socially
 to
 become
 contributing
 members
  of
 society,
 to
 foster
 healthy
 lifestyles,
 and
 to
 promote
 an
 understanding
 and
  acceptance
 of
 human
 values.
 
  School
 Counseling
 Program
 Mission
 Statement
  The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 will
 provide
 a
 comprehensive
 guidance
 program
 that
 will
  assist
 all
 students
 in
 acquiring
 the
 skills,
 knowledge
 and
 attitudes
 necessary
 to
  become
 contributing
 members
 to
 society.
 The
 program
 will
 accept
 and
 embrace
 the
  individual
 uniqueness
 of
 all
 students
 and
 will
 facilitate
 achievement
 by
 helping
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

11
 
 


 


 

students
 overcome
 barriers
 that
 affect
 learning.
 The
 educational,
 personal/social,
  and
 developmental
 needs
 of
 students
 will
 be
 met
 through
 the
 comprehensive
 and
  coordinated
 program,
 which
 will
 work
 to
 connect
 students
 and
 families
 to
 a
 wide
  array
 of
 school
 and
 community
 resources
 that
 enable
 success.
 
  The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 Foundation
 will
 lastly
 outline
 the
 program
 domains,
 

standards,
 competencies,
 and
 goals
 using
 the
 ASCA
 crosswalk
 in
 order
 to
 ensure
  consistency
 with
 ASCA
 national
 model
 (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 D).
 The
 crosswalk
 utilizes
  the
 following
 to
 ensure
 this:
 goals
 of
 the
 School
 Counselors
 Association
 (SCA),
 ASCA
  national
 standards
 for
 school
 counseling
 programs,
 National
 Career
 Development
  Guidelines
 (NCDG)
 and
 the
 Common
 Core
 skills
 and
 competencies
 of
 learning.
 In
  addition,
 the
 student
 health
 will
 be
 interwoven
 into
 the
 three
 domains
 (academic,
  career,
 and
 personal/social)
 in
 order
 to
 cater
 the
 crosswalking
 tool
 to
 the
 specific
  needs
 of
 our
 school.
 The
 following
 will
 be
 added
 to
 the
 personal/social
 SCA
 goal
 of
  survival
 and
 safety
 skills,
 along
 with
 the
 academic
 SCA
 goal
 of
 school
 success.
 This
  statement
 has
 been
 added
 to
 the
 Common
 Core
 skills
 and
 competencies
 section.
  • Students
 will
 learn
 to
 live
 healthier,
 more
 active
 lifestyles
 and
 will
 be
  supported
 in
 valuing
 their
 physical
 and
 mental
 health
 as
 a
 lifelong
  commitment
 

The
 West
 Tisbury
 school
 counselor
 will
 evaluate
 the
 crosswalk
 to
 assess
 what
 is
  missing
 from
 the
 program
 and
 what
 elements
 need
 to
 be
 changed.
 This
 is
 done
 with
  the
 school
 principal
 annually
 at
 the
 end
 of
 the
 school
 year
 so
 the
 school
 counseling
  team
 will
 be
 able
 to
 make
 necessary
 adjustments
 to
 the
 program
 the
 following
 fall.
 
 
  DELIVERY
 SYSTEM
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

12
 
 


 


 

West
 Tisbury
 Elementary
 School
 will
 provide
 the
 following
 four
 curriculum
  programs
 to
 address
 the
 needs
 aforementioned.
 These
 include,
 The
 Teachers
  Involve
 Parents
 in
 Schoolwork
 (TIPS)
 Interactive
 Homework
 Program,
 The
 Lunch
  Buddy
 Mentorship
 Program,
 The
 Network
 for
 a
 Healthy
 California
 Vegetable
  (“Veggie”)
 Intervention
 Program,
 and
 The
 “Media
 Matters”
 Media
 Literacy
 Program.
  In
 addition
 to
 providing
 these
 programs,
 the
 counseling
 program
 will
 provide
  responsive
 services
 with
 individual
 and
 small
 group
 student
 support
 and
 will
 work
  to
 connect
 students
 to
 a
 variety
 of
 school
 and
 community
 resources.
 
  Of
 primary
 importance
 are
 the
 immediate
 needs
 of
 students.
 Although
 the
  individual
 counseling
 (i.e.
 responsive
 services)
 the
 counselor
 provides
 for
 students
  only
 take
 up
 a
 percentage
 of
 his
 time,
 these
 sessions
 are
 critical
 in
 helping
 students
  overcome
 barriers.
 If
 the
 counselor
 feels
 that
 he
 is
 not
 able
 to
 meet
 the
 needs
 of
  students
 through
 the
 developmental
 program
 (either
 because
 of
 time
 constraints
 or
  because
 the
 counselor
 feels
 the
 student
 needs
 more
 specialized
 services),
 he
 will
  seek
 help
 from
 school
 faculty
 and
 administrators
 (e.g.
 school
 nurse
 or
  special/regular
 education
 teacher).
 If
 none
 of
 these
 individuals
 can
 meet
 the
 needs
  of
 the
 student,
 the
 counselor
 will
 make
 a
 referral
 to
 mental
 health
 agencies,
 the
 local
  hospital,
 or
 any
 other
 necessary
 community
 resource.
 
  The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 comprehensive
 coordinated
 program
 for
 the
 2011-­‐ 2012
 school
 year
 is
 comprised
 of
 the
 following:
 a
 school
 guidance
 curriculum
 that
  combines
 classroom
 instruction,
 an
 interdisciplinary
 curriculum
 team
 that
 refines
  the
 program
 over
 time,
 group
 activities,
 and
 parent
 workshops
 and
 instruction
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 40).
 A
 description
 of
 the
 program
 can
 be
 found
 in
 the
 attached
  brochure
 entitled
 The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 Counseling
 Program.
 

13
 
 


 


 

In
 order
 to
 work
 to
 improve
 achievement
 scores,
 the
 counseling
 program
 will
  implement
 the
 Teachers
 Involve
 Parents
 in
 Schoolwork
 (TIPS)
 program,
 an
  intervention
 designed
 to
 involve
 parents
 and
 families
 with
 students’
 homework.
 In
  the
 past,
 implementing
 this
 program
 has
 led
 students’
 standardized
 test
 scores
 to
  improve
 (Van
 Voorhis,
 2011).
 Sheldon
 and
 Epstein
 identify
 “learning
 at
 home”
 as
  one
 of
 the
 six
 necessary
 partnerships
 between
 the
 school
 and
 home
 environment
 to
  facilitate
 student
 success
 (Sheldon
 &
 Epstein,
 2005).
 Van
 Voorhis
 (2011)
 also
 notes
  that
 parents
 often
 experience
 anxiety
 when
 helping
 their
 child
 with
 math
 and
 other
  school
 subjects
 and
 may
 consequently
 refrain
 from
 helping
 their
 child
 with
 school
  assignments.
 The
 TIPS
 program
 addresses
 these
 issues
 through
 the
 following
  process.
  Students
 are
 given
 TIPS
 assignments
 on
 a
 bi-­‐monthly
 basis,
 which
 is
 carried
  out
 by
 providing
 the
 following:
 Look
 This
 Over
 (a
 letter
 to
 parent/guardian
 with
 the
  program
 calendar,
 instructions
 for
 completing
 the
 assignments,
 and
 contact
 number
  for
 questions);
 Now
 Try
 This
 (initial
 scores
 and
 data
 will
 be
 collected
 and
 compared
  to
 in-­‐class
 test
 scores
 and
 assignment
 effectiveness);
 Practice
 and
 Application
  (individual
 bi-­‐monthly
 assignments);
 Home-­to-­school
 communication
 (the
 family
  partner
 sends
 an
 observation,
 comment,
 or
 question
 to
 the
 child’s
 teacher
 about
 the
  skill
 demonstrated
 and
 homework
 experience);
 Signature
 (the
 guardian
 signs
 off
 on
  the
 assignment);
 Follow-­up
 (the
 teacher
 provides
 feedback
 for
 the
 student
 and
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  guardian);
 and
 Results
 (parents
 and
 families
 are
 given
 feedback
 about
 how
  successful
 the
 program
 was).
  In
 the
 results
 of
 Van
 Voorhis
 (2011),
 students
 and
 their
 families
 from
 

14
 
 


 


 

reported
 increased
 family
 involvement
 with
 the
 school,
 closer
 relationships
 with
 the
  student’s
 teacher,
 more
 positive
 feelings
 and
 attitudes
 about
 homework,
 and
  significantly
 higher
 achievement
 scores
 on
 standardized
 tests.
 By
 implementing
 this
  framework
 in
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 counseling
 program,
 we
 hope
 to
 have
 similar
  results.
  The
 second
 program
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
 West
 Tisbury
 will
  implement
 at
 is
 the
 “Veggie”
 Intervention
 Program.
 This
 will
 be
 a
 three-­‐year
  program
 that
 follows
 Wang
 et
 al.
 (2010)
 implementation
 process:
 (1)
 increase
  healthier
 food
 options
 in
 the
 cafeteria
 (2)
 provide
 children
 and
 their
 families
 with
  healthy
 cooking
 classes
 (3)implement
 a
 school
 gardening
 program
 and
 (4)provide
  students
 with
 nutrition/health
 classes
 and
 presentations.
 
  Research
 shows
 that
 obesity
 interventions
 that
 are
 implemented
 early
 on
 in
  human
 development
 tend
 have
 more
 lasting
 effects
 than
 programs
 implemented
  later
 in
 life
 (Raynor,
 2008).
 Glanz,
 Sallis,
 Saelens,
 and
 Frank
 (2005)
 support
 this
  finding
 by
 discussing
 the
 positive
 impact
 of
 establishing
 a
 “nutritional
 environment”
  for
 students.
 By
 creating
 an
 environment
 that
 fosters
 healthy
 eating
 habits,
 we
 can
  encourage
 students
 to
 make
 more
 constructive
 decisions
 around
 the
 foods
 they
 eat.
  The
 school
 counselor
 will
 first
 design
 a
 Veggie
 intervention
 curriculum.
 The
  curriculum
 will
 be
 implemented
 into
 brief
 weekly
 lessons
 during
 student
 health
  classes.
 Second,
 the
 counseling
 program
 will
 work
 to
 increase
 the
 number
 and
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

15
 
 


 


 

quality
 of
 nutritional
 options
 available
 in
 the
 lunchroom
 by
 implementing
 a
 School
  Garden
 Project.
 This
 will
 be
 done
 with
 the
 help
 of
 student,
 teacher,
 and
 family
  volunteers
 who
 will
 help
 build
 and
 maintain
 the
 garden.
 This
 will
 be
 carried
 out
 in
 a
  volunteer
 effort
 and
 fundraiser
 for
 the
 school
 during
 the
 summer
 of
 2011.
  Additional
 funding
 may
 also
 be
 provided
 activities
 like
 school
 bake
 sales,
 after
  school
 fundraiser
 events,
 and
 donations.
  Cooking
 classes
 will
 be
 provided
 during
 bi-­‐annual
 family
 night
 events.
 This
  will
 be
 done
 in
 order
 to
 involve
 families
 in
 the
 school
 project
 and
 to
 increase
  awareness.
 The
 cooking
 classes
 will
 also
 connect
 families
 with
 a
 licensed
  nutritionist
 and
 health
 teachers
 that
 can
 help
 them
 find
 ways
 to
 incorporate
  healthier
 foods
 into
 their
 daily
 lives.
 
  At
 the
 end
 of
 the
 study,
 data
 will
 be
 collected
 regarding
 overall
 changes
 in
  student
 vegetable
 consumption.
 This
 information
 will
 be
 provided
 by
 coding
 the
  weekly
 food
 journals
 created
 by
 individual
 students.
 This
 will
 be
 done
 by
 a
  volunteer
 researcher
 and
 licensed
 dietician.
 Finally,
 the
 findings
 from
 the
 results
  will
 be
 summarized
 in
 a
 letter
 home
 to
 families.
  The
 third
 intervention
 will
 be
 the
 Elledge
 et
 al.
 (2010)
 Lunch
 Buddy
 Mentorship
  Program
 for
 victims
 of
 school
 bullying.
 In
 this
 program,
 students
 are
 asked
 to
 meet
  twice
 a
 week
 with
 a
 volunteer
 college
 mentor
 during
 lunchtime.
 Although
 there
 are
  no
 colleges
 near
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 School,
 there
 is
 a
 nearby
 public
 high
 school
 for
  recruiting
 volunteers.
 These
 students
 will
 be
 recruited
 via
 email
 and
 subsequent
  interviews,
 and
 will
 be
 provided
 with
 public
 transportation
 (school
 bus)
 to
 visit
  mentees
 once
 a
 week.
 Dieterich,
 Brisson,
 Bender,
 and
 Powell
 (2010)
 note
 that
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

16
 
 


 


 

successful
 bullying
 prevention
 programs
 focus
 on
 cooperative
 group
 work
 and
 peer
  interventions.
 The
 Elledge
 et
 al
 (2010)
 model
 works
 to
 create
 a
 positive
 mentor-­‐ mentee
 relationship
 by
 creating
 a
 cooperative
 group-­‐work
 intervention
 among
 the
  school
 counselor,
 volunteer,
 bullying
 victim,
 and
 the
 victim’s
 classmates.
 Instruction,
  consultation
 and
 utilization
 of
 feedback
 will
 be
 essential
 for
 this
 process.
  Results
 from
 Elledge
 et
 al
 (2010)
 show
 a
 decrease
 in
 reported
 bullying
 after
  one
 semester
 of
 program
 implementation.
 Non-­‐victims
 who
 viewed
 victims
 as
  “highly
 bullied”
 saw
 these
 same
 peers
 as
 less
 victimized
 following
 program
  completion.
 Overall,
 students
 also
 reported
 a
 decreased
 willingness
 to
 engage
 in
  bullying
 behavior.
 We
 hope
 to
 see
 similar
 results
 at
 West
 Tisbury.
  The
 fourth
 program
 West
 Tisbury
 will
 implement
 is
 the
 Media
 Matters
 Media
  Literacy
 Program.
 Cantor
 and
 Wilson
 (2003)
 note
 that
 adults
 who
 establish
  commentary
 before
 and
 during
 a
 child’s
 viewing
 of
 violent
 media
 may
 help
 reduce
  the
 potential
 for
 aggressive
 tendencies.
 Helping
 children
 actively
 process
 the
  material
 they
 view
 and
 making
 distinctions
 between
 television
 and
 real
 life
 leads
 to
  a
 decrease
 in
 subsequent
 violent
 behavior
 (Cantor
 and
 Wilson,
 2003).
 The
 Media
  Literacy
 Program
 helps
 students
 cognitively
 reflect
 on
 media
 material
 during
 a
 ten-­‐ week-­‐long
 program.
  Results
 from
 a
 pilot
 study
 conducted
 by
 Byrne
 showed
 that
 students
 who
  completed
 a
 cognitive
 activity
 following
 media
 exposure
 showed
 decreased
  willingness
 to
 use
 aggression
 (Byrne,
 2009).
 Conversely,
 students
 who
 did
 not
  cognitively
 reflect
 on
 their
 viewing
 experiences
 persisted
 or
 increased
 their
  willingness
 to
 aggress.
 This
 information
 was
 gathered
 in
 a
 survey
 that
 assessed
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

17
 
 


 


 

students’
 willingness
 to
 aggress
 following
 exposure
 in
 a
 series
 of
 7-­‐point
 Likert
 scale
  questions.
 The
 fact
 that
 incorporating
 a
 cognitive
 reflection
 piece
 into
 the
 media
  literacy
 curriculum
 works
 indicates
 that
 programs
 that
 focus
 purely
 on
 an
  informational
 approach
 (i.e.
 teaching
 students
 about
 media
 literacy)
 may
 not
 be
  sufficient
 in
 reducing
 students’
 aggressive
 tendencies
 (Byrne,
 2009).
  West
 Tisbury
 students
 will
 be
 asked
 to
 complete
 a
 ten-­‐week
 program
 similar
  to
 what
 has
 been
 outlined
 here.
 Students
 will
 be
 given
 an
 initial
 assessment
  regarding
 average
 duration
 of
 media
 exposure,
 media
 preferences,
 and
 media
  literacy
 skills
 and
 will
 be
 re-­‐assessed
 following
 program
 completion.
  The
 program
 will
 be
 carried
 out
 in
 10-­‐15
 minute
 lessons
 once
 a
 week
 during
  information
 technology
 (IT)
 classes.
 The
 school
 counselor
 will
 consult
 the
 IT
 teacher
  to
 develop
 and
 implement
 these
 lesson
 plans.
 In
 class,
 students
 will
 view
 a
 stimulus
  clip,
 cognitively
 reflect
 on
 that
 material,
 and
 then
 engage
 in
 a
 class
 lesson
 and
  discussion.
 The
 counselor
 will
 work
 closely
 with
 the
 IT
 teacher
 to
 ensure
 media
  literacy
 skills
 improve
 and
 subsequent
 negative
 behaviors
 (i.e.
 acting
 out,
 violence)
  are
 reduced.
 During
 this
 time,
 the
 counselor
 will
 have
 to
 be
 particularly
 careful
 in
  the
 media
 clips
 he
 and
 the
 IT
 teacher
 chose
 to
 use
 because
 research
 shows
 that
  showing
 even
 mildly
 violent
 clips
 without
 leading
 the
 child
 to
 reflect
 on
 such
  materials
 will
 typically
 have
 negative
 outcomes
 in
 what
 Byrne
 refers
 to
 as
 “The
  Boomerang
 Effect”
 (Byrne,
 2009).
  MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
  The
 school
 guidance
 curriculum
 will
 be
 implemented
 in
 several
 stages
  throughout
 the
 year.
 These
 are
 listed
 in
 the
 school
 calendar
 (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 E).
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

18
 
 


 


 

Of
 upmost
 importance
 is
 that
 the
 counselor
 divides
 his
 time
 appropriately.
 Ensuring
  he
 does
 not
 spend
 time
 on
 inappropriate
 activities
 such
 as
 administrative
 work
 will
  ensure
 a
 balance
 in
 daily
 activities
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 25).
 By
 implementing
 the
 four
  programs
 in
 collaboration
 with
 others,
 the
 school
 counselor
 will
 have
 ample
 time
  for
 individual
 student
 planning,
 responsive
 services,
 and
 system
 support.
 
  The
 counselor
 will
 spend
 35-­‐45%
 of
 his
 time
 developing
 the
 guidance
  curriculum,
 5-­‐10%
 on
 individual
 student
 planning,
 30-­‐40%
 on
 response
 services,
  and
 10-­‐15%
 on
 system
 support.
 The
 school
 counseling
 team
 will
 make
 management
  agreements
 and
 an
 advisory
 council
 will
 be
 formed
 to
 review
 the
 program
 and
 make
  recommendations.
 This
 will
 help
 the
 counselor
 in
 maintaining
 a
 proper
 time
  distribution
 of
 tasks.
  Action
 plans
 will
 be
 carried
 out
 during
 school
 counseling
 team
 monthly
  meetings.
 It
 is
 critical
 for
 counselors
 to
 reach
 out
 to
 student
 families
 in
 order
 to
  gather
 information
 and
 identify
 individual
 student
 barriers.
 More
 broadly
 speaking,
  the
 counselor
 must
 also
 consult
 and
 collaborate
 with
 a
 wide
 array
 of
 individuals
  throughout
 the
 school
 and
 the
 surrounding
 community
 in
 order
 to
 gather
 more
  information
 about
 program
 effectiveness,
 what
 areas
 need
 to
 be
 improve,
 and
 what
  resources
 are
 available.
 Gathering
 relevant
 data
 is
 essential
 for
 correctly
 identifying
  the
 needs
 of
 the
 school
 and
 finding
 solutions
 to
 those
 needs.
 The
 following
 discusses
  who
 and
 when
 program
 data
 will
 be
 collected
 and
 also
 why
 this
 is
 being
 done.
  All
 data
 for
 the
 programs
 will
 be
 collected
 by
 the
 school
 psychologist
 with
 the
  exception
 of
 the
 Veggie
 intervention
 program,
 which
 will
 be
 collected
 by
 a
 licensed
  dietician.
 The
 psychologist
 and
 the
 school
 counselor
 will
 collaborate
 in
 the
 drawing
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  of
 conclusions
 about
 the
 data.
 Following
 program
 completion,
 the
 school
  psychologist
 will
 meet
 with
 the
 school
 counselor
 in
 order
 to
 formulate
 how
 the
  counseling
 program
 will
 present
 the
 findings
 from
 the
 data
 to
 families
 in
 the
  community.
 This
 document
 will
 need
 to
 be
 written
 and
 organized
 in
 a
 way
 that
 is
  easy
 for
 families
 to
 understand.
 Extra
 measures
 may
 need
 to
 be
 taken
 for
 families
  who,
 for
 example,
 do
 not
 have
 adequate
 English
 reading
 skills.
 

19
 
 


 


 

The
 TIPS
 program
 will
 be
 explained
 in
 an
 information
 meeting
 during
 the
 fall
  semester
 of
 2011
 and
 a
 letter
 outlining
 the
 program
 will
 be
 sent
 home
 to
 parents.
  The
 program
 will
 be
 carried
 out
 by
 math
 and
 language
 arts
 teachers
 in
 the
 school,
  who
 will
 consult
 with
 the
 counselor
 in
 monthly
 meetings.
  The
 Wang
 et
 al.
 (2010)
 Veggie
 Intervention
 Program
 curriculum
 will
 be
  implemented
 by
 the
 school
 health
 education
 teacher,
 along
 with
 a
 local
 licensed
  dietician
 who
 has
 volunteered
 to
 be
 a
 part
 of
 program.
 This
 yearly
 curriculum
 will
  be
 agreed
 upon
 in
 an
 initial
 meeting
 during
 the
 first
 week
 of
 September
 2011
 (prior
  to
 the
 commencement
 of
 the
 2011-­‐2012
 school
 year).
 The
 counselor
 will
 need
 to
  rely
 on
 the
 school
 lunch
 staff,
 school
 treasurer
 (for
 program
 funding),
 and
 parents
 to
  create
 a
 program
 that
 works
 for
 the
 school.
 The
 counselor
 will
 provide
 those
  involved
 in
 the
 program
 with
 surveys
 in
 order
 to
 identify
 how
 the
 program
 is
  successful
 and
 how
 it
 can
 be
 improved.
 
  The
 Lunch
 Buddy
 mentorship
 program
 will
 begin
 with
 an
 initial
 meeting
 with
  the
 student
 volunteers.
 The
 meeting
 will
 outline
 the
 goals
 of
 the
 program
 along
 with
  a
 discussion
 of
 its
 importance
 as
 a
 protective
 factor
 for
 students.
 Student
 volunteers
  will
 check
 in
 with
 the
 counselor
 monthly.
 Mentors
 will
 complete
 weekly
 journals
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

20
 
 


 


 

and
 questionnaires
 that
 will
 be
 coded
 by
 the
 school
 psychologist.
 Bully
 victims
 and
  students
 who
 are
 perpetrators
 of
 bullying
 will
 also
 provide
 surveys
 that
 identify
 the
  number
 of
 reported
 incidents
  The
 media
 literacy
 program
 will
 be
 led
 in
 collaboration
 with
 the
 IT
 teacher
 in
  the
 school.
 The
 counselor
 will
 develop
 lesson
 plans
 during
 the
 fall
 semester
 and
 will
  implement
 the
 program
 in
 the
 spring
 of
 2012.
  Students
 will
 be
 given
 a
 baseline,
 7-­‐point
 Likert
 scale
 questionnaire
 regarding
  willingness
 to
 aggress,
 and
 a
 final
 assignment
 to
 complete
 with
 their
 parents
  regarding
 “how
 their
 behaviors
 and
 attitudes
 towards
 media
 literacy
 have
 changed
  since
 they
 began
 the
 program.”
 We
 hope
 that
 in
 implementing
 this
 follow-­‐up
  activity,
 we
 will
 encourage
 families
 and
 their
 children
 to
 establish
 open
 dialog
 and
  become
 increasingly
 aware
 of
 the
 importance
 of
 media
 literacy.
  The
 counseling
 program
 will
 be
 maintained
 by
 using
 this
 program
 data,
  counselor/program
 evaluations,
 administrative
 review,
 and
 consultation.
 The
  principal
 will
 meet
 annually
 with
 the
 school
 counselor
 to
 provide
 suggestions
 for
  improvement
 regarding
 counseling
 services
 or
 about
 specific
 programs.
 This
 is
 the
  counselor’s
 administrative
 review
 process.
  Data
 will
 be
 utilized
 in
 a
 variety
 of
 ways.
 It
 will
 first
 be
 used
 to
 monitor
 student
  progress
 in
 achievement.
 The
 counselor
 will
 also
 use
 achievement-­‐related
 data
 (e.g.
  attendance
 and
 homework
 completion)
 to
 find
 other
 potential
 barriers
 that
 may
 be
  inhibiting
 a
 student’s
 improvement
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 49).
 Disaggregating
 data
  (separating
 the
 data
 by
 gender,
 ethnicity,
 SES,
 language
 spoken
 at
 home,
 grade
 level
  etc.)
 will
 be
 essential
 for
 targeting
 at
 risk
 students
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 50).
 Some
 of
 this
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  data
 may
 be
 collected
 over
 a
 long
 period
 of
 time,
 often
 several
 years,
 and
 so
  necessary
 steps
 must
 be
 taken
 to
 analyze
 the
 data
 during
 various
 stages
 of
 the
 

21
 
 


 


 

implementation
 process,
 track
 changes
 in
 this
 data,
 and
 ensure
 each
 step
 is
 leading
  to
 student
 progress.
 An
 example
 of
 intervention
 assessment
 for
 the
 Veggie
  Intervention
 program
 is
 shown
 in
 Appendix
 G.
  Finally,
 the
 counselor
 will
 take
 full
 advantage
 of
 professional
 development
  opportunities
 and
 be
 aware
 of
 findings
 from
 pertinent
 research.
 This
 will
 ensure
 the
  program
 is
 up-­‐to-­‐date
 with
 current
 academia
 trends.
 The
 counselor
 will
 consult
  with
 professionals
 from
 other
 school
 systems
 that
 rely
 on
 the
 ASCA
 national
 model
  in
 order
 to
 be
 aware
 of
 potential
 issues.
 Of
 upmost
 importance
 is
 that
 the
 counselor
  establishes
 a
 positive
 relationship
 with
 students
 and
 their
 families
 in
 order
 for
 those
  students
 to
 develop
 academically,
 socially,
 and
 emotionally.
 Families
 will
 be
  provided
 with
 available
 resources
 so
 their
 son
 or
 daughter
 can
 be
 successful.
  ACCOUNTABILITY
 
  Evaluating
 the
 program
 will
 complete
 the
 final
 step
 of
 the
 comprehensive
  coordinated
 counseling
 program.
 The
 results
 reports
 section
 will
 address,
 “How
  students
 are
 different
 as
 a
 result
 of
 the
 program”
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 59).
 The
 data
 may
  be
 analyzed
 in
 a
 variety
 of
 ways
 and
 in
 conjunction
 with
 a
 variety
 of
 individuals,
  depending
 on
 the
 prevention/intervention
 being
 implemented
 and
 the
 individuals
  that
 make
 themselves
 available
 in
 the
 community.
 For
 example,
 the
 West
 Tisbury
  program
 used
 a
 dietician
 to
 code
 student
 journals
 in
 the
 Veggie
 Intervention
  program
 and
 used
 the
 school
 psychologist
 to
 code
 data
 from
 the
 bully
 prevention
  program.
 
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

22
 
 


 


 

By
 working
 with
 school
 staff
 and
 other
 individuals
 to
 publish
 this
 data
 on
 the
  school
 website
 and
 in
 school
 newsletters
 (Refer
 to
 Appendix
 F),
 families
 and
 the
  surrounding
 community
 will
 become
 more
 aware
 of
 the
 changes
 being
 made
 in
 their
  school.
 These
 changes
 can
 be
 represented
 in
 graphs
 and
 charts
 that
 provide
 clear,
  concise
 and
 meaningful
 information.
 The
 Accountability
 system
 will
 also
 measure
  the
 impact
 of
 the
 school
 counseling
 program
 as
 a
 whole
 over
 time.
 This
 includes
  information
 like
 attendance
 data
 and
 suspension
 and
 expulsion
 rates
 (ASCA,
 2005,
  p.
 61).
  The
 school
 counselor
 will
 also
 be
 held
 to
 the
 performance
 standards
 that
 are
  outlined
 in
 the
 ASCA
 national
 model
 (ASCA,
 2005,
 p.
 62-­‐65).
 This
 will
 ensure
 the
  school
 counselor
 is
 engaging
 in
 ethical
 practice
 and
 is
 helping
 the
 school
 in
 making
  AYP.
 Finally,
 a
 program
 audit
 will
 be
 completed
 to
 ensure
 the
 program
 aligns
 with
  the
 ASCA
 national
 standards.
 This
 ensures
 the
 program
 has
 all
 the
 necessary
  components
 for
 a
 comprehensive
 framework.
  Modifications
 to
 the
 program
 rely
 not
 only
 on
 data,
 but
 also
 on
 the
 feedback
  that
 all
 those
 affected
 by
 the
 program
 provide
 for
 counselors.
 The
 impact
 of
  individual
 prevention
 programs
 should
 be
 measurable,
 but
 the
 school
 counselor
  should
 always
 consider
 the
 ways
 that
 the
 comprehensive
 program
 can
 be
 improved.
  CONCLUSION
  The
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 counseling
 program
 has
 undergone
 systemic
  changes
 that
 have
 led
 to
 positive
 student
 outcomes.
 The
 school
 counselor
 has
 played
  a
 central
 role
 in
 the
 improvements
 and
 successes
 of
 today’s
 West
 Tisbury
 Students.
  By
 implementing
 a
 coordinated
 comprehensive
 curriculum,
 and
 by
 utilizing
 school
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  and
 community-­‐wide
 resources,
 the
 comprehensive
 coordinated
 counseling
 

23
 
 


 


 

program
 has
 advocated
 for
 the
 needs
 of
 all
 students
 in
 meaningful
 and
 measurable
  ways.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  APPENDIX A West Tisbury Elementary School Enrollment - 2009-10 Grades Offered: PK, K, 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08 Enrollment - 2009-10 Total Count Race/Ethnicity (%) African American Asian Hispanic or Latino Multi-race (Non-Hispanic) Native American Hawaiian or Pacific Islander White Gender (%) Male Female Limited English Proficiency Low-Income Special Education First Language Not English
  School 276 0.0 0.4 3.3 6.2 1.4 88.4 47.8 52.2 1.8 9.1 26.4 2.2 District 320 0.6 0.3 2.8 5.9 1.9 88.1 50.3 49.7 1.6 8.4 24.1 2.2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  State 957,053 8.2 5.3 14.8 2.2 0.3 69.1 51.3 48.7 6.2 32.1 17.0 15.6

24
 
 


 


 

MDESE
 (2011)
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  APPENDIX
 B
  2009
 NAEP
 Test
 Scores
  GRADE LEVEL 4 READING
  Student Group Avg. Scaled Score 234 211 198 216 241 211 241 215 Massachusetts % of Stud. at Each Perf. Level B A P+ B+ % Assessed B 13 47 80 20 100 5 21 54 46 15 1 12 40 60 6 3 23 62 38 7 22 3 17 3 A All Students Stud. w/ Disab LEP/FLEP African American/Black Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Latino White Low-Income
 
 
 
  252 237 221 236 264 232 258 237 12 4 1 2 28 2 14 3 56 20 56 23 P+ 57 32 15 30 70 25 67 31 85 56 87 61 B+ 92 81 62 84 96 78 97 83 15 44 13 39 B B 8 19 38 16 4 22 3 17 5 17 69 33 % Assessed 100 15 7 8 6 17 68 34

25
 
 


 


 

All Students Stud. w/ Disab LEP/FLEP African American/Black Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Latino White Low-Income GRADE LEVEL 4 MATHEMATICS

MDESE
 (2011)
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  APPENDIX
 C
  2009
 NAEP
 Test
 Scores
 
 

26
 
 


 


 

GRADE LEVEL 8 - READING
  Student Group Avg. Scaled Score 274 251 217 251 281 250 279 254 Massachusetts % of Stud. at Each Perf. Level B A P+ BB % Assessed + 5 43 83 17 100 1 18 61 39 15 # 3 25 75 2 1 17 64 36 8 10 1 6 1 50 17 49 20 89 62 87 66 11 38 13 34 6 10 74 29

All Students Stud. w/ Disab LEP/FLEP African American/Black Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Latino White Low-Income GRADE LEVEL 8 MATHEMATICS All Students Stud. w/ Disab LEP/FLEP African American/Black Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Latino White Low-Income
 
 
 
 

299 271 238 272 314 271 305 278

A 17 4 1 3 35 4 20 5

P+ B+ 52 85 21 59 8 22 23 62 66 21 59 29 90 62 91 69

BB 15 41 78 38 10 38 9 31

% Assessed 100 14 2 8 6 11 73 29

MDESE
 (2011)
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

27
 
 


 


 


 
 
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  APPENDIX
 E
  SCHOOL
 CALENDAR
  Fall
 2011
 
 
  -­‐Introduction
 of
 TIPS
 Homework
 program
 and
 initial
 assessments
  -­‐Introduction
 of
 
 “Veggie”
 Intervention
 Program
 and
 initial
 assessments
  -­‐Informational
 meeting
 for
 parents
 and
 families
 regarding
 current
 and
 up-­‐ and-­‐coming
 student
 intervention
 programs
 for
 the
 2011-­‐2012
 school
 year
  -­‐October
 is
 “Let’s
 Move”
 month…
  -­‐A
 series
 of
 workshops
 and
 informational
 sessions
 for
 students
 and
  families
 about
 ways
 to
 eat
 healthier
 and
 live
 more
 active
 lifestyles
  Winter
 2011
 
  -­‐Introduction
 of
 Lunch
 Buddy
 Mentor
 Program
 and
 initial
 assessments
  -­‐“Lunch
 Buddy”
 Program
 informational
 meeting
 for
 student
 families
  -­‐December
 15th
 Family
 cooking
 classes!
 Learn
 how
 to
 cook
 healthy
 and
  affordable
 meals
 for
 your
 child
  Spring
 2012
 
  -­‐Introduction
 of
 Media
 Literacy
 Program
 and
 initial
 assessments
  -­‐Movie
 night
 activity
 March
 20th:
 parents
 learn
 about
 ways
 to
 help
 their
  children
 cognitively
 reflect
 on
 the
 media
 that
 they
 watch
 on
 television
  -­‐Results
 from
 TIPS,
 “Veggie”
 Intervention,
 and
 Lunch
 Buddy
 Programs
  Fall
 2012
 
 
  -­‐Results
 from
 Media
 Literacy
 Program
 

28
 
 


 


 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  APPENDIX
 F
 –
 School
 Newsletter
  West
 Tisbury
 December
 Newsletter
  YOUR
 KIDS
 ARE
 EATING
 HEALTHY!
 

29
 
 


 


 

Here
 are
 several
 pictures
 from
 our
 recent
 Family
 Cooking
 Class
 event,
 which
  was
 a
 great
 success
 for
 the
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 counseling
 program.
 More
 than
  sixty
 five
 parents
 and
 family
 members
 attended.
 The
 positive
 feedback
 that
 I
 have
  received
 from
 West
 Tisbury
 School
 families
 is
 encouraging
 for
 reaching
 our
 2011-­‐ 2012
 school
 goal
 to
 get
 students
 to
 eat
 healthier
 at
 school
 lunch.
 

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=student+vegetable+intervention+program
 

EVENTS
 COMING
 UP
 THIS
 SPRING
  Movie
 night
 activity
 March
 20th:
 Parents
 will
 learn
 about
 ways
 to
 help
 their
  child
 cognitively
 reflect
 on
 the
 media
 that
 they
 watch
 on
 television
 and
 the
 internet.
  This
 presentation
 marks
 the
 beginning
 of
 the
 new
 Media
 Matters
 media
 literacy
  program
 at
 West
 Tisbury,
 which
 will
 begin
 this
 spring
 during
 students’
 information
  technology
 classes.
 Come
 to
 this
 important
 event
 to
 find
 out
 more
 about
 the
 health-­‐ related
 concerns
 around
 passive
 media
 consumption.
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  APPENDIX
 G
 
  Veggie
 Intervention
 Assessment
 

30
 
 


 


 

Figure 1. How degree of intervention development was assessed. Attributes of each intervention component were determined and then rated using a Likert scale. These ratings (for each attribute) were summed to provide a total score. Examples of attributes rated for each intervention component are shown. The number of attributes rated varied from 14 for School Food to six for Lesson Integration. Degree of intervention development . N1 . N2 . N3 . N4 . N5, where Nk is the sum of the ratings for all attributes for each intervention component.


 
 
 

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
  References Adelman H. S. & Taylor, L. T. (2002) Building Comprehensive, Multifaceted, and Integrated Approaches to Address Barriers to Student Learning. Childhood Education, 261-268.

31
 
 


 


 

American School Counselor Association (2005) ASCA National Model: A Framework for School Counseling Programs, Second Addition, Alexandria, VA: Author. Byrne, S. (2009). Media literacy interventions: What makes them boom or boomerang? Communication Education, 58(1), 1-14. Cantor, J., & Wilson, B. J. (2003). Media and violence: Intervention strategies for reducing aggression. Media Psychology, 5(4), 363403. Dollarhide, C. T., & Lemberger, M. E. (2006). "No child left behind": Implications for school counselors. Professional School Counseling, 9(4), 295-304. Efrat, M. (2011). The relationship between low-income and minority children’s physical activity and academic-related outcomes: A review of the literature. Health Education & Behavior, 38(5), 441451. Elledge, L. C., Cavell, T. A., Ogle, N. T., & Newgent, R. A. (2010). School-based mentoring as selective prevention for bullied children: A preliminary test. The Journal of Primary Prevention, 31(3), 171-187. Glanz, K., Sallis, J. F., Saelens, B. E., & Frank, L. D. (2005). Healthy nutrition environments: Concepts and measures. American Journal of Health Promotion, 19(5), 330-333. Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2007). School counseling to close the achievement gap: A social justice framework for success. Thousand Oaks, CA, US: Corwin Press. Jacobs, A. K. (2008). Components of evidence-based interventions for bullying and peer victimization. New York, NY, US: Springer Science + Business Media. Lee, J., & Bowen, N. K. (2006). Parent involvement, cultural capital, and the achievement gap among elementary school children. American Educational Research Journal, 43, 193-218.

WEST
 TISBURY
 SCHOOL
 COUNSELING
 PROGRAM
 

32
 
 


 


 

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Website [MDESE], 2011 http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/reportcard/rc.aspx?linkid=37&orgco de=07740020&fycode=2010&orgtypecode=6&. Newman-Carlson, D., & Horne, A. M. (2004). Bully busters: A psychoeducational intervention for reducing bullying behavior in middle school students. Journal of Counseling & Development, 82(3), 259-267. Olweus, D. (1993). Bullying at school: What we know and what we can do. Malden: Blackwell Publishing. Raynor, H. A. (2008). Evidence-based treatments for childhood obesity. New York, NY, US: Springer Science + Business Media. Reinke, W. M., Stormont, M., Herman, K. C., Puri, R., & Goel, N. (2011). Supporting children's mental health in schools: Teacher perceptions of needs, roles, and barriers. School Psychology Quarterly, 26(1), 1-13. Schmidt (2008) Counseling in Schools: Comprehensive Programs of Responsive Services for All Students, Fifth Edition. Pearson Publishing, Inc. Sheldon, S. B., & Epstein, J. L. (2005). Involvement counts: Family and community partnerships and mathematics achievement. The Journal of Educational Research, 98(4), 196-206. Song, S. Y., & Stoiber, K. C. (2008). Children exposed to violence at school: An evidence-based intervention agenda for the "real" bullying problem. Journal of Emotional Abuse, 8, 235-253. Van Voorhis, F. L. (2011). Adding families to the homework equation: A longitudinal study of mathematics achievement. Education and Urban Society, 43(3), 313-338. Wang, M. C., Rauzon, S., Studer, N., Martin, A. C., Craig, L., Merlo, C., et al. (2010). Exposure to a comprehensive school intervention increases vegetable consumption. Journal of Adolescent Health, 47(1), 74-82. Webb, T., Martin, K., Afifi, A. A., & Kraus, J. (2010). Media literacy as a violence-prevention strategy: A pilot evaluation. Health Promotion Practice, 11(5), 714-722.
 
 

Sponsor Documents


Recommended

No recommend documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close