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Family - March/April 2011

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Welcome to the Parkview Family Birthing Centers. Here, every baby is a miracle, and every birth
is a moment to cherish forever. So, to make your baby’s arrival even more special, Parkview now
offers a birth planner at all Family Birthing Centers. Someone to guide you through every step of the
process. You’ll also enjoy the privacy of your own room and receive experienced lactation support.
We’ll even help you design a personalized family hour so the moments right after your baby’s birth
are even more memorable. Call the Parkview Family Birthing Center nearest you to arrange a tour.
See how your little miracle will receive a big, warm welcome.
© 2011, Parkview Health PWC-A-027
Parkview Hospital 260.672.6500 Parkview Women’s & Children’s Hospital 260.672.6500
Parkview Huntington Hospital 260.355.3640 Parkview LaGrange Hospital 260.463.9300
Parkview Noble Hospital 260.347.8330 Parkview Whitley Hospital 260.248.9426
parkview.com
Little miracle. Big welcome.
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fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 1
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All kids really need is
YOU!
Kids thrive when parents visit
Life Steps
6 EXPECTING
Get ready for a healthy pregnancy
8 BABIES | 0- 1 YEARS
Baby can keep on rockin’
10 TODDLERS | 1- 3 YEARS
Vacationing with young kids
12- 13 TYKES | 4- 8 YEARS
Libraries make magic ever y day
14 PRETEENS | 9- 12 YEARS
Tax time = college savings time
20 TEENS | 13- 18 YEARS
Teens known for mischief since
time immemorial
6 EXPECTING
Get ready for a healthy
pregnancy
16- 18 COVER STORY
Negotiating the
child care maze
14 PRETEENS | 9- 12 YEARS
Saving for college
Special features, tips and more
11 Product reviews
15 Women’s Business Forum helps women lead, achieve
19 Healthy structure aids addiction recover y
21 CASA birthday party will help abused,
neglected children
22- 23 Scouting tradition brings learning, joy, amazement
23 Trees Indiana connects children with nature
24 Oak Farm Montessori parents donate 1,000 hours
26 Allergies? Maybe you can still have a pet
28 Batter y-powered comb good way to tackle lice
Teachable moments
5 POOPED- OUT PARENT PAGE
Have fun and get it all done
Humor Helps
7 FUNNY THINGS KIDS SAY
Local fami li es share
thei r funny stori es
Calendar
29- 32 FAMILY EVENTS
Acti vi ti es for you
and your fami ly
ON THE COVER: CONOR, 8 M ONTHS, I S THE SON OF M I TCH AND AM Y WOLF OF
ANGOLA. THE COVER PHOTO WAS TAKEN BY I N A FLASH PHOTOGRAPHI C STUDI O OF
ANGOLA.
ON THE COVER >>>
2 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
CONTENTS >>>
Spring is just around the corner! Our March/April Family magazine heralds the renewal
that comes with the rebirth of nature and also the beginning of our second year of support
by Friends of the Family. (They are listed on the inside back cover and back cover.) We
thank the ongoing supporters and the new Friends!
Friends of the Family enable us to provide this magazine free of charge by mail to any
person in the greater Fort Wayne area who requests it.
It is with great joy that I share with our readers this photo of Jane Aastrun, our first
grandchild. Jane, who you first “met” when her ultrasound photo was published in the
January/February issue, was born in Bergen, Norway, Feb. 5. Dorothy, our oldest daughter,
lives in Bergen, where she and her husband Simon have science-related careers. We can’t
wait to greet Jane in person, but until then we are very grateful for the Internet,
which allowed us to “meet” Jane and congratulate her parents when Jane
was only seven hours old. We feel very blessed!
This issue has excellent articles by a variety of area contributors.
The cover story contains information of vital importance to parents
seeking quality child care. Thank you to Andrea Sullivan for coming
up with the idea for this story and doing such a nice job with it!
If you have an idea for an article, please e-mail me at
[email protected] I appreciate the growing number of people
who are contributing quality articles! Thank you also to everyone who
shares their stories for Humor Helps — it is so much fun to compile!
Also, don’t forget to submit your family-focused events at fwevents.com
— or you can e-mail them directly to me.
May you enjoy the miracles of spring with your family!
Volume 7, Issue 2
March/ April 2011
Greater FW Family aims to provide parents with
helpful information so they can make sound
decisions while raising and educating their
children. Every child is unique. Please consider
your child’s individual development and needs
when using parenting information. Authors’
opinions and advice presented in FW Family do
not necessarily reflect the opinions of FW Family
and may not be applicable to all children. We
welcome your comments.
Greater FW Family
826 Ewing St.
Fort Wayne, IN 46802
Telephone (260) 426-2640
[email protected]
fwfamily.com
Greater FW Family magazine is a publication of
KPC Media Group Inc.
President
Terry Housholder
Vice President of Sales/ General Manager
Don Cooper
Chief Financial Officer
Donna Scanlon
Copyright 2011. Greater FW Family Magazine.
All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be
reproduced without written consent of the publisher.
The opinions expressed by contributors or writers do not
necessarily reflect the opinion of this magazine.
Distribution of this publication does not constitute an
endorsement of the products or services herein.
For quality reprints, please call (260) 426-2640.
Outside Greater Fort Wayne area mail delivery is $15 for
12 issues.
Publisher
Terry Housholder
[email protected]
Editor
Grace Housholder
[email protected]
Photographs by Chad Kline, dreamstime.com,
Metro Creative Connection, MultiAd Builder and
contributing organizations and individuals
For Advertising Information and Rates
Contact Advertising Director
Karen Bloom
(260) 347-0400, Ext. 110
[email protected]
(260) 426-5511
Presentation Editor
Erin Doucette
[email protected]
Creative Manager
Jane Minick
Welcome
to our March/April issue!
Grace Housholder
Editor, [email protected]
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 3
<<< LETTER FROM THE EDI TOR
Welcome, Jane!
Welcome to the fami ly!
We met you i n an amazi ng/ wonder ful way
W i th a vi si t at dawn on your natal day
You three, we three, connecti ng ri ght here
An ocean away but feeli ng qui te near
We mar veled at ti mi ng, wi sdom, per fecti on
Halo of whi te fuzz, unendi ng affecti on
Ears li steni ng, fi ngers gri ppi ng, eyes seei ng
We almost touched, smelled, felt your
verni x, your bei ng
Just seven hours old
Images, feeli ngs stamped forever i n hear ts
You are wi th us and i n us, i n all our par ts
We are one
Welcome!
— Grandma Grace, Feb. 5, 2011
Seven hours old
SI MON DANKEL
DOROTHY JANE DANKEL
holds daughter
Jane Aastrun Dankel, a few hours old.
Dorothy i s the daughter of Terr y and Grace
Housholder of Kendallvi lle.
DR. JOHN
ROSEM OND
>>>
Rosemond is America’s
most widely-read
parenting authority. He
is a best-selling author,
columnist, speaker and
family psychologist.
More information at rosemond.com.
M ARCH, APRI L CONTRI BUTORS >>>
4 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
ERI N DOUCETTE
>>>
Doucette i s the
presentati on edi tor
for KPC Medi a
Group, leadi ng
desi gn and layout
for several of i ts
publi cati ons. She, her husband,
Stephen, daughters Ella, 3, and Eva, 1,
li ve i n Hunter town. Her blog can be
read at fwfami ly.com. She can be e-
mai led at eri [email protected] ly.com.
NADINE KLINE
>>>
is a presentation layout
designer/ technical
coordinator at KPC
Media Group. She
and her husband
Corey are parents of
Gage, Ethan and
Sophia. She can be
reached at [email protected]
<<<
THE REV.
DANI EL D.
SCHRECK
Schreck, MS LCAC,
ICAC-II, is a
substance abuse
counselor with the
Northeastern Center,
Kendallville. Contact him at
[email protected]
<<<
KATE
COFFM AN
Coffman is the
program manager
for the College and
Career Counseling
(C3) initiative of the
Indiana Youth
Institute. C3 offers driveofyourlife.org and
triptocollege.org to explore career options
and college.
<<<
SHARON
STROH
Stroh of Angola is
the principal at SE
Resources, providing
independent
consulting work to
all areas of profit and non-profit manage-
ment and development. She can be
reached at [email protected]
or (260) 667-7668.
DR. TERRY GAFF
>>>
Gaff i s medi cal
di rector of the
emergency depar t-
ment at Parkvi ew
N oble Hospi tal i n
Kendallvi lle and the
N oble County EMS. He can be
reached at terr [email protected]
JENNA
ANDERSON
>>>
Anderson’s love
for libraries
began at an
early age. Now
the Kendallville
Public Librar y
multimedia
marketing
manager, she passes that love on to her son, RJ, 9. Jenna
and Rob, who met in high school, have been married 13
years. Contact her at [email protected] y.org.
HEATHER HERRON
Herron is a news anchor at WANE-TV. She lives with
her husband and two daughters in Fort Wayne. Contact her
at [email protected]
<<<
ANDREA SULLI VAN
Sulli van of Warsaw has j ournali sm and
Engli sh li terature degrees from Indi ana
Uni versi ty, Bloomi ngton, as well as
several years of experi ence i n publi c
relati ons and adver tori al wri ti ng for
vari ous busi ness-to-busi ness publi ca-
ti ons. She has spent the last few years
at home rai si ng her fami ly. Contact her
at (574) 269-9608 or
amsulli [email protected]
>
>
>
success
Hunger and boredom are major kid dissatis-
fiers — especially late in the afternoon. Take
care of both problems by stocking a shelf full
of healthy snacks down low in the fridge.
Now even young ones can help themselves!
Start with cheese cubes, apple slices, blueber-
ries and veggies with dip. These snacks won’t
spoil dinner. They’ re so nutritious they can BE
dinner!
Gather your child up in a hug while you relax
by looking out the window to watch birds at a
birdfeeder. You might want to say something
like, “ Look! The birds are having their supper.
Let’s be really quiet and watch for a while.
Then let’s get our supper ready too.”
<<< POOPED- OUT PARENT PAGE
Yeah, we’ ve been there.
But before you grab the
remote, and hi re the
electroni c baby si tter, tr y
these i deas.
H A V E F U N A N D G E T I T A L L D O N E !
R U just 2 TIRED 2 think?
Want more i deas?
Vi si t before5.org
Yes Mom and Dad
we mean you! By
remaining calm and
polite you can
change the
atmosphere in your
home and give
yourself time to think.
Tr y phrases like,
“ W ill you please…?”
and “ Thank you so
much for your help!”
Be a role model
Set yourself up for success
Watch your
language
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 5
Future mothers and fathers can do much to give
their unborn child every opportunity to be healthy
and strong. Here are simple steps that every woman
who is pregnant or who hopes soon to be pregnant
should take to heart.
1)
Take 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid every
day for at least one month before getting
pregnant to help prevent birth defects.
2)
Stop smoking and drinking alcohol. Smoking
during pregnancy is the single most preventable
cause of illness and death among mothers and
infants. Learn more about the dangers of smoking
and find help to quit before you get pregnant. When a
pregnant woman drinks alcohol, so does her unborn
baby. There is no known safe amount of alcohol to
drink while pregnant. If you’re planning a pregnancy,
stop drinking alcohol now.
3)
If you have a medical condition, be sure it is
under control. Some conditions include asthma,
diabetes, oral health, obesity or epilepsy. Poor control
of diabetes during pregnancy increases the chance for
birth defects and other problems for your baby. It can
cause serious complications for you, too. Existing
high blood pressure can increase the risk of problems
when you become pregnant.
4)
Be sure that your vaccinations are up to date.
5)
Talk to a health care professional about any
over-the-counter and prescription medicines
you are taking. These include dietary or herbal
supplements.
6)
Avoid contact with toxic substances or
materials that could cause infection at work and
at home. Stay away from chemicals and cat or rodent
feces.
7)
Bleeding and clotting disorders can cause
serious problems for women. These problems
include heavy menstrual bleeding (a disorder called
menorrhagia), bleeding and clotting complications in
pregnancy, and miscarriage. If you have a bleeding
disorder or have heavy menstrual bleeding, talk to
your health care provider.
8)
Learn about the harmful effects of STDs and
find out how to protect yourself and your baby
against infection.
This information is from the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. More information at cdc.gov.
6 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
Get ready
for a
healthy
pregnancy
H E A L T H Y B O D I E S
Star t foli c aci d before
pregnancy to help
prevent bi r th defects
If you have a
medical condition,
be sure it is under
control. Some
conditions include
asthma, diabetes,
oral health, obesity
or epilepsy
‘‘
’’
Alexys, 7, had the stomach flu. She
told her mother that she wished she
would never have eaten the bowl of
cereal before she went to bed the
night before because that is what
made her sick. Her mother
explained to her that the cereal had
nothing to do with her being sick.
Her mother told her she had a “ flu
bug.” Alexys’ eyes got big. W ith a
horrified look on her face she
asked, “ You mean I swallowed a
bug?”
— HEATHER ANTAL ( M OTHER OF
ALEXYS) OF TOPEKA
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 7
<<< HUM OR HELPS
HUMOR
HELPS
Readers, if you have a true funny kid
stor y (or a collection of stories)
involving you or your co-workers,
friends, students or family, please call
me at (260) 347-0738 or e-mail me
at [email protected]
— BY GRACE HOUSHOLDER
Sherri’s boyfriend’s oldest daughter woke up one Saturday morning, walked
out of her room with her hand on her forehead and a really terrified look
on her face. Sherri asked her what was wrong and she said she had a
NIGHTMARE. Sherri sort of smiled (expecting to hear about some monster
chasing her or something) and went ahead and asked, “ What was your
nightmare about, Sweetie?” She looked up with the most serious look on
her face and said, “ I dreamed I got married!”
— SHERRI OF MENTONE
W hen Margo and Dan
purchased their new front
loading washer her grandchil-
dren were impressed with all the
“ bells and whistles.” One
evening they had taken their little
chairs into the laundr y room
and were watching the clothes
in the washer and dr yer. W hen
asked what they were doing
they said, “ We’ re watching the
laundr y channel.”
— GRAM M Y AND PAWPAW ( M ARGO
AND DAN PHI LLI PS) OF BI G LONG
LAKE, WOLCOTTVI LLE
Joy was buckling Jac, 2, into
his car seat one morning a
few weeks after Christmas
when he said, “ I need some
more presents … I’ ll go see
Santa tomorrow!”
— JOY COOK ( M OTHER OF JAC) OF
FORT WAYNE
Janeen’s mother died recently, so
Janeen’s 3-year-old grandniece
learned from her parents about how
Great-Grandma was in heaven now.
Then she was told that they were going
to see Great-Grandma (at the funeral
home). W hen they got out of the car at
the funeral home, the 3-year-old
asked, “ Is this heaven!?”
— JANEEN LONGFELLOW OF ALBI ON
Zelma was babysitting
Cheyenne, 3. W hen
Zelma’s husband took his
glasses off, Cheyenne
said, “ Lloyd, put your
glasses back on. I can see
better when you have
glasses on!”
— ZELM A FELTNER OF
KENDALLVI LLE
FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY
I SABELLA,
1, already knows how to be
a pri ncess. She i s the daughter of Mat
and Mallor y Ri ce of Auburn.
BY DR. JOHN ROSEMOND
QUESTI ON:
Our first child, a 10-month-old boy,
bangs his head on the headboard of his crib when
we put him to bed. He doesn’t cry or exhibit any
distress, but he pushes himself to his hands and
knees and then begins rocking forward and
backward, banging his head in the process.
I’m very worried, although in all other respects,
he acts normally. Is this something I should tell his
doctor about? Can it be stopped, and if so, how?
ANSWER:
I’m not the least bit concerned about
your son, but I think you may have come down
with a moderate case of First-Time Parent Over-
Interpretation of Anything That Seems Even
Slightly Off the Norm Syndrome.
Unless dealt with successfully in its early stages,
this syndrome can and will worsen over time and
ultimately dooms parenthood to 18 or more years
of anguish over one insignificant thing after
another. Needless to say, the child in question is no
happier being the object of constant, and mostly
needless, parental anxiety.
Indeed, head-banging is associated with certain
profound forms of mental and emotional disability,
but otherwise happy, healthy infants have been
known to gently “bang” their heads as a means of
relaxation.
What your son is doing to put himself to sleep
is a form of what’s called “non-pathological head-
banging.” Consider it the physical equivalent of
counting sheep.
He gets up on his hands and knees facing the
crib headboard, begins rocking rhythmically back-
and-forth, gently banging his head in the process,
and in short order, he’s fast asleep.
8 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
Baby can keep on rockin’
B E H A V I O R
Indeed, head-
banging is associ-
ated with certain
profound forms of
mental and
emotional
disability, but
otherwise happy,
healthy infants
have been known
to gently “ bang”
their heads as a
means of
relaxation.
John Rosemond
‘‘
’’
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 9
BY ERIN DOUCETTE
We just took our 1-year-
old and 3-year-old on
vacation and I have to say, it
went remarkably well.
I think there are several
reasons the trip was a great
one to take with little ones.
Here’s my advice if you are
thinking of taking your
young children on vacation:
1)
Don’t go too far. Our
destination, Kalahari
waterpark in Ohio, is just
the right distance away to
make us feel like we are
really getting away, yet short
enough to easily keep two
small kids happy. A 3-hour
drive is perfect for us right
now. I think I’ll pass on
driving all day or taking my
kids on a plane ride for the time-being. Vacations
are for relaxing!
2)
Take an entourage. Having friends, Grandma,
Grandpa, cousins and aunts and uncles
makes the trip even more fun for everyone. And if
you have someone that will give you a little help
with the kids and give you a little adult time, all
the better.
3)
Relax on all your rules. With all the glorious
treats and candy at Kalahari it’s quite a
challenge to not have sugared-up little crazies in
your midst. But, like they say, if you can’t beat
them join them. It is vacation after all so it’s nice to
splurge, and you can always “lose” those bags of
candy when you get home.
4)
Take a rest. Luckily my girls enjoy taking an
afternoon break in the room. I’m sure that
helped their mood later on the day. Just be
prepared with books and magazines to keep you
entertained during naptime in your room.
5)
Go somewhere the whole family likes. I’m
sure one day my husband is going to have to
spend way more time than he’s ever wanted
looking at all things princess at Disney. But riding
waterslides and sitting in hot tubs? I think we can
handle that.
6)
Keep it short. A three-day trip seems like a
good amount of time to be gone. Not as hard
to cover things at work or home for three days as,
say, a week. And no one will be too homesick or
out of routine in that amount of time. So make it
short and sweet!
Vacationing with young kids
I think I’ ll pass on
driving all day or
taking my kids on
a plane ride for
the time-being.
Vacations are for
relaxing!
Erin Doucet t e
‘‘
’’
F U N A N D L E I S U R E
10 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
Star t small and i t wi ll seem li ke a breeze
GOI NG WI TH
cousi ns, aunts, uncles and grandparents made vacati on even
more fun for the Doucettes.
All-natural and
effective
Zarbee’s all-natural children’s cough
syrup is made from pure honey. Not only
does it suppress
the cough, it
tastes good and
boosts little
one’s immune
systems. This
worked
wonders on my
2-year-old
daughter’s
cough. And I
know she likes the way it tastes because
she asked for it after she was well. Made in
the USA. For more information visit
zarbees.com. — NADINE KLINE
Barney shapes
and colors
Fun and educational for toddlers and
preschoolers. This disc has a convenient
auto play
feature so you
don’t have to
wait for the
main menu
to load. It
kept my 2-
year-old
daughter’s
attention. She
stayed
entertained
and I could tell that she was absorbing
the information. — NADINE KLINE
<<< PRODUCT REVI EWS
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 11
Handy in a pinch
Not meant as a replacement for daily
hygiene. Rather a quick cleanup when
away from home.
Qwik Shower
Wipes come in
handy for today’s
busy family.
Individually
packaged and
freshly scented. They’re suitable for
camping, hiking, workouts and sports. For
more information visit qwikshower.com.
— NADINE KLINE
Smells like very strong lemons and feels
like a nice cold, wet napkin. Very durable
wipe indeed. Also convenient and
refreshing. Perfect for gym if you don’t
have time to take a shower. Long lasting
smell. — ETHAN KLINE, 4 TH-GRADER
12 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
Libraries
make magic
every day
C O M M U N I T Y R E S O U R C E S
BY JENNA ANDERSON
As a child, I always looked forward to walking into the
basement of Huntington’s old Carnegie library and being
surrounded by my favorite things.
The walls of the rooms were lined with shelves and each shelf
was stuffed with books that I would check out by the armload. I
don’t recall if my mother imposed a limit on me, but I hope that I
returned everything on time so that she didn’t have too many
fines to pay. If I did, she’s not holding it against me.
That library became a refuge for me. Reading books led to
writing my own stories as a child, which eventually led me to
become a television news writer and then a newspaper reporter.
Now I’ve come full circle and can use my personal experience to
encourage everyone to rediscover your library.
In the older libraries, and there are still a few great Carnegies
around, you can feel the history, the excitement, of the genera-
tions that have come before you. But the newer library buildings
hold just as much magic and wonder.
That’s what librarians in our area do best — make magic every
day for the children that walk through the doors. They create
spaces that are fun for kids. They stock the shelves with materials
they know kids will love and they plan programs that are both
educational and fun!
Libraries exist for you and your family. There is something for
everyone, even from an early age. Parents and caregivers can bond
with their babies through infant and toddler story times that
begin at birth. Preschool Story Time offers children creative activi-
ties, while showing them just how fun books can be. Elementary
students can take part in a variety of after school programs that
are not only fun, but offering unique learning opportunities. Teens
have programs all their own, ranging from gaming tournaments
to cooking classes. And adults can take advantage of a wide
variety of diverse programming designed for our busy lives,
including computer classes, craft programs and art exhibits.
Rock exper t Ji m Hayes talks
wi th home school ki ds and
thei r parents about the
vari ety of rocks, gems and
fossi ls i n hi s collecti on. Thi s
program at the South
W hi tley — Cleveland
Townshi p Publi c Li brar y i s
par t of the Fi eld Tri p Fri days
collaborati on wi th several
li brari es i n nor theast
Indi ana. In other photos,
chi ldren are decorati ng thei r
own pet rocks.
PHOTOS CONTRI BUTED
PI CTURED HARD AT WORK
i s a
regular at the South W hi tley
li brar y, McKi nley Swenson.
See LIBRARIES page 13
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 13
The Kendallville Public Library, along with many
others in the area, provides an online calculator to help
you determine how much library service is worth to
your family. You can find the Kendallville Public
Library’s calculator at kendallvilleli-
brary.org/calculator.htm. For example: If in one month
your family checks out just five adult books, 10
children’s books, three movies and attends two children’s
programs, that’s a savings of around $413! You can
calculate the savings to your family by customizing the
calculator to the way you use your library.
Home school families can even turn to their local
library for resources. A number of libraries around
northeast Indiana have teamed up to offer monthly
home school programs, called Field Trip Fridays. A
complete list of Field Trip Fridays from now through
May is available at participating libraries in Garrett,
Columbia City, Albion, Kendallville, Avilla, Auburn and
South Whitley.
From Page 12
LIBRARIES
PHOTOS CONTRI BUTED
14 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
BY KATE COFFMAN
The recession, coupled with the rising
costs of college tuition, means more
families are spending part of their
income, dipping into their savings and
taking out loans to help their children
pay for college. Last year, parents covered
47 percent of college costs, students
about 23 percent. Scholarships and grants
and families and friends picked up the
rest of the tab.
Parents pondering that funding
formula, reported in Sallie Mae’s annual
survey “How America Pays for College,”
might also consider this — the vast
majority of families are worried about
future tuition increases but still believe a
college degree is an investment in the
future.
Investing in a child’s future helps
explain the growth of college savings
plans, used last year by 15 percent of
families paying college bills, up from 9
percent just two years ago. The tax
season provides some incentive to
consider a college savings plan. An
Indiana College Choice 529 plan, which
costs just $25 to open, offers Hoosiers a
20 percent state income tax credit
($1,000 maximum credit) on annual
contributions. This 20 percent direct
return is in addition to tax-free growth
on the assets in a 529 account.
Anyone can open or contribute to a
529 plan — parents, students, grandpar-
ents, other relatives — and those who
are Indiana residents also can take
advantage of the tax credit. Accounts
also can be linked to the Upromise
Rewards Program at
Upromise.com/Indiana. The plan awards
additional dollars to college savings plans
based upon purchases — just like a
frequent flier or rewards card system.
Visit collegechoiceplan.com to learn
more.
Another option for those with larger
sums to invest is a Roth IRA. It takes a
minimum of $2,500 to open a Roth
account. An attractive benefit of a Roth is
that if the money saved exceeds the cost
of a child’s education, the money also
may be used for retirement. That differs
from funds in a 529 plan, which must be
spent on higher education.
While there is no income limit on 529
investors, those with annual incomes
greater than $120,000 (individual) or
$176,000 (couple) cannot contribute to a
Roth. There also are limits on the amount
that can be invested each year. Visit
irs.gov to learn more about Roth IRAs.
For more information on planning,
applying and funding for college, visit
triptocollege.org. This website, provided
by the Indiana Youth Institute with
generous support from Lilly Endowment,
Inc. is a free tool for Indiana families to
help get more Indiana residents prepared
for college.
Tax time
= college
savings
time
More online
Visit collegechoiceplan.com and
triptocollege.org to learn more.
M O N E Y
529 plan offers Hoosi ers 20
percent state i ncome tax
credi t, tax free growth
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 15
<<< CAREER SUCCESS
Women’s Business
Forum helps women
lead, achieve
BY SHARON STROH
No one achieves career success alone. The most successful
professionals nurture their networks, show support and give
more than they expect to get. If you are one of the millions of
women in the workforce looking for ways in which you can
stand out, or stand up, you will want to consider attending
the Women’s Business Forum at Trine University in Angola on
May 19.
The Women’s Business Forum got its start in August of
2008, when discussion began about providing a venue for
something other than the typical small business coaching
topics. Instead, a workshop that was unique to women’s
interests and special to their personal and professional growth
was developed.
Now in its third season, the forum has helped women from
Indiana, Michigan and Ohio learn how to achieve professional
success and personal achievement. Whether communicating
more expertly with co-workers, leading a more balanced
lifestyle, or gaining greater leadership qualities, participants
hear about specific steps to achieve their career aspirations,
and ways to keep focused on a development plan.
Last year’s experience entitled “Connectivity” received high
marks for relevance and personal impact. Evaluations
reflected an interactive and informative environment, filled
with meaningful topics and excellent presenters.
For 2011 the theme is “Career Success Strategies.”
Jamie Rose, international photojournalist, member of the
White House News Photographers Association, and a Kent,
Ohio, native, will present the keynote address. A wide variety
of workshops will again be offered; topics include networking,
value-driven leadership, presentation skills, knowing your
worth, embracing failure as a growth step and more.
Admission is $35 per person for the day-long event, and
includes lunch.
Presenting sponsors are the Regional Cancer Care Center
and host Trine University, along with KPC Media Group
(publisher of this magazine), the City of Angola, SCORE,
NIPSCO, Farmers State Bank, Cameron Hospital, the
Women’s Fund at the Steuben County Community
Foundation and others.
TripToCollege.org
find us on facebook:
facebook.com/triptocollege
TripToCollege.org will show you how.
This on-line resource is totally FREE and
specifically designed for Indiana students
and parents! Visit now for step-by-step
advice on planning, preparing and paying
for college.
It’s never too early or too late
to save for college.
fwFami l y.com March/April 2011 17 16 March/April 2011 fwFami l y.com
COVER STORY >>> <<< COVER STORY
Negotiating
the child
care maze
Website helps parents find
quality care in Indiana
BY ANDREA SULLIVAN
P
arents magazine’s list of Best Cities for Babies in the
United States ranks Fort Wayne No. 2 in the nation!
As expected, large cities like sunny Phoenix and
picturesque Seattle are on the current Best Cities for
Babies list, but they were ranked below Fort Wayne.
(See parents.com.)
The editors rated cities on the basis of population, quality child
care, infant safety and health, recreational opportunities and afford-
ability.
So, how did the Summit City knock out such big competitors
like Phoenix and Seattle with their beautiful locations, big city
amenities and hip downtown scenes? The answer can be found on
your computer.
That is where parents can find a website devoted to finding and
comparing child care providers within the state of Indiana. The
website, childcareindiana.org, a project of the Indiana Association
for Child Care Resource and Referral and the Indiana Bureau of
Child Care, allows parents to put in their zip code and find local
childcare providers that fit their families’needs. It also gives parents
vital information like staff-child ratios, hours of operation and an
overall rating of the facility.
The rating system, called Paths to Quality, was devised more
than a decade ago by the Early Childhood Alliance, a nonprofit
organization in Fort Wayne. The ECAstarted a quality-improve-
ment system to rate the city’s child-care businesses based on health
and safety standards, education of staff, and other factors. It became
so successful, the entire state of Indiana has now implemented it.
Pam Leffert, program director of the ECA, says she has seen
enormous strides in the quality of area child care since Paths to
Child care resources:
WEBSITES:
childcareindiana.org
ECAlliance.org
naccrra.org
PHONE NUMBERS:
Early Childhood Alliance:
(800) 423-1498 or (260) 745-2501
Important
questions to
ask care
providers:
• Will my child be
supervised at all
times?
• Is the group size
and number of adults
available appropriate
for the age of my
child?
• Have the adults
been trained to care
for children?
• Is this a safe and
healthy place for my
child?
• Is the program set
up to promote quality
( policies/ procedures,
evaluations, etc.) ?
• Does the program
encourage parent
involvement?
See CHILD CARE page 18
18 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
enormous strides in the quality of area child care since Paths to
Quality began. “I have been at Early Childhood Alliance for 13
years and I can see a big difference in the quality of programs
throughout the area,” she said. “I have also seen a real increase in
the interest and commitment to quality child care from all types of
child care programs.”
Participation in Paths to Quality is voluntary. Child care
providers who participate are ranked on one of four different
levels, from meeting children’s basic health and safety needs to the
highest ranking of national accreditation.
One Fort Wayne parent who used the Indiana Child Care
Resource and Referral system is Samantha Dunn. Before finding
the Indiana CCR&R, the young mother said she felt overwhelmed
when trying to find an appropriate day care setting for her infant
daughter.
“I was terrified. [The first place I called] I could barely talk to
the woman on the phone because there were so many babies
crying,” said Dunn. “All I could think was, ‘This woman has to
answer the phone instead of taking care of the babies!’”
Many parents who have tried to find day care can relate to that
feeling of confusion and fear. In the past, finding good day care
was a hit-or-miss proposition, generally guided by a word-of-
mouth recommendation and a “go with your gut” feeling.
Luckily, parents now have an easier way to compare the
different child care options available and find the best fit for their
child.
Dunn says that not only did the CCR&R provide a list of
childcare providers but also noted if it was a day care facility, single
home care provider, or church based ministry, hours of operation,
address and contact information. The website also featured a
valuable list of questions that parents should ask child care
providers.
“I would absolutely recommend it. There were so many
questions that I didn’t know to ask, but I am so happy that I did,”
said Dunn, who chose a church ministry setting for her daughter.
“[The website] has pretty much done the homework for you. It
was an amazing time saver, and there needs to be more informa-
tion put out there to let people know that this resource is
available.”
Finding child care is still a highly personal decision. What
works for one family or child might not work for another.
However, any tool that can help parents negotiate the maze of
options available is valuable, and the online referral system is a
good first step. Parents are still encouraged to follow through with
phone calls, questions and personal visits to the child care provider
before making their final choice.
”We would be thrilled if every family in Indiana had access to a
high quality child care program that met their individual needs
and was affordable,” said Leffert. “That is certainly something we
will continue to work on and advocate for.”
From Page 17
CHILD CARE
COVER STORY >>>
For more information or to join,
call (260) 672-6500 or visit parkview.com.
A woman’s health encompasses more than routine
doctor visits. And, as you move through life, needs
change and priorities shift. Parkview Women’s
Health Center is there for you at every stage with
programs and services to support your health,
nurture your well-being and enhance your life.
Membership is free.
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• Nurse Consultations
• Monthly Education
Programs
• Exercise Programs
• Wellness & Nutrition
Programs
• Support & Discussion
Groups
• L’Athene Skin Care
& Other Retail Items
• Massage &
Spa Services
• Lending Library
• Licensed Psychologist
• Health Screenings
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 19
<<< RECOVERY
BY THE REV. DANIEL SCHRECK
Over the past 30 years I have been
involved with organizations and people that
have dealt with many types of addiction and
provided some addiction counsel to those
connected to churches. Two years ago I
began working directly with people with
some intense addictions as a substance
abuse counselor. The No. 1 thing that I have
learned over the years about addictions is
that the addict needs a lot of healthy
structure to work through the addiction.
This structure helps break the cycle of
addiction by providing a schedule of healthy
activities. The structure builds an environ-
ment that can assist the person in recovery
by having a plan that the person in recovery
follows in order to keep away from people,
places and things that they associate with
substance abuse and behaviors that may
have led them to become addicted.
The structure helps the addict to begin
and maintain recovery. That structure must
provide ways of staying away from people,
places, things and behaviors that trigger the
brain’s “pleasure center” into thinking about
using. The addict begins to crave the
substance and then actively seeks out the
substance in order to use. Because of the
addiction the brain is not normal, it has
changed. This change is almost like the
transformation of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
The addictive brain takes over and
everything that the addict does is designed
to maintain the addiction.
The elements that build a healthy
structure are a specific time of reflection of
daily events; a daily schedule of events;
group therapy meeting (begin with at least
three per week and decreasing to one per
week for 6-9 months); weekly support
meetings (Celebrate Recovery, AA, NA, MA,
etc.); accountability to a sponsor, family and
friend; perhaps individual meetings with a
substance abuse counselor; exercise;
employment or looking for employment;
giving back to the community
(volunteering); and working through a 12-
step program.
In addition, healthy structure can come
from a church congregation that
understands how to help people with “life
controlling” situations to live more produc-
tive lives.
For more information about recovery
from addiction and treatment options
contact Park Center, Fort Wayne; Oaklawn
Psychiatric Center, Goshen; Bowen Center,
Albion; or the Northeastern Center,
Kendallville.
Healthy structure breaks addiction cycle
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Call Kenny: 574-238-4498
BY DR. JOHN ROSEMOND
QUESTI ON:
We allow our almost 16-
year-old daughter to text on weekends
if her grades through the week have
been good. She knows I read almost all
of what she writes. It disturbs me that
she’s telling other children strange lies
about herself. For example, we went to
a ballet recently. She told her friend she
had been in the ballet. We went to a
parade. She told her friend she’d partici-
pated in the parade. Other than this,
she’s a wonderful and very moral young
person. What does this sort of lying
mean?
ANSWER:
It probably means that that
your daughter knows you are going to
read her text messages, and she’s having
a bit of fun knowing that she’s getting a
rise out of you. Her friend knows she’s
not a ballet dancer, right? Right.
I think she and her friend are getting
a major hoot out of this. It’s called
mischief, something teens have been
known for since time immemorial.
QUESTI ON:
What do you think about
a 13-year-old child playing poker with
my kids, ages 8 and 9. Even though
they weren’t using money, I didn’t think
it was age-appropriate so I stopped
them. Do you think I am being overly
protective?
ANSWER:
Is the issue playing cards,
playing poker, or playing cards with an
older child? If card-playing is the issue,
that’s a values issue that I have no right
to comment on. If you don’t mind your
kids playing cards, but you don’t like
the idea of poker, then I’ll point out
that in the absence of betting, playing
poker is no different than playing Old
Maid except that poker, unlike Old
Maid, might improve your kids’
understanding of probability and
general math skills.
If the issue is playing cards with an
older child, my feeling is that as long
as the play is adult-supervised, there’s
no inherent harm in the situation.
20 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
F A M I L Y D Y N A M I C S
Teens known for mischief
since time immemorial
Teen’s text li es may be hoax on i nterested parents
Area residents will have a fun-filled
opportunity April 15 to celebrate an
important milestone and help abused and
neglected children.
Northeastern Indiana CASA will be
celebrating 25 years of advocating for
abused and neglected children in
LaGrange, Steuben, Noble, DeKalb and
Whitley counties.
The Mid-America Windmill Museum
in Kendallville will be transformed into a
gala birthday party venue, complete with
a cupcake birthday cake.
Food stations will feature the “best of
the best” from restaurants in the five
counties CASA serves. In addition, wine
and beer will be available.
No big-time birthday party would be
complete without party games and lots of
balloons. In addition, there will be a
silent auction and “fund a need.”
The need in northeast Indiana is
critical, says Kristi Bachman, executive
director. “For 25 years, Northeastern
Indiana Court Appointed Special
Advocates have provided a voice for
powerless children involved in judicial
proceedings; advocated for their best
interests, and have striven to improve
their quality of life. But the need for
volunteers continues to rise,” she says.
CASA’s operating revenue comes
primarily from courts, state funding, and
the United Way. But those funds are
proving to be insufficient. “We are unable
to adequately serve the growing need of
our counties,” Bachman says.
That is why they came up with the
idea for the birthday party — to celebrate
25 years of service and, of far more
importance, to raise much-needed funds
to meet current and future needs.
When the birthday candles are blown
out, we know what the biggest wish will
be.
Help your presence to be part of the
present!
“It is critical to help the children in
your county have someone who will
speak for them,” Bachman says. “Think
how many children’s lives can be
changed.”
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 21
CASA birthday party will help
abused, neglected children
CASAFORCHI LDREN.ORG.
On Apri l 15 N or theastern Indi ana CASA
wi ll be celebrati ng 25 years of advocati ng
for abused and neglected chi ldren i n
LaGrange, Steuben, N oble, DeKalb and
W hi tley counti es. The Mi d-Ameri ca W i ndmi ll
Museum i n Kendallvi lle wi ll be transformed
i nto a gala bi r thday par ty venue.
Contact
For more information contact: Kristi Bachman,
Northeastern Indiana CASA, Inc., P.O. Box
111, Albion, IN 46701. Phone: (888) 636-
6101; Online: neincasa.net
<<< CHARI TY EVENT
22 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
YOUTH ORGANI ZATI ONS >>>
BY HEATHER HERRON
I just finished
unloading 98 cases of
cookies and stacked them
in my living room.
Ninety-eight cases. That’s
1,176 boxes of cookies.
Or approximately 29,400
individual wafers of
chocolaty, peanut buttery,
lemony, minty goodness.
Yes, I’m a Girl Scout
leader — and a proud one. And that’s why every
year I schlep to Cookie HQ, load up my car, and
set about the monumental task that awaits me
during Girl Scout Cookie Time!
Really, it’s not about the cookies. OK, it IS
about the cookies. But it’s also about teaching the
young ladies in my two troops about setting
goals, being a leader, gaining confidence and
more.
I was a Girl Scout for 12 years. My mom was
my leader — and her mom was her leader. So
when I had my daughters, I knew I was destined
to take charge of a troop someday.
Over the years, we’ve done countless arts and
crafts projects, learned basic first aid, collected
food and other items for a local women and
children’s shelter, camped in the rain, climbed
rock walls, canoed, conducted science experi-
ments and sung campfire songs. Oh, we’ve also
eaten dozens of s’mores. But who’s counting?
The girls have made new friends, conquered
their fears of spiders in their tents, and learned
how to tie knots, start a fire and sew on a button.
But as is often the case, the teacher becomes
the student. I have continually been amazed at
the things they’ve taught me: loads of patience,
the ability to laugh at myself, and how to really
stop to appreciate beauty in the small things.
( And no, Rachel, I’m not talking about the garter
snake you wanted to take back to our campsite.)
The once-pigtailed girls are older now; some
will enter middle school in the fall. They are
becoming young women and entering a new
phase of their lives. I know that a few won’t
continue on with Scouting, despite my best
Scouting
tradition brings
learning, joy,
amazement
G I R L S C O U T S
Fast Facts:
WEBSI TE:
girlscoutsnorth-
ernindiana-michiana.org
COOKI E SALE:
Ends March 14
HEADQUARTERS:
2135 Spy Run Avenue,
Fort Wayne
Phone: (260) 422-3417
MI SSI ON:
Girl Scouting
builds girls of courage,
confidence, and character,
who make the world a
better place.
FOUNDER:
Juliette
Gordon Low organized
the first Girl Scout Troop
on March 12, 1912,
in Savannah, Ga.
I NTERNATI ONAL:
A
worldwide family of 10
million girls and adults in
145 countries.
PHOTO CONTRI BUTED
THREE GENERATI ONS OF GI RL SCOUTS
smi le broadly at the Mother/ Daughter
Sock Hop i n October 2009. In back are Juli e Herron and daughter Heather
Herron. In front are Dani elle, 11, and Carly, 9
See SCOUTS page 2 3
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 23
efforts to engage them in all of the wonderful things it has to
offer.
At my recent high school reunion, I reminisced with
friends about our days as Girl Scouts: that time Stephanie ran
a needle through her hand when we were learning about
embroidery, how Sheryl sold more than 1,000 boxes of
cookies all by herself, our week-long trek to the Opryland
Jamboree, making apple butter over an open fire at Hillary’s
house, the visit to Washington, D.C., and the harmony we
created when singing around a fire at Camp Windigo.
So as I glance at the mountain of cookies in my living
room and the even more daunting mountain of related
paperwork on the kitchen table it’s my sincere wish that
someday these magnificent ladies look back at the experi-
ences we’ve had together and smile.
Maybe, just maybe, when they have daughters of their
own, they’ll feel strongly about continuing Girl Scout
traditions. And if they do, I hope they grow to appreciate not
what I did for them as their leader, but what being their
leader has done for me.
In the meantime, if you need some Thin Mints for the
freezer, you know where to find them!
From Page 22
SCOUTS
Trees Indiana
connects kids
with nature
Trees Indiana, an organization dedicated to educating and
engaging youth environmental stewards, culminated its
yearlong series of NeighborWoods projects with a major tree
planting in the Fort Wayne Renaissance Pointe neighbor-
hood.
Youth from Trees Indiana’s TreeKeepers program joined
forces with 100 community volunteers and neighborhood
residents to plant 50 trees in this central-city neighborhood.
This project offers a unique opportunity for people to
understand the contributions of trees to the health, beauty,
and livability of their communities.
While protecting and maintaining these trees, the
TreeKeeper youth learn first-hand how their positive actions
produce positive results.
More information online: treesindiana.org
<<< YOUTH ORGANI ZATI ONS
=-..: .?. .c|| · R ·.-.4 -.-.
Allen County War Memorial Coliseum W 4000 Parnell Avenue W Fort Wayne
www.ipfw.edu/tapestry W [email protected] W 260-481-6854

Preregistration required by April 11
Celebrate the fabric of women
at our 10th annual day of
inspiration, renewal, and
education for women in all stages
of life while raising funds for
women’s scholarships at IPFW.
1980’s “Brat Pack” actress, theatre
favorite, best-selling author, and current
star in the breakout hit The Secret Life of
the American Teenager
Molly Ringwald
Keynote Speaker:
I
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Register Now!
www.ipfw.edu/tapestry
24 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
COMMUNI TY >>>
V O L U N T E E R I S M
Following in the footsteps of the school’s
founder, the late area philanthropist Lorene
Dekko Salsbery, the parents at Oak Farm
Montessori of rural Avilla in Noble County
wanted to set an example for their children
about the responsibility of caring about
one’s community, recognizing problems and
the importance of doing something about it.
The idea to echo the philanthropic
activities was the result of meetings between
the Oak Farm Parent Organization
president Jackie Henry, volunteer coordi-
nator Patty Fulk and head of school Judith
Cunningham. Using the motto, “It is not
how much you give, but that you give,” the
school reached 90 percent participation
over the past five months. Almost 200
families donated 1,000 hours and raised
$40,000.
“It made my children proud to see that I
cared enough about their school to bring
their grandparents into the classroom. They
are still talking about it,” said Melinda
Smith.
Oak Farm Montessori earlier this year
received full accreditation from the
Independent Schools of the Central States
and the American Montessori Society,
making it the first school in the Fort Wayne
area to hold such dual accreditation.
“ISACS accreditation is the gold
standard for private, independent schools in
the Midwest,” said Cunningham, “and
recognition by ISACS honors not only the
effort of all of us, but also the vision of our
late founder, who wanted to make
exceptional learning opportunities available
and affordable to families in northeast
Indiana.”
The only other ISACS accredited school
in the area is The Canterbury School.
“Accreditation honors more than the
efforts and skills of the teaching
and administrative staff,” said board chair,
Erica Dekko. “The accrediting agencies
examine our financials, our relationships
with our parents and, of course, our
curriculum. This is as much an honor for
our parent community, in that it recognizes
their involvement in school activities and
their children’s education, as it is for our
academic leadership.”
Oak Farm Montessori School is on a 54-
acre campus in Avilla.The school opened in
January 2000 and serves nearly 200
students, with programs ranging from
infants through eighth grade.
Oak Farm
Montessori
parents donate
1,000 hours
Parents rai se $40,000, set
example for students
PHOTOS CONTRI BUTED
PARENT VOLUNTEER TERRI CLARK
weeds the Oak Farm gardens
alongsi de her two daughters,
Madi son and Mari ah. Also,
volunteers Mandy Westropp and
Meli nda Smi th greet grandpar-
ents and assi st at the snack table
at Bri ng Your Grandparent to
School Day. More i nformati on
about the school at oakfarm.org.
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 25
26 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
FAMI LY PETS >>>
D I S C I P L I N E
Yes, perhaps you CAN have pets
if you or other people in your home
have allergies, says Bonnie Buell at
Pawsitively Paradise.
Many opportunities exist to help
ease the problem. Here are Buell’s
Top 10 tips.
1)
When getting pets groomed
be aware of the ingredients in
shampoo. Often if people are
allergic to detergents, they may be
allergic to the shampoo their
groomer is using. There are
shampoos that are hypoallergenic,
with no dyes, no perfumes and
harsh cleaning agents. Also many
pets are allergic to these things as
well.
2)
In cats, the saliva mixed with
the natural oils in cats hair
shafts causes many upper respiratory
issues. Getting cats groomed or just bathed
on a regular basis cuts down on these
issues tremendously. Research has proven
that washing your cat two to three times a
week can remove up to 84 percent of
existing allergens and reduce the future
production of allergens. Some claim that
using cool, distilled water in the bath may
also reduce allergen levels. Frequent
brushing will reduce the amount of hair
and dander loose in your home.
3)
Ask that no perfumes, powders or
other styling agents that groomers
may use be put on pets when getting
groomed. At least have groomers check
ingredients of those products being used
for certain red flags agents.
4)
Keep pets out of bedrooms. Most
bedrooms are very enclosed. Fans are
also bad for upper respiratory issues. Cool
humidifiers are much better for bedrooms.
5)
People getting hamster, guinea pigs,
rabbits etc. need to remember even if
they are not allergic to that type of animal,
they may have issues with the bedding that
needs to be used to house that pet.
6)
Getting dogs and cats shaved does
not help with allergies! The dander
and oils are still on pets skin. The only real
solution is to have the animals bathed, with
proper products to reduce the amount of
these two elements. A protein (Fel D1) is
the allergen in the cat’s saliva that causes
problems for allergy sufferers.
7)
Other pets to consider are of
course fish, birds (although some
people have allergies to these as well)
hairless breeds of cats and dogs
(although there is a lot of bathing and
upkeep to these as well due to natural
oils) and reptiles.
8)
Often, the designer dog craze,
which revolves around mixing a
poodle with nearly every other breed on
the planet to play on the heartstrings
and wallets of allergy sufferers seeking
hypoallergenic dogs, is misleading to
potential pet owners. Do not assume
that mixed breeds with one poodle
parent will automatically be low-allergen
dogs.
9)
These breeds tend to have less fur
than other breeds, but more
importantly, generally shed less dander.
Generally, these breeds are characterized by
an assortment of coat types — very curly
coated dogs (poodles of all sizes,
Portuguese Water Dogs, Bedlington
Terriers, Bichon Frises), hairless dogs
(American Crested, Chinese Crested
Hairless), corded dogs (Puli, Komondor,
poodles) and wirehaired dogs (Wirehaired
Fox Terrier, Broken Coat Parson/Jack
Russell Terrier, Wirehaired Dachshund,
Rough Coat Brussels Griffon, etc.).
10)
Male cats produce more allergenic
secretions than females. Intact
males produce more than neutered males.
Dark cats tend to produce more than light-
colored ones (no one knows why). Kittens
produce fewer allergens than adults. So, a
light-colored female cat might work out
better for people with cat allergies.
Allergies? Maybe you can
still have a pet
PHOTO CONTRI BUTED BY PAWSI TI VELY PARADI SE
SPECI AL ATTENTI ON
wi th groomi ng can help reduce pet
allergens.
:KHQGR,VFKHGXOHWKHÀUVWGHQWDOYLVLW"
A child’s first dental visit is an important one. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommends that
your child’s first visit be made when the first tooth erupts or no later than his/her first birthday. This visit provides time-critical
opportunities for education, nutritional counseling and to begin a preventative oral health plan to help reduce the risk of your
child getting cavities. There is increasing evidence that when professional fluoride is applied within the first two years of a tooth’s
eruption, the child’s overall risk of getting cavities is reduced.
You can make the first visit to the dentist enjoyable and positive if you convey a positive attitude. The first visit will usually be
done with the child in the parent’s lap. Even though all of the teeth may not be present, it is important to assess the eruption of the
teeth, development of the jaw, nutrition and fluoride. The discussion may include topics such as finger sucking, pacifiers, trauma,
grinding, caries risk assessment, and the age old question, “Will my child need braces?”. The first visit will also include a tour of
the office with a member of the staff to familiarize your child with the dental equipment used, a comprehensive exam, cleaning of
the teeth and fluoride application , and digital x-rays (we like to call them pictures), depending on need.
Dentists strive to make each child’s first visit a good and memorable one, so that they can
establish habits to ensure a lifetime of good oral health.
Dr. Derrow is a board certiñed pediatric dentist, a
2004 graduate of Indiana University SchooI of Dentistry
and a 2006 graduate of the Indiana University/RiIey
HospitaI for ChiIdren Pediatric DentaI Residency Program.
She practices at Auburn Pediatric Dentistry in Auburn, IN.
The ofñce is Iocated at 1005 NichoIas Street, 260-927-0707.
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 27
THE NEWS SUN
102 N. Main St.
Kendallville, IN 46755
Star
The
118 W. Ninth St.,
Auburn, IN 46706
GREATER FORT WAYNE
Business Weekly
TIMES
Community Publications
826 Ewing St.,
Fort Wayne, IN 46802
:PNU\WMVY`V\Y-9,,Z\IZJYPW[PVU[VKH`
+65»;40::(50::<,6-
Family
GREATER
FORT WAYNE
Fill out this form and mail to: KPC Media Group, P.O. Box 39,
Kendallville, IN 46755 or drop it off at any KPC office.
Name _______________________________________________________________________________________
Address ____________________________________________________________________________________
Apt. # ________________ Phone ( ) ___________________________________________________
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State_________ Zip_________E-Mail ____________________________________________________________
CHECK ONE:
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Important note: The FREE 2-year subscriptions are brought to you by the Best Friends of the Family and are available only to people living in the Greater
Fort Wayne area. Outside of the Greater Fort Wayne area subscriptions are $15 for two years.
THE
HERALD
REPUBLICAN
45 S. Public Square
Angola, IN 46703














































































































































































































































28 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
T H E R O B I C O M B
BY DR. TERRY GAFF
Head lice infest the hair of millions of
people.
One of the things that prompted this
unhappy subject was public relations
material about a product called Robi Comb
from LiceGuard (liceguard.com).
The information they sent included the
following description: “The Robi Comb is a
non-invasive electronic lice comb powered
by a single AA battery that detects and
destroys lice on contact simply by combing
it through dry hair. When the Robi Comb’s
metal teeth touch lice, the lice get zapped,
die and then get combed away.
“Unlike chemical treatments, the Robi
Comb can be used as often as you like and
can be used repeatedly by the entire family.
The Robi Comb lets you know by an
audible signal whether or not head lice are
present, so it can be used to detect an
infestation as well as treat it.
“In fact, many school nurses are now
using the Robi Comb for exactly that
reason.”
I called a local school nurse to ask if she
would be willing to try the product on her
students.
I was a bit surprised to learn she has
been using it for years, including loaning it
out to families for treatment.
Head lice are small insects that live on
the human scalp and feed on human blood
several times a day. They can cause itching
and allergic reactions during their 30-day
lifespan, but will die within a day or two if
they fall off.
The lice lay tiny eggs that are attached
to the hair, called
nits. Since the nits
stay put, many
times, they are
easier to find than
the lice
themselves.
When
checking for lice
without the Robi
Comb, you
should look
carefully for nits and lice at the temples,
behind the ears, and at the neck. Then,
comb the hair after wetting it with
conditioner and then passing a lice detection
comb methodically through the hair. After
each pass of the comb, the excess
conditioner is wiped on sanitary paper and
examined for lice, nits, and eggs with a
magnifying glass.
If you find that someone in your family
is infested with lice and you cannot borrow
a Robi Comb and do not have (or want to
spend) about $30 for the device, what can
you do?
You could just use a fine-tooth comb
and some cream rinse repeatedly until no
more evidence can be found.
Other relatively inexpensive over-the-
counter methods of treatment include
using olive oil in the hair prior to thorough
fine-tooth combing and then removing the
oil with Dawn dishwashing detergent. Tree
oil, petroleum jelly and mayonnaise have
also been rumored to work.
There are even some people who resort
to shaving off all of their hair!
After combing out all of the nits, wash
in hot water (130°F) all clothing, bedding,
towels and hair products (combs, brushes)
used by infested people. Consider dry
cleaning or keeping non-washable fabrics
in a sealed plastic bag for two weeks. A
multi-use lice spray may be used on
furniture and bedding that cannot be
washed or dry-cleaned.
The most common way of getting lice is
from head-to-head contact with someone
who already has them at school, at home,
during sports, on the playground, at
slumber parties, at camp, or any number of
other places. So everyone who might have
been exposed to an infested person should
be informed to watch out for lice.
Since head lice move by crawling, they
may also be spread by sharing clothing such
as hats, scarves, coats, or sports uniforms
and other belongings like hair ribbons,
barrettes, combs, brushes, towels, or stuffed
animals recently worn or used by an infested
person.
Truthfully, considering the amount of
hassle, I would probably use the Robi Comb
for 10 days. If that failed, I would probably
shave my head! That would certainly freak
out a lot of people.
Battery-powered
comb good way
to tackle lice
HEALTH >>>
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 29
THURSDAY, MARCH 3
International Women’s Day
5-9 p.m. International Women’s Day celebration at
IPFW Walb Union Ballroom. Free. Dr. Linda Malkas,
oncology chair for the Vera Bradley Foundation for
Breast Cancer, is keynote speaker. Opening
processional of 100 women dressed in traditional
clothing of an international country or First Nation.
The processional will represent the diversity of our
community and the symbolic unity of women
everywhere determined to make a better world for
themselves and their families. Volunteer for the
opening processional at IWDEvents.com/volunteers
or (260) 748-8364
SATURDAY, MARCH 5
Throw Mountain
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. A speaking tour for people in their
20s and 30s and the churches who love them.
Location: Kendallville Public Library, 221 S. Park
St., Kendallville. Contact: The Rev. Jim Kane of
Kendallville on Facebook and throwmountains.com
Spring Awakenings
1-3 p.m. “Spring Awakenings at Arrowhead Prairie.”
Meet at Arrowhead Prairie. Take Redding Drive off
of W. Jefferson, in 1.5 miles turn left on Aboite
Road, go 1/8 mile on the right, park by the
buildings. Hike and see how the new seedlings are
doing, including seeing the area burned last fall.
Wear boots. Sponsored by Little River Wetlands
Project. Free. Contact: [email protected] or (260) 478-
2515
Sensory Sensitive Films
10 a.m. Easter Seals Arc in cooperation with Regal
Cinemas is bringing sensory sensitive films to this
area. Regal Cinemas will turn the lights up, and the
sound down, and guests are free to get up, dance,
walk shout, and whatever else feels right. Outside
food permitted. Concession stands will be open.
Location: Coldwater Crossing, 211 W. Washington
Center Road, Fort Wayne. Rango (rated PG),
starring Johnny Depp, about a chameleon with an
identity crisis. Admission charge. Contact Tony
Belton (260)469-2777
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9
Shots For Tots
1-4:30 p.m. Free infant/child immunization clinic.
DeKalb County Health Department, 220 E. 7th St.,
Auburn. Requirements: infant to age 18. Shot
record. Must be accompanied by parent or legal
guardian. Contact DeKalb County Health
Department (260) 925-2220
SATURDAY, MARCH 12
Home and Garden Show
Kendallville Spring Home and Garden Show at the
Event Center in Kendallville. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Dozens of demonstrators and displays. Give aways.
Prenatal Education
9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Prenatal education. DeKalb
Memorial OB Conf. Rm., 2nd Floor, 1316 E. 7th St.,
Auburn. Fee $20. Need-based financial assistance
available. Registration required: Julie Wagner at
(260) 920-2510
SUNDAY, MARCH 13
Home and Garden Show
Kendallville Spring Home and Garden Show at the
Event Center in Kendallville. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Dozens of demonstrators and displays. Give aways.
MONDAY, MARCH 14
Breastfeeding Education
6-8 p.m. Breastfeeding education. DeKalb Memorial
OB Conf. Rm., 2nd Floor, 1316 E. 7th St., Auburn.
Fee $5. Need-based financial assistance available.
Registration required: Julie Wagner (260) 920-
2510
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16
‘Achieving Your Potential’
7:30 p.m. “Achieving Your Potential.” Patrick Henry
Hughes was born with a rare genetic disorder that
left him without eyes or the ability to fully straighten
his arms or legs. Despite overwhelming challenges,
Hughes started playing the piano at the age of 9
months. Today he is a virtuoso pianist, trumpet
player, and vocalist. In his book titled “I Am Potential:
Eight Lessons on Living, Loving, and Reaching Your
Dreams,” he recounts life lessons that are at the
heart of his success. Hughes has appeared on
Oprah, Extreme Makeover: Home Edition, The Ellen
DeGeneres Show, and the Grand Ole Opry. IPFW
Omnibus Lecture Series on the IPFW campus in
The John and Ruth Rhinehart Music Center’s 1,600-
seat Auer Performance Hall. Doors open at 6:30
p.m. Free admission. Free parking. More information:
omnibuslectures.org or contact Louise Teague,
(260) 481-6495 or [email protected]
TUESDAY, MARCH 22
Healthy Eating
6:30 p.m. Eating Healthy on a Budget 2. Parkview
Noble Hospital dining room, U.S. 6 W, Kendallville.
Learn how to fix nutritious and delicious meals for
your family without breaking the bank! Reservations
required by calling (260) 347-8161 or toll free
(888) 737-9311, Ext. 78161.
CALENDAR
Elkhart County
LaGrange County
Steuben County
DeKalb County
Noble County
Kosciusko
County
Whitley
County
Allen County
Adams
County
Wells
County
Huntington
County
Defiance County
Paulding County
Van Wert County
Williams County
Goshen
Shipshewana
LaGrange
Angola
Kendallville
Albion
Auburn
Bryan
Columbia City
Warsaw
Fort Wayne
Decatur
Bluffton
Huntington
Paulding
Defiance
Van Wert
More events online at fwfamily.com.
SERVI NG THE GREATER FORT WAYNE AREA
30 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
THURSDAY, MARCH 24
40 Under 40
6 p.m. Who are the 40 under 40 who are making a
difference in the greater Fort Wayne area. The
Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly “40 under
40” event. Location: YOLO Event Center, 4201 N.
Wells St., Fort Wayne. Details: fwbusiness.com
FRIDAY, MARCH 25
Salamander Strut Night Hikes
7:30 p.m. Friday, March 25, and Saturday, March
26. Meet at the Eagle Marsh barn, 6801 Engle
Road, Fort Wayne. Witness an astounding natural
phenomenon under the cover of darkness: the mass
migration of the salamanders. Be ready to get dirty;
we’ll be turning over logs and wading into shallow
water wetlands. Wear rubber boots and bring a
flashlight if you can. Sponsored by Little River
Wetlands Project. Free. Contact: [email protected] or
(260) 478-2515
SATURDAY, MARCH 26
Salamander Strut
See March 25 information
SATURDAY, APRIL 2
Say Hello to Spring
1-3 p.m. “Regeneration ‘Sun’-sation.” Meet at the
Eagle Marsh barn, 6801 Engle Road, Fort Wayne.
Join us to search for signs that spring has sprung.
We may see spring’s first flowers and eggs for this
year’s amphibian populations. Don’t forget the
rubber boots! Sponsored by Little River Wetlands
Project. Free. Contact: [email protected] or (260) 478-
2515
SATURDAY, APRIL 9
Alphabet Affair
7:30 p.m. Help raise money for literacy in Steuben
County and have a great time dressed up to
celebrate something beginning with the letter “J.” An
annual event looked forward to by many. Location:
Glendarin Hills Golf Club, Angola. For ticket informa-
tion contact the Steuben County Literacy Coalition:
steubenliteracy.org
Noble County Health Fair
7-11 a.m. Noble County Health Fair at Central
Noble High School Cafetorium. Reduced cost
blood tests, chem 17, $17; hemogram, $8; PSA,
$20; and thyroid, $20. Plus a variety of health
displays and information. No appointments. Call
(260) 347-8161 or toll free (888) 737-9311, Ext.
78161 for more information.
THURSDAY, APRIL 14
DeKalb County Senior Expo
8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. (Health Fair 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.)
Senior Expo sponsored in part by DeKalb County
Council on Aging. National Military History Center,
5634 County Road 11-A, Auburn. Contact: Meg
Zenk (260) 925-3311 or [email protected]
FRIDAY, APRIL 15
CASA Birthday Party Fundraiser
See story on page 21.
Girl Scout Fundraiser
The girls in Girl Scout troops 20157 and 20063 are
earning their Bronze Awards —the third highest
award in Girl Scouting. As part of the service
project requirements, they are hosting a Used Book
Media Sale. Collecting books, cds, dvds, vhs tapes,
etc. at the collection boxes at Deer Ridge,
Covington, and Lafayette Meadows Elementary
Schools. Sale will be held Friday, April 15, and
Saturday, April 16, at Deer Ridge. Proceeds will be
split among a local charity and the schools the girls
CALENDAR
ToII frcc: 1-888-462-4693 www.thchowcschooI.org
Bovs 6 wcck camp:
lune l9 - luív 29
Bovs first
3 wcck camp:
lune l9 - luív 8
Bovs Sccond
3 wcck camp:
luív l0 - luív 29
GirIs 1 wcck camp:
luív 3l - Aug. 5
THE HOWE SUMMER CAMP
MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR SUMMER!
­ A bíended progrum oí ucudemícs und
recreutíon íor bovs und gírís uges 9-l5
­ Locuted on beuutííuí Cedur Luke, lndí-
unu's cíeunest íuke
­ Cur cumps stress seíí-díscípííne, ío-
cus, structure, respect íor uuthorítv, íeud-
ershíp und churucter
­ Actívítíes íncíude rííe, urcherv, bout-
íng, svímmíng, nuture studv, gumes,
phvsícuí truíníng, ruppeíííng, hígh ropes
course, horsebuck rídíng, scubu und
snorkeííng
fwFami l y.com March/April 2010 31
attend (Deer Ridge, Covington, Lafayette Meadows,
and Canterbury.) Contact: Heather Herron at
[email protected]
SATURDAY, APRIL 16
KPC Community Garage Sale
The KPC Garage Sale at the Noble County
Fairgrounds, Kendallville. Admission donation for
Newspapers in Education. Dozens of booths.
Details at kpcnews.com
English Tea
The Garden Gals —Marty Diller and Bonnie Snyder,
both of Angola —will host an English Tea.
Homemade foods and teas to sample.at the
Fremont Public Library this spring, April 16, with
details to be announced. That tea will feature a
Gene Stratton-Porter re-enactor. Stratton- Porter
was a Hoosier author.
SUNDAY, APRIL 17
Childcare & Camp Expo
1-4 p.m. Childcare & Camp Expo at the Plex South
location. One-stop shop for parents looking for safe
childcare for their children, as well as, summer
camps for the 2011 season. Parents can “interview”
several centers in one day. Early Childhood Alliance
will provide materials for parents at the Expo and
“teach” them how to interview daycare providers
and summer camp supervisors.
FRIDAY, APRIL 22
Earth Day
3:30-4:30 p.m. “Earth Day Tree Planting.” Meet at
the Eagle Marsh barn, 6801 Engle Road, Fort
Wayne. Tree planting at the largest habitat restora-
tion project in the area. Help plant native trees and
shrubs at Eagle Marsh. Contact: [email protected] or
(260) 478-2515. If you will be bringing a grou
contact Betsy Yankowiak: [email protected]
Website: lrwp.org
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27
‘Activism: Then and Now’
7:30 p.m. Tom Rush and Country Joe McDonald
“Activism: Then and Now.” In a moderated format
with acoustic musical elements, the legendary song
writers discuss how music was used as an outlet for
social commentary and protest in the 1960s, and
society’s response to national issues today. Rush
helped shape the folk music revival in the ’60s and
its renaissance in the ’80s and ’90s. McDonald’s
music straddles the two polar events of the ’60s —
Woodstock and the Vietnam War. Location: IPFW
campus in The John and Ruth Rhinehart Music
Center’s 1,600-seat Auer Performance Hall. Doors
open at 6:30 p.m. No charge. Free parking. More
information: omnibuslectures.org or contact Louise
Teague, (260) 481-6495 or [email protected]
FRIDAY, APRIL 29
Tapestry 2011
Actress Molly Ringwald will be the luncheon
keynote speaker at Tapestry-A Day for Women, at
the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum.For more
information on the Dedication Award, Ringwald.
Contact: ipfw.edu/tapestry or (260) 481-6854 or
[email protected]
SATURDAY, APRIL 30
Safety Rodeo
8 a.m. to noon. Parkview Noble Rehab Bike Rodeo
in the Parkview Noble Rehab parking lot (across
from the ER entrance). Kids, preschool through age
12, get a bicycle safety lesson and then apply what
they learned as they ride their bikes on a set up
safety obstacle course. All kids signed up get fit for
a new bike helmet free and additional family
members can purchase bike helmets at a reduced
cost. Reservations required by calling (260) 347-
8824 or toll free (888) 737-9311, Ext. 78824.
ONGOING EVENTS
Home and Garden Show
The 38th annual Fort Wayne Home and Garden
Show returns to the Allen County Memorial
Coliseum March 3-6 featuring over 650 home and
garden exhibits. Hours are 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Thursday and Friday; 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Saturday,
and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. This year’s event,
themed “Fall in Love with Your Home Again,” will
feature an expanded Garden Gallery filled with
thousands of fragrant blooms and breathtaking
landscape showcases. Michael Weishan, host of
PBS’ “Victory Garden” and former gardening editor
of both Country Living and New Old House
magazines, will share design tips, professional
advice and humor at 4 and 7 p.m. on Thursday, and
at 1, 4 and 7 p.m. on Friday. Showgoers also are
invited to laugh with and learn from The Duct Tape
Guys, 3 and 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and 12
noon, 3 and 7 p.m. Saturday. Main entrance to the
show is off Coliseum Boulevard at the stoplight.
Contact: (260) 432-1705, (800) 695-5288, online:
home-gardenshow.com.
Little River Ramblers
Every Tuesday in March: 9-11 a.m. “Little River
CALENDAR
BROOKE BARENFANGER, ANGOLA
THI S I S A PI CTURE OF MY LI TTLE SI STER
Gabri ella surrounded by stuffed ani mals that my other
si ster ,Hannah, put around her.
Ramblers” Meet at the Eagle Marsh barn, 6801
Engle Road, Fort Wayne, to explore the preserve’s
interesting plants and wildlife. Sponsored by Little
River Wetlands Project. Free. Contact:
[email protected] or (260) 478-2515
Spring Break Workshops
Spend Spring Break at Science Central. Children
are welcome to participate with or without their
parents, but parents must remain in the building.
Ages: 3 years and up. Cost: $3/Session (pre-
registered), $4/session at the door, plus regular
admission to Science Central. Times: Sessions are
from 11 a.m. to 12 noon and 1-2 p.m. each day.
First come, first served —space is limited, so
register today. Topics: A Rainforest in Fort Wayne,
Tuesday, March 22. Swing from the branches like an
orangutan, make your own jumping poison dart frog,
learn about conservation of rain forest habitats and
eat a tasty, chocolate-covered insect snack. After
the workshop, be sure to visit the newest Science
Central traveling exhibit, “Our Weakening Web: the
Story of Extinction.” Innovation Station, Wednesday,
March 23. Let out your inner creative genius as you
invent a casing that will protect an egg dropped
from Science Central’s roof, perfect a bristle-bot
creation and more. Twist and Shout, Thursday,
March 24. You will learn how strength, quickness,
balance and hand/eye coordination all contribute to
make a great athlete while balancing on stilts,
spinning on a disk and competing in an obstacle
course. Chemical Concoctions, Friday, March 25.
Put on your lab coats and goggles and mix some
crazy chemical combinations to design your own lip
balm, candy creations and clay dough. Online:
sciencecentral.org or call (260) 424-2400, ext. 451.
Peter Pan Exhibit
Ends April 10. Peter Pan, the mischievous, magical
boy who refuses to grow up, visits the Conservatory
this winter. Join him as he whisks Wendy, John, and
Michael Darling away to Neverland. There they meet
Peter’s loyal Lost Boys and the tiny fairy Tinker Bell,
have adventures with the Indian princess Tiger Lily,
and battle the evil Captain Hook. Online: botanical-
conservatory.org. Location: Foellinger-Freimann
Botanical Conservatory, 1100 S. Calhoun St., Fort
Wayne. Phone: (260) 427-6440. Closed Mondays.
‘Thoroughly Modern Millie’
East Noble High School, Kendallville, presents
“Thoroughly Modern Millie” April 14-16 at 7 p.m.
each night and April 17 at 2 p.m. Box office: (260)
347-7167 Online: hs.eastnoble.net/theatre
Sports, Lake & Cabin Show
2nd annual Outdoor Sports, Lake & Cabin Show,
March 18-20, Allen County Memorial Coliseum, Fort
Wayne. More than a hundred exhibitors, attractions,
seminars and clinics on vacations, travel, hunting,
fishing, log cabin and cottage living, RVs, motor
sports, boating, biking, hiking. Games. Contests.
Prizes. Show hours are Friday, 12 noon to 9 p.m.;
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Admission is $10 per person; children 12
and under are admitted free of charge. Parking $4
per car. Contact: (317) 227-7419 or sportsandcab-
inshow.com.
Help for Homeless
Fort Wayne Rescue Ministries auction to benefit
homeless women and children in the Fort
Wayne region Saturday, May 14, at the Grand
Wayne Center with proceeds going toward the
new Charis House homeless shelter for women
and children. The Charis House does not
receive government funding of any kind. Tickets
$ 60. To purchase a ticket cont act Melissa
McKeeman at (260) 426-7357 or
[email protected] For auction
sponsorship opportunities or to donate an item
to the auction, cont act Tracy Williams at (260)
625-5043 or [email protected]
Community Book Drive
Book collection for pediatric clinics, community
centers. Ends March 31. Where: All Half Price
Books locations: 533 E. Coliseum Blvd. (Fort
Wayne) Half Pint Libraries were created to give
children and their families the chance to read
and share books while st aying at pediatric
clinics and community centers across the
nation. All of the books collected during the 6-
week drive will be donated to local non-profit
and community organizations for children in the
community. The drive accepts any type of
children’s book, including Spanish language
books, as long as they are in good condition.
More information about Half Price Books:
hpb.com. Half Price Books will match each
book donated during the drive. Books donated
through the Half Pint Library program provide an
escape from the challenges faced by children,
while helping to boost literacy outside of school.
Private Zoo Tours
Enjoy an intimate and informative “ private tour”
at Black Pine Animal Sanctuary in Albion
featuring behind-the-scenes access with an
animal keeper. Private tours last up to two
hours, available by appointment only for ages
eight and up November through April. Fee
charged. Call (260) 636-7383 for det ails or to
schedule. Online:
blackpineanimalpark.com
New radio show for moms
Moms, a special radio show for you is on HG
Radio Network every Thursday from 10-11 a.m.
You can link to it from mom2momtv.com.
Listen live every Thursday from 10-11 a.m. or an
archived podcast anytime you want. Kim Shea
Richards will have lots of interesting guests
including Fort Wayne mayoral candidate Paula
Hughes on March 11 to discuss how mother-
hood has prepared her for mayor.
KRI S READE, WOLCOTTVI LLE
GRANDSON
BRAD
and hi s
best fri end
explore along
the creek
last spri ng.
We found a
bunch of
mushrooms!
32 March/April 2010 fwFami l y.com
Best Friends
of the
Family
Thank you to before5.org and these family-focused locations!
BEFORE5.ORG AND THESE BEST FRIENDS BRING EACH ISSUE TO YOU!
Getting You Back on Top!
Cameron Memorial Community Hospital
Well into the FUTURE
416 E. Maumee St., Angola
260-665-2141 ext. 2144
The Rehab Center
THINK ABOUT IT....
Now is the time to consider
enrolling your student at
St. John Lutheran.
ST. JOHN LUTHERAN SCHOOL
Christ Centered Academic Excellence
Pre School - 8th Grade,
Now Enrolling for the 2011-12 School Year
347-2444
www.sjlc.net
43 N. 200 W.,
Angola 260-668-PAW8
NOT JU8T FOR BOARD¡NGl
D¡D YOU KNOW? WE OFFER.
· Health & Wellness - Massage &
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· Grooming
· Daycare
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· Grief Counseling
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Angola
200 Hoosier Drive
260-665-9494
Kendallville
1930 E. Dowling St.
260-347-4400
Auburn
1800 Wesley Road
260-925-2453
LaGrange
2155 N. SR 9
260-463-7144
Inpatient Services
1850 Wesley Road,
Auburn, IN
260-927-0726
• Individual Counseling
• Group Counseling
• Consultation & Education
• Drug & Alcohol Counseling
• Child & Adolescent Counseling
• Family Counseling
• Geriatric Services
• Inpatient Mental Health Services
HOSPITAL
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PET CARE
YOUTH AGENCY
COUNSELING EDUCATION
COMMUNITY
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Thank you to before5.org and these family-focused locations!
EDUCATIONAL FIELD TRIPS!
· Buggy Rides · Hay Rides · Amish Dinner
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140 1/2 North Harrison Street · Shipshewana, IN
574-238-4498 º www.buggylanetours.com
ouburn pediofric
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State of the art dental facility for infants, children,
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now ucceptinq new putients
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Augers, Shanties, GPS/Fish Finders, Trolling Motors, Columbia Omni Heat Product, Gift
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Angola - Angola Square - 260-668-3500 Auburn - Auburn Plaza - 260-927-1095
TOURISM
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