of 79

GEOGRAPHIC

Published on 2 weeks ago | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 1 | Comments: 0
174 views

Comments

Content

Can ap ort LNG Oil Canap Handling Facil Facil ity Oil Pollution Emergency Plan Final

2 0 1 4 J u n e 2 6 – 14-9187

i

Execut iv ivee Summ ary This Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facilit Facility y (C-OHF) (C-OHF) Oil Oil Pollution Pollution Emergency Plan (OPEP) has been prepared pursuant to Section 168(1)(d) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (CSA, 2001) for Transport Canada review. This OPEP was developed primarily based on the requirements for procedures, equipment and resources as set out in legislation Section 168(1)(e) of the CSA,2001 and in regulations for Response Organizations and Oil Handling Facilities.

Canaport Cana port LNG Oil Handling Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

3

v

Table of Cont ents 1.0 

2.0 

3.0 

Introduction

1

1.1

Purpose and Objective.................................................... 1

1.2

Description of Facility....................................................... 1

1.3

Legal Framework.............................................................. 2

1.4

Boundary of Control ......................................................... 3

1.5

Correspondence ............................................................... 3

1.6

Plan Review....................................................................... 3

Resources

4

 2.1

Introduction ........................................................................ 4

 2.2

Personnel ........................................................................... 4

 2.3

Equipment .......................................................................... 5

 2.4

Logistics.............................................................................. 7

Mobilization

9

3.1

Introduction ........................................................................ 9

3.2

Incident Manager.............................................................. 9

3.3

Activation Procedures...................................................... 9

3.4

Roles and Responsibilities ........................................... 10

3.4.1

Responsibilities of the Incident Manager................... 10

3.4.2

Responsibilities of the HSSE Manager (or designate) ............................................................................................ 10

3.4.3

Responsibilities of the Canadian Coast Guard ........11

3.4.4

Responsibilities of the Environmental Emergencies Science Table.................................................................. 12

3.4.5

Responsibilities of the Response Organization........ 12

3.5

General Response Procedures ................................... 12

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

4.0 

5.0 

6.0 

3.5.1

Initial Response .............................................................. 12

3.5.2

Initial Corrective Actions ............................................... 17

3.5.3

Termination of Response Actions............................... 17

HEALTH AND SAFETY

18

4.1

Introduction ......................................................................18

4.2

Site Control ...................................................................... 18

4.3

Safe Working Practices ................................................. 18

4.3.1

General ............................................................................. 18

4.3.2

When Operating a Vessel............................................. 18

4.3.3

Personal Protective Equipment ................................... 19

4.4

Jetty Operations and Response .................................. 19

4.5

Volatile Emissions .......................................................... 19

4.6

Material Safety Data Sheets ........................................ 20

4.7 

Weather Limitations ....................................................... 20

4.7.1

Cold Weather Precautions............................................ 20

Training and Exercise

21

5.1

Introduction ......................................................................21

5.2

Training............................................................................. 21

5.3

Exercise Program ........................................................... 21

5.4

Response Equipment Maintenance............................ 22

Response Strategies

23

6.1

Introduction ......................................................................23

6.2

Scenarios ......................................................................... 23

6.3

Sensitive Resources ...................................................... 23

6.4

Containment .................................................................... 23

6.5

Basic Booming Strategies............................................. 24

6.5.1

Containment Booming................................................... 24

6.5.2

Diversion / Deflection Booming ................................... 24

6.5.3

Exclusion Booming......................................................... 24

6.5.4

Boom Monitoring............................................................. 24

6.6

Weather Precautions ..................................................... 25

6.6.1

Cold Weather Response............................................... 25

6.7 

Shoreline Clean Up Strategies .................................... 25

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

7.0  8.0 

6.7.1

Natural Recovery ............................................................ 26

6.7.2

Flooding ............................................................................ 26

6.7.3

Low-Pressure, Cold Water Wash................................ 26

6.7.4

Low-Pressure, Warm Water Wash ............................. 26

6.7.5

High-Pressure, Cold Water Wash............................... 27

6.7.6

High-Pressure, Warm/Hot Water Wash..................... 27

6.7.7 

Steam Cleaning .............................................................. 27

6.8

Removal and Disposal Techniques ............................ 27

6.8.1

Manual Removal............................................................. 27

6.8.2

Vacuums .......................................................................... 28

6.8.3

Mechanical Removal ..................................................... 28

6.8.4

Vegetation Removal....................................................... 28

6.8.5

Passive Sorbents............................................................ 28

6.8.6

Mechanical Tilling/Aeration ..........................................29

6.9

Shoreline Characteristics..............................................29

6.9.1

Bedrock Shorelines........................................................ 29

6.9.2

Man-made Solid Shorelines ......................................... 29

6.9.3

Boulder Beaches ............................................................ 29

6.9.4

Pebble-cobble Beaches ................................................ 29

6.9.5

Sand-gravel Beaches .................................................... 30

6.9.6

Sand Beaches................................................................. 30

6.9.7 

Tidal Flats.........................................................................30

6.9.8

Mud Flats.......................................................................... 30

6.9.9

Marshes ............................................................................ 30

Communications Emergency Shutdown Systems Appendices A

Site Layout

B

Incident Form

C

Training Records

D

Scenarios

E

Sensitivities

F

Clean Up Strategies

G

Oil Handling Facility Declaration

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

31 32

References Acronyms and Abbreviations

Figures Figure 1 - Various Components of C-OHF......................................... 2 Figure 2 - Typical Notification Procedure ........................................... 11 Figure 3 – Initial Response Decision Plan.......................................... 13 Figure4 - ResponseEquipment........................................................ 32

Tables Table 1 - Facility Description............................................................. 2 Table 2 - Canaport LNG Personnel ................................................... 4 Table 3 - Personnel and Equipment Involved During Cargo Transfer Operations .................................................................. 4 Table 4 - Available Equipment at C-OHF........................................... 5 Table 5 – Additional Available Spill Response Equipment .................. 5 Table 6 – Additional Resources for Vessels to Assist in an Oil Pollution Incident ....................................................................... 6 Table 7 – Additional Sources of BoomTrucks, Cranes and BoomLifts Table 8 – Additional Resources for Construction Equipment (Excavators, Backhoes, Loaders, Dump Trucks and Fill) .................. 6 Table 9 – Available Rental Companies in Vicinity of C-OHF ............... 6 Table 10 – Available Vacuum Truck Rental Companies In Vicinity of COHF ............................................................................ 6 Table 11 – Security Service Providers ............................................... 7 Table 12 – Available Emergency Services in Vicinity of C-OHF.......... 7 Table 13 – Available Industrial Suppliers In Vicinity of C-OHF ............ 7 Table 14 – Available Machine Shops In Vicinity of C-OHF ................. 7 Table 15 – Ships Agents In Vicinity of C-OHF.................................... 8 Table 16 – Sheen Colour and Appearance to Determine Volume of Slick ...................................................................................15 Table 17 – C-OHF Exercise Program ................................................ 22 Table 18 – Shoreline Categories in Bay of Fundy .............................. 25

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

6

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

1

1 .0 

Introduction

1.1 

Purpose and Objective The objective of the Canaport LNG (C-LNG) Oil Handling Facility (C-OHF) Oil Pollution Emergency Plan (OPEP) is to provide the means to properly asses and take appropriate action to mitigate the effects of an accidental release of oil into the marine environment. The plan outlines the procedures for reporting a release and mobilization procedures for equipment, materials and personnel required for containment and recovery of a release. This OHF OPEP has been drafted in accordance with the Oil Handling Facilities Standards (Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response, 1995) and the Response Organizations and Oil Handling Facilities Regulations (Government of Canada, 1995) made under the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 (Canada, 2001).

1.2 

Description of Facility The C-OHF consists of the following components, which are illustrated in Figure 1: •



Canaport LNG Canaport Mispec

The C-LNG facility is a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) offloading and regasification facility that has a daily capacity of 1.2 billon cubic feet per day. The C-LNG facility began operations in June 2009 and consists of three 160,000 m3 LNG storage tanks, a jetty, a regasification plant and offices. In 2012 the facility underwent a limited upgrade to enable it to become a LNG export facility. The Canaport LNG facility is located on Mispec Head, immediately east of Canaport Mispec, at 45o12.3’ N latitude and 65o58.8’ W longitude. The C-OHF will utilize the Canaport LNG 400 m jetty connected to the shore by a 300 m bridge. A crude oil cargo transfer arm and connection valve connects the cargo transfer hose to the ship on the C-LNG jetty. The crude oil cargo transfer arm is connected to a 762 mm steel line that runs 1036m. from the C-LNG jetty to the CANAPORT Mispec Terminal as indicated in Figure A-1, located in Appendix A. The Canaport Mispec facility is the on shore storage facility for Irving crude oil shipments. The Canaport Mispec facility began operations in 1970 and consists of 18 crude oil storage tanks, interconnecting pipelines, a site office and a 762 mm pipeline connection to the Canaport Offshore monobuoy.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

2

Canaport Mispec

Canaport LNG

Based on the Canada Shipping Act the C-OHF will be a Level 4 facility with a scenario spill size of 50m3 as summarized in Table 1. TABL E 1 - FACILITY DESCRIPTION

Level

4

1.3 

Maximum Transfer Rate

Scenario Spill Size

> 2000 m3/hour

50 m3

Legal Framework This OPEP was developed in accordance with the following Federal Standards and Acts: • • •



Canada Shipping Act, 2001 – Section 168 (1)(d and e) Oil Handling Facilities Standards (TP12402) Response Organization and Oil Handling Facilities Regulations (SOR/95-405) Environmental Response Arrangement Regulations (SOR/2008-275)

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

3









1.4 

Pollutant Discharge Reporting Regulations (repealed, SOR/2012-69) Regulations for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and Dangerous Chemicals (repealed, SOR/2012-69) Vessel Pollution and Dangerous Chemicals Regulations, Part 2, Division 1 – Oil, Subdivision 5 – Transfer Operations (SOR/2012-69) Canadian Environmental Protection Act (S.C. 1999, c. 33)

Boundary of Control The C-OHF OPEP applies only when an oil tanker is secured alongside until the time it departs the berth as well as any oil pollution emergencies originating from C-OHF (e.g.: Oil pipeline rupture or transfer arm failure).

1.5 

Correspondence Any and all correspondence in relation to this plan should be forwarded to: Canaport LNG PO Box 2029 2530 Red Head Road Saint John, NB E3L 3T5 Attn: Adolfo Jose Azcarraga Gomis, General Manager Phone: (506) 638-1300

1.6 

Plan Review In accordance with Section 17 of the Response Organizations and Oil Handling Facilities Regulations (SOR/95-405) this plan will be updated on a yearly basis and after an oil pollution incident or exercise. Personnel at C-LNG shall review this plan and record any revisions annually.

Maintenance and review of this plan is the responsibility of the C-LNG General Manager. All Revisions will be evaluated  and distributed to all plan holders by  C-LNG.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

4

2 .0 

Resources

2.1 

Introduction The resources section provides a listing of the personnel, contractors and logistical resources that are likely to be utilized during an oil pollution incident at the C-OHF.

2.2 

Personnel The personnel listed in Table 2, are employees of C-LNG who have received oil spill response training and will be available to respond in the event of a release. TABL E 2 - CANAPORT LNG PERSONNEL

Name

Position

Role in Oil Pollution Emergency

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Trevor Brown

Operations

Field Operators

Tony Lyons

Operations

Field Operators

JT Kroll

Operations

Field Operators

Mike Adams

Operations

Field Operators

John Estabrooks

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Rejean Levesque

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Aaron Lewis

Operations

Field Operators

Trevor Breau

Operations

Field Operators

Jeff Keleher

Operations

Field Operators

Kyle MacLeod

Operations

Field Operators

Troy Smyth

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Brad Doskas

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Rick Brown

Operations

Field Operators

Greg VanWart

Operations

Field Operators

Craig MacDonald

Operations

Field Operators

Justin Hanson

Operations

Field Operators

Kevin Tillman

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Jamie Allison

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Rick Spears

Operations

Field Operators

Brett Saunders

Operations

Field Operators

Todd O’Brien

Operations

Field Operators

Ryan Watson

Operations

Field Operators

Scott Kilpatrick

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Gordon Oram

Operations Coordinator

Control Panel

Fraser Forsythe

HSSE Coordinator

Incident Manager

Sergio Carvana

HSSE Manager

Incident Manager

Derek Thorne Dave Stuart

During cargo transfer operations the personnel listed in Table 3 will be present to assist in the cargo transfer operations and will provide immediate spill response in the event of an accidental release. TABL E 3 - PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT INVOLVED DURING CARGO TRANSFER OPERATIONS

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

5

Position

Employer

Number

Location

LNG Team Leader (OSC)

Canaport LNG

1

On Jetty and Ship

LNG Field Operator (TRT)

Canaport LNG

1

On Jetty and Ship

Mooring Master

Canaport Offshore

1

Onboard Ship

Shipboard Operators

Canaport Offshore

2

Onboard Ship

Terminal Personnel

Canaport Mispec

3

Canaport Mispec

DMK or Other Contractor

3

On Water (adjacent to Ship)

Atlantic Towing

1

On Water (adjacent to Ship)

Vessel of Opportunity (VOO) Stand By Tug

2.3 

Equipment The equipment presented in Table 4 will be dedicated to the C-OHF and will be present and in operational condition during cargo transfer operations. TABLE 4 - AVAILABLE EQUIPMENT AT C-OHF

Equipment 54“ Offshore Boom Tracking Buoys VOO Hull Magnets

Description Containment boom, 2 reels located on towable trailers stored on land adjacent to jetty

Quantity 3000 ft. (1500 ft. per reel)

Spill tracking buoys with strobe fitted

2

3 response persons in boat during cargo transfer operations.

1

Magnets that attach 54” boom to hull of ship

8

5” boom and 18” absorbent pads

On DMK Vessel and on Jetty.

Sorbents

When a crude oil tanker is not at the C-OHF jetty the tracking buoys and hull magnets will be stored onshore in a trailer at the C-LNG facility. Table 5 to 10 provide a listing of various equipment and resources that may be required in the event of an oil pollution incident at the C-OHF. TABLE 5 – ADDITIONAL AVAILABLE SPILL RESPONSE EQUIPMENT

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

ALERT

Saint John, NB

(506) 632-4499

Atlantic Towing Ltd.

Saint John, NB

(506) 648-2790

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

6

TABL E 6 – ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR VESSELS TO ASSIST IN AN OIL POL LUTION INCIDENT

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

ALERT

Saint John

(506) 632-4499 24 hrs

Atlantic Towing Ltd.

Saint John

(506) 648-2790 24 hrs

DMK Marine Ltd.

Saint John

(506) 635-4150 or Cell (506) 658-8340

Jordive Ltd.

Saint John

(506) 763-3261 or Cell (506) 636-0057

ALERT II

Saint John

(506) 643-1281

TABL E 7 – ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF BOOM TRUCKS, CRANES AND BOOM LIFTS

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Irving Equipment

Saint John

(506) 635-5555

Larry’s Welding and Crane Rentals

Saint John

(506) 633 1987

MacDonald Crane Service Ltd

Saint John

(506) 667-6666 After hours (506) 647-0745

TABL E 8 – ADDITIONAL RESOURCES FOR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT (EXCAVATORS, BACKHOES, LOA DERS, DUMP TRUCKS AND FILL)

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Gulf Operators

Saint John

( 506 ) 633-0116

TABL E 9 – AVAILAB LE RENTAL COMPANIES IN VICINITY OF C-OHF

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

A To Z Rental

Saint John

( 506 ) 633-1919

Atlantic Rentals Ltd.

Saint John

( 506 ) 658-1408

Ready Rentals Ltd.

Saint John

( 506 ) 635 8911

Kennebecasis Rentals ( 1992 ) Ltd.

Quispamsis

( 506 ) 847-2792

TABL E 10 – AVAILABL E VACUUM TRUCK RENTAL COMPANIES IN VICINITY OF C-OHF

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Atlantic Industrial Cleaners

Saint John

( 506 ) 652-9178

Newalta

Saint John

( 506 ) 693-9967

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

7

2.4 

Logistics Table 11 to 15 provides a listing of potential available logistic resources in the event of an oil pollution incident. TABL E 11 – SECURITY SERVICE PROVIDERS

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Industrial Security Ltd.

Saint John

(506) 648-3060

TABL E 12 – AVAILAB LE EMERGENCY SERVICES IN VICINITY OF C-OHF

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Saint John Regional Hospital

Saint John

(506) 648-6000

Saint John Police Dept.

Saint John

911 or (506) 648-3333

Fire Department

Saint John

911 or (506) 649-6030

Ambulance

Saint John

911

St. Joseph’s Hospital

Saint John

(506) 632-5555

TABL E 13 – AVAILAB LE INDUSTRIAL SUPPLIERS IN VICINITY OF C-OHF

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Source Atlantic

Saint John

(506) 632-1000

Chandler Sales

Saint John

(506) 658-8000

Wolseley Industrial Products

Saint John

(506) 634-8115

Frank Fales and Sons Ltd.

Saint John

(506) 633-7700

Estey Industrial and Safety

Saint John

(506) 634-1288

TABL E 14 – AVAILAB LE MACHINE SHOPS IN VICINITY OF C-OHF

Company Name

Location

Telephone Number

Custom Fabricators and MachinistsCFM

Saint John

(506) 635-5656

Maritime Industrial Machining

Saint John

(506) 633-0984

Bourque Industrial Ltd.

Saint John

(506) 633-7740

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

8

TABL E 15 – SHIPS AGENTS IN VICINITY OF C-OHF

Name

Office Telephone #

Home Telephone #

Mobile Phone #

F.K. WARREN Sean Perry

(506) 635-1303

(506) 763-2710

(506) 636-1255

FURNCANMARINE & ROBERT REFORD Kevin Creighton

(506) 632-1090

(506) 832-3832

(506) 636-1325

H.E. Kane Agencies Bob Kane

(506) 632-0947

(506) 632-0947

-

KENT LINE LIMITED Kevin Lagos Dave Keating

(506) 648-2779 “

-

(506) 636-2051 (506) 647-1218

SEABRIDGE Bob Sharp

(902) 449-9000

-

-

NORBULK

(506) 657-7555

-

-

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

9

3 .0 

Mobilization

3.1 

Introduction This section details the immediate actions to be performed in the event of an oil pollution incident that occurs at the C-OHF. It outlines the required notifications, the immediate actions to be taken to mitigate the impacts of the spill, and the assessment required to determine the appropriate course of action. The intent is to carry out these actions as soon as practicably and safely possible after the incident occurs in order that the appropriate spill response procedures are initiated. As per the Oil Handling Facilities Standards (Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response, 1995) the following priorities shall be considered for the purpose of establishing the priority of measures to be taken during the response to an oil pollution incident:

3.2 

1.

The safety of the facility’s personnel;

2.

The safety of the facility;

3.

The safety of the communities living adjacent to the facility;

4.

The prevention of fire and explosion;

5.

The minimization of the oil pollution incident;

6.

The notification and reporting of the oil pollution incident;

7.

The environmental impact of the oil pollution incident; and,

8.

The requirements for cleaning up the oil pollution incident.

Incident Manager Once an oil pollution incident is discovered, the C-LNG Team Leader at the scene assumes the role of Incident Manager. The Incident Manager is responsible for the safety of all personnel at the scene. Once the personnel’s safety has been established, they are to determine the source of the leak, if it is safe, they should take action to stop the leak by all reasonable means. The typical notification procedure is outlined inError! Reference source not found.. The incident must be reported to the C-LNG HSSE Manager or Coordinator or in their absence the CLNG on call Manager, Canaport Mispec facility office, and the Coast Guard immediately. The C-LNG HSSE Manager or designate, once contacted, may choose to become theIncident Manager and relieve the C-LNG Team Leader to take over the response effort. TheC-LNG HSSE Manager or designate will generally take on the role of Incident Manager during a large oil pollution emergency or when additional response resources are required. The Incident Manager is to keep C-LNG Management informed of the progress of the response as well as act as liaison between C-LNG, and government officials.

3.3 

Activation Procedures The Incident Manager assures the safety of all personnel at the site, investigates the source and magnitude of the spill and takes immediate action to stop the leak and minimize the impact of the spill. The Incident Manager will assume the responsibility of initiating the OPEP and directing spill response efforts until relieved. Error! Reference source not found. outlines the anticipated notification procedure. C-LNG is ultimately responsible for the entire response operation. All contractors and response organizations hired  will be under C-LNG command. Communications with a Response Authority (RA) will be made immediately after the Regional Operations Centre (ROC) is advised. They will consult with the C-LNG and monitor the situation for the duration of the response effort. The Coast Guard acts as lead agency, if at any time they decide that the effort on the part of C-LNG is not effective or sufficient, they will take over command of the response effort and carry it out

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

10

until completion at C-LNG’s cost. Regardless of whether, the Coast Guard takes command of the situation or not, they will decide when the operation is complete and satisfactory.

3.4 

Roles and Responsibilities

3.4.1 

Responsibilities of the Incident Manager : The Incident Manager responsibilities are as follows Determine the source of the spill and make all reasonable efforts to stop the flow. Assess health and safety hazards. Order containment to begin, if area is safe. Determine amount of loss. Prepare incident report form in Appendix B. Report oil pollution incident to Canadian Coast Guard Operations Centre. Maintain a detailed log of events. Plan recovery phase of response. Inform Response Organization if escalation of response is deemed necessary. Inform local officials if spill has the potential to adversely impact surrounding residents Assess the magnitude of the spill and determine what actions or assistance is required. Ensure that a safe working environment exists. Assess response actions carried out to date. Continue response action or modify as needed. Initiate mobilization of additional personnel, equipment, or other supplies as needed. •



























3.4.2 

Responsibilities of the HSSE Manager (or designate) The HSSE Manager or designate responsibilities are as follows: •





Confirm that proper notifications have been made. Inspect log to confirm that it is accurate as well as concise. Provide a liaison between C-LNG Management and representatives of government agencies.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

11

3.4.3 

Responsibilities of the Canadian Coast Guard The Canadian Coast Guard has overall responsibility to ensure that there is an appropriate response to any oil pollution incident that occurs as a result of loading or unloading of oil to or from a ship at a designated OHF. The Coast Guard will appoint a person to monitor the response and in some circumstances it may become necessary for Coast Guard to take over the operational response in its entirety.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

12

3.4.4 

Responsibilities of the Environmental Emergencies Scie nce Table The Environmental Emergencies Science Table (EEST) can be convened by Environment Canada’s National Environmental Emergencies Centre in Montreal, PQ when one or more triggers are met. The advice provided by the EEST is on matters such as: spill fate and effects; sensitivity; maps; environmental protection and clean-up; priorities on spill monitoring and countermeasures; shoreline clean-up assessment technology; wildlife protection and rehabilitation; weather conditions and forecasts; contaminated waste storage, and disposal. However, the EEST is only activated when one or more triggers are met and when requested by a lead agency. Therefore it is imperative to ensure that the lead federal agency, CCG, requests EEST immediately after notification if their assistance is anticipated to be required.

3.4.5 

Responsibilities of the Response Organization The response organization (RO) that is identified in this OPEPis responsible for providing, to the operators of the C-OHF, the equipment and resources specified in their arrangement. The response organization for the C-OHF is Atlantic Emergency Response Team (ALERT). A copy of the Oil Handling Facility Declaration is provided in Appendix G.

3.5 

General Response Procedures In the event of an oil pollution incident the response procedures detailed in the sections below will be employed by C-LNG. Personnel working at the C-OHF will be familiar with the C-LNGEmergency Response Plan.

3.5.1 

Initial Response In the event of an oil pollution incident this section outlines the immediate response activities that shall occur. The initial response decision plan is presented in Figure 3. Safety is the first priority. Notify other C-LNG, Canaport Mispec and Ship personnel by verbal and/or radio communication and attempt to stem flow by shutting valves, if this can be done safely.

If the Spill is on fire, or other health hazards are present that   prevent personnel from safely stopping the flow of product, DO NOT attempt to stop or contain the spill.

The MSDS’s in the C-LNG office and on the Ship provide the information needed to ensure adequate personnel protection when dealing with spills (all personnel should be aware of the characteristics and potential hazards of all products before operations begin). If you are not sure what the material is that has spilled, to prevent a potential health hazard, STAY upwind or upgradient.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

13

FIGURE 3 – INITIAL RESPONSE DECISION PLAN

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

14

1. Stop transfer of product All cargo transfer operations are to be shut down immediately upon the discovery of an oil pollution incident. Cargo transferring operations are not to be resumed if doing so will interfere with the immediate, effective, and sustained response to the oil pollution incident. In addition to the valves located at the manifolds, there are multiple block valves for each line located both on the  wharf and in the tank field.

2.

Determine source of spill

A rapid survey should be done to determine the source of the leak. This is necessary to most effectively isolate the leak from the rest of the discharge system. Probable spill locations can include, but are not limited to: •







The ship itself; The crude oil cargo arm; The pipeline; The isolation values on the pipeline;

3. Assess health and safety hazards/weather conditions/fire hazards Health and safety hazards should be assessed using the techniques taught in the Basic Oil Spill Response course and by referring to the appropriate MSDS sheets. If you do not know the material that has spilled, STAY upwind or upgrade to prevent a potential health hazard.

4. Start spill containment Once the source of the spill has been determined and the flow of product has been stopped, the priority of first responders is to contain the spill. Rapid containment affords many advantages; it reduces the affected area, and in most instances will minimize the logistical challenges of a response. Also, a smaller contaminated area will allow for tighter security around the spill perimeter. Containment can include the deployment of booms, construction of temporary berms (dikes, trenches and excavation) to prevent oil from reaching the water, and the spread absorbent pads at spill boundary. The equipment necessary for boom deployment is available at the C-LNG Terminal, as indicated in Section 2.3.

HEALTH AND SAFETY HAZARDS MUST  BE ASSESSED BEFORE PERSONNEL ARE TO PROCEED INTO THE  SPILL ZONE 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

15

5.

Determine amount of loss

The amount of oil lost may be estimated using various methods. The gauging of tanks and visual inspection of the slick are only two examples. Table 16 may be used as a reference in determining the amount of oil contained in a particular slick. TABL E 16 – SHEEN COLOUR AND APPEARANCE TO DETERMINE VOLUME OF SLICK

Gallons Per 100’ X 100’

Gallons Per Square Mile

Barely visible under most favorable light conditions

0.1

25

Visible as a silvery sheen on surface water

0.2

50

Slightly Coloured

First trace of colour is visible

0.5

100

Brightly Coloured

Bright bands of color are visible

0.8

200

Dull

Colors begin to turn dull brown

2.5

666

Dark

Much darker brown

5.0

1322

Standard Term Barely Visible Silvery

Appearance

6. Prepare incident report form The Incident Report Form is located in Appendix B. Record the sequence of events (actions taken and time) as they are performed to respond to an oil pollution incident.

7. Report to government agencies

1-800-565-1633 Canadian Coast Guard Operations Centre And Fundy Traffic (506) 636-4696 or VHF channel 12 or 16

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

16

8. Report to C-LNG management

C-L NG General Man ager

9.

A dolfo Jose Azcarrag a G omis

(506) 638-1300

Inform response organization

ALERT 24 hr. Emergency 1-506-632-4499

10. Adjacent residents If a spill appears or is likely to affect adjacent residents (hazardous vapours, etc.) contact the following local officials.

PO L ICE

911or 648-3333

FIRE

911 or 648-2922

PORT

636-4883

11. Personnel A listing of available personnel to assist in the response effort is provided in Section 2.2 on page 4. Request all unnecessary personnel stand clear of the area.

12. Pollution response equipment A detailed listing of available pollution response equipment is provided in Section 2.3 on page 5.

13. Local contractors and resources (as required) A detailed listing of available local contractors and resources is provided in Section 0 on page 7.

14. Assess response actions and determine an escalation of response At this point, the ability of the C-OHF to respond to and control the oil pollution incident must be re-evaluated. If it is determined that the oil pollution incident is of such quantity, or presents logistical problems that overload the

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

17

response resources of the facility-OHF, then the facility shall call on their RO to supply expertise and resources necessary for the successful response to the oil pollution incident.

15. Escalation of response The RO for the C-OHF is ALERT. ALERT is a 10 000 tonne certified RO. Even though the RO has been contracted to respond to the spill, it is the responsibility of the C-LNG General Manager, or designate, to oversee all response efforts undertaken on behalf of the C-OHF. 3.5.2 

Initial Corrective Actions Initial corrective actions are those actions which are implemented with on-site resources and available staff. Their purpose is to provide immediate corrective action which is conservative and will facilitate subsequent corrective action plans. Examples include: •





Boom deployment Operators closing valves to isolate a tank or pipeline or stop a leak Construction of an earthen berm

Mitigation procedures for several potential discharge scenarios that may occur are provided in Appendix D. 3.5.3 

Termination of Response Actions Response operations will continue until the C-LNG General Manager, or designate, is satisfied no further oil can reasonably be recovered.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

18

4 .0 

HEALTH AND SAFETY

4.1 

Introduction The first response action taken at the scene of an oil pollution incident is to assess the health and safety hazards for OHF employees and other personnel in the area. Under certain circumstances spilled oil may present a fire or explosion hazard. Until otherwise established, all incidents will be considered as potential fire hazards and potentially explosive.

Under no circumstances will personnel health and safety  be compromised for response purposes 

4.2 

Site Control Control of access to the spill site will be established immediately to limit the risks of inadvertently entering an area that is dangerous to unqualified responders. Immediate assessment of personnel hazards, injuries, or risks to health is a first step in response. Site control may also be required to limit intrusion of response activities on culturally or ecologically sensitive areas (cultural heritage sites or wildlife habitat sites). The Incident Manager will establish a zone of safety around the spill, and only persons authorized for cleanup work will be allowed in this zone. The perimeter of this zone will be well beyond vapour fire or explosion danger. Factors that influence safe distances are type of petroleum cargo (vapour density/pressure, specific gravity), quantity and rate of release, wind speed and direction, and temperature.

4.3 

Safe Working Practices Safety and health of response personnel, contractors and the general public are the most important considerations in any operation. C-LNGwill comply with applicable Federal and Provincial regulations to protect the health and safety of its workers. Appropriate personal protection equipment will be provided to response personnel.

4.3.1 

General •







4.3.2 

C-OHF policy requires two employees be present at all times when a work situation is on, or adjacent to, the water. When an employee is working alone, it is imperative that all safety precautions be adhered to. The employee must ensure the supervisor is aware of the employee whereabouts and is equipped with the appropriate Ridex radios to provide for two way communication in the event of an emergency. MSDS’ should be read by personnel prior to working with any product and reviewed with their supervisor as appropriate. Contravention of the above by any C-LNG employee or contractor will result in disciplinary action.

When Operating a Vessel •

Regulations under the Canada Shipping Act and the International Collision Regulations must be adhered to.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

19







4.3.3 

Personal Protective Equipment •















4.4 

Vessel operators must acquaint themselves with the specific vessel operating procedures before leaving the jetty. A minimum of two people, or as otherwise specifically directed, must be on board any vessel when underway. Vessels will participate in the vessel traffic system at all times.

Personal protective equipment (PPE) must meet the approval of the provincial Workers Compensation Board (WCB), Canadian Standards Association, and C-LNG. Workers are to comply with the provincial WCB Industrial Health and Safety Regulations during both land and marine operations. Personal floatation devices are to be worn and securely fastened when working on jettys, deck, in small boats, or whenever the risk of falling into the water exists. All protective equipment required for the safe handling of a material must be worn by personnel and replaced/cleaned as and when necessary. Personnel who are required to use respirators or SCBA equipment must be clean shaven and fully trained in their use. The respirator code of practice must be followed whenever personnel use respiratory equipment. Proper hearing protection must be worn by personnel while working in high noise areas. All workers are required to wear minimum PPE for the site.

Jetty Operations and Response C-LNG personnel conduct jetty operations in accordance with C-LNG requirements. At least two qualified C-LNG employees are required to be present during crude oil transfer operations. Two employees are responsible for jetty operations and coordinate the discharge. The employees are responsible for inspecting the pipeline and valves prior to discharge operations. Three Canaport (Mispec) personnel shall be located at the tank farm at all times during cargo transfer operations. One employee is responsible for the operation of the booster pumps at the terminal yard level and coordinates the discharge. Another employee is responsible for facility equipment in the tank farm (e.g., operate tank and pipeline valves) and inspects tanks and pipelines used during transfers. A third employee coordinates terminal operations from the control room in the terminal office and monitors the marine manifold. C-LNG personnel maintain radio communications with each other, and with the vessel, throughout transfer operations. Vessels are monitored during transfers to observe for spills and leaks, as well as safety-related issues. A containment boom is located at the pier, which can be placed to enclose the vessel in the event of an oil pollution incident.

4.5 

Volatile Emissions Fresh spilled oil can have several compounds that can readily volatilize once released. These include Volitile Organic Compounds (VOCs), benzene and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The vapours from these compounds can enter the human body through the eyes, skin, mouth and lungs and have effects on the nervous system, causing dizziness, drowsiness followed by unconsciousness and even death. Benzene is also a known carcinogen. If spilled oil potentially contains VOCs, H2S and benzene (check the MSDS sheet), or if in doubt as to whether the oil

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

20

does responders should initially wear self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) until gas testing has confirmed that vapour concentrations of these compounds are below lethal limits. If gas testing demonstrates that volatiles are present above regulatory limits, but below lethal limits, than appropriate respiratory protection should be made available.

4.6 

Material Safety Data Sheets During a spill event the MSDS are available electronically and will be printed as required. Irving Oil shall provide MSDS for the products that are being transferred.

4.7 

Weather Limitations Extreme weather, including heavy seas and extreme temperatures, affects the ability of C-LNG personnel to respond to an oil pollution emergency. Heavy winds and large sea states also effects the ability of booms to remain effective and recovery equipment to recover oil. There may be periods of time that oil pollution recovery is not permitted as the prevailing weather has created a dangerous and unsafe working environment. The weather limitations that oil pollution equipment and responders can respond at the C-OHF are outlined in the C-LNG Marine Operating Terminal Manual.

4.7.1 

Cold Weather Precautions Cold temperatures affect both mental performance by causing people to become more distracted and physical performance by reducing blood flow to peripheral areas of the body, including hands and feet. When muscles are cold they are less efficient which can lead to numbness and loss of ability to use the muscle. Cold temperatures can also lead to frostbite and hypothermia. In order to mitigate potential risks that cold temperatures have on responders the following should be considered: •







Provision of appropriate PPE for cold weather. Having heated shelters in close proximity to work areas so personnel can warm up. Limited work periods with frequent breaks so people can warm up. Having supervisors trained to recognize signs of hypothermia and frost bite in their personnel.

VOCs, benzene, H2S and other light end hydrocarbon chains will not evaporate as rapidly in cold weather therefore, there is a potential for lethal concentrations of these compounds to remain in vicinity of the spill for longer periods of time then in warmer conditions. Additional precautions are required in cold weather that include conducting additional gas testing and wearing of appropriate PPE including, if required, self-contained breathing apparatus and or a respirator with appropriate filter.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

21

5 .0 

Trai ning and Exerci se

5.1 

Introduction Experienced well trained response personnel are key to containing and effectively recovering a spill of oil. The training of personnel provides the knowledge required to an employee or contractor to assist in the response effort. Exercises demonstrate the effectiveness of the training and serve as useful tests to refine and evaluate the training and readiness of the response team.

5.2 

Training C-LNGpersonnel involved in handling of oil will as a minimum complete the OHF Basic Oil Spill Response Course (BOSRC). Additional training courses that may be required by C-LNG personnel include the following: •





Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS) First Aid CPR

C-LNG personnel training records and their roles in an oil pollution incident are presented in Appendix C. A fundamental concept is that in the event of an incident C-LNG will only utilize trained personnel and contractors; volunteers will not be used. Contractors will be hired based on response requirements and the individual services they offer.

5.3 

Exercise Program As per Section 15.0 of the Response Organizations and Oil Handling Facilities Regulations (Government of Canada, 1995) regular exercises will be conducted to test the effectiveness of personnel and procedures. Spill response exercises allow response personnel to practice specific actions assigned to them in the Spill Response Plan. An Application may be submitted to Transport Canada (TC) for approval to substitute an actual response to an oil spill incident or participation in other exercises for one or more of the exercises described in this plan. In such cases, substituted exercises will be accompanied by appropriate documentation for review by TC at their request. Exercises will be evaluated and conducted following the procedures and guidelines specified in the National Exercise Program. Feedback and knowledge gained from these exercises will be incorporated into regional response strategy development. The C-OHF exercise program is summarized in Table 17.

Records of training received and dates of training for all training participants are maintained by C-LNG. Records of all exercises will also be maintained on file at C-LNG. All records are available for review upon request by appropriate authorities.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

22

TABL E 17 – C-OHF EXERCISE PROGRAM

Frequency

5.4 

Type

Quarterly

Notification – Notification exercises would be limited to the notification of key members of the oil pollution response team as well as major contractors.

Annual

Operational – Operational exercises would be conducted by C-LNG personnel and would encompass the activation of members of the oil pollution response teamand the deployment of oil pollution response equipment.

3 – Year

Management – Management exercises would be on a three year basis which includes the facilities (C-LNG, and Canaport Mispec), ships and Government Agencies. The exercise will include the following: activation of the OPEP, Site Safety Assessment, Equipment Deployment and Readiness, Logistics and long term response strategy development.

Response Equipment Maintenance The oil pollution emergency response equipment identified in Section 2.3 is to be inspected monthly by C-OHF operations personnel to confirm it is in good working order. The emergency response equipment shall be maintained by C-OHF operations personnel or qualified contractors in accordance with recommended manufacturer’s instructions. The C-OHF HSSE Manager shall ensure that records of these inspections are maintained.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

23

6 .0 

Response St rat egies

6.1 

Introduction The following section describes sensitive areas in the region, as well as the response techniques which may be employed to protect them and recover spilled oil. It is very important for response personnel to be knowledgeable about their geographic area and be able to identify and protect sensitivities. The situations faced by the C-LNG staff during a spill response will be influenced by the meteorological conditions at the time of the incident. High seas or strong currents may endanger personnel, or render booms ineffective.

The Health and Safety of Personnel is the First Priority 

6.2 

Scenarios Several oil pollution incident scenarios and response strategies are presented in Appendix D. The scenarios were based on averaged metocean data collected from the Bay of Fundy over the past 25 years. The scenarios were modeled in OILMAP®using a calibrated 3D hydrodynamic model and historical averaged wind data.

6.3 

Sensitive Resources The Bay of Fundy supports a diverse range of sensitive resources, environmental, human and socio-economic. An oil pollution incident at the C-OHF has the potential to affect a large area of the Bay of Fundy. Figure E-1, located in Appendix E, presents sensitive ecological and environmental features in vicinity of the C-OHF. Figure E-2 in Appendix E, illustrates potential human and socio-economic resources in vicinity of the C-OHF. Potential sensitive resources in vicinity of the C-OHF are as follows: •









6.4 

Mispec Beach Mispec Fisherman’s wharf SBM (Canaport Offshore) Traffic Lanes for Saint John Harbour Saint John Harbour.

Containment There is 3000 feet of 54” containment boom mounted on the C-LNG jetty. The pre-planned and expedient deployment of this boom is perhaps the most formidable tool available to minimize potential effects of an oil release. In the event of an oil pollution incident originating from the tanker, the supporting VOO will, deploy containment boom around the tanker using magnetic fasteners to secure the boom to the hull of the ship. Prior to deployment the boom will be positioned on the jetty by C-LNG personnel who will also assist the VOO in hooking up and unreeling the boom. If the spill originates from a source other than from the tanker (e.g. from a transfer pipeline) the supporting VOO and C-LNG personnel will deploy the prepositioned boom around the leaking component.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

24

6.5 

Basic Booming Strategies Deploying booms is the most common method of protecting the marine environment from oil spills. There are numerous techniques and strategies for deploying boom, the proper technique to use is often dictated by the type of geographical location to be protected, the weather patterns present at the time of the spill and the available equipment. The most common types of deployment strategies are discussed briefly in the sections below.

6.5.1 

Containment Booming Containment booming is used to contain oil either by encircling it or entrapping floating oil in an area so that it can be accumulated and recovered at the spill location.

6.5.2 

Diversion / Deflection Booming Diversion booming is used to redirect oil away from a sensitive location towards another area, where recovery may be more easily achieved with less damage to the environment. An advantage of diversion patterns is that they are less affected by high currents than are many other types of booming patterns. The deployment of shorter sections of booming enhances control, making the task easier.

6.5.3 

Exclusion Booming Exclusion booming is used to completely protect an area from contamination by completely isolating it from the rest of the body of water. Often this is the case in calm waters where small surface currents are present and shift at the slightest change in wind direction. Exclusion booms can consist of different types of materials, such as filter barriers (screen covered with bales of hay, straw or oleophilic materials), boom or even sand bags and gravel.

6.5.4 

Boom Monitoring Booms are never to be deployed and then left, deployed booms must be monitored on an on-going basis to ensure that they remain in place and effective. Booms should be monitored for changes in tides, tidal currents, winds or other factors that influence water depth, direction and force of motion. These forces may significantly impair the ability of a boom to retain oil. Untended booms can become dislodged or submerged and release oil collected in it as well as poses hazards to shipping and wildlife. Given the large range of tides in the Bay of Fundy it is important to consider the tidal cycle when deploying booms in an oil pollution emergency. If the boom is to be moored either using anchors or attaching to shoreline or manmade equipment then it is important to select the correct length of mooring lines to suit the given tidal range,  water depth, swell and current. If the mooring lines are too short the boom or portions of it could become submerged and/or lines could become dislodged. If the mooring lines are too long it will be difficult to control the configuration of the boom. If it is observed that mooring lines are too short or too long they should be adjusted as long as this adjusting will not result in adverse environmental effects. Magnetic mooring points will allow the boom to be attached directly to the ship’s side, thus eliminating the problem of the boom becoming submerged due to changing tidal conditions. Boom operators should always follow the manufactures recommended instructions and limitations for the deployment and use of booms. These instructions and limitations are located on the boom real and should be reviewed prior to their deployment.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

25

6.6 

Weather Precautions The C-LNG Marine Terminal Operations Manual outlines the weather and ambient conditions that are considered safe to perform oil transfer and clean-up operations. If weather conditions or sea state exceed these conditions than oil transfer and clean-up operations are to cease.

6.6.1 

Cold Weather Response Oil pollution incidents during the winter where there could be extreme low temperatures effects equipment, personnel involved and the oil. The affect cold weather has on personnel is discussed in Section 4.0. In order to mitigate the risks cold temperatures have on response equipment responders should follow the manufacturer’s recommended cold weather operating instructions on the equipment. Cold temperatures effect the viscosity, rate of evaporation of lighter ends and the ability to contain and clean-up an oil pollution emergency. Oil viscosity increases as the ambient air and water temperature decreases which has the potential to limit the oil spreading but can also affect the ability to clean it up by limiting its ability to be recovered by mechanical means. Incident managers need to be cognizant of this risk and identify other means to recover oil if mechanical recovery is not working.

6.7 

Shoreline Clean Up Strategies This section provides a brief review of shoreline cleanup strategies. There are two general categories of shoreline, permeable and impermeable. Impermeable shorelines characteristically do not allow penetration of oil below the surface layer. These shorelines are typically solid, stable and contain very little sediments. Permeable surfaces on the other hand are composed of organic and inorganic sediments which are often mobile. Oil will most likely penetrate and get buried below the surface layer if it remains for any significant length of time. Table 18 provides a description of the various types of shorelines found under each category. TABL E 18 – SHORELINE CATEGORIES IN BAY OF FUNDY

Shoreline Categories

Types

Sub-Types

Bedrock

N/A

Man Made Solid

N/A

Impermeable Boulder Pebble/Cobble Beach Mixed Sand/Gravel

Permeable

Sand Sand

Tidal Flat Marsh

Mud N/A

When cleaning contaminated soils on the shoreline, there are a variety of techniques which may be applied. Each technique has its advantages and disadvantages, it’s a matter of evaluating each possibility and picking the method best suited for the type of shoreline and conditions you are dealing with. In evaluating the situation, factors to consider are the extent of contamination, the type of shoreline, the type of habitat, biological presence, safety considerations and impact the cleanup operation will have on the environment.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

26

6.7.1 

Natural Recovery Natural recovery is simply to allow the shoreline to recover without intervention. In order to implement this type of recovery it must be judged that to treat or clean stranded oil would cause more damage than leaving the environment to recover naturally. Often this is the case in silty marshes where most of the damage is already done on initial contamination and trampling through would aggravate the situation. Some types of shoreline or products can be hazardous to response personnel’s safety; if extreme conditions are present, natural recovery is sometimes the only alternative. Optimum Use: •



6.7.2 

All shoreline types; and, Small amounts of non-persistent oil.

Flooding This method involves flooding a site with ambient temperature water so that mobile or demobilized oil is lifted and carried down slope to a collection area. The high volume, low pressure supply of sea water, at normal temperature, is pumped using a large diameter pipe or hose (header) to the upper section of the oiled shoreline. It can be a simple hose without nozzle or a perforated line placed on the upper shoreline and parallel to the water line. Washing oil down slope into the lower intertidal zones that have attached plant or animal communities should be avoided, particularly if these were not oiled. To avoid this type of problem, work should be done at mid tide (flood); the lower sections will be submerged and protected by the water level. Optimum Use: •



6.7.3 

Most shoreline types; and, Light to medium oils.

Low-Pressure, Cold Water Wash Hand operated or remote controlled hoses that use normal temperature sea water to flush, wash and herd oil to a collection point for removal. Pressures from the hose are generally less than 50 psi. Booms and/or other methods of trapping and containing the oil are used. This technique is practical and effective on most impermeable shoreline types and on some permeable shores (beaches) or marshes. Effectiveness decreases as oil viscosity increases and depth of oil penetration increases on cobble or boulder beaches. It is recommended to avoid flushing the oil down gradient onto previously unaffected surfaces; work should be performed during the middle of the rising tide. Optimum Use: •



6.7.4 

Impermeable shorelines; and, Light to medium oils.

Low-Pressure, Warm Water Wash This technique is very similar to the cold water wash, with the only exception being is that the sea water is warmed  with nozzle temperatures of the water ranging from 30oC to 100oC. This technique is better at dislodging viscous oils by heating the oil and thus reducing its viscosity. A potential hazard of using warm water to wash the oil is that hazardous vapours may form due to the elevated temperatures. However, if used in conjunction with flooding, up gradient, the warm water will have less harmful impacts on the shoreline due to the cooling effects of the up gradient flood water. The warm water can create harmful ecological effects if care is not taken in evaluating the net benefit of this technique in its surrounding environment. Optimum Use: •

Impermeable shorelines; and,

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

27



6.7.5 

Light to medium oils.

High-Pressure, Cold Water Wash The oil is flushed towards a collection and containment area using high pressure (100 psi or greater) ambient sea  water. This technique is only used when oil cannot be dislodged using washing or low-pressure techniques and should only be used on oiled bedrock or solid man-made shorelines. This technique can be enhanced through the use of flooding up gradient. Response personnel must be cognizant that this technique can dislodge and potentially harm healthy marine organisms. Optimum Use: •



6.7.6 

Impermeable shorelines; and, Medium to heavy oils.

High-Pressure, Warm/Hot Water Wash This technique is the same as High-Pressure, Cold Water Wash but uses warm to hot seawater between 30oC and 100oC. This technique is recommended to be used only on solid man-made structures. Optimum Use: •



6.7.7 

Impermeable shorelines; and, Medium to heavy oils.

Steam Cleaning This technique should be reserved to remove thin layers of highly viscous oil from man-made impermeable surfaces. Hand operated or remote operated steam units are used to dislodge, wash and her oil to collection points for removal. Steam temperatures are in excess of 100oC with pressures over 100 psi. This technique will kill most marine organisms and therefore should only be used in areas with very little plant and animal life. Optimum Use: •



6.8 

Impermeable man-made shorelines; and, Heavy, weathered oils.

Removal and Disposal Techniques Besides washing, shoreline clean up techniques also includes physical removal of contaminated soils and debris. The following sub-sections provide a list of removal/disposal techniques. A Matrix of optimal clean up strategies for each shoreline type is presented Table F-1 in Appendix F.

6.8.1 

Manual Removal This technique involves cleanup crews picking up oil, oiled sediments and oily debris by hand, rakes, forks, trowels, shovels, sorbent materials and buckets. Collected material is placed in disposal bags, drums or other containers until they can be transported for disposal. Manual removal generally also involves the scraping or wiping of the cleanup area with sorbent materials. Since workers are in direct contact with oiled surfaces they should wear PPE, minimum PPE includes splash suits/Tyvex suits, CSA approved safety boots, gloves, hard hats and eye protection. Manual removal is a slow process but generally creates less waste and is less intrusive then using mechanical equipment. It also allows for easier sorting and segregation of oiled waste material. Optimum Use: •



Any shoreline type; and, Small amounts of surface oil.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

28

6.8.2 

Vacuums Primarily used where oil is pooled in natural depressions or hollows or where it has been herded into collection areas, such as lined pits or trenches. This technique can be used in combination with flooding or washing techniques to float and collect oil. Commercially available equipment includes small hand carried, or larger truck mounted, vacuum systems. The suction end of the hose is deployed manually to collect oil / oily water. This method is labour intensive but effective. It is time consuming due to the fact that it only covers small areas at a time and involves frequent equipment mobilizations. Optimum Use: •

6.8.3 

Light to medium, non-volatile, pooled or collected oil.

Mechanical Removal Mechanical removal can be used on all but bedrock or man-made shoreline types. The bearing capacity of the sediments and the slope of the shore zone as well as the performance characteristics of the individual equipment control the applicability of different types of machine. Typical equipment include: scrappers, front end loaders, backhoes, draglines, bulldozers and vacuum trucks. These methods are extremely intrusive. Sometimes access is the only limitation, especially on shores that can only be reached by boat. This type of equipment tends to mix oil into the soil under their wheels. It is important that specific procedures or even clean up patterns be established. Optimum Use: •



6.8.4 

Permeable shorelines; and, Any oil type.

Vegetation Removal Vegetation removal is done to prevent remobilization of oil attached to plants, to prevent contact by animals and birds and to accelerate the recovery of the plants. Vegetation removal is conducted manually using knives, scythes, powered weed cutters or rakes. This method is applicable where the continued presence of oil could pose a risk to ecological life in the area or slow the natural recovery process. A labour intensive method it is usually used in marshes or plants attached to beaches (like seaweeds). Optimum Use: •



6.8.5 

Marshes, vegetated shorelines; and, Where remobilization will affect other resources.

Passive Sorbents This technique places sorbent material in a fixed location or pattern so that they collect oil by contact. Sorbent materials are placed in the shore zone to collect oil as it comes ashore of it the oiled area after it has become stranded. Common sorbents include pads, rugs, blankets/rolls, sweeps, pillows or booms. Sorbents can be used on any type of shoreline and can be used on the majority of oils. They are less likely to be effective on very viscous, volatile oil and for weathered, semi-solid oils. Sorbents have a finite capacity and can quickly reach their capacity if in contact with large volumes of oil. If not used correctly sorbent use has the potential to generate a large volume of waste. Optimum Use: •



Any shoreline type; and, Light to heavy oils, non-solids, non-volatile oils.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

29

6.8.6 

Mechanical Tilling/Aeration Heavy equipment is used to break up oil located on the surface or to expose subsurface oil to allow for the natural  weathering process to occur. The heavy equipment involved are front end loaders, bulldozers, graders and farm equipment including disc tillers, harrows, plows, rakes or tines towed by tractors. This technique’s purpose is to break up weathered and solidified medium to heavy oils to assist in the promotion of evaporation of the oil and the natural degradation process. A key consideration is to ensure that the oil is being exposed and not being buried as this would defeat the purpose of the work. Optimum Use: •



6.9 

Sand or coarse sediment beaches; and, Small amounts of medium to heavy oils.

Shoreline Characteristics Although there are many different shorelines described in the Shoreline Clean-up and Assessment Techniques Manual (SCAT) the following are shorelines located in vicinity of the terminal.

6.9.1 

Bedrock Shorelines Bedrock shorelines are considered generally impermeable. Stranded oils tend to remain on the surface. The persistence of the oil depends greatly on whether the coast is sheltered or not. On exposed coasts, oil often does not strand due to wave reflection. If stranded, the oil may be washed off rapidly by wave action. Oil may be splashed above the limit of normal wave action. On platforms and ramps oil may collect in hollows or tidal pools,  which tend to have abundant attached animal and plant populations in ice free coastal areas. On sheltered coasts, oil is likely to be deposited on the upper intertidal zone as a band near the last high-water level. Because of the low  wave energy conditions, heavy oils or weathered crudes may persist for considerable time, as there is insufficient energy to naturally remove these oil types. Table F-1 presented in Appendix F lists recommended clean up strategies for bedrock shorelines for various types of oils.

6.9.2 

Man-made Solid Shorelines Man-made shorelines typically consist of structures made of concrete, metal and wood. Each of these materials has a different surface texture and roughness. The stranding of the oil depends on the surface texture; on smooth metallic faces it may not strand at all, while on rougher concrete type surfaces it may. Again, the persistency of the oil will depend greatly on whether the coast is sheltered or not. High energy wave action tends to flush away lighter oils.

6.9.3 

Boulder Beaches Boulder beaches are permeable, and generally have a stable surface layer. Boulders are usually greater than 256 mmin diameter and are moved only by ice and extreme wave conditions. These types include boulder barricades and breakwaters. Oil persistence is usually dependent on viscosity and wave energy.

6.9.4 

Pebble-cobble Beaches Pebble cobble beaches are permeable to all but the semi-solid oils and have dynamic, mobile and unstable surface layers. They include man-made structures such as riprap or sand bag walls, with material between 2-256mm. Pebble cobble beaches are distinguished from sand-gravel beaches as the interstitial or pore spaces between the individual pebbles or cobbles are open, rather than filled with sand. Stranded oil can easily penetrate the subsurface sediments. Oil viscosity and wave energy play an important role in influencing the depth in which the oil  will penetrate.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

30

6.9.5 

Sand-gravel Beaches These are composed of mixed sand, pebbles and cobbles and are sometimes referred to as gravel beaches. The surface layer is predominantly coarse sediments with increasing amounts of sand in the subsurface. The coarser fractions are infilled with the finer sands so that these beaches are permeable only for some medium oils and all light oils, and have a dynamic, mobile surface layer.

6.9.6 

Sand Beaches Sand beaches are permeable for some medium and all light oils, and have a very dynamic, mobile, unstable surface layer. Coarse sand beaches usually have steeper slopes and poorer bearing capacity, whereas fine-sand beaches have flatter gradients and are harder with better traction for vehicles. Pore spaces are small, which restrictions oil penetration. Medium and heavy oils are unlikely to penetrate more than 25 cm. Sand is very mobile on exposed coasts and even in sheltered areas, provided there is minor wave action. Burial and mixing can occur easily and quickly. Light oils may readily penetrate a medium or coarse grained sand beach and mix with ground  water. Light oils can also be refloated and transported by changing tidal water levels.

6.9.7 

Tidal Flats Tidal flats are usually wide, flat or very small gradients. Tidal flats generally consist of fine sand and muds and are located in the lower part of the intertidal zone. They are permeable only to some medium and all light oils and have a very dynamic, mobile unstable surface layer. Tidal flats do not generally fully drain at low tide and many sections are water saturated at/or just below the surficial sediments. Oil penetration is limited. Light oils can mix with the  waters in the sediment.

6.9.8 

Mud Flats Mud Flats are usually wide, flat with small gradients, are not permeable and have very mobile surface layers. Mudflats generally consist of silts and clays and are located in the upper part of the intertidal zone. Mud flats are frequently water saturated at or just below the surface of the sediments. The potential for oil penetration is limited. Burial of oil is possible with heavy or dense oils. Oils may enter the subsurface through mud cracks or holes made by burrowing organisms and may have long persistence times. Steep side creeks or drainage channels may be present that could hinder access. Mud flats are usually very productive marine biological habitats with many burrowing organisms and species. These species often serve as primary food sources for animals (birds) and humans.

6.9.9 

Marshes Salt marshes are usually permeable for light oils. They support a stable surface vegetation cover and root system and are sometimes fringed by muddy creeks or tidal flats. March types range from narrow fringing marshes to extensive salt marsh meadows. Usually marshes are above the mean high water mark and only flood during spring tides or storm surges. Marsh habitats are extremely productive in terms of plant and animal life and are important nursery areas for many species.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

31

7 .0 

Communications C-LNG recognizes the importance of proper communications between its operational personnel and the crews of vessels calling at the jetty. C-LNG personnel have the necessary radios to communicate with support vessels and Fundy Traffic in the event of an oil pollution incident. All federal laws pertaining to radio protocol will be adhered to. Oil pollution response personnel will use Ridex radios. Cellular phones shall not be used on the jetty or out in the open at the C-OHF as well as on the upper decks of any vessel at the C-LNG jetty.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

32

8 .0 

Emergenc y Shut down Syst ems The terminal has an emergency shutdown system for crude cargo transfer operations adjacent to the crude oil cargo transfer arm located in the stripping pump valve box. An additional quick close valve is located in a second valve box located on the Canaport Mispec facility. Emergency shut downs can be completed within 30 seconds. Locations of emergency shutdown systems and response equipment are illustrated in Figure 4. When a crude oil tanker is not at the C-LNG jetty spill response equipment (including tracking buoys and hull magnets will be stored at the C-LNG facility in a storage shed or trailer.

Storage Shed

Boom Reels

Emergency Shutoffs Response Boat

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Appendix A  A

Site Layout 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

 

Appendix B B

Incident Form 

Appendix B B

Incident Form 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

INCIDENT REPORT FORM DATE (MM/DD/YY):

INCIDENT FORM

Time (24 Hour):

 REPORTED BY (Name and Company): Telephone Number: INITIAL INCIDENT SUMMARY

LOCATION OF INCIDENT:

Type of Hydrocarbon Lost: Estimated Volume Lost:

Units:

3

litres, bbl, tonnes, m

ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION

Wind Speed:

o

C

knots/kph Air Temperature:

Wind Direction: Tide: Visibility: Current Conditions:

High Tide:

Water Temperature: hours Low Tide: Precipitation: Current (including direction and speed):

o

C hours

NOTIFICAITON LIST ORGANIZATION CCG Ops Centre CANAPORT LNG ALERT

NAME & POSITION DARTMOUTH Adolfo Jose Azcarrage Gomis 24 Hour EMERGENCY

TELEPHONE # 1-800-565-1633 (506) 638-1300 (506) 632-4499

INCIDENT DESCRIPTION

Brief Description of the Incident:

Current Status:

Time:

TIME NOTIFIED

INCIDENT REPORT FORM

INCIDENT FORM

DATE (MM/DD/YY): Time (24 Hour):

INCIDENT RESPONSE CHECKLIST STEP

RESPONSE

TIME

1 Stop Transfer of Product 2 Determine Source of Spill and Assess Situation Determine type of product lost Determine area where product was lost Determine volume lost Determine prevailing weather conditions 3 Assess Health and Safety (review MSDS) 4 Start Spill Containment Deploy containment boom Deploy absorbent booms 5 Determine amount of loss 6 Prepare Incident Report Form (this form) 7 Report to Government Agencies Canadian Coast Guard 1-800-565-1633 Fundy Traffic VHF Channel 12 or 16 8 Report to Company Canaport LNG (506) 638-1300 ALERT (506) 632-4499

9 Continue with deployment of spill response equipment. SUMMARY OF ACTIONS CONDUCTED TIME

ACTION / NOTE

Appendix C C 

Training Records 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

TABL E C19 – C-LNG PERSONNEL TRAINING RECORDS

WHMIS

BOSR

Gas Detector

First Aid

CPR

H&S

Derek Thorne

X

0

X

X

X

X

Dave Stuart

X

0

X

X

X

X

Trevor Brown

X

0

X

X

X

X

Tony Lyons

X

0

X

X

X

X

JT Kroll

X

0

X

X

X

X

Mike Adams

X

0

X

X

X

X

John Estabrooks

X

0

X

X

X

X

Rejean Levesque

X

0

X

X

X

X

Aaron Lewis

X

0

X

X

X

X

Trevor Breau

X

0

X

X

X

X

Jeff Keleher

X

0

X

X

X

X

Kyle MacLeod

X

0

X

X

X

X

Troy Smyth

X

0

X

X

X

X

Brad Doskas

X

0

X

X

X

X

Rick Brown

X

0

X

X

X

X

Greg VanWart

X

0

X

X

X

X

Craig MacDonald

X

0

X

X

X

X

Justin Hanson

X

0

X

X

X

X

Kevin Tillman

X

0

X

X

X

X

Jamie Allison

X

0

X

X

X

X

Rick Spears

X

0

X

X

X

X

Brett Saunders

X

0

X

X

X

X

Todd O’Brien

X

0

X

X

X

X

Ryan Watson

X

0

X

X

X

X

Scott Kilpatrick

X

0

X

X

X

X

Gordon Oram

X

0

X

X

X

X

Sergio Carvana

X

0

X

X

X

X

Fraser Forsythe

X

0

X

X

X

X

  Name

“X” denotes training received and up to date. “O” denotes training required but will be completed prior to an Oil Tanker berthing at C-OHF.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

TABL E C20 – C-LNG PERSONNEL ROLES IN AN OIL POLL UTION INCIDENT

Name

Position

Role

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Trevor Brown

Operations

Field Operators

Tony Lyons

Operations

Field Operators

JT Kroll

Operations

Field Operators

Mike Adams

Operations

Field Operators

John Estabrooks

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Rejean Levesque

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Aaron Lewis

Operations

Field Operators

Trevor Breau

Operations

Field Operators

Jeff Keleher

Operations

Field Operators

Kyle MacLeod

Operations

Field Operators

Troy Smyth

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Brad Doskas

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Rick Brown

Operations

Field Operators

Greg VanWart

Operations

Field Operators

Craig MacDonald

Operations

Field Operators

Justin Hanson

Operations

Field Operators

Kevin Tillman

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Jamie Allison

Operations Control Panel

Control Panel

Rick Spears

Operations

Field Operators

Brett Saunders

Operations

Field Operators

Todd O’Brien

Operations

Field Operators

Ryan Watson

Operations

Field Operators

Scott Kilpatrick

Operations Team Lead

Incident Manager

Gordon Oram

Operations Coordinator

Control Panel

Fraser Forsythe

HSSE Coordinator

Incident Manager

Sergio Carvana

HSSE Manager

Incident Manager

Derek Thorne Dave Stuart

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Appendix D D

Scenarios 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

D-1 Specific Procedures for Potential Release Scenarios Mitigation procedures for several potential release scenarios that may occur are described in the following Sections.

Procedure for the Mitigation of Oil Discharge Caused by Failure of the Cargo Transfer Arm 1. C-LNG Team Leader shall notify the vessel that the transfer operation will be shut down immediately and instruct the vessel to execute its planned vessel transfer shutdown procedures. 2. After vessel pump shutdown, the C-LNG terminal operator shall immediately close the jetty XV valve, if safely accessible. 3. The C-LNG Team Leader shall become the Incident Manager and shall instruct the vessel to close the vessel manifold valve, if safely accessible. With both the jetty XV valve and vessel manifold valve closed, the cargo transfer arm, and its liquid contents, will be isolated between valves. 4. If the jetty XV valve, the vessel manifold valve, or both, cannot be safely accessed for closure, the nearest line valve in the facility’s (i.e., Canaport Mispec XV valve) and/or vessel’s transfer system shall be closed. 5. The Incident Manager shall direct appropriate C-LNG personnel to undertake any reasonable INTIAL RESPONSE actions to safely confine, contain, and collect any spilled oil (i.e., placement of absorbent materials, pumping with portable equipment, etc.). 6. In accordance with this OPEP the Incident Manager shall notify the CCG, the C-LNG On Call Manager and ALERT, as appropriate.

Procedure for the Mitigation of Oil Discharge Caused by Failure of Jetty Manifold Valve, Flange Gasket, Check Valve, Pressure Gauge Fitting, or Relief Valve 1. The C-LNG Team Leader shall notify the vessel that the transfer operation will be shut down immediately and instruct the vessel to execute its planned vessel transfer shutdown procedures in close coordination with the Incident Manager and terminal operator. 2. In the event of jetty XV valve failure, the C-LNG team leader shall inform Canaport Mispec to close their XV valve. 3. The C-LNG Team Leader shall instruct the vessel operators to close the vessel manifold valve, if safely accessible. 4. The C-LNG Team Leader shall instruct the vessel to shut down the vessel transfer pump. 5. C-LNG personnel shall make every effort to direct, into fixed or portable catchments, the flow of oil from the failed component. Collected oil from fixed or portable catchments shall be transferred to temporary storage of adequate capacity. 6. The C-LNG Team Leader shall become the Peron in Charge. The Incident Manager, and C-LNG operators shall undertake any reasonable INITIAL RESPONSE actions to safely confine, contain, and collect spilled oil (i.e., placement of sorbent booms and materials, deployment of containment boom). Collected oil shall be transferred to temporary storage of adequate capacity. 7. In accordance with this OPEP the Incident Manager shall notify the CCG, the C-LNG On Call Manager and ALERT, as appropriate.

Procedure for the Mitigation of Oil Discharge Caused by Piping Rupture During Cargo Transfer 1. In the event that any indication of piping rupture (visible leakage from welded seam, tank nozzle, and/or fitting) is observed by any team member, that team member shall notify the C-LNG Team Leader and they shall notify the vessel that the transfer pumps must be shut down immediately. 2. C-LNG personnel shall immediately close the jetty XV valve, if safely accessible.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

3. The Canaport Mispec operators shall immediately close the XV valve located in the tank farm. 4. The C-NLG Team Leader shall instruct the vessel to shut down the vessel manifold valve and vessel transfer pump. 5. The C-LNG Team Leader shall assume the role as Incident Manager and direct Canaport Mispec and C-LNG personnel to undertake any reasonable INITIAL RESPONSE actions to safely confine, contain, and collect any spilled oil (i.e., placement of absorbent materials, deployment of containment boom). 6. In accordance with this OPEP the Incident Manager shall notify the CCG, C-LNG On Call Manager and ALERT, as appropriate.

Procedure for the Mitigation of Oil Discharge Caused by Piping Rupture during Line Draining  without a Vessel at J etty 1. In the event that any indication of piping rupture during pipeline stripping/drainage (visible leakage from welded seam and/or fitting) is observed by any team member, that team member shall insure the stripping pump is shut down. 2. The nearest C-LNG personnel shall immediately close the jetty XV valve, if safely accessible. 3. The Canaport Mispec operators shall immediately close the XV valve located in the tank farm. 4. The C-LNG Team Leader shall assume the role as Incident Manager and direct Canaport Mispec and C-LNG personnel to undertake any reasonable INITIAL RESPONSE actions to safely confine, contain, and collect any spilled oil (i.e., placement of absorbent materials, deployment of containment boom). 5. In accordance with this OPEP the Incident Manager shall notify the CCG, the C-LNG On Call Manager and ALERT, as appropriate.

Procedure for the Mitigation of Oil Discharge Caused by Corroded Pipeline without a Vessel at Jetty 1. In the event that any indication that corrosion on the pipeline is causing the release of oil by any team member, that team member shall notify the C-LNG Team leader 2. The nearest C-LNG personnel shall immediately close the closest XV valve, if safely accessible. 3. The Canaport Mispec operators shall immediately close the XV valve located in the tank farm. 4. The C-LNG Team Leader shall assume the role as Incident Manager and direct Canaport Mispec and C-LNG personnel to undertake any reasonable INITIAL RESPONSE actions to safely confine, contain, and collect any spilled oil (i.e., placement of absorbent materials, deployment of containment boom). 5. In accordance with this OPEP the Incident Manager shall notify the CCG, the C-LNG On Call Manager and ALERT, as appropriate.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

D-2 Potential Release Scenarios The following three scenarios represent potential oil pollution emergencies at the C-OHF.

Scenario 1 – Release of 50 m 3 of Lloydminister Heavy Situation: A Suezmax is offloading Lloydminster Heavy Crude at the C-OHF. At 0900 on February 12, 2015 a member of the ship’s crew observes that there is a leak in the line connecting the ship to the cargo transfer hose. Approximately, 50 m3 of oil is observed by the ship’s crew member to be on the surface of the water surrounding the ship. Winds: SW at 4.3m/s Tides: 4.2 meters and rising SST: 5oC Summary of Actions: 0900 Leak is observed by crew member. Unloading of the vessel is immediately suspended as crew member raises alarm. The C-LNG Team Leader calls the CCG, the and the C-LNG On Call Manager. The C-OHF OPEP is activated. 0906 C-LNG TeamLeader/Incident Manager requests that the onsite VOO assists in deploying the 54” containment boom around the ship and to fasten the boom to the ship with magentic holders. 0915 C-LNGOn Call Manager assumes role of Incident Manager and activates ALERT to assist with oil pollution response. 1000 Containment boomhas been deployed around the ship at the C-LNG jetty, a portion of the oil is contained but some of the oil is outside the boom. 1030

Oil is observed on the structure of the C-LNGjetty and along the shore of red head.

1130 ALERT RIB, ALERT II and ALERT SeaTruck depart jetty 3 in Courtenay Bay to trasit to C-LNG. On the vessels are ALERT’s two current busters, skimmer and sea slug. DOP250 skimmer is deployed on another ALERT Sea Truck 1200

VOO vessel deploys two tracking bouys to track the oil slick outside the boomed off area.

1300

Two current busters commence operations and start recoving oil.

1310

DOP250 skimmer commences recovering oil from inside the containment booms.

1330 Alert notifies its sub-contractors and activates them or places them on stand-by. The ALERT Spill Manager sets up a command centre at 11 Expansion Ave. 1600 On water operations cease for the night. ALERT takes over remaining spill response and will develop the next operational plan. Summary of Trajectory and Weathering Day 1 The weathering graph and 24 hour trajectory model from OILMAPare provided on the next page.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

50 45 40 35

Surface

Ashore

Evaporated

Skimmed

    s     e     r 30      t     e     m25     c      i      b     u20      C

15 10 5 0 0

10

20

30

Time (hou rs)

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

40

50

Scenario 2 – Release of 1000 bbl of Arab Light Crude Situation: A Suezmax is offloading Arab Light Crude at the C-OHF. At 1500 on August 17, 2016 a leak develops in the 762 mm line connecting the jetty to the tank farm. The leak’s location is indicated in Figure 7. Approximately 1,000 bbl. of Arab Light Crude Oil is released.

Leak location

Winds: SSWat 4.3m/s Tides: 4.3 meters and rising SST: 8oC Summary of Actions: 1500 Leak is observed by C-LNG Operator. The C-LNGOperator notifies the TeamLeader of what they observed. The C-LNG Team Leader instructs tanker personnel to stop cargo transfer pumps and shut the valves at the manifold. The C-LNG Team Leader radios to the Canaport Mispec tank farm to close valves leading to the CLNG Terminal. The C-LNG Operator once informed that the ship has stopped pumpingcloses the XV valve to shut down the transfer. Once the operator hits the emergency closing button the XV valve closes in 30 seconds. The remaining crude oil in the line empties out of the line, approximately 1000 bbl is released. 1510 The C-LNG TeamLeader/Incident Manager requests that the onsite VOO and the support fire tug assist in deploying the 54” containment booming and to deploy tracking buoys. 1515 The C-LNG TeamLeader commences to complete the incident report form (located in Appendix B). The CLNG Team Leader then contacts the CCGOperations Centre and notifies Fundy Traffic via VHF channel 12. 1530 The C-LNG Team Leader contacts the C-LNG On Call Manager, who assumes the role of Incident Manager and activates ALERT. 1600 The boomhas been deployed surrounding the leak in the pipeline and the crew of the DMK Vessel place sorbent booms and pads inside the boom. 1630 ALERT vessels ALERT RHIB and ALERT Sea Truck 1 and 2 prepare to deploy with the current busters, skimmer and a sea slug. 1700 ALERT contacts Atlantic Towing Ltd. and request that the Atlantic Spruce be prepared to tow the “Fundy Responder” barge. 1800 Both current busters arrive at the location of the spill and begin operations.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

1830 ALERT notifies its sub-contractors and activates them or places them on stand-by. The ALERT Spill Manager sets up a command centre at 11 Expansion Ave. 1835 The “Fundy Responder” is ready for towing form Pier 17 to the spill location by the Altantic Spruce. It departs Pier 17 with the Nofi V-sweep system, 200 m of sea boom, a DOP-160 skimmer and four ALERT responders. 1945 Fundy Responder arrives and commences deployment of the Nofi V-Sweep. 2000 Two current busters and Fundy Responder are not conducting on-water recovery operations. At 2000 an overflight by Irving Transport Ltd provides the location of the slick indicated in Figure 8. Fromthe overflight it is observed that oil is coming ashore near Mispec Beach.

2010 Incident Manager contacts 911 to inform them of the potential risk to neighbouring residential properties in the area. 2200 Sunset, on-water operations cease for the evening.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

August 18, 2016 0445 Irving Transport Ltd. plane departs from Saint John Airport with ALERT observer, and CCG representative. 0500 At first light on-water operations commence again with deployment of two current busters and the Fundy Responder. 0800 Containment boomis setup on Mispec Beach to contain oil to beach. Vacuumtrucks are used to remove the collected oil in the boom. Operations continue until Incident Manager and CCG representative are satisfied no further oil can be reasonably recovered. Summary of Trajectory and Weathering Scenario 2 The weathering graph and 24 hour trajectory model from OILMAPare provided in.

1000 Surface  Ashore Skimmed

900 800

WaterColumn Evaporated NotTracked

700 600

    s      l     e     r 500     r     a      B

400 300 200 100 0 0

20

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

40 60 Time (hou rs)

80

100

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Scenario 3 – Failure of Pipeline During Dr ainage of Line, Without a Ship Present at Jetty Situation: During pipeline purging a C-LNG operator discovers a leak in a welded joint on the pipeline causing a slick on the surface of the water below the elbow. Winds: S at 1.5 m/s Tides: 1.2 meters and rising SST: 7oC Summary of Actions: 0920-30 Leak is spotted by C-LNG personnel. Immediately, C-LNG Operators stop the line drainage. The shift supervisor immediately reports the incident to CCG and C-LNG On Call Manager. 0940 C-LNGHSSE Manager acting as the Incident Manager activates ALERT to assist in the response. The ALERT RHIB and 1 Sea Truck with current buster and additional absorbent materials are requested. 0945 A vessel of opportunity arrives at C-LNG and is used to deploy 54” containment boom around the slick on the  water surface. CCG FRC arrives onsite to inspect the incident. 0955 C-LNGpersonnel report that the failure of a welded joint is what caused the leak. 1030 ALERT RHIB and Sea Truck arrive at C-LNG. 1045 The ALERT RHIB deploys the current buster and recovery operations begin. 1130 Incident Manager updates CCG of recovery effort and repair of leak. CCG responds that they are happy with the response and FRC returns to harbour. 1300 ALERT RHIB and Sea Truck complete recovery of oil in current buster. The absorbent material used is recovered and transferred to a waste wrangler on the Sea Truck. 1315 ALERT RHIB is dispatched to conduct a survey of the surrounding 5 nm area for signs of oil. 1345 Sea Truck completes recovery of the current buster and boom, and stands by for further instruction. 1500 ALERT RHIB completes its survey of the area and no further evidence of oil is observed. 1515 ALERT RHIB and Sea Truck are stood down and return to Courtenay Bay. 1530 Incident Manager advices CCG of the completion of the response efforts and repairs. 1600 Incident completed and response efforts are stood down.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Appendix E E 

Sensitivities 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport Cana port LNG Oil Handling Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Rockwood Park

Westfield

@

/

Legend Expressway Primary Highway Railroads

Saint John

!

Ferry Crossing

!

 Atlantic Walrus - NW Atlantic pop. pop. Fin Whale (Atlantic pop.)

Dominion Park

@

Fin Whale - Bay of Fundy Harbour Porpoise - NW Atlantic pop. North Atlantic Right Whale

1 V U

Carleton Martello Tower NHS

@

Owl

Red Head Marsh DUC

Raptor 

@

Seabird Shorebird Waterfowl (Sea) Bird (Passerine)

            !

Fish (anadromous)

            !

Fish (catadromous)             !

See Inset A

Inset A

Fish - Freshwater 

            !

Reptile (Freshwater)

7 V U

Reptile (Marine)

            !

 Amphibian

            !

@

            !

1 V U @

Sts Rest Marsh (beach) Sts Rest Marsh Nature Preserve

@

Protected Sites

Protected Wellfields

            !

Simonds

Regulated Wetland

            !

Provincially Significant Wetland

            !

            !

Irving Nature Park

@

Taylors Island

            !

@

Figure E1 Sensitivities in the Vicinity of the Terminal

            !

Manawagonish Nature Preserve

@

            !

            !

Kilometers             !

1

0.5

0

1

2

            !

Project Name: Sensitivity Mapping Map Created By: RMD Map Checked By: DJC Date Created: June 2014 Date Modified: File Path G:\CAD\GIS\NB Basemap\Saint John Sensitivity Map

            !

            !

            !

            !

            !

1:75,000             !

Appendix F F 

Clean Up Strategies 

Appendix F F 

Clean Up Strategies 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

T A B LE F - 1 -

C L E A N U P

S T R A TE G I E S

  y   e  r   o  v   c    R  e   g     l    i  n   a   u  r   o  d   t    l  o    N  a    F

Bedrock

Man-made Solid Shorelines

  e  r   e  r   o  t   o  t   a  t   a  t    H    H   /    W   /    W   m   d   m   r   d    l   r    l   a   o   a   o    l    W    W   a   g   ,  C  ,  ,  C  ,    i  n   o  v   r  e   r  e   h   r  e   r  e   h   n   u   u   m   u   u   a   s   s   s    l  e   s  s   s  s   a  s   r  e  s   s    R  e   e  s   a   C    l    W    P   r  e   r  e   r   m    P  r    W    P    P    h    h   u  a  -   s  -   t   e   u  u    h -  a  s    h -  a  t  e  r   e  a  m   n   w   w   c   g    g    a   a   a    i    W    i    W    L  o   W    L  o   W    H    H   S  t    M    V  a

Very light vo latile oils

X

X

X

Light oils

X

X

X

Medium oils

X

* *

X

*

*

*

X

*

Heavy oils

*

*

Semi-solid or solid o ils

*

*

X

Very light vo latile oils

X

X

X

Light oils

X

X

X

Medium oils

X

X

Heavy oils

X

Pebble-cobble Beaches

X

X

Light oils

X

X

X

Medium oils

X

X

X

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Heavy oils

X

*

Semi-solid or solid o ils

X

X

Very light vola tile oils

X

X

*

Light oils

X

X

X

*

*

*

*

Medium oils

X

X

X

*

*

*

*

*

X

*

*

X

Very lig ht vo latile oils

X

X

*

Light oils

X

X

X

*

*

*

*

Medium oils

X

X

X

*

*

*

*

*

X

*

*

X

Heavy oils Very light vo latile oils

X

X

*

Light oils

X

X

X

*

X

*

*

Medium oils

X

X

X

*

X

*

*

*

X

*

X

Heavy oils Semi-solid or solid o ils Very light vo latile oils

X

X

*

Light oils

X

X

*

X

*

*

Medium oils

X

X

*

X

*

*

Heavy oils

X

*

Semi-solid or solid o ils

Mud Flats

Very light vo latile oils

X

X

*

X

*

*

X

*

Light oils

X

X

X

*

*

Medium oils

X

X

X

*

*

Heavy oils

X

*

*

*

*

*

Semi-solid or solid o ils

Marshes

* *

Semi-solid or solid o ils

Tida l Flats

*

*

Semi-solid or solid o ils

Sand Beaches

*

*

X

Heavy oils

Sand-gravel Beaches

* X

*

Very light vo latile oils

* *

Semi-solid or solid o ils

Boulder Beaches

  n    i   t  o   r  a    l   e    l   a   a   /  A   g    o  v   o  v   t  s    i  n    l   m    l   e  m   e  n    i   e    R    T    b    R   r    l    l   n   S  o    i  c  a    i  c  a    i   t  o   a  n   a  n   t  a    i  v  e    h    h   e   s   s   g    e  c   e  c    M    V  e    P  a    M

Very light volatile oils

X

X

Light oils

X

X

X

*

*

Medium oils

X

X

X

*

*

Heavy oils

*

*

*

*

Semi-solid or solid oils

*

*

*

* Indicates method only appropriate for small amounts of surface oil

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Appendix G G

Oil Handling Facility Declaration 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

SCHEDULE 6 – OIL HANDLING FACILITY DECLARATION

Pursuant to paragraph 168(1)(b) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, I, Adolfo Jose Azcarraga Gomis, declare that to comply with the regulations made under paragraph182(a) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001, respecting the circumstances in which operators of oil handling facilities shall report discharges or anticipated discharges of pollutants, the manner of making the reports and the persons to whom the reports shall be made; all the information contained in the submission is true and complete to the best of my ability and accurately reflects our interpretation of the regulations. * I have an arrangement with the response organization known as Atlantic Emergency Response Team (ALERT) (name of response organization) *The arrangement is with respect to 10,000 tonnes of oil and in respect of Canaport LNG at Mispec. * The persons listed below are authorized to implement the arrangement.

(Name, address, telephone number and fax or email address)

(Name, address, telephone number and fax or email address) The persons listed below are authorized to implement the oil pollution emergency plan in the manner prescribed:

(Name, address, telephone number and fax or email address)

(Name, address, telephone number and fax or email address)

(Signed by the operator of the OHF)

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facility  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

(Date)

1

References Oil Handling Facilities Standards / auth. Canadian Coast Guard Rescue and Environmental Response. - Ottawa : Government of Canada, 1995. Oil Handling Facility Oil Pollution Emergency Respons Plan for Irving Oil Terminals and Pipelines G.P. (Offshore Division) [Report] / auth. ALERT. Saint John : ALERT, 2012. Response Organizations and Oil Handling Facilities Regulations / auth. Government of Canada // Canada Shipping Act, 2001. - Ottawa : Government of Canda, 1995. - Vols. SOR/95-405.

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

3

Acronyms and Abbrevia t ions “

Inch

ALERT

Atlantic Emergency Response Team

Canaport ESJ Canaport East Saint John Marine Terminal C-LNG

Refers to the Canaport LNG facility including the LNG jetty, tanks and tank field, pipelines and buildings.

Capt.

Captain

CCG

Canadian Coast Guard

C-OHF

Canaport LNGOil Handling Facility

CSA

Canadian Standards Association

CSA 2001

Canada Shipping Act, 2001

EEST

Environmental Emergencies Science Table

ft.

feet

H&S

Health and Safety

hrs.

hours

ICS

Incident Command Structure

LNG

Liquefied Natural Gas

Ltd.

Limited

m

meter

m3 

cubic meter

Maint.

Maintenance

mm

millimeter

MSDS

Material Safety Data Sheet

N

North

N/A

Not applicable

oC

Degrees Celsius

OHF

Oil Handling Facility

OPEP

Oil Pollution Emergency Plan

PPE

Personal Protective Equipment

psi

pounds per square inch

RA

Response Authority

RO

Response Organization (ALERT in Bay of Fundy)

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

4

ROC

Regional Operations Centre

SCAT

Shoreline Clean-up and Assessment Techniques

SCBA

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus

TC

Transport Canada

TDG

Transportation of Dangerous Goods

UHF

Ultra High Frequency

VHF

Very High Frequency

VOO

Vessel of Opportunity

W

West

WHMIS

Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System

Canaport LNG Oil Handling Facil ity  Final 

 20 14 Ju ne 26 – 14 -91 87 

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close