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Graphic Handout Design Document

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INTE
 6710
 ~
 Creative
 Designs
 for
 Instructional
 Materials
  Project
 2:
 Graphic
 Novel
 Handout
 Design
 Document
  Ryan
 McClintock
 
March
 1 8,
 2 012
 

1.
 Significant
 Purpose
  Recently
 my
 mother
 shared
 a
 story
 with
 the
 family
 about
 her
 favorite
 gift
 she
 received
 growing
  up.
 “It
 was
 a
 set
 of
 Encyclopedias.
 I
 loved
 looking
 things
 up
 and
 learning,”
 she
 said,
 to
 which
 my
  17-­‐year-­‐old
 niece
 responded,
 “Wow,
 everything
 I
 need
 is
 on
 my
 phone.”
 Hearing
 this,
 I
 could
  only
 think
 that
 the
 short
 exchange
 between
 my
 mother
 and
 niece
 exemplified
 how
 much
 has
  changed
 as
 a
 result
 of
 what
 many
 call
 a
 Digital
 Revolution.
 Society
 is
 becoming
 increasingly
  networked
 and
 information
 is
 more
 readily
 available.
 
  Education,
 although
 changing,
 lags
 behind
 the
 rate
 at
 which
 society
 is
 changing.
 While
 there
  may
 be
 many
 reasons
 for
 this
 gap
 between
 society
 and
 schools,
 one
 of
 the
 main
 reasons
 may
  be
 that
 educators
 need
 to
 recognize,
 accept,
 and
 adapt
 to
 the
 needs
 of
 a
 new
 generation
 of
  students;
 a
 generation
 that
 is
 connected,
 sophisticated,
 and,
 I
 think,
 inherently
 hungry
 to
  demonstrate
 their
 ability
 to
 innovate
 and
 influence.
  Many
 progressive
 educators
 are
 currently
 working
 to
 adapt
 by
 transforming
 their
 instruction
 to
  meet
 the
 needs
 of
 their
 students.
 Part
 of
 this
 transformation
 involves
 networking
 and
  collaborating
 with
 colleagues
 and
 fellow
 educators.
 Reflecting
 with
 colleagues
 will
 improve
 so
  many
 lessons,
 labs,
 and
 activities
 and
 will
 result
 in
 the
 creation
 of
 many
 deeper
 project
 (or
  problem)-­‐based
 learning
 (PBL)
 opportunities
 for
 students.
  A
 PBL
 curriculum
 encourages
 students
 to
 work
 together
 as
 they
 investigate
 open-­‐ended
 type
  questions
 that
 cover
 content
 and
 introduces
 them
 to
 important
 skills
 along
 the
 way.
 They
 learn
  to
 utilize
 their
 resources
 to
 access
 information
 while
 teachers
 circulate
 and
 help
 guide
 them
  through
 their
 work.
 True
 cross-­‐curricular
 sharing
 and
 collaboration
 is
 required
 to
 create
 well-­‐ designed
 projects.
 Image
 what
 a
 team
 made
 up
 of
 English,
 History,
 Science,
 and
 Math
 teachers
  could
 create
 when
 they
 work
 together
 to
 address
 students’
 needs
 by
 designing
 a
 project
 that
  will
 involve
 content
 and
 skills
 from
 each
 of
 their
 respective
 areas
 of
 expertise.
 Students
 will
  engage
 in
 these
 projects
 and
 remember
 their
 work
 for
 years
 to
 come.
  Many
 teachers
 work
 collaboratively
 as
 they
 seek
 to
 improve
 their
 instruction.
 Occasionally
  several
 will
 create
 a
 project
 or
 problem
 that
 spans
 more
 than
 one
 curricular
 area.
 Creating
 and
  implementing
 an
 overarching
 PBL
 program,
 however,
 involves
 much
 more
 than
 several
  teachers
 working
 together
 because
 they
 recognize
 the
 benefits
 of
 such
 collaboration.
 To
 effect
  a
 building-­‐wide
 program
 requires
 more
 structure
 and
 examples.
 
INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 
  Page
 
  1
 

This
 project
 will
 create
 a
 graphic-­‐novel
 depicting
 the
 major
 steps
 involved
 in
 successful
 cross-­‐ curricular
 PBL
 programs.
 The
 handout
 will
 depict
 several
 teachers
 working
 together
 to
 create
 a
  project,
 all
 the
 while
 they
 will
 be
 describing
 their
 ideas
 and
 individual
 contributions.
 This
  handout
 will
 help
 teachers
 learn
 the
 nuances
 of
 PBL
 by
 breaking
 the
 process
 into
 a
 series
 of
  steps
 and
 examples,
 thus
 addressing
 any
 misconceptions
 regarding
 PBL
 and
 highlighting
 the
  advantages
 of
 such
 an
 approach.
  Teachers
 at
 Castle
 View
 High
 School
 will
 recognize
 their
 building
 is
 appropriately
 setup
 to
  encourage
 a
 PBL-­‐approach
 to
 learning.
 Our
 current
 culture
 of
 collaboration
 and
 Professional
  Learning
 Communities
 is
 primed
 to
 handle
 a
 more
 organized
 push
 to
 create
 rigorous
 and
  relevant
 learning
 opportunities
 for
 our
 students.
 This
 handout
 will
 catalyze
 their
 efforts
 to
  create
 more
 cross-­‐curricular
 PBL,
 which
 is
 becoming
 more
 and
 more
 important
 as
 schools
 and
  educators
 seek
 methods
 to
 engage
 our
 students
 in
 an
 ever-­‐changing,
 technologically-­‐infused,
  networked
 society.
 
“Designing
 your
 curriculum
 around
 project-­‐based
 learning
 is
 a
 dynamic
 way
 of
 engaging
  learners
 and
 of
 cultivating
 their
 powers
 of
 imagination,
 creativity
 and
 inquiry.”
  -­‐
 Sir
 Ken
 Robinson
 

2.
 A
 Picture
 of
 the
 Future
 
Recent
 efforts
 in
 education
 have
 resulted
 in
 the
 creation
 and
 utilization
 of
 Professional
 Learning
  Communities,
 PLCs,
 which
 often
 include
 teachers
 from
 several
 content
 areas.
 The
 PLC
 movement
 is
  centered
 on
 collaboration
 and
 reflection,
 which
 often
 results
 in
 teachers
 talking
 about
 what
 they
 do
 and
  how
 they
 can
 improve.
 Most
 PLC
 work
 encourages
 the
 creation
 and
 implementation
 of
 cross-­‐curricular
  material,
 though
 on
 a
 small
 scale.
  A
 PBL-­‐centered
 program
 takes
 this
 work
 to
 the
 next
 level
 as
 students
 make
 connections
 between
  several
 disciplines
 and
 thus
 engage
 more
 and
 engage
 and
 take
 more
 control
 of
 their
 learning.
  Castle
 View
 High
 School
 is
 organized
 into
 four
 academies
 for
 students
 to
 choose
 from.
 These
 academies
  contain
 teachers
 from
 each
 content
 area
 who
 meet
 twice
 a
 week
 to
 discuss
 their
 efforts
 to
 increase
  academic
 rigor
 and
 relevance,
 through
 their
 relationships
 with
 students.
 Implementing
 a
 building-­‐wide
  PBL
 effort
 will
 work
 well
 at
 several
 levels.
  Firstly,
 academies
 will
 be
 able
 to
 distinguish
 themselves
 from
 each
 other
 via
 PLB.
 Our
 Biotech
 and
 Health
  Sciences
 (BHS)
 academy
 will
 design
 projects
 that
 center
 on
 the
 major
 goals
 of
 the
 science-­‐based
  academy.
 Our
 Leadership
 and
 Global
 Communications
 (LGC)
 academy
 can
 focus
 on
 their
 sociological
  design.
 The
 other
 two
 academies
 will
 similarly
 focus
 their
 PBL
 efforts
 on
 the
 defining
 aspects
 of
 their
  academies.
 

INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 


 

Page
 
 

2
 

Secondly,
 teachers
 will
 realize
 the
 power
 of
 a
 more
 inquiry-­‐based
 approach
 to
 learning
 where
 students
  are
 able
 to
 manage
 their
 work
 in
 ways
 that
 are
 more
 engaging
 and
 effective
 than
 traditional
 lecture-­‐ type
 approaches.
  Thirdly,
 students
 will
 engage
 in
 memorable
 work
 that
 advances
 their
 intellectual
 contributions
 beyond
  the
 walls
 of
 a
 single
 classroom.
 Students,
 therefore,
 will
 more
 than
 likely
 retain
 the
 skills
 and
 content
  involved
 in
 their
 projects
 well
 beyond
 their
 high
 school
 days.
  Teachers
 will
 be
 the
 audience
 for
 this
 particular
 handout.
 Here’s
 what
 they
 should
 be
 able
 to
 do
 after
  reviewing
 the
 handout:
  • • Form
 (join)
 a
 cross-­‐curricular
 PLB
 team
 of
 teachers
  Execute
 a
 PBL
 project
  o o o o o • Get
 an
 idea
  Design
 the
 project
  Tune
 the
 project
  Do
 the
 project
  Exhibit
 the
 project
 

Reflect
 on
 their
 efforts
 at
 introducing
 PBL
 

Academy
 PLCs
 will
 be
 expected
 to
 create
 and
 execute
 a
 minimum
 of
 one
 PBL
 experience
 per
 nine-­‐week
  term
 to
 measure
 the
 usefulness
 of
 both
 the
 handout
 and
 the
 approach
 for
 Castle
 View
 students.
 

Design
 Values
 
I
 think
 a
 graphic
 novel
 handout
 is
 an
 effective
 medium
 for
 instructing
 readers
 on
 designing
 PBL
 for
 their
  students.
 What
 follows
 are
 the
 major
 design
 values
 I
 took
 into
 consideration
 when
 creating
 this
  handout.
  This
 graphic
 handout
 was
 designed
 to
 be
 brief,
 concrete,
 yet
 effective
 in
 introducing
 and
 instructing
  readers
 how
 to
 think
 and
 implement
 PBL
 into
 a
 course.
 “Using
 concreteness
 as
 a
 foundation
 for
  abstraction
 is
 not
 just
 good
 for
 mathematical
 instruction;
 it
 is
 a
 basic
 principle
 of
 understanding.
 Novices
  crave
 concreteness
 ….
 Concrete
 ideas
 are
 easier
 to
 remember,”
 according
 to
 Heath
 &
 Heath
 (2007,
 p.
  106)
 regarding
 how
 to
 make
 a
 difficult
 or
 abstract
 idea
 easier
 to
 understand
 and
 recall.
 Along
 these
 lines
  I
 structured
 this
 handout
 by
 creating
 short
 lists
 of
 the
 most
 important
 portions
 of
 PBL
 for
 students
 and
  of
 how
 teachers
 can
 approach
 PBL
 to
 create
 amazing
 projects.
 Portions
 of
 Medina
 (2008)
 material
 on
  short-­‐term
 memory,
 specifically
 on
 repetition,
 influenced
 the
 organization
 of
 this
 handout.
 

INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 


 

Page
 
 

3
 

Similar
 to
 the
 style
 of
 McCloud
 (2006),
 I
 decided
 to
 include
 a
 narrating
 character
 to
 instruct
 readers
  about
 PBL.
 I
 thought
 this
 style
 would
 best
 engage
 the
 readers
 and
 give
 the
 handout
 a
 personal
 tone.
 This
  idea
 allowed
 me
 to
 include
 frames
 that
 were
 describing
 or
 exemplifying
 some
 of
 the
 narrator’s
 points
  that
 had
 slightly
 different
 looks
 and
 feels
 (colors,
 texture,
 positioning,
 etc.)
 so
 it
 was
 obvious
 to
 readers
  that
 the
 content
 was
 one
 “layer”
 deeper
 than
 the
 narrator
 slides.
  Handout
 flow
 was
 designed
 so
 readers
 are
 mostly
 tracking
 left
 to
 right,
 though
 some
 panels
 and
 frames
  are
 slightly
 larger
 than
 others.
 I
 used
 McCloud’s
 six
 panel
 to
 panel
 transitions
 (mainly
 Moment
 to
  Moment,
 Action
 to
 Action,
 and
 Subject
 to
 Subject)
 when
 designing
 the
 flow
 of
 my
 handout.
  I
 chose
 to
 not
 include
 each
 and
 every
 single
 detail
 about
 PBL
 planning
 in
 this
 handout.
 Medina
 (2008,
 p.
  105)
 alludes
 to
 our
 brain’s
 ability
 to
 fill
 in
 the
 gap
 of
 details
 when
 recalling
 the
 effect
 of
 writing
 vowels
  with
 a
 stroke
 victim.
 A
 handout
 containing
 too
 many
 details
 may
 overwhelm
 readers
 and
 dissuade
 them
  from
 reading
 for
 comprehension
 (as
 referenced
 by
 one
 of
 my
 reviewers
 in
 the
 next
 section).
 
  I
 continued
 to
 include
 many
 of
 the
 lessons
 I’ve
 learned
 from
 Reynolds
 (2009)
 regarding
 font
 selection,
  emphasis,
 and
 spacing.
 With
 respect
 to
 font
 selection,
 Pixton
 has
 a
 limited
 selection
 and
 uses
  proprietary
 fonts,
 but
 I
 was
 still
 able
 to
 choose
 a
 font
 that
 appeared
 similar
 to
 Futura
 and
 Rockwell
 as
  described
 by
 Reynolds
 (2009,
 p.
 44).
 I
 positioned
 text
 and
 images
 in
 ways
 to
 avoid
 clutter
 (Reynolds,
 p.
  38),
 which
 often
 resulted
 in
 more
 than
 one
 panel
 for
 a
 specific
 thought
 and
 guided
 readers
 to
 the
 next
  panel.
 I
 choose
 a
 color
 scheme
 that
 I
 think
 was
 easy
 to
 read
 on
 both
 a
 screen
 and
 paper.
 
  McCloud
 (2006)
 served
 as
 the
 best
 model
 and
 example
 for
 my
 handout.
 The
 visual
 examples
 that
 he
  connected
 with
 his
 text
 and
 instruction
 provided
 me
 a
 template
 of
 sorts
 for
 my
 handout.
 I
 thought
 his
  use
 of
 a
 “narrator”
 worked
 well
 and
 therefore
 incorporated
 the
 same
 idea
 for
 my
 PBL
 handout.
 
 

Formative
 Evaluation
 Response
 
I
 asked
 the
 following
 questions
 of
 two
 of
 my
 peers:
  1. I
 changed
 some
 of
 the
 design
 details
 of
 the
 thought
 bubbles
 throughout
 the
 handout.
 Which
  aspects
 did
 you
 enjoy
 the
 most?
  I
 asked
 this
 question
 to
 help
 identify
 which
 type
 of
 Pixton
 thought
 bubble
 was
 the
 most
  attractive
 and
 effective
 for
 the
 handout.
 Some
 of
 the
 choices
 were
 more
 rounded,
 some
 were
  boxy,
 and
 others
 were
 star-­‐like
 in
 appearance.
 I
 also
 framed
 the
 bubbles
 with
 thicker
 lines
 for
 a
  few
 to
 help
 draw
 the
 reader’s
 attention
 to
 the
 content
 and
 wanted
 to
 know
 if
 this
 was
 an
  effective
 strategy.
  Here
 are
 the
 responses
 from
 my
 reviewers:
 
  Personally,
 I
 neither
 liked
 nor
 disliked
 the
 changing
 up
 of
 the
 bubbles.
 In
 the
  Design
 the
 Project
 area
 on
 page
 2
 (it
 is
 a
 panel
 with
 three
 bubbles
 in
 one
 panel
 …
 
INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 
  Page
 
  4
 

such
 that
 the
 conversation
 was
 building
 off
 of
 each
 other),
 you
 used
 all
 three
  styles.
 That
 did
 strike
 me
 as
 odd,
 but
 it
 wasn’t
 overly
 distracting.
 However,
 in
  hindsight,
 I
 think
 that
 I
 would
 stick
 to
 one
 style.
 One
 thing
 that
 I
 did
 find
  bothersome
 was
 the
 extremely
 large
 size
 of
 the
 font
 in
 the
 thought
 bubbles.
  While
 it
 was
 purposeful,
 I
 found
 that
 to
 be
 very
 distracting…
 I
 would
 suggest
  bringing
 the
 font
 size
 down
 a
 notch
 on
 the
 very
 large
 ones.
 
 

***************
 

  I
 personally
 preferred
 the
 thought
 bubbles
 with
 the
 thinner
 outline,
 though
 in
  the
 first
 read-­‐through
 I
 didn’t
 notice
 that
 they
 changed
 at
 all.
 I’d
 say,
 unless
  you’re
 trying
 to
 emphasize
 a
 point,
 keep
 them
 consistent.
 You
 can
 use
 the
 darker
  outline
 on
 important
 thoughts/words
 then
 whatever
 other
 consistent
 design
 for
  the
 rest.
 Though
 I’m
 not
 sure
 if
 it’s
 worth
 your
 time
 to
 go
 back
 and
 reformat
  them
 to
 make
 them
 all
 the
 same
 at
 this
 point,
 since
 as
 I
 said,
 I
 didn’t
 even
 notice
  at
 first.
  I
 decreased
 the
 font
 size
 on
 the
 larger
 font
 panels
 and
 reduced
 the
 number
 of
 callout
 bubble
  styles.
 I
 also
 reformatted
 the
 outline
 of
 several
 of
 the
 bubbles
 to
 a
 more
 consistent
 thickness.
 
 
  2. What
 should
 I
 improve
 with
 respect
 to
 the
 flow
 of
 the
 handout?
  I
 asked
 this
 to
 ascertain
 whether
 or
 not
 the
 size
 and
 shape
 of
 the
 frames
 were
 easy
 to
 follow
  and
 if
 it
 was
 obvious
 to
 the
 reader
 when
 the
 content
 shifted
 to
 a
 new
 idea.
 I
 purposefully
 kept
  this
 question
 rather
 general
 so
 as
 to
 encourage
 my
 reviewers
 to
 provide
 a
 large
 amount
 of
  feedback
 regarding
 the
 overall
 readability
 and
 flow
 of
 instruction.
  Here
 are
 the
 responses
 from
 my
 reviewers:
 
  Overall,
 I
 thought
 the
 flow
 was
 fine.
 You
 covered
 a
 bit
 of
 why
 do
 PBL,
 the
 history
  of
 it,
 the
 steps,
 the
 outcomes,
 and
 how
 to
 do
 it.
 My
 only
 flow
 comment
 would
 be
  that
 it
 seems
 to
 just
 end
 abruptly
 after
 the
 instructor
 leaps
 and
 jumps
 with
 joy.
  I’d
 suggest
 maybe
 decreasing
 the
 number
 of
 panels
 showing
 his
 joy
 and
 putting
  in
 one
 more
 summary
 panel.
 
  I
 did
 have
 a
 specific
 question
 about
 the
 first
 page,
 5th
 row,
 second
 panel
 (the
  bubble
 over
 the
 chalkboard,
 “…and
 how
 we
 know
 how
 to
 do
 good
 PBL.”
 I’m
 not
  sure
 why
 this
 is
 here…
 It
 seems
 out
 of
 place.
 
 

INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 


 

Page
 
 

5
 

On
 page
 2,
 in
 the
 “Design
 the
 Project”
 description,
 I
 don’t
 understand
 the
  wording
 in
 the
 last
 panel
 under
 that
 section.
 Is
 there
 a
 word
 missing
 around
 the
  words
 “the
 phase”?
 
 

***************
 

  I
 thought
 it
 flowed
 really
 well
 and
 told
 a
 great
 little
 story.
 Obviously
 it
 would
 be
  nice
 if
 you
 could
 have
 all
 three
 parts
 merged,
 but
 that’s
 a
 limitation
 of
 the
 tool.
  One
 other
 thing
 I
 noticed
 that
 I
 liked,
 but
 might
 use
 slightly
 differently
 is
 your
 use
  of
 emphasis
 on
 certain
 words.
 I
 like
 that
 it
 gives
 cadence
 to
 the
 text
 as
 if
 you’re
  actually
 hearing
 someone
 speak,
 but
 when
 I
 look
 back
 over
 it
 at
 a
 glance,
 my
 eye
  is
 drawn
 to
 those
 words
 thinking
 they’re
 the
 important
 takeaway
 points,
 but
  they
 don’t
 always
 seem
 to
 be.
 Perhaps
 you
 could
 use
 more
 selection
 about
 the
  words
 that
 are
 larger/bold
 so
 they
 align
 with
 key
 words/phrases.
  I
 changed
 the
 reference
 to
 “this
 phase”
 as
 described
 by
 the
 first
 reviewer.
 I
 also
 reviewed
 each
  callout
 bubble
 and
 either
 changed
 or
 deleted
 any
 emphasized
 text
 to
 draw
 attention
 to
 terms
  specific
 to
 the
 content
 being
 discussed
 rather
 than
 the
 speaking
 cadence.
 
  3. I
 was
 learning
 Pixton
 as
 I
 constructed
 this
 handout
 and
 consequently
 ran
 into
 a
 few
 technical
  issues
 (e.g.,
 length
 of
 comic).
 What
 issues
 did
 you
 run
 into
 and
 do
 you
 have
 any
 advise
 for
 my
  Pixton
 comic?
  I
 tried
 several
 different
 strategies
 when
 constructing
 this
 handout,
 from
 hand
 drawings,
 taking
  pictures
 of
 my
 colleagues
 working
 together,
 to
 Pixton.
 I
 chose
 Pixton
 because
 of
 its
 supply
 of
  characters
 and
 background
 props.
 I
 did
 not
 anticipate
 a
 restriction
 on
 the
 length
 of
 a
 comic
 to
  fourteen
 strips.
 This
 required
 me
 to
 create
 a
 total
 of
 three
 comics
 to
 contain
 my
 material.
 I
  asked
 this
 question
 in
 anticipation
 of
 one
 or
 more
 of
 my
 reviewers
 also
 using
 Pixton
 as
 their
  tool.
 I
 figured
 they
 might
 have
 some
 practical
 advise
 for
 using
 Pixton.
  Here
 are
 my
 reviewers’
 comments:
  See
 above.
 Really,
 the
 only
 thing
 was
 the
 super
 large
 font
 size.
 Oh,
 I
 did
 notice
  one
 panel
 (was
 of
 the
 chalkboard/screen)
 that
 had
 a
 completely
 different
 font
 all
  together.
 Would
 be
 nice
 if
 you
 could
 make
 it
 one
 file
 instead
 of
 three,
 but
 I
  suspect
 the
 size
 was
 limited.
 
 

***************
 

  Nice
 job
 learning
 a
 new
 tool
 as
 you
 went.
 The
 only
 thing
 that
 really
 stuck
 out
 in
  my
 mind
 was
 your
 sample
 of
 student
 work.
 When
 you
 mention
 that
 students
 did
  a
 painting
 on
 plywood
 to
 house
 their
 video
 I’m
 really
 intrigued
 and
 want
 to
 see
 
INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 
  Page
 
  6
 

it,
 because
 I’m
 not
 quite
 sure
 what
 you
 mean.
 I’m
 assuming
 the
 accompanying
  image
 is
 a
 screen
 shot
 of
 their
 animation.
 If
 you
 have
 a
 picture
 of
 the
 display
  that
 would
 be
 nice
 to
 see.
  As
 soon
 as
 I
 can
 find
 a
 version
 of
 Acrobat
 Pro
 I
 plan
 to
 export
 each
 of
 the
 three
 handout
 parts
 as
  pdf
 files
 and
 condense
 them
 to
 one
 file.
 Until
 then
 I’ll
 have
 to
 simply
 provide
 either
 three
 links
  to
 the
 parts
 or
 three
 pdf
 files.
  To
 address
 the
 “painting
 on
 plywood”
 issue,
 I
 removed
 that
 description.
 What
 I
 think
 could
 be
  done
 once
 a
 “multiple
 file”
 pdf
 is
 created
 is
 add
 web
 links
 to
 each
 of
 the
 hi-­‐lighted
 examples
 for
  readers
 to
 review
 in
 detail.
 
  4. With
 this
 handout
 I
 try
 to
 condense
 the
 process
 of
 Project-­‐Based
 Learning,
 PBL,
 into
 a
 few
  “doable”
 steps.
 How
 can
 my
 approach
 be
 improved
 to
 make
 the
 understanding
 of
 PBL
 and
  subsequent
 implementation
 easier
 and
 more
 attractive
 to
 teachers?
  There
 are
 several
 aspects
 of
 proper
 PBL
 implementation
 that
 many
 teachers
 simply
 do
 not
 know
  about
 or
 practice
 (for
 whatever
 reason).
 I
 asked
 this
 question
 because
 I
 wanted
 to
 know
 if
 the
  number
 of
 steps
 I
 condensed
 the
 process
 into
 were
 understandable
 or
 if
 I
 bit
 off
 more
 than
 I
 can
  chew
 by
 doing
 this.
  Here
 are
 my
 reviewers’
 comments:
  You
 might
 want
 to
 consider
 adding
 one
 more
 descriptive
 panel
 for
 each
 of
 the
  How
 to
 Do
 PBL
 steps?
 I’m
 conflicted,
 as
 you
 cover
 plenty,
 yet
 I
 wonder
 if
 more
  could
 go
 in
 here.
 I
 leave
 that
 up
 to
 your
 judgment,
 as
 I
 think
 it’s
 really
 a
 very
  good
 length.
 If
 you
 give
 to
 much,
 it
 won’t
 get
 read,
 if
 you
 give
 too
 little,
 you
  leave
 them
 hanging.
 I
 do
 think
 you
 did
 a
 nice
 job
 of
 summarizing
 the
 tons
 of
  information
 that’s
 out
 there.
 
 

***************
 

  I
 think
 you
 did
 a
 really
 nice
 job
 breaking
 this
 down
 to
 make
 it
 a
 much
 more
  approachable
 topic.
 I’m
 not
 sure
 if
 teachers
 at
 your
 school
 have
 a
 good
 amount
  of
 prep
 time
 to
 do
 all
 the
 planning
 that
 you
 propose,
 but
 that
 might
 be
 a
  perceived
 barrier
 to
 them.
 I
 bet
 there
 are
 some
 great
 PBL
 project
 resources
 and
  examples
 somewhere
 on
 the
 web,
 giving
 them
 a
 link
 to
 something
 like
 that
  might
 make
 PBL
 a
 little
 more
 accessible.
 
  The
 second
 reviewer
 mentions
 additional
 PBL
 resources,
 which
 reinforces
 my
 desire
  to
 add
 web
 links
 to
 example
 sites
 and
 sites
 that
 continue
 to
 describe
 the
 PBL
  process.
 
INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 
  Page
 
  7
 


  5. How
 can
 I
 make
 this
 handout
 more
 interesting
 to
 read
 and
 more
 effective
 at
 conveying
 my
  message
 to
 teachers?
  This
 was
 a
 sort
 of
 “anything
 else?”
 type
 of
 question
 that
 would
 allow
 my
 reviewers
 to
 mention
  errors
 in
 grammar
 and
 spelling,
 font
 size,
 and
 any
 other
 general
 design
 aspects
 that
 my
 first
 four
  questions
 missed
 asking
 about.
  Here
 are
 my
 reviewers’
 comments:
  I
 would
 say
 ditto
 to
 my
 answer
 above.
 Overall,
 I
 think
 you
 did
 a
 very
 nice
 job.
 I
  did
 find
 a
 couple
 of
 errors:
  • 1st
 page,
 5th
 row,
 1st
 column:
 “student”
 should
 be
 plural
  • 1t
 page,
 near
 the
 bottom:
 “Today,
 teachers
 around
 the
 world
 are…”
 I’d
  suggest
 using
 either
 college
 or
 university
 in
 your
 text,
 but
 not
 both.
 Although
  the
 two
 words
 have
 different
 meanings,
 I
 think
 that
 for
 most
 people,
 the
 two
  words
 are
 synonymous
 in
 that
 they
 indicate
 higher
 education
 after
 high
  school.
  • 2nd
 page:
 “This
 inspires
 a
 level
 of
 commitment…
 than
 is
 fuelled
 by…”.
  Although
 fueled
 can
 be
 spelled
 with
 one
 L
 or
 two,
 it
 looks
 funny
 in
 this
 font
  with
 two
 Ls.
 I’d
 suggest
 spelling
 with
 only
 one
 L,
 as
 I
 think
 it’s
 more
 common
  (judgment
 call
 on
 your
 part
 though)
 
 the
 period
 should
 be
 contained
  within
 the
 closing
 quotation
 mark.
  • 3rd
 page:
 “Sorry,
 Good
 PBL
 get’s
 me
 excited”
 
 “get’s”
 should
 be
 “gets”
  • 3rd
 page,
 last
 panel:
 “I
 hope
 this
 has
 inspired
 you
 to
 bing
 PBL
 into…”
 
 bing
  should
 be
 bring.
 Also,
 “…tips
 and
 to
 to
 engage
 and
 challenge
 our
 students.”
  Do
 you
 mean
 “your”
 students
 instead
 of
 “our”?
 
 

***************
 

  I
 actually
 think
 you
 did
 an
 exceptional
 job
 of
 making
 this
 interesting
 to
 read.
 I
  especially
 like
 the
 last
 few
 frames
 where
 your
 character
 does
 a
 cartwheel.
 I
 think
  it
 does
 a
 good
 job
 of
 practicing
 what
 you
 teach
 when
 you
 tell
 them
 they
 should
  show
 enthusiasm
 for
 a
 project.
 I
 feel
 like
 this
 project
 could
 be
 particularly
  impactful
 if
 you
 do
 manage
 to
 print
 a
 few
 copies.
 That
 could
 get
 around
 the
  multiple
 sections
 issue
 and
 grab
 the
 teacher’s
 attention
 a
 bit.
 
  Each
 of
 the
 errors
 described
 by
 the
 first
 reviewer
 have
 been
 fixed.
 
 

INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 


 

Page
 
 

8
 

Bibliography
 
Heath,
 C.,
 &
 Heath,
 D.
 (2008).
 Made
 to
 Stick:
 Why
 Some
 Ideas
 Die
 and
 Others
 Survive.
 New
 York:
  Random
 House.
  McCloud,
 S.
 (2006).
 Making
 Comics:
 Storytelling
 Secrets
 of
 Comics,
 Magna
 and
 Graphic
 Novels.
 New
  York:
 Harper.
 
  Medina,
 J.
 (2008).
 Brain
 Rules:
 12
 Principles
 for
 Surviving
 and
 Thriving
 at
 Work,
 Home,
 and
 School.
  Seattle,
 WA:
 Pear
 Press.
  Patton,
 A.
 (2012)
 Work
 that
 matters:
 The
 teacher’s
 guilde
 to
 project-­‐based
 learning.
 Retrieved
 from
  http://www.innovationunit.org/our-­‐services/projects/learning-­‐futures-­‐increasing-­‐meaningful-­‐student-­‐ engagement
  Reynolds,
 G.
 (2009).
 Presentation
 Zen
 Design:
 Simple
 Design
 Principles
 and
 Techniques
 to
 Enhance
 Your
  Presentations.
 Berkeley,
 CA:
 New
 Riders.
 
 

INTE
 6710
 ~
 Project
 2
 


 

Page
 
 

9
 

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