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Ida Jean Orlando

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PREPARED BY: BERNIE P. MALABANAN, RN MASTER OF ARTS IN NURSING STUDENT

€ FULL

NAME: Ida Jean Orlando-Pelletier € DATE BORN: August 12, 1926 € DATE DIED: November 28, 2007 OTHER SIGNIFICANT INFORMATION € Daughter of Italian Immigrants € Grew up during the Depression € Married To Robert Pelletier

€ DIPLOMA IN


NURSING, 1947

NEW YORK MEDICAL COLLEGE FLOWER FIFTH AVENUE HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING

€ BS


PUBLIC HEALTH IN NURSING, 1951
ST. JOHN·S UNIVERSITY, BROOKLYN NEW YORK

€ MA


IN MENTAL HEALTH CONSULTATION, 1954
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY TEACHER·S COLLEGE

€ ´Integration

of Mental Health Concepts in Basic Curriculumµ (PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR) € ´Two Systems of Nursing in a Psychiatric Hospitalµ (PROJECT DIRECTOR)

€ ´The

Dynamic Nurse-patient Relationship: Function, Process, and Principles of Professional Nursing Practiceµ(1961)
ƒ ƒ

Published in 5 other languages Basis of her Nursing Process Theory

€ ´The

Discipline and Teaching of Nursing Processµ,(1972)

€ YALE
ƒ ƒ ƒ

SCHOOL OF NURSING, NEW HAVEN CONNECTICUT
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR RESEARCH ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MENTAL HEALTH PSYCHIATRIC NURSING

€ HARVARD
ƒ

COMMUNITY HEALTH PLAN

BOARD MEMBER

€ NATIONAL AND

INTERNATIONAL CONSULTANT

€ Nurse-Patient

relationship is reciprocal (action of one affects the other)

€

Important components of the nurse-patient interaction
ƒ ƒ

Patient participation Intelligent nurse deliberation

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Nursing action is derived from the patient·s immediate experience and immediate needs for help Nurses use an interactive process to resolve client·s helplessness One·s actions should be based on rationale and not protocols

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PATIENT·S BEHAVIOR NURSE·S RESPONSE NURSE·S ACTION

€ May

be verbal or non-verbal € Sets the nursing process in motion € Must be considered an expression of a need for help until its meaning to a particular patient behavior is understood € Helplessness results when clients cannot resolve their own need for help without others

€ Patient

behavior stimulates a nurse-reaction, which is the start of the nursing process of an appropriate nurse reaction

€ Steps


Behavior perception with use of senses Automatic thought formation Automatic feeling Sharing and validating accuracy of nurses reactions Deliberation of reaction and patient input

€ TYPES
1) 2)

OF NURSE·S ACTION

Automatic ²hasty; unprofessional Deliberative ² professional nursing actions

€ Correct

identification of a patient needs by validation of nurse·s reaction to patient behavior € Exploration of the meaning of the action with the patient and its relevance to meeting his need € Validation of the action·s effectiveness immediately after completing it € Absence of a stimuli unrelated to the patient·s need when action is taken

€

Nursing is distinct profession separate from other disciplines Professional Nursing has a distinct function and product (outcome) There is difference between lay and professional nursing Nursing is aligned with medicine

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€

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Patient·s needs for help are unique Patients have initial inability to communicate their needs for help When patients cannot meet their own needs, they become distressed The patient·s behavior is meaningful Patients are able and willing to communicate verbally

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The nurse·s reaction to each patient is unique Nurses are responsible for helping patients avoid or alleviate distress The nurse·s mind is the major tool for helping patients The nurse·s use of automatic response prevents the responsibility of nursing from being fulfilled A nurse·s practice is improved through selfreflection

€

€

€

€ The

nurse-patient situation is a dynamic whole phenomenon of the nurse-patient encounter represents a major source of nursing knowledge

€ The

€A

deliberate nursing process has elements of continuous reflection as the nurse tries to understand the meaning to the patient of the behavior she observes and what he needs from her in order to be helped. Responses comprising this process are stimulated by the nurse·s unfolding awareness of the particulars of the individual situation.

€

It proposes a specific process of deliberative, intentional one-to-one interaction between the nurse and the patient to support optimal nursing care directed to address patient·s expressed need for help

PATIENT

NURSES

NURSING PROCESS ENVIRONMENT (NURSE-PATIENT SITUATION)

NURSING

PERSON (PATIENT)

‡ A unique individual in need demonstrating behaviors, verbal or non-verbal, to express their helplessness and need for professional nursing

HEALTH ENVIRONMENT (NURSE-PATIENT SITUATION) NURSING

‡ Being able to meet and resolve their needs without help from others

‡ Nursing situation that o urs when there is a nurse-patient onta t and that both nurse and patient per eive, thin , feel and a t in the immediate situation
¡        

‡ A distin t profession that provide dire t assistan e to individuals in whatever setting they are found for he purpose of avoiding, relieving, diminishing, or uring the individual's sense of helplessness
 

 

 

  

 

€ TO
ƒ

NURSING RESEARCH

Use of effective nurse-patient interaction as a parameter in measurement of nurse efficiency and patient satisfaction

€ TO
ƒ

NURSING EDUCATION

The model may be used as a good basis in training the students to become effective in their nurse-client interactions and utilization of therapeutic communication

€ NURSING
ƒ

PRACTICE

It may be used as one of the parameters when doing nursing audit and quality assurance monitoring

€

Marriner-Tomey, Ann. Nursing Theorists and their Work. (1989). C.V. Mosby. St. Louis Orlando, Ida Jean. The Dynamic Nurse-Patient Relationship: Function, Process and Principles. (1961). G.P. Putnam Sons. New York Schimieding, Norma Jean. Ida Jean Orlando: A Nursing Process Theory. (1993). SAGE Publications. California Sitzman, Kathleen and Eichelberger, Lisa Wright. Understanding the Work of Nurse Theorists: A Creative Beginning. (2004). Jones Bartlett Publishers. Canada

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