of 81

“Funding Opportunities for Community Colleges: NSF - DUE”

Published on 1 weeks ago | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 0 | Comments: 0
157 views

Comments

Content

“Funding Opportunities for Community Colleges: NSF - DUE” 183rd Two-year College Chemistry Consortium Conference Eun-Woo Chang [email protected]

Division of Undergraduate Education National Science Foundation November 21, 2008 1

Purpose of this session To share information about several specific NSF programs from which you may wish to seek funding

http://www.sju.edu/~scooper/NSF/index.html 2

Caution Most of the information presented in this workshop represents the opinions of the individual program officers and is not an official NSF position.

NATI ONAL  SCI ENCE  FOUNDATI ON

DI VI SI ON  OF  UNDERGRADUATE  EDUCATI ON  ( DUE)

www.nsf.gov

“EHR’s Mission is to promote the development of a diverse and well-prepared workforce of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, educators, and technicians and a well informed citizenry who have access to the ideas and tools of science and engineering.”

The Role of Community Colleges in the Education of Recent Science and Engineering Graduates



44% of all S & E 1999 and 2000 graduates with a bachelor’s or master’s degree attended a community college (more than 50% of the bachelors and 35% of the masters)



51% of Hispanic bachelor’s and masters graduates and 18% of the Hispanic Ph.D.s attended a community college

The Role of Community Colleges in the Education of Recent Science and Engineering Graduates 

62% of female graduates and 51% of male graduates who had children attended a community college



42% of the graduates who had a GPA between 3.75 and 4.00 attended a community college

NSF Budget 

Education and Human Resources (EHR): FY 2009 (Requested) $709 Million



Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE): FY 2007 (Actual) $204.96 Million FY 2008 (Estimate) $211.05 Million FY 2009 (Requested) $219.83 Million *Note: Extra $75 million from H-1B visa fees employers pay to obtain a visa for a foreign high-tech worker to fund the S-STEM program.

Selected Programs in DUE

ATE CCLI STEP S-STEM NOYCE

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

(Actual)

(Estimate)

(Requested)

$50.58 $51.62 $51.62 $37.78 $37.50 $39.21 $28.90 $29.70 $29.70 ~ $75 /year from H1B visa fee $10.30 $10.80 (55) $11.60 (55)

* (in Million)

NSF support for two-year college projects FY 2006-2008 FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

Program Award # ($)

Award # ($)

Award # ($)

119 (50M)

151 (50M)

ATE

128 (44M)

CCLI

5 (0.6M)

9 (1.5M)

19 (2.0M)

S-STEM

34 (17.8M)

25 (19M)

35 (16M)

STEP

4 (2.8M)

7 (5M)

4 (2.1M)

MSP

-

-

2 (0.58M)

Noyce

1 (0.24M)

0 (0)

1 (0.24M)

172 (66M)

160 (75M)

212 (71M)

218 (82M)

212 (91M)

278(101M)

Total DUE Total NSF

The Unconventional Way of Repairing

Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI)

CCLI Vision

Excellent STEM education for all undergraduate students. Goal

Stimulate, disseminate, and institutionalize innovative developments in STEM education through the production of knowledge and the improvement of practice. *Most comprehensive program

CCLI “The program supports efforts to create, adapt, and disseminate new learning materials and teaching strategies, develop faculty expertise, implement educational innovations, assess learning and evaluate innovations, and conduct research on STEM teaching and learning.”

CCLI Cyclic Model New Materials and Strategies

Research on Teaching and Learning

Assess And Evaluate

Increase Faculty Expertise

Implement Innovation

Phase 1 

Exploratory Projects “Phase 1 projects typically will address one program component and involve a limited number of faculty members at one academic institution. However, larger scale projects can be proposed provided they can be done within the Phase 1 budget limitations….” - 90 to 100 awards expected, each with a total budget up to $150,000 ($200,000 when four-year colleges and universities collaborate with twoyear colleges) for 1 to 3 years.

Phase 2 

Expansion Projects “Phase 2 projects build on smaller-scale projects that have produced promising results, such as those produced by successful Phase 1 projects, and refine and test these with diverse users in several settings. Projects may address single or multiple components….” - 25 to 35 awards expected, each with a total budget up to $500,000 for 2 to 4 years.

Phase 3 

Comprehensive Projects “Phase 3 projects are intended to support large scale efforts and may focus on a single or multiple components. These projects might be focused on faculty professional development, transformative curriculum projects with national impact, or educational assessment or research projects addressing significant questions in undergraduate education. …..” - 4 to 7 awards expected, each with a total budget up to $2,000,000 for 3 to 5 years.

Deadlines Phase 1 : May ??, 2009 (not posted) - Be alert for a new solicitation. Phase 2 & 3 : January 12, 2009 - Current solicitation, 08-546, applies.

Advanced Technological Education (ATE)

ATE 

Goal: Educate technicians for the hightech fields that drive our nation’s economy



Sample activities:  Curriculum development  Faculty professional development  Building career pathways

ATE ATE is in its 16th year of funding community colleges, having started with the Science and Advanced Technology Act of 1992 (SATA). FY2008 Preliminary Proposals Formal Proposals

April 23, 2009 Oct. 15, 2009

ATE Institution Requirements Focus is on two-year colleges  All proposals are expected to include one or more two-year colleges in leadership roles  A consortium of institutions may also apply 

ATE Tracks 

Projects  



 

Program improvement Professional development for educators Curriculum and educational materials development Teacher preparation Small grants to new awardees

Small grants 

Focus on community colleges that have little or no previous ATE grant experience



Designed to stimulate implementation, adaptation, and innovation in tech. education

ATE Tracks 

ATE Centers  National Centers of Excellence  Regional Centers of Excellence  Resource Centers



Targeted research on technician education

ATE awards (FY2008) 

Typical award sizes: Projects: $200K/year for 3 years (45 new awards) Small Grants: $75K/year for 2 years (15 new awards) National Centers: $1.2M/year for 4 years (2 new awards)

ATE Professional Development Opportunities 

Go to www.TeachingTechnicians.org



Now over 100 professional development opportunities

Number of Awards per State in ATE’s 15 Year History Total number of Awards (865) 30 WASHINGTO N

6

3

5

MONTANA

NORTH DAKOTA

MAINE

18

2 7

MINNESOTA

25

19

2

OREGON

VT. N.H.

IDAHO

WISCONSIN

4

2 WYOMING

SOUTH DAKOTA

7

3

IOWA

NEBRASKA

NEVADA

2

COLORADO

99

6

3 KANSAS

ARIZONA

7 OKLAHOMA

16 NEW MEXICO

22 VIRGINIA

18

18

NORTH CAROLINA

TENNESSEE

4

22

ARKANSA S

S.C.

15

MISS. ALABAMA

53

2 W.V.

KENTUCKY

12

TEXAS

OHIO

18

MISSOURI

CALIFORNIA

21

16 PENNSYLVANI A

42

8

28

ILLINOIS INDIANA

15

UTAH

NEW YORK

MICHIGA N

23

9 GEORGIA

3 LOUISIANA

32

3

FLA.

ALASKA

9 HAWAII

3

MA.

47

16

PUERTO RICO

62

14 CT.

1 R.I. 16 N.J. 2 DEL. 26 MD. 20 D.C.

ATE Centers of Excellence (36)

National Center Regional Center Resource Center

FY 09

FY 08

FY 07

FY 06

FY 05

FY 04

FY 03

FY 02

FY 01

FY 00

FY 99

FY 98

FY 97

FY 96

FY 95

FY 94

Millions of Dollars

ATE Program Budget

$55 $51 M

$50

$45

$40

$35

$30

$25

$20

$15

$10

$5

$0

Foci of ATE Awards FY

FY

FY

96-06

2007

2008

Biotechnology

47

5

8

Chemical Technology/Pulp & Paper/Environmental

58

3

1

Multidisciplinary/Institution Reform

43

4

2

Electronics/Microelectronics/Nanotech/Mechatronics/Lasers

23

7

8

Other Engineering Technology

75

7

10

Geospatial (GIS/GPS/Surveying)

28

3

4

Manufacturing

92

4

5

Math/Physics/Computational Science/Core

40

1

1

139

8

8

Marine/Agriculture/Aquaculture/Natural Resources/Viticulture

20

2

2

Teacher Preparation

34

1

4

Multimedia

7

1

4

Energy Technology

6

3

9

Research/Evaluation

5

2

2

Recruitment/Retention

7

3

1

614

54

69

Computer/Information Systems/Cybersecurity/Telecommunications

Totals

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program (STEP) 

Goal: increase the number of students receiving associate or baccalaureate degrees in STEM

36

STEP Tracks 

Type 1: Implement strategies that will increase the number of students obtaining STEM degrees.



Type 2: Conduct research on factors affecting associate or baccalaureate degree attainment in STEM 37

STEP Type 1 

Possible project activities:  Focus directly on student learning  Incorporate current technology  Develop interdisciplinary approaches  Offer bridge programs



Increases in a particular field must not be at the expense of other fields! 38

Submission & Funding Trends Fiscal Year

Type 1

Type 2

Submitted Awarded Submitted Awarded 2005

170

22

16

2

2006

141

22

-

-

2007

135

19

21

2

2008

139

20

14

2

2009

153

~20

11

1-3

STEP awards (FY2008) 

Maximum award sizes  Type 1 (15-20 awards anticipated) $100K/year for 5 years for SFTE <5000  $200K/year for 5 years for 5000<SFTE<15000  $400K/year for 5 years for 15000<SFTE 



Type 2: $500K/year for 3 years (2 awards anticipated) 40

Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (S-STEM) 41

S-STEM 

Goal: Provides institutions funds to provide scholarships to academically talented, but financial needy, students. Students can be pursuing associate, baccalaureate, or graduate degrees.



Letter of Intent: July 10, 2008 Full Proposal: August 12, 2008

S-STEM - Eligible disciplines extended to include biology, physical and mathematical sciences, computer and information sciences, geosciences, and engineering - Maximum scholarships $10,000 (based on financial need) - Grant size: up to $600,000 - One proposal per constituent school or college - About $50-$70 million available 43

S-STEM Special Program Features Has a faculty member in a STEM discipline as the PI. Involves cohorts of students. Provides student support structures. Includes optional enhancements such as research opportunities, tutoring, internships, etc. Enrolls students full time. 44

Information about funded proposals

NSF Chemistry Division - Undergraduate Research Collaboratives (URC): Initiated in 2004 - Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)

How to Write Good Proposals?

NSF Proposal Review and Decision Process Mail Reviews

Investigator/ Institution

Central Processing

Award (Via DGA)

Program Manager

Division Director

Declination

Withdrawal

Panel

DML

Inappropriate DML

The Proposal: Criteria for Evaluation



What is the intellectual merit of the proposed activity?



What are the broader impacts of the proposed activity?

Intellectual Merit       



Addresses a major challenge Supported by capable faculty and others Improved student learning Rationale and vision clearly articulated Informed by other projects Effective evaluation and dissemination Adequate facilities, resources, and commitment Institutional and departmental commitment

Broader Impacts      

Integrated into the institution’s academic programs Contributes to knowledge base and useful to other institutions Widely used products which can be disseminated through commercial and other channels Improved content and pedagogy for faculty and teachers Increased participation by women, underrepresented minorities, and persons with disabilities Ensures high quality STEM education for people pursuing careers in STEM fields or as teachers or technicians

General tips •

At the DUE Web Site • http://www.nsf.gov/div/index.jsp?div=DUE • Create a personalized alert service



Get copies of previously funded proposals  Directly from the PI  From Leslie Jensen ([email protected])



Contact a program officer (PO) and offer to review proposals 57

Making the Project Better based on Review Criteria 10 Helpful Hints (What do you think they are?)

Helpful Hints: 1. Read the Program Announcement

Helpful Hints: 2. Care About the Project

Helpful Hints:

3. Build on What Others Have Done

Helpful Hints:

4. Think Global, Act Local and Global

Helpful Hints:

5. Have Measurable Goals and Objectives

Helpful Hints: 6. Think Teamwork

Helpful Hints: 7. Use Good Management Skills

Helpful Hints:

8. Evaluation Includes Impact and Effectiveness

Helpful Hints:

9. Spread the Word

Helpful Hints:

10. Pay It Back

Top Ten Ways To Write a Good Proposal… That Won’t Get Funded

Flaws 10. Inflate the budget to allow for negotiations.

Flaws

9. Provide a template letter of commitment for your (genuine) supporters to use. (They will!)

Flaws

8. Assume your past accomplishments are well known.

Flaws 7. Assume a project website is sufficient for dissemination.

Flaws

6. Assert: “Evaluation will be ongoing and consist of a variety of methods.”

Flaws

5. Assume the program guidelines have not changed; or better yet, ignore them!

Flaws 4. Don’t check your speeling, nor you’re grammer.

Flaws

3. Substitute flowery rhetoric for good examples.

Flaws

2. Assume page limits and font size restrictions are not enforced.

Flaws

1. Assume deadlines are not enforced.

WAYS TO PARTICIPATE ON A GRANT 

Grant Holder     

Principal Investigator Member of Project Team Member of a coalition Member of an Advisory Board Test Site

User of Products  Participant in Workshops and Symposium  Reviewer of Proposals 

But Most Important!

Have fun!

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close