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Resource Finder Financial and Technical Assistance for Local

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Resource Finder: Financial and Technical Assistance for Local Government Units. 3rd Edition A Joint Project of

GOVERNANCE Local Legislation Transparency Participation

ADMINISTRATION Development Planning Revenue Generation Resource Allocation and Utilization Financial Accountability Customer Services Human Resource Management and Development

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE (DOF) The Department of Finance is principally responsible for the formulation, institutionalization and administration of the government’s fiscal policies, in coordination with other concerned agencies of government. It is also tasked to generate and manage the government’s financial resources as well as supervise the revenue operations of all local government units. Furthermore, the DOF is approves and manages all public sector domestic or foreign debt; and rationalizes and privatizes corporations and assets that are owned, controlled or acquired by the government. Vision  A strong economy with stable prices and strong growth;  A stable fiscal situation which could adequately finance government projects and budgetary programs;  A borrowing program that is also able to avoid the crowding-out effect on the private sector and minimize costs  A public sector debt profile with long maturities and an optimum mix of currencies that minimizes the impact of currency movements; and  A strong economic growth with equity and productivity. Mission The DOF shall take the lead in providing a solid foundation for the achievement of an economy that is dynamic and active in the world, globally competitive and onward looking. The SECRETARY DOF Bldg., BSP Complex Roxas Blvd., Metro Manila Tel: (02) 523-6054 Fax: (02) 526-8474 www.dof.gov.ph

OVERVIEW OF DOF’S FINANCIAL GOVERNMENT UNITS (LGUs)

ASSISTANCE

TO

LOCAL

 Creation of the Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) thru Executive Order No. 41 to administer the Municipal Development Fund Revolving Fund for local government units established under PD 1914.  Its objectives include helping the LGU enhance its local revenue generation and promote economic growth through investment on local public enterprise and infrastructure project; and providing financial assistance to upgrade delivery of basic services and facilities which could not be funded through local incomes and transfer of fund from the national government.  Eligible borrowers include cities, provinces and municipalities  Eligible Subprojects for the Program: A. INFRASTRUCTURE 1.

Revenue Generating Projects such as Water Supply System, Local Electrification System, Slaughterhouse, Terminal, Wharf, Public Market, “Bagsakan Center”, Cold Storage Plant, Post-Harvest Facility, Food Processing Facility and Memorial Park. 2. Social Projects for Education such as School Buildings (including the furniture and facilities), Non-Formal Education and Training Center, Public Library (including books and the access to Electronic Information System) and Day Care Centers; and for Health such as Hospital, Health Center, Lyingin Clinic, Birthing Facility, Health Training Center, Barangay Health Stations and other health facilities. 3. Environmental Projects under Solid Waste Management such as Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), Sanitary Landfill, Composing Facility; Water Management such as Sewerage System, Drainage System, Waste Water Treatment Facility (Biogas Digester); Air quality Management (Support to the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1990); and Land Conservation such as River/Seashore Protection and Sea Wall. 4. Other Infrastructure Projects such as Farm-to-Market Roads and other LGU priority infrastructure projects. B. EQUIPMENT Procurement of Heavy Equipment for Construction and road Maintenance, Dump Truck, Equipment for the Operation of Slaughterhouse; MRF Equipment; and Medical and Dental Equipment.  For Loan Terms and Conditions, the Municipal Development Fund Project (MDFP) offers pure loan with fixed interest rate of 9% per annum with no equity required.

Type of Subproject Infrastructure

Equipment

Repayment Period 15 years, inclusive of 3-year grace period on principal payment 10 years, inclusive of 2-year grace period on principal payment

 Application Requirements include: 1. Letter of Intent from the Local Chief Executive 2. Local Council Resolutions manifesting support for the project and authorizing the Local Chief Executive to enter into relevant agreements 3. Creation of Subproject Management Office 4. Project Proposal/Feasibility Study (pro-forma will be provided) CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: MDFO, Department of Finance 7/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila Tel: (02) 523-9935; 521-7192; 525-9185 to 87 Fax: (02) 523-9936; 525-9186 Email: [email protected]  Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) in their issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity (Please see BLGF page)

MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT FUND OFFICE (MDFO) The Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) was created as an office under the Department of Finance (DOF) by virtue of Executive Order No. 41 on 20 November 1998 to acts as a source of credit financing to support LGUs in the implementation of their priority development projects and programs. It promotes LGU self-reliance in undertaking socio-economic development programs through effective system of making ODA available to LGUs, assist low income LGUs to establish creditworthiness to help them access private funds. The MDFO has four (4) major thrusts, namely: 1. Administrator of the Municipal Development Fund – Second Generation Fund (MDF-SGF) 2. Fund Administrator of Foreign-Assisted Projects (FAPs) implemented by other National Agencies. 3. Implementer of Projects/Programs 4. Policy Formulation The MDFO has a Policy Governing Board comprised of officials from DOF (chairperson), National Economic Development Authority (NEDA), Department of Budget and Management (DBM), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), DPWH, and the Executive Director of the MDFO that sets policy directions for the Office. Among the credit financing initiatives/loan packages administered by the MDFO are as follows: 1. Municipal Development Fund (MDF) Project On 29 March 1984, through Presidential Decree No. 1914, the Municipal Development Fund (MDF) was created as a special revolving fund for re-lending to Local Government Units (LGUs). It became an effective mechanism that enabled LGUs to avail of financial assistance from local and international sources for the implementation of various social and economic development projects. It provides concessional financing assistance to lower income class LGUs with revenue-generating subprojects. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs nationwide Eligible Proposals/Subprojects 1. Revenue/Non-revenue generating projects 2. Other infrastructure projects 2. Program Lending (ProLend)

ProLend assists provincial LGUs in financing development projects with the provision that they will pursue a policy reform agenda Eligible Borrowers: All provinces Eligible Proposals/Subprojects:  Revenue-generation  Expenditures planning and management  Service delivery 3. Project Technical Assistance and Contingency Fund (PTACF) PTACF assists in accelerating LGU preparation and submission of feasibility studies and detailed engineering design. It creates a fund to finance the actual foreign exchange differentials of LGUs incurred in their project implementation. PTACF provides a source of financing for other technical assistace (TA) needs of LGUs. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs except highly urbanized cities CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: MDFO, Department of Finance 7/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila Tel: (02) 523-9935; 521-7192; 525-9185 to 87 Fax: (02) 523-9936; 525-9186 Email: [email protected]

BUREAU OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE (BLGF) Department of Finance’s arm (DOF) directly responsible over the fiscal and financial affairs of local government. Under a decentralized regime, BLGF provides a catalytic role in effective and sustainable management of fiscal and financial resources of LGUs, transforming them into self-reliant communities. It is vigilant and dedicated to pursuit of development and professionalization of its employees including those of the local treasury and assessment services. Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) required documents for the issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity: 1. Statement of Income and Expenditures for the last three (3) years duly certified and audited by the local accountant and auditor, (General Fund) with Pre-Closing Trial Balance. 2. Current year Annual Budget 3. Annual Investment Plan for 20% Development Fund 4. Certification of existing/absence of loan/loans duly certified by the Local Treasurer and lending institution with the following details:  Kind of Loans and Other Obligations  Purpose of Loans and Other Obligations  Name of the Lending Institution  Date of Approval and Maturity  Terms and Conditions (Interest & No. of years to pay)  Latest Balance of Loans & Other Obligations - Current - Arrearages  Annual Amortization Schedule (Segregate Principal & Interest) 5. Letter request from the Local Chief Executive indicating where to apply and purpose of the loan CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: Bureau of Local Government Finance Department of Finance 8/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila 1004 Tel: (02) 527-2780; 522-8773 Fax: (02) 527-2780 www.blgf.gov.ph

DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (DILG) The DILG is the primary national government agency mandated to promote peace and order, ensure public safety and further strengthen local government capability aimed towards the effective delivery of basic services to the citizenry. Vision The Department is the primary catalyst for excellence in local governance that nurtures self-reliant, progressive, orderly, safe and globally-competitive communities sustained by God-centered and empowered citizenry. Mission The Department shall promote peace and order, ensure public safety, and strengthen capability of local government units through active people participation and a professionalized corps of civil servants. Goals  Peaceful, safe, self-reliant and development-dominated communities  Improved performance of local governments in governance, administration, social and economic development and environmental management  Sustain peace and order condition and ensure public safety Objectives  Reduce crime incidents and improve crime solution efficiency  Improve jail management and penology services  Improve fire protection services  Continue professionalization of PNP, BFP, and BJMP personnel and services  Enhance LGU capacities to improve their performance and enable them to effectively and efficiently deliver services to their constituents  Continue to initiate policy reforms in support of local autonomy CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY A. Franciscon Gold Con. II, EDSA Cor. Mapagmahal Street, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 925-0330/31; 929-9406 Fax: (02) 925-0332 Email: [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

PHILIPPINE BASIC URBAN SERVICES INVESTMENT PROGRAM (PBUSIP) Funding Agency: ADB, DBP, MDFO and DILG Lead Implementing Agency: Infrastructure Investment – PFI/DBP and MDFO and ADB Capacity Development – DILG/MDFO Infrastructure Implementation – LGUs Project Duration: 10-Years starting 2nd Semester of 2010 Beneficiaries: 179 LGUs Target Program Location: Eligible LGUs in the Visayas (Region VI, VII and VIII) and in Luzon (Regions III, IV-A) and Mindanao (Regions X, XI, XII,) and NCR. Project Description: The Philippine Basic Urban Services Investment Program (PBUSIP) is an expansion of the Mindanao Basic Urban Services Sector Project (MBUSSP) that aims to continue to pursue improvement in the qualify of life of urban residents by building local capacities and providing investment support for urban sector development. Consistent with the priority development thrust of the MTPDP and the urban sector development strategies, the PBUSSP supports the national government’s efforts in promoting equitable economic growth in the urban sector addressing deficiencies in basic infrastructure, pursuing effective local governance and adopting a holistic approach to development of the urban sector The project is designed as a Multi-Trance Financing Facility (MFF) to be funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). It is co-executed by the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP), and the Municipal Development Finance Office (MDFO), with the DILG as the lead executing agency. The goal of PBUSIP is to improve the standard of living, health and economic opportunities in local government units (LGUs) by enhancing the quality, coverage and reliability of the basic urban infrastructure and services among participating LGUs. It aims to support the capability of LGUs to fund basic infrastructure by introducing innovative financing models consistent with the LGU Financing Framework and further develop the technical capacity of LGUs to sustain the viable operations of these infrastructure facilities. The PBUSIP, referred herein as the Investment Program, is designed to be funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The Project will be coexecuted by the DILG, the DBP and MDFO and may be implemented up to a 10-year period. The DILG will be the lead executing agency. The PBUSIP has two parts: Part A – Investment in Infrastructure and Services is designed to provide LGUs the financial resources to pursue infrastructure subprojects; Part B – Institutional Capacity Development and Policy Reforms ensures that the necessary capacity to implement and operate these infrastructures are made available to LGUs by introducing tools and systems that will facilitate the institutionalization of sustainable practices;

Part A covers the provision of innovative financial assistance to pursue infrastructure projects through the MDFO and the Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP). The MDFO will provide the financial assistance to LGUs consistent with the National Government-Local Government Cost Sharing Arrangement. The DBP will extend credit financing for income generating subprojects proposed by the cities and higher income class LGUs and loans to private proponents who will partner with LGUs for the implementation and operation of local development projects. Project Objectives 1. To improve the standard of living of residents in urban areas throughout the Philippines 2. To increase capacity of local governments and national agencies in urban management 3. To increase and mobilize resources to improve service delivery and enable better access of the population to basic urban infrastructure Project Coverage  Eligible LGUs in Mindanao that have expressed their interest with manifested commitment but were not accommodated in the current phase due to fund limitations. These would include about 50 LGUs that have submitted their Letter of Intents with the attached Local Legislative Council resolutions to the DILG 

Eligible LGUs in the Visayas (Regions VI, VII, VIII) and in Luzon (Regions I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, and CAR) that have expressed their interest through the DILG Regional Offices. This would include additional 60 eligible LGUs

Project Implementation Arrangement  Infrastructure Investment - Private Financing Institutions/ Government Financing Institutions (GFIs), MDFO and ADB  Capacity Development – DILG  Infrastructure Implementation – LGUs Project Components 1. Investments in Infrastructure and Services  Subprojects of LGUs – possibly in association with the private sector proponents, for subsectors such as: local roads and bridges, water and sanitation, drainage, flood control, solid waste management, [public markets, bus terminals, public facilities such as municipal buildings, sports facilities, public parks, slaughterhouses, ice plants  Economic Infrastructure such as incubation centers for small and medium enterprises (SMEs)  Area development projects, economic zones/cluster development and others, with preference for revenue generating subprojects 2. Institutional Capacity Development and Reforms

  

Strengthening program and project management systems Capacity development for urban management systems Policy reforms for sustainable urban services delivery

CONTACT DETAILS ENGR. ROLYN Q. ZAMBALES OIC – Director, OPDS DILG-Office Of Project Development Services (OPDS), 5th Flr., A. Francisco Gold Condo II, EDSA, cor. Mapagmahal St., Diliman, Quezon City Attn to: MR. ROGELIO P. SUMNGAT Project Manager, PBUSIP Tel: (02) 9299601; 9299406; 925-1135 Fax: (02) 9296227 E-mail: [email protected] [email protected], [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT (DSWD) Under the Local Government Code of 1991, some of functions, services and programs of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) were devolved to LGUs. With the issuance of Executive Order No. 15: Redirecting the Functions and Operations of the Department of Social Welfare and Development, DSWD is mandated to assist LGUs, NGOs, NGAs, POs and CSOs in effectively implementing programs and projects and delivering services that will eradicate poverty and empower the disadvantaged individuals, families and communities Vision "A society where the poor, vulnerable and disadvantaged individuals, families and communities are empowered for an improved quality of life.” Mission "To provide social protection and promote the rights and welfare of the poor, vulnerable and the disadvantaged individual, family and community to contribute to poverty alleviation and empowerment through SWD policies, programs, projects and services implemented with or through LGUs, NGOs, POs, GOs and other members of civil society." Programs and Projects Some of the programs and projects of DSWD are the following:    

Capacity building or technical assistance Disaster management Crisis intervention ODA-funded projects

These programs and projects benefit LGUs and their constituents. Details about these programs and projects are presented in the next pages. CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY DSWD Bldg., Constitution Hills, Batasan Complex, Q.C., Philippines Tel: (02) 931-7916; 931-8068 Local 108 & 109 Fax: (02) 931-8191 www.dswd.gov.ph

Recently Concluded Programs/Projects Related to Governance and Admnistration:  IMPROVING GOVERNANCE TO REDUCE POVERTY: ACCESS TO JUSTICE FOR THE POOR PROJECT Funding Agency: European Commission Partner Agencies: Supreme Court (SC), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), Department of Justice (DOJ), Alternative Law Groups (ALG) Program Duration: August 2004 – November 10, 2008 Beneficiaries: Poor and vulnerable groups particularly women and children Program Location: Regions IV-B, V, VI, X, XII Provinces: Oriental Mindoro, Camarines Sur, Capiz, Lanao del Norte, Sultan Kudarat Program Description: The project will expand the information, Education and Communication infrastructure of the Court system by delegating one Clert of Court as Municipal Court Information Officer (MCIO) at each of the approximately 756 barangays under their jurisdiction, legal information desks will be established in cooperation with the Barangay Council and capacity building will take place for those involved in the Barangay Justice System, legal information desks’ officers, women and children. An effort will be made to enhance the sensitivity of particularly those working in law enforcement and the judiciary to the problems of the poor.  PODER Y PROSPERIDAD DELA COMUNIDAD Funding Agency: Agencia Española Cooperacion Internacional (AECID) Program Duration: May 17, 2007 – June 30, 2008 Beneficiaries: Municipalities of Diringalan, Dipaculao and Baler of Aurora, Manito and Malinao of Albay, Hinatuan and San Agustin of Surigao del Sur and Sibagat of Agusan del Sur Program Description: The Poder Y Prosperidad del Comunidad adopts the communitydriven development approach (CDD) as a strategy in implementing projects. This approach utilizes maximum potential of the villagers or barangay people in the whole process of project implementation. The Area Coordinating Team deployed in each covered municipality and barangay, facilitated the community process to enable community to analyze their problems/situations and identify/recommend their development interventions to their identified problem(s). As primary stakeholder of the project, the villagers are continuously engaged in the project from project preparation, implementation, operation and maintenance. Thus, appropriate capacity-building interventions forms part of the whole process.

As the CDD Strategy puts emphasis in recognizing and develop people’s potential, they are assisted in forming and strengthening their groups/organizations to ensure sub-project sustainability.  PODER Y PROSPERIDAD DELA COMUNIDAD (Cycle 4) Funding Agency: Agencia Española Cooperacion Internacional (AECID) Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: April 9, 2008 – June 30, 2009 Beneficiaries: Municipalities of Malinao, Bacatay, Hinatuan, Legaspi, Malilipot, Tabaco, Tiwi and Sto. Domingo of Albay, HIntayan and San Agustin of Surigao del Sur and Sibagat of Agusan del Sur Program Description: The 4th Phase/Cycle of the Poder Y Prosperidad Dela Comunidad adopts the community-driven development approach (Empowerment and Development of the Community) project comes after the successful implementation of three cycles. It covers the 10 barangays which did not acquire funding of their proposed sub-projects during the 3 cycles of the project implementation. A major component of phase/cycle 4 or PODER 4 is the Bicol Rehabilitation covering the 6 municipalities of the province of Albay which were devastated by series of typhoons that struck the province in 20062007. The objectives of Poder 4 are both long term development and rehabilitation. With the first component following the Community Driven Development (CDD), the objectives are community empowerment, poverty reduction and improved local governance. The Bicol Rehabilitation on the other hand, while adopting most of the strategies of the first component, aims to accelerate the socio-economic rehabilitation efforts by providing financial and technical assistance to the Local Government Units (LGU).  NATIONAL SECTOR SUPPORT FOR SOCIAL WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT REFORMS (NSS-SWDR) PROJECT Funding Agency: World Bank Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: June 16, 2006 to September 30, 2008 Beneficiaries: Poor people especially children and women Program Description: The DSWD sought the assistance of the World Bank through the project entitled “National Sector Support for Social Welfare and Development Reform (NSS-SWDR)” under the funding assistance of the PHRD Grant to support efforts to undertake institutional reforms to make it better fit to lead and steer implementation of social sector programs. The NSS-SWDR is an 18-month project which is intended to contribute to better quality of life, reduced vulnerabilities and improved social welfare and development conditions.

LGU GUARANTEE CORPORATION (LGUGC) LGUGC is a private credit guarantee institution incorporated in March 1998 with the primary mandate of granting local government units (LGUs) access to private sources of capital by providing credit enhancement to LGU debt. LGUGC’s stockholders are the Bankers Association of the Philippines (BAP), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) and the Asian Development Bank. LGUGC’s primary goal is to make private financial resources available to creditworthy local government units (LGUs) through its credit guarantee. Its credit enhancement facilitates the entry of LGUs with infrastructure development projects in the capital market. Recently, LGUGC extended its guarantee services to water districts, electric cooperatives, state universities and colleges, and renewable energy technology projects. Vision To be the recognized private sector link in public-private partnerships for local development financing Mission  Advocate for reforms that will mobilize resources of the private sector toward financing local government projects  Continue to advocate for policy reforms for LGU bond flotation as a viable alternative local financing option  Instill values of good governance to enhance the borrower’s enterprise management and creditworthiness, especially local governments and utility companies Guarantees As of March 2009, LGUGC has guaranteed 16 bond deals, 2 LGU loans and 9 water district loans aggregating Php 4.0982 billion. Guaranteed projects include the following: public markets, slaughterhouses, jetty port, low-cost housing, hospitals, commercial complex with toll parking facilities, commercial centre with wet and dry stalls, convention center cum hostel facilities, academic center and multi-purpose gymnasium, integrated solid waste management facility, and water districts’ rehabilitation and expansion projects and bulk water supply. SERVICES OFFERED Guarantee LGUGC currently guarantees the indebtedness of LGUs, water districts (WDs), electric cooperatives, renewable energy providers and state universities and colleges. The guarantee fee is a function of the underlying borrower and project risks. Fees range from 0.5% to 2% per annum. Credit Rating

LGUGC implements an internal LGU Credit Screening and Rating System (LCSRS) and Water District Credit Rating System (WDCRS) in the absence of a formal stand-alone entity specializing in risk evaluating of LGUs and WDs. Both credit rating systems adopt internationally-accepted standards fit for sue diligence requirement of private financial institutions and individual investors. The system serves as the primary guide for the LGUGC and partner financial institutions to identify LGUs and WDs’ creditworthiness and their capacity to participate in the commercial credit market. It is also a tool for assisting LGUs and WDs implement good governance practices. LGUGC has an internal borrower risk rating system for other types of proponents. Program Management LGUGC offers program management services. Currently, LGUGC is managing the guarantee fund for Electric Cooperative System Loss Reduction Project (ECSLRP) of the World Bank – Global Environment Facility thru the Department of Energy (DOE). LGUGC is likewise the program manager for the Capacity Building to Remove Barriers to Renewable Energy Development (CBRED) Loan Guarantee Fund of the UNDP. CONTACT DETAILS LYDIA N. ORIAL President/CEO Unit 2801, 28/F Antel Corporate Centre 121 Valero Street, Salcedo Village Makati City Tel: (02) 750-4168/751-8764 to 68 Fax: (02) 888-4217 Email: [email protected] www.lgugc.com

CANADA Canada’s assistance to the Philippines began in earnest in 1986 following the People Power Revolution, which brought down the government of Ferdinand Marcos, and the subsequent election of Corazon Aquino as President. A commitment to substantially increase Canadian assistance was made in order to support the new government’s reform efforts and the restoration of democracy. The Canadian International Development Agency’s (CIDA) bilateral program has evolved over the years, from focusing on the democratic process immediately following the People Power Revolution, to more broadly supporting responsible governance and private sector development. Canada is currently contributing to poverty reduction in the Philippines through equitable, sustainable development. The objectives of CIDA’s strategy in the Philippines are to: foster efficient, responsive, transparent and accountable governance at all levels; and support the development of sustainable small and medium-sized enterprises that create more, better, and decent jobs for both men and women. This strategy is closely aligned with the Government of the Philippines’ Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan (2004–2010). Results Technical assistance to local governments has helped improve the delivery of services to the poor. In addition, greater participation by local communities in setting development plans in areas such as investment, taxation, and social services has increased local government accountability and responsiveness to the needs of the poor. CIDA’s assistance has also helped the Government of the Philippines address corruption at the national level through projects that have increased transparency and efficiency in areas that include government procurement and tax collection. Support given to small and medium-sized enterprises by providing business advice and market information and the strengthening of business-service organizations has helped create many business opportunities and jobs in the Philippines. In addition, CIDA has helped women increase their participation in decision-making, exercise their rights, and reduce inequalities in their access to, and control over, resources. Support to the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women has helped make this institution a regional model of national women’s machinery to promote gender equality. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Laurenne Garneau Counsellor (Development) and Head of Cooperation Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Tel: (02) 857-9004; 857-9133 Fax: (02) 843-1083; 857-9175 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: GENDER RESPONSIVE ECONOMIC ACTIONS – TRANSFORMATION OF WOMEN (GREAT WOMEN) Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 7,000,000 Executing Agency: National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women Status: Operational Start - End: 2006 – 2013 Sector: Public sector policy and administrative management: 70% Decentralisation and support to sub-national government: 30% Project Description: The Gender Responsive Economic Actions for the Transformation of Women (GREAT Women) project assists the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women, and its partners at the national and local levels, to contribute to the economic empowerment of women by strengthening their capacities to develop, implement, monitor and evaluate gender-responsive economic legislation, policies, programs, and services, especially those related to microenterprise. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Luzviminda Villanueva Project Manager

Ms. Myrna Jarillas Senior Program Officer

GREAT Women Project Management Office National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women (NCRFW) 1145 J.P. Laurel St., San Miguel, Manila

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Tel: (02) 734-1731 Fax: (02) 736-4449 Email: [email protected]; [email protected]

Tel: (02) 857-9137 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: LOCAL GOVERNANCE SUPPORT PROGRAM FOR LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (LGSP-LED) Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 18,000,000 Executing Agency: Canadian Urban Institute in consortium with the Association of Canadian Community Colleges Status: Operational Start - End: 2008 – 2016 Sector: Public sector policy and administrative management: 50% Public finance management: 25% Public-private sector networking: 25% Beneficiaries: DILG and select LGUs/LGU alliances Project Description: The program supports national agencies to develop and/or improve policies, laws, programs and activities in order to enhance local governance and economic development as well as strengthen relevant coordinating mechanisms (horizontal and vertical) at the national level. In addition, it supports the strengthening of umbrella organizations (e.g., leagues of provinces, cities and municipalities) of Local Government Units (LGUs) in order to increase their capacity to advocate for national level measures to enhance the enabling environment for LGUs. The program aims also at strengthening the capacity of LGUs to equitably and effectively formulate policy and to implement and monitor programs. The program supports the meaningful participation of civil society and the private sector in local development processes and strengthens resource generation and management capacities of LGUs. To improve conditions for local economic development, it supports also the strengthening of LGU/private sector/civil society partnerships, development of supportive policies, incentives and regulatory frameworks, and helps to increase transparency and fairness in government systems and processes. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Marion Villanueva Canadian Field Director

Ms. May Wong

Ms. Rachel Bruneau

First Secretary (Development)

Senior Development Officer

c/o PCCO Office 9th Floor, Salcedo Towers 169 H. V. dela Costa Street, Salcedo Village, Makati City

Canadian International Development Agency Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Philippines, Indonesia, Regional Program, SriLanka and Nepal (Headquarters) 200 Promenade du Portage, Gatineau, Québec, KIA OG4, Canada

Tel: (02) 813-8255 Fax: (02) 892-8913

Tel: (02) 857-9123 Fax: (02) 843-1083

Tel: (819)997-0936 Fax: (819) 997-0968

Email: [email protected]

Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca www.canadainternational.gc.ca/philippines

Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Email: [email protected] www.acdi-cida.gc.ca

Project: LOCAL GOVERNANCE SUPPORT PROGRAM IN MUSLIM MINDANAO (LGSPA) Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 17,750,000 Executing Agency: Agriteam Canada Status: Operational Start - End: 2005 – 2010 Sector: Public sector policy and administrative management: 50% Public finance management: 30% Democratic participation and civil society: 20% Project Description: Local Governance Support Program in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (LGSPA) aims to enhance local governance capacity in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) with respect to local government leadership and management, service delivery, resource generation and management, participatory governance, and peace building. It builds on the successful results of the Local Government Support Program I and II, using the strategies, tools and lessons learned to replicate the overall process of capacity development and performance improvement in ARMM Local Government Units. It also works with the Autonomous Regional Government and other institutions to develop their capacity to support local government development. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Myn Garcia Canadian Field Program Manager

Ms. May Wong First Secretary (Development)

Local Governance Support Program in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao Unit 70 & 72, Landco Corporate Center J. P. Laurel Avenue, Bajada, Davao City

Canadian International Development Agency Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Tel: (082) 227-7980 to 81 Fax: (082) 227-7982 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.lgsp.org.ph

Tel: (02) 857-9123 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: PHILIPPINES CANADA COOPERATION OFFICE PHASE III (PCCO) Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 3,998, 431 Executing Agency: Coffey Philippines, Inc. Status: Operational Start - End: 2003 – 2010 Sector: Promotion of development awareness: 100% Project Description: The Philippines-Canada Cooperation Office (PCCO) provides operational support to the CIDA program in the Philippines. Its services can be grouped in four general, at times interrelated, components: 1. Program-Level Services to CIDA Embassy and Headquarters officers and consultants, and to the National Economic Development Authority (NEDA) of the Government of the Philippines, including administrative, logistics and program level analytical support. 2. Project-Level services, including the recruitment and selection of local consultants and staff, administrative and logistics support to project missions; 3. Support to CIDA-funded local initiative projects (e.g. the Canada Fund) and CIDA advisors (e.g., gender advisor) through the recruitment, selection and management of local consultants; 4. Project Management, including the setting up, administration and management of PCCO's internal mechanisms and delivery systems to efficiently deliver its services to clients. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Gary Nitorreda General Manager th

Ms. Laurenne Garneau Counsellor (Development) and Head of Cooperation

9 Floor, Salcedo Towers 169 H. V. dela Costa Street, Salcedo Village, Makati City

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Tel: (02) 813-8255 Fax: (02) 892-8913 Email: [email protected]

Tel: (02) 857-9004; 857-9133 Fax: (02) 843-1083; 857-9175 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

www.pcco.org.ph

Project: ELECTRONIC GOVERNANCE FOR EFFICIENCY AND EFFECTIVENESS (E3) Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 10,000,000 Executing Agency: Agriteam Canada and Intelecon Research and Consultancy Status: Operational Start - End: 2006 – 2011 Sector: Public sector policy and administrative management: 40% Media and free flow of information: 10% Statistical capacity building: 10% Communications policy and administrative management: 25% Business support services and institutions: 15% Project Description: The project is designed to help the Government of the Philippines to use information and communications technologies (ICTs) in the social services sector through a combination of: a) increasing the knowledge and skills of the government so it can address the strategic and cross-government issues of e-governance; and b) implementing a number of e-governance ICT pilot projects in selected rural areas designed to demonstrate the sustainable use of ICTs to support and improve the provision of social services in rural areas. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Ed Sutherland Project Manager

Ms. Narcisa Rivera Senior Program Officer

th Canadian International Development 10 Floor, The Orient Square Emerald Avenue, Ortigas Center, Pasig Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 City 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Tel: (02) 637-4427 to 29 Fax: (02) 634-8316 Email: [email protected]

Tel: (02) 857-9122 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: CANADA FUND FOR LOCAL INITIATIVES Maximum CIDA Contribution: $370,000 Executing Agency: Canadian Embassy Status: Operational Start - End: Annual Project Description: The Canada Fund for Local Initiatives is a Mission administered CIDA program that has been active in the Philippines since 1972. It provides direct funding assistance to community groups for small projects addressing technical, economic, educational, cultural, and/or social development issues. It complements CIDA’s bilateral and multilateral activities especially in sustainable development and poverty reduction. The general objective of all Canada Funds is to enhance the economic, cultural and social lives of the people of the eligible developing countries. Canada Fund seeks to assist community-based organizations and NGOs in their efforts to develop self-reliance and sustainability, gain access and control of limited resources and assets, and contribute to ongoing, long-term and integrated community development programs. In line with the thrusts of CIDA, Canada Fund carries the following program priorities:  Basic Human Needs;  Women in Development (Gender Equality);  Human Rights, Democracy, and Good Governance;  Private Sector Development; and  Environment Canada Fund stresses the Social Development Priorities of health and nutrition, basic education, HIV/ AIDS, and child protection. Gender and environment remain as its crosscutting themes. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Amina Lim Coordinator

Ms. Myrna Jarillas Senior Program Officer

9th Floor, Salcedo Towers Canadian International Development 169 H. V. dela Costa Street, Salcedo Agency (CIDA) Village, Makati City Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-8255 Fax: (02) 892-8913 Email: [email protected] www.pcco.org.ph

Tel: (02) 857-9137 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected]

CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

FRANCE The focus of French Development cooperation includes the following: -

Climate change & Energy Environment & Biodiversity Natural risk assessment and reduction Agriculture, Aquaculture & Food security Education & Research for development Health Heritage conservation Cultural diversity & Intercultural dialogue Human rights & Governance

The cultural, scientific, technical and audio-visual relations between France and the Philippines was developed within the framework of a Cooperation Agreement signed in 1978, the terms of which are updated on a regular basis. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of France 16/F Pacific Star Bldg., Makati Ave. corner Gil Puyat Ave. 1200 Makati City Tel: (02) 857-6900 Fax: (02) 857-6948 Email: [email protected] www.ambafrance-ph.org Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer

GERMANY The Federal Republic of Germany is committed to work with its partners for peace and the alleviation of poverty throughout the world and it acknowledges the need for concerted efforts to promote sustainable development everywhere. German Development Cooperation provides the following services:  Analysis of framework conditions and possibilities for effective development cooperation in the host country, including continual critical monitoring of existing projects and programs  Informing the Federal Government of the political, economic and social situation in developing countries  Presenting the Federal Government's policy, as well as conducting a dialogues on the issue of sustainable development with as many social groups as possible in the host country, ranging from ministers to NGOs  Coordinating German development cooperation with other donor countries and institutions, as well as with German implementing organizations such as the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) and the Reconstruction Loan Corporation (KfW); and Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)  Providing advice regarding, and serving as a point of contact for, scholarships within the framework of development cooperation. Meanwhile, its key areas of development cooperation include the following: 1. Financial Cooperation Since many developing countries lack the financial resources to implement urgently required investments, without which a long-term improvement in the population's living standards would be difficult to achieve, the Federal Republic of Germany makes available funds to developing countries within the framework of German Financial Cooperation. Financing for identified projects occurs through low-interest credits, in order to create the structural prerequisites for sustainable development. The bulk of financial cooperation aid is implemented on behalf of the German Government by the Reconstruction Loan Corporation (KfW), which has it own representatives or offices in particular developing countries. German Embassies assist and cooperate with the KfW in the preparation, implementation and monitoring of projects. 2. Technical Cooperation Projects on the development of the health and primary-school system, food security and environmental protection are urgently required in many developing countries. Foreign know-how and material available on the international market is barely within the capacities of developing countries. These emerging countries must therefore identify fields for which they can request assistance from industrialized countries. Within the framework of Technical Cooperation, German implementing organizations initiate projects in developing countries on behalf of the German Government in partnership with state institutions or NGOs in the host country. The German contributions are granted to the receiving country free of charge in the form

of inputs of material and equipment, as well as advisory services. Efforts are made to ensure that a disproportionate share of the funds provided is not used for administrative tasks. Technical Cooperation is utilized in conjunction with Financial Cooperation in focal areas in consensus with the partner countries. Intergovernmental arrangements are concluded for individual Technical Cooperation projects. The bulk of official Technical Cooperation is implemented by the GTZ which has its own offices in many developing countries. German Embassies assist the GTZ in identifying, preparing, implementing and monitoring its tasks and coordinate the work of the GTZ with other German and international implementing organizations. 3. Bilateral Development Cooperation The amount of funds that will be made available for development cooperation with individual countries is determined as part of the annual framework planning for financial and technical cooperation, to which the Federal Foreign Office contributes its foreign policy expertise, as well as by the Bundestag Committee on Economic Cooperation and Development (AWZ). On a regular basis, the Federal Government and the partner Government hold intergovernmental negotiations, where individual projects and programs to be promoted are selected. The commitments are then laid down in bilateral agreements or exchanges of notes that are binding under international law. 4. Private Sponsors of Development Cooperation An important task of the Federal Foreign Office, and in particular of the local German Embassies, in cooperation with the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, is to effectively coordinate the large number of development policy measures in a country or a region. Many private institutions are engaged in the field of development policy, ranging from churches to political foundations to NGOs. In addition to the few large sponsors who have considerable experience regarding work in foreign countries, there are many smaller and less experienced groups that are in particular need of advice and support in order to effectively contribute to sustainable development in countries in the South. German embassies act as points of contact in the host country for private sponsors; they also provide consular services to the German employees of private sponsors. Support for private sponsors is mainly provided through funds from the budget of the BMZ. 5. Public Private Partnership Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are projects implemented by the private sector agencies and which are in the interest of the company while at the same time advance development policy. Given their interest in the long-term economic success of their project it is initially these companies - whether from Germany or other European countries - which invest their own capital, staff and expertise into the project. The Federal Government supports these projects if they have a significant development policy component. Private companies with the cooperation of the German Investment and Development Company (DEG), the KfW, the GTZ or the Foundation for

Economic Development and Vocational Training (SEQUA) implement PPP initiatives. 6. Technical Cooperation Microprojects The members of German embassies regularly take note of minor but serious emergencies and can provide assistance as requested. Typical assistance might include the improvement of local health facilities or the sanitation situation (e.g. the construction of wells), the material requirements for primary education (e.g. the construction and maintenance of small school buildings) and improvements in family income (e.g. construction of small market buildings, creation of means of transport, support for trade-firm cooperatives). Within the framework of Technical Cooperation micro-projects, German embassies can immediately grant requests for assistance to be of benefit to development. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Office Address: Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, 25/F RCBC Plaza Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue 1200 Makati City Mailing address: German Embassy Manila P.O. Box 2190, Makati CPO Makati City 1261 Metro Manila, Philippines Tel: (02) 702 3000; 892-1001 Fax: (02) 702 3015; 810-4703 Email: [email protected] www.manila.diplo.de; www.germanembassy-philippines.com Mr. Martin Mueller Director German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Manila Office 9/F PDCP Building

KONRAD ADENAUER FOUNDATION (KAF) The Germany-based foundation, Konrad Adenauer Foundation is related to the Christian Democratic movement. Having emerged from the 'Society for Christian Democratic Education Work' founded in 1956, it was named after the first Chancellor of the Federal Republic in 1964. It is guided by the same principles that inspired Adenauer's work. Focus of Development Cooperation The Foundation offers political education, conducts scientific fact-finding research for political projects, grants scholarships to gifted individuals, researches the history of Christian Democracy, and supports and encourages European unification, international understanding, and development-policy cooperation. Its annual budget amounts to around DM 200 million. CONTACT DETAILS Dr. Peter Koeppinger 140 Leviste Street, ALPAP I Building 3/F, Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 894-3737 Fax: (02) 893-6199/750-0096 Email: [email protected]

FRIEDRICH-EBERT-STIFTUNG (FES) The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES) is a German non-profit, private educational foundation committed to the concepts and basic values of social democracy. It promotes democracy and social justice within the context of national societies as well as international cooperation. FES is an international organization with activities in more than 100 countries. While its headquarters is located in Berlin, it maintains a network of branch offices in some 70 countries. The FES Philippines Office is based in Metro Manila. It was established in 1964. FES cooperating partners come from all walks of life and include: Authorities and offices of central state and local government, NGOs and NGO-Networks, environmental groups, women and feminist organizations, trade unions, professional associations, people’s organizations, research and academic institutions, and human rights groups. Focus of Development Cooperation FES projects give special focus on:    

Empowering marginalized social sectors and groups to represent their interests in areas of socio-economic and socio-political decision-making; Promoting socio-political dialogue between various groups in the understanding, that peace and democracy can only prevail on the basis of sharing and compromising; Exchange program and international cooperation to build awareness of global interdependence of states and societies and the need for multilateralism with fair participation; and Participation in local governance (planning and service delivery).

CONTACT DETAILS Mirko Herberg Resident Representative Office Address: Unit 2601 Discovery Centre, 25 ADB Avenue, Ortigas Center 1600 Pasig City Mailing Address: Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung Ortigas P.O. Box 12271 1605 Pasig City, Metro Manila Philippines Tel: (02) 634-6919; 637-7186; 637-7187 Fax: (02) 632-0697

Email: [email protected] www.fes.org.ph

DEUTSCHER ENTWICKLUNGSDIENST (DED) – GERMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICE The German Development Service is one of the leading European development services for personnel cooperation. It was founded in 1963: since then more than 15,000 development workers have committed themselves to improve the living conditions of people in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Almost 1,200 development workers are currently working in 47 countries. Their aims are to fight poverty, promote a selfdetermined, sustainable development, and to preserve natural resources. The German Development Service also offers its services to international clients. DED places development workers at the request of governmental and non-governmental organisations in its partner countries and on the basis of framework agreements with the respective governments. These development workers are professionally experienced and socially committed specialists who engage mainly in training, advisory capacity and planning tasks. DED Philippines In the Philippines, specifically in Mindanao and Visayas, the cooperation between the DED and local partners focuses on the following programmes:  Forestry and Environmental Management - Poverty reduction and ecological sustainability - Environment -friendly, economically viable and socially acceptable use of forest resources - Increasing income of rural communities - Control on waste management and environmental protection - Improvement of environmental education  Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Improvement of living conditions in coastal communities - Improvement of income generation of marginal small scale fisher folk - Protection and conservation of coastal habitats - Control on the use of marine resources  Sustainable Economic Development - Improvement of competitiveness on global markets - Local and regional economic development - Corporate Social Responsibility - Improvement of job opportunities - Satisfaction of demands for qualified workers  Civil Peace Service - Prevention and mitigation of violence in Mindanao - Facilitation of peace talks between conflict parties - Raising awareness for the root causes and impacts of violence

- Strengthening of actors of civil society who advance peaceful coexistence - Conflict sensitive programming of all DC projects (Do No Harm / PCA) Eligibility Below are the organizations that are eligible to apply:  NGOs and POs  LGUs  Regional Institutions  Industry Associations  Educational Institutions Considerations in requesting for assistance: If you belong to any of the organizations listed above, and  

 

You are based - In Mindanao or Visayas You are active in any of the following fields: - Forestry and Environmental Management - Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Sustainable Economic Development - Civil Peace Service You have a need for a particular expertise which cannot be found in the country You have the means to support the work of the expert

CONTACT DETAILS German Development Service in the Philippines 11/F PDCP Bank Center Building V.A. Rufino cor. L.P. Leviste Sts. Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 812-5640 Fax: (02) 894-1486 www.ded.de

GERMAN TECHNICAL COOPERATION (GTZ) Among the entities implementing German development cooperation worldwide is the federally owned international enterprise Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit GmbH - better known as German Technical Cooperation or GTZ. Through 14,000 staff in 130 countries, GTZ supports complex reform and change processes, often operating under difficult environments (i.e. disaster and conflict areas) to ensure the delivery of sustainable benefits. Since 1971 GTZ has been improving the living conditions of Filipinos, as well. It has equipped them better for the future and brought together political decision-makers, civil society, and other local institutions to tackle problems jointly. In its current priority areas in the Visayas and Mindanao, GTZ supports programs in: * * * * * * * * * * *

Climate change adaptation and preservation of biodiversity Environment and rural development Peace building and conflict transformation Promotion and development of SMEs Health sector reforms Water supply and sanitation Solid waste management for LGUs Urban infrastructure planning Good governance through effective decentralization Micro-insurance innovations for social security; and Intra-Asean economic cooperation.

A greener, safer future GTZ helps bring the effects of climate change under control through forward-looking eco-solutions worldwide. Among its programs are to improve energy efficiency in buildings, fight deforestation, and promote renewable energy and sustainable city planning. In behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, GTZ is actively shaping the follow-on agreement to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol that will be adopted by the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen by end-2009. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Jochem Lange Country Director GTZ Office Manila PDCP Bank Centre 9/Floor, V.A. Rufino cor. L.P. Leviste Sts Makati City

Tel: (02) 812-3165 Fax: (02) 753-1441 Email: [email protected]

Program Title: DECENTRALIZATION PROGRAM Funding Agency: GTZ Lead Implementing Agency: Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) and National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) Program Duration: October 2005 – September 2012 Beneficiaries: Citizens in the Visayas and Mindanao Target Program Location: Visayas and Mindanao Program Description: The GTZ, through its Decentralization Program (DP) aims to improve governance, which is oriented to the needs of the population at the national and local levels. Its three components, namely, Political Decentralization, Fiscal Decentralization and Capacity Development System for local governments, are meant to reinforce GTZ’s and its implementing partners’ initiatives at making decentralization work. The program aims to achieve this by (a) conducting a demand-oriented, conflictsensitive planning, building the basis for budgeting in local governments; (b) contributing to good local fiscal governance through fair, adequate, transparent and efficient tax system and (c) disseminating to the local governments innovative, conflict-sensitive approaches for an improved decentralization, from the capacity development providers. CONTACT DETAILS OF PROGRAM AND IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS GTZ (Decentralization Program)

Dr. Herwig Mayer Program Manager Add: Unit 2-A, PDCP Bank Centre Bldg., V.A. Rufino cor L.P. Leviste St., Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-6821 Fax: (02) 892-8843 Email: [email protected] www.decentralization.org.ph

Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)

Austere A. Panadero Undersecretary Add: A. Francisco Gold Condominium II, EDSA cor Mapagmahal St., Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 925-0347; 925-0357 Fax: (02) 925-0361 Email: [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

National Economic and Development

Rolando G. Tungpalan

Authority (NEDA)

Deputy Director-General Add: 12 St. Josemaria Escriva Drive, Ortigas Center, Pasig City Telefax: (02) 631-2186 Email: [email protected] www.neda.gov.ph

ISRAEL Israel’s official overseas development cooperation was launched in 1958 with the aim of sharing with the rest of the developing world the know-how and technologies which provided the basis for Israel’s own rapid development. MASHAV, the Hebrew acronym for the Center for International Cooperation, was established as a division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and is responsible for international cooperation and assistance around the world, through the provision of guidance and training in Israel and abroad. Part of the center’s activity takes place in cooperation with other countries and international institutions, or with their financial assistance. The following activities are supported:  Courses in Israel: international and national courses  On-the-spot courses conducted at the request of the recipient country. Training courses concentrate in traditional areas where Israel has acquired experience such as agriculture and related sciences, rural and urban development, education, social and economic development, medicine and public health, environmental and natural resource protection, and advancement of women.  Short-term consultancies: a MASHAV expert is sent at the request of GOP to provide rapid, specific advisory services, assistance in program implementation, conduct a survey on a specific topic or back-up for MASHAV experts on long-term projects.  Long-term consultancies: MASHAV experts are dispatched at the request of the host country to assist in the design, implementation, management or general assessment of pilot or development projects;  International partnerships: forging partnerships with other donor bodies, international organizations and NGOs in order to enhance efficacy of work in the developing world. Focus of Development Cooperation The priority sectors of cooperation include the following:  Agriculture  Cooperation and labor studies  Community development  Rural development  Medicine and public health  Science and technology  Education  Advancement of women CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of Israel 23/F Trafalgar Plaza

105 H.V. Dela Costa Street Salcedo Village, Makati City 1227 Tel: (02) 894-0441 to 43 Fax: (02) 894-1027 Email: [email protected] http://manila.mfa.gov.il; http://mashav.mfa.gov.il

JAPAN The Philippines ranks as the third largest recipient of Japan’s ODA totaling US$9.4 billion. Through the decades, Japanese ODA has been contributing to Philippine’s development efforts in many fields, including irrigation, flood control, education, health care, earthquake detection, rural road network construction / improvement, water supply, and livelihood programs. The country receives assistance from Japan in various forms loans, grants, and technical assistance. Respecting the self-help efforts of every developing country, Japanese ODA in principle, is extended upon the request of the recipient governments. In the case of the Philippines, government agencies and LGUs submit project proposals to NEDA for its evaluation. After the respective approval by NEDA and the ICC, the Philippine government makes an official request for its short-listed priority projects to the Japanese government, which then carefully appraises those projects and approves those that are most necessary and matured. Responsible for ODA policy and programming, the Japanese Embassy coordinates with two Japanese development assistance implementing agencies operating under the Government of Japan, namely the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) (www.jica.go.jp/philippine/index.html), which handles grant-aid and technical assistance and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) (www.jbic.go.jp/english), which handles loans. Source: http://www.ph.emb-japan.go.jp/bilateral/oda/index.htm CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of Japan in the Philippines 2627 Roxas Boulevard, Pasay City 1300 Tel: (02) 551-5710 Email: [email protected] www.ph.emb-japan.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY (JICA) Following the completion of the merger between the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) in October 2008, the New JICA is developed to become the government agency responsible for the implementation of the yen loan, grant aid and technical cooperation aspects of Japan’s Official Development Assistance (ODA). With this, JICA’s programs continue to contribute to the economic and social advancement in developing countries. JICA's Priority Issues: 1. Sustainable Economic Growth Aimed at Creating Employment Opportunities 1.1. Support for Financial Reform/Good Governance 1.2. Investment Promotion 1.3. Improvement of Transportation Network 1.4. Enhancing Power and Energy Sector 1.5. Tourism 2. Poverty Reduction 2.1. Livelihood Improvement 2.2. Enhancement of Basic and Social Services 2.3. Environment Protection and Disaster Prevention 3. Peace and Stability in Mindanao 3.1. Administrative Capacity Building 3.2. Improvement of Basic Human Needs 3.3. Economic Development 3.4. Peace Building CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Norio Matsuda Chief Representative JICA Philippine Office 40/F Tower 1 RCBC Plaza Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 889-7119 Fax: (02) 889-6850 Email: [email protected] www.jica.go.jp

KOREA Korea's development assistance is a rather recent phenomenon dating from the early 1980s, when the Korean government designed a program for sharing development experiences with fellow developing nations based on the spirit of South-South cooperation, self-help, and self-reliance among developing countries. In 1987, the Korean government established the Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) through which concessional loans for development projects are provided to the governments of developing countries. In 1991, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) was established as an arm of Korea's Official Development Assistance (ODA). KOICA was mandated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to execute technical cooperation programs, which were previously executed and administrated under authority of different ministries. ODA is administered through two major channels of development cooperation; bi-lateral and multi-lateral. Bi-lateral aid is divided in two forms: grants and loans. KOICA under policy guidance of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is administrator of grants, and implements two types of grants: 1) grant aid, which includes the Provision of Equipment and Project Aid; 2) Technical Cooperation, which includes Development Studies, the Invitation of Trainees, and the dispatch of Korean Overseas Volunteers and Experts. On the other hand, the bi-lateral soft loans or Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) loans are managed by the Export-Import Bank of Korea under the direction of the Ministry of Strategy and Finance. In terms of multi-lateral aid, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is responsible for contributions to the United Nations and UN specialized agencies, etc, while the Ministry of Strategy and Finance oversees subscriptions to international development institutions such as the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the African Development Bank (AfDB). Korean assistance to the Philippines began in 1988. Korean bilateral assistance consists mainly of development loans and grants or technical cooperation. Focus of Development Cooperation Korean ODA, particularly grant assistance, focuses on the following strategic areas:     

Promoting human resources development Eradicating poverty and provision of basic human needs Promoting market economy and free trade Building the capacity of policy development and administration of recipients Contributing to addressing global issues as environmental degradation, population and gender

Loan assistance may expand further given Korea’s strong interest to assist priority activities in telecommunications, transport and energy sectors.

The Korean Government is currently studying effective and efficient ways of extending its information technology cooperation program to the Philippines. Programs and Projects Concessional Loans (Economic Development Cooperation Fund) The Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) loan was established in 1987 under the management of Korea’s Ministry of Finance. Export-Import Bank (Eximbank) was officially introduced to the Philippines in 1988. The EDCF loan menu is provided on a per loan basis at 0.1 to 0.5 percent interest per annum, forty (40) years maturity inclusive of ten years grace period, 0.1 percent service charge of the amount of Letter of Commitment and generally tied procurement conditions. Grants (Korea International Cooperation Agency) The Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) administers Korean ODA grants and technical assistance programs. Project Aid provides for the construction of facilities (e.g., Korea-Philippines Friendship Medical Center). Development Studies are preinvestment studies in the areas of infrastructure (particularly irrigation, water supply and sewerage), agriculture, natural resources and urban development. Other Korean technical assistance includes Technical Training, Dispatch of Experts, Dispatch of Korean Overseas Volunteers, and Dispatch of Medical Doctors. Other Ongoing Korean-assisted projects include: 1. Luzon Transmission and Substation Expansion Project (US$ 14 M) 2. Laguidingan Airport Development Project (US$ 25 M) 3. Korea-Philippines Friendship Medical Center (US$ 3.8 M) CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR 10th Floor, The Pacific Star Building Sen. Gil Puyat corner Makati Avenue Makati City RP Tel: (02) 811-6139 to 46 Fax: (02) 811-8258 to 59 www.mofat.go.kr/mission/emb/embassy_en. mof?continent=AS&si_dcode=PHPH&section=A; www.korea.net

KUWAIT Kuwait Fund has been in existence for 48 years now. The object of the Fund is to assist Arab and other developing countries in developing their economies by extending loans and providing guarantees; making grants by way of technical assistance and providing other types of technical assistance, and contributing to capital stocks of international and regional development finance institutions and other development institutions and representing the State of Kuwait in such institutions. The Fund's operations are focused primarily on the sectors of agriculture and irrigation, transport and communications, energy, industry, water and sewage in 101 countries worldwide.

Eligible Entities The Fund may extend its assistance to different types of entities which include:   

Central and provincial governments, public utilities and other public corporations. Development institutions, whether international, regional or national and, in particular, development finance institutions. Corporate entities that undertake projects which are jointly owned by a number of developing countries as well as mixed or private enterprises that enjoy corporate personality, and are of a developmental nature and not merely oriented towards making of profit. Such enterprises must be either under the control of one or more developing country or have the nationality of any such country.

(Where the Borrower is an entity other than the state in the beneficiary country, the Fund usually requires that the state in such country enters into an agreement with the Fund whereby it guarantees the performance of the borrower's obligations under the respective loan agreement.) Forms of Assistance:   

 

 

Direct loans or the provision of guarantees. Joint or parallel financing with other international, regional or national development finance institutions. Making of grants-in-aid to finance technical, economic and financial studies whether in relation to projects financed by the Fund or otherwise. Such studies may be of such types as pre-investment surveys, studies for the identification of Investment opportunities and projects, feasibility studies, project preparation, sectoral studies and the like. Advisory services in relation to technical, financial, economic and legal aspects of projects or programmes or development policies, or in relation to institution building in the field of development. Subscription to the capital or contribution to the resources of development finance institutions. Subscription to the capital of eligible developmental enterprises.

(The Fund does not provide financial assistance for budgetary or balance of payment support.) The Philippines has been extended thus far a cumulative 45 Million dollars loan. Source: http://www.kuwaitfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=145&Itemid=134 CONTACT DETAILS Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development Mirqab Mubarak Al-Kabeer St. Kuwait City P.O. Box 2921 Safat 13030 Kuwait State of Kuwait Tel: (+965) 22999000 www.kuwait-fund.org

NETHERLANDS After the Second World War, development cooperation between the Philippines and the Netherlands at first took the form of mainly private assistance through non-governmental organisations. Based upon a long experience of educational work, Dutch missionaries initiated projects in the media, economic and health fields as well. Dutch ‘co-financing organisations’ which are partially funded by the government (such as Cordaid, ICCO and NOVIB), later created linkages with counterpart organisations in the Philippines. At first, Dutch development assistance was channelled via multilateral organisations like the UN specialised agencies and International Financial Institutions like the World Bank, European Commission and the Asian Development Bank as well as via nongovernmental organisations. The primary focus of the official Netherlands development assistance was on poverty alleviation through rural development. In financial terms the assistance peaked in 1996 with USD 18 million spent on ongoing activities. In 1998 a major reorientation of Dutch development policy took place, where various criteria were reassessed, including per capita annual income. In 1999 the Netherlands government announced that from then on the Philippines would only be eligible for bilateral assistance with regard to the environment sector. In 2004 development cooperation with the Philippines was cancelled altogether when the Dutch Minister for Development Cooperation decided to focus on other countries. The Philippines however still benefits from several Dutch global programs. Under the ORIO and PSI subsidy schemes, Dutch businessmen are provided assistance in their investment projects in the Philippines. Under the NUFFIC program, fellowships in selected post-graduate courses are granted to qualified Filipinos. The Senior Experts Program (PUM) sends retired executives to render expert technical advice on business projects in the country and the Center for Promotion of Imports from Developing Countries (CBI) provides technical training to Filipino business and staff of business support organisations and also sends technical consultants to the Philippines. The Embassy in Manila moreover supports NGOs through the small grants programme and the Human Rights Fund. Apart from these bilateral global programs, Dutch funding finds its way to the Philippines through multilateral channels such as the World Bank, UNICEF and the European Union. Programme information CBI CBI contributes to the equitable economic development of selected developing countries by providing export marketing and management support to their SME exporters and Business Support Organisations with the purpose of increasing exports to Europe. CBI stimulates and supports economic activities that are sustainable, socially responsible and environmentally sound. This implies compliance with international social standards, more specifically ILO Conventions, and European consumer health, safety and environmental requirements. Requirements are both

legislative and market driven. CBI works with clients who subscribe and strive to comply with these standards and requirements. Procedures: please check www.cbi.eu Nuffic; Netherlands Fellowship programme The overall aim of the NFP is to help alleviate qualitative and quantitative shortages of skilled manpower and to do so within the framework of sustainable capacity-building directed towards reducing poverty in developing countries. To maximize the fellowships’ impact on capacity-building, NFP-funded training must be linked to the institutional development of organizations. A wide range of organizations are eligible – governmental, private and non-governmental. They can include educational institutions, planning agencies, ministries, community-based organizations (CBOs), and private enterprises, for example. Procedures: please check www.nuffic.nl or http://www.nuffic.nl/internationalorganizations/services/scholarships/nfp ORIO ORIO contributes to the development, implementation (construction and/or renovation), operation and maintenance of public infrastructure in developing countries. ORIO wishes to encourage the involvement of international business in the development and realisation of public infrastructure projects in order to utilise the knowledge, skills and developing power of the private sector. Grant applications are submitted by the central government. These applications may be initiated by companies, the so called private initiative. Selection of grant applications is made on the basis of competition. The applications will be assessed according to a number of impact and quality criteria. The available budget is allocated to the applications with the highest ranking. ORIO focuses on a limited number of priority sectors per country. Procedures: please check www.evd.nl/orio PSI The Private Sector Investment programme (PSI) is a subsidy programme of the Dutch government. Its aim is to stimulate sustainable economic growth in developing countries by supporting innovative investment projects in these markets. The developing world offers great possibilities to entrepreneurs with ambition. But investing in emerging markets can be risky and difficult. Commercial financing is often unavailable. Cooperation with a local partner that, apart from capital, brings in knowledge of local business culture, is indispensable. PSI can ease some of the financial risks that an investment in one of these markets entails. If the application meets the criteria, PSI will subsidize 50 or 60 percent of the project budget. Procedures: please check www.evd.nl/psi PUM

Sustainable economic growth in developing countries cannot be achieved if it does not benefit local societies. Industrious small and medium-sized firms play the most significant role in creating new employment. PUM therefore grants preference to local companies. PUM believes that ensuring a sustainable development of the private sector is the best way to fight poverty; there is no ideological basis. Its policy is practical and business-like: helping small and medium-sized businesses stand on their own two feet is more effective than theorising and moralising. PUM only provides help in response to specified requests: it works directly and cost-effectively. This method has proved to be extremely successful and has created a great deal of goodwill. Procedures: please check www.pum.nl Small Embassy Projects and Human Rights Fund The Netherlands Embassy in Manila supports via this programme local organisations that promote good governance and human rights in the Philippines Procedures: Submit proposal to the Netherlands Embassy. Proposal screened by the Embassy. Decision will be made based on the quality of the proposal and available budget. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 26th floor, Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City Tel: (02) 786-6622 Email: [email protected] www.netherlandsembassy.ph

SPAIN Focus of Development Cooperation 

Financial cooperation: waste water & solid waste management, air & maritime safety, renewable energy, water supply levels I & II, basic health



Grants: poverty alleviation (health, water supply, food security), support to peace process, transfer of technology, education and cultural cooperation, presentation of historical heritage



Technical cooperation (grants)



Mixed credit: 50 percent soft loan (1-2.5% interest rate, payable in 30 years inclusive of 10 years grace period) and 50 percent commercial loan (6-8% commercial / credit under the prevailing OECD consensus rate)

CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Office Address: Embassy of Spain 27th Floor Equitable Bank Tower, 8751 Paseo de Roxas 1229 Makati City Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1114 Makati Central Post Office 1251 Makati City, Metro Manila Philippines Tel: (02) 817-6676; 817-5131; 817-9997 Fax: (02) 817-4892 Email: [email protected] www.mae.es/

Program: STRENGTHENING LOCAL GOVERNMENTS IN THE PHILIPPINES PHASE 2 and 3 Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing Agency: Local Government Academy (LGA) Program Duration: January 23, 2009 to January 23, 2010 (Phase 2) Target Program Location: Bicol and CARAGA Program Description: The objective of the project is to contribute to the strengthening process of the institutional capacity of Local Government Units with the aim of promoting development policies that improve the residents’ quality of life and contribute to reducing the vulnerability of the most disadvantaged groups. CONTACT DETAILS Gonzalo Serrano Program Manager/ Program Officer for Rural Development 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.es IMPLEMENTING PARTNER Marivel Sacendoncillo, CESO III Executive Director LGA, 8th Floor Agustin I Building, F. Ortigas Jr. Road, Ortigas Center, 1605 Pasig City Telefax: (02) 634-8430; 634-6567; 6341883 Email: [email protected]/ [email protected] www.lga.gov.ph

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA U.S. Agency for International Development/Philippines The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is the principal agency responsible for managing U.S. Government assistance programs in more than 100 developing countries around the world. Under the overall foreign policy direction of the Secretary of State, USAID helps build and sustain democratic, well-governed states that respond to the needs of their people, reduce widespread poverty, and conduct themselves responsibly in the international system. The United States has a long-standing and successful development partnership with the Philippines. Over the past 30 years, U.S. Embassy Manila's USAID Mission has provided more than US$5 billion in total assistance, making the United States the largest grant donor to the Philippines. USAID/Philippines’ current programs support local efforts to promote the development of a more peaceful and prosperous Philippines that can better provide an improved quality of life and future for all Filipinos. The following are the focus of development cooperation of USAID:      

Economic Growth Health Education Energy and Environment Humanitarian Assistance Democracy and Governance

DEMOCRACY and GOVERNANCE The Philippines still faces significant challenges in democracy and governance. In 2008, Freedom House maintained its ranking of the Philippines as "partly free", citing issues of high-level corruption, impunity, the increasing incidence of political killings, and violent conflict and the halted peace process in the south. Strengthening Philippine democracy requires increased political competition, greater accountability, and improvements in the exercise of human rights. USAID supports a broad range of democracy and governance programs at the national level and local levels. USAID funds programs in the following key areas: electoral reform, judicial reform and the rule of law, anticorruption, local governance, conflict resolution, human rights and anti-trafficking. USAID's strategic approach to these challenges seeks to achieve results in these areas: 1. Electoral Reform

USAID supports activities that enhance the capacity of the Commission on Elections in election administration and efforts to promote increased and more vigorous oversight by media and civil society. 2. Judicial Reform and the Rule of Law USAID contributes to the reform program of the Philippine judiciary, particularly in increasing the capacity of judges and court personnel to efficiently resolve cases, systematize court operations through case and court management systems, reinforce the importance of ethics, and institutionalize alternative dispute resolution as an acceptable mode of resolving conflict. USAID is supporting the Supreme Court-led initiative to establish small claims courts nationwide. 3. Anticorruption USAID assists Philippine partners to help the judicial system become more transparent and predictable in enforcing laws and policies. USAID implements anticorruption programs that complement work done by the Millennium Challenge Account – Philippines Threshold Program. Training, equipment and research support for independent accountability agencies, the anti-graft court and other anticorruption agencies of the government significantly improved the capacity of these agencies in corruption prosecution and corruption prevention. 4. Local Governance and Conflict Resolution USAID works with local governments in Mindanao to improve various aspects of local administration such as local economic policy reform, management of public services and enterprises, real property tax administration, and business licensing, local planning and budgeting, and human resource management. USAID also supports civil society and business groups in their effort to engage local governments in a continuing dialogue to promote transparent and accountable governance. In conflict-affected areas in Mindanao, USAID helps its partners in strengthening community-based dispute resolution mechanisms, which extend justice services to the poor and prevent clan disputes from escalating into violent conflict. 5. Human Rights USAID funding for the promotion and protection of human rights is creating greater understanding in the judiciary and among human rights organizations of recently issued additional legal remedies that allow human rights victims to seek justice. USAID is working with the Commission on Human Rights to strengthen monitoring and investigation capabilities. USAID is also strengthening the capacity of hundreds of prosecutors and judges to prosecute and adjudicate human rights cases, particularly those involving extra-legal killings and enforced disappearances.

6. Anti-Trafficking in Persons USAID supports GRP's efforts to more effectively implement the Philippines' antitrafficking in persons law, increase prosecution of trafficking cases and conviction of traffickers, and strengthen the capacities of NGOs to provide better protective services to victims and widely advocate for preventive measures through community education and awareness campaigns. USAID also supports the provision of direct services to trafficking victims in the halfway houses located in strategic the ports nationwide. CONTACT DETAILS Elzadia Washington Acting Mission Director USAID Philippines 8th Floor, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines Tel: (02) 552-9900; 552-9800 Fax: (02) 551-9297; 552-9999 philippines.usaid.gov/ Myra Emata-Stokes Chief, Office of Program Resource Management 8/F, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines

USAID in MINDANAO Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago comprise about one-third of the Philippines' territory and one-quarter of the country’s total population of approximately 87 million. It has the highest levels of poverty in the Philippines, partly because of the longstanding conflict between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) and separatist groups within the Muslim population, which numbers over four million. After years of negotiations, one of the two main separatist groups, the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), signed a Peace Agreement with the GRP in 1996. USAID responded immediately with livelihood training, infrastructure development, and other economic incentives to facilitate the reintegration of former MNLF combatants. As economic growth in Mindanao has accelerated in recent years, negotiations between the primary remaining Muslim separatist group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), and the GRP have intensified. USAID is ready to support the consolidation of the peace process by quickly responding to the opportunity provided by such a GRPMILF agreement. USAID directs 60% of its total assistance towards Mindanao, focusing on the following areas: Peace and Security – Helping communities in conflict-affected areas of Mindanao to rebuild a peaceful economy by providing former combatants the production inputs, training, and marketing assistance needed to become small-scale commercial farmers. Economic Growth – Promoting economic growth that provides business opportunities for as many individuals as possible by supporting producers associations and chambers of commerce. USAID is developing needed basic infrastructure, such as ports and bridges, and assisting rural banks to profitably provide loans and deposit services to microenterprises. Assisting local governments in Mindanao to effectively manage natural resources, improve urban environmental management, and use renewable energy supplied through public-private partnerships. Democracy and Governance – Partnering with local officials to combat corruption by focusing on transparency and accountability in public administration processes at the local level. Health – Working with Muslim Religious Leaders and local governments to improve the delivery of family health services, including the prevention of water-borne illnesses and infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and TB. Education - Increasing access to quality education and livelihood skills in areas most affected by conflict and poverty and improving the quality of instruction—particularly in math, science, and English. USAID also provides vocational training opportunities for out-of-school youth.

CONTACT DETAILS Elzadia Washington Acting Mission Director USAID Philippines 8th Floor, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines Tel: (02) 552-9900; 552-9800 Fax: (02) 551-9297; 552-9999 www. philippines.usaid.gov/ Myra Emata-Stokes Chief, Office of Program Resource Management 8/F, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines

ALTERNATIVE PLANNING INITIATIVES, INC. (ALTERPLAN) ALTERPLAN is a non-stock, non-profit NGO that undertakes projects, programs and policy research, and generally provides services to its partners. The work the institution undertakes concerns space and the built environment as integral components or focal points for community development. As a technical service organization, Alterplan works in partnership with community-based organizations and other non-government organizations in building their capacities to analyze, implement, plan and steer area-based development. ALTERPLAN was incorporated in 1990 by a group of women-architects/planners whose vision was a just and democratic Philippines with a total environment that is nurturing of its citizens. The group realized in the course of its work with people’s organizations and NGOs in different regions that the role of architects and planners was not so much to design and build structures, but to ensure that the conditions in both the natural and the built environment were supportive of people’s aspirations. ALTERPLAN promotes a planning attitude that recognizes the ability and the right of people to plan and pursue their own destiny, within a society that allocates its resources fairly among its people. It provides services within a framework of integrated sociophysical area development planning. ALTERPLAN has immersed itself in working with communities, mostly urban poor, in examining and planning for resettlement and on-site development areas and in using planning tools to attain land tenure. Working with other NGOs involved in community organizing, ALTERPLAN has touched base with communities in urban areas within and outside Metro Manila. ALTERPLAN also works with local governments in efforts to institutionalize consultative processes in urban planning. ALTERPLAN has established gender and environment as core mandates within its vision. ALTERPLAN is a capacity-building organization whereby technical assistance based on the needs and requests of its partners is provided. With its network of consultants, it is able to access expertise for poor communities after determining with them their needs and plans of action. Programs and Services ALTERPLAN realizes the multi-disciplinary character of community development and so seeks to expand the perspective of the communities it assists to open up to each aspect of development: from the financial, technical, organizational, to the environmental and socio-economic. This, the institution tries to do without overwhelming the community and losing sight of their internal capabilities and aspirations.

The following are the services that ALTERPLAN offers:  Design and implementation of training workshops and seminars. A number of urban poor communities, cooperatives, and other NGO’s have benefited from specialized modules that it has designed for their specific needs in community planning and cooperative housing.  Research, including policy research, related to its areas of concern. Among the studies that have been conducted are those on gender, medium-rise buildings as housing solutions, housing finance, solid waste management and cooperative housing development in the Philippines.  Library of resource materials that can be accessed by interested individuals or groups. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Sarah Redoblado Executive Director Rm. 307, Bencom Bldg., 146 West Ave., Quezon City Tel: (02) 448-7287 Email: [email protected], [email protected] www.alterplan.org.ph

The ANDRES SORIANO FOUNDATION, INC. The Andres Soriano Foundation is a non-stock, non-profit foundation established by A Soriano Corporation (Anscor) in 1968 to contribute to national development through the practice and promotion of corporate social responsibility. Forging partnerships between the business sector – starting with Anscor and its affiliates and subsidiaries – and its various stakeholders, the Foundation implements integrated area development programs for beneficiary communities in the small islands of north-east Palawan. It also has grant program for NGOs and other institutions which have programs on fighting against cancer. FLAGSHIP PROGRAMS A. Small Islands Sustainable Development Program (SISDEP) Four key result areas: 1) Effective agenda-based governance aims to develop leadership capacities to manage community resources on a sustained basis, in alliance with the local government to ensure a favorable policy environment. 2) Resource management helps people’s organizations institutionalize efforts that protect and rehabilitate critical marine and territorial areas while respecting the need for socioeconomic growth. 3) Economic mainstreaming harnesses sustainable on-shore livelihood opportunities that ease the pressure on marine resources. 4) Basic services provide access to potable water and pre-school education, and to reproductive health and family planning information. B. Cancer Abatement and Rehabilitation Efforts (CARE) ASF’s second flagship program dates back to the founding of the Andres Soriano Cancer Research Foundation in 1965. Three-pronged program of research and training, treatment services for indigent patients, and consensus building. CONTACT DETAILS Lemia Liguaton-Simbulan Executive Director A. Soriano Aviation Hangar, Andrews Avenue, 1300 Pasay City Tel: (02) 831-9941; 834-0874 Fax: (02) 834-0872 Email: [email protected];

[email protected] www.anscor.com.ph/foundation/foundation.html

ATENEO SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT (ASG) The overarching vision of the Ateneo School of Government (ASoG) is "transforming communities, building a nation." It follows a 'mosaic' approach of  Helping to build the country community by community, municipality by municipality, city by city, province by province, until the School establishes educational (learning or capacity building) partnerships with 1,000 local government units (a critical mass of 60 percent of local governments in the country);  Linking islands of good governance -- an explicit strategy to link effective and ethical leaders throughout the country;  Stimulating public demand for reform, a 'demand-side' strategy based on experiencing good governance at the local level;  Encouraging the emergence of new national leaders by training and giving support to promising executives from local governments; and,  Working with national institutions and organizations because governance innovations at the national level can have a direct impact on enabling local governments to create wealth and deliver basic services. As a professional school for public service, the School creates an environment that fosters the development of new ideas and approaches. By focusing on results, the School makes possible a learning process that creates a bridge between classroom wisdom and the world of policy decision. The School draws from the intellectual resources of the Ateneo de Manila University as well as from its many years of social apostolate and interaction with the country’s decision-makers and basic sectors of society. In recent years, the School also has become adept at South East Asia-level work. Since its beginnings as part of the Graduate School of Business in 1996 and its eventual formation as an autonomous academic unit in 2001, the ASoG has been faithful to its mission of working with effective and ethical public servants to build prosperous and just communities throughout the Philippines. PROGRAMS AND SERVICES ASoG carries its mission through its Academic Program, its Jaime V. Ongpin Executive Education Program, and its Knowledge and Practice Clusters consisting of ASoG institutes, networks, and project teams. The School trains and educates public servants put in place conditions to create wealth, deliver basic services efficiently, and open democratic access to opportunities and justice. At the same time, the School is a forum for dialogue and partnership between government and citizen organizations. Academic Program The Master in Public Management (MPM) is the School's flagship academic program for education in leadership and management in the public and non-profit sectors. The broad goal of the MPM program is to develop leaders and managers who are visionaries,

ethical, strategic and analytical, politically smart, technically proficient, and practical. MPM students learn to - Analyze the social, political, economic, institutional, and cultural context of policies and programs;  Interpret information and apply analytical tools for policy and program decisionmaking;  Formulate effective and ethical responses to real-world problems; and,  Manage and lead organizations efficiently and effectively. The MPM has two categories: 1) A mid-year Public Offering open to professionals from the public, for-profit, and nonprofit sectors. Classes bring together working students from local and national government agencies who hold elected and appointed positions, military officers, corporate executives, professionals from foreign funding agencies, the schools, nongovernment organizations and the media; and, 2) A Customized Program that offers the MPM full-time or part-time according to the specific needs of the requesting institution or organization where a significant number of MPM participants are coming from. ASoG has an MPM specialized in Rural Agricultural Development for the Department of Agriculture, an MPM specialized in TechnologyBased Enterprise Development for the Department of Science and Technology, an MPM specialized in Environmental Governance, and an MPM specialized in Local Governance for LGUs. The last is delivered off-campus in partnership with host local government units. Jaime V. Ongpin (JVO) Executive Education Program The JVO Executive Education Program was created to continue the efforts of the late Jaime V. Ongpin, a business and government leader from the Ateneo, in fostering cooperation between the private and the public sectors for national development goals. The program helps political leaders, civil servants, and corporate managers to conceptualize, develop, and manage programs relevant and responsive to the social, economic, and political needs of Filipinos. This Program offers short, focused, and customized training programs that help to provide methods and strategies to concretize ethical governance and sustainable development. It also promotes leadership and governance through modules that orient public officials and politicians on the fundamental elements of leadership. It continues to uphold the Ateneo tradition of academic excellence in relation to providing Christ-like service for others. The program offers a 'leadership sanctuary', where reform-oriented and value-driven public officials can meet, support, and sustain one another; a certificate course in leadership development; and, leadership research. The JVO Executive Education Program offers the following modules/courses:  Local Governance Modules

    

Local Economic Development Modules Sustainable Development and Urban Management Modules Development Planning and Management Series Challenges and Innovations in Governance Modules Customized Modules

Knowledge and Practice Clusters The School has distinct competencies in several knowledge and practice areas. It is pursuing a medium-term goal of becoming, by 2012, a center of excellence in research, innovation, and training both in the Philippines and in the South East Asia region in –  Leadership - Supporting effective and ethical leaders  Local Governance - Strengthening local governance  Poverty - Providing solutions to poverty  Environment - Implementing sustainable development  Social accountability - Mainstreaming social accountability  Social entrepreneurship - Promoting social entrepreneurship  Politics - Transforming politics. CONTACT DETAILS Antonio G.M. La Vina, JsD Dean Ateneo School of Government Pacifico Ortiz Hall, Social Development Complex Fr. Arrupe Road Ateneo de Manila University Loyola Heights, Katipunan Ave., Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 426-4279 Fax: (02) 426-5997 Email: [email protected] www.asg.ateneo.edu

BANGSAMORO WOMEN FOUNDATION FOR PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT (BMWFPDI) The Bangsamoro Women Foundation for Peace and Development, Inc. (BMWFPDI) is a non-profit organization established two months after the Peace Agreement was signed between the Government of the Philippines and the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) on September 2, 1996. The BMWF has more than 17,000 women followers, mainly families and supporters of the Moro combatants. A board of Trustees, composed of 13 members, provides the over-all policy and guidance to the BWFPDI. The foundation has collaborated and worked with the following organizations: CIDA, USAID, UNFPA, GTZ, TAF, US Embassy, all Moro NGO Consortium, Ford Foundation, PBSP, Kusog Mindanao Forum, Foundation for Phil. Environment, KADTUNTAYA Foundation Inc., NDFCAI-WED, ABANSE Pinay, Murid Center, PDAP, and Mindanao Council of Women Leader Forum. Its area of operation includes 17 provinces and 14 cities namely: The provinces of Basilan, Cotabato, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte, Davao Oriental, Lanao del Sur, lanao Norte, Maguindanao, Palawan, Sarangani, Sultan Kudarat, Sulu, South Cotabato, TawiTawi, Zamboanga del Sur, Sibugay and Zamboanga del Norte. The cities of Cotabato , Dapitan, Dipolog, General Santos, Iligan, Marawi, Pagadian, Pueto Princesa, Davao, Kidapawan, Koronadal, Tacurong, Zamboanga and Isabela. Vision: Empowered Bangsamoro women who are God fearing, self-reliant, just, progressive and, living in a healthy environment. Mission: To harness the potentials of the Bangsamoro Women through participation in the socio-economic, political and cultural field. Goal: To institutionalize the full integration, mainstreaming and participation of Bangsamoro women and children in the advancement of peace and development of Mindanao and its islands. Programs Related to Governance and Administration: 1. Governance a. The foundation promotes good governance for sustained peace and development in Mindanao b. Promotes responsive and participatory governance. 2. Linkages, Partnership, Research and Documentation a. The foundation maintains linkages with all organizations and agencies that are supportive of gender developments. b. The foundation implements collaborative programs in partnership with other organization. The Foundation has implemented following donor-funded programs/projects:

Emergency Livelihood Assistance Project & LEAP Real Property Taxation & HRD Barangay/Municipal Planning and Budgeting/TAG Reproductive Health Program Livelihood Assistance Community Organizing & Livelihood Assistance Livelihood Assistance Literacy Program Tobacco Survey Baseline Survey of National Objective for Health Hospital Assessment Capability Building & Livelihood

CONTACT DETAILS Door 1, Salik Apt., Espino St., Rabago Extension, Cotabato City, 9600 Philippines Tel: (064) 421-6154 Email: [email protected]

GEM-USAID

1997-2005

TAF-USAID TAF-USAID

2003 2002 to date

UNFPA SZOPAD-World Bank PBSP

1997-2003 2000 2001-2004

Prof Nur Misuari Manila Bulletin World Ed. & ADB

& 2000 1997-2001

UP & DOH UP& DOH

2003 (2 mos.) 2002 (6 mos.)

JSI US Embassy

2003 (3 mos.) 2007

CENTER FOR LOCAL AND REGIONAL GOVERNANCE (CLRG) – UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES NATIONAL COLLEGE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND GOVERNANCE (UP-NCPAG) Mandated to conduct research, training and consultancy to expand knowledge of decentralization and local governance as well as enhance the capability of local government officials and staff, CLRG collaborates with various local, national and international institutions in the pursuit of these efforts. The Center was created in 1965 through Republic Act No. 4223 as the Local Governance Center at the University of the Philippines’ College of Public Administration (now NCPAG). PROGRAMS AND SERVICES Training Programs Local Administration and Development Program (LADP). An extensive four-week training seminar which addresses critical and urgent issues and problems pertaining to local administration and development. It is conducted by the Center in collaboration with the Local Government Academy of the DILG. Basic Course on Local Government Finance (BLGF). The three-day training course aims to bridge the knowledge/orientation divide between the local executive and legislative officials, for better cooperation by equipping them with the basic knowledge and skills on local government finance and retooling the treasurers and other members of the Local Finance Committee on the same. Basic Course on Local Governance and Administration (BLGA). This five-day training course aims to prepare first-term local chief executives to perform their mandated functions by equipping them with the relevant knowledge and required skills in various aspects of local administration and governance. Basic Course for Local Legislation and Development (BCLLD). This five-day training course aims to prepare first-term local legislators and their staff to perform their mandated functions by equipping them with the relevant knowledge and required skills in local legislation and development legislation. Kapitan ng Pagbabago Starter Course (KPSC). An orientation course geared primarily for newly elected barangay chairpersons. It aims to enhance their capacity to perform their roles as area managers and public servants closest to the grassroots. Effective Leadership and Management Training Program (Leadman). A five-day course designed to enhance the leadership and managerial skills of key-appointive local government employees, particularly the department heads, on the areas of

communication, stress and time management, team-building, motivation, conflict resolution and operations management. Youth Leadership and Governance for Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) Leaders. The course explores the youth’s leadership challenges as they participate in barangay deliberations and programs as well as in promoting awareness on responsible adolescent reproductive health and rights. Development Legislation Enhancement Course (DLEC). Designed as a follow-up course for those who attended the BCLLD, DLEC is an advanced five-day training course generally aimed at enhancing the legislative capability and effectiveness of the participants – both in the procedural aspect and in the participatory dimension of legislation in local governments – to enable them to perform their development roles, policy making functions, official duties and obligations. Training on Specific Concerns. Seminars on specific topics such as governance and leadership, management systems, LGU-NGO partnership, development planning, local legislation, local economic promotion, financial administration and environmental management conducted upon request. Research Services Organization and Management Study. A comprehensive study of administrative and management processes practiced in a LGU, it includes performance evaluation studies of the different local departments, including its role, function, staffing pattern and plantilla positions. It aims to delineate functions of the different offices of the local government and identify the resources needed for a more efficient and effective delivery of their mandates. Technical Assistance Drafting of Comprehensive Development Plans. The Center provides technical assistance to LGUs in the formulation of their Comprehensive Development Plans. This includes coordination with key local officials in planning and facilitating the activities needed in preparing the local CDPs such as the conduct of stakeholders’ workshops and focus group discussions. The Center also assists the LGUs in drafting the CDPs based from the outputs of these activities and provides inputs for its finalization. Formulation of Executive -Legislative Agenda. This service aims to assist LGUs in the creation and drafting of their Executive-Legislative Agenda. This includes the conduct of focus group discussions with the community or the different barangays, along with facilitation and conduct of a multi-sectoral consultation. The Center would also assist the ELA team of the LGU to draft their ELA based on the outputs of the different consultations. Knowledge Products

In addition to its research, training and consultancy services, CLRG produces various knowledge products such as books, monographs, handbooks, learning modules, toolkits and training manuals on a wide range of local government concerns, such as business permit issuance and licensing, decentralization, federalism, agricultural development, local economic promotion, systems improvement, and urban governance, among others. CONTACT DETAILS Professor Simeon A. Ilago Director Office Add: Rm. 210, NCPAG Building, E. Jacinto St. U.P. Campus, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines Mailing Add: P.O. Box 198, UP Campus, Diliman 1101 Quezon City, Philippines Telefax: (02) 928-3914; 925-7422 Email: [email protected]

DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY OF THE PHILIPPINES (DAP) The Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP) is a government corporation established in 1973 with original charter created by Presidential Decree 205, amended by Presidential Decree 1061, and further amended by Executive Order 288. The Academy was founded by the following institutions: Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, Development Bank of the Philippines, Government Service Insurance System, National Economic and Development Authority, Philippine National Bank, Social Security System, and the Land Bank of the Philippines. The Academy was created for the following purposes: 

To foster and support the developmental forces at work in the nation's economy through selective human resource development programs, research, data-collection, and information services, to the end that optimization of wealth may be achieved in a manner congruent with the maximization of public security and welfare;



In line with the foregoing objective, to promote, carry on and conduct scientific, interdisciplinary and policy-oriented research, education, training, consultancy, and publication in the broad fields of economics, public administration, and the political and social sciences, generally involving the study, determination, interpretation and publication of economic, political and social facts and principles bearing upon development problems of local, national or international significance; and



To discharge a regional role in initiating and catalyzing exchange of ideas and expertise on development activities in the region of Asia and the Far East.

As the National Productivity Organization of the Philippines, DAP fulfills the country’s commitment to the Asian Productivity Organization. DAP envisions itself to be a world-class national development and productivity organization. DAP exists to:  build capacities and partnerships among the key sectors of Philippine society;  generate innovative, value-adding, and synergistic solutions to national and local concerns; and  promote sustainable human development and global competitiveness in partnership with international community organizations. Services DAP offers training, education, technical assistance/consultancy, policy-and actionoriented research and publications in the areas of governance and accountability,

productivity and quality, knowledge management, education and learning, and sustainable human development. DAP also provides training and conference facilities in Pasig and Tagaytay City that are conducive to learning and productive work. Operating Centers The core services of the Academy are carried out by its key operating centers. Programs  Center for Governance  Center for Knowledge Management  Center for Quality and Competitiveness  Center for Sustainable Development Graduate School  Institute of Public Management  Institute of Productivity and Quality Regional Operations  DAP sa Mindanao  DAP sa Visayas Clients DAP’s clientele includes national line agencies, local government units, and government corporations. It also undertakes projects for international organizations and funding institutions, private firms including small and medium enterprises, non-government organizations, and the academe. Recent DAP Mandates Under Republic Act No. 9013 or “Philippine Quality Award Act of 2001”, DAP serves as Administrator of the Philippine Quality Award (PQA) for Performance Excellence in the Public Sector. In connection with this, DAP extends assistance to government agencies including GOCCs, LGUs and SUCs in PQA Assessment and Application Development. Executive Order No. 605, s.2007 directed the institutionalization of the structure, mechanisms and standards to implement the Government Quality Management Program. As member of the Government Quality Management Committee, DAP is the lead agency tasked to promote awareness and develop organizational capabilities in the establishment of ISO 9000-certifiable Quality Management System (QMS) in public sector organizations. To facilitate the implementation of Republic Act No. 9485 or “Anti-Red Tape Act of 2007,” DAP is mandated to assist government agencies in the reengineering of systems

and procedures and in the establishment of Citizen’s Charter for frontline services. Section 10 of RA 9485 also mandates DAP to assist CSC in undertaking the Report Card Survey, which shall be used to obtain feedback on how the provisions of the Charter are being followed and how the agency is performing. Training Services DAP provides training services to develop and enhance individual and organizational capacities in various disciplines. DAP’s training services range from training needs assessment, program design, training management to training evaluation. DAP has regular training programs open to the public. These programs can also be customized to suit the needs of client organizations. Current training programs available are: Center for Governance  Leadership, Excellence and Development for LCEs  Effective Local Legislation  Local Revenue Generation and Resource Mobilization  Project Development and Project Management  Strategic Planning  Change Management  Formulation of a Citizen’s Charter  Gearing Up for Citizen’s Charter Implementation  Public Service Ethics and Accountability  Basic Policy Process  Policy Appreciation Course for CESOs Center for Knowledge Management  Basic and Advance Knowledge Management  Benchmarking  Basic Training Management  Presentation and Facilitation Skills Development  Technical Writing  Customer Service Skills  Performance Management and Evaluation  Information Systems Strategic Planning  Information Systems Development  IMO Model Course 609: Training Course for Instructors  IMO Model Course 312: Training Course for Assessors  Open Source Softwares Center for Quality and Competitiveness  Basic Quality and Productivity Improvement Approaches o 5S: Good Housekeeping for Improved Productivity



 

o Trainer’s Training on Quality Circles o Basic 7 quality control tools for problem solving and decision making o Suggestion Scheme Advanced Quality and Productivity Approaches o Total Productivity Maintenance o Total Quality Management o Six sigma o Just in time o ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System o ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) Integrated productivity and technology upgrading program o Practical industrial engineering (IE) Productivity and quality measurement approaches o Measuring service quality o Benchmarking o Cost of quality

Center for Sustainable Human Development  Ecotourism Planning and Development  Waste management using 3 R’s (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle)  Environmental Management  Disaster Risk Reduction  Renewable Energy and Clean Development  Resource Optimization and Waste Minimization  Nature interpretation and visitor management  Doing renewable energy enterprises/business  Ecotourism products identification and development DAP sa Visayas  SUC IGP Managers’ Course  Business Planning for SUC  Entrepreneurship Development Course for Women  Facilitation for Community Development  Natural Farming System for Green Productivity  Eco Business Development Using Biomass/Wastes  Development of Productivity Specialist DAP sa Mindanao  Technical Writing  Project Development and Management  Facilitating Training Sessions  Supervisory Skills Enhancement  Basic Productivity Tools and Techniques  ISO 9000 QMS  Effective Internal Quality Audit

Consultancy and Research Services In line with its mandates, DAP provides services by way of technical assistance, management advisory, and policy-and action-oriented research in the fields of governance and accountability, productivity and quality, knowledge management, education and learning, and sustainable human development. Governance and Accountability The Center for Governance is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on political, economic and administrative governance. It provides services to strengthen institutions and mechanisms to develop and effectively implement public policies and programs that promote transparent and accountable governance, observance of the rule of law, government effectiveness, effective regulation, control of corruption, citizen voice and participation. CFG has three program offices: Operations Management, Policy Research, and Local Governance and Development. CFG offers research and consultancy services on the following areas:  Basic social services  Corruption prevention and integrity development for the NGAs and LGUs  Impact analysis  Operations, systems and/or performance review;  Budget management (NGAs and LGUs). Knowledge Management The Center for Knowledge Management is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on harnessing intellectual and human capital, and other knowledge-based assets towards performance excellence. CKM has three program offices: Human Capital Development, Knowledge Management Systems, and Knowledge Solutions Development. The main areas of research and consultancy of CKM are the following:  Human resource and organization development  Organization diagnosis  Systems design and development  KM Readiness Assessment  Knowledge Mapping  Knowledge Harvesting  Documentation and Sharing of Best Practices  Institutionalization of Communities of Practice (CoPs)  Implementing KM in the Organization. Productivity and Quality

The Center for Quality and Competitiveness is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on value chain productivity and technology enhancement, total quality management, productivity measurement and analysis, and sectoral productivity enhancement. It is responsible for the promotion of quality and productivity concepts, principles and practices to strengthen competitiveness and help organizations achieve performance excellence. CQC has four program offices: Service Quality Management, Value Chain Productivity Management, SME Productivity Development, and Agriculture Productivity Development. CQC currently offers the following research and consultancy services:  Agricultural productivity  Productivity among industries, SMEs  Service quality standards  Quality and productivity approaches. Sustainable Human Development The Center for Sustainable Human Development is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on developmental strategies and solutions to help reduce poverty and meet the Millennium Development Goals. CSHD has two program offices: Community Development and Environmental Management. CSHD currently offers the following research and consultancy services: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Developing sustainable development indicators Sustainable environmental management alternatives and systems Developing strategies for disaster risk reduction Impact studies on climate change, development projects, tourism and the rural poor.

Regional Development DAP has two regional offices that are responsible for the development of programs and projects at the local/community levels in Southern Philippines. These are: the DAP sa Mindanao and the DAP sa Visayas. CONTACT DETAILS Antonio D. Kalaw, Jr. President 6/F DAP Building, San Miguel Avenue Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1600 Tel: (02) 631-2153 Fax: (02) 631-2123

Email: [email protected] www.dap.edu.ph DAP Conference Center, Tagaytay City Barangay Sungay East, Tagaytay City 2720 Tel: (046) 483-1290 to 1292 Fax: (046) 483-1290/1292 www.daptagaytay.com.ph

EDUCATIONAL DISCIPLINE IN CULTURE AND ARTS FOR DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICES, INC. (EDCADS) In 1986, amidst the socio-political upheaval which ushered the EDSA revolt, a group of educators, artists, cultural workers, religious workers and activists convened and gave birth to a vision which metamorphosed into an institution, the Educational Discipline in Culture and Area-based Development Services, Inc. (EDCADS). EDCADS is a non-stock, non-profit organization founded in 1986, which gradually expanded both its mission and its services in response to a developing condition. From the community of artists and cultural workers, it in time became involved in the struggles of the peasant and Indigenous People. Soon enough, EDCADS was no longer confined in serving any specific sector but rather had reached and touched almost all the marginalized sectors in our society, specially those in the rural areas. Today, through its management, EDCADS has acquired its own assets, which includes a more than 600 square meters lot and a two-storey building housing its office with sufficient equipment and communication facilities; and a modest space for seminars and trainings. Track Record Cultural Work is an EDCADS’ Legacy and perhaps also its most definitive aspect. In the past EDCADS has become synonymous with culture and arts. However, EDCADS developed concepts that elevated cultural work into alternative approaches for community-based education, promotion and advocacy. This provides EDCADS with a distinct character and tactical advantage that sets it apart from other development institutions. One of the significant experiences of EDCADS in its dynamic evolution to become a “comprehensive” NGO, is its involvement in community development. For the past twenty three (23) years and through its projects, the EDCADS has contributed to the development of rural communities in the fields of community organizing, capabilitybuilding and systems enhancement, community-based education, promotion and advocacy, livelihood development and facilitating the provision of basic social services. EDCADS’ interventions benefited farmers, fisherfolks, women, youth, and indigenous people, among others. Its critical experience in projects with strong emphasis on community organizing provides the EDCADS with a well-grounded basis in formulating its distinctive strategies and approaches to development work. Vision “Empowered and sustainable communities of men and women in harmony with nature” Mission “Improve the capacity and livelihood of the rural poor”

Goals  Enhance the capacity of self help groups and organization s for effective local governance and sustainable management of their resources;  Strengthen community-managed health care initiatives linked with local health care structure and systems;  Facilitate access to market, micro financing and technology development of community livelihood undertakings;  Augment the physical, financial and personnel capability of EDCADS to support its operations for at least 10 years. EDCADS Themes 1. Family/Community Health 2. Rural Organization/Institution 3. Good Governance and Administration 4. Local Livelihood 5. Gender The EDCADS upholds that community development must be a multi-pronged yet integrated intervention, aimed at the community. These interventions however, must involve a wide partnership that would include the People’s Organizations (POs), the Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), the Local Government Units (LGUs) and Line Agencies (LAs), and the Private Sector (PS). In a critical evaluation of the status of most POs, EDCADS had identified four (4) main areas that require substantial interventions. These areas of concern serve as the focus in defining the appropriate programs and services, which EDCADS aims to provide. These areas include:  Capacity enhancement,  Institutional building and strengthening,  Services provision, and  Administrative support. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Mary May RC. Diaz Managing Director 177 Bougainvilla St., South Montilla Blvd., Butuan City

KADTUNTAYA FOUNDATION, INCORPORATED (KFI) The Kadtuntaya Foundation, Inc. (KFI) is a non-government, development oriented organization based in Cotabato City, born out of the need to respond to the socioeconomic and cultural needs of the Moro people, particularly in Central Mindanao. KFI was established and registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission in July 1989. During its early operation, KFI’s main thrust was to bridge the gap between the Christians and Muslims whose relationship had been stained by decades of conflict and wars. KFI facilitated dialogues and understanding of Muslims and Christians, reducing prejudices, improving relationships, and forging mutual cooperation. Its focus then, was still in Cotabato City. In the following years, KFI expanded its areas of concern to include socio-economic programs such as helping organize communities and cooperatives, extending assistance to income-generating projects like malong weaving, and small entrepreneurship (e.g. sari-sari store, small and large livestock raising, buy and sell ventures, among others). To date, KFI has more than 50 staff and volunteer workers facilitating several projects in the Provinces of Maguindanao, Sultan Kudarat, Cotabato, and in the other provinces of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). KFI envisions politically empowered, economically sufficient, environmental friendly, gender-conscious and culturally sensitive tri-people communities peacefully co-existing in equality, mutual respect and prosperity. It is committed to facilitate the empowerment of the people, especially the grassroots, so that collectively they can improve their sociocultural, economic and political well being. KFI aims to: 1. Increase participation and involvement of men and women at the grassroots level in community decision-making processes and development activities through awareness building, leadership and PO formation, capability building and gender advocacy. 2. Improve means of livelihood and food security of grassroots at the household level at all times. 3. Reduce sources of conflicts and vulnerabilities of the grassroots communities that may result to displacement, loss of livelihood, morbidity or death. 4. Actively advocate for accountable and good governance to improve avenue for people’s participation, cooperation, transparency, and delivery of services. 5. Improve the situation of women and children, especially those in difficult circumstances through the promotion of their rights. 6. Promote environmental awareness and respect so that people become just to nature and caring stewards of the earth. To achieve this, KFI seeks all means to sustain its human, financial and material resources. Core Programs:

1. Moro Integrated Area Development (MIAD) Being the core program, MIAD is the main concern and focal point of the organization’s interventions. It comprises four essential strategies. 1.1 Organizational Building and Strengthening (OBS) This is the primary approach by which KFI is able to facilitate the conscientization of the grassroots community as well as ensure their development in terms of asserting their rights and aspirations, particularly in the fields of governance and decision making. 1.2 Farming Enterprise and Economic Development (FEED) This strategy focuses on the improvement of prevailing farming practices through the introduction of viable farming technologies that are environment-friendly and sustainable. It is also through the FEED project that off-farm alternative income generating activities are facilitated for both men and women members of the community. 1.3 Community Social Services (CSS) Through the CSS strategy, the health and sanitation problems and concerns of the community are addressed. Health services include the promotion of Promotive and Preventive Health Care through the active involvement of health committees. Literacy projects provide basic writing, reading, and numeracy skills to adult illiterates geared towards greater involvement in family and community affairs. 1.4 Natural Resource Management and Tenure Improvement (NRMTI) It aims to facilitate, at the maximum, the acquisition of lands through the Claim of Ancestral Domain Title (CADT) and Agrarian Reform Program, at the minimum the improvement of tenure relationship of the landowners and the tenants through continued advocacy and campaign. 2. Governance and Peace This program aims at forging understanding and cooperation among the tri-people in Mindanao through continuing dialogues and joint community activities. It promotes the Culture of Peace towards prejudice reduction and improving inter-relationships. It also cultivates critical awareness among the grassroots on the roots of conflict in Mindanao as the basis of finding meaningful and long-tern peace. Strategies include peace consultations and dialogues, rights-based advocacy, linkage and networking with LGUs, as well as establishing Zones of Peace. 3. Women & Children Development This program aims at providing gender-awareness/education and organizing support group to enhance understanding of the role of men and women in Muslim society. It provides scholarship for children and youth and enhances their capacity to lead and take active role in the promotion of understanding of the rights and proper care f children through Child Rights Advocacy and Theater Development.

4. Disaster Management This program provides trainings and awareness on disaster preparedness and management. It helps organize community-based disaster coordinating councils, and provides relief assistance, shelter, psychosocial and economic rehabilitation to victims of disasters. List of Fund Sources for the Last Five Years: 1. Philippine Business for Social Progress 2. Terre Des Hommes – Germany 3. Cordaid – The Netherlands 4. Trocaire – Ireland 5. Bread for the World – Germany 6. Misereor – Germany 7. Catholic Relief Services – USA 8. Oxfam – GB/HK 9. Ausaid/ARMM SF 10. German Development Service (DED) 11. German Development Cooperation (GTZ) 12. Embassy of Japan in the Phil. 13. HEKS – Switzerland List of Network Affiliation: 1. Coalition Development NGOs 2. Mindanao Emergency Response Network 3. Consortium of Bangsamoro Civil Society 4. AGONG Peace Network 5. Kutawato Coalition of Development NGOs 6. Well-Family Midwife Clinics Partnership Foundation, Inc. Current Projects:

PROJECT TITLE 1. Empowering Communities Towards Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding in Central Mindanao

DONOR Cordaid

2. Empowering Communities Towards Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding in Central Mindanao 3. Mapayag, Adaon, Kiladap Integrated Area Development Program III (MADAKIL-IAD III) 4. Continuation of a Development Programme for a Group of Indigenous

OXFAMHK

PROJECT SITE Datu Piang (5 brgys) Mamasapano (2 brgys) Datu Saudi Ampatuan (4 brgys) Datu Piang (8) Midsayap (2)

BFTW

Talitay (3 brgys)

Misereor

Brgy. Tomicor, Ampatuan, Maguindanao

People in Saniag, Ampatuan, Maguindanao 5. Agricultural Development and Ecological Protection Towards Sustainable Economic Livelihoods in Fukol

CONTACT DETAILS Guiamel M. Alim Executive Director G/Floor, Community Training and Resource Center Bldg. Doña Pilar Street, Vilo Subdivision, Poblacion IV, Cotabato City 9600 Philippines P.O. Box 116 Tel: (064) 421-4222 Telefax: (064) 421-2072 Email: [email protected] [email protected] www.kadtun.org

HEKS

Barangay Fukol, Talayan

LEAGUE OF CITIES OF THE PHILIPPINES (LCP) Protecting the interests of cities, the League of Cities of the Philippines (LCP) is committed to bringing local urban governance agenda at the forefront of the country’s development strategies. As the mandated organization of the Philippine cities, the LCP believes effective change in the national consciousness starts with the primary visions of the local government units. On July 25, 1987, former President Corazon Aquino issued Executive Order No. 262 that created the League of City Mayors of the Philippines. It was also during that time when local government units – provinces, cities, municipalities, and the barangays – clamoured for genuine reforms. After years of hard advocacy work, Congress passed the Republic Act 7160, the Local Government Code, on October 10, 1991. Under Section 499, LCP is finally institutionalized for the “primary purpose of ventilating, articulating, and crystallizing issues affecting city government administration...” The change in nomenclature transformed the character of LCP from an organization of political personalities to a membership-based institution where the cities – and not their political leaders – are accountable entities. Through the years, LCP’s services have evolved from administrative to policy, technical, and programs support. Vision An Empowered, Strong, United Brotherhood of Purpose-Driven Cities committed to serve its people with a deep sense of pride and value-laden commitment for progress and development Mission To enable Cities to stand as one, defend its rights, provide the best possible services, and pursue the common good for its constituents through its advocacies, capabilities, and networking Services to member-cities • Policy development and advocacy support in coordination with other local government leagues and national agencies; • Networking and building linkages for programs and project development and implementation; • Facilitation in the information exchange through quarterly meetings, policy fora, IEC materials development, sharing of best practices, the LCP Caravan, and through website; and • Full administrative and secretariat services to the member-cities and staff Source: http://www.lcp.org.ph/lcp/vision

Programs LCP-LMP-FCM Municipal Cooperation Program This partnership focuses on organizational development, particularly on policy development and advocacy with UBCM, and in the implementation of Municipal Partnership Program where technical exchanges happen between Philippines cities and their Canadian counterparts. Partner Institution Federation of Canadian Municipalities Fernando Gerard Espero III FCM National Coordinator LMP Office, Ermin Garcia Street, Cubao, Quezon City Tel: (02) 813-5737 Telefax: (02) 813-5738 Email: [email protected] www.fcm.ca Standardized Business Registration and Permit Process/Regulatory Simplification Project The program aims to streamline the BPLS in as many cities as possible nationwide. Partner Institution International Finance Corporation Jesse O. Ang Country Representative 11/F, Ayala Triangle One, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-7333 Telefax: (02) 848-7339 Email: [email protected] Protect-MDG Project The program aims to enhance the procurement capacities of the pilot cities, strengthen their civil society partnerships and provide a platform for knowledge sharing. Partner Institution

United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Renault Mayer Country Representative UNDP, 30/F RCBC Plaza, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 901-0100 Telefax: (02) 889-7177 www.undp.org

LEAGUE OF MUNICIPALITIES OF THE PHILIPPINES (LMP) Its creation and purpose is mandated by Section 496 of the Republic Act 7160, otherwise known as the Local Government Code of 1991, as amended, which states: There shall be an organization of all municipalities to be known as league of municipalities for the primary purpose of ventilating, articulating and crystallizing issues affecting municipal government administration, and securing, through proper and legal means, solutions thereto. Powers, Functions, and Duties Section 498 of the Local Government Code of 1991 outlines the following powers, functions and duties of the League: • Assist the national government in the formulation and implementation of the policies, programs and projects affecting municipalities as a whole; • Promote local autonomy at the municipal level; • Adopt measures for the promotion of the welfare of all municipalities and its officials and employees; • Encourage people's participation in local government administration in order to promote united and concerted action for the attainment of country-wide development goals; • Supplement the efforts of the national government in creating opportunities for gainful employment within the municipalities; • Give priority to programs designed for the total development of the municipalities in consonance with the policies, programs and projects of the national government; • Serve as a forum for crystallizing and expressing ideas, seeking the necessary assistance of the national government, and providing the private sector avenues for cooperation in the promotion of the welfare of the municipalities; and • Exercise such other powers and perform such other duties and functions as the league may prescribe for the welfare of the municipalities. CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR League of Municipalities of the Philippines 2nd Floor, LMP Building 265 Ermin Garcia St., Cubao, Quezon City Telefax: (02) 913-5737 to 38; (02) 913-5642 Email: [email protected] or [email protected] www.lmp.org.ph

Lead Implementing Agency: Mayor’s Development Center (MDC)/League of Municipalities of the Philippines (LMP) Course Duration: Two-and-a-half (2-1/2) to Five (5) days Beneficiaries: Mayors, Key staff and/or Local Functionaries Target Program Location: Regional/Provincial-on site Courses: Strategic Management in Development: Managing Performance of Municipal Governments A five-day course designed to enhance the analytical skills of mayors and their key staff in understanding the context within which they operate, specifically the challenges and opportunities that they face, and their capacities for effective action. Partner Institution: German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)/Hanns Seidel Foundation (HSF)

Dr. Herwig Mayer Program Manager Unit 2A, PDCP Bank Centre, Cor. VA Rufino and LP Leviste Sts., Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-6821 Fax: (02) 813-6821 www.decentralization.org.ph

Integrated Solid Waste Management (ISWM) for Municipalities A four-day learning event aimed at understanding and appreciating better the links between MDGs, good local governance, and integrated solid waste management; and the role of municipal governments, civil society and the communities in caring for the planet given its limited carrying capacity. Executive Course on Sustainable Municipal Fisheries A four-day learning event primarily designed to answer questions and build knowledge and skills of local chief executives for informed decision-making in coastal and fisheries management. The course provides a comprehensive ‘snapshot’ of the ‘what, why and how’ of marine capture fisheries and will take participants through the range of principles, concepts, options and interventions that will help local chief executives plan and implement immediate actions. Partner Institution: Fisheries Improved for Sustainable Harvest (FISH) Project/USAID

Geronimo Silvestre Chief of Party Metro Manila: 18/F OMM-CITRA Bldg., San Miguel Avenue, Ortigas Center, 1605 Pasig City

Tel:(02) 636-0052 to 53 Fax: (02) 634-0327 Email: [email protected] Cebu: 5/F, CIFC Towers; JL Briones corner Juan Luna Avenue; NRA, Cebu City 6000 Tel: (032) 232-1821 to 23 Fax: (032) 232-1825 Email: [email protected] www.oneocean.org Learning Event on Local Economic Development A four-day training-workshop designed to build, strengthen and enhance the governing ability of local executives in the execution of social, economic, political reforms and policies that can translate the aspirations of society into tangible measures to make development accessible to those in dire need of development. The event serves as a forum where participants can hope to acquire certain approaches and strategies in the recognition and management of potentials, resources and opportunities to make development possible. Partner Institution: International Labour Organization (ILO)

Linda Wirth Director 19F Yuchengco Tower, RCBC Plaza, 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 580-9900 Fax: (02) 856-7597 Email: [email protected] (Jesus Macasil, Programme Officer) www.ilo.org/manila

Orientation for Newly-Elected Mayors (ONE-M) A two-and-a-half-day orientation program for newly-elected municipal mayors designed to prepare and equip the local chief executives with the necessary knowledge and attitude to efficiently manage their respective localities during their first term in office, using a development management framework. The program utilizes a peer-to-peer sharing approach tapping multi-awarded municipal mayors who were once newly-elected and started out like them. The module also introduces the newly-elected mayors to national government agencies, regional officials and the services that they provide. Partner Institution: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (for Luzon ONE-M)

Frances Tanner First Secretary Level 7 étage, Tower/Tour 2, Place RCBC Plaza, 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 857-9123

Partner Institution (for Visayas and Mindanao ONE-M): German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)/Hanns Seidel Foundation (HSF)

Dr. Herwig Mayer Program Manager Unit 2A, PDCP Bank Centre, Cor. VA Rufino and LP Leviste Sts., Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-6821 Fax: (02) 813-6821 www.decentralization.org.ph

LEAGUE OF PROVINCES OF THE PHILIPPINES (LPP) The Local Government Code of 1991 recognized and institutionalized the League of Provinces of the Philippines as a forum to articulate issues affecting the provinces, and to provide and propose solutions to these concerns. Since then, the League has consistently demonstrated its vision and mission to promote local autonomy, and sternly lobbied against all proposed bills in Congress which undermine decentralization efforts. Believing that progress can only be achieved if there is genuine and meaningful local autonomy, the League has consistently blocked moves by certain sectors to renationalize the functions that have already been devolved. The League was instrumental in the devolution of health, social welfare and agriculture, among others, from the national government to the local governments and the transfer of 70,498 national employees to the local units. Today, the League has become an effective forum of intervention, and a rich source of materials for progressive policies and programs for the national government and for its eighty (80) member-provinces. As an advocate of decentralization and local autonomy, the League provides venues to ventilate, articulate, and crystallize issues affecting provincial and metropolitan government administrations. It likewise serves to secure, through proper and legal means, solutions to problems confronting the locales. Vision “Empowered provincial governments dedicated to excellence in local governance and constantly vigilant in the pursuit of genuine and meaningful local autonomy for sustainable countryside development.” Mission 1) To foster unity and cooperation among all provinces of the country; 2) To provide a cohesive force that embodies the sentiments and aspirations of member provinces; 3) To serve as a forum for discussion and feedback mechanism on policies affecting local governments; 4) To collaborate with national and other local governments in attaining efficient and effective inter-governmental relations to provide development programs that will enrich and upgrade the capabilities of local government units; PROGRAMS AND SERVICES The programs of the League fall under the following component strategies: 1) Strengthening local government performance 2) Influencing national policy

3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8)

Nurturing partnership with other Leagues of Local Governments Enhancement of membership participation Expanding the revenue base of the League Institutionalization of the League Secretariat Strengthening private sector partnerships Fostering international cooperation

CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Unit 1510 West Tower Philippine Stock Exchange Centre Exchange Road, Ortigas Center, Pasig City Tel: (02) 657-5399; 631-0170; 631-0197 Telefax: (02) 687-4048 Email: [email protected] www.lpp.gov.ph

LOPEZ GROUP FOUNDATION, INC. The Lopez Group Foundation Inc. was incorporated on February 29, 2004 and is certified by the Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC). LGFI's coordinates and synergizes the CSR efforts of the Lopez Group’s 9 foundations and more than 15 companies. The Group's CSR programs are primarily in education, the environment, entrepreneurship, children’s rights, family planning, health, and disaster-relief and rehabilitation. LGFI builds partnerships and alliances and provides a reference for those who desire to collaborate or provide funding support. It is an active member of the League of Corporate Foundations (LCF), Association of Foundations (AF), Corporate Network for Disaster Response (CNDR), Public Relations Society of the Philippines (PRSP), Employers Confederation of the Philippines (ECOP), Philippine Association for Volunteer Efforts (PAVE) and the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines (FOCAP). CONTACT DETAILS 5/F Benpres Building Meralco Avenue corner Exchange Road Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1600 Tel: (02) 490-0779 Telefax: (02) 631-3128 Email: [email protected] www.lopezgroup.org The CSR community of the Lopez Group include: ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation, Inc. 2/F Calderon Bldg. # 827 Edsa QC, Telephone: (02) 929 3273 / (02) 415 0545 Website: www.abs-cbnfoundation.com Email address: [email protected] ABS-CBN Foundation, Inc. Mother Ignacia Avenue, Quezon City 1103, Philippines Telephone: (02) 924 2740 / (02) 922 4842 Website: www.abs-cbnfoundation.com Don Senen Gabaldon Foundation 20/F JMT Corporate Condominium, ADB Ave., Ortigas Center, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 634 4092

Eugenio Lopez Foundation, Inc. (The Lopez Museum) G/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 631 2417 Website: www.lopezmuseum.org.ph Email Address: [email protected] First Philippine Conservation, Inc. 4/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 449 6086 to 87 / (02) 638 7670 Email: [email protected] Knowledge Channel Foundation, Inc. 5/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 910 2033 – (02) 910 3181 Website: www.knowledgechannel.com.ph

MUSLIM-CHRISTIAN AGENCY FOR ADVOCACY, RELIEF AND DEVELOPMENT, INC. (MuCAARD) The Muslim Christian Agency for Advocacy, Relief and Development or MuCAARD has been working for over two decades in Mindanao. It has proven its effectiveness in the implementation of development programmes, its extensive reach among poor and marginalized households in the rural areas, and its wide acceptance among Muslims, Christians and indigenous tribal groups for its efforts in trying to eradicate poverty and social exclusion. Established in July 1984 as a consortium, it is the first genuine MuslimChristian NGO in the Philippines assisting Peoples’ Organizations (PO) in improving their capacity to assist small farmers, fisher folks, women and urban poor. It has centered its activities in the island of Mindanao, specifically the provinces of Zamboanga del Sur, Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Bukidnon and North Cotabato including the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). These areas are recognized as amongst the poorest provinces in the country. (IBON Special Report March 2007) MuCAARD’s mandate is “To develop sustainable communities where Muslims, Christians and Tribal People can live together recognizing and respecting their different faiths and cultures where there is sustainable environment, political empowerment, economic equity, gender equality, unity and lasting peace.” This mandate is rooted in MuCAARD’s commitment to the practical expression of interfaith dialogue. This mandate is also in line with the UN Millennium Development Goals specifically MDG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7. That is: 1. To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger; 2. To achieve universal education; 3. To promote gender equality and empower women; 4. To reduce child mortality; 5. To improve maternal health; and 7. To ensure environmental sustainability. MuCAARD works with a network of POs through the four MTs, all of whom belong to poorest of the poor. Each Member Team is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). They are coordinated with the Secretariat in Cagayan de Oro City who takes lead in many of the initiatives and provides the support they need such as Fund-Sourcing/Resource Locator; Training Provider/Resource Persons or respond to request for training and consultancy outside of MuCAARD network; Advocacy, Networking/Linkages; Monitoring and Evaluation; Auditing; Center of Communication; Assist in resolving critical issues affecting the Member Teams; Initiate contacts/develop new programs beneficial to MuCAARD network. Vision MuCAARD’s Vision is to create effective and accountable democratic communities based on sustainable development and founded on justice and equality – where sustainability includes the need to protect and rehabilitate the environment for our grandchildren. The agency dreams of a Mindanao where people of all faiths and

ethnicity can live in peace respecting the unity in our diversity and where everyone is included. The key to achieving our vision is through active people’s participation. Mission MuCAARD’s Mission is to consolidate and expand people’s involvement in local governance so that they can access resources and services and ensure the promulgation of equitable policies and laws. To strive against discrimination and oppression so that the women and the most vulnerable sectors of society can reach their full potential; that they are protected against natural and human disasters. To educate and create communities that can live sustainably providing a decent livelihood for their families and future generations. Goals 1. Good Governance - To ensure that Local Government Units (LGUs), MuCAARD and the local community work together so that agreed programmes and provision of services (health, education, infrastructure and others) are accountable and transparent reaching those who need them most and following the rule of law; 2. Peace Building – To organize and train barangay-based Peace and Development Councils and Advocates which include women. To promote and implement a system of Barangay Justice Service Systems (BJSS) to revitalize and modernize the traditional ways of settling disputes within the different tribal groups in order to prevent conflicts from exploding into violent encounters. Declaration of peace zones. Note: Good governance and sustainable livelihoods are also keys to peace building; 3. Sustainable Livelihoods – to encourage and enable rural communities to identify and implement projects that both protect, conserve and rehabilitate the environment as well as providing economic growth; 4. NGO-GO cooperation – To ensure that there is a genuine partnership between community and the local government so that community projects are based on felt needs; and 5. Disaster Risk Management – to reduce the toll of disasters through community participation in pre-disaster risk reduction planning and strategies, emergency response and post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction. Programs Related to Governance and Administration:     

Local Governance (The overarching program) Community Organization Community Development Capability Building Peace Building and Barangay Justice Service Systems Issue Advocacy/Linkages and Networking (Cross-cutting theme)

Major Skills and Competencies  Community Planning using the participatory tools,  Community Organizing through Community Development

 Conducting and facilitating capability and capacity buildings to PO, NGOs, and Local Government Units,  Linkaging with the Local Government Units that resulted to the formulation of municipal and barangay comprehensive development plans  Conducting and facilitating program and project planning, monitoring and evaluation Available Resources and Facilities  Owned building in Cagayan de Oro where the head office is located with training and session hall  Provincial offices in Bukidnon, Marawi City, Lanao del Sur, and Zamboanga del Sur  Three service cars and motorbikes in the Members  Enough desktops and laptops (Computers) in the head and provincial offices  27 committed and skilled regular staff Member Teams Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Bukidnon Integrated Services Assistance Program, Inc. (MUCARD-BISAP)

Address Purok 3, Poblacion, 8721 Damulog, Bukidnon, Mindanao, Philippines

Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Community Services for Education and Economic Development, Inc. (MUCARD- CoSEED)

Purok Daisy, Poblacion, Vincenzo Sagun, Zambonaga del Sur, Philippines

Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Panginam O Masa, Inc. (MUCARD-POM)

Lombayao, Balindong, Lanao del Sur, Philippines

Muslim-Christian Agency

Riverside, Madaya Lilod

Target Beneficiaries  Manobo (Tribe)  Christian and Muslim farmers and women in Bukidnon province particularly in the municipalities of Damulog, Kibawe and Kadingilan.  Maguindanaon in Carmen, N. Cotabato  Subanen (Tribe)  Christian and Muslim fisher folk, farmers, and women in Zamboanga del Sur province particularly in the municipalities of Dinas, Margosatubig, Pitogo and Vincenzo Sagun  Muslim Maranao farmers, women and children in the west of Lanao del Sur province particularly in the municipalities of Bacolod-Kalawi, Balindong, Kapatagan, Madamba and Madalem  Muslim Iranon in Kapatagan, Lanao del Sur  Muslim Maranao farmers,

for Rural Development – Ranao Integrated Assistance Program, Inc. (MUCARD-RIAP)

Marawi City, Philippines

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Imelda Ganaden-Manginsay Overall Coordinator #12 11-15th Street, Nazareth Subdivision 9000 Cagayan de Oro City Mindanao, Philippines Tel: (08822) 72-8542 (088) 857-2423 Fax: (088) 857-2423 Mobile: (+63)926-510-9040 Email: [email protected] www.mucaard.org

youth and women in the East of Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte and in the City of Marawi particularly in the municipalities of Sanguiaran, Bubong, Ramain, Kapai, Piagapo and the Islamic City of Marawi in Lanao del Sur and in the municipalities of Balo-i, Pantar, Tagoloan and Munai in Lanao del Norte

PHILIPPINE PARTNERSHIP FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN RURAL AREAS (PhilDHRRA) The Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) is a network of sixty - seven (67) non-government organizations (as of 2007) involved in various development activities in rural communities all over the country. Today, PhilDHRRA continues to be a national network of social development organizations (SDOs) committed to the pursuit and realization of agrarian reform and rural development in the Philippines. It is part of the chain of DHRRA networks throughout the Asian region aspiring for a common vision of rural development in their respective countries. Now in its 20th year of development work, it operates in 70 of the 75 provinces in the Philippines. A national secretariat and three regional secretariats in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao manage the day-to-day operations of the network. Central Strategies PhilDHRRA reaffirms the Sustainable Integrated Area Development (SIAD) as its overall framework in conducting programs in rural communities. It is anchored on the need to integrate the various initiatives in a geographically defined area to address diverse yet interrelated issues of the people. As a framework, it needs to be translated into specific programs depending on specific needs of the communities, the resources and capacities available. The strategy assumes that the development and implementation of SIAD programs are the main responsibility of the NGO members. The role of PhilDHRRA as a network is to provide support to them so that they may become more capacitated to implement those program and projects at the ground level. With its commitment to rural development, the members of the network adopted the Integrated Provincial Sustainable Agriculture, Agrarian Reform and Rural Development (IPSAARRD) as its core strategy. Concretizing this strategy are initiatives in SIAD in areas where PhilDHRRA members operate. IPSAARRD: • Observes the key principle of equity-led sustainable development by focusing on contiguous lowland/upland/coastal ecosystem areas at the provincial level; • Targets comprehensive integration of existing programs and efforts by building on their gains and strengths and fusing local governance and reproductive health into their implementation; • Strives to ensure resource tenure, sustainable productivity and cooperative development; and, • Fortifies multipartite partnership mechanisms to enclose political boundaries for more concerted development efforts.

Servicing the needs of NGOs in the rural areas in general, the following are the competencies the network has focused on that is related to Governance and Administration: People’s Participation in Local Governance Developing the capacity of rural communities, through organized groups, to effectively participate in local governance processes, thus enabling them to bring their development issues into the mainstream of local government decision – making. The Local Governance projects of PhilDHRRA aim to engender responsive democratic institutions with greater citizen participation in local development and governance. The Governance and Local Democracy (GOLD) project aimed to enable the citizenry, through the organized groups (NGOs, POs, and Private Sector) to effectively participate in the local governance processes. The project was implemented in 9 provinces, two cities, and 27 municipalities. Lately, PhilDHRRA implemented projects like the Local governance Support Project of CIDA and the 10.10.10 Project of DILG in cooperation with UNDP. Cutting across these program are a wide range of on-the-ground community based activities, namely: 1. Resource tenure improvement; 2. Protection of ancestral domains and indigenous people’s rights; 3. Upland, lowland and coastal community-based resource management; 4. Sustainable agriculture/Propagation of appropriate technology; 5. Community organizing/Empowerment of grassroots communities; 6. Gender and development; 7. Cooperative development; 8. Income-generation and management; 9. NGO/PO participation in local governance; and, 10. Policy advocacy for agrarian reform and rural development and participative local governance Participation and Linkage Building Catalyzing processes to bring together various stakeholders to collaborate on common objectives following the principles of continuing dialogue, mutual respect, transparency, and accountability. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Anna Maria Leida “Chem” N. Pacaño National Coordinator PhilDHRRA National 59 C. Salvador St., Loyola Heights Quezon City 1108 Philippines Tel: (02) 436-0702

Fax: (02) 426 0385 Email: [email protected] www.phildhrra.net Mr. Macario “Mac” Jusayan Regional Coordinator PhilDHRRA Luzon 59 C. Salvador St., Loyola Heights Quezon City 1108 Philippines Telefax: (02) 426-0710 Email: [email protected] Ms. Luz Angeles “Luchie” AlmagroBlanco Regional Coordinator PhilDHRRA Visayas 102 Arbor Ville, Borromeo Compound, Barangay Kalunusan 6500 Cebu City Tel. (032) 253-4200 Email: [email protected] Mr. Rolando “Rollie” Abando Regional Coordinator PhilDHRRA Mindanao  6 Lunar St., Doña Vicenta Village, Davao City  Burgos Pacana St., Cagayan de Oro City Tel. (082) 227-7647 (Davao City) Tel. (08822) 722820 (Cagayan de Oro City) Email: [email protected]

RAMON ABOITIZ FOUNDATION INC. The Ramon Aboitiz Foundation’s vision, in its 42 years of existence in development work in the Visayas and Mindanao, has consistently been “Touching People, Shaping the Future.” It has worked towards elevating lives through a comprehensive approach that champions best practices in community development. The position calls for the foundation to be: collaborative—adhering to an inclusive process as a venue for sharing knowledge to gather the best resources, and providing opportunities to establish partnerships; holistic—conceptualizing programs that look into multi-issues and draw comprehensive solutions, according to the foundation’s and the partners’ resources, with the end of empowering people; and a role model—leading communities to sustained change and results by utilizing best practices at the same time exploring innovative solutions, and setting an example to other development partners by promoting their work and causes. Focus Areas 1. Integrated development, with specific concerns in community development, health and the environment 2. Culture and heritage 3. Leadership and citizenship 4. Micro-finance and entrepreneurship 5. Education. Services 1. Grants and awards 2. Institutional development and planning 3. Knowledge sharing and advocacy 4. Services and facilities CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Dominica B. Chua Chief Operating Officer 35 Lopez Jaena Street, Cebu City 6000 Tel: (032) 418-7234 Email: [email protected]

UP VISAYAS-BARANGAY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT APPROACH FOR NUTRITION IMPROVEMENT OF THE RURAL POOR (UPV-BIDANI) Barangay Integrated Development Approach for Nutrition Improvement is an action – reasearch community outreach program of UP Visayas. It started in 1990 with funding from the Dutch Government. At present, it is a regular extension program of the university, with special funding from the DBM. UPV – BIDANI has been working in nine municipalities and forty – nine barangays in the province of Iloilo. It has trained teams from Panay State Polytechnic College and from Aklan State University to spread the good news of BIDANI in the provinces of Capiz and Aklan, respectively. Programs and Services The UPV – BIDANI assists in the rehabilitation of malnourished children and the prevention of the occurrence of malnutrition. It aims to increase food availability at the household level, and improve standard of living of rural poor. It enhances the capability of barangay people in planning and implementation of development activities and projects. It reinforces the capability of municipal agencies to support barangay development activities. It prioritizes women, youth and children in its programming. CONTACT DETAILS Vicente T. Balinas Program Director UP Visayas City Campus Gen. Luna Street, 5000 Iloilo City, Iloilo Telefax: (033) 336 – 5568 Email: [email protected]

ZAMBOANGA DEL NORTE CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS AND DEVELOPMENT (CESCOD) CESCOD is a non-government organization committed to engage communities, government and other concerned groups and individuals on a principled and pro-active basis to effect sustainable development and social change. Major Programs  Organic Farming and Sustainable Agriculture  Capability building/trainings for : farmers, women, LGUs, children and youth, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors  Micro-enterprise/Livelihood assistance (Credit Facility/small loans program)  Literacy Education for Adults (IPs and non-IPs)  Mainstreaming Gender in Development  Advocacy for social –economic-political issues  Community Development/Rebuilding communities/Empowering communities  Participation in Local Governance  Ecology and environmental concerns  Leadership trainings, Team building seminars etc for organizations and offices  Educational Assistance for Marginalized Youth (Scholarship Program )  Networking Network Affiliation PhilDHRRA Civil Society Counterpart Council for Sustainable Development (CSCCSD)  Member of various national and local sectoral and/or issue-based coalitions and organizations  Member of the City Development Council (Dipolog City) and other special bodies/committees/councils in Dipolog City CONTACT DETAILS Fr. Enrico V. Montano Executive Director CESCOD Magsaysay cor Bonifacio St., Dipolog City Tel: (065) 212-7791 Telefax: (065) 212-2953 Email: [email protected]

SERVICE AREAS     

Health and Nutrition Education Housing Peace, Security and Disaster Risk Management Advocacies

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE (DOF) The Department of Finance is principally responsible for the formulation, institutionalization and administration of the government’s fiscal policies, in coordination with other concerned agencies of government. It is also tasked to generate and manage the government’s financial resources as well as supervise the revenue operations of all local government units. Furthermore, the DOF is approves and manages all public sector domestic or foreign debt; and rationalizes and privatizes corporations and assets that are owned, controlled or acquired by the government. Vision  A strong economy with stable prices and strong growth;  A stable fiscal situation which could adequately finance government projects and budgetary programs;  A borrowing program that is also able to avoid the crowding-out effect on the private sector and minimize costs  A public sector debt profile with long maturities and an optimum mix of currencies that minimizes the impact of currency movements; and  A strong economic growth with equity and productivity. Mission The DOF shall take the lead in providing a solid foundation for the achievement of an economy that is dynamic and active in the world, globally competitive and onward looking. The SECRETARY DOF Bldg., BSP Complex Roxas Blvd., Metro Manila Tel: (02) 523-6054 Fax: (02) 526-8474 www.dof.gov.ph

OVERVIEW OF DOF’S FINANCIAL GOVERNMENT UNITS (LGUs)

ASSISTANCE

TO

LOCAL

 Creation of the Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) thru Executive Order No. 41 to administer the Municipal Development Fund Revolving Fund for local government units established under PD 1914.  Its objectives include helping the LGU enhance its local revenue generation and promote economic growth through investment on local public enterprise and infrastructure project; and providing financial assistance to upgrade delivery of basic services and facilities which could not be funded through local incomes and transfer of fund from the national government.  Eligible borrowers include cities, provinces and municipalities  Eligible Subprojects for the Program: INFRASTRUCTURE

A.B. 1.4.

Revenue Generating Projects such as Water Supply System, Local Electrification System, Slaughterhouse, Terminal, Wharf, Public Market, “Bagsakan Center”, Cold Storage Plant, Post-Harvest Facility, Food Processing Facility and Memorial Park.

2.5.

Social Projects for Education such as School Buildings (including the furniture and facilities), Non-Formal Education and Training Center, Public Library (including books and the access to Electronic Information System) and Day Care Centers; and for Health such as Hospital, Health Center, Lyingin Clinic, Birthing Facility, Health Training Center, Baranggay Health Stations and other health facilities.

3. Environmental Projects under Solid Waste Management such as Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), Sanitary Landfill, Composing Facility; Water Management such as Sewerage System, Drainage System, Waste Water Treatment Facility (Biogas Digester); Air quality Management (Support to the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1990); and Land Conservation such as River/Seashore Protection and Sea Wall. 4. Other Infrastructure Projects such as Farm-to-Market Roads and other LGU priority infrastructure projects. B. EQUIPMENT

Procurement of Heavy Equipment for Construction and road Maintenance, Dump Truck, Equipment for the Operation of Slaughterhouse; MRF Equipment; and Medical and Dental Equipment.  For Loan Terms and Conditions, the Municipal Development Fund Project (MDFP) offers pure loan with fixed interest rate of 9% per annum with no equity required. Type of Subproject Infrastructure

Equipment

Repayment Period 15 years, inclusive of 3-year grace period on principal payment 10 years, inclusive of 2-year grace period on principal payment

 Application Requirements include: 1.6. Letter of Intent from the Local Chief Executive 2.7. Local Council Resolutions manifesting support for the project and authorizing the Local Chief Executive to enter into relevant agreements 3.8. Creation of Subproject Management Office 4.9. Project Proposal/Feasibility Study (pro-forma will be provided)  Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) in their issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity (Please see BLGF page)

MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT FUND OFFICE (MDFO) The Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) was created as an office under the Department of Finance (DOF) by virtue of Executive Order No. 41 on 20 November 1998 to acts as a source of credit financing to support LGUs in the implementation of their priority development projects and programs. It promotes LGU self-reliance in undertaking socio-economic development programs through effective system of making ODA available to LGUs, assist low income LGUs to establish creditworthiness to help them access private funds. The MDFO has four (4) major thrusts, namely: 1.5.Administrator of the Municipal Development Fund – Second Generation Fund (MDF-SGF) 2.6.Fund Administrator of Foreign-Assisted Projects (FAPs) implemented by other National Agencies. 3.7.Implementer of Projects/Programs 4.8.Policy Formulation The MDFO has a Policy Governing Board comprised of officials from DOF (chairperson), National Economic Development Authority (NEDA), Department of Budget and Management (DBM), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), DPWH, and the Executive Director of the MDFO that sets policy directions for the Office. Among the credit financing initiates administered by the MDFO are as follows: 1.2.Municipal Development Fund (MDF) Project On 29 March 1984, through Presidential Decree No. 1914, the Municipal Development Fund (MDF) was created as a special revolving fund for re-lending to Local Government Units (LGUs). It became an effective mechanism that enabled LGUs to avail of financial assistance from local and international sources for the implementation of various social and economic development projects. It provides concessional financing assistance to lower income class LGUs with revenue-generating subprojects. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs nationwide Eligible Proposals/Subprojects 3. Revenue/Non-revenue generating projects 4. Other infrastructure projects 2. Disaster Management Assistance Fund (DMAF)

DMAF provides financial assistance to LGUs affected by calamities (reactive) and enhance the disaster preparedness to LGUs through technical assistance (proactive). Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs nationwide Eligible Proposals/Subprojects  Emergency Financial Assistance (EFA)  Restorative Financial Assistance (RFA)  Anticipative Financial Assistance (AFA) 3. Mindanao Basic Urban Services Sector Project (MBUSSP) MBUSSP funds initiatives in providing basic urban infrastructure facilities in Mindanao. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs nationwide Eligible Proposals/Subprojects:  Infrastructure projects  Heavy equipment  Institutional capacity building 4. Philippine Water Revolving Fund (PWRF) PWRF leverages Official Development Assistance (ODA), Private Financing Institutions (PFI) funding. This financing window develops financing mechanism acceptable to PFIs but at the same time affordable to water utilities. It also develops financing mechanism with revolving capacity and a mechanism to implement EO 279. Eligible Borrowers:  Water districts, LGUs  Consortium or joint ventures  Privately-owned corporations  Private financial institutions Eligible Proposals/Subprojects:  Water extraction  Water transmission, water supply treatment  Water distribution, collection of wastewater  Wastewater treatment and disposal  NRW reduction and efficiency enhancing measures  Refinancing of water project loans 5. Project Technical Assistance and Contingency Fund (PTACF)

PTACF assists in accelerating LGU preparation and submission of feasibility studies and detailed engineering design. It creates a fund to finance the actual foreign exchange differentials of LGUs incurred in their project implementation. PTACF provides a source of financing for other technical assistace (TA) needs of LGUs. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs except highly urbanized cities CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: MDFO, Department of Finance 7/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila Tel: (02) 523-9935; 521-7192; 525-9185 to 87 Fax: (02) 523-9936; 525-9186 Email: [email protected]

BUREAU OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE (BLGF) BLGF is the Department of Finance’s arm (DOF) directly responsible over the fiscal and financial affairs of local government. Under a decentralized regime, BLGF provides a catalytic role in effective and sustainable management of fiscal and financial resources of LGUs, transforming them into self-reliant communities. It is vigilant and dedicated to pursuit of development and professionalization of its employees including those of the local treasury and assessment services. Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) required documents for the issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity: 1.2.

Statement of Income and Expenditures for the last three (3) years duly certified and audited by the local accountant and auditor, (General Fund) with Pre-Closing Trial Balance.

2. Current year Annual Budget 3. Annual Investment Plan for 20% Development Fund 4. Certification of existing/absence of loan/loans duly certified by the Local Treasurer and lending institution with the following details:  Kind of Loans and Other Obligations  Purpose of Loans and Other Obligations  Name of the Lending Institution  Date of Approval and Maturity  Terms and Conditions (Interest & No. of years to pay)  Latest Balance of Loans & Other Obligations - Current - Arrearages  Annual Amortization Schedule (Segregate Principal & Interest) 5.10. Letter request from the Local Chief Executive indicating where to apply and purpose of the loan CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: Bureau of Local Government Finance Department of Finance 8/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila 1004 Tel: (02) 527-2780; 522-8773 Fax: (02) 527-2780 www.blgf.gov.ph

DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (DILG) The DILG is the primary national government agency mandated to promote peace and order, ensure public safety and further strengthen local government capability aimed towards the effective delivery of basic services to the citizenry. Vision The Department is the primary catalyst for excellence in local governance that nurtures self-reliant, progressive, orderly, safe and globally-competitive communities sustained by God-centered and empowered citizenry. Mission The Department shall promote peace and order, ensure public safety, and strengthen capability of local government units through active people participation and a professionalized corps of civil servants. Goals  Peaceful, safe, self-reliant and development-dominated communities  Improved performance of local governments in governance, administration, social and economic development and environmental management  Sustain peace and order condition and ensure public safety Objectives  Reduce crime incidents and improve crime solution efficiency  Improve jail management and penology services  Improve fire protection services  Continue professionalization of PNP, BFP, and BJMP personnel and services  Enhance LGU capacities to improve their performance and enable them to effectively and efficiently deliver services to their constituents  Continue to initiate policy reforms in support of local autonomy CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY A. Franciscon Gold Con. II, EDSA Cor. Mapagmahal Street, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 925-0330/31; 929-9406 Fax: (02) 925-0332 Email: [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

PHILIPPINE BASIC URBAN SERVICES INVESTMENT PROGRAM (PBUSIP) Funding Agency: ADB, DBP, MDFO and DILG Lead Implementing Agency: Infrastructure Investment – PFI/DBP and MDFO and ADB Capacity Development – DILG/MDFO Infrastructure Implementation – LGUs Project Duration: 10-Years starting 2nd Semester of 2010 Beneficiaries: 179 LGUs Target Program Location: Eligible LGUs in the Visayas (Region VI, VII and VIII) and in Luzon (Regions III, IV-A) and Mindanao (Regions X, XI, XII,) and NCR. Project Description: The Philippine Basic Urban Services Investment Program (PBUSIP) is an expansion of the Mindanao Basic Urban Services Sector Project (MBUSSP) that aims to continue to pursue improvement in the qualify of life of urban residents by building local capacities and providing investment support for urban sector development. Consistent with the priority development thrust of the MTPDP and the urban sector development strategies, the PBUSSP supports the national government’s efforts in promoting equitable economic growth in the urban sector addressing deficiencies in basic infrastructure, pursuing effective local governance and adopting a holistic approach to development of the urban sector The project is designed as a Multi-Trance Financing Facility (MFF) to be funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). It is co-executed by the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP), and the Municipal Development Finance Office (MDFO), with the DILG as the lead executing agency.

The goal of PBUSIP is to improve the standard of living, health and economic opportunities in local government units (LGUs) by enhancing the quality, coverage and reliability of the basic urban infrastructure and services among participating LGUs. It aims to support the capability of LGUs to fund basic infrastructure by introducing innovative financing models consistent with the LGU Financing Framework and further develop the technical capacity of LGUs to sustain the viable operations of these infrastructure facilities. The PBUSIP, referred herein as the Investment Program, is designed to be funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The Project will be coexecuted by the DILG, the DBP and MDFO and may be implemented up to a 10-year period. The DILG will be the lead executing agency. The PBUSIP has two parts: Part A – Investment in Infrastructure and Services is designed to provide LGUs the financial resources to pursue infrastructure subprojects; Part B – Institutional Capacity Development and Policy Reforms ensures that the necessary capacity to implement and operate these infrastructures are made available to LGUs by introducing tools and systems that will facilitate the institutionalization of sustainable practices;

Part A covers the provision of innovative financial assistance to pursue infrastructure projects through the MDFO and the Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP). The MDFO will provide the financial assistance to LGUs consistent with the National Government-Local Government Cost Sharing Arrangement. The DBP will extend credit financing for income generating subprojects proposed by the cities and higher income class LGUs and loans to private proponents who will partner with LGUs for the implementation and operation of local development projects. Project Objectives 1.4.To improve the standard of living of residents in urban areas throughout the Philippines 2.5.To increase capacity of local governments and national agencies in urban management 3.6.To increase and mobilize resources to improve service delivery and enable better access of the population to basic urban infrastructure Project Coverage  Eligible LGUs in Mindanao that have expressed their interest with manifested commitment but were not accommodated in the current phase due to fund limitations. These would include about 50 LGUs that have submitted their Letter of Intents with the attached Local Legislative Council resolutions to the DILG 

Eligible LGUs in the Visayas (Regions VI, VII, VIII) and in Luzon (Regions I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, and CAR) that have expressed their interest through the DILG Regional Offices. This would include additional 60 eligible LGUs

Project Implementation Arrangement  Infrastructure Investment - Private Financing Institutions/ Government Financing Institutions (GFIs), MDFO and ADB  Capacity Development – DILG  Infrastructure Implementation – LGUs Project Components 1.3.Investments in Infrastructure and Services  Subprojects of LGUs – possibly in association with the private sector proponents, for subsectors such as: local roads and bridges, water and sanitation, drainage, flood control, solid waste management, [public markets, bus terminals, public facilities such as municipal buildings, sports facilities, public parks, slaughterhouses, ice plants  Economic Infrastructure such as incubation centers for small and medium enterprises (SMEs)  Area development projects, economic zones/cluster development and others, with preference for revenue generating subprojects 2.4.Institutional Capacity Development and Reforms  Strengthening program and project management systems

 

Capacity development for urban management systems Policy reforms for sustainable urban services delivery

CONTACT DETAILS ENGR. ROLYN Q. ZAMBALES OIC – Director, OPDS DILG-Office Of Project Development Services (OPDS), 5th Flr., A. Francisco Gold Condo II, EDSA, cor. Mapagmahal St., Diliman, Quezon City Attn to: MR. ROGELIO P. SUMNGAT Project Manager, PBUSIP Tel: (02) 9299601; 9299406; 925-1135 Fax: (02) 9296227 E-mail: [email protected] [email protected], [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

MILLENIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS FUND (MDG FUND)  



In November 2004, The DILG issued Memorandum Circular No. 2004-152 or the “Guide to Local Government in the Localization of the MDGs” The MDFO-Policy Governing Board, DOF passed Resolution No. 04-12-22-2005 establishing the MDG Fund and allocating Php 500 M for financing local initiatives in support of attaining the objectives of the MDG The DILG and DOF-MDFO agreed to jointly implement the MDG Fund under a Memorandum Order (MOA) signed on 6 August 2007

The Millennium Development Goals Fund is a locally-funded project jointly implemented by the DILG and the Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) of the DOF, with DILG responsible for capacity development, particularly on project preparation, implementation and operation and maintenance, and MDFO for Fund administration of the P500 M made available by MDFO from its Second Generation Fund (SGF) for relending to interested and eligible LGUs. The MDG Fund finances projects that clearly contribute to the attainment of any or all of Millennium Development Goals 1 – 7, such as those on water, sanitation, health, education and other socioeconomic projects. Examples of such projects include, but not limited to: 1.

Livelihood programs/projects such as cottage industries, handicraft industries, livestock production, etc including construction of livelihood centers/support facilities

2.

Construction/rehabilitation/improvement of: - water supply systems - access roads such as farm-to-market roads, footbridges - public auction markets - health care centers - day care centers/pre-school institutions - RHUS/lying-in clinics which may include equipment and supplies - Municipal/barangay wharves/ports

3.

Construction/provision of women resource centers and livelihood centers

4.

Procurement of various seedlings and other farm equipment, other farm implements

5.

Procurement of heavy equipment for SWM, road construction/maintenance

6.

Establishment of HIV/AIDS and STD counseling and surveillance center/desks

7.

Construction/installation of solar driers, multi-purpose pavement, post-harvest facilities, food processing, rice and corn mills, warehouses

Objective To support and fund LGU initiatives that directly contribute to the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals. Coverage  

4th to 6th income class municipal LGUs can avail of the financing Provincial LGUs may also avail of the financing in behalf of its 4th to 6th income class municipalities

Components 1. Investment Support Component (ISC) - Provision of financial assistance for infrastructures and capital investment projects on soft credit scheme 2. Institutional Capacity Building Component (ICBC) - Provision of technical assistance and advisory services relative to the stages of the project cycle Financing Terms 1.

Softer-Support Projects Interest Rate: 7.5% per annum (fixed) Repayments Period: 6 years inclusive of 1 year grace period on principal

2.

Infrastructure Projects Interest Rate: 8.5% per annum (fixed) Repayments Period: 10 years inclusive of 2 year grace period on principal

Documentary Requirements 1.

Loan Application:  Letter of Intent – duly signed by the Mayor/Governor  Sangguniang Bayan Resolution  Feasibility study of project proposal

2.

Certification for Borrowing & Debt Service Capacity:  Name of LGU and Income Class  Statement of Actual Income and Expenditures for the last three (3) years duly certified and audited by the local accountant and auditor with the following supporting documents: - Trial balance - Balance sheet - Statement of operations - Report of revenue and receipts

-

Status of appropriation, allotments, and actual obligation incurred Statement of cash flow

3.

Current Year Annual Budget

4.

Annual Investment Plan

5.

Certification of existing/absence of loans duly certified by the Local Treasurer and/or lending institutions with the following details:       

Kinds of loans and other obligations Purpose of loan and other obligations Name of lending institution/s Date of approval and maturity Terms and conditions (interest rate and repayment period) Latest balance of loan and other obligations: (Current & arrearages Annual amortization schedule (segregated into principal and interest)

CONTACT DETAILS: ENGR. ROLYN Q. ZAMBALES OIC, Director Office of Project Development Services 5/F, Francisco Gold Cond. II, EDSA cor. Mapagmahal St., Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 929-9601; 929-9406 E-mail: [email protected]

ENHANCING ACCESS TO AND PROVISION OF WATER SERVICES WITH THE ACTIVE PARTICIPATION OF THE POOR (MDGF 1919) The project aims to contribute to the improvement of efficiency, access, affordability and quality of potable water services by establishing support mechanisms which include the development of a range of incentives options and partnership modalities (e.g. funds leveraging) that would help facilitate investments in water utility expansion and/or improvements in water service provision in the President Priority Programs on Water (P3W’s) grant assistance program of National Anti-Poverty Commission or NAPCWASCO. Also, it is intended to improve local capacities through mentoring and training with the rolling-out of the WATSAN toolbox, intended not only to stimulate investment flows, but also to sustain water service delivery. Capacity development is focused in these areas: sector planning and monitoring; development of service codes; tariff setting and regulation; and, management and operation of water supply and sanitation services. Objectives 1. Harmonization/Mobilization of grassroots organizations, local government units (LGUs) and other institutions that will ensure sustainability of investments 2. Formulation of policy reforms in terms of financing (NG-LGU cost sharing) and programming (particularly of grant assistance from the National Anti-Poverty Commission or NAPC) to leverage social subsidies with better responsibility and accountability from communities 3. Improvement of existing tariff-setting methodologies to cater to small water utilities to ensure that the appropriate levels of tariff are imposed. Project Implementation Arrangement UNDP and UNICEF NEDA DILG

Managing or Administrative Agent - Executing Agency (National Focal Point) - Implementing Agency

-

Duration: January 2009 – December 2011 Components 1. Technical Assistance - Policy Formulation in terms of financing and programming 2. Planning - Water Supply and Sanitation Investment and Development Plan Preparation - Localization of Costumer Service Code (tariff methodology)

3. Capacity Building - Conduct of intensive learning program to LGUs using WATSAN Toolbox - Formation of WATSAN Councils - Organization of Water User Associations with increased participation and membership especially among women - Development of IEC Materials Project Assistance -

Policy formulation in terms of financing and programming Formulation of Water Supply and Sanitation investment and Development Plan for 36 municipalities Localization of Customer Service Code (tariff methodology) Intensive learning program to LGUs using WATSAN toolbox Formulation of WATSAN Councils and membership especially among women Development of IEC Materials Organization of Water Users Associations with increase participation

CONTACT DETAILS: MS. FE CRISCILLA M. BANLUTA Project Manager, WSSPMO Office of Project Development Services 5/F, Francisco Gold Cond. II,., EDSA cor. Mapagmahal st Diliman, QC Tel: (02) 9251145/928635/9250362 E-mail: [email protected]

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH (DOH) The differences in health status among various groups and regions in the country have widened through the years. These disparities indicate deficient economic and social policies, showing the need to reprioritize interventions to promote equity, fairness and immediate action. Unnecessary and unfair gaps in the health care delivery system that deprive the poor of access to basic services must be reduced. The system must work efficiently to reach the highest possible health standards that can be shared by all Filipinos, given the limited resources available for health. Although socioeconomic differences significantly influence health status, the equitable distribution of quality health services is an important measure of fairness in the country. Revitalizing the health care system must be seen within the broader context of several forces affecting the delivery of basic health services in the past two decades. Among these factors are the devolution of health services to local governments, passage of national legislation for universal coverage for health through social insurance, the epidemiologic shift and current double burden of disease brought about by the rise in degenerative diseases and the reemergence of previously controlled infectious diseases, demographic trends pointing to longer life span, greater number of adolescents and youth, rapid urbanization, industrialization, environmental degradation and climate change. Under these realities, the health sector must work to attain a common vision of health for all Filipinos. Its mission is to ensure accessibility and quality of healthcare to improve the quality of life of all Filipinos, especially the poor. Vision The leader of health for all in the Philippines Mission Guarantee equitable, sustainable and quality health for all Filipinos, especially the poor, and to lead the quest for excellence in health. DOH Hospitals Provides hospital-based care; specialised or general services, some conduct research on clinical priorities and training hospitals for medical specialisation. Attached Agencies 

The Philippine Health Insurance Corporation is implementing the national health insurance law, administers the medicare program for both public and private sectors.



The Dangerous Drugs Board on the other hand, coordinates and manages the dangerous drugs control program.



The other two agencies are Philippine Institute of Traditional and Alternative Health Care and the Philippine National AIDS Council.

CONTACT DETAILS: The SECRETARY San Lazaro Compound Sta. Cruz, Manila Tel: (02) 743-8301 to 23 www.doh.gov.ph

NATIONAL DRUG POLICY – PHARMACEUTICAL MANAGEMENT UNIT (NDPPMU 50) The Pharma 50 Project Management Unit (PMU 50), presently called the National Drug Policy – Pharmaceutical Management Unit (NDP-PMU 50) of the Department of Health, is an ad-hoc unit established to operationalize, manage and monitor the implementation of all DOH initiatives, programs and projects, whose paramount objective is to achieve Her Excellency, President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo’s proposed program called the “Half-Priced Medicines Program,” that would reduce the cost of medicines commonly bought by the poor to half of their 2001 prices and make them available nationwide through a distribution network as determined by the Department of Health, in coordination with the Philippine International Trading Corporation Pharma, Inc. (PPI). Two main strategies, establishment of Botika ng Barangay (BnB) and parallel brand importation, were anchored by DOH through this unit.

Vision Providing quality health care through improved access and rational use by the Filipino people of safe, effective, quality and affordable drugs to all, especially the poor. Mission Collectively adopted as NDP-PMU 50, a team of dedicated, committed, competent and dynamic health and health-related professionals that endeavors to formulate national policies, processes and design strategies through participatory/multisectoral coordination and knowledge management that shall ensure availability and accessibility of safe, efficacious and quality essential drugs. Goal: Attaining universal (at least 85%) regular access to Essential Medicines by 2015.

NDP-PMU 50 PROJECTS

A. REPUBLIC ACT NO. 9502 (R.A. No. 9502) OTHERWISE KNOWN AS THE UNIVERSALLY ACCESSIBLE QUALITY AND CHEAPER MEDICINES ACT OF 2008 AND ITS IMPLEMENTING RULES AND REGULATIONS (IRR) Described as a model of transparent, effective, and responsive consultative process, the crafting of the IRR for R.A. No. 9502 was done urgently but with the utmost care and diligence. In the four (4) short months given to complete such a gargantuan task, a total of seven (7) public hearings involving hundreds of participants and resource speakers, including the richness of knowledge and experiences by local and international experts, were conducted in different places, Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. And, true to promise, Secretary Francisco T. Duque III along with Secretary Peter Favila of the Department of Trade and Industry signed the IRR of R.A. No. 9502 on November 4, 2008. This heralded a new era in the Philippine pharmaceutical arena, an era of quality affordable medicines.

Among the powers articulated in the Law and its IRR are the powers to promote the use of low cost quality generic drugs and medicines as alternatives to more expensive innovator brands; to impose upon government physicians to prescribe only in generics to give their patients the needed choice to buy only the brand/generic medicine they can afford; to do parallel importation of low cost quality medicines (buying cheap drugs abroad and selling these in the Philippines at low cost compared to how much these are sold currently in the local drugstores); to sell over the counter medicines even in supermarkets to increase availability of these medicines; to strengthen the Bureau of Food and Drugs to make it more equipped to respond to the changing times and assure us of safe, effective, quality medicines which is now known as Food and Drug Administration Act (FDA) of 2009, R.A. No. 9711; and, as a reserve instrument, the power to regulate the prices of medicines and impose a maximum retail price (or MRP) if and when necessary. As of this writing, the DOH has implemented in varying stages all these enumerated interventions. Advisory Councils In order to assist government in its endeavor to rationalize the market, provide the needs of the Filipinos equitably, as well as emphasize transparency in the processes involved, an Advisory Council made up of proponents of the pharmaceutical industry as well as civil societies and non-governmental organizations has been in place since January 2009. This Council has been working hard to give valuable inputs on how to bring quality affordable medicines to the people the soonest.

B. BOTIKA ng BARANGAY (BnB) PROJECT BnB refers to a drug outlet managed by a legitimate Community Organization (CO)/Non-Government Organization (NGO) and/or the Local Government Unit (LGU), with a trained operator and a supervising pharmacist. The BnB outlet should be initially identified, evaluated and selected by the concerned Center for Health Development (CHD), approved by NDP-PMU 50 and specially licensed by the Bureau of Food and Drugs (BFAD) to sell, distribute and offer for sale and/or made available low-priced generic over-the-counter (OTC) drugs and selected prescription drugs listed in the Philippine National Drug Formulary (PNDF), Volume I, latest edition. The BnB project aims to promote equity in health by ensuring the availability and accessibility of affordable, safe and effective, quality, essential drugs to all, with priority for marginalized, underserved, critical and hard to reach areas. As of September 2009, there are a total of 14,504 existing BnBs nationwide. And the latest European Commission study done by Mr. Ed Vreeke, a consultant economist, findings showed that at least 85% of the BnBs remain functional which signifies its sustainability. These BnBs serve hundred thousands to millions of Filipinos, especially the poor and those living in far-flung conflict areas. There are anecdotal

reports of how BnBs have also helped augment meager income of communities, have assisted in the schooling of some of the operators’ families, and have made the health and lives better for many Barangay Health Workers (BHWs) and senior citizens who manage some of these BnBs. As quoted by one BHW, “this is one of those government Programs that has really been felt by the people all the way to the grassroots level.

C. DRUG CONSIGNMENT SYSTEM In order to enhance the physical and financial accessibility of essential drugs and medicines (EDM) commonly dispensed to the public as a commitment of our Government in the State of the Nation Address (SONA), the DOH has explored innovative ways to achieve that commitment. Among the courses of action that was projected as viable alternative in bringing into realization such commitment is the procurement of drugs through consignment method. The consignment strategy is provided under A.O. No. 5 s. 2003 amended to A.O. No. 2006-0039, also known as Guidelines and Procedure for the institutionalization of the Department of Health Drug Consignment System. Under the said A.O., DOH hospitals are allowed to enter into a Drug Consignment Agreement with legitimate manufacturers/suppliers which have the capability to meet the demands of the Hospital for essential drugs and medicine in a sustainable manner.

D. P100 PROJECT The P100 Project provides package of complete drug regimen worth 100 pesos or lower, available in DOH – retained hospitals and some LGU hospitals. Piloted in 2008, the P100 Project is continuously being expanded. The paramount goal of this project is to increase patients’ access to low-cost quality medicines, at the same time considering the importance on the promotion of its rational use. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines “rational drug use as patients receiving medications appropriate to their clinical needs, in doses that meet their own individual requirements, for an adequate period of time, and at the lowest cost to them and to their community,” (WHO, 1985). This Program aims to make the irrational (and expensive) behavior of buying medicines by the piece, a thing of the past. “U Complete Me”, the tagline to promote the P100, is the DOH battle cry to make medicines more affordable and its use more rational. The drug packages are prescribed, dispensed and sold at a price of 100 or less to the public. For antibiotics: only one (1) drug package should be prescribed and dispensed for a complete regimen. For chronic and maintenance treatment, a maximum of one (1) to one-and-a-half (1 ½) month supply shall be prescribed and dispensed. The prescribing physicians must state in the prescriptions the required dosage per day.

Hospitals must either be a DOH accredited hospital with functional Therapeutics Committee (TC) or LGU hospital accredited by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC) with functional TC. For sustainability, it is recommended that an approved Resolution/Ordinance by the Sangguniang Panlalawigan and the establishment of a Revolving Fund for drugs and medicines for all selected pilot LGU hospitals shall be in place to institute control measures in stock operations and resale.

E. GENERICS ADVOCACY A 1st Multi-stakeholders Summit on Generics was held last September 25-26, 2008 during the Generics month. This was also a part of the 20th Anniversary of the Generics Law of 1988. The event re-defines and expands the meaning of “Generics” to all, especially to health professionals and consumers/patient. Emphasis was made on the cGMP or current Good Manufacturing Practices, the quality standards imposed internationally by regulatory agencies to assure that companies adhere to the sanitation, infection control, human resource, essential equipments and other quality standards to make sure that drugs and medicines being manufactured are safe, effective and of good quality. On January 7, 2009, a Memorandum to all public health physicians was issued, directing health workers in the government and all employed by the government to use generic terminology in all transactions related to purchasing, prescribing, dispensing, reimbursing and administering of drugs and medicines.

F. electronic–ESSENTIAL DRUG PRICE MONITORING SYSTEM (e–EDPMS) The electronic-Essential Drug Price Monitoring System (e-EDPMS) software was developed to support the establishment of an efficient and effective system and procedure for collecting prices and inventories of essential drugs and considered as basic necessities, monitoring and tracking reports on prices and inventories of drugs. The primary end-objective of which is to lower down the prices of drugs. Current activities done by the DOH – Information Management Service (IMS), together with BFAD, as information and communication technologies support of the NDP-PMU 50 are completion of the drug code, development of implementation plan and policy guidelines, testing of software in pilot sites, Center for Health and Development (CHD) training of trainors, users orientation by the regions, et. al.

G. PHILIPPINE NATIONAL DRUG FORMULARY (PNDF), VOL I

The Philippine National Drug Formulary (PNDF) Vol. I, the Essential Drugs List (EDL) is an integral component of the National Drug Policy (NDP) aimed at making available and accessible, essential drugs of proven efficacy, safety and quality at affordable cost. Its formulation by the Department of Health through the National Drug Committee (NDC) now renamed as National Formulary Committee (NFC) is mandated by the R.A. 6675 otherwise known as the Generics Act of 1988. The PNDF is a major strategy in the promotion of rational drug use. It is formulated by utilizing submitted evidence-based documents and other documentations for a series of deliberation meetings with a panel of experts and resource persons consisting of representatives from medical schools, Philippine Medical Association (PMA), academic, specialty and sub-specialty societies, government and private hospitals, and other stakeholders. The PNDF is a very dynamic bet which is regularly reviewed and updated to make it fully relevant in meeting the health needs of the great majority of the population. In 1993, the PNDF was officially adopted as the basis for procurement of drug products by all government agencies and for reimbursements for drugs by the Philippine Health Insurance Corp. by virtue of Executive Order No. 49 of 1993 and the Philippine Health Insurance Act of 1995. The latest edition of the PNDF, 7th Edition, Volume I was initially posted in the DOH website (www.doh.gov.ph) in 2007. Administrative Order No. 2006 – 0018, dated May 8, 2006, was formulated in order to revise the inputs, processes, and outputs of the Philippine National Drug Formulary (PNDF), collectively referred to, thereafter as the Philippine National Drug Formulary System (PNDFS). This was intended to provide systems and procedure for the selection of drugs to be included in or deleted from the Essential Drugs List (EDL) that would be an essential part of the PNDF Manual. Moreover, PHIC intends to broaden its responsibilities in the implementation of the PNDF for the provision of the necessary administrative and secretariat functions of the Epidemiology and Pharmacology Committees of the Formulary Study Group (FSG).

H. VULNERABLE GROUPS The vulnerable groups of cancer children, mothers, and the elderly (senior citizens) have been identified and coordinated with concerned agencies for the procurement of medicines relative to the identified group. Statistical data from institutions were collected for identification of medicines to be included in the project. A Memorandum of Agreement among the DOH, PPI and the Cancer Warriors Foundation (CWF) was drafted for the implementation of the project for cancer children in identified hospitals, and the vaccines for elderly with the on-going study on medicines for mothers.

Program Executive Officer: Atty. Alexander A. Padilla Undersecretary for Health Regulations Program Manager: Dr. Robert Louie P. So Deputy Program Manager: Ms. Jesselle Anne M. Navarro Address: Department of Health, Bldg. 12, San Lazaro Compound, Rizal Avenue, Sta. Cruz, Manila Contact Nos.: Trunkline: 743-8301 local 1101 – 1103 Telefax: 749-8490 E-mail: [email protected]

NDP-PMU 50 IN RELATION TO THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNIT (LGU) 1. How does an LGU benefit from procuring NDP-PMU 50 drugs? 

Value for Money: Because of lower prices, LGUs can maximize their drug budgets.



Facilitated Procurement: Since this is a government initiative, LGUs can simply enter into a negotiated contract with PPI or enter into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with NDP-PMU 50.



Easy Payment Terms: PPI is prepared to extend credit within a reasonable time from the date of delivery.



Quality. As mentioned above, the PPI takes care that products (a) are sourced only from the reputable suppliers with the proper current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP)/World Health Organization (WHO) certification schemes, (b) undergo the standard laboratory testing process of the BFAD, (c) are registered with BFAD before delivery, (d) undergo laboratory testing prior to delivery.

2. Who are the key players in this Project and what are their roles? a. Department of Health (DOH)  Selects the essential medicines to be procured.  Ensures their quality through BFAD.  Promotes rational use of these drugs in order to preserve the savings and its effectiveness.  Serves the outlets for these drugs through government hospital pharmacies. b. Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)/ PPI  Facilitates importation of the medicines through PPI.



Delivers the medicines to all participating government hospital pharmacy.

c. Local Government Unit (LGU)  Sells quality and affordable drugs to the public through its hospital pharmacies. d. Botika ng Barangay (BnB) Outlet  Serves as outlets for affordable, quality OTC medicines and eight (8) prescription drugs serving far flung and underserved areas nationwide. e. DOH-Retained Hospital  Sells quality, affordable medicines for the patients.

3. Who can participate? 

Initially, only public health facilities can distribute these drugs. Centers for Health Development (CHD), DOH hospitals, provincial district, other LGU hospitals and BnB outlets, can participate.



For the P100 Project, participating hospitals must either be a DOH accredited hospital with functional TC or LGU hospital accredited by the PHIC as secondary level with functional TC. For sustainability, it is recommended that an approved Resolution/Ordinance by the Sangguniang Panlalawigan and the establishment of a Revolving Fund for drugs and medicines for all selected pilot LGU shall be in place to institute control measures in stock operations and resale.



LGUs are encouraged to participate in this project. In the province of Capiz, many patients have benefited and incomes of hospitals have increased because of pharmacy sales. Private drugstores are coordinating with the DOH as possible distribution sites.

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (DOST) The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) is the premiere science and technology body in the country mandated to provide central direction, leadership and coordination of all scientific and technological activities, ensure that results are geared and utilized in areas of maximum economic and social benefits for the people, and formulate policies, programs and projects to support national development. DOST envisions a competent and competitive science and technology community with a social conscience. Guided by the principles of competence, competitiveness, and conscience, the DOST pursues six priority flagship programs, namely:      

Establishment of a Packaging R&D Center Expansion of Regional Metrology Centers Comprehensive Program to Enhance Technology Enterprises Integrated Program on Cleaner Production Technologies Science & Technology Intervention Program for the Poor, Vulnerable and Disabled Comprehensive Science & Technology Program for Mindanao

DOST performs functions to produce programs and projects related to science and technology. The functions include the following:          

Formulate and adopt a comprehensive National Science and Technology Plan, and monitor and coordinate its funding and implementation Promote, assist and, where appropriate, undertake scientific and technological research and development in areas identified as vital to the country's development Promote the development of indigenous technology and the adaptation and innovation of suitable imported technology, and in this regard, undertake technology development up to commercial stage Undertake design and engineering works to complement research and development functions Promote, assist and, where appropriate, undertake the transfer of the results of scientific and technological research and development to their end-users Promote, assist and, where appropriate, undertake the technological services needed by agriculture, industry, transport, and the general public Develop and maintain an information system and databank on science and technology Develop and implement programs for strengthening scientific and technological capabilities through manpower training, infrastructure and institution-building Promote public consciousness in science and technology Undertake policy research, technology assessment, feasibility and technical studies.

LGUs or their constituents can access a number of these programs and products. The next pages feature some of the programs and projects relevant to LGUs. CONTACT DETAILS: The SECRETARY DOST Central Office DOST Bldg. Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan Taguig, Metro Manila Tel: (02) 837-2071 to 82 Fax: (02) 837-8937 E-mail: [email protected] www.dost.gov.ph

DOST-ACADEME TECHNOLOGY-BASED ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT (DATBED) PROGRAM The DOST-Academe Technology-Based Enterprise Development (DATBED) Program aims to develop entrepreneurial competencies of students and young professionals including out-ofschool youths (OSYs) in selected academic institutions and non-governmental organizations; stimulates the development of entrepreneurial curriculum of schools; and creates incomegenerating projects for the participating institutions. The Program will function as a feeder program under DOST’s SET-UP in accelerating the establishment of small-scale technologybased enterprise in the countryside.

The financial assistance covers mainly cost of start-up projects of student-entrepreneurs, young professional and OSYs. In order to avail the assistance, the following eligibility/requirements should be met: Academic Institution 1. Preferably located or providing services to a depressed province 2. Offers tertiary science and technology courses and entrepreneurship development program 3. Has a student-faculty ration of at most 25:1 in the S&T courses and entrepreneurship development program 4. Existing facilities/resources available for use of the proposed technology-based projects Non-Government Organizations 1. 2. 3. 4.

Existing/completed youth development programs/activities Approved board resolution indicating interest to be accredited under the Program Availability of a core team of advisers/experts and program management support Registered at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) or Cooperative Development Authority (CDA)

The academic institution/NGO must submit letter of request to TAPI including the following requirements to avail this assistance: 1. Endorsement letter from DOST Regional Office 2. Comprehensive implementing plan for SETUP-DATBED Program to include the following: a. Project management plan b. Organization of core team of advisers c. Fund management plan d. Repayment scheme of recipients e. Selection of scheme for recipients f. Project monitoring scheme g. Loan administration and profit sharing mechanism

3. Submission of project proposal/s including business plan/feasibility study upon accreditation CONTACT DETAILS: ARMAN P. BIONAT Program Manager, DATBED, Investment Business and Operations Division Technology Application and Promotion Institute DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Avenue, Bicutan, Taguig City Tel: (02) 837-2071 to 82 loc. 2165; 8376186

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT (DSWD) Under the Local Government Code of 1991, some of functions, services and programs of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) were devolved to LGUs. With the issuance of Executive Order No. 15: Redirecting the Functions and Operations of the Department of Social Welfare and Development, DSWD is mandated to assist LGUs, NGOs, NGAs, POs and CSOs in effectively implementing programs and projects and delivering services that will eradicate poverty and empower the disadvantaged individuals, families and communities Vision "A society where the poor, vulnerable and disadvantaged individuals, families and communities are empowered for an improved quality of life.” Mission "To provide social protection and promote the rights and welfare of the poor, vulnerable and the disadvantaged individual, family and community to contribute to poverty alleviation and empowerment through SWD policies, programs, projects and services implemented with or through LGUs, NGOs, POs, GOs and other members of civil society." Programs and Projects Some of the programs and projects of DSWD are the following:    

Capacity building or technical assistance Disaster management Crisis intervention ODA-funded projects

These programs and projects benefit LGUs and their constituents. Details about these programs and projects are presented in the next pages. CONTACT DETAILS: The SECRETARY DSWD Bldg., Constitution Hills, Batasan Complex, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-7916; 931-8068 local 108 & 109 Fax: (02) 931-8191 www.dswd.gov.ph

PANTAWID PAMILYANG PILIPINO PROGRAM (4P’s) Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4P’s) was launched in September 2007 as a poverty reduction strategy of the national government that provides cash grant to extremely poor households to allow them to meet certain human development goals in exchange of compliance to core responsibilities. It invests on human capital, primarily focusing on the improvement of health, nutrition and education particularly of the growing members of the family, children aged 0-14. The program is currently providing cash assistance to about 700,000 poorest households in 45 provinces, 255 municipalities, 15 cities nationwide. 4Ps goal is primarily to break the inter-generational cycle of poverty among poor through the promotion of human capital accumulation among young children and to ensure that the program objectives are met. 4Ps beneficiaries are expected to comply with several conditionalities such as: 1. Pregnant women must avail pre-natal and post natal care and be attended during childbirth by a skilled/trained health professional; 2. Parents must attend responsible parenthood sessions, mother classes and parent effectiveness seminars 3. 0-5 year old children must receive regular preventive health check-ups and vaccines 4. 3-5 year old children must attend day care pre-school classes at least 85% of the time 5. 6-14 year old children enrolled in elementary and high school must attend at least 85% of the time 6. 6-14 year old must receive deworming pills twice a week The selection of eligible households is done using a Proxy-Means Tests that determines the socio-economic category of the families by looking at certain proxy variable such as ownership of assets, type of housing, education of the household head, livelihood of the family and access to water and sanitation facilities. 4Ps beneficiaries are extended 6,000 a year of P500 per month per household for health and nutrition expenses; and P3,000 for one school year or 10 months or P300/month per child. A maximum of three children per household is allowed. The monthly cash grants is received through a Land Bank cash card in the respective area of the 4Ps beneficiaries.

CONTACT DETAILS: Undersecretary LUWALHATI F. PABLO National Program Director

Director Margarita V. Sampang

3rd flor, DSWD New Building, Constitution Hills Batasan Complex, Quezon City

4th floor, DSWD Old Building, Constitution Hills Batasan Complex, Quezon city

Program Manager

Tel: (02) 931-8138; 951-7121; 931-8101 Tel: (02) 9516827 locals 315-316 Fax: (02) 931-8138 Fax: (02) 9516827

CONTACT INFORMATION OF FIELD OFFICES: Leonardo C. Reynoso Regional Director, Field Office I Quezon Avenue, San Fernando, La Union Tel: (072) 888-2184; 888-6196; 888-2184 Fax: (072) 888-2184 [email protected]

Remia T. Tapispisan Regional Director, Field Office V Buragwis, Legaspi City Tel: (052) 480-5754; 820-4637; 820-6198 Fax: (052) 480-57-74 [email protected]

Arnel B. Garcia Regional Director, Field Office II Magallanes St., Carig, Tuguegarao, Cagayan Tel: (078) 846-7043; 846-7532 Fax: (078) 846-7043 [email protected]

Teresita S. Rosales Regional Director, Field Office VI Molo St., Iloilo City Tel: (033) 508-6775; 508-6867; 336-5428 Fax: (033) 337-6212 [email protected]

Minda B. Brigoli Regional Director, Field Office III San Fernando City, Pampanga Tel: (045) 61-2143; 246-7021; 860-5631 Fax: (045) 961-2143 [email protected] fo3dswd.gov.ph

Evelyn B. Macapobre Regional Director, Field Office VII Cuenco St. cor Maxilom Ave., Cebu City Tel: (032) 231-2172; 232-1192 Fax: (032) 231-2172 [email protected]

Honorito B. Bayudan Regional Director, Field Office IV-A CALBARZON Alabang Zapote Road, Muntinglupa City Tel: (02)807-1518; 807-4140; 807-4142

Leticia T. Corillo Regional Director, Field Office VIII Magsaysay Ave., Tacloban City Tel: (053) 321-1007; 321-2040; 772-2080

Fax: (02) 807-1518; 807-4140 [email protected]

Fax: (053) 321-1007 fo8dswd.gov.ph

Violeta A. Cruz Teodoro R. Romo, Jr. Regional Director, Field Office IV-B Regional Director, Field Office IX MIMAROPA Malate, Manila Gen. Alvarez St., Zamboanga City Tel: (02)524-2742; 523-5873 Tel: (062) 991-6030; 991-0652; 991-1001 Fax: (02) 991-6030; 991-0652 Fax: (02) 524-2742 [email protected] [email protected] Atty. Araceli F. Solamillo Porfiria M. Bernardez Regional Director, Field Office X Regional Director, Field Office CAR Km. 5 Upper Canitaan, Cagayan de Oro #40 North Drive, Baguio City City Tel:(088) 858-89-59/858-81-34 Tel:(074) 442-79-17/446-59-61/304-39-40 Fax: 858-89-59 Fax: 442-79-17 [email protected]; [email protected] [email protected] Ester A. Verzosa Regional Director, Field Office XI Suazo cor Magsaysay Avenue, Davao City Tel:(082)226-28-57/227-19-64/227-14-35 Fax: 226-28-57/227-19-64 [email protected] Zorahayda T. Taha Regional Director, Field Office XII So. Cotabato Gymnasium Cultural Center Aluna Avenue, Koronadal City Tel: (083) 228-31-80/228-86-37/228-3181 Fax: 228-31-80/228-86-37 [email protected] com

Mercedita P. Jabagat Regional Director, Field Office Caraga Pili Drive Extension, Butuan City Tel:(085) 815-91-73/342-65-19 227-19-64 Fax: 815-91-73 [email protected] Thelsa P. Biolena Regional Director, Field Office NCR Tel: (02) 313-14-32/734-86-39/931-80-68 Fax: 313-14-32/734-86-39 [email protected]

KAPIT-BISIG LABAN SA KAHIRAPAN-COMPREHENSIVE AND INTEGRATED DELIVERY OF SOCIAL SERVICES: KAPANGYARIHAN AT KAUNLARAN SA BARANGAY (KALAHI-CIDSS: KKB) – A POVERTY ALLEVIATION STRATEGY KALAHI-CIDSS is a flagship poverty alleviation project of the Philippines. It is a community-driven development (CDD) project which particularly aims to reduce poverty and vulnerabilities to poverty, by addressing negative conditions related to: (i) lack of capacity and resources at the local level and (ii) limited responsiveness of local governance to community-determined development priorities. The KALAHI-CIDSS project purpose is “empowerment of local communities through improved participation in local governance and involvement in the design and implementation of poverty reduction projects.” Launched in 2003, the project covers 25% of the poorest municipalities in the poorest 42 (out of 81) provinces of the Philippines reaching about 1.1 million households (or about 25% of the total poor families). By 2006, the project has attained full scale implementation, covering 12 regions, 42 provinces, 184 municipalities and 4,229 barangays. Through the project, communities were able to participate in identifying, prioritizing, and planning community development interventions, implement community projects and practice transparency and accountability in resource allocation and implementation of sub-projects. Goals and Objectives Empowered Communities. The poorest barangays are given access to and control of key development decisions and resources through a guided process of community mobilization. Improved Local Governance. KALAHI-CIDSS ensures that transparency, accountability, and community participation are institutionalized in the barangay and municipal government. Reduced Poverty. Funding of barangay-level infrastructure and common service facility projects improve access to basic services and increases productivity. Key Features of the Project  

Community-led analysis of local poverty conditions and identification of key development challenges (Participatory Situational Analysis); Community-based project identification (open menu), design, and implementation;

     

Participatory, collective, and criteria-based project prioritization and approval process through Inter-Village Forums; Direct fund release to KALAHI-CIDSS community bank account; Community-led implementation of projects and management of development funds; Multi-level monitoring and evaluation mechanisms; Promotion of Transparency and Accountability through the Grievance Redress System (GRS); and Investment on community capability-building

Covered LGUs KALAHI-CIDSS targets the poorest communities in the country through a stratified selection process. 

Provinces. The project first identified the 42 poorest provinces based on the National Statistics Coordination Board’s survey.



Municipalities. All municipalities under the identified provinces were ranked using the following indicators: quality of human capital, housing and amenities, and access to centers and trade. The 184 or top one-fourth poorest municipalities were identified as Project areas.



Barangays. All of 4,299 barangays of the identified municipalities are covered by KALAHI-CIDSS.

The Project supports community sub-projects through fund releases direct to community project accounts, which are maintained by community volunteers. Funded community projects are distributed among the five major sub-projects types. 

Basic social services sub-projects: community water systems, school buildings, day care centers, barangay health stations, electrification, and tribal housing/shelter



Basic access infrastructure: access roads, small bridges/footbridges and access trails



Community production, economic support and common services facilities: community economic enterprise training, equipment and materials support subprojects, pre- and post harvest and multi purpose facilities, small scale irrigation and community transport



Environmental protection and conservation: drainage, river/flood control, sea wall, soil protection (rip rap), artificial coral reef sanctuary and sanitation facilities



Skills training and capability building sub-projects and others like light house/eco-tourism sub projects

Role of LGUs     

Project monitoring; Problem solving at regular inter-barangay assembly meetings with beneficiary communities Provision of technical services; Support for community investments through complementary municipal development planning; and Auditing and accounting reports

CONTACT DETAILS: Undersecretary LUWALHATI F. PABLO National Program Director

Director Camilo G. Gudmalin National Project Manager

3rd flor, DSWD New Building, Constitution Hills Batasan Complex, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-8138; 951-7121; 931-8101 locals Tel: (02) 952-0697 315-316 Fax: (02) 931-8138 Fax: (02) 931-6114 Email: [email protected] Email:[email protected] CONTACT INFORMATION OF FIELD OFFICES (see Services for Communities and Families)

TINDAHAN NATIN PROJECT The Tindahan Natin Project, which started in 2006, is the national government initiative for food security, job generation and livelihood. The project provides low-priced but good quality rice at P18/kg and noodles to low income families through a store jointly identified and endorsed by the DSWD and Local Government Units (LGUs), the Barangay Council and subsequently accredited by the NFA. It is operated by the DSWD SEA-K beneficiaries, Barangay Councils, community-based organizations, non government organizations (NGOs), existing retail/sari sari storeowners and merchants. Objectives 

To ensure that poor families below the food threshold get access to low priced basic food items specifically rice and noodles



To create livelihood and job opportunities for the community



To ensure availability/supply of rice in the community at any given time

Target Areas Tindahan Natin operates in Metro Manila and the 54 food poor provinces identified by the National Nutrition Council with high hunger and poverty incidence statistics classified as Priority 1, 2 and 3 and in other areas not included in the 54 but are classified as poverty stricken. Target Beneficiaries  

The marginalized and poor sector whose income is below the food threshold as the direct beneficiaries and The Tindahan Natin Operators as livelihood participants who earns additional income.

CONTACT DETAILS: Assistant Secretary Vilma B. Cabrera Head, Program Management Bureau DSWD Bldg., Constitution Hills Tel: 951738; 9318101 loc 408/407 Fax: 9512801

INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL WELFARE SERVICES FOR FILIPINO NATIONALS This project institutionalized a system of providing social welfare services to overseas Filipino workers through the deployment of social workers. It aims to institutionalize the establishment of social welfare desks at diplomatic posts where there are large concentrations at overseas Filipinos. It also established a network of welfare agencies and service providers for OFWs giving technical assistance along social welfare to GOs and NGOs concerned with the welfare of the OFWs. There are two schemes of deployment: 

Social Welfare Attaché. A social welfare attaché is currently in Malaysia to assist in handling the concerns of overseas Filipino workers. Two social welfare attachés will also be deployed in Jordan and Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.



Secondment to International Social Services of Japan (ISSJ). A social worker is deployed in Japan as secondment as the ISSJ to provide services on international adoption, repatriation of children of undocumented Filipinos and counseling on inter-racial marriages.

CONTACT DETAILS: Undersecretary Alicia R. Bala Policy and Program Group 3rd floor, DSWD New Building, Constitution Hills Batasan Complex, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-9131 Fax: (02) 951-2239 Email: [email protected]

SELF EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE KAUNLARAN (SEA-K) PROGRAM Level I - Micro-Enterprise The Self-Employment Assistance - Kaunlaran program is the DSWD’s comprehensive approach to and investment in social capital towards poverty alleviation. SEA-K, as the project is known, aims to provide the poor and disadvantaged sector of the society with timely access to credit and development opportunities. SEA Kaunlaran Associations (SKAs) are organized and assisted to establish communitybased, self-managed credit facilities and access community social services. Each association, which is composed of an average of 25 members, are provided technical assistance and an average seed capital of P150,000.00 for capital of micro-enterprises of members at P4,000.00 to P5,000.00 each. Starting with a revolving fund of P 65 million in 1993, the SEA Project has provided technical and capital assistance to 21,715 successful SKAs all over the country with 345,057 members-families engaged in various micro- enterprises involving a total investment of P1,529,845,127.00 Level II - Expansion of Micro-Enterprise and Shelter Construction or Home Improvement Level II is an expansion of Level I where seed capital has been expanded to cover shelter needs of members in addition to micro- enterprise. Successful 2-5 SKAs are transformed into genuine grassroots NGOs known as Kabayans (Kabuhayan and KabahayanLivelihood and Shelter and are then provided with seed capital for expansion of microenterprise projects of member-families at P10,000.00 and shelter construction/home improvement at P25,000.00 each. The SEA-K Project undertakes social preparation and provides capability building and technical and financial assistance to individuals who are interested to become members of an SKA in their respective communities. It is optimistic that as the members’ economic activities grow and the SEA-KABAYANs’ financial capabilities improve, they will be able to leverage other resources from both formal and informal sector. CONTACT DETAILS: Vilma B. Cabrera Director Self-Employment Assistance-Kaunlaran Project Department of Social Welfare and Development 3rd Floor DSWD Building, Batasan Complex, Quezon City

Tel: (02) 951 7438; 951 2801; 931 8101 loc 102 Fax: (02) 932-25-73 Email: [email protected] SEA-K PILOT PROJECTS I.

Therapy Center for Abused and Exploited Children

This is a physical structure in a residential or community-based facility that provides rehabilitation services to abused and exploited children ages 7-17 years old through therapeutic activities. It is equipped with a one-way mirror, audio-video camera recorder system and therapeutic materials appropriate for children. II.

National Family Violence Prevention Program

This is a community-based strategy. It intends to prepare family members to protect themselves against violence and to manage conflict resolution within the context of family resolution. It mobilizes community and inter-agency groups/structures and consolidates efforts in support of families-at-risk or exposed to family violence. III.

Night Care for Children of Working Mother

This involves the provision of temporary substitute custodial care to young children while their mothers are working on night shift. Currently, the project is being pilot-tested in Taytay, Rizal (Region IV). The center also serves as a temporary shelter to working mothers to stay with their children after work until it is safe enough to go back to their own homes. Strong coordination/partnership between DSWD, LGU of Taytay and the industries is a contributing factor in the success of the implementation. IV.

Street Children Village

This is a residential care facility that provides 24-hour residential group care on a temporary basis. The support is directed to street children ages 8-17 years old whose needs cannot, at the time, be adequately met by their biological parents and extended family. The identified sites are in Alabang, Muntinlupa (NCR); Mambusao, Capiz (Region VI); Iligan City (Region XII); and, Surigao City (CARAGA). This project is being worked out for funding by JICA. V.

Foster Care Program for Children with Special Needs

This involves the development of foster families to provide planned alternative parental care to children with special needs. These include children who are sexually and physically abused, street children, youth offenders, and children with parent's suffering from HIV/AIDS. It was implemented in NCR where a greater number of child caring agencies have foster care program. Key partners in the implementation of the program are

DSWD-NCR, Kaisahang Buhay Foundation, NORFIL Parenting Foundation, Concordia Children’s Services, CRIBS, and the Home of Joy. VI.

Integrated Day Services for Senior Citizens and Children

This project aims to demonstrate the integrated delivery of social services vis-à-vis day care for children, child-minding service, day care service for autistic children, day care services for senior citizens, supplemental feeding and psychosocial intervention to senior citizens, children and other needy individuals and groups. VII.

Tuloy Aral Walang Sagabal (TAWAG)

This project aims to provide continuing service to children and out-of-school youth with disabilities identified in the Early Detection, Prevention and Intervention of Disabilities Among 0-6 Years Children (EDPID) and Self-Help components of Social Mobilization Project (SOCMOB). Members of the families are actively involved and participate in the rehabilitation process. The needed rehabilitation services enhance the physical, social, mental and psychological functioning of the children preparatory to their integration into day care services and regular/special school and/or into the community life. VIII.

Home Aide Service

This is a special project for disadvantaged women to enable them to acquire knowledge and skills along home management, care giving of children and elderly, protective behavior and communication/negotiation. IX.

Social Integration for Indigenous Groups (SINING)

SINING is a program for the total development of indigenous peoples/indigenous cultural communities utilizing ethnic values, system, and institutions for project management. It is being pilot-tested in the Bugau community of Malamawi Island, Isabela, Basilan. Support services extended are Self-Employment Assistance - Kaunlaran livelihood project and Supplemental Feeding. X.

Early Childhood Development Project

DSWD CRISIS INTERVENTION UNIT What is it all about? The Crisis Intervention Unit is a special unit operating on a 24-hour basis, which serves as a receiving and action center for walk-in, referred, and rescued individuals and families in crisis situations. It serves as a venue in providing integrated services that include protection and provision of immediate psychosocial services. It also provides accommodation or temporary shelter for a limited period of time. Where is it located? The unit is headed by a Head Social Worker and is manned with three to six social workers that are trained in counseling and take turns in rendering duty on a three shift. Also, it has a driver and a clerk. In the highly urbanized areas like NCR and Field Offices IV, VII and XI, more personnel are being deployed, as there are volumes of clients seeking help and have a higher incidence of emergencies. Also, an extension office was created at the DSWD Central Office to cater to the needs of referrals from media, Senators and Congressmen. Technical Assistance to LGUs, NGOs and POs Including Disaster Response Augmentation Although LGUs have the primary responsibility to assist victims of man-made or natural calamities, LGUs can ask for relief assistance from DSWD in the form of food commodities, used clothing, tarpaulins and other items needed by the victims. LGUs can send their letter of request to the DSWD regional office. A social worker will determine the validity of the request and make the necessary recommendation to the head of the DSWD regional office. DSWD also provides a monitoring and quick feedback mechanism in times of disaster through its Disaster Response Operations Monitoring and Information Center (DROMIC). DROMIC serves as a focal point in carrying out activities for quick and efficient generation of data from the local levels and other sources to support decisionmaking for timely and appropriate response. DROMIC Functions 

Maintains communication network with the 15 DSWD Field Office DROMIC and LGU implementers. Operates 24 hours daily including Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays.



Receives regular updates from the warning agencies such as Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHILVOCS) and Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Service Administration (PAGASA) and alert regions that may be affected by oncoming disasters.



Maintains a data bank of disaster incidents and related information nationwide. Sends regular updates on disaster situation (QUICK FACTS) to the Office of the President (OP), National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC), other government officials, NGOs and media.



Packages and reports disaster information received within 24 hours especially during major disaster events. Operates the Disaster Welfare Inquiry Desk during global crises where Filipinos are involved as in Gulf Crisis.

DROMIC Data To effectively assess disaster situations and come up with appropriate response, DROMIC gathers data on:           

Type of Disaster Date of Occurrence Affected Areas Affected Population (families and persons) Evacuation Centers Damaged Houses (totally and partially) Casualties (dead, injured and missing) Assistance Extended Number Served Issues and Concerns in the Operation Situationer

CONTACT DETAILS: Vilma B. Cabrera Director DROMIC UNIT – Contact Numbers (24 Hours) Department of Social Welfare and Development 3rd Floor DSWD Building Batasan Complex, Quezon City Tel: (02) 951- 7119 Fax: (02) 951- 7435 Email: [email protected]

RECENTLY CONCLUDED PROGRAMS/PROJECTS RELATED TO SOCIAL SERVICE:

1. Developing Systems, Tools and Capacities to Improve Recovery and Reintegration Services to Victims of Trafficking Funding Agency: International Labor Organization (ILO) Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: August 2007 to March 31, 2009 Beneficiaries: Trafficked persons particularly women and children and service providers dealing with trafficked persons Target Program Location: I, III, IV-A, IX and NCR Program Description: The project is an endeavor to create a mechanism that would facilitate the provision of assistance to victims of human trafficking who are returning from abroad. It addresses the problems of lacks of systematic documentation of trafficked victims, absence of an effective referral system, and inadequate competencies of service providers in providing recovery ad reintegration services for the trafficked persons.

2. Japan Social Development Fund-Social Inclusion Project (JSDF-SIP) Funding Agency: World Bank Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: April 29, 2005 to December 31, 2008 Beneficiaries: All communities/barangays of 35 covered municipalities Target Program Location: Regions CAR, IV-A, IV-B, V, VI, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII and CARAGA Program Description: The JSDF-SIP is a three-year complementary grant to the World Bank-funded Kapit Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan – Comprehensive Integrated Delivery of Social Services: Kapangyarihan at Kaularan sa Barangay (KALAHICIDSS:KBB), the flagship anti-poverty program of the Philippine government implemented by the DSWD. The project is based on the reality that poverty is not only a result of economic deprivation but is also a systematic problem of social inclusion. As a component of KALAHI-CIDSS:KBB, JSDF-SIP believes that strengthening and widening social capital to provide support systems to impoverished communities would significantly improve their capacity to address poverty.

3. Maintreaming Program for Badjao Families: A Resettlement Village Project (Expansion of Project Hope for Badjao Families) Funding Agency: New Zealand Agency for International Development

Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: January 2, 2005 to May 31, 2008 Beneficiaries: Eighty (80) Bajao families Target Program Location: Region IX, Province of Zamboanga Program Description: The project is designed to prevent the migration of Bajao families to Metro Manila and other urban center. The project quadruple – framed process responds to the tribe’s expressed need for a culturally sensitive community. By and large, will minimize mendicancy and homeless, as they gain access to basic social services, while increasing their capabilities that uplift their self image enabling them to be self-reliant.

4. Development of Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) Web-Based Monitoring System Funding Agency: United Nations Children’s Fund Lead Implementing/Executing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: June 30, 2008 to February 2009 Beneficiaries: The ECCD Web-Based Monitoring System will effectively respond to the need for complete and reliable data and information on Day Care Centers, other ECCD Center, Service Providers and the profile of children served. These data and information would specifically be useful to decision makers at different levels for effective program management and improvement of service delivery. The proposed system will also ensure the efficient generation of the data and the information on ECCD program implementation. Target Program Location: DSWD National Program Description: The project aims to establish a web-based monitoring system that would gather comprehensive data and information on Day Care Centers, other ECCD Centers, Service Providers and the profile of children served for effective program monitoring and evaluation. Specifically, the project aims to generate the profile and status of Day Care Centers, other ECCD Centers, Service Providers and the profile of children served. The proposed system will also put into reality the strategic support services that would maximize the use of information and communications technology to further improve service delivery. The main components of the project follows the existing software development cycle embodied in the DSWD Memorandum Circular No. 01, series of 2005: Information System Development Guidelines.

5. National Sector Support for Social Welfare and Development Reforms (NSSSWDR) Project

Funding Agency: World Bank Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: June 16, 2006 to September 30, 2008 Beneficiaries: Poor people especially children and women Program Description: The DSWD sought the assistance of the World Bank through the project entitled “National Sector Support for Social Welfare and Development Reform (NSS-SWDR)” under the funding assistance of the PHRD Grant to support efforts to undertake institutional reforms to make it better fit to lead and steer implementation of social sector programs. The NSS-SWDR is an 18-month project which is intended to contribute to better quality of life, reduced vulnerabilities and improved social welfare and development conditions.

ON-GOING PROGRAMS/PROJECTS RELATED TO SOCIAL SERVICE:

1. Strengthening Government Mechanisms in Mainstreaming Gender in the Reproductive Health, Population and Anti-VAW Programs Funding Agency: United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: May 2005 to 2011 Beneficiaries: All women victims-survivors of gender-based violence regardless of economic or social standing Target Program Location: III, V, VII, VIII, CAR and ARMM Program Description: The project is a part of the Gender Component of the UNFPA 6th Country Programme under the leadership of the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women. The outcome that the Department wishes to accomplish is congruent with the outcomes that the UN Development Assistance Fund wish to accomplish, which is the attainment of good government reforms and practices that are institutionalized by the government, local government units, civil society organizations and private sector all levels with a view toward reducing poverty, protecting rights and promoting sustainable development. Specifically, the project wants to create an enhanced enabling environment to promote and protect rights of women and girls and to advance gender equity and equality. CONTACT DETAILS Atty. Dulfie Tobias-Shalim Director IV, Social Technology Bureau DSWD, Batasan Complex, Constitution Hills, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-8101 local 326, 325, 327 Fax: (02) 951-2802 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.dswd.gov.ph

2. Care and Support Services for People Living with HIV AIDS (PLWHAS), their Families and Children Funding Agency: UNDP Funds Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: January 2007 to 2011 Beneficiaries: PLWHAS and their families Target Program Location: III and NCR Program Description: The project is a community-based intervention for the prevention and management of the risk related problems of the HIV intervention. It is geared towards the education and capability of the service providers and the community leaders/volunteers and the public in general in limiting the impact of HIV and AIDS. It also includes the provision of support services to PLWHAs and the affected families/children. CONTACT DETAILS Atty. Dulfie Tobias-Shalim Director IV, Social Technology Bureau DSWD, Batasan Complex, Constitution Hills, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-8101 local 326, 325, 327 Fax: (02) 951-2802 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.dswd.gov.ph

3. Comprehensive Pilot Intervention Plan Against Gender Violence in CARAGA (CoPiPAGV 13) Funding Agency: Agencia Española Cooperacion Internacional (AECID) Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: March 2008 – March 2011 Beneficiaries: Women, girls and adolescents who are survivors of maltreatment, victims of sexual abuse, and trafficked for the purposes of sexual and/or labor exploitation Target Program Location: CARAGA Program Description: CoPiPAGV 13 is the Philippine and Spanish Government’s attempt towards addressing issues concerning gender violence through an adoption of a strategic and comprehensive approach in executing a comprehensive work which will consider all the key intervention points when fighting against VAW. CONTACT DETAILS Atty. Dulfie Tobias-Shalim Director IV, Social Technology Bureau DSWD, Batasan Complex, Constitution Hills, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-8101 local 326, 325, 327 Fax: (02) 951-2802 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.dswd.gov.ph

4. Emergency Operations Philippines-Assistance to Conflict Affected Mindanao (EMOP-ACAM) Project Funding Agency: United Nations World Food Programme Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Beneficiaries: Vulnerable population living in conflict-affected areas in Mindanao Target Program Location: Lanao del Norte in Region X, North Cotabato and Sultan Kudarat in Region XII and Lanao del Sur and Maguindanao in ARMM Program Description: Food communities are given to beneficiaries per component, as follows: 

Food for Education - For elementary school children who complete 80% of attendance, a monthly 12.5 kg of rice is given as a take home ration. These elementary school children, as well as day care center pupils, also benefit from on-site feeding. On-site feeding meals are cooked from rations of corn soya blend (CSB), oil and sugar.



Mother and Child Health - Pregnant and lactating women who get to receive a monthly allocation of 7.5 kg of CSB, 0.75 kg of oil and 0.6 kg of sugar, and children below two years old are given 6 kg of CSB, 0.6 kg of oil and 0.45 kg of sugar per month. The beneficiaries of the Mother and Child Health component have to complete the monthly medical services at the rural center units.



Food for Work - For Food for Work and Food for Training, beneficiaries are allocated 50 kg of rice and 5 kg of beans on output system.



Food for Internally Disabled Persons (IDPs)/Emergency Relief Distribution Emergency relief distributions for IDPS, ration 10 kg of rice and 1 kg of beans are distributed. This same allocation is given to IDPs as a take home ration when they go back to their home

5. Supplemental Feeding (SF) Program For Malnourished Children Funding Agency: Kabisig ng Kalahi, Mead Johnson Nutrition Lead Implementing/Executing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: August 2001 to July 2010 Beneficiaries: Children Target Program Location: Nationwide Program Description: This is a multi-partnership that targets the problem of malnutrition during the early years of child development. CONTACT DETAILS of PROGRAM and IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS DSWD Program Team

Asec. Vilma B. Cabrera Program Manager 4/F DSWD Building, IBP Road, Batasang Pambansa Complex, Constitution Hills, Quezon City Telefax: (02) 951-2801 Email: [email protected]

Kabisig ng Kalahi

Ms. Victoria V. Weineke Add: 40 Polaris Condominium, Makati City Telefax: (02) 895-6998 Email: [email protected]

Mead Johnson Nutrition

Ms. Mila Lloren Director, Corporate Affairs Add: 2306 Don Chino Roces Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 841-8181 local 8169 Fax: (02) 8418103 Email: [email protected]

6. Share Your Extras Funding and Lead Implementing Agency: SM Foundation, Inc. (SMFI) Program Duration: 1999-present Beneficiaries: Children Target Program Location: Regions I, III, IV-A, VI, VII, X, XI, CAR and NCR Program Description: One of the annual mall-based outreach projects of SMFI in partnership with DSWD. This project aims to foster the value of generosity and sharing among SM mall shoppers, tenants and concerned citizens through the donation of items. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Connie Angeles Executive Director SM Corporate Offices, Building B, 2000 Bay City, Pasay City Tel: (02) 833-1698 Fax: (02) 831-8282 Email: [email protected] www.sm-foundation.org

7. Donate-A-Book Funding Agency: SM Foundation, Inc. (SMFI) and Bato Balani Foundation Lead Implementing/Executing Agency: SMFI Program Duration: 1998-present Beneficiaries: Children Target Program Location: Regions I, III, IV-A, VI, VII, X, XI, CAR and NCR Program Description: One of the annual mall-based outreach projects of SMFI in partnership with DSWD. This project aims to encourage book donations from shoppers, tenants, private schools and publishing companies for distribution to government schools and community. IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS and CONTACT DETAILS SM Foundation, Inc. (SMFI)

Ms. Connie Angeles Executive Director SM Corporate Offices, Building B, 2000 Bay City, Pasay City Tel: (02) 833-1698 Fax: (02) 831-8282 Email: [email protected] www.sm-foundation.org

Bato Balani Foundation

Ms. Lorna L. Belen President Add: 6 PDCP Bank Center, V.A. Rufino corner L.P. Leviste Streets, Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 892-5462 Fax: (02) 892-6464 Email: [email protected] www.batobalanifoundation.org.ph

8. Gamot Para sa Kapwa Funding and Lead Implementing Agency: SM Foundation, Inc. (SMFI) Program Duration: 1997 to present Beneficiaries: Communities Target Program Location: Regions I, III, IV-A, VI, VII, X, XI, CAR and NCR Program Description: One of the annual mall-based outreach projects of SMFI in partnership with DSWD. This project is SMFI’s medicine drive. It aims to solicit unopened/unexpired medicines from shoppers and pharmaceutical companies that will benefit the indigent communities. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Connie Angeles Executive Director SM Corporate Offices, Building B, 2000 Bay City, Pasay City Tel: (02) 833-1698 Fax: (02) 831-8282 Email: [email protected] www.sm-foundation.org 9. Make a Child Happy Share-A-Toy Funding and Lead Implementing Agency: SM Foundation, Inc. (SMFI) Program Duration: 1998 to present Beneficiaries: Children Target Program Location: Nationwide Program Description: An annual Christmas treat for children. This project aims to make Christmas celebration more meaningful for disadvantaged children in the residential care and other accredited facilities. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Connie Angeles Executive Director SM Corporate Offices, Building B, 2000 Bay City, Pasay City Tel: (02) 833-1698 Fax: (02) 831-8282 Email: [email protected] www.sm-foundation.org

10. DSWD Tie-Up Project with Philippine Pediatric Dental Society, Inc. (PPDSI) and Philippines Dentists Development Cooperative (PDDC) on Dental Services Funding Agency: PDDC Lead Implementing Agency: PPDSI Program Duration: 2007 to 2012 Beneficiaries: Children Program Description: This project involves the provision of dental treatment and care to the resident of DSWD centers and institutions by the PPDSI dental team. CONTACT DETAILS Dr. Noel V. Ballesteros Head 5/F Medical Art Building, Dr. Fe del Mundo Center and General Hospital Foundation, 11 Banawe Avenue corner Cadiz Street, Quezon City Telefax: (02) 740-7728 Email: [email protected] www.pediatricdentistry.com.ph 11. Bahay Pag-Asa Project Funding Agency: Interested Corporations and LGUs Lead Implementing/Executing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: 2007 to present Beneficiaries: Children and youth Target Program Location: National Program Description: The Bahay Pag-asa s a transitory home for disadvantaged children. The Department envisions one in every province and in the eleven cities in NCR. The program seeks to help children in conflict with the law (CICL) in the criminal justice system. CONTACT DETAILS Atty. Dulfie Tobias-Shalim Director IV, Social Technology Bureau DSWD, Batasan Complex, Constitution Hills, Quezon City Tel: (02) 931-8101 local 326, 325, 327 Fax: (02) 951-2802 Email: [email protected]; [email protected]

www.dswd.gov.ph

12. Earn Your Training out of Love For Sasa (TOOLS) Funding Agency: Chevron Philippines, Inc. Lead Implementing Agency: Philippine Agency for Community and Family, Inc. (PACAF) Program Duration: January 2009 to December 2011 Beneficiaries: Children and Youth Target Program Location: Region IX Program Description: This project involves the technical training with values formation for OSYs. IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS and CONTACT DETAILS Philippine Agency for Community and Family, Inc. (PACAF)

Ms. Sharon Ira Tiongco Executive Director, PACAF-Davao Add: Km. 7, 8024 Ilang, Davao City Tel: (082) 238-0230 Email: [email protected]

Chevron Philippines, Inc.

Mr. Randall Johnson Country Chairman and General Manager Add: 10/F 6750 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 841-1000 Fax: (02) 841-1092 Email: [email protected]

13. Tinapay ng Bayan Funding Agency: Philippine Association for Flour Millers (PAFMIL), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and Chamber of Philippine Flour Millers (CHAMPFLOUR) Lead Implementing Agency: DSWD Program Duration: 2008 to present Beneficiaries: Youth, residents of Centers and Institutions and other needy adults Target Program Location: Regions VI, XI and NCR Program Description: This project three components: the training of OSYs and DSWD wards and residents in vocational baking; provision of capital assistance; and the production of low cost bread to support the Hunger Mitigation Program. The project also involves OJT and pre-employment program with Julies Franchise Corporation. A training center project is also being conceptualized with PAFMIL and DSWD-NCR. IMPLEMENTING PARTNERS and CONTACT DETAILS Philippine Association for Flour Millers (PAFMIL

Mr. Ric M. Pinca Executive Director Add: Rm 311, 3rd Floor Atrium Bldg., Makati Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 811-4033 Email: [email protected]

Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)

Nelly C. Guinid Assistant Division Chief Add: BTRCP, DTI, Buendia, Makati City Telefax: (02) 751-3238 Email: [email protected]

Julie Franchise Corporation

Virgilio G. Espeleta President Add: Blk 1, Lot 1, JRA Subdivision, Amang Rodriguez, Manggahan, Pasig Tel: (02) 643-5024 Fax: (02) 642-2583 Email: [email protected] www.juliebakeshop.com.ph

NATIONAL FOOD AUTHORITY (NFA) The vision of the National Food Authority is to be at the forefront in providing excellent needed services to the food marketing industry towards global competitiveness and committed to ensuring food security. Mission  Pursue and accelerate the integrated growth and modernization of the food marketing industry  To provide excellent services towards attaining food security and the stabilization of the supply and prices of rice  Assist the food marketing industry move towards global competitiveness  Empower rice farmer Objectives  To provide appropriate and adequate support aimed at integrating, improving and modernizing food marketing systems and facilities  To provide and make available marketing and technical services that will ensure food security and stabilization of food supply and prices  To provide rice farmers initially with a market for their palay and eventually with the capability to profitably market their produce  To promote the upgrading and optimum utilization of grains post-harvest facilities and technology  To improve existing services and linkages

NFA Programs 1. Distribution Program which aims to ensure that prices of staple rice and corn are reasonable and affordable to consuming public. This is undertaken through the various distribution strategies wherein rice is sold to different accredited market outlets, such as: 

Market-Based Outlets of accredited NFA retailers located in public markets which sell solely NFA rice at a maximum of 5 kilograms per family per week with prices ranging from PhP23.50-25.00 per kilogram

2. Community Based Outlets or Pro-Poor Outlets which are NFA dedicated outlets selling subsidized NFA rice and noodles located outside the market and in the DSWD-identified depressed barangays/areas; it sells rice at a maximum of 2 kilograms per family per day to Family Access Cardholders only.   

NFA-Operated Rolling Stores NFA-Operated Stationary Stores Tindahan Natin – established in coordination with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and located in depressed areas

    

Tinatin Natin Legislators’ Fund Tindahan sa Parokya – (inter-faith) are outlets handled by parishes selling NFA-rice at PhP18.25/kg in depressed areas Bigasang Bayan Outlets (BBO-LGU)  Stationary Outlets  Rolling Stores KALAHI Outlets LGU-identified outlets – are outlets identified by LGU located in the depressed areas

3. Food for School Program (Special Program) which is an emergency food augmentation program of the Department of Education (DepEd). It includes provision of one kilogram of NFA rice to identified public elementary grade pupils in exchange for their attendance to school and at the same time conduct values formation activities and productivity skills training for their parents. 4. Disaster and Crisis Preparedness Program (Special Program) which is a 24-hour Operation Center (OPCEN) activated during disasters and calamities to ensure the availability of rice within 24-hour response time upon occurrence, and stabilize rice supply and prices within a two-week period during emergency and crisis situation CONTACT DETAILS The ADMINISTRATOR National Food Authority Department of Agriculture North Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 453-3900, 981-3800 Fax: (02) 453-3900 Email: [email protected] www.nfa.gov.ph

TECHNICAL EDUCATION AND SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (TESDA) TESDA was created through Republic Act No. 7796 (TESDA Act of 1994) to ensure the equal participation of industry trade, labor and local government units in the country’s skilled worker development programs. The TESDA Act embodies State policy of providing relevant, accessible, and high quality technical education and skills development for middle-level manpower that is supportive of and responsive to the country’s development goals. It integrated under a single authority the functions of two-related government institutions and a government program, namely:   

National Manpower and Youth Council; Bureau of Technical and Vocation Education of then Department of Education, Culture and Sports; and Apprenticeship Program of the Bureau of Local Employment of the Department of Labor and Employment

Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Development Loop 1. TVET Delivery System  126 TESDA Technology Institutes  Language Skills Institute (LSI)  LGUs  Public Schools / Centers  Private TVET Institutions 2. TVET Support System  Labor Market Intelligence (LMI)  Youth Profiling for Starring Career (YP4SC)  Job Placement / Referral  TVET Tracking System 3. TVET Quality Assurance  TESDA Assessment and Certification  Private Assessment 4. TVET Financing (Scholarships)  Private Education Student Fund  Pangulong Gloria Scholarship (PGS) Program  Ladderized Education Program (LEP)  TESDA Development Fund (TDF)  I-CARE

CONTACT DETAILS: The DIRECTOR GENERAL

Director Noel K. Villaflor Executive Director, Corporate Affairs Office

TESDA Complex, East Service Road, South Super Highway, Taguig, Metro Manila Tel: (02) 893-2454; 818-8829 Fax: (02) 816-2480 Email: [email protected] www.tesda.gov.ph

Tel: (02) 816-7143 Fax: (02) 816-7143

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES (DBP) The DBP’s mission to influence and accelerate sustainable economic growth of the country has led it to anchor its lending activities on the task of financing development. It has evolved already from its role of development financing. From the task of simply providing the necessary funds for projects, DBP now functions to meet the medium and long – term needs as well as the sustainability of key strategic sectors which are deemed vital to progress and growth. In line with the government’s thrust, the DBP has developed programs for the following priority sectors: 1. Infrastructure and Logistics The DBP provides funding support to projects that will enhance investments, production and trade. This would include projects that increase value-adding production capacity (such as power projects and acquisitions of plant and equipment) or projects that result in the utilization of otherwise idle existing production capacity. It also includes projects that facilitate the movement of goods, such as trading, transportation and communication. 2. Social Development The DBP provides funding support to investments in the areas of health care, education, housing, community development and livelihood. Investments in these areas are designed to directly address poverty alleviation initiatives. One of the Bank’s corporate social responsibility initiatives, the DBP Endowment for Education Program (DEEP), provides scholarship opportunities for higher education or technical courses to poor but deserving high school graduates. 3. Environment The DBP provides not only funding support, but also partnership arrangements to address the protection of natural resources and the mitigation of the degradation of the environment. Credit-based program would include projects to support new and renewable energy sources (hydro, geothermal, rural power projects), solid and hazardous waste management and pollution control. The “DBP FOREST” is a noncredit program where in partnership with community groups, LGUs and DENR, forest projects are undertaken. In these projects, a variety of high value fruit and forest trees are planted to prevent erosion, restore watersheds, and help absorb carbon emissions.

4. Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises

The MSME sector acts as the seedbed for the development of entrepreneurial skills and innovation. It accounts for about 99.7% of the registered businesses in the country, from which 70% of the labor force earn a living. Thus, its contribution to the country’s economic development cannot be underemphasized. Hence, the DBP targeted this sector as one of its priority sectors. A separate unit in Head Office for the Microfinance and the branches for SMEs assume the responsibility of assisting this sector, either credit or non-credit support. Tie ups with government agencies and state universities are forged to support the MSME Programs of the government. The advocacy for the Overseas Filipino Workers such as offering livelihood and training programs for returning OFWs and assisting them thru the One Town One Product or OTOP of the government, and eventually, offering them a full range of assistance including their families. 5. Commercial Lending The DBP also lends its hands to commercial activities of large corporations in the country. It complements the private banks in responding to expansion projects of big industries in the country. In the light of the lowering interest rates, the DBP has launched five (5) new deposit products:     

YES (Young Earners Savings for Kids); Payroll + Savings Account; Wisdom Account for Senior Citizens; High Earner Account for High-Net worth Individuals; and Deposito ng Bayaning Pilipino (for OFWs)

The DBP finances the following projects: 1. Industrial a. Large manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries b. Small and medium manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries c. Industrial Estate Projects 2. Public Utilities a. Land, air and water transportation b. Telecommunications c. Power generation and distribution d. Water supply and distribution 3. Community Development a. Housing b. Hospitals

c. Schools d. Infrastructure e. Eco-Tourism 4. Agro-industrial a. Post harvest-facility b. Agri-business 5. Focused Lending Programs a. Environmental  Pollution control and abatement  Waste minimization and recycling  Efficient use and/or management of natural resources  Occupational health and safety  Solid and hazardous waste management  Water supply and sanitation b. Micro-financing c. Lending program for franchises d. Program towards obtaining ISO 9000 certification e. New and renewable energy (NRE) projects f. Technology development and commercialization g. LGU financing program h. Sustainable Logistics Development Program  Road/Roro Ferry Network  Bulk Grains  Cold Chain 6. Other Programs a. Factoring b. Loans Against Hold Out on Deposit CONTACT DETAILS Benedicto Ernesto R. Bitonio, Jr. Executive Vice President Brillo L. Reynes Senior Vice President Makati Avenue corner Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 8189511 locals 3307, 3324; 8170473; 840-0735 Fax: (02) 815-1517 Email: [email protected] http://www.devbankphil.com.ph

DBP LOAN PROGRAMS: 1. ADB-Development of Poor Urban Communities Sector Project (DPUCSP) Priorities: Housing and livelihood projects outside Metro Manila Eligible Borrowers:  LGUs  MFIs  NGOs  Cooperatives  Private Developer  Homeowners Associations  Organized poor urban households with no access to formal housing finance  Majority of which have irregular or limited sources of livelihood  Insecure tenure Note: LGUs and enterprises projects should be located in a city or 1st class municipalities outside Metro Manila. LGUs must have nationally or locally-owned government land. A qualified enterprise must have a clean title of the project site. Eligible Projects:  Part A - Site development - Civil works, including roads drainage, water supply, sanitation & waste management - Community facilities 

Part B - Shelter finance, housing loans - Home improvement, livelihood projects (available only through MFIs) - Microfinance for livelihood projects

Note: For LGU borrowers, only the development and housing construction projects are among the eligible projects Subloan Size Up to 90% of total project cost  Micro-Finance Institutions (MFI) – up to P150,000  Housing loan - up to P400,000.00/unit  Home improvement - up to P 150,000.00  Livelihood projects - up to P 150,000.00 Repayment Term  Site development – up to 10 years with 3 years grace period  Housing loan – up to 15 years with 3 years grace period

 

Home improvement – 5 years with 1 years grace period Livelihood – 5 years

2. KfW-Sustainable Health Care Investment Project (Schip) Priorities: New facilities for hospitals, clinics, health centers, laboratories, medical schools, and also for the expansion, renovation, and/or augmentation of existing health facilities Eligible Borrowers:  All hospital levels (PHIC accredited or for PHIC accreditation)  Schools offering medical and allied medical courses  Laboratories, diagnostic centers and medical clinics  Private companies engaged in the production of medicines and/or research development in delivering health-related services  Local Government Units (LGUs) hospitals Eligible Projects:  Acquisition/leasing of health care equipment  Construction of health care facilities, clinics or the expansion/renovation of existing health facilities  Refinancing of existing eligible projects  Working capital requirements of SHCIP supported acquisition of equipment  Working capital requirement of heath oriented/related service companies  Health related education requirements  Other sub-projects expenditures subject to prior approval by KfW Subloan Size:  LGUs: Up to 90% of total project cost  Non-LGUs: Up to 80% of total project cost Repayment Term:  Start: June 30, 2010  End: December 30, 2022 Grace Period: Preferably up to 1 year

3. ADB-Credit for Better Health Care Project (CBHCP) Priorities: Health Care Loans for LGUs, private and primary health care providers Eligible Borrowers:  Private and primary health care (PHC) service providers: - Health Maintenance Organization - Family Physicians Clinics - Midwifery or Birthing Clinics - Pharmacies/Small Drugstores     

Local Government Units (LGUs) for rural health units (RHUs), secondary and tertiary level hospitals; Laboratories and diagnostic centers, preferably integrated into larger health care facilities such as hospitals; Business solution companies or NGOs, charitable institutions and non-profit organizations; Drugs procurement and distribution companies willing to distribute generics and to cover rural and remote areas; Microfinance Institutions (MFIs) – cooperatives, rural and thrift banks engaged in health financing

Eligible Projects:  Civil works – construction/renovation/upgrading  Acquisition of equipment  Working capital  Preparation of feasibility studies Subloan Size:  LGUs: Up to 90% of total project cost  Non-LGUs: Up to 80% of total project cost  Up to $ 2 million (subject to ADB’s approval if the amount of loan being requested exceeds to $ 2 million) Repayment Term:  For retail (LGUs/Private Ventures): - Civil Works: Maximum of fifteen (15) years with a maximum grace period of three (3) years - Equipment: Maximum of ten (10) years with a maximum grace period of three (3) years - Working Capital: Maximum of five (5) years with a maximum grace period of three (3) years 

For wholesale (MFIs,/Rural & Thrift Banks/Cooperatives &NGOs): - Between five (5) to ten (10) years with an allowable grace period of six (6) months to two (2) years

HOME GUARANTEE CORPORATION (HGC) Home Guaranty Corporation (HGC) is a wholly-owned Government Financial Institution tasked to operate a mortgage guaranty program in support of the Philippine Government’s effort to promote home ownership. HGC traces its origin to the Home Financing Commission (HFC), which started operation in 1955 in accordance with its charter under Republic Act 580. In 1979, Executive Order No. 535 was enacted, upgrading HFC from a commission to a corporation and giving HFC the exclusive jurisdiction over the registration and supervision of homeowners associations (HOA). On 17 December 1986, HFC was renamed the Home Insurance and Guaranty Corporation (HIGC) through E.O. No. 90. HIGC was tasked to assist developers to undertake low and middle income mass housing production as well as to encourage private institutional funds and commercial lenders to finance such housing developments and long-term mortgages through a viable system of guarantees, loan insurance and other fiscal incentives. In December 2000, HFC’s original corporate life expired. R.A. 8763, known as the Home Guaranty Corporation Act of 2000, was signed on 7 March 2000 renaming HIGC to Home Guaranty Corporation (HGC), increasing its authorized capital to PhP50 Billion and extending its corporate life for another fifty (50) years. Guaranty Program The HGC provides Guaranty for End-Users Financing, which covers housing loans to be obtained by individual borrowers from banks or other financial institutions for purposes of acquiring a residential unit from the housing projects of LGUs and developers. HGC guarantees the funding institution the payment of the interest and principal obligation of any defaulting loan borrower. The collateral of the loan should either be a First Real Estate Mortgage on the property to be financed or the receivables from the Contract-toSell of the purchased property. HGC charges guaranty fees which comprise the core of its revenue stream. These fees come from guaranty enrollments (for new accounts) and guaranty renewals. Guaranty Capacity Under the new HGC Charter, HGC can provide guarantees up to twenty times its net worth. With a net worth of PhP7.12 billion as of Dec. 2008, HGC’s guaranty capacity is PhP142.31 billion. CONTACT DETAILS: Melinda M. Adriano Vice President

Guaranty Group 4/F Jade Building 335 Sen. Gil Puyat Ave., Makati C Tel: (02) 897-3532 Fax: (02) 896-4114 Email: [email protected] www.hgc.gov.ph

LAND BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES (LBP) Since its creation in August 1963, the LBP has successfully balanced its universal banking and countryside development mission. The profits from its commercial banking operations have successfully financed development initiatives that benefited the small farmers, fisherfolk and other countryside-based small and medium entrepreneurs. CONTACT DETAILS Melinda C. Cruz Department Manager Landbank Head Office 1598 M.H. Del Pilar cor Dr. Quintos Street Malate, Manila Tel: (02) 405-7476 Fax: (02) 528-8541 Email: [email protected] http://www.landbank.com 1

Program: SUPPORT FOR STRATEGIC LOCAL DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT PROJECT (S2LDIP) Program Fund: US$100M Source of Fund: World Bank Loan Effectivity: March 2007 to December 2012 Program Objective: To improve living conditions, public health standards and the urban environment by providing upgraded and improved urban and rural infrastructure and services in line with the Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan’s strategic focus of eradicating poverty, good governance, and efficient delivery of basic services. The institutional capacities to provide improved urban and rural management and service of participating LGUs will also be strengthened; and To facilitate LGU’s access to viable financing options to fund the construction, upgrading and rehabilitation of basic urban and rural infrastructure facilities. Eligible Borrower:  LGUs (cities, municipalities, and provinces) nationwide  Public Utilities and Private Operators providing local infrastructure services. Eligible Projects: A. LGU Infrastructure facilities and utilities such as:  Water supply and distribution  Power production and distribution  Solid waste management facilities including construction of sanitary landfill  Waste water management  Housing  New site development for commercial purposes  Roads and bridges  Drainage and flood control  Schools and health clinics; and  Improvement of municipal enterprise and infrastructure facilities such as public markets, slaughterhouses, bus terminals, and other related income generating projects B. Goods and services for enhancement of revenue of income Loan Amount for LGUs:  For LGUs, the loan amount shall be based in the requirement of the sub-project but shall in no case exceed net borrowing capacity  For public utilities and private operators providing local infrastructure services, shall be based on the projected subproject cash flow but shall in no case exceed PhP500M

Term of Loan:  Maximum of 15 years inclusive of two (2) years grace period on principal payment Interest Rate:  1 to 5 years - 8%  6 to 10 years - 8%  11 to 15 years - 10% Commitment Fee: 0.25% on the undrawn loan amount Front-End Fee: 0.25% of the loan amount Processing Requirement  Sanggunian Resolution authorizing the Local Chief Executives to negotiate a loan with LBP  Approved budget for the current year  COA Audited Financial Statement for the past 3 years  List of elected officials and key officers  Schedule of IRA for the past 2 years  Copy of the Municipal Development Plan and Public Investment Program  BLGF certification on Net Borrowing Capacity for current year  Other standard documentary requirements of LBP For project involving construction  Project plans and specification  Cost estimates  Bill of materials  Work Programs/schedule duly approved by the local chief executive and the city/municipal/district engineer For machineries and equipment acquisition  List, description and estimated cost of machineries and equipment based on price quotation  Certification from the dealers/suppliers as to the availability of spare parts in the local market For projects involving construction  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report and Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) Collateral Documents  Real Estate Mortgage  Chattel Mortgage  Hold-Out on Deposits

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Assignment of the LGU’s regular income including portion of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) which in no case shall exceed 20% of the LGU’s regular income Assignment of a portion of the LGU’s Internal Revenue Allotment for the payment of the sub-loan

LGU GUARANTEE CORPORATION (LGUGC) LGUGC is a private credit guarantee institution incorporated in March 1998 with the primary mandate of granting local government units (LGUs) access to private sources of capital by providing credit enhancement to LGU debt. LGUGC’s stockholders are the Bankers Association of the Philippines (BAP), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) and the Asian Development Bank. LGUGC’s primary goal is to make private financial resources available to creditworthy local government units (LGUs) through its credit guarantee. Its credit enhancement facilitates the entry of LGUs with infrastructure development projects in the capital market. Recently, LGUGC extended its guarantee services to water districts, electric cooperatives, state universities and colleges, and renewable energy technology projects. Vision To be the recognized private sector link in public-private partnerships for local development financing Mission   

Advocate for reforms that will mobilize resources of the private sector toward financing local government projects Continue to advocate for policy reforms for LGU bond flotation as a viable alternative local financing option Instill values of good governance to enhance the borrower’s enterprise management and creditworthiness, especially local governments and utility companies

Guarantees As of March 2009, LGUGC has guaranteed 16 bond deals, 2 LGU loans and 9 water district loans aggregating Php 4.0982 billion. Guaranteed projects include the following: public markets, slaughterhouses, jetty port, low-cost housing, hospitals, commercial complex with toll parking facilities, commercial centre with wet and dry stalls, convention center cum hostel facilities, academic center and multi-purpose gymnasium, integrated solid waste management facility, and water districts’ rehabilitation and expansion projects and bulk water supply. Services Offered 1. Guarantee LGUGC currently guarantees the indebtedness of LGUs, water districts (WDs), electric cooperatives, renewable energy providers and state universities and colleges. The

guarantee fee is a function of the underlying borrower and project risks. Fees range from 0.5% to 2% per annum. 2. Credit Rating LGUGC implements an internal LGU Credit Screening and Rating System (LCSRS) and Water District Credit Rating System (WDCRS) in the absence of a formal stand-alone entity specializing in risk evaluating of LGUs and WDs. Both credit rating systems adopt internationally-accepted standards fit for sue diligence requirement of private financial institutions and individual investors. The system serves as the primary guide for the LGUGC and partner financial institutions to identify LGUs and WDs’ creditworthiness and their capacity to participate in the commercial credit market. It is also a tool for assisting LGUs and WDs implement good governance practices. LGUGC has an internal borrower risk rating system for other types of proponents. 3. Program Management LGUGC offers program management services. Currently, LGUGC is managing the guarantee fund for Electric Cooperative System Loss Reduction Project (ECSLRP) of the World Bank – Global Environment Facility thru the Department of Energy (DOE). LGUGC is likewise the program manager for the Capacity Building to Remove Barriers to Renewable Energy Development (CBRED) Loan Guarantee Fund of the UNDP. CONTACT DETAILS Lydia N. Orial President/CEO Unit 2801, 28/F Antel Corporate Centre 121 Valero Street, Salcedo Village Makati City Tel: (02) 750-4168/751-8764 to 68 Fax: (02) 888-4217 Email: [email protected] www.lgugc.com

BILATERAL OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

CANADA Canada’s assistance to the Philippines began in earnest in 1986 following the People Power Revolution, which brought down the government of Ferdinand Marcos, and the subsequent election of Corazon Aquino as President. A commitment to substantially increase Canadian assistance was made in order to support the new government’s reform efforts and the restoration of democracy. The Canadian International Development Agency’s (CIDA) bilateral program has evolved over the years, from focusing on the democratic process immediately following the People Power Revolution, to more broadly supporting responsible governance and private sector development. Canada is currently contributing to poverty reduction in the Philippines through equitable, sustainable development. The objectives of CIDA’s strategy in the Philippines are to: foster efficient, responsive, transparent and accountable governance at all levels; and support the development of sustainable small and medium-sized enterprises that create more, better, and decent jobs for both men and women. This strategy is closely aligned with the Government of the Philippines’ Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan (2004–2010). Results 

Technical assistance to local governments has helped improve the delivery of services to the poor. In addition, greater participation by local communities in setting development plans in areas such as investment, taxation, and social services has increased local government accountability and responsiveness to the needs of the poor.



CIDA’s assistance has also helped the Government of the Philippines address corruption at the national level through projects that have increased transparency and efficiency in areas that include government procurement and tax collection.



Support given to small and medium-sized enterprises by providing business advice and market information and the strengthening of business-service organizations has helped create many business opportunities and jobs in the Philippines.



CIDA has helped women increase their participation in decision-making, exercise their rights, and reduce inequalities in their access to, and control over, resources. Support to the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women has helped make this institution a regional model of national women’s machinery to promote gender equality.

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Laurenne Garneau Counsellor (Development) and Head of

Cooperation Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 857-9004; 857-9133 Fax: (02) 843-1083; 857-9175 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE TO DISPLACED POPULATIONS IN THE PHILIPPINES - ICRC 2009 Maximum CIDA Contribution: C$ 600,000 Executing Agency - Partner - Recipient: ICRC Appeals via CRCS Status: Operational Start - End: 2009 – 2010 Sector:Material relief assistance and services: 33.4% Relief co-ordination; protection and support services: 33.3% Reconstruction relief and rehabilitation: 33.3% Project Description: The escalation of the forty-year separatist conflict in August 2008 has left more than 300,000 civilians displaced in conflict-affected areas, with at least 76,000 living in evacuation centers. Flooding in early January 2009 has exacerbated the humanitarian situation, affecting 40,000 people in 30 villages and increasing the number of displaced by 10,000. CIDA's contribution is supporting the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to provide protection and assistance to displaced and conflict-affected civilians in the Philippines. Activities also include providing relief items in response to the recent flooding, and working with the Philippine National Red Cross to provide humanitarian assistance to the displaced, and to promote compliance with International Humanitarian Law with parties to the conflict.

Project: PEACE LINKS I Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 1,000,000 Executing Agency - Partner - Recipient: The World Bank Status: Operational Start - End: 2007 – 2010 Sector: Post conflict peace-building (UN): 100% Project Description: The Peace Links Program: Canada's Support to Peace and Development in Mindanao is composed of four linked and mutually supportive components designed to promote sustainable peace and development in Muslim Mindanao. This component is a contribution to the World Bank-led Mindanao Trust Fund for the first phase of its Reconstruction and Development Program. The Fund is focused on funding community-driven reconstruction and development projects and building the capacity of the Bangsamoro Development Agency (BDA), the principal development arm of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). The BDA is working to build its capacity in the areas of project and program management, administrative and financial management, and organizational, institutional and human resource development. Currently, the Trust Fund targets six pilot communities, selected from among more than 3,000 conflict-affected communities in Mindanao. The funding being provided through this project helps to further develop the capacity of the BDA to prepare for a second phase once a peace agreement has been signed. The second phase will increase the number of communities targeted. This project aims to help mainstream gender equality in peace-building work, in community-level emergency response, and in developing appropriate information dissemination and feedback mechanisms for the BDA, MILF, and civil society. At the same time, it systemizes links and coordination with other projects in the conflict areas. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Lynette Corcino Senior Program Officer Canadian International Development Agency Levels 6-8, RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City 0707 Tel: (02) 857-9110 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca

Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: PEACE LINKS II Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 1,850,000 Executing Agency: Canadian Embassy, Manila Status: Operational Start - End: 2007 – 2010 Sector: Civilian peace-building, conflict prevention and resolution: 100% Project Description: The Peace Links Program: Canada's Support to Peace and Development in Mindanao is composed of four linked and mutually supportive components designed to promote sustainable peace and development in Muslim Mindanao. The two still on-going components are as follows: 1. Peace Fund supporting peace-building and development initiatives by local civil society groups. This fund supports local initiatives in the following areas: promotion and protection of the rights of children, women and marginalized or vulnerable groups; capacity development of peace advocates and other stakeholders in the peace process; community-based or indigenous conflict/dispute resolution mechanisms; community education on peace and security; community engagement in local decision-making processes (e.g. environmental management issues); improved access to justice, particularly for women and marginalized groups; and law and policy reform advocacy. The fund is administered by the Canadian embassy in the Philippines. 2. Electoral assistance to the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) and adjoining areas in the May 2007 local elections. This component has been completed and was managed by the Asia Foundation. The Foundation undertook targeted activities to support the May 2007 local elections, in order to strengthen the credibility and legitimacy of the process and results. The Foundation recruited and deployed election observers from Indonesia and other Muslim countries.

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Lynette Corcino Senior Program Officer Canadian International Development Agency Levels 6-8, RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City 0707 Tel: (02) 857-9110 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected]

CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: GENDER RESPONSIVE ECONOMIC ACTIONS – TRANSFORMATION OF WOMEN (GREAT WOMEN) Maximum CIDA Contribution: $ 7,000,000 Executing Agency: National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women Status: Operational Start - End: 2006 – 2013 Sector: Public sector policy and administrative management: 70% Decentralisation and support to sub-national government: 30% Project Description: The Gender Responsive Economic Actions for the Transformation of Women (GREAT Women) project assists the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women, and its partners at the national and local levels, to contribute to the economic empowerment of women by strengthening their capacities to develop, implement, monitor and evaluate gender-responsive economic legislation, policies, programs, and services, especially those related to microenterprise. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Luzviminda Villanueva Project Manager

Ms. Myrna Jarillas Senior Program Officer

GREAT Women Project Management Office National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women (NCRFW) 1145 J.P. Laurel St., San Miguel, Manila Tel: (02) 734-1731 Fax: (02) 736-4449 Email: [email protected]; [email protected]

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 857-9137 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

CZECH REPUBLIC Accession of the Czech Republic to the European Union followed by accession to ASEM in 2004 represent two important milestones in economic relations between the Republic of the Philippines and the Czech Republic. In addition to the most conspicuous supplies in the past (train coaches for MRT-3, aircrafts L-410-Let, diesel generating sets, sugar cane mills, rifles, packing machines, etc.) many opportunities from the Czech Republic for Philippine importers remain still undiscovered such as machine tools. In terms of the overall level of production of machine and working tools, the Czech Republic is ranked seventh in Europe and 14th in the world, mobile-type airports, machines and equipment for open-pit and underground mining, personal cars SKODA, components for the automobile industry and accessories for personal cars, heavy duty trucks TATRA, sewage and water treatment plants, industrial and water pumps, building and road-making machines, food-processing machines, glass products, food products, drugs and pharmaceuticals, outfit of medical centers, fertilizers etc. I. Development Assistance A. Measures Ensuring Reliable and Sustainable Drinking Water Supply for Metro Manila after Damages Caused by Catastrophic Typhoon Project/MWSS The project involves the rehabilitation of the existing Umiray-Angat Mini-Hydro Power Plant in particular, requires detailed description of damages, design of the plant rehabilitation, equipment supply and installation and design and implementation of protection measures, and training of local staff. Location: Region III and IV-A Total Czech ODA funds: €1,300,000 + Local funding €450,000 Duration: 2006-2010 B. Improvement of solid waste management in Naga City (Completed) Improve the solid waste management of Naga City; Technical assistance to the city government in including its solid waste management which includes conversion of waste to energy project and redesigning of modern sanitary landfill Location: Municipality of Naga City, Naga City Total Czech ODA funds: €390,000 Duration: 2007 – 2009 C. Feasibility study of the rehabilitation of the cascade of the mini hydropower plants in Baguio (Completed)

Map out the current situation and the scope of work and finances needed for the rehabilitation of the existing mini-hydropower plants; Expert assistance to the municipal government in establishing the overview of the needs and costs of rehabilitation Location: City of Baguio Total Czech ODA funds: € 20,000 Duration: Aug – Dec 2008 II. Humanitarian Aid In 2006, humanitarian aid of the Czech Republic, amounted to 22 000 EUR for oil spill removal. A total of 13 000 EUR in connection with the typhoon Durian was also part of the Czech Republic’s humanitarian assistance. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of the Czech Republic in the Philippines 30th Floor Rufino Pacific Tower 6784 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 811-1155/56/58 Fax: (02) 811-1020 Email: [email protected] www.mfa.cz/manila

FINLAND Finnish development cooperation to the Philippines started in 1985. Finnish bilateral cooperation in the form of programs and project is directed to their main partner countries – Mozambique, Nicaragua, Tanzania, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Namibia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nepal, the Palestinian Autonomous Territories, Ethiopia and China. Finland also extends support to these countries through humanitarian aid, interest subsidies, support to development cooperation by NGOs, and even use of concessional credit. The Philippines has not been classified as an official “program country” for Finnish ODA. Finland prefers to implement its development cooperation endeavors in the Philippines indirectly, through multilateral international organizations, such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) and United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). Focus of Development Cooperation The Finnish government has made available four types of assistance to the Philippines under the development cooperation program: 1. Concessional Loan Scheme (CSL) is a credit facility that can finance social, environment and health sector projects, i.e., water and sewage disposal and management, water supply management, upgrading of hospitals and forestation projects. The facility can finance 85 to 100% of a project’s financial requirement with 0 percent interest, over a ten-year repayment period. Fully 50% of a contract value must be tied to Finnish goods and services. 2. Grant assistance is provided through co-financing with multilateral organizations and to national government agencies (bilateral projects) 3. Feasibility Study Grant Facility is provided through the Industrial Cooperative Fund can only be tapped by Finnish private/ business firms. The Finnish Government evaluates proposals to finance preparation of feasibility studies (FS) on a case-by-case basis and prefers co-financing by the GOP/ proponent agencies (cost-sharing 50-50) than to shoulder the full cost of the FS. 4. The Small Scale Funding Facility is provided annually to finance short-term projects implemented by NGOs, cooperatives, universities and other CSOs in support of the Indigenous Peoples, person with disabilities, and the academe. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland through the Department for International Development Cooperation is responsible for Finland’s official development assistance including bilateral and multilateral cooperate, development policies and guidelines, and coordination with other departments of the Ministry. Priority areas include projects focused in the following sectors:  Environment and technology development  Strengthening the immunization programme in the Philippines  Institutional strengthening of small and medium-scale enterprises in Mindanao  Reduction of child labour in small-scale mining  Improvement of the level and quality of micro-credit service

In addition to these, Finland supports indigenous people’s organization as well as disabled peoples’ organizations through funds for local co-operation facility. These activities focus particularly on income generation, capacity building and basic services. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer Embassy of Finland 21/F BPI Buendia Center, Sen. Gil Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 891-5011 to 17 Fax: (02) 817-1654 www.webdc.com.ph/finland

FRANCE The focus of French Development cooperation includes the following:         

Climate change & Energy Environment & Biodiversity Natural risk assessment and reduction Agriculture, Aquaculture & Food security Education & Research for development Health Heritage conservation Cultural diversity & Intercultural dialogue Human rights & Governance

The cultural, scientific, technical and audio-visual relations between France and the Philippines was developed within the framework of a Cooperation Agreement signed in 1978, the terms of which are updated on a regular basis. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of France 16/F Pacific Star Bldg., Makati Ave. corner Gil Puyat Ave. 1200 Makati City Tel: (02) 857-6900 Fax: (02) 857-6948 Email: [email protected] www.ambafrance-ph.org Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer

GERMANY The Federal Republic of Germany is committed to work with its partners for peace and the alleviation of poverty throughout the world and it acknowledges the need for concerted efforts to promote sustainable development everywhere. German Development Cooperation provides the following services: 

 





Analysis of framework conditions and possibilities for effective development cooperation in the host country, including continual critical monitoring of existing projects and programs Informing the Federal Government of the political, economic and social situation in developing countries Presenting the Federal Government's policy, as well as conducting a dialogues on the issue of sustainable development with as many social groups as possible in the host country, ranging from ministers to NGOs Coordinating German development cooperation with other donor countries and institutions, as well as with German implementing organizations such as the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) and the Reconstruction Loan Corporation (KfW); and Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) Providing advice regarding, and serving as a point of contact for, scholarships within the framework of development cooperation.

Meanwhile, its key areas of development cooperation include the following: 1.7.Financial Cooperation Since many developing countries lack the financial resources to implement urgently required investments, without which a long-term improvement in the population's living standards would be difficult to achieve, the Federal Republic of Germany makes available funds to developing countries within the framework of German Financial Cooperation. Financing for identified projects occurs through low-interest credits, in order to create the structural prerequisites for sustainable development. The bulk of financial cooperation aid is implemented on behalf of the German Government by the Reconstruction Loan Corporation (KfW), which has it own representatives or offices in particular developing countries. German Embassies assist and cooperate with the KfW in the preparation, implementation and monitoring of projects. 2.8.Technical Cooperation Projects on the development of the health and primary-school system, food security and environmental protection are urgently required in many developing countries. Foreign know-how and material available on the international market is barely within the capacities of developing countries. These emerging countries must therefore identify fields for which they can request assistance from industrialized countries. Within the framework of Technical Cooperation, German implementing organizations initiate projects in developing countries on behalf of the German Government in partnership with

state institutions or NGOs in the host country. The German contributions are granted to the receiving country free of charge in the form of inputs of material and equipment, as well as advisory services. Efforts are made to ensure that a disproportionate share of the funds provided is not used for administrative tasks. Technical Cooperation is utilized in conjunction with Financial Cooperation in focal areas in consensus with the partner countries. Intergovernmental arrangements are concluded for individual Technical Cooperation projects. The bulk of official Technical Cooperation is implemented by the GTZ which has its own offices in many developing countries. German Embassies assist the GTZ in identifying, preparing, implementing and monitoring its tasks and coordinate the work of the GTZ with other German and international implementing organizations. 9. Bilateral Development Cooperation The amount of funds that will be made available for development cooperation with individual countries is determined as part of the annual framework planning for financial and technical cooperation, to which the Federal Foreign Office contributes its foreign policy expertise, as well as by the Bundestag Committee on Economic Cooperation and Development (AWZ). On a regular basis, the Federal Government and the partner Government hold intergovernmental negotiations, where individual projects and programs to be promoted are selected. The commitments are then laid down in bilateral agreements or exchanges of notes that are binding under international law. 10. Private Sponsors of Development Cooperation An important task of the Federal Foreign Office, and in particular of the local German Embassies, in cooperation with the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, is to effectively coordinate the large number of development policy measures in a country or a region. Many private institutions are engaged in the field of development policy, ranging from churches to political foundations to NGOs. In addition to the few large sponsors who have considerable experience regarding work in foreign countries, there are many smaller and less experienced groups that are in particular need of advice and support in order to effectively contribute to sustainable development in countries in the South. German embassies act as points of contact in the host country for private sponsors; they also provide consular services to the German employees of private sponsors. Support for private sponsors is mainly provided through funds from the budget of the BMZ. 11. Public Private Partnership Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are projects implemented by the private sector agencies and which are in the interest of the company while at the same time advance development policy. Given their interest in the long-term economic success of their project it is initially these companies - whether from Germany or other European countries - which invest their own capital, staff and expertise into the project. The Federal

Government supports these projects if they have a significant development policy component. Private companies with the cooperation of the German Investment and Development Company (DEG), the KfW, the GTZ or the Foundation for Economic Development and Vocational Training (SEQUA) implement PPP initiatives. 12. Technical Cooperation Microprojects The members of German embassies regularly take note of minor but serious emergencies and can provide assistance as requested. Typical assistance might include the improvement of local health facilities or the sanitation situation (e.g. the construction of wells), the material requirements for primary education (e.g. the construction and maintenance of small school buildings) and improvements in family income (e.g. construction of small market buildings, creation of means of transport, support for tradefirm cooperatives). Within the framework of Technical Cooperation micro-projects, German embassies can immediately grant requests for assistance to be of benefit to development. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Office Address: Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, 25/F RCBC Plaza Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue 1200 Makati City Mailing address: German Embassy Manila P.O. Box 2190, Makati CPO Makati City 1261 Metro Manila, Philippines Tel: (02) 702 3000; 892-1001 Fax: (02) 702 3015; 810-4703 Email: [email protected] www.manila.diplo.de; www.germanembassy-philippines.com Mr. Martin Mueller Director German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Manila Office 9/F PDCP Building

DEUTSCHER ENTWICKLUNGSDIENST (DED) – GERMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICE The German Development Service is one of the leading European development services for personnel cooperation. It was founded in 1963: since then more than 15,000 development workers have committed themselves to improve the living conditions of people in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Almost 1,200 development workers are currently working in 47 countries. Their aims are to fight poverty, promote a selfdetermined, sustainable development, and to preserve natural resources. The German Development Service also offers its services to international clients. DED places development workers at the request of governmental and non-governmental organisations in its partner countries and on the basis of framework agreements with the respective governments. These development workers are professionally experienced and socially committed specialists who engage mainly in training, advisory capacity and planning tasks. DED Philippines In the Philippines, specifically in Mindanao and Visayas, the cooperation between the DED and local partners focuses on the following programmes: 

Forestry and Environmental Management - Poverty reduction and ecological sustainability - Environment -friendly, economically viable and socially acceptable use of forest resources - Increasing income of rural communities - Control on waste management and environmental protection - Improvement of environmental education



Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Improvement of living conditions in coastal communities - Improvement of income generation of marginal small scale fisher folk - Protection and conservation of coastal habitats - Control on the use of marine resources



Sustainable Economic Development - Improvement of competitiveness on global markets - Local and regional economic development - Corporate Social Responsibility - Improvement of job opportunities - Satisfaction of demands for qualified workers



Civil Peace Service - Prevention and mitigation of violence in Mindanao - Facilitation of peace talks between conflict parties - Raising awareness for the root causes and impacts of violence

- Strengthening of actors of civil society who advance peaceful coexistence - Conflict sensitive programming of all DC projects (Do No Harm / PCA) Eligibility Below are the organizations that are eligible to apply:  NGOs and POs  LGUs  Regional Institutions  Industry Associations  Educational Institutions Considerations in requesting for assistance: If you belong to any of the organizations listed above, and  

 

You are based - In Mindanao or Visayas You are active in any of the following fields: - Forestry and Environmental Management - Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Sustainable Economic Development - Civil Peace Service You have a need for a particular expertise which cannot be found in the country You have the means to support the work of the expert

CONTACT DETAILS German Development Service in the Philippines 11/F PDCP Bank Center Building V.A. Rufino cor. L.P. Leviste Sts. Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 812-5640 Fax: (02) 894-1486 www.ded.de

ISRAEL Israel’s official overseas development cooperation was launched in 1958 with the aim of sharing with the rest of the developing world the know-how and technologies which provided the basis for Israel’s own rapid development. MASHAV, the Hebrew acronym for the Center for International Cooperation, was established as a division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and is responsible for international cooperation and assistance around the world, through the provision of guidance and training in Israel and abroad. Part of the center’s activity takes place in cooperation with other countries and international institutions, or with their financial assistance. The following activities are supported:  

  

Courses in Israel: international and national courses On-the-spot courses conducted at the request of the recipient country. Training courses concentrate in traditional areas where Israel has acquired experience such as agriculture and related sciences, rural and urban development, education, social and economic development, medicine and public health, environmental and natural resource protection, and advancement of women. Short-term consultancies: a MASHAV expert is sent at the request of GOP to provide rapid, specific advisory services, assistance in program implementation, conduct a survey on a specific topic or back-up for MASHAV experts on long-term projects. Long-term consultancies: MASHAV experts are dispatched at the request of the host country to assist in the design, implementation, management or general assessment of pilot or development projects; International partnerships: forging partnerships with other donor bodies, international organizations and NGOs in order to enhance efficacy of work in the developing world.

Focus of Development Cooperation The priority sectors of cooperation include the following:        

Agriculture Cooperation and labor studies Community development Rural development Medicine and public health Science and technology Education Advancement of women

CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR

Embassy of Israel 23/F Trafalgar Plaza 105 H.V. Dela Costa Street Salcedo Village, Makati City 1227 Tel: (02) 894-0441 to 43 Fax: (02) 894-1027 Email: [email protected] http://manila.mfa.gov.il; http://mashav.mfa.gov.il

JAPAN The Philippines ranks as the third largest recipient of Japan’s ODA totaling US$9.4 billion. Through the decades, Japanese ODA has been contributing to Philippine’s development efforts in many fields, including irrigation, flood control, education, health care, earthquake detection, rural road network construction / improvement, water supply, and livelihood programs. The country receives assistance from Japan in various forms loans, grants, and technical assistance. Respecting the self-help efforts of every developing country, Japanese ODA in principle, is extended upon the request of the recipient governments. In the case of the Philippines, government agencies and LGUs submit project proposals to NEDA for its evaluation. After the respective approval by NEDA and the ICC, the Philippine government makes an official request for its short-listed priority projects to the Japanese government, which then carefully appraises those projects and approves those that are most necessary and matured. Responsible for ODA policy and programming, the Japanese Embassy coordinates with two Japanese development assistance implementing agencies operating under the Government of Japan, namely the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) (www.jica.go.jp/philippine/index.html), which handles grant-aid and technical assistance and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) (www.jbic.go.jp/english), which handles loans. Source: http://www.ph.emb-japan.go.jp/bilateral/oda/index.htm CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of Japan in the Philippines 2627 Roxas Boulevard, Pasay City 1300 Tel: (02) 551-5710 Email: [email protected] www.ph.emb-japan.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY (JICA) Following the completion of the merger between the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) in October 2008, the New JICA is developed to become the government agency responsible for the implementation of the yen loan, grant aid and technical cooperation aspects of Japan’s Official Development Assistance (ODA). With this, JICA’s programs continue to contribute to the economic and social advancement in developing countries. JICA's Priority Issues: 1. Sustainable Economic Growth Aimed at Creating Employment Opportunities 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4. 1.5.

Support for Financial Reform/Good Governance Investment Promotion Improvement of Transportation Network Enhancing Power and Energy Sector Tourism

2. Poverty Reduction 2.1. Livelihood Improvement 2.2. Enhancement of Basic and Social Services 2.3. Environment Protection and Disaster Prevention 3. Peace and Stability in Mindanao 3.1. 3.2. 3.3. 3.4.

Administrative Capacity Building Improvement of Basic Human Needs Economic Development Peace Building

CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Norio Matsuda Chief Representative JICA Philippine Office 40/F Tower 1 RCBC Plaza Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 889-7119 Fax: (02) 889-6850 Email: [email protected] www.jica.go.jp

KOREA Korea's development assistance is a rather recent phenomenon dating from the early 1980s, when the Korean government designed a program for sharing development experiences with fellow developing nations based on the spirit of South-South cooperation, self-help, and self-reliance among developing countries. In 1987, the Korean government established the Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) through which concessional loans for development projects are provided to the governments of developing countries. In 1991, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) was established as an arm of Korea's Official Development Assistance (ODA). KOICA was mandated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to execute technical cooperation programs, which were previously executed and administrated under authority of different ministries. ODA is administered through two major channels of development cooperation; bi-lateral and multi-lateral. Bi-lateral aid is divided in two forms: grants and loans. KOICA under policy guidance of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is administrator of grants, and implements two types of grants: 1) grant aid, which includes the Provision of Equipment and Project Aid; 2) Technical Cooperation, which includes Development Studies, the Invitation of Trainees, and the dispatch of Korean Overseas Volunteers and Experts. On the other hand, the bi-lateral soft loans or Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) loans are managed by the Export-Import Bank of Korea under the direction of the Ministry of Strategy and Finance. In terms of multi-lateral aid, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is responsible for contributions to the United Nations and UN specialized agencies, etc, while the Ministry of Strategy and Finance oversees subscriptions to international development institutions such as the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the African Development Bank (AfDB). Korean assistance to the Philippines began in 1988. Korean bilateral assistance consists mainly of development loans and grants or technical cooperation. Focus of Development Cooperation Korean ODA, particularly grant assistance, focuses on the following strategic areas:     

Promoting human resources development Eradicating poverty and provision of basic human needs Promoting market economy and free trade Building the capacity of policy development and administration of recipients Contributing to addressing global issues as environmental degradation, population and gender

Loan assistance may expand further given Korea’s strong interest to assist priority activities in telecommunications, transport and energy sectors.

The Korean Government is currently studying effective and efficient ways of extending its information technology cooperation program to the Philippines.

Programs and Projects 1. Concessional Loans (Economic Development Cooperation Fund) The Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) loan was established in 1987 under the management of Korea’s Ministry of Finance. Export-Import Bank (Eximbank) was officially introduced to the Philippines in 1988. The EDCF loan menu is provided on a per loan basis at 0.1 to 0.5 percent interest per annum, forty (40) years maturity inclusive of ten years grace period, 0.1 percent service charge of the amount of Letter of Commitment and generally tied procurement conditions.

2. Grants (Korea International Cooperation Agency) The Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) administers Korean ODA grants and technical assistance programs. Project Aid provides for the construction of facilities (e.g., Korea-Philippines Friendship Medical Center). Development Studies are preinvestment studies in the areas of infrastructure (particularly irrigation, water supply and sewerage), agriculture, natural resources and urban development. Other Korean technical assistance includes Technical Training, Dispatch of Experts, Dispatch of Korean Overseas Volunteers, and Dispatch of Medical Doctors. Other Ongoing Korean-assisted projects include:

1.4.Luzon Transmission and Substation Expansion Project (US$ 14 M) 2.5.Laguidingan Airport Development Project (US$ 25 M) 3.6.Korea-Philippines Friendship Medical Center (US$ 3.8 M) CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR 10th Floor, The Pacific Star Building Sen. Gil Puyat corner Makati Avenue Makati City RP Tel: (02) 811-6139 to 46 Fax: (02) 811-8258 to 59 www.mofat.go.kr/mission/emb/embassy_en. mof?continent=AS&si_dcode=PHPH&section=A; www.korea.net KUWAIT

Kuwait Fund has been in existence for 48 years now. The object of the Fund is to assist Arab and other developing countries in developing their economies by extending loans and providing guarantees; making grants by way of technical assistance and providing other types of technical assistance, and contributing to capital stocks of international and regional development finance institutions and other development institutions and representing the State of Kuwait in such institutions. The Fund's operations are focused primarily on the sectors of agriculture and irrigation, transport and communications, energy, industry, water and sewage in 101 countries worldwide. Eligible Entities The Fund may extend its assistance to different types of entities which include:   

Central and provincial governments, public utilities and other public corporations. Development institutions, whether international, regional or national and, in particular, development finance institutions. Corporate entities that undertake projects which are jointly owned by a number of developing countries as well as mixed or private enterprises that enjoy corporate personality, and are of a developmental nature and not merely oriented towards making of profit. Such enterprises must be either under the control of one or more developing country or have the nationality of any such country.

(Where the Borrower is an entity other than the state in the beneficiary country, the Fund usually requires that the state in such country enters into an agreement with the Fund whereby it guarantees the performance of the borrower's obligations under the respective loan agreement.) Forms of Assistance:   

 

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Direct loans or the provision of guarantees. Joint or parallel financing with other international, regional or national development finance institutions. Making of grants-in-aid to finance technical, economic and financial studies whether in relation to projects financed by the Fund or otherwise. Such studies may be of such types as pre-investment surveys, studies for the identification of Investment opportunities and projects, feasibility studies, project preparation, sectoral studies and the like. Advisory services in relation to technical, financial, economic and legal aspects of projects or programmes or development policies, or in relation to institution building in the field of development. Subscription to the capital or contribution to the resources of development finance institutions. Subscription to the capital of eligible developmental enterprises.

(The Fund does not provide financial assistance for budgetary or balance of payment support.) The Philippines has been extended thus far a cumulative 45 Million dollars loan. Source: http://www.kuwaitfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=145&Itemid=134 CONTACT DETAILS Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development Mirqab Mubarak Al-Kabeer St. Kuwait City P.O. Box 2921 Safat 13030 Kuwait State of Kuwait Tel: (+965) 22999000 www.kuwait-fund.org

NETHERLANDS After the Second World War, development cooperation between the Philippines and the Netherlands at first took the form of mainly private assistance through non-governmental organisations. Based upon a long experience of educational work, Dutch missionaries initiated projects in the media, economic and health fields as well. Dutch ‘co-financing organisations’ which are partially funded by the government (such as Cordaid, ICCO and NOVIB), later created linkages with counterpart organisations in the Philippines. At first, Dutch development assistance was channelled via multilateral organisations like the UN specialised agencies and International Financial Institutions like the World Bank, European Commission and the Asian Development Bank as well as via nongovernmental organisations. The primary focus of the official Netherlands development assistance was on poverty alleviation through rural development. In financial terms the assistance peaked in 1996 with USD 18 million spent on ongoing activities. In 1998 a major reorientation of Dutch development policy took place, where various criteria were reassessed, including per capita annual income. In 1999 the Netherlands government announced that from then on the Philippines would only be eligible for bilateral assistance with regard to the environment sector. In 2004 development cooperation with the Philippines was cancelled altogether when the Dutch Minister for Development Cooperation decided to focus on other countries. The Philippines however still benefits from several Dutch global programs. Under the ORIO and PSI subsidy schemes, Dutch businessmen are provided assistance in their investment projects in the Philippines. Under the NUFFIC program, fellowships in selected post-graduate courses are granted to qualified Filipinos. The Senior Experts Program (PUM) sends retired executives to render expert technical advice on business projects in the country and the Center for Promotion of Imports from Developing Countries (CBI) provides technical training to Filipino business and staff of business support organisations and also sends technical consultants to the Philippines. The Embassy in Manila moreover supports NGOs through the small grants programme and the Human Rights Fund. Apart from these bilateral global programs, Dutch funding finds its way to the Philippines through multilateral channels such as the World Bank, UNICEF and the European Union. Programme Information 1. CBI CBI contributes to the equitable economic development of selected developing countries by providing export marketing and management support to their SME exporters and Business Support Organisations with the purpose of increasing exports to Europe. CBI stimulates and supports economic activities that are sustainable, socially responsible and environmentally sound. This implies compliance with international social standards, more specifically ILO Conventions, and European consumer health, safety and environmental requirements. Requirements are both

legislative and market driven. CBI works with clients who subscribe and strive to comply with these standards and requirements. Procedures: please check www.cbi.eu 2. Nuffic; Netherlands Fellowship Programme The overall aim of the NFP is to help alleviate qualitative and quantitative shortages of skilled manpower and to do so within the framework of sustainable capacity-building directed towards reducing poverty in developing countries. To maximize the fellowships’ impact on capacity-building, NFP-funded training must be linked to the institutional development of organizations. A wide range of organizations are eligible – governmental, private and non-governmental. They can include educational institutions, planning agencies, ministries, community-based organizations (CBOs), and private enterprises, for example. Procedures: please check www.nuffic.nl organizations/services/scholarships/nfp

or

http://www.nuffic.nl/international-

3. ORIO ORIO contributes to the development, implementation (construction and/or renovation), operation and maintenance of public infrastructure in developing countries. ORIO wishes to encourage the involvement of international business in the development and realisation of public infrastructure projects in order to utilise the knowledge, skills and developing power of the private sector. Grant applications are submitted by the central government. These applications may be initiated by companies, the so called private initiative. Selection of grant applications is made on the basis of competition. The applications will be assessed according to a number of impact and quality criteria. The available budget is allocated to the applications with the highest ranking. ORIO focuses on a limited number of priority sectors per country. Procedures: please check www.evd.nl/orio 4. PSI The Private Sector Investment programme (PSI) is a subsidy programme of the Dutch government. Its aim is to stimulate sustainable economic growth in developing countries by supporting innovative investment projects in these markets. The developing world offers great possibilities to entrepreneurs with ambition. But investing in emerging markets can be risky and difficult. Commercial financing is often unavailable. Cooperation with a local partner that, apart from capital, brings in knowledge of local business culture, is indispensable. PSI can ease some of the financial risks that an investment in one of these markets entails. If the application meets the criteria, PSI will subsidize 50 or 60 percent of the project budget. Procedures: please check www.evd.nl/psi

5. PUM Sustainable economic growth in developing countries cannot be achieved if it does not benefit local societies. Industrious small and medium-sized firms play the most significant role in creating new employment. PUM therefore grants preference to local companies. PUM believes that ensuring a sustainable development of the private sector is the best way to fight poverty; there is no ideological basis. Its policy is practical and business-like: helping small and medium-sized businesses stand on their own two feet is more effective than theorising and moralising. PUM only provides help in response to specified requests: it works directly and cost-effectively. This method has proved to be extremely successful and has created a great deal of goodwill. Procedures: please check www.pum.nl 6. Small Embassy Projects and Human Rights Fund The Netherlands Embassy in Manila supports via this programme local organisations that promote good governance and human rights in the Philippines Procedures: Submit proposal to the Netherlands Embassy. Proposal screened by the Embassy. Decision will be made based on the quality of the proposal and available budget. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 26th floor, Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City Tel: (02) 786-6622 Email: [email protected] www.netherlandsembassy.ph

NEW ZEALAND The objective of New Zealand’s Official Development Assistance (ODA) is sustainable development in developing countries, in order to reduce poverty and contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world. New Zealand's ODA is managed and delivered by the New Zealand Agency for International Development (NZAID), which is part of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. New Zealand’s ODA budget for the Philippines is estimated to be around NZ$4 million annually. These allocation funds activities aligned with key thematic objectives and cross-cutting programmes outlined in a five year country strategy agreed between the Philippine and New Zealand Governments in 2003. These strategic themes and programmes include:     

Natural resource management; Indigenous peoples’ empowerment; Good governance; Peace and development in Mindanao; and Human resource development.

Major activities under the current country programme include: 

Camiguin Coastal Resources Management Programme. A province-wide intervention addressing the complex issues of sustainable management of coastal and marine resources in Camiguin (NZ $3million, 2008–2012).



Natural Resource Management through Enterprise Development. This project of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation assists forest dwellers, local government units and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) to develop financially viable, ecologically sound and socio-culturally appropriate community enterprises (NZ$500,000, 2008–2010).



Integrated Programme for Empowerment of Indigenous Peoples and Sustainable Development of Ancestral Domains. This programme of the United Nations Development Programme aims to support the effective implementation of the Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Act (IPRA) through assisting indigenous people to formulate their ancestral domain sustainable development plans (NZ$1.5 million, 2007–2011).



Child-Friendly Movement in Mountain Province. This programme of the United Nations Children's Fund improves early childhood development, education, health and nutrition for indigenous people’s children (NZ$650,000, 2009–2011).



Action for Conflict Transformation Programme. A peace-building and conflict transformation effort of the United Nations Development Programme aimed at improving the lives of conflict-affected indigenous communities in the Caraga region of Mindanao (NZ$1.9 million, 2008–2011).



New Zealand Development Scholarships offer opportunities for Filipinos to undertake postgraduate, development-related studies at universities in New Zealand, so they can better contribute to the human resource development needs of the Philippines (NZ$1.2 million per year).

New Zealand is currently in the process of developing a new country strategy for the continuation of its Philippine ODA programme activities in the next five years. CONTACT DETAILS Patrice Tan NZAID Manager New Zealand Embassy 23rd Floor, BPI Buendia Centre Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 891-5358 local 209 Email: [email protected] www.nzembassy.com/philippines; www.nzaid.govt.nz

SPAIN Focus of Development Cooperation 

Financial cooperation: waste water & solid waste management, air & maritime safety, renewable energy, water supply levels I & II, basic health (mixed credit)



Grants: poverty alleviation (health, water supply, food security), support to peace process, transfer of technology, education and cultural cooperation, presentation of historical heritage



Technical cooperation (grants)



Mixed credit: 50 percent soft loan (1-2.5% interest rate, payable in 30 years inclusive of 10 years grace period) and 50 percent commercial loan (6-8% commercial / credit under the prevailing OECD consensus rate)

CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Office Address: Embassy of Spain 27th Floor Equitable Bank Tower, 8751 Paseo de Roxas 1229 Makati City Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1114 Makati Central Post Office 1251 Makati City, Metro Manila Philippines Tel: (02) 817-6676; 817-5131; 817-9997 Fax: (02) 817-4892 Email: [email protected] www.mae.es/

Program: HEALTH SECTOR REFORM AGENDA/SECTOR DEVELOPMENT APPROACH IN HEALTH PHASE 1 and 2 Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing/Executing Agency: Department of Health (DOH) Program Duration: Phase 1: April 27, 2009 – October 19, 2010 CONTACT DETAILS Bella Fernandez Program Manager/Program Officer for Education and Social Development 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.es

Program: COMPREHENSIVE PILOT INTERVENTION PLAN AGAINST GENDER VIOLENCE IN CARAGA PHASE 2 and 3 Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing/Executing Agency: Department of Social Welfare and Development Program Duration: Phase 1: March 4, 2009 to September 4, 2010 Target Program Location: CARAGA CONTACT DETAILS Bella Fernandez Program Manager/Program Officer for Education and Social Development 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.es

Program: PYPC CYCLE 5 Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing Agency: Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Target Program Location: Bicol and CARAGA Program Description: The objective of the project is to contribute to poverty alleviation by improving the living conditions of the poor and vulnerable groups, ensuring the training and involvement of the communities in the project’s complete cycle, which would provide a continuous learning and community monitoring, internal and independent. CONTACT DETAILS Bella Fernandez Program Manager/Program Officer for Education and Social Development 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.es

Program: ALBAY PUBLIC SAFETY AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT OFFICE Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing Agency: Province of Albay Program Duration: February 26, 2009 to August 26, 2010 Beneficiary and Target Program Location: Province of Albay Program Description: The objective of said subsidy is to contribute to reducing vulnerability against natural disasters in the Province of Albay/Bicol. CONTACT DETAILS Norberto Gomez de Liaño Deputy Coordinator General 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.ph

Program: REHABILITATION OF THE EMERGENCY SCHOOL SHELTER IN GUINOBATAN Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing Agency: Province of Albay Program Duration: February 26, 2009 to August 26, 2010 Beneficiary and Target Program Location: Municipality of Guinobatan (Albay) Program Description: The target project of this subsidy aims to rehabilitate a school located in Guinobatan (Province of Albay) Philippines which was damaged by typhoon Durian. This school provides a double function, as a center of learning and as an evacuation center for the population living in the risk area along the Mayon Volcano’s slopes. The location of this school was certified safe by the state authorities proficient in safety studies which therefore allow it to function as an evacuation center. CONTACT DETAILS Norberto Gomez de Liaño Deputy Coordinator General 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.ph

Program: REHABILITATION OF THE EMERGENCY SCHOOL SHELTER IN CAMALIG Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing Agency: Province of Albay Program Duration: February 26, 2009 to August 26, 2010 Beneficiary and Target Program Location: Municipality of Camalig (Albay) Program Description: The target project of this subsidy aims to rehabilitate a school located in Camalig (Province of Albay) Philippines which was damaged by typhoon Durian. This school provides a double function, as a center of learning and as an evacuation center for the population living in the risk area along the Mayon Volcano’s slopes. The location of this school was certified safe by the state authorities proficient in safety studies which therefore allow it to function as an evacuation center. CONTACT DETAILS Norberto Gomez de Liaño Deputy Coordinator General 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.ph

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA U.S. Agency for International Development/Philippines The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is the principal agency responsible for managing U.S. Government assistance programs in more than 100 developing countries around the world. Under the overall foreign policy direction of the Secretary of State, USAID helps build and sustain democratic, well-governed states that respond to the needs of their people, reduce widespread poverty, and conduct themselves responsibly in the international system. The United States has a long-standing and successful development partnership with the Philippines. Over the past 30 years, U.S. Embassy Manila's USAID Mission has provided more than US$5 billion in total assistance, making the United States the largest grant donor to the Philippines. USAID/Philippines’ current programs support local efforts to promote the development of a more peaceful and prosperous Philippines that can better provide an improved quality of life and future for all Filipinos. Among the focus of development cooperation of USAID in the area of social services are as follows:

1. HEALTH Filipinos suffer from high rates of malnutrition, high infant and maternal mortality, and one of the highest tuberculosis (TB) rates in the world. HIV prevalence remains low, but still poses a risk. The rate of population growth, at 2.05% per year from 2000-2004, is one of the highest in Southeast Asia. At the same time, the documented gap between actual fertility (3.5 children per woman) compared to desired fertility (2.5 children per woman) signals a significant unmet need for reproductive health services and commodities. USAID supports the enhanced capacity of provinces, cities, municipalities and the private sector to provide quality health services. USAID-supported programs focus on promoting access to maternal and child health care including voluntary family planning, micronutrient supplementation and food fortification, prevention and treatment for TB, surveillance and prevention of HIV/AIDS and emerging diseases like avian influenza. All USAID activities support the Philippine government's Health Sector Reform Agenda and are implemented through a bilateral assistance agreement with the Philippine Department of Health (DOH). USAID's strategic approach to these challenges seeks to achieve results in these areas: 1.1.Maternal and Child Health (MCH)

Maternal and infant deaths are preventable. Yet, 10 women die everyday due to pregnancy-related causes and 24 newborns per 1,000 live births die (2006 FPS). USAID, through the Strengthening Local Governance for Health (HealthGov) Project and the Sustainable Health Improvements through Empowerment and Local Development (SHIELD) Project helps the public sector strengthen local health systems, financing, and health service provision. These two projects cover all USAID’s health program areas -- maternal and child health (MCH), family planning (FP), HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB), and emerging infectious diseases in the ARMM areas (thru SHIELD) and non-ARMM areas (thru HealthGov). Specific to MCH, HealthGov develops technical assistance products such as a tool for accessing the Department of Health’s (DOH) MCH grants by local governments. HealthGov supports advocacy for increased funding support and improved programs on MCH and other health issues. SHIELD assists in building community partnerships for health and provide support to LGUs in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). SHIELD mobilizes Community Health Action Teams (CHATs), which assist the health service providers in caring for mothers and newborns, including early detection and referral of mothers and newborns with complications. USAID, through the Private Sector Mobilization for Family Health (PRISM) Project, expands private sector provision of health services on MCH and FP through workplace initiatives, market development and private practice initiatives. PRISM engages companies and cooperatives to increase employees or cooperative members’ access to family health information and services. In the Micronutrient and Child Blindness (A2Z) Project, USAID promotes micronutrient and food fortification especially for mothers and children. A2Z, in collaboration with the other USAID health projects, supports public and private sector programs to increase awareness and coverage of Vitamin A supplementation for children, iron supplementation for pregnant women, Vitamin A and iron fortification of food (e.g., flour, cooking oil) and use of zinc and oral rehydration salts for diarrhea management. USAID, through the Health Policy and Development Project (HPDP), helps develop appropriate policies and build a systematic policy change process in DOH, with focus on contraceptive self-reliance/FP/MCH. HPDP runs an operations research project in Compostela Valley that is testing an integrated approach for preventing mother and child deaths through information and social mobilization. Through the Health Promotion and Communication Project (HealthPro), USAID assists LGUs through the DOH and related agencies to broaden the reach, improve the quality, and sustain health promotion and communications to increase appropriate healthy behaviors and practices. HealthPro helps to develop a behavior change

communication (BCC) national strategy and local campaign plans and materials on MCH, FP, TB, HIV/AIDS and emerging infectious diseases. 1.2.Family Planning (FP) While the total fertility rate (TFR) declined from 6 to 3.2 children per woman from 1970 to 2006, there is still a high unmet need for family planning (FP) and reproductive health services (16% based on the 2006 Family Planning Survey). To address this unmet need, the Philippine government aims to increase the modern contraceptive prevalence rate from 36% in 2006 to 60% in 2010 and reduce TFR to 2.7 in 2011. The short term goals are to improve service quality in health facilities and to increase demand and access to modern contraceptive methods in both public and private sectors. USAID, through PRISM, expands private sector provision of family planning services mainly through commercial sales of low-priced contraceptives by pharmaceutical companies. PRISM increases the number and quality of USAIDtrained private sector health providers and USAID-assisted private service delivery points, giving Filipinos greater access to a wider range of family planning and maternal and child health services. Through HealthGov, USAID provides technical assistance on FP to the public sector through contraceptive self-reliance (CSR) planning, resource generation and implementation; support to FP competency-based training of regional and provincial FP trainers, among others. USAID, through SHIELD, adopts culture- and religion-sensitive interventions to improve family planning practice in Muslim communities. It organizes Community Health Action Teams (CHATs) which help in educating communities on the importance of appropriate health behaviors and how to access health services. 1.3.Tuberculosis (TB) The Philippines has the ninth highest burden of TB in the world. With 107 Filipinos dying of TB every day, it is the country’s sixth leading cause of death and illness. The majority of TB cases are found in those between the ages of 15-54, impacting not only the health of the person infected, but the economic stability of the family and community. USAID supports the reduction of TB prevalence and mortality through the Linking Initiatives and Networking to Control Tuberculosis (TB LINC) Project, which supports the DOH’s TB control initiatives. TB LINC promotes utilization of DOTS (Directly Observe Treatment Short Course) in 17 provinces and three cities in the country. In the nine provinces not covered by TB LINC, HealthGov implements the USAID-assisted TB programs, in particular advocacy support for TB control. USAID has been improving sustainability of financing by optimizing PhilHealth

reimbursements as a funding source for TB programs. The program helps to integrate DOTS into the local health system and among private providers and develops prototypes of LGU ordinances for local TB control. It helps improve the strategic and investment plans for TB and forges multi-sectoral collaboration to fight TB. 1.4.HIV/AIDS HIV incidence in the country, despite being considered by some as “low and slow” should actually be regarded as "hidden and growing." Aside from low reporting of cases due to social stigma attached to the disease, significant risks exist for increased HIV prevalence in the most-at-risk populations (MARPs), such as sex workers, injecting drug users and men having sex with men. Such risks are mainly due to low knowledge about HIV transmission, high prevalence of unprotected sexual partnerships leading to increasing prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and high levels of needle sharing among injecting drug users. USAID, through HealthGov, strengthens local responses to HIV/AIDS, including a mechanism for LGU performance-based grants to NGOs, and promotes advocacy support for HIV/AIDS prevention and has initiated steps to do to cross-border monitoring of HIV-AIDS. HealthPro assists in enhancing BCC strategies for HIV/AIDS, such as the peer education approach to the prevention of HIV/AIDS, and maximizing public events in creating awareness of HIV/AIDS. 1.5.Emerging Infectious Diseases Infectious diseases like Avian Influenza (AI) and other emerging diseases are a continuous threat. USAID through HealthGov strengthens the preparedness and response of local governments through the organization of community-based early warning systems and response plans. TB LINC and SHIELD projects have developed information campaigns on AI while TB LINC and HealthPro have supported printing and dissemination of information materials for the public on how to prevent the transmission of infections such as A(H1N1) influenza.

2. EDUCATION 2.1.Basic Education Through the Education Quality and Access for Learning and Livelihood Skills (EQuALLS) Project, USAID improves access to and quality of basic education in Mindanao. Working with the national and ARMM Departments of Education, EQuALLS increases learning opportunities through providing infrastructure and materials, improving instruction quality in English, science and math, mobilizing local governments, communities, and other stakeholders to give greater support to basic education, and increasing learning opportunities for out-of-school children and youth through alternative learning systems. EQuALLS is being implemented by a

team of local and international organizations with expertise in youth development, led by the Education Development Center. Areas:  Learning Opportunities for Children and Youth Through Community Support for Education  Instruction Quality for English, Science and Math Education for Out-of-School Children and Youth 2.2.Workforce Development USAID improves opportunities for out-of-school youth (OSY) in Mindanao under its Education Quality and Access for Learning and Livelihood Skills (EQuALLS) Project. OSY’s acquire certification for vocational and technical training to prepare them for the job market, or learn other valuable livelihood skills to make the youth productive members of the community. Area:  Education and Training for Out-of-School Youth

3. HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE The Philippines is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world. Its geography and location make the island nation particularly vulnerable to natural hazards. The most frequent disasters that occur are caused by typhoons, which sweep the country annually; approximately 19 typhoon systems affect the Philippines each year. In addition, the Philippines has experienced devastating earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, and conflict in Mindanao has caused people to be displaced from their homes, disrupting their livelihoods. The U.S. Government, principally through USAID and the U.S. military, has provided humanitarian assistance to the Philippines in response to natural disasters on many occasions. USAID has also supported a limited number of disaster preparedness and mitigation activities in the Philippines, directly or through regional programs. The USAID Administrator is designated as the U.S. President's Special Coordinator for International Disaster Assistance, and USAID's Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) is the USAID office principally responsible for providing non-food humanitarian assistance in response to international crises and disasters. Its mandate is to save lives and alleviate human suffering, and to reduce the economic and social impact of natural and human-made disasters by providing limited support for disaster prevention, preparedness and mitigation. In the event of a disaster in the Philippines, USAID/Philippines works closely with U.S. Embassy agencies such as the U.S. military to coordinate U.S. government relief

assistance. USAID/Philippines also helps to manage a limited number of ongoing USAID/OFDA-funded disaster mitigation activities.

CONTACT DETAILS Elzadia Washington Acting Mission Director USAID Philippines 8th Floor, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines Tel: (02) 552-9900; 552-9800 Fax: (02) 551-9297; 552-9999 philippines.usaid.gov/ Myra Emata-Stokes Chief, Office of Program Resource Management 8/F, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines

USAID in MINDANAO Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago comprise about one-third of the Philippines' territory and one-quarter of the country’s total population of approximately 87 million. It has the highest levels of poverty in the Philippines, partly because of the longstanding conflict between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) and separatist groups within the Muslim population, which numbers over four million. After years of negotiations, one of the two main separatist groups, the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), signed a Peace Agreement with the GRP in 1996. USAID responded immediately with livelihood training, infrastructure development, and other economic incentives to facilitate the reintegration of former MNLF combatants. As economic growth in Mindanao has accelerated in recent years, negotiations between the primary remaining Muslim separatist group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), and the GRP have intensified. USAID is ready to support the consolidation of the peace process by quickly responding to the opportunity provided by such a GRPMILF agreement. USAID directs 60% of its total assistance towards Mindanao, focusing on the following areas: 1. Peace and Security Helping communities in conflict-affected areas of Mindanao to rebuild a peaceful economy by providing former combatants the production inputs, training, and marketing assistance needed to become small-scale commercial farmers. 2. Economic Growth Promoting economic growth that provides business opportunities for as many individuals as possible by supporting producers associations and chambers of commerce. USAID is developing needed basic infrastructure, such as ports and bridges, and assisting rural banks to profitably provide loans and deposit services to microenterprises. Assisting local governments in Mindanao to effectively manage natural resources, improve urban environmental management, and use renewable energy supplied through public-private partnerships. 3. Democracy and Governance Partnering with local officials to combat corruption by focusing on transparency and accountability in public administration processes at the local level. 4. Health

Working with Muslim Religious Leaders and local governments to improve the delivery of family health services, including the prevention of water-borne illnesses and infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and TB. 5. Education Increasing access to quality education and livelihood skills in areas most affected by conflict and poverty and improving the quality of instruction—particularly in math, science, and English. USAID also provides vocational training opportunities for out-ofschool youth.

CONTACT DETAILS Elzadia Washington Acting Mission Director USAID Philippines 8th Floor, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines Tel: (02) 552-9900; 552-9800 Fax: (02) 551-9297; 552-9999 philippines.usaid.gov/ Myra Emata-Stokes Chief, Office of Program Resource Management 8/F, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines

MULTI-LATERAL OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (ADB) ADB is a multilateral development bank owned by 67 members, 48 from the region and 19 from other parts of the world. ADB’s main instruments for helping its developing member countries are policy dialogue, loans, equity investments, guarantees, grants, and technical assistance (TA). Uniquely, the Philippines is not only Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) founding member and 11th largest shareholder, but also its host country. It is the fifth largest borrower, accounting for about 8% of total sovereign and nonsovereign lending. It is also one of the largest clients for private sector lending and equity investments, and is a supplier, winning bids under ADB loans and technical assistance (TA) projects. In response to assessments that ADB’s large program with the Philippines had yielded less than expected, and taking into account economic uncertainties, the Country Strategy and Program (CSP) for 2005–2007 was framed to make a significant break with past practice. In alignment with Philippine priorities, it had a tight strategic focus on fiscal consolidation, an improved investment climate, and the accelerated attainment of the Millennium Development Goals. There is greater selectivity of projects to be supported. The CSP’s flexibility has served its purpose well, allowing wide tolerance in the ADB– Philippines partnership and ensuring new operations do not run ahead of the political, macroeconomic, and sector supports needed for sustainability and high impact.

ONGOING ADB PROGRAM FOR LGUS 1. Program: Development of Poor Urban Communities Sector Project (DPUCSP) Lead Implementing Agency: Development Bank of the Philippines Program Duration: 2003-2010 Beneficiaries: About 60 poor urban communities, largely informal settlement areas, are expected to directly benefit from the sites and services development subprojects, and at least another 60 nearby communities will indirectly benefit from offsite infrastructure, including flood protection, roads, and drainage Target Program Location: The Project is a sector project and will be available to all cities and first-class municipalities outside Metro Manila. Program Description: The purpose of the Project is to put in place systems to provide affordable housing and serviced land for the poor. In order to do this, it will (i) improve the access of low income urban families to tenured, serviced plots and to opportunities for upgraded and new housing; (ii) provide appropriate finance for shelter and other

services; (iii) strengthen low-income communities and LGU support for such communities; and (iv) mobilize communities and LGUs to participate in the shelter provision and finance parts of the Project, which were expected at appraisal to produce 12,000 new houses, 2,300 home improvements and 10,000 livelihood loans in 60 communities in 20 cities by April 2010. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Leopoldo A. Resmundo, Jr. Head, Housing and Livelihood Unit./ Program Manager Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) Sen. Gil Puyat cor. Makati Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 812-5703 Fax: (02) 812-8088 Email: [email protected] 2. Program Title: Philippine Basic Urban Services Investement Projects (PBUSIP) Lead Implementing Agency: Development Bank of the Philippines Program Duration: 2010-2019 Target Program Location: The PBUSIP will provide financing for priority economic and environmental infrastructure projects which support development in the three largest and most dynamic metropolitan regions of the country: (i) the Greater Manila Metropolitan Region. The Greater Manila Metropolitan Region is defined to include Metro Manila/National Capital Region (NCR), Region III (Batangas, Cavite, Laguna, Quezon, and Rizal), and Region IV (Bataan, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Tarlac, and Zambales)., (ii) Metro Cebu, (iii) Metro Davao. The PBUSIP project area will also encompass four LGU clusters in the island groups of Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao Program Description: The PBUSIP is a sequel to Loan 1843-PHI: Mindanao Basic Urban Services Sector Project (MBUSSP). The goal of PBUSIP is to improve the standard of living, environment and economic opportunities for urban areas. Its expected outcome is increased quality, coverage, and reliability of basic urban services and infrastructure in the participating cities, municipalities and provinces. The Investment Program will give preference to three metropolitan regions of Manila, Cebu and Davao and four clusters of LGUs in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao which jointly pursue local economic development initiatives. The Program will be financed under a MFF with three tranches over a ten-year disbursement period up to 2019.

CONTACT DETAILS Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) Sen. Gil Puyat cor. Makati Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 818-9511

INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND DRUG (IFAD) The International Food And Drug (IFAD, a specialized agency of the United Nations, was established as an international financial institution in 1977 as one of the major outcomes of the 1974 World Food Conference. The Conference was organized in response to the food crises of the early 1970s that primarily affected the Sahelian countries of Africa. The conference resolved that “an International Fund for Agricultural Development should be established immediately to finance agricultural development projects primarily for food production in the developing countries”. One of the most important insights emerging from the conference was that the causes of food insecurity and famine were not so much failures in food production, but structural problems relating to poverty and to the fact that the majority of the developing world’s poor populations were concentrated in rural areas. IFAD is dedicated to eradicating rural poverty in developing countries. Seventy-five percent of the world’s poorest people – 1.05 billion women, children and men – live in rural areas and depend on agriculture and related activities for their livelihoods. Working with rural poor people, governments, donors, non-governmental organizations and many other partners, IFAD focuses on country-specific solutions, which can involve increasing rural poor peoples’ access to financial services, markets, technology, land and other natural resources.

IFAD’s Strategy in the Philippines IFAD’s current strategy in the Philippines has evolved from the government’s own strategic initiative – contained in its social reform agenda – from IFAD’s own strategic framework and key strategies for Asia and the Pacific region, and from lessons learned from past operations in the country. Past experiences have sharpened the focus of IFAD’s activities to concentrate on the least-favoured marginal upland and coastal areas, home to many of the country’s poorest people. Target groups include the indigenous peoples and people who benefited from agrarian reform in the uplands, coastal fishers, landless people and women, in general, who are among the poorest of the poor. IFAD works with the government and other partners to help reduce poverty in some of the poorest areas in the country: Bicol, Panay Island, Samar and Leyte, Northern Mindanao and Caraga. IFAD loans support:     

Decentralization, by strengthening capacities of local institutions Enterprise and market development Private sector involvement in operations Improved management of natural resources and the environment Access to assets, technologies and markets

Poor people’s access to the financial services that they need to improve their incomes is a crucial factor in breaking the poverty cycle. In the Philippines, IFAD supports institutions that adopt the Grameen banking approach, providing microcredit in the form of small, every tiny, loans to borrowers who have little to no collateral. Programmes and projects financed by IFAD promote innovative approaches to some of the issues that perpetuate rural poverty. Key innovative features of IFAD operations in the Philippines focus on securing access to land in ancestral domains for indigenous peoples, on putting in place land use planning, and on helping indigenous peoples achieve better management of natural resources.

On-Going Operations 1. Second Cordillera Highland Agricultural Resource Management Project The project builds on the first Cordillera Highland Agricultural Resource Management Project, which has contributed to reducing poverty among indigenous peoples in the highlands of Cordillera Region in the northern Philippines. The second project concentrates on areas where poverty is most severe in all six provinces of the region: Abra, Apayao, Benguet, Ifugao, Kalinga and Mountain province. The aim is to reduce poverty and improve the livelihoods of indigenous peoples living in farming communities in the mountainous project area. The indigenous peoples consist of many tribes, whose main economic activity is agriculture. More than half of the people in the area are poor. 2. Rapid Food Production Enhancement Programme The programme will support the government’s 2009-2013 Rice Self-Sufficiency Plan, a nationwide effort to regain self-sufficiency in rice production and to respond to the rising food price crisis that emerged in 2008. IFAD’s investment will provide support for securing good quality seed to boost rice production and for rehabilitating and developing irrigation works. The programme includes two subprogrammes that are separate but mutually dependent:  

The Rapid Seed Supply Financing Project (RaSSFiP), to be implemented in 2009 The Irrigated Rice Production Enhancement Project (IRPEP), to be implemented from 2010 to 2015

The programme targets poor paddy farmers and poor irrigators’ associations in various rice-growing areas, with the objective of achieving an increase in paddy production. 3. Rural Microenterpise Promotion Programme

Building on the experiences of the IFAD-funded Rural Microenterprise Finance Project, the programme targets the poorest 19 provinces in five of the poorest regions in the country, focusing on areas with the highest potential for enterprise development. The aim is to raise the incomes and improve the livelihoods of rural poor people by providing them with loans and other financial services and with business development services such as capacity-building, market linkages and product development. It will work with poor microentrepreneurs and other poor people involved in microenterprises, including women, young people and indigenous peoples. Although the programme will focus on formation and expansion of microenterprise at the lower and poorer end of the scale of assets, it will also include larger microenterprises, which are an important source of employment. The programme’s objective is to see increasing numbers of new and existing rural microenterprises expanding and operating profitably and sustainably. Investments will support microfinance and credit, microenterprise promotion and development, and programme and policy coordination. Programme operations will adhere to sound financial principles and resources will be concentrated in a limited area to avoid diluting their impact. Rural poor people will have a voice in programme planning and in adjustments that are required during implementation. Activities will pinpoint policy issues and opportunities.

Completed Operations 1. Northern Mindanao Community Initiatives and Resource Management Project Loan number(s) : I – 577 –PH 2. Western Mindanao Community Initiatives Project Loan number(s): I – 474 – PH CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Thomas Elhaut Director, Asia and Pacific Division Mr. Sana F.K. Jatta Country Programme Manager Via Paolo di Dono, 44 Rome, Italy

UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND (UNFPA) The United Nations Fund for Population Activities was established as a trust fund in the 1967 and began funding population programmes in 1969. In 1987, it was officially renamed the United Nations Population Fund, reflecting its lead role in the UN system in the area of population. The original abbreviation, UNFPA, was retained. For general communications, UNFPA is used as the Fund’s working title in all languages. The full name is spelled out after the first reference. Official UN documents use the full written out name. Goal UNFPA promotes the right of all individuals to develop to their fullest potential. To exercise this right, all people, especially women, needs access to information and services on reproductive health, including family planning and sexual health, to enable them to make informed all voluntary choices and decisions. As reflected in our mission statement, the Fund “supports countries in using population data for policies and programmes to reduce poverty and to ensure that every pregnancy is wanted, every birth is safe, very young person is free of HIV/AIDS, and every girl and woman is treated with dignity and respect. Focus The primary focus of the UNFPA is to meet the Fifth Millenium Development Goal. This goal aims to reduce maternal mortality ration by three quarters, between 1990 and 2015 and to provide universal access to reproductive health. The Fund promotes a holistic approach to reproductive health care that includes access to a range of safe and affordable. CONTACT DETAILS 30th Floor, Yuchengco Tower 1 RCBC Plaza, 6819 Ayala Avenue 1229 Makati City Tel: (02) 901-0100 www.unfpa.org.ph

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF) UNICEF is the world’s leading child rights advocacy organization. Its global experience and mandate influences support from decision makers to create a world fit for children. Around the world, UNICEF’s expertise helps meet the challenges facing children and those who safeguard them. Its experience has given UNICEF a profound understanding of development and how important children are to human progress. UNICEF is about realizing the rights of every child around the world. UNICEF’s expertise and commitment help the Philippines meet the challenges facing children and those who safeguard them. It began providing assistance to the Philippines in November 1948. Since then, it has been working with the Philippine government in protecting Filipino children. It has more than 60 people working to promote and protect the rights of children, and it aims to provide the best quality of life for every Filipino child through programmes that help them survive and flourish. UNICEF’s programmes cover education, health and nutrition, HIV and AIDS prevention, child protection, communication, and local policy and institutional development. UNICEF’s work is geared towards:      

Helping children develop into their full potential Enroll and keep kids in school Create a safe and protective environment Ensure that children’s voices are heard and counted Involve and mobilize society to fulfil, promote and protect children’s rights Assist and protect children in emergencies and disasters

UNICEF supports the Child-Friendly Movement, which engages all levels of government, non-governmental partners, civil society, other United Nations agencies, and children themselves. CONTACT DETAILS Vanessa J. Tobin Representative Colin Davis Deputy Representative 31/F Yuchengco Tower 1, RCBC Plaza, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 901-0100 www.unicef.org/philippines

ALTERNATIVE PLANNING INITIATIVES, INC. (ALTERPLAN) ALTERPLAN is a non-stock, non-profit NGO that undertakes projects, programs and policy research, and generally provides services to its partners. The work the institution undertakes concerns space and the built environment as integral components or focal points for community development. As a technical service organization, Alterplan works in partnership with community-based organizations and other non-government organizations in building their capacities to analyze, implement, plan and steer area-based development. ALTERPLAN was incorporated in 1990 by a group of women-architects/planners whose vision was a just and democratic Philippines with a total environment that is nurturing of its citizens. The group realized in the course of its work with people’s organizations and NGOs in different regions that the role of architects and planners was not so much to design and build structures, but to ensure that the conditions in both the natural and the built environment were supportive of people’s aspirations. ALTERPLAN promotes a planning attitude that recognizes the ability and the right of people to plan and pursue their own destiny, within a society that allocates its resources fairly among its people. It provides services within a framework of integrated sociophysical area development planning. ALTERPLAN has immersed itself in working with communities, mostly urban poor, in examining and planning for resettlement and on-site development areas and in using planning tools to attain land tenure. Working with other NGOs involved in community organizing, ALTERPLAN has touched base with communities in urban areas within and outside Metro Manila. ALTERPLAN also works with local governments in efforts to institutionalize consultative processes in urban planning. ALTERPLAN has established gender and environment as core mandates within its vision. ALTERPLAN is a capacity-building organization whereby technical assistance based on the needs and requests of its partners is provided. With its network of consultants, it is able to access expertise for poor communities after determining with them their needs and plans of action. Programs and Services ALTERPLAN realizes the multi-disciplinary character of community development and so seeks to expand the perspective of the communities it assists to open up to each aspect of development: from the financial, technical, organizational, to the environmental and socio-economic. This, the institution tries to do without overwhelming the community and losing sight of their internal capabilities and aspirations.

The following are the services that ALTERPLAN offers:  Design and implementation of training workshops and seminars. A number of urban poor communities, cooperatives, and other NGO’s have benefited from specialized modules that it has designed for their specific needs in community planning and cooperative housing.  Research, including policy research, related to its areas of concern. Among the studies that have been conducted are those on gender, medium-rise buildings as housing solutions, housing finance, solid waste management and cooperative housing development in the Philippines.  Library of resource materials that can be accessed by interested individuals or groups. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Sarah Redoblado Executive Director Rm. 307, Bencom Bldg., 146 West Ave., Quezon City Tel: (02) 448-7287 Email: [email protected], [email protected] www.alterplan.org.ph

The ANDRES SORIANO FOUNDATION, INC. The Andres Soriano Foundation is a non-stock, non-profit foundation established by A Soriano Corporation (Anscor) in 1968 to contribute to national development through the practice and promotion of corporate social responsibility. Forging partnerships between the business sector – starting with Anscor and its affiliates and subsidiaries – and its various stakeholders, the Foundation implements integrated area development programs for beneficiary communities in the small islands of north-east Palawan. It also has grant program for NGOs and other institutions which have programs on fighting against cancer. Flagship Programs A. Small Islands Sustainable Development Program (SISDEP) Four key result areas: 1. Effective agenda-based governance aims to develop leadership capacities to manage community resources on a sustained basis, in alliance with the local government to ensure a favorable policy environment. 2. Resource management helps people’s organizations institutionalize efforts that protect and rehabilitate critical marine and territorial areas while respecting the need for socio-economic growth. 3. Economic mainstreaming harnesses sustainable on-shore livelihood opportunities that ease the pressure on marine resources. 4. Basic services provide access to potable water and pre-school education, and to reproductive health and family planning information. B. Cancer Abatement and Rehabilitation Efforts (CARE) ASF’s second flagship program dates back to the founding of the Andres Soriano Cancer Research Foundation in 1965. Three-pronged program of research and training, treatment services for indigent patients, and consensus building. CONTACT DETAILS Lemia Liguaton-Simbulan Executive Director A. Soriano Aviation Hangar, Andrews Avenue, 1300 Pasay City Tel: (02) 831-9941; 834-0874

Fax: (02) 834-0872 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.anscor.com.ph/foundation/foundation.html

AYALA FOUNDATION, INC. (AFI) Ayala Foundation, Inc. (AFI) is a nonstock, nonprofit organization that serves as the socio-cultural development arm of the Ayala Group of Companies. AFI is also working to extend the benefits of recent technological developments to a greater number of Filipinos. Through these new technologies, AFI continues to work for the cultivation of Filipino ingenuity and talent, as well as the preservation of our rich culture, history and traditions. Programs and Services Related to Social Service 1. Education 1.1.Center for Excellence in Public Elementary Education (CENTEX) in Tondo, Manila and Bauan, Batangas 1.2.Gearing-up Internet Literacy and Access for Students (GILAS) 1.3.Education and Livelihood Alliance (ELSA) in ARMM 1.4.Youth Leadership Development Unit (YLDU) and the Ayala Young Leaders Congress (AYLC) 1.5.Text-to-Teach 2. Arts and Culture 2.1.Ayala Museum 2.2.Filipinas Heritage Library 3. Social Development 3.1.Ayala Social Initiatives 3.2.Buklod Bahayan Daycare Center in Silang, Cavite 3.3.Iraya Mangyans of Puerto Galera, Mindoro 3.4.Tabang Mindanaw Project 3.5.Calatagan Retirees Program 3.6.Global Forum on Migration and Development 3.7.Ayala Foundation USA CONTACT DETAILS Victoria Garchitorena President 10th Floor Ayala Wing, BPI Building 6768 Ayala Avenue corner Paseo de Roxas Makati City, 1226 Philippines

Tel: (02) 752-1101 to 02 Fax: (02) 813-4487; 813-4488 Email: [email protected] www.ayalafoundation.org

BANGSAMORO WOMEN FOUNDATION FOR PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT (BMWFPDI)

The Bangsamoro Women Foundation for Peace and Development, Inc. (BMWFPDI) is a non-profit organization established two months after the Peace Agreement was signed between the Government of the Philippines and the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) on September 2, 1996. The BMWF has more than 17,000 women followers, mainly families and supporters of the Moro combatants. A board of Trustees, composed of 13 members, provides the over-all policy and guidance to the BWFPDI. The foundation has collaborated and worked with the following organizations: CIDA, USAID, UNFPA, GTZ, TAF, US Embassy, all Moro NGO Consortium, Ford Foundation, PBSP, Kusog Mindanao Forum, Foundation for Phil. Environment, KADTUNTAYA Foundation Inc., NDFCAI-WED, ABANSE Pinay, Murid Center, PDAP, and Mindanao Council of Women Leader Forum. Its area of operation includes 17 provinces and 14 cities namely: The provinces of Basilan, Cotabato, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte, Davao Oriental, Lanao del Sur, lanao Norte, Maguindanao, Palawan, Sarangani, Sultan Kudarat, Sulu, South Cotabato, TawiTawi, Zamboanga del Sur, Sibugay and Zamboanga del Norte. The cities of Cotabato , Dapitan, Dipolog, General Santos, Iligan, Marawi, Pagadian, Pueto Princesa, Davao, Kidapawan, Koronadal, Tacurong, Zamboanga and Isabela. Vision: Empowered Bangsamoro women who are God fearing, self-reliant, just, progressive and, living in a healthy environment. Mission: To harness the potentials of the Bangsamoro Women through participation in the socio-economic, political and cultural field. Goal: To institutionalize the full integration, mainstreaming and participation of Bangsamoro women and children in the advancement of peace and development of Mindanao and its islands. Programs Related to Social Services: 1.3.Women Organizing, Training Capability Building A basic strategy in the empowerment of Bangsamoro lies in strengthening their organization capabilities a. The foundation facilitates the formation and corresponding accreditation of the Bangsamoro women organization. b. Enlist a pool of trainers and develop modules relevant to the training of the Bangsamoro women. c. Conducts intensive training for all Bangsamoro women organizations as may be required by them. d. Conducts and coordinate women assemblies, conferences and congress. e. Develop women leaders for participation in policy making bodies.

2.4.Functional Literacy/Numeracy Program (non-formal education) a. Conducts literacy and numeracy programs for far flung communities in coordination with Dep. Ed., BNFE and other organizations. b. Enlist a pool of facilitators from non-formal education. c. Provide capacity building and accessing resources for women organizations o manage and implement non-formal education in their communities. 3.5.Health a. The foundation emphasizes community-based people’s participation - where health providers and target families are partners in health care. b. Implement Reproductive Health Program. c. Assist communities to access resources for the establishment of BHS & Botica sa Barangay. 4.6.Livelihood a. The foundation provides small scale lending for women. b. Facilitates fund sourcing for livelihood to member organization. 5.7.Children Program a. Conducts Focus Group discussion with mothers and mothers class b. Implements Program for children 6.8.Emergency Assistance Program a. b.

Provides basic necessity to victims of natural/man made calamity Assist evacuees during their stay at the evacuation center

The Foundation has implemented following donor-funded programs/projects:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Program/Project Emergency Livelihood Assistance Project & LEAP Real Property Taxation & HRD Barangay/Municipal Planning and Budgeting/TAG Reproductive Health Program Livelihood Assistance Community Organizing & Livelihood Assistance Livelihood Assistance

8. Literacy Program 9. Tobacco Survey 10. Baseline Survey of National Objective for Health 11. Hospital Assessment 12. Capability Building & Livelihood CONTACT DETAILS Door 1, Salik Apt., Espino St., Rabago Extension, Cotabato City, 9600 Philippines Tel: (064) 421-6154 Email: [email protected]

Funding Source GEM-USAID

Duration 1997-2005

TAF-USAID TAF-USAID

2003 2002 to date

UNFPA SZOPAD-World Bank PBSP

1997-2003 2000 2001-2004

Prof Nur Misuari & Manila Bulletin World Ed. & ADB

2000 1997-2001

UP & DOH UP& DOH

2003 (2 mos.) 2002 (6 mos.)

JSI US Embassy

2003 (3 mos.) 2007

BROKENSHIRE INTEGRATED HEALTH MINISTRIES, INC. (BIHMI) Brokenshire supports training of health workers, medical mission, research and documentation, community organizing and socio-economic programs in selected poor communities in the Southern Mindanao Region. BIHMI through its Brokenshire Memorial Hospital: 

Offers medical training (internship and residency) and nursing training (hospital-based short-term training program).



Provides training for community health workers and disaster volunteers in the different poor communities in Mindanao.



Supports human resource training and development by providing conducive training venues and high-tech facilities for small, medium, and large groups.

CONTACT DETAILS The CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Brokenshire Heights, Madapo Hills, Davao City

Tel: (082) 305-3524 Fax: (082) 224-1214 Email: [email protected]

www.brokenshire.org

CENTER FOR EMPOWERMENT AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, INC. (CERD) CERD is a non-government organization that is operating for 31 years now. It envisions empowered, self-reliant coastal communities sustainably living in harmony with abundant and diverse coastal and marine environment, and as such would like to contribute to saving and restoring coastal environment through capability building of local organizations; creation of model communities and learning areas; and building partnerships. CERD’s work with the fisherfolk communities started with researches on fisherfolk problems, consciousness raising activities and providing trainings. A research in 1984 showed that women played major roles in pre- and post- harvest phases of fishing, with some even participating in actual harvesting. This alerted CERD for the need to organize both men and women fishers in order to develop the fisheries sector.

MAJOR PROGRAMS AND SERVICES A. Fishery Integrated Resource Management for Economic Development (FIRMED) FIRMED is a multi-disciplinary approach to fishery management as it integrates such development strategies as community organizing, capability building, human resource development, sustainable fisheries management, socioeconomic and enterprise development; rehabilitation and conservation work, policy advocacy and networking; and institutional development towards addressing the problems and issues of men and women fishers, and the entire coastal community. It caters to the needs of other institutions engaged in coastal resource management and bio-diversity conservation. FIRMED program is currently being implemented in Biri and Mondragon in Northern Samar, and in Hinatuan and Marihatag in Surigao del Sur. FIRMED implementation has led to the establishment of several community based coastal resource management strategies and tools in Maqueda Bay and Samar Sea in Samar, Western Batangas, Matarinao Bay in Eastern Samar. Among these are 11 fish sanctuaries with total area of 1406 hectares; wherein 7 sanctuaries are from Hinatuan, 3 demarcated fishery management areas (DFMA) in Mondragon, mangrove reforestation and protection with a total of 975 hectares in 8 barangays. Currently also there are 2 municipal federations of fisherfolk organizations being assisted (Hinatuan and Mondragon) plus 4 barangay-based organizations in Biri. Both men and women fishers have been involved in the development and management of these initiatives. For the year 2007-2011 one of CERD’s Goals is “CERD institutional and program sustainability developed, operational and ensured”. Among the initiatives undertaken to achieve this goal is through technology testing and enhancement of marine based products such as seaweeds, milkfish, prawn, and capacity building of partner fishers towards engagement in livelihood and social enterprise development initiatives.

FIRMED Program Components 

Coastal Community and Household Organizing: Formation and strengthening of development structures for people’s empowerment and engagement of fisherfolk households in Community Based Coastal Resource Management.



Sustainable Fisheries Development: Participatory research on the status of the coastal and marine ecosystem and community situation to serve as basis for community planning; coastal and marine resource protection, rehabilitation and management strategies and tools and development of livelihood opportunities.



Livelihood & Enterprise Development: Provision of capital for livelihoods and enterprise development activities; technology testing/piloting; product development and marketing linkage and assistance



Capability Building: Continuing education and training of development workers, community leaders and PO members to enhance their skills, knowledge, attitudes and imbibe positive values towards sustainable development and people empowerment.



Fisheries Policy Advocacy and Participatory Governance: Lobby for the passage of appropriate barangay and municipal ordinances and national policies that address municipal fishers issues and agenda; influence the development planning processes from the barangay, municipal and bay-level to ensure that municipal (men and women) fishers issues and agenda are addressed.



Gender and Development: Mainstreaming of gender and development issues particularly of the municipal fisheries sector in the development processes at the PO level, in the community, and at the household level. Leadership and management skills of Women fishers are developed and enhanced. Coastal and marine resources utilized by women fishers are protected and managed.

B. Gender Mainstreaming The Gender and Development Program facilitates the development of gender-responsive projects among coastal communities. It provides relevant interventions at the household, PO and community levels through gender responsive researches, capacity building, creation of mechanisms for equal participation of men and women in development activities and decision making processes. This program also seeks to sharpen analysis of women and gender issues in the fisheries sector and coastal communities. Gender Mainstreaming program was implemented through the Enhancing Gender Relations in Coastal Resource Management in Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur Phase 1 & 2

from 2002-2007. Through this project Hinatuan was able to implement potable water in 2 islands and Botika ng Barangay in 2 other areas. C. Social Enterprise Program In 2008, as part of institutional sustainability strategy, the Social Enterprise Program was established initially in Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur. The Integrated prawn enterprise has two-pronged goals: to generate profit to sustain its operations in the medium term and allow expansion in the long term. It further aims to achieve this goal by proficiency in other farmed species and continued systems improvement on its current species. An equally important goal is to contribute to the reduction of poverty in coastal communities, i.e. a sustainable social enterprise entity that is instrumental to the coastal community poverty reduction through development and capacity building of municipal fishers to be responsible farm operators and social entrepreneurs, upholding always the highest standard of responsible aquaculture. The program has the prawn hatchery and prawn grow-out in fish pond that aims to generate funds for the continuous implementation of CERD programs and generate employment for PO members. CERD prawn fry facility has the capacity to produce 8 to 11 million fry per sixty (60) day production cycle. Four (4) PO individual members trained and employed as Hatchery Aide. One percent (1%) of produced per cycle is for reseeding of prawn fry to the wild. Thirty one (31) hectares of fish ponds operated with caretakers from partner fisherfolk organization. Municipal fishers are trained in the prawn fishpond operation: feeding, monitoring of growth rate, water exchange, and harvesting. CONTACT DETAILS Ma. Jovelyn T. Cleofe Executive Director 102-E R.L. Mendoza Bldg., Kamuning Road Quezon City, 1103 Philippines Tel: (02) 924-09-44 Telefax: (02) 925-16-42 Email: [email protected]

COMMUNITY HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, INC. (COMDEV) Vision ComDev is a lead organization in a community of well-planned, healthy, self-reliant and environment caring families. Mission ComDev is committed to promote well-planned, healthy and self-reliant families through reproductive health care, social entrepreneurship and environmental management by people who are inspired by a culture of excellence. Goal ComDev seeks to contribute to the achievement of a manageable, healthy population and a sustainable environment. Type of Training Activities Conducted/Assisted by the Organization 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Basic Comprehensive Family Planning for Physicians, Nurses and Midwives Ambulatory Facility Management Bookkeeping for Midwives Recording and Reporting for Midwives Syndromic Management of STI/HIV &AIDS Counseling 6.1.Family Planning for Midwives 6.2.STD/HIV/AIDS for Midwives, Community Health Outreach Workers (Transport Workers), Guidance Counselors, Youth Peer Educators, Inter-Faith Religious Leaders 7. FP/MCH Orientation for Community Based Motivators 8. Basic Training On HIV/AIDS – Principals, Guidance Counselors, Teachers, Youth Peer Educators 9. Workshop on Integrating STD/HIV/AIDS in the High School Curriculum – Supervisors, Principals, Guidance Counselors 10. Gender and Sexuality – Social Workers and Women Community Leaders 11. Participatory Monitoring and Evaluation – Guidance Counselors and Partner Agencies 12. Project Proposal Writing – Partner Agencies 13. Consultative Workshop on Responsible Parenthood for Inter-Faith Religious Leaders 14. Responsible Sexuality – Youth Peer Educators, In-School (High School and College Levels) and Out of School Youth 15. Effective Communication for Inter-Faith Religious Leaders 16. RH Orientation – Senior Citizens, Inter-Faith Religious Leaders, Midwives, Company Based Management Officers 17. Fatwah Orientation – Muslim Religious Leaders and other Inter-Faith Religious Leaders 18. Basic Management – WFMC Midwives 19. NGO Orientation Forum on Fourmula 1 for Sarangani Province

Present and Past Engagements of ComDev 1. NGO Essential Service Provider of WFMC franchised clinics in Region XII and part of ARMM. 2. Chair of the Gensan Reproductive Health Network – spearheads RH related activities 3. Ad hoc Committee Member of Population, Health and Environment (PHE) Mindanao Network with on-going planning for scaling up and hosting of the 2010 conference in Gensan. 4. Participation in legislative advocacy – First draft of the Table of Contents of the Local Public Health Code was assigned to the NGO and has been submitted to the LHB. (As Chair of the Gensan RH Network, it has significantly contributed to the crafting of the RH Code and STI/HIV and AIDS Ordinance Amendment, refinement of the GAD Code and CSR Ordinance during Committee hearings). 5. As lead NGO of the Gensan Inter-Faith Team for Responsible Parenthood (GIFTRP), sustains the organization’s VMG. 6. As NGO partner of the Department of Education in the Youth Peer Education Program, sources out materials and other forms of support to the youth. 7. As member of the Ad hoc Committee of Population, Health and Environment (PHE) Mindanao Network, participates in planning for the 2010 Conference and scaling up. 8. Assists Sarangani PHO whenever called for in health related concerns. 9. Partner of Healthgov in implementing a Community Based Early Warning System on Aviian Influenza in Barangay Bula, General Santos City – 2008 10. Partner of PBSP/TB LINC in implementing a TB Prevention and Control Program in 5 selected barangays in the Municipality of Alabel, Sarangani Province. – 2008-2009 11. Partner of Consuelo Foundation in a Project for Young Parents in 2 barangays in General Santos City – on going. CONTACT DETAILS Miriam C. Grafilo Executive Director 029 Kayumanggi Street, Block 2 Dadiangas Heights Subd. 9500 General Santos City, Philippines Tel: (083) 552-4973; 552-3776 Telefax: (083) 552-4973 Email: [email protected] www.geocities.com/comdevgsc

COMMUNITY ORGANIZERS MULTIVERSITY (CO Mulitversity) Established in 1994 as Community Organizers Training, Research, and Advocacy Institute (CO-TRAIN), it evolved to its present name as Community Organizers Multiversity. CO Multiversity is an alternative learning center for community organizers, People’s Organizations leaders and other Non-government Organization workers. CO Multiversity traces more than 30 years of CO tradition that incorporates the ideals of Saul Alinsky, Paolo Freire and Gustavo Gutierrez. Today, CO Multiversity is actively engaged in the pursuit of realizing its framework for sustainable development as a contribution to the growth of the body of knowledge in community organizing. The framework gives emphasis on gender, ecology, ethnicity, equity, peace based on justice, social justice and democracy. The organization continues to play a lead role in promoting community organizing as a tool for development and empowerment, and search for innovations to develop an integrated and sustainable development process by employing the following strategies: 1. Training of community organizers and people’s organizations’ leaders in identified learning centers. 2. Promotion of issue-based community organizing through the regular modules and consultancies. 3. Documentation and popularization of CO materials 4. Linkages with different stakeholders of society. 5. Assisting people’s efforts in engaging in the electoral process Programs Implemented: 1. Elimination of child labor in the quarry site of Montalban and pyrotechnics industry in Bulacan - The program was supported by ILO-International Program for the Elimination of Child Labor) 2. Implementation of the Successor Generation Program for the leaders and officers of the Caucus for Development NGOs (CODE-NGO) networks - The program was supported by FORD Foundation. 3. Peace and Development Program in Mindanao where MNLF combatants were trained to become peace and development advocates - The program was funded by UNDP and currently supported by OXFAM-HK, CIDA-LGSP, Peace and Equity Foundation and Trocaire. 4. Mainstreaming Gender in Community Organizing is a milestone in the tradition of CO practice - A handbook has been developed incorporating gender sensitive indicators and gender perspective in the CO steps as well as concrete illustrations by CO Multiversity partner NGOs and People’s Organizations highlighting roles and

contributions of grassroots women in community empowerment and development. 5. Training of community organizers in Mt. Banahaw area on issues of environmental protection. 6. Training of community organizers in Mindoro and Tarlac around the issues coming from the Mangyan’s fight for ancestral domain and social justice in general. 7. Training of community organizers and people’s organizations around the issues affecting the communities along Pasig River and Laguna Lakeshore. 8. CO Consultancy Training.

CONTACT DETAILS Lucila B. Malibiran Executive Director 18 Marunong Street, Barangay Central 1100 Quezon City Tel: (02) 922-0246 Fax: (02) 927-0794 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.comultiversity.org.ph Blog: comultiversity.blogspot.com

DAVAO MEDICAL SCHOOL FOUNDATION - INSTITUTE OF PRIMARY HEALTH CARE (IPHC) The Institute of Primary Health Care is the community service arm of the Davao Medical School Foundation. It has continued to pursue its over-all development framework the Sustainable Integrated Community Health and Development (SICHaD) Approach in its work with partner communities. The SICHaD Framework is based on the concept of the Sustainable Integrated Area Development approach and on its core competencies developed over the years in terms of- a) Facilitating the establishment of communitymanaged health care program, b) Formation of organized groups which are able to engage the government in effective partnership and create its own impact in the community, c) Securing LGU participation and support in project planning, implementation, sustainability, and d) Providing livelihood assistance to the poor. In 2008, IPHC has formed and strengthened 129 people’s organizations and have engaged the government and other stakeholders in effective partnership to address the needs of the community especially in the areas of community managed health care (primary health care, reproductive health, integrative and alternative medicine), alternative livelihood enhancement, sustainable agriculture/ organic farming, and basic alternative education. It continuously advocates for transparency and participatory local governance and increased LGU fund allocation in all its project communities. IPHC is tapped for several consultancies by NGOs, Academe, Government agencies in the areas of primary health care, alternative health care financing, health planning, community organizing through participatory action research, land used based barangay development planning and the like. Manages the Mindanao Training and Resource Center (MTRC) and coordinates the Masters in Participatory Development (MPD) program. IPHC has worked in 5 regions (X, XI, XII, XIII, and ARMM), covering 16 municipalities, 85 barangays and 42,319 families. Is a member of several development networks including PhilDHRRA, MINCODE, TAN, WAND, Barangay Good Governance and many local development councils. IPHC is now 31 years in promoting participatory development in Mindanao. IPHC’s experiences and those of its partner communities were documented and featured in its newsletter called “SYNAPSE”. CONTACT DETAILS Ma. Socorro Perpetita M. Mercader Executive Director Bajada, Davao City, Philippines Tel: (082) 226-2344 Email: [email protected] www.dmsf.edu.ph

DEL MONTE FOUNDATION, INC. (DMFI) Del Monte Foundation, Inc. (DMFI) is a non-stock, non-profit organization established in 1994 to promote social progress in Northern Mindanao, Philippines, through rural education, youth development and technical skills training. It is tasked with continuing the social responsibility thrust that Del Monte Philippines has pursued since the 1960s. Through its programs, Del Monte shares its blessings with nearby communities in the provinces of Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental, benefiting around 250,000 people in this part of Northern Mindanao. Del Monte Foundation is a private company with funding coming mainly from Del Monte Philippines and the Campos family. Other resources come from earnings from its business projects, as well as from the generosity of friends and benefactors in the Philippines. In 2006, the Foundation received a five-year accreditation with the Philippine Council for NGO (Non-Government Organization) Certification, afirming its conformance with the highest standards of good governance, transparency and corporate social responsibility.

Programs and Services DMFI sponsors schools and scholarship programs, livelihood training for the unemployed, basic agricultural training and organizing, and youth development training. It also undertakes community primary health care training, feeding and nutrition education, barrio medical-clinics/services, natural family planning education, and community infrastructure projects. 1. Technical Skills Training Program Since 1998, the Foundation has trained and graduated nearly 7,000 community leaders and workers, heads of families, out-of-school youth and unemployed mothers in various training courses. Graduates who embark on communal livelihood projects organize themselves into trade associations that enjoy organization support from the Foundation. The Foundation has been recognized for this program when it was awarded Regional Winner of TESDA’s Kabalikat Award in 2004, and the Commendable Institution Award by the Municipality of Manolo Fortich, Bukidnon in 2008. 2. Scholarships & Schools Development Program The Foundation has an ongoing scholarship program for bright children who come from poor families. The program covers education from the pre-school and elementary levels up to graduate school. Currently, the Foundation provides for the school fees and living allowances of over 180 scholars. The Foundation also implements a School Development Program for the Our Lady of Lourdes Elementary School in Camp Phillips, Bukidnon. This program provides support for the school’s faculty and staff development, marketing, infrastructure, and other projects undertaken in partnership with the School Board.

3. Home Care Education Program Through the various modules under the Home Care Education Program, and in partnership with the Committee of German Doctors for Developing Countries, the Foundation has helped bring nutrition, food safety, and increased health consciousness to 11 municipalities in Bukidnon and Misamis Oriental. The Foundation also conducts

regular trainings for barangay health workers and reinforces natural herbal remedy teachings through its Herbal Processing Center. The Foundation also promotes natural family planning and healthy family life. Since the program started, Del Monte Foundation has reached out to some 1,000 families in remote areas within the region. 4. Arts, Environment and Youth Programs Beginning 2009, the Foundation will expand its scope of community projects through programs focusing on youth development, environmental conservation & sustainability, and arts & culture within Del Monte communities. CONTACT DETAILS Ma. Isabel C. Malferrari Executive Director Del Monte Compound, National Highway, Bugo 9000 Cagayan de Oro City Tel: (088) 855-4312 loc 2825; 855-5537 Fax: (088) 855-5323 Email:[email protected] www.dmfiph.org Weblog: delmontefoundation.wordpress.com

DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY OF THE PHILIPPINES (DAP) The Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP) is a government corporation established in 1973 with original charter created by Presidential Decree 205, amended by Presidential Decree 1061, and further amended by Executive Order 288. The Academy was founded by the following institutions: Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, Development Bank of the Philippines, Government Service Insurance System, National Economic and Development Authority, Philippine National Bank, Social Security System, and the Land Bank of the Philippines. The Academy was created for the following purposes: 

To foster and support the developmental forces at work in the nation's economy through selective human resource development programs, research, data-collection, and information services, to the end that optimization of wealth may be achieved in a manner congruent with the maximization of public security and welfare;



In line with the foregoing objective, to promote, carry on and conduct scientific, interdisciplinary and policy-oriented research, education, training, consultancy, and publication in the broad fields of economics, public administration, and the political and social sciences, generally involving the study, determination, interpretation and publication of economic, political and social facts and principles bearing upon development problems of local, national or international significance; and



To discharge a regional role in initiating and catalyzing exchange of ideas and expertise on development activities in the region of Asia and the Far East.

As the National Productivity Organization of the Philippines, DAP fulfills the country’s commitment to the Asian Productivity Organization. DAP envisions itself to be a world-class national development and productivity organization. It exists to:   

Build capacities and partnerships among the key sectors of Philippine society; Generate innovative, value-adding, and synergistic solutions to national and local concerns; and Promote sustainable human development and global competitiveness in partnership with international community organizations.

Services DAP offers the following services: 1. Training Services

DAP provides training services to develop and enhance individual and organizational capacities in various disciplines. DAP’s training services range from training needs assessment, program design, training management to training evaluation. DAP has regular training programs open to the public. These programs can also be customized to suit the needs of client organizations. training, education, technical assistance/consultancy, policy-and action-oriented research and publications in the areas of governance and accountability, productivity and quality, knowledge management, education and learning, and sustainable human development. 2. Consultancy and Research Services In line with its mandates, DAP provides services by way of technical assistance, management advisory, and policy-and action-oriented research in the fields of governance and accountability, productivity and quality, knowledge management, education and learning, and sustainable human development. 3. Conference Facilities DAP also provides training and conference facilities that are conducive to learning and productive work in Pasig and Tagayta City.

Operating Centers The core services of the Academy are carried out by its key operating centers. 1. Center for Governance (CFG) The Center for Governance is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on political, economic and administrative governance. It provides services to strengthen institutions and mechanisms to develop and effectively implement public policies and programs that promote transparent and accountable governance, observance of the rule of law, government effectiveness, effective regulation, control of corruption, citizen voice and participation. CFG has three program offices: Operations Management, Policy Research, and Local Governance and Development. Specifically, CFG offers research and consultancy services on the following areas:     

Basic social services Corruption prevention and integrity development for the NGAs and LGUs Impact analysis Operations, systems and/or performance review; Budget management (NGAs and LGUs).

Trainings offered by CFG are as follows:

          

Leadership, Excellence and Development for LCEs Effective Local Legislation Local Revenue Generation and Resource Mobilization Project Development and Project Management Strategic Planning Change Management Formulation of a Citizen’s Charter Gearing Up for Citizen’s Charter Implementation Public Service Ethics and Accountability Basic Policy Process Policy Appreciation Course for CESOs

2. Center for Knowledge Management (CKM) The Center for Knowledge Management is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on harnessing intellectual and human capital, and other knowledge-based assets towards performance excellence. CKM has three program offices: Human Capital Development, Knowledge Management Systems, and Knowledge Solutions Development. The main areas of research and consultancy of CKM are the following:         

Human resource and organization development Organization diagnosis Systems design and development KM Readiness Assessment Knowledge Mapping Knowledge Harvesting Documentation and Sharing of Best Practices Institutionalization of Communities of Practice (CoPs) Implementing KM in the Organization

Trainings offered by CKM are as follows:           

Basic and Advance Knowledge Management Benchmarking Basic Training Management Presentation and Facilitation Skills Development Technical Writing Customer Service Skills Performance Management and Evaluation Information Systems Strategic Planning Information Systems Development IMO Model Course 609: Training Course for Instructors IMO Model Course 312: Training Course for Assessors



Open Source Softwares

3. Center for Quality and Competitiveness (CQC) The Center for Quality and Competitiveness is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on value chain productivity and technology enhancement, total quality management, productivity measurement and analysis, and sectoral productivity enhancement. It is responsible for the promotion of quality and productivity concepts, principles and practices to strengthen competitiveness and help organizations achieve performance excellence. CQC has four program offices: Service Quality Management, Value Chain Productivity Management, SME Productivity Development, and Agriculture Productivity Development. CQC currently offers the following research and consultancy services:    

Agricultural productivity Productivity among industries, SMEs Service quality standards Quality and productivity approaches

Trainings offered by CQC are as follows: 

Basic Quality and Productivity Improvement Approaches - 5S: Good Housekeeping for Improved Productivity - Trainer’s Training on Quality Circles - Basic 7 quality control tools for problem solving and decision making - Suggestion Scheme



Advanced Quality and Productivity Approaches - Total Productivity Maintenance - Total Quality Management - Six sigma - Just in time - ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System - ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS)



Integrated productivity and technology upgrading program - Practical industrial engineering (IE)



Productivity and quality measurement approaches - Measuring service quality - Benchmarking - Cost of quality

4. Center for Sustainable Human Development

The Center for Sustainable Human Development is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on developmental strategies and solutions to help reduce poverty and meet the Millennium Development Goals. CSHD has two program offices: Community Development and Environmental Management. CSHD currently offers the following research and consultancy services:    

Developing sustainable development indicators Sustainable environmental management alternatives and systems Developing strategies for disaster risk reduction Impact studies on climate change, development projects, tourism and the rural poor.

Trainings offered by CSHD are as follows:         

Ecotourism Planning and Development Waste management using 3 R’s (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle) Environmental Management Disaster Risk Reduction Renewable Energy and Clean Development Resource Optimization and Waste Minimization Nature interpretation and visitor management Doing renewable energy enterprises/business Ecotourism products identification and development

5. Graduate School of Public and Development Management  

Institute of Public Management Institute of Productivity and Quality

The Master in Public Management program, which is offered on a regular mode or customized for a particular agency, develops professional public managers who are focused on real, current and anticipated development issues. Current programs available are:      

Master in Public Management (MPM) MPM Major in Biodiversity Conservation and Management MPM Major in Local Governance Management MPM Major in Development and Security MPM Major in Public Service Management Graduate Certificate Course on Corruption Prevention (equivalent to 15 graduate units)

The Master in Productivity and Quality Management program is the first P & Q graduate program of its kind in the country and the Asia-Pacific region. It can be availed of through a regular program or a ladderized mode. Current program available:



Master in Productivity and Quality Management (MPQM)

The Graduate School also offers competency-based certificate and diploma programs that can eventually lead to a master’s degree. Current programs available are:      

Certificate Course on Development of Productivity Practitioners Certificate Course on ISO-QMS Lead Auditors Certificate Course on Productivity Measurement for Business Performance Certificate Course on Knowledge Management Certificate Course on Balanced Scorecard Certificate Course on Benchmarking

6. DAP sa Mindanao and DAP sa Visayas DAP has two regional offices that are responsible for the development of programs and projects at the local/community levels in Southern Philippines. These are: the DAP sa Mindanao and the DAP sa Visayas. Trainings offered by DAP sa Visayas are as follows:  SUC IGP Managers’ Course  Business Planning for SUC  Entrepreneurship Development Course for Women  Facilitation for Community Development  Natural Farming System for Green Productivity  Eco Business Development Using Biomass/Wastes  Development of Productivity Specialist Trainings offered by DAP sa Mindanao are as follows:  Technical Writing  Project Development and Management  Facilitating Training Sessions  Supervisory Skills Enhancement  Basic Productivity Tools and Techniques  ISO 9000 QMS  Effective Internal Quality Audit

Clients DAP’s clientele includes national line agencies, local government units, and government corporations. It also undertakes projects for international organizations and funding institutions, private firms including small and medium enterprises, non-government organizations, and the academe. Recent DAP Mandates

Under Republic Act No. 9013 or “Philippine Quality Award Act of 2001”, DAP serves as Administrator of the Philippine Quality Award (PQA) for Performance Excellence in the Public Sector. In connection with this, DAP extends assistance to government agencies including GOCCs, LGUs and SUCs in PQA Assessment and Application Development. Executive Order No. 605, s.2007 directed the institutionalization of the structure, mechanisms and standards to implement the Government Quality Management Program. As member of the Government Quality Management Committee, DAP is the lead agency tasked to promote awareness and develop organizational capabilities in the establishment of ISO 9000-certifiable Quality Management System (QMS) in public sector organizations. To facilitate the implementation of Republic Act No. 9485 or “Anti-Red Tape Act of 2007,” DAP is mandated to assist government agencies in the reengineering of systems and procedures and in the establishment of Citizen’s Charter for frontline services. Section 10 of RA 9485 also mandates DAP to assist CSC in undertaking the Report Card Survey, which shall be used to obtain feedback on how the provisions of the Charter are being followed and how the agency is performing.

CONTACT DETAILS Antonio D. Kalaw, Jr. President 6/F DAP Building, San Miguel Avenue Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1600 Tel: (02) 631-2153 Fax: (02) 631-2123 Email: [email protected] www.dap.edu.ph DAP Conference Center, Tagaytay City Barangay Sungay East, Tagaytay City 2720 Tel: (046) 483-1290 to 1292 Fax: (046) 483-1290/1292 www.daptagaytay.com.ph

EDUCATIONAL DISCIPLINE IN CULTURE AND ARTS FOR DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICES, INC. (EDCADS) In 1986, amidst the socio-political upheaval which ushered the EDSA revolt, a group of educators, artists, cultural workers, religious workers and activists convened and gave birth to a vision which metamorphosed into an institution, the Educational Discipline in Culture and Area-based Development Services, Inc. (EDCADS). EDCADS is a non-stock, non-profit organization founded in 1986, which gradually expanded both its mission and its services in response to a developing condition. From the community of artists and cultural workers, it in time became involved in the struggles of the peasant and Indigenous People. Soon enough, EDCADS was no longer confined in serving any specific sector but rather had reached and touched almost all the marginalized sectors in our society, specially those in the rural areas. Today, through its management, EDCADS has acquired its own assets, which includes a more than 600 square meters lot and a two-storey building housing its office with sufficient equipment and communication facilities; and a modest space for seminars and trainings. Track Record Cultural Work is an EDCADS’ Legacy and perhaps also its most definitive aspect. In the past EDCADS has become synonymous with culture and arts. However, EDCADS developed concepts that elevated cultural work into alternative approaches for community-based education, promotion and advocacy. This provides EDCADS with a distinct character and tactical advantage that sets it apart from other development institutions. One of the significant experiences of EDCADS in its dynamic evolution to become a “comprehensive” NGO, is its involvement in community development. For the past twenty three (23) years and through its projects, the EDCADS has contributed to the development of rural communities in the fields of community organizing, capabilitybuilding and systems enhancement, community-based education, promotion and advocacy, livelihood development and facilitating the provision of basic social services. EDCADS’ interventions benefited farmers, fisherfolks, women, youth, and indigenous people, among others. Its critical experience in projects with strong emphasis on community organizing provides the EDCADS with a well-grounded basis in formulating its distinctive strategies and approaches to development work. Vision “Empowered and sustainable communities of men and women in harmony with nature” Mission

“Improve the capacity and livelihood of the rural poor” Goals  Enhance the capacity of self help groups and organization s for effective local governance and sustainable management of their resources;  Strengthen community-managed health care initiatives linked with local health care structure and systems;  Facilitate access to market, micro financing and technology development of community livelihood undertakings;  Augment the physical, financial and personnel capability of EDCADS to support its operations for at least 10 years. EDCADS Themes     

Family/Community Health Rural Organization/Institution Good Governance and Administration Local Livelihood Gender

The EDCADS upholds that community development must be a multi-pronged yet integrated intervention, aimed at the community. These interventions however, must involve a wide partnership that would include the People’s Organizations (POs), the Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), the Local Government Units (LGUs) and Line Agencies (LAs), and the Private Sector (PS). In a critical evaluation of the status of most POs, EDCADS had identified four (4) main areas that require substantial interventions. These areas of concern serve as the focus in defining the appropriate programs and services, which EDCADS aims to provide. These areas include:    

Capacity enhancement, Institutional building and strengthening, Services provision, and Administrative support.

On-Going Projects Related to Social Service: 1. Philippines-Australia Community Assistance Program (PACAP) SECRETARIAT IP FOCAS STRATEGY Project Objective: “To reduced poverty and improve the standard of living of poor communities through sustainable economic and social development” Project Area(s): Entire IP areas of Agusan del Sur Project Cost: PhP 1,200.000.00 Project Beneficiaries: Indigenous People (IPs)

2. Philippines-Australia Community Assistance Program (PACAP) - Enhancing IP Communities on the Management of Pinagalaan Watershed with Livelihood Development Project Objective: “To reduced poverty and improve the standard of living of poor communities through sustainable economic and social development” Project Area(s): Barangay Pinagalaan, Bayugan City Project Cost: PhP 2,527,105.00 Project Beneficiaries: Indigenous People (IPs) 3. Department of Tourism (DOT) Caraga - Development of Community-Managed Eco-Tourism Enterprise Project Objective: “To capacitate the beneficiaries on the basic skills in entrepreneurship and product development and management” Project Area(s): Seven (7) Barangay-Beneficiaries in the Province of Dinagat Islands Project Cost: PhP P1,070,450.00 Project Beneficiaries: Community on the said area CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Mary May RC. Diaz Managing Director 177 Bougainvilla St., South Montilla Blvd., Butuan City

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY PHILIPPINES, INC. (HFHP) Habitat for Humanity Philippines (HFHP) is a non-profit Christian ministry working to help build responsible and self-reliant communities by enabling Filipino families in need to acquire affordable, decent, and durable homes. Established in 1988, HFHP is present in provinces and cities through its local affiliates, local management councils and project coordinating councils nationwide. Vision: HFHP envisions a world where everyone has a decent place to live. Families served to date: Over the years, HFHPhas built over 26,000 homes and has helped develop almost 200 communities across the country. Each year, HFHP endeavors to build 5,000 houses. Core Program Areas 1. Urban Renewal – (“Habitat takes urban housing to the next level”) With the use of appropriate technology, efficient and affordable medium rise condominium type structures are built where land is scarce and expensive. 2. Disaster Risk Mitigation – (“Rebuilding Lives”). The program has transformed from disaster relief to risk mitigation as informal settlers in endangered zones are relocated to safe and decent areas. The thrust is not merely to provide intervention only after calamities and disasters shall have stricken. 3. Peace Build – (“Building for peace and development”) is being carried out by bringing people of different creeds and faith together to jointly address the massive need for decent housing in underserved communities in Mindanao. 4. “No More Slums”–This mission of eliminating substandard housing and homelessness is carried out through our partners, by providing simple, decent and affordable shelter to the economically lowest 30% of the population. Current Projects

1. “BayaniJuan sa Calauan”. A multi-sectoral undertaking called “Kapit-Bisig Sa Ilog Pasig” headed by ABS-CBN Foundation, Inc. (AFI), was initiated to rehabilitate the river in seven years. AFI, together with HFHP and other partner institutions have joined together to save the families along the riverbanks from potential tragedy by allowing them to resettle in a healthy and sustainable community called BayaniJuan sa Calauan, located in Calauan, Laguna. The initiative seeks to provide homes for at least 4,000 Filipino families coming from the Pasig riverbanks. 2. “Rebuilding Lives in Bicol”. After Typhoon Reming and Milenyo hit the Bicol region, leaving hundreds of thousands of families homeless, HFHP stepped up to help these families by building and repairing their homes. To date, about 3,000 homes and 50 school classrooms were completed in Bicol through partnerships with various

organizations. Today, HFHP continues to help in providing 1,500 more families in need with homes. 3. “Helping Iloilo after Frank”. Following Typhoon Frank which hit Iloilo in 2008, HFHP is set to build a total of 4,000 homes in Iloilo, a work of great magnitude that requires numerous resources. Initially, HFHP, with the help of its partners will build 500 core shelter units in San Isidro, Jaro, Iloilo City. CONTACT DETAILS Alberto Jugo President & CEO Habitat for Humanity Philippines Foundation Inc. Unit 26-A, 26th Floor, PET Plans Tower 444 EDSA, Guadalupe Viejo, Makati City Tel: (02) 897-3069 Fax: (02) 897-3248 Email: [email protected] www.habitat.org.ph

KADTUNTAYA FOUNDATION, INCORPORATED (KFI) The Kadtuntaya Foundation, Inc. (KFI) is a non-government, development oriented organization based in Cotabato City, born out of the need to respond to the socioeconomic and cultural needs of the Moro people, particularly in Central Mindanao. KFI was established and registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission in July 1989. During its early operation, KFI’s main thrust was to bridge the gap between the Christians and Muslims whose relationship had been stained by decades of conflict and wars. KFI facilitated dialogues and understanding of Muslims and Christians, reducing prejudices, improving relationships, and forging mutual cooperation. Its focus then, was still in Cotabato City. In the following years, KFI expanded its areas of concern to include socio-economic programs such as helping organize communities and cooperatives, extending assistance to income-generating projects like malong weaving, and small entrepreneurship (e.g. sari-sari store, small and large livestock raising, buy and sell ventures, among others). To date, KFI has more than 50 staff and volunteer workers facilitating several projects in the Provinces of Maguindanao, Sultan Kudarat, Cotabato, and in the other provinces of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). KFI envisions politically empowered, economically sufficient, environmental friendly, gender-conscious and culturally sensitive tri-people communities peacefully co-existing in equality, mutual respect and prosperity. It is committed to facilitate the empowerment of the people, especially the grassroots, so that collectively they can improve their sociocultural, economic and political well being. KFI aims to: 1.7.Increase participation and involvement of men and women at the grassroots level in community decision-making processes and development activities through awareness building, leadership and PO formation, capability building and gender advocacy. 2.8.Improve means of livelihood and food security of grassroots at the household level at all times. 3.9.Reduce sources of conflicts and vulnerabilities of the grassroots communities that may result to displacement, loss of livelihood, morbidity or death. 4.10. Actively advocate for accountable and good governance to improve avenue for people’s participation, cooperation, transparency, and delivery of services. 5.11. Improve the situation of women and children, especially those in difficult circumstances through the promotion of their rights. 6.12. Promote environmental awareness and respect so that people become just to nature and caring stewards of the earth. To achieve this, KFI seeks all means to sustain its human, financial and material resources. Core Programs:

1. Moro Integrated Area Development (MIAD) Being the core program, MIAD is the main concern and focal point of the organization’s interventions. It comprises four essential strategies. 1.1.Organizational Building and Strengthening (OBS) This is the primary approach by which KFI is able to facilitate the conscientization of the grassroots community as well as ensure their development in terms of asserting their rights and aspirations, particularly in the fields of governance and decision making. 1.2.Farming Enterprise and Economic Development (FEED) This strategy focuses on the improvement of prevailing farming practices through the introduction of viable farming technologies that are environment-friendly and sustainable. It is also through the FEED project that off-farm alternative income generating activities are facilitated for both men and women members of the community. 1.3.Community Social Services (CSS) Through the CSS strategy, the health and sanitation problems and concerns of the community are addressed. Health services include the promotion of Promotive and Preventive Health Care through the active involvement of health committees. Literacy projects provide basic writing, reading, and numeracy skills to adult illiterates geared towards greater involvement in family and community affairs. 1.4.Natural Resource Management and Tenure Improvement (NRMTI) It aims to facilitate, at the maximum, the acquisition of lands through the Claim of Ancestral Domain Title (CADT) and Agrarian Reform Program, at the minimum the improvement of tenure relationship of the landowners and the tenants through continued advocacy and campaign. 2. Governance and Peace This program aims at forging understanding and cooperation among the tri-people in Mindanao through continuing dialogues and joint community activities. It promotes the Culture of Peace towards prejudice reduction and improving inter-relationships. It also cultivates critical awareness among the grassroots on the roots of conflict in Mindanao as the basis of finding meaningful and long-tern peace. Strategies include peace consultations and dialogues, rights-based advocacy, linkage and networking with LGUs, as well as establishing Zones of Peace.

3. Women & Children Development This program aims at providing gender-awareness/education and organizing support group to enhance understanding of the role of men and women in Muslim society. It provides scholarship for children and youth and enhances their capacity to lead and take active role in the promotion of understanding of the rights and proper care f children through Child Rights Advocacy and Theater Development. 4. Disaster Management This program provides trainings and awareness on disaster preparedness and management. It helps organize community-based disaster coordinating councils, and provides relief assistance, shelter, psychosocial and economic rehabilitation to victims of disasters. List of Fund Sources for the Last Five Years: 1.14. 2.15. 3.16. 4.17. 5.18. 6.19. 7.20. 8.21. 9.22. 10.23. 11.24. 12.25. 13.26.

Philippine Business for Social Progress Terre Des Hommes – Germany Cordaid – The Netherlands Trocaire – Ireland Bread for the World – Germany Misereor – Germany Catholic Relief Services – USA Oxfam – GB/HK Ausaid/ARMM SF German Development Service (DED) German Development Cooperation (GTZ) Embassy of Japan in the Phil. HEKS – Switzerland

List of Network Affiliation: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Coalition Development NGOs Mindanao Emergency Response Network Consortium of Bangsamoro Civil Society AGONG Peace Network Kutawato Coalition of Development NGOs Well-Family Midwife Clinics Partnership Foundation, Inc.

Current Projects:

PROJECT TITLE 1. Empowering Communities Towards Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding

DONOR Cordaid

PROJECT SITE Datu Piang (5 brgys) Mamasapano (2 brgys)

in Central Mindanao 2. Empowering Communities Towards Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding in Central Mindanao 3. Mapayag, Adaon, Kiladap Integrated Area Development Program III (MADAKIL-IAD III) 4. Continuation of a Development Programme for a Group of Indigenous People in Saniag, Ampatuan, Maguindanao 5. Agricultural Development and Ecological Protection Towards Sustainable Economic Livelihoods in Fukol

CONTACT DETAILS Guiamel M. Alim Executive Director G/Floor, Community Training and Resource Center Bldg. Doña Pilar Street, Vilo Subdivision, Poblacion IV, Cotabato City 9600 Philippines P.O. Box 116 Tel: (064) 421-4222 Telefax: (064) 421-2072 Email: [email protected] [email protected] www.kadtun.org

OXFAMHK

Datu Saudi Ampatuan (4 brgys) Datu Piang (8) Midsayap (2)

BFTW

Talitay (3 brgys)

Misereor

Brgy. Tomicor, Ampatuan, Maguindanao

HEKS

Barangay Fukol, Talayan

LEAGUE OF CITIES OF THE PHILIPPINES (LCP) Protecting the interests of cities, the League of Cities of the Philippines (LCP) is committed to bringing local urban governance agenda at the forefront of the country’s development strategies. As the mandated organization of the Philippine cities, the LCP believes effective change in the national consciousness starts with the primary visions of the local government units. On July 25, 1987, former President Corazon Aquino issued Executive Order No. 262 that created the League of City Mayors of the Philippines. It was also during that time when local government units – provinces, cities, municipalities, and the barangays – clamoured for genuine reforms. After years of hard advocacy work, Congress passed the Republic Act 7160, the Local Government Code, on October 10, 1991. Under Section 499, LCP is finally institutionalized for the “primary purpose of ventilating, articulating, and crystallizing issues affecting city government administration...” The change in nomenclature transformed the character of LCP from an organization of political personalities to a membership-based institution where the cities – and not their political leaders – are accountable entities. Through the years, LCP’s services have evolved from administrative to policy, technical, and programs support. Vision: An Empowered, Strong, United Brotherhood of Purpose-Driven Cities committed to serve its people with a deep sense of pride and value-laden commitment for progress and development Mission: To enable Cities to stand as one, defend its rights, provide the best possible services, and pursue the common good for its constituents through its advocacies, capabilities, and networking Services to member-cities 

Policy development and advocacy support in coordination with other local government leagues and national agencies;



Networking and building linkages for programs and project development and implementation;



Facilitation in the information exchange through quarterly meetings, policy fora, IEC materials development, sharing of best practices, the LCP Caravan, and through website; and



Full administrative and secretariat services to the member-cities and staff

Program/s 1. LCP-UNFPA Project RH Commodity Security The program aims to strengthen the capacity of city health offices in reproductive health and family planning through technical assistance and capacity building activities that repositions family planning as part of the overall development agenda of the local government units. Partner Institution United Nations Populations (UNFPA) Suneeta Mukherjee Country Representative

Fund

UNFPA, 30/F RCBC Plaza Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 901-0302 Telefax: (02) 901-0348 www.unfpa.org Source: http://www.lcp.org.ph/lcp/vision

LEAGUE OF MUNICIPALITIES OF THE PHILIPPINES (LMP) Its creation and purpose is mandated by Section 496 of the Republic Act 7160, otherwise known as the Local Government Code of 1991, as amended, which states: “There shall be an organization of all municipalities to be known as league of municipalities for the primary purpose of ventilating, articulating and crystallizing issues affecting municipal government administration, and securing, through proper and legal means, solutions thereto.” Powers, Functions, and Duties Section 498 of the Local Government Code of 1991 outlines the following powers, functions and duties of the League: •

Assist the national government in the formulation and implementation of the policies, programs and projects affecting municipalities as a whole;

• Promote local autonomy at the municipal level; •

Adopt measures for the promotion of the welfare of all municipalities and its officials and employees;



Encourage people's participation in local government administration in order to promote united and concerted action for the attainment of country-wide development goals;



Supplement the efforts of the national government in creating opportunities for gainful employment within the municipalities;



Give priority to programs designed for the total development of the municipalities in consonance with the policies, programs and projects of the national government;



Serve as a forum for crystallizing and expressing ideas, seeking the necessary assistance of the national government, and providing the private sector avenues for cooperation in the promotion of the welfare of the municipalities; and

• Exercise such other powers and perform such other duties and functions as the league may prescribe for the welfare of the municipalities. CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR League of Municipalities of the Philippines 2nd Floor, LMP Building 265 Ermin Garcia St., Cubao, Quezon City

Telefax: (02) 913-5737 to 38; (02) 913-5642 Email: [email protected] or [email protected] www.lmp.org.ph Relevant Course Offerings under the Mayor’s Development Center (MDC)/League of Municipalities of the Philippines (LMP) Course Duration: Two-and-a-half (2-1/2) to Five (5) days Beneficiaries: Mayors, Key staff and/or Local Functionaries Target Program Location: Regional/Provincial-on site 1. Strategic Management in Development: Managing Performance of Municipal Governments A five-day course designed to enhance the analytical skills of mayors and their key staff in understanding the context within which they operate, specifically the challenges and opportunities that they face, and their capacities for effective action. Partner Institution: German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)/Hanns Seidel Foundation (HSF)

Dr. Herwig Mayer Program Manager Unit 2A, PDCP Bank Centre, Cor. VA Rufino and LP Leviste Sts., Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-6821 Fax: (02) 813-6821 www.decentralization.org.ph

2. Integrated Solid Waste Management (ISWM) for Municipalities A four-day learning event aimed at understanding and appreciating better the links between MDGs, good local governance, and integrated solid waste management; and the role of municipal governments, civil society and the communities in caring for the planet given its limited carrying capacity. 3. Executive Course on Sustainable Municipal Fisheries A four-day learning event primarily designed to answer questions and build knowledge and skills of local chief executives for informed decision-making in coastal and fisheries management. The course provides a comprehensive ‘snapshot’ of the ‘what, why and how’ of marine capture fisheries and will take participants through the range of principles, concepts, options and interventions that will help local chief executives plan and implement immediate actions.

Partner Institution: Fisheries Improved for Sustainable Harvest (FISH) Project/USAID

Geronimo Silvestre Chief of Party Metro Manila: 18/F OMM-CITRA Bldg., San Miguel Avenue, Ortigas Center, 1605 Pasig City Tel:(02) 636-0052 to 53 Fax: (02) 634-0327 Email: [email protected] Cebu: 5/F, CIFC Towers; JL Briones corner Juan Luna Avenue; NRA, Cebu City 6000 Tel: (032) 232-1821 to 23 Fax: (032) 232-1825 Email: [email protected] www.oneocean.org

4. Learning Event on Local Economic Development A four-day training-workshop designed to build, strengthen and enhance the governing ability of local executives in the execution of social, economic, political reforms and policies that can translate the aspirations of society into tangible measures to make development accessible to those in dire need of development. The event serves as a forum where participants can hope to acquire certain approaches and strategies in the recognition and management of potentials, resources and opportunities to make development possible. Partner Institution: International Labour Organization (ILO)

Linda Wirth Director 19F Yuchengco Tower, RCBC Plaza, 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 580-9900 Fax: (02) 856-7597 Email: [email protected] (Jesus Macasil, Programme Officer) www.ilo.org/manila

5. Orientation for Newly-Elected Mayors (ONE-M) A two-and-a-half-day orientation program for newly-elected municipal mayors designed to prepare and equip the local chief executives with the necessary knowledge and attitude to efficiently manage their respective localities during their first term in office, using a development management framework. The program utilizes a peer-to-peer sharing approach tapping multi-awarded municipal mayors who were once newly-elected and

started out like them. The module also introduces the newly-elected mayors to national government agencies, regional officials and the services that they provide. Partner Institution: Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) (for Luzon ONE-M)

Partner Institution (for Visayas and Mindanao ONE-M): German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)/Hanns Seidel Foundation (HSF)

Frances Tanner First Secretary Level 7 étage, Tower/Tour 2, Place RCBC Plaza, 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 857-9123 Dr. Herwig Mayer Program Manager Unit 2A, PDCP Bank Centre, Cor. VA Rufino and LP Leviste Sts., Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-6821 Fax: (02) 813-6821 www.decentralization.org.ph

LOPEZ GROUP FOUNDATION, INC. The Lopez Group Foundation Inc. was incorporated on February 29, 2004 and is certified by the Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC). LGFI's coordinates and synergizes the CSR efforts of the Lopez Group’s 9 foundations and more than 15 companies. The Group's CSR programs are primarily in education, the environment, entrepreneurship, children’s rights, family planning, health, and disaster-relief and rehabilitation. LGFI builds partnerships and alliances and provides a reference for those who desire to collaborate or provide funding support. It is an active member of the League of Corporate Foundations (LCF), Association of Foundations (AF), Corporate Network for Disaster Response (CNDR), Public Relations Society of the Philippines (PRSP), Employers Confederation of the Philippines (ECOP), Philippine Association for Volunteer Efforts (PAVE) and the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines (FOCAP). CONTACT DETAILS 5/F Benpres Building Meralco Avenue corner Exchange Road Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1600 Tel: (02) 490-0779 Telefax: (02) 631-3128 Email: [email protected] www.lopezgroup.org The CSR community of the Lopez Group include: ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation, Inc. 2/F Calderon Bldg. # 827 Edsa QC, Telephone: (02) 929 3273 / (02) 415 0545 Website: www.abs-cbnfoundation.com Email address: [email protected] ABS-CBN Foundation, Inc. Mother Ignacia Avenue, Quezon City 1103, Philippines Telephone: (02) 924 2740 / (02) 922 4842 Website: www.abs-cbnfoundation.com Don Senen Gabaldon Foundation 20/F JMT Corporate Condominium, ADB Ave., Ortigas Center, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 634 4092

Eugenio Lopez Foundation, Inc. (The Lopez Museum) G/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 631 2417 Website: www.lopezmuseum.org.ph Email Address: [email protected] First Philippine Conservation, Inc. 4/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 449 6086 to 87 / (02) 638 7670 Email: [email protected] Knowledge Channel Foundation, Inc. 5/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 910 2033 – (02) 910 3181 Website: www.knowledgechannel.com.ph

MINDANAO LAND ACQUISITION, HOUSING & DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION, INC. (aka Mindanao Land Foundation, Inc. / MinLand) Mindanao Land Foundation, Inc. (MinLand) was created to respond to the complex development problems of poor communities in the Philippines. Incorporated in 1989, MinLand believes that housing is not simply land and structures but should be a continuing process of building relationships among families within a community and between the community and its environment. As such, MinLand envisions a society of socially cohesive and sustainable communities where families can live in security, with dignity and integrity. MinLand started out as an originator of the Community Mortgage Program (CMP); a program designed to answer the land tenure problems of slum and blighted communities. To date, MinLand has already assisted more than 5,000 households own their lots through the CMP and other land tenure security programs. Distinctively, MinLand has developed its distinguished expertise in securing land tenure needs through the CMP and direct purchase, community infrastructure and basic services, enterprise development, housing project development for poor communities and coordination and networking with other resource providers such as local government units, national government agencies and foreign funding institutions. In addition, MinLand has also pilot-tested livelihood enterprises such as the production of microconcrete roofing tiles, environment-friendly and indigenous walling materials, and community-based production of compressed earth blocks. MinLand’s success in its CMP projects, with notably high repayment rates ranging from 87-95%, lies on its mandatory adoption of the standard template it developed that extensively looks into the affordability and willingness to pay of the community members/beneficiaries. MinLand’s advocacy work is done in close collaboration with multi-sectoral groups and is directed at ensuring efficiency in housing delivery focusing on the most disadvantaged groups. MinLand has provided active leadership in steering the National Congress of CMP Originators and Social Housing Developers since its inception more than 10 years ago. It is also part of the Philippine Undertaking for Social Housing (PUSH) which provides financial intermediation for social housing projects implemented nation-wide by NGO partners. Initially in partnership with 13 communities in Davao City, MinLand has now worked with 55 other communities in other cities and municipalities as well under different projects that include land tenure security, social housing, settlements enhancement, gender-integrated savings mobilization, poverty reduction, social cohesion building in post conflict communities and community-driven development for internally displaced persons in Mindanao urban areas. Vision: After 6 years (2012), selected partner communities affected by social conflict are enabled to help other communities towards development.

Mission: Enabling communities to eradicate poverty. Programs and Services In its almost twenty (20) of years of operations, MinLand has already significantly acquired, developed and enriched its experiences and expertise in various fields such as, but not limited to:                  

Community land tenure security, Voluntary resettlement & social housing, Community organizing & governance, Community infrastructure, Urban community development, Poverty impact assessment, Organization building, Rapid resource appraisal, Community savings & credit, LGU comprehensive shelter planning, Social cohesion building, Social protection & social services, Post conflict community development, Participatory social mapping, Livelihood & enterprise development, Village agri-processing, Community based natural farming, and Social assessment

In addition, MinLand has also developed its capabilities in information, communication & visibility (ICV) administration and has already partnered with a number of Donor Agencies in producing ICV materials for print, radio, television and the internet media. Today, MinLand has also set its focus on providing the conditions for further investment with sustainable resource use, building institutional capacity for informed planning, and achieving participation and ownership through consultation programs and awareness initiatives. MinLand takes pride in the distinction that it is one of the only two institutions in the entire Philippines that formally assists local government units in preparing local shelter plans. It has already come up with a standard template in developing shelter plans, starting in 1997 up to the present, which has been the prototype of LGU adopted shelter plans in 12 urban centers in Mindanao. Guided by its mission-vision, MinLand’s work in post-conflict, rural and other conflictaffected communities is focused at creating enabling environments for peace and development, human security and social cohesion by enabling its partner communities to

participate, and teach other communities, in shaping and implementing appropriate approaches in development work.

CONTACT DETAILS Mr. EJ A. Matela Director - Post Conflict and Rural Services Reyes Building, Jade Street, Saniel Subdivision, Kidapawan City, 9400 North Cotabato Telefax: +6364 278 3077 , +6382 301 9001 Ms. Dolly B. Pascua Director - Urban Services 62 Tatad Street, Dumanlas, Buhangin, 8000 Davao City Telefax: +6382 305 1200, +6382 300 0206 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.minland.ph

MUSLIM-CHRISTIAN AGENCY FOR ADVOCACY, RELIEF AND DEVELOPMENT, INC. (MuCAARD) The Muslim Christian Agency for Advocacy, Relief and Development or MuCAARD has been working for over two decades in Mindanao. It has proven its effectiveness in the implementation of development programmes, its extensive reach among poor and marginalized households in the rural areas, and its wide acceptance among Muslims, Christians and indigenous tribal groups for its efforts in trying to eradicate poverty and social exclusion. Established in July 1984 as a consortium, it is the first genuine MuslimChristian NGO in the Philippines assisting Peoples’ Organizations (PO) in improving their capacity to assist small farmers, fisher folks, women and urban poor. It has centered its activities in the island of Mindanao, specifically the provinces of Zamboanga del Sur, Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Bukidnon and North Cotabato including the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). These areas are recognized as amongst the poorest provinces in the country. (IBON Special Report March 2007) Mandate MuCAARD’s mandate is “To develop sustainable communities where Muslims, Christians and Tribal People can live together recognizing and respecting their different faiths and cultures where there is sustainable environment, political empowerment, economic equity, gender equality, unity and lasting peace.” This mandate is rooted in MuCAARD’s commitment to the practical expression of interfaith dialogue. This mandate is also in line with the UN Millennium Development Goals specifically MDG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7. That is:      

To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger; To achieve universal education; To promote gender equality and empower women; To reduce child mortality; To improve maternal health; and To ensure environmental sustainability.

MuCAARD works with a network of POs through the four MTs, all of whom belong to poorest of the poor. Each Member Team is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). They are coordinated with the Secretariat in Cagayan de Oro City who takes lead in many of the initiatives and provides the support they need such as Fund-Sourcing/Resource Locator; Training Provider/Resource Persons or respond to request for training and consultancy outside of MuCAARD network; Advocacy, Networking/Linkages; Monitoring and Evaluation; Auditing; Center of Communication; Assist in resolving critical issues affecting the Member Teams; Initiate contacts/develop new programs beneficial to MuCAARD network. Vision

MuCAARD’s Vision is to create effective and accountable democratic communities based on sustainable development and founded on justice and equality – where sustainability includes the need to protect and rehabilitate the environment for our grandchildren. The agency dreams of a Mindanao where people of all faiths and ethnicity can live in peace respecting the unity in our diversity and where everyone is included. The key to achieving our vision is through active people’s participation. Mission MuCAARD’s Mission is to consolidate and expand people’s involvement in local governance so that they can access resources and services and ensure the promulgation of equitable policies and laws. To strive against discrimination and oppression so that the women and the most vulnerable sectors of society can reach their full potential; that they are protected against natural and human disasters. To educate and create communities that can live sustainably providing a decent livelihood for their families and future generations. Goals 1. Good Governance - To ensure that Local Government Units (LGUs), MuCAARD and the local community work together so that agreed programmes and provision of services (health, education, infrastructure and others) are accountable and transparent reaching those who need them most and following the rule of law; 2. Peace Building – To organize and train barangay-based Peace and Development Councils and Advocates which include women. To promote and implement a system of Barangay Justice Service Systems (BJSS) to revitalize and modernize the traditional ways of settling disputes within the different tribal groups in order to prevent conflicts from exploding into violent encounters. Declaration of peace zones. Note: Good governance and sustainable livelihoods are also keys to peace building; 3. Sustainable Livelihoods – to encourage and enable rural communities to identify and implement projects that both protect, conserve and rehabilitate the environment as well as providing economic growth; 4. NGO-GO cooperation – To ensure that there is a genuine partnership between community and the local government so that community projects are based on felt needs; and 5. Disaster Risk Management – to reduce the toll of disasters through community participation in pre-disaster risk reduction planning and strategies, emergency response and post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction. Programs Related to Social Services: 

Maternal and Child Health Care/Reproductive Health

      

Community Animal Health Care and Draft Animal Dispersal – Livestock Capability Building Adult Literacy and Day-care Classes Program Peace Building and Barangay Justice Service Systems Gender Equity and Development (Cross-cutting theme) Issue Advocacy/Linkages and Networking (Cross-cutting theme) Disaster Management and Preparedness

Major Skills and Competencies     

Community Planning using the participatory tools, Community Organizing through Community Development Conducting and facilitating capability and capacity buildings to PO, NGOs, and Local Government Units, Linkaging with the Local Government Units that resulted to the formulation of municipal and barangay comprehensive development plans Conducting and facilitating program and project planning, monitoring and evaluation

Available Resources and Facilities     

Owned building in Cagayan de Oro where the head office is located with training and session hall Provincial offices in Bukidnon, Marawi City, Lanao del Sur, and Zamboanga del Sur Three service cars and motorbikes in the Members Enough desktops and laptops (Computers) in the head and provincial offices 27 committed and skilled regular staff

Member Teams Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Bukidnon Integrated Services Assistance Program, Inc. (MUCARDBISAP)

Address Purok 3, Poblacion, 8721 Damulog, Bukidnon, Mindanao, Philippines

Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Community Services for Education and Economic Development, Inc. (MUCARD- CoSEED)

Purok Daisy, Poblacion, Vincenzo Sagun, Zambonaga del Sur, Philippines

Target Beneficiaries  Manobo (Tribe)  Christian and Muslim farmers and women in Bukidnon province particularly in the municipalities of Damulog, Kibawe and Kadingilan.  Maguindanaon in Carmen, N. Cotabato  Subanen (Tribe)  Christian and Muslim fisher folk, farmers, and women in Zamboanga del Sur province particularly in the municipalities of Dinas, Margosatubig, Pitogo and Vincenzo

Member Teams Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Panginam O Masa, Inc. (MUCARD-POM)

Address Lombayao, Balindong, Lanao del Sur, Philippines

Muslim-Christian Agency Riverside, Madaya Lilod for Rural Development – Marawi City, Philippines Ranao Integrated Assistance Program, Inc. (MUCARDRIAP)

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Imelda Ganaden-Manginsay Overall Coordinator #12 11-15th Street, Nazareth Subdivision 9000 Cagayan de Oro City Mindanao, Philippines Tel: (08822) 72-8542 (088) 857-2423 Fax: (088) 857-2423 Mobile: (+63)926-510-9040 Email: [email protected] www.mucaard.org

Target Beneficiaries Sagun  Muslim Maranao farmers, women and children in the west of Lanao del Sur province particularly in the municipalities of Bacolod-Kalawi, Balindong, Kapatagan, Madamba and Madalem  Muslim Iranon in Kapatagan, Lanao del Sur  Muslim Maranao farmers, youth and women in the East of Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte and in the City of Marawi particularly in the municipalities of Sanguiaran, Bubong, Ramain, Kapai, Piagapo and the Islamic City of Marawi in Lanao del Sur and in the municipalities of Balo-i, Pantar, Tagoloan and Munai in Lanao del Norte

NOTRE DAME FOUNDATION FOR CHARITABLE ACTIVITIES, INC. – WOMEN IN EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT (NDFCAI-WED) The Notre Dame Foundation for Charitable Activities, Inc. WOMEN IN EDUCATION and DEVELOPMENT (NDFCAI-WED) was identified and selected by the Asia-Pacific Cultural Centre for UNESCO (ACCU) as its NGO partner in the Philippines in its 1995 Programme for Establishing Literacy Resource Centre for Women and Girls in the AsiaPacific. It was selected from amongst a number of Philippine-based NGOs engaged in literacy work and promotion. The NDFCAI-WED is an NGO whose project activities are specifically focused on literacy and education, ALS/NFE serving marginalized adult learners, unemployed women, and out-of-school children and youth (OSCY) of ARMM and other regions of Mindanao. Programs and Services NDFCAI-WED is involved in Alternative Learning System (ALS) / Non – Formal Education (NFE), livelihood and community organizing, gender and development, maternal-child health nutrition and medical (harelip) services . It is the social development institution of the Archdiocese of Cotabato, serving Muslims, Christians and IPs of Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) and other regions in Mindanao. It is also currently serving NGOs and their communities. It has established the Japan-Philippine Training Resource Center, a sixty (60) bed live-in center funded by the Japan Assistance to Grassroots Project. WED is involved in implementing projects on:       

Alternative Learning System(ALS) for OSCY Functional Literacy and Adult Education Entrepreneurship and Skills Training Marketing Assistance Technical Assistance and Consultancy Research and Advocacy for Education for All (EFA) Installation of UNESCO GenPeace Community Radio Stations

Institutional Major Awards      

1998 Rafael M. Salas Award for Population and Development 1997 UNESCO King Sejong International Literacy Prize 1996 Philippine Best Project for Community Development sponsored by Population Commission 1996 ACCU Literacy Prize Awardee for Video Presentation 1994 Most Outstanding Literacy Program (DECS)

CONTACT DETAILS Myrna B. Lim

Executive Director WED Bldg., Santos St., Krislamville Subd., Rosary Heights 6, Cotabato City (9600) Tel: (064) 421-1954 Fax: (064) 421-7184 Email: ndfcaiwed [email protected] www.accu.org.jp

PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH ORGANIZATION OF COMMUNITIES AND EDUCATION TOWARDS STRUGGLE FOR SELF-RELIANCE (PROCESS), BOHOL, INC. The Participatory, Research, Organization of Communities and Education towards Struggle for Self-Reliance (PROCESS)-Bohol, Inc. is a non-stock, non-profit organization, established in October 2, 1982 with the aim of creatively animating the formation of strong, autonomous people’s organizations and building up their capabilities for participatory and self-reliant development. PROCESS evolved from Sarilakas (from the Filipino term sariling lakas), a project sponsored by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and the then Ministry of Labor and Employment in 1981. Sarilakas was an attempt to stimulate grassroots initiatives among rural communities, particularly in the provinces of Antique and Batangas. Drawing from the Sarilakas experience, PROCESS continues to involve itself in the organization and empowerment of fishing and farming communities, particularly in the upland, lowland and coastal communities in Northern Luzon, Panay Island and the province of Bohol. PROCESS started its operation in Bohol on March, 1985 in the coastal municipality of Tubigon. Since then, PROCESS has expanded and facilitated the formation and strengthening of people’s organization (POs) situated province-wide comprising women, fisherfolks, farmers and urban poor sectors Currently, PROCESS-Bohol is covering 29 municipalities in the province of Bohol and 1 municipality in Southern Leyte. Total barangays covered is 58. Principles of Development PROCESS believes that grassroots organization should play a key role in transforming society and should effectively participate in local and national decision-making. By empowering the grassroots through their own collective reflection and action, PROCESS aims to make itself progressively immaterial as communities increasingly take control of their own destiny.

Vision: Improved quality of life of poor communities, particularly those of farmers and fishers who are God-loving, gender-sensitive and empowered, living in a healthy, just and equitable environment. Mission: To continuously empower the poor farmers and fishers towards effective and sustainable management of resources and promotion of just and gender-sensitive environment. Goal: Empowered POs that can claim and protect sectors’ rights, advance their interests and enhance their participation in society and governance.

Objectives 1. To organize and institutionalize strong-gender sensitive people’s organizations (POs) at the barangay, municipal and provincial levels. 2. To facilitate active participation of partners in the rehabilitation, conservation, protection and sustainable use of natural resources through CBRM. 3. To provide education and enterprise interventions for the improvement of socioeconomic condition of farmers and fishers. 4. To continuously build alliance for the enactment and implementation of local and national legislations, policies and programs relevant to the needs of the farmer and fisher sectors. 5. To develop and establish mechanisms for the sustainability of PROCESSS-Bohol operations Main Program/s Related to Social Services 1. Gender and Development (GAD) Program Support Programs 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Research and Development Training and Consultancy Enterprise Development Legal Resource Development Community-Based Sustainable Tourism

Services 1. Community Organizing 2. Watershed Management 3. Water and Sanitation 4. Community-Based Coastal Resource Management 5. Training and Consultancy 6. Research and Development 7. Advocacy and Networking 8. Gender and Development 9. Family Planning and Reproductive Health 10. Population, Health and Environment (PHE) 11. Agro forestry 12. Project Monitoring and Evaluation 13. Financial Systems Installation 14. Consultancy Accreditations/Affiliations

1. Local Level 1.1.Bohol Alliance of NGOs (BANGON) 1.2.Bohol Initiators for Sustainable Agriculture Development (BISAD) 1.3.Bohol Coastal Resource Management Task Force (BCRMTF) 1.4.Bohol Integrated Water Resources Management Board 1.5.Abatan River Development Management Council 1.6.Wahig-Inabanga Watershed Management Council 1.7.Bohol Coastal Law Enforcement Council (CLEC) 1.8.Bohol Rescue Unit for Marine Mammals (BRUMM) 1.9.Provincial Development Council (PDC) 1.10. City Development Council (CDC) 1.11. Member of Provincial and Municipal Local Development Councils and local special bodies 2. Regional Level 2.1.Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) 2.2.Coastal Law Enforcement Alliance in Region 7 (CLEAR 7) 2.3.Regional Development Council 2.4.Population Network (PopNet 7) 2.5.Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) 2.6.Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) 3. National Level 3.1.Population, Health and Environment (PHE) Network 3.2.Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC) 3.3.Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) 3.4.Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) 3.5.Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) 3.6.National Water and Sanitation Association (NAWASA) of the Philippines. 3.7.Founding member of the Philippine Community-Based Sustainable Tourism Association (PhilCBSTA) 3.8.Philippine Watershed Management Coalition (PWMC) 3.9.Coastal Resource Management Network (CRMNet) 3.10. NGOs for Fishery Reform (NFR) 4. International Level 4.1.Coastal Zone Asia Pacific (CZAP) 4.2.Conservation Farming in the Tropical Uplands (CFTU) 4.3.Indonesia, Cebu, Bohol, Leyte and Davao (INCEBOLEDA) watershed practitioners alliance 4.4.Women in Leadership Development (WILD) 4.5.World Agroforestry Centre/International Center for Research in AgroForestry (ICRAF)

4.6.SEAFish for Justice – an alliance of CBCRM practitioners and advocated in Southeast Asia 4.7.Alliance of Solidarity for Industrial Aquaculture (ASIA) 5. Academe 5.1.University of San Carlos (USC) – Water Laboratory 5.2.Holy Name University (HNU) – Research 5.3.University of Bohol (UB) 5.4.Central Visayas State College of Agriculture, Forestry and Technology (CVSCAFT) 5.5.University of Waikato, New Zealand 5.6.Leyte State University Achievements 1. Facilitated the formation and strengthening of Ubay Water Sanitation Cooperative (UWASCO) under the Central Visayas Water and Sanitation Project (CVWSP) funded by AusAID in collaboration with the provincial government of Bohol. This Coop successfully managed the municipal waterworks of the municipality of Ubay, Bohol. 2. Facilitated the formation and strengthening of Farmers Association of Owac (FAO) Owac, Bilar managing a successful Level 2 & 3 Water Systems Project. 3. Currently the Regional Chair of the PhilDHRRA-Visayas, a network of development NGOs in the Visayas Regions. 4. Vice Chair of PhilDHRRA- National 5. Facilitated the formation and strengthening of 58 people’s organizations (POs) in the provinces of Bohol and Southern Leyte. 6. All the POs formed are registered at the government registering agencies such as SEC, DOLE and CDA. All POS are accredited by the local government units at the municipal levels. 7. Facilitated the formation of 2 provincial federations: MAKAMASA – Bohol (a provincial federation of small fishers) and PAGKAINA –Bohol ( a provincial federation of rural women. These two federations are accredited by the provincial local government unit. 8. Recognized as one of the leading NGOs in Bohol working closely with the local government units with expertise on Water Systems Development, watershed management, coastal resource management and gender and development. 9. Nominated in the Social Development Excellence Awards for Local Governance by the Philippine Business for Social Progress- Visayas 10. Outstanding accredited co-partner in the partnership with the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) 11. Cited as an outstanding non-government organization by the government agencies, to wit: Provincial Agricultural and Fishery Council (1989), Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor and the City Government of Tagbilaran M(1994), Department of

Labor and Employment (1995), Department of Agrarian Reform in the Belgian Integrated Agrarian Reform Support Program (1999) CONTACT DETAILS Emilia M. Roslinda Executive Director Purok 5, Esabo Road, Tiptip District, Tagbilaran City, Bohol, Philippines Tel: (038)416-0067; 500-1992 Mobile: (+63) 920-906-7446 Email: [email protected] www.processbohol.org

PHILIPPINE CENTER FOR WATER AND SANITATION (PCWS) Philippine Center for Water and Sanitation (PCWS) used to be known as International Training Network (ITN) when it started in 1990 as a project of the Netherlands-based Institute of Infrastructure, Hydraulics and Engineering (IHE). It registered as a nongovernmental organization in 1998 and started supporting itself through its professional fees. PCWS now undertakes researches, trainings and consultancies. It also provides technical assistance to local governments, communities and NGOs. Engineers of PCWS work with communities in developing low cost water supply and sanitation technology options, thereby enhancing local initiatives leading to benefits in health and livelihood. PCWS leads the WASH (water, sanitation and hygiene) Philippines Coalition, a loose coalition of organizations, local governments, communities and individuals working with national and local policy makers as well as the poorest communities to improve access to WASH in areas of the Philippines most in need of them. WASH Philippines Coalition is a partner of the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (www.wsscc.org). Priority Programs/Projects 1. Low-Cost Alternative Wastewater Treatment for Communities and Households (LOCAL WATCH) LOCAL WATCH is a sanitation system that includes toilets, biogas digester septic tank, baffled reactor, anaerobic filter, gravel filter and lotus /fish pond. PCWS developed LOCAL WATCH is in response to the fact that sanitation is lagging behind in the Philippines as it is not made a priority of national and most local governments, NGOs, communities, etc. partly due to the belief that sanitation technologies like wastewater treatment systems are expensive and complicated. 2. Ensuring Access to Safe Water for Households in Communities Affected by Floods in the Philippines PCWS and the World Health Organization, with support from the Spanish Government, are jointly implementing a project on promoting household water treatment and safe storage in Eastern Visayas and the Bicol Region, specifically in flood prone communities with outbreaks of water-borne diseases due to contamination of water sources. The use of sodium hypochlorite water disinfectant is being promoted to treat drinking water at point-of-use and to safely store the treated drinking water to protect households against waterborne diseases until more definite solutions can be achieved in communities with doubtful water sources. 3. Ferro-Cement House with Wastewater Treatment and Rainwater Harvesting Systems This demonstration project on how to build a ferro-cement house with low-cost wastewater treatment and rainwater harvesting systems is meant to show that these

simple, low-cost technologies help conserve water, prevent pollution, and enable families to adapt to climate change. It also shows that sanitation is neither expensive nor complicated and is achievable even in a difficult, congested, flood-prone urban environment or in an isolated peri-urban area. This project represents the cumulative learnings of PCWS from its field-based implementation experiences and its interactions with households and communities. PCWS hopes that this demonstration project could inspire the passing of enabling local and national policies for both human health and environmental protection. 4. Technical Assistance to Local Governments, NGOs and Communities on Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) PCWS provides technical assistance to local governments, communities and NGOs to improve water supply, sanitation and hygiene. It also undertakes researches, trainings and consultancies in partnership with relevant organizations. PCWS addresses the lack of knowledge, awareness and appreciation of low-cost sanitation technologies among policy makers. It also encourages increased investments in sanitation and the development of enabling policies. Local governments are called upon to include among their priorities the implementation of WASH projects. Aside from responding to requests for technical assistance, PCWS presents low-cost appropriate alternatives to create positive changes. It addresses the need to make sanitation affordable to low-income households. Expanding the range of water supply and sanitation systems presented to communities and households provide them with more options and information. 5. Action Researches with Households CWS continues to do researches with households on more appropriate designs of WASH systems and how these could be made more affordable to low-income families. Even after the implementation of projects, the communities and households are encouraged to maintain consultative access to PCWS engineers, especially for those who have acquired skills in building their own water and their community’s water supply and sanitation systems. CONTACT DETAILS Lyn N. Capistrano Executive Director Penthouse 3, Minnesota Mansion 267 Ermin Garcia Street, Cubao, Quezon City Telefax: (02) 912-0531 Email: [email protected];

[email protected] www.itnphil.org.ph

RAMON ABOITIZ FOUNDATION INC. The Ramon Aboitiz Foundation’s vision, in its 42 years of existence in development work in the Visayas and Mindanao, has consistently been “Touching People, Shaping the Future.” It has worked towards elevating lives through a comprehensive approach that champions best practices in community development. The position calls for the foundation to be: collaborative—adhering to an inclusive process as a venue for sharing knowledge to gather the best resources, and providing opportunities to establish partnerships; holistic—conceptualizing programs that look into multi-issues and draw comprehensive solutions, according to the foundation’s and the partners’ resources, with the end of empowering people; and a role model—leading communities to sustained change and results by utilizing best practices at the same time exploring innovative solutions, and setting an example to other development partners by promoting their work and causes. Focus Areas 1. Integrated development, with specific concerns in community development, health and the environment 2. Culture and heritage 3. Leadership and citizenship 4. Micro-finance and entrepreneurship 5. Education. Services 1. 2. 3. 4.

Grants and awards Institutional development and planning Knowledge sharing and advocacy Services and facilities

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Dominica B. Chua Chief Operating Officer 35 Lopez Jaena Street, Cebu City 6000 Tel: (032) 418-7234 Email: [email protected]

SAVE THE CHILDREN Save the Children is an international independent organization that fights for children’s rights, delivering immediate and lasting improvements to children’s lives worldwide. In the Philippines, Save the Children operates in the National Capital Region and the Bicol Region in Luzon; the Central Visayas Region and Western Visayas Region; and Zamboanga Peninsula, Davao Region, SOCCKSARGEN and the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) in Mindanao. As a child rights organization, Save the Children’s work is anchored on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child UN CRC). It strives to manifest in its programs the core principles of the UN CRC, namely, children’s right to survival and development, right to equity and non-discrimination, right to be heard and the best interests of the child. Save the Children aims to create a significant impact on a greater number of children by: 1. Developing and implementing innovative evidence-based, replicable programs for children; 2. Advocating and mobilizing support to influence policies, programs and practice using its experiences; 3. Building the capacities of its implementing partners; 4. Strengthening government accountability and influencing government to ensure that children’s rights are realized; and 5. Conducting researches and documentation to serve as basis in continuously enhancing its programming and advocacy work. Programs and Services Save the Children works in communities in urban and rural poor settings; disaster-prone and conflict-affected areas; and indigenous communities, reaching out especially to marginalized sectors of children. It implements with and through partner nongovernment organizations (NGOs), community-based organizations, children’s and young people’s organizations, government line agencies and local government units (LGUs) programs in the following thematic areas: 1. Education. This thematic area covers early childhood development, basic education, adolescent learning/education and education in emergencies. 2. Child Protection. This involves strengthening laws, policies and mechanisms that will address the issue of corporal punishment of children and ensure protection for

children in conflict with the law, internally displaced children and children affected by natural disasters and armed conflict. 3. Children in Emergencies. This covers work with children affected by conflict and disasters, and includes disaster preparedness/disaster risk reduction and humanitarian response. 4. Health and Nutrition. This covers maternal and newborn health, child health and nutrition, adolescent health, newborn and child survival, and emergency health and nutrition. 5. HIV/AIDS. HIV/AIDS.

This entails work on awareness raising on and prevention of

6. Livelihoods. This involves facilitating the creation of economic opportunities for vulnerable households, and implementing programs on livelihoods readiness for youths and hunger mitigation. 7. Realizing Children’s Rights and Strengthening Civil Society. This covers work on children’s participation in governance, monitoring of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and capacity building of core partner organizations and networks in both development and emergency contexts. CONTACT DETAILS Latha Caleb Country Director 1 Encarnacion Street corner Lapu-lapu Avenue, Magallanes Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 852-5408; 852-3064; 8523059 Fax: (02) 853-0215 Mobile: (+63) 929-847-8648 www.savethechildren.net

SILAY-MAGALONA FOUNDATION, INCORPORATED SIMAG Foundation, Inc. started as a socio-economic committee in 1987 to respond to the sugar crises affecting the sugar industry in the province of Negros Occidental specifically in the district of Silay City and Municipality of E.B. Magalona in the northern side of the province. The committee was composed of volunteer citizens of the district, mostly sugarcane planters, who joined hands to combat the widespread poverty and malnutrition affecting the sugar workers and their families. The word “SIMAG” comes from the Foundation’s areas of coverage; Silay City and the town of E.B. Magalona. During the infancy stage of the organization, it initiated various projects primarily to address the hunger and malnutrition problems such as: feeding program for the malnourished children, introduction and implementation of the Bio-Intensive Gardening concept in every household, agricultural projects such as planting of cash crops like rice, corn, peanut, monggo through a land-sharing scheme with the planter-owners under the Food for Work Program of the government. The SIMAG FOUNDATION, INC. was then officially established in 1989 by the Asociacion de Hacenderos de Silay-Saravia, Inc. (AHSSI) and the Associated Planters of Silay-Saravia, Inc. (APSSI). It now seeks to wholistically improve the quality of life of the sugar workers and their families in the milling district of Silay City and E.B. Magalona covering over 320 large and small farms. With an integrated three-fold approach in Livelihood, Health and Education, SIMAG has over the years organized and financed Community Cooperatives in over a hundred farms, trained and assisted about a hundred Volunteer Health Workers throughout the area, and provided scholarships to almost a thousand deserving high school and college students. Through the continued support of Association Planters - members, with skilled, experienced and committed managers and staff, in close coordination with government and non-government agencies, and in active partnership with the farm community leaders, SIMAG envisions the flowering of empowered sustainable communities capable of contributing to the progressive development of the sugar industry and the province. Vision Advancing to the 21st Century Serve as catalyst in transforming a home in a sugarcane farm to a prosperous household in a progressive community. Mission Professionalizing Grassroot Organizations Assist each SIMAG member in maximizing his full potential by providing professional opportunities and services Goals and Objectives

1. To harness all available human, natural and material resources for the social, political, economic and spiritual upliftment of the quality of life of the working communities in Silay and E.B. Magalona. 2. To facilitate and engage in activities which can provide relief assistance primarily to distressed families of sugar workers, and secondarily to other beneficiaries which may be decided by the Board. 3. To facilitate and provide educational services which will improve the livelihood skills, health care, community-oriented values and democratic ideals of the working communities. 4. To facilitate the implementation of livelihood projects that could address the food deficiency and malnutrition problems, and which could provide or generate extra income. 5. To facilitate, engage and promote basic social services which will improve the living conditions of the working communities. Program Areas: A. Livelihood - Financial/Loan Assistance - Capability Building Training - Skills Training B. Health - VHW Training, Volunteerism & Family Management - Botika ng Barangay - Environmental Sanitation (Clean & Green) C. Education - Educational Assistance Program for Elementary, High School & College - Personal Safety Lessons - Summer Learning Experience (College Scholars) - Education Reform Project D. Special Projects - Children Development Project PARTNERS Local  Asociacion de Hacenderos de SilaySaravia, Inc.  Associated Planters of Silay-Saravia, Inc.  Sugar Industry Foundation, Inc.

National  Philippine NGO Support Program (PHANSuP) Inc.  Philippine Center for Population and Development, Inc. (PCPD)

International  Les Amis De Soeur Emmanuelle (ASMAE), France  British Embassy – UK

Local  Department of Labor and Employment  Department of Health  Department of Education – Silay City Division Office  Technical Education and Skills Development Authority  Province of Negros Occidental  City Government of Silay  Municipal Government of E.B. Magalona  Office of Congressman Jose Carlos Lacson  Office of Board Member Manuel Fredrick “Manman” Ko  Negros-Japan Human Resource Exchange Association, Inc. (NJRHEA)  Hope Foundation, Inc.  Monde Nissin Corporation

National  Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse (CPTCSA)  Philippine Educational Theater Association (PETA)  Philippine NGO Council on Population, Health & Welfare, Inc. (PNGOC)  Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC)  Association of Foundations, Inc. (AF)  Institute of Reproductive Health Philippines (IRH)  National Pharmaceutical Foundation, Inc. (NPF)  Philippine Development Assistance Programme, Inc. (PDAP)

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Fely D. Flores Administrative Manager Mr. Francis Joseph J. Jalandoni Executive Director G/F AHSSI Building, Rizal St., Barangay Mambulac, 6116 Silay City, Negros Occidental Telefax: (034) 495-1549 E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]

International

SILSILAH DIALOGUE MOVEMENT – SILSILAH FOUNDATION, INC. (SILSILAH) Silsilah envisions a life-in-dialogue for all Muslims, Christians and peoples of other living faiths in respect, trust and love for one another and moving together towards a common experience of harmony, solidarity and peace. It aims to be in dialogue with all people, regardless of culture and faith, promoting a Culture of Dialogue with particular emphasis on spiritual values; and facilitate solidarity with all peoples in the upliftment of the less privileged in order to build a progressive, just, humane and ecologically sound society. Programs and Services SISILAH encourages inter-religious dialogue for peace and development. It provides social services, education and training, and health and nutrition. CONTACT DETAILS Fr. Sebastiano D'Ambra, PIME Founder, Silsilah Dialogue Movement JBC Rodriguez Building 137 Buenavista Street, Zamboanga City E-mail: [email protected] silsilahdialogue.com; silsilahforum.org.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE ORGANIZATION, INC. (TAO-Pilipinas, Inc.) TAO-Pilipinas is a women-led, non-stock, non-profit, non-government organization that provides technical assistance to urban and rural poor communities in the planning, development, and management of their settlements. The organization’s core values are integrity, commitment, professionalism, and respect for diversity. TAO-Pilipinas is geared towards the development of sustainable human settlements that are inclusive, people-centered, environment-friendly and promotes equitable distribution of and access to resources. To achieve this vision, the organization promotes and pursues:  

Participatory human settlements planning, development and management; and Enhancement of technical knowledge and skills among stakeholders in the housing and urban development sector especially the marginalized groups.

TAO-Pilipinas supports urban poor organizations, young professionals and builds partnerships with non-government organizations through its four core programs: 1. Human Settlements and Environment Program 

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Provide technical support to urban poor organizations, local government units and non-government organizations in settlements planning, development and management. Facilitate sustainable urban development through encouraging community-based management processes. Engage the government at the barangay level in the implementation of communitybased projects (e.g. community-based solid waste management and communitybased disaster risk management for sites and buildings).

The Human Settlements and Environment Program is a response to the growing problem of homelessness, lack of security of tenure and the limited access to housing support mechanisms of the majority of the Filipinos. This program primarily covers architecture, engineering and the planning aspects of human settlements with a strong emphasis on the social empowerment. Under the HSE Program, TAO-Pilipinas extends direct technical assistance to urban and rural poor people’s organizations and NGOs to help them negotiate for security of tenure or plan and develop an on-site settlement or resettlement site, with a strong emphasis on community participation and social empowerment. The agency provides the following technical services:   

Coordination of land survey and titling between surveyor and urban poor organization; Conceptual development planning of occupied site for negotiations to acquire security of tenure; Subdivision planning of acquired land for socialized housing; and



Design of housing unit, community facilities and infrastructure.

TAO-Pilipinas is also engaged in promoting appropriate, cost-effective, and environment-friendly housing approaches and building technologies responsive to the needs of the marginalized sectors. 2. Education and Training/Young Professionals Program 

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Facilitate transfer of knowledge, skills, and technology to urban and rural poor organizations, non-government organizations and young professionals through training, workshops and capacity-building. Develop competencies of urban and rural poor organizations, NGOs and young professionals in settlements planning, development and management Develop tools for popularization of technical information and awareness building of stakeholders in the development of human settlements.

As an Education and Training sub-program, TAO-Pilipinas is also focused on capability building. The agency aims to provide university students, academics, and young professionals with a venue for social orientation and action on issues concerning sustainable human settlements development. Those who have the interest to work on issues affecting the poor are given the chance to interact and work with poor communities. Program activities include the following:      

Training and orientation workshops with direct community interaction Internship program Volunteer placement for individuals and student organizations Project partnerships with academic institutions University lectures Newsletter dissemination to the YP network

3. Research and Publications Program  

Contribute to the body of knowledge on sustainable human settlements development and architectural heritage through research and documentation. Increase awareness on processes related to sustainable human settlements development through the establishment of a resource and information center.

Under the RP Program, TAO-Pilipinas supports the delivery of technical assistance to poor communities through conducting research on sustainable human settlements development and other related issues. It also builds awareness on topics such as alternative approaches to housing and community-based management processes through publication on print and online media. Program activities include:  

Documentation of TAO-Pilipinas’ technical assistance to communities Research on alternative building materials and technologies; and land acquisition, registration, surveying and titling processes

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Maintenance of the TAO Resource Center and Library Bi-annual publication of TAO Shelter magazine Collaboration with local and international academic and research institutions and individuals

4. Organization, Networking, and Advocacy Program  

Pursue organizational sustainability to ensure continuing services to the marginalized sectors. Build networks with community-based organizations, NGOs, international organizations, academe, funding agencies and government to strengthen partnerships, share resources, and support initiatives and advocacies towards the development of sustainable human settlements.

Projects 1. Community Projects These projects involve assistance to urban or rural poor communities that are in the process of upgrading, relocation, resettlement, or under the threat of demolition. These aim to help the people improve their settlements and gain security of tenure. 1.1.SANAGMANA (Federation of the United Urban Poor of Navotas) in Tanza, Navotas, Metro Manila Informal settlers in Navotas whose homes were demolished or are under threat of demolition have resettled in a one-hectare, privately-owned site within the city in Barangay Tanza. They are planning to purchase the land themselves and develop the site incrementally. TAO-Pilipinas has given assistance by training the people on estate management and solid waste management; building awareness on planning and design standards; facilitating participatory community planning; and giving guidance/advice on technical requirements for land research/acquisition, site development, disaster risk management, and house design. 1.2.DSOP (Dike-Side Organization of Punta) in Sta. Ana, Manila The informal settlers of Punta, Sta. Ana, Manila are affected by the Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission’s (PRRC) 10-meter Environmental Preservation Area (EPA) Project. TAO-Pilipinas helped the organization present an alternative reblocking scheme to PRRC against what they felt as inadequate housing options. However, PRRC has maintained its position to pursue its clearing of the 10-meter EPA. TAO-Pilipinas advised the organization in the site selection, assessment and the selection of housing options for its resettlement. About 200 households have now chosen to transfer to a resettlement site in Rodriguez, Rizal. TAO-Pilipinas is currently drafting a proposal to the Asian Development Bank to train the community

in estate management and solid waste management before they transfer to the resettlement site. 1.3.SAPSPA (Association for the Appropriate Housing of San Pablo Apostol) in Tondo, Manila Assistance to SAPSPA involves the mobilization of student volunteers from the University of the Philippines Task Force Arki (a student organization in the UP College of Architecture) to design the upgrading of houses of beneficiaries who qualify for a loan from a donor. The students prepare the blueprints for the building permit while TAO architects give guidance and sign the final design. TAO has also mobilized student volunteers from other universities to assist in the construction and supervision. 1.4.DAMPA – DVNA (Solidarity of the Urban Poor – Dumpsite View Neighborhood Association) Kabisig HOA (Entwined Arms Home Owners Association) and Happy Family Neighborhood Association (HFNA) in Payatas, Quezon City TAO-Pilipinas is coordinating with a geodetic engineer in the surveying of the area for titling of individual lots. 1.5.St. Hannibal Christian Community (SHACC) in Pasay City TAO-Pilipinas is assisting two barangays (165 and 156) in proposing an on-site development with a total reblocking scheme to the government to accommodate about 500 families. This is being done in coordination with the Hannibal Empowerment Center (SHEC), a non-government organization based in Pasay City assisting the SHACC in their community needs. Finalization of the plan is on hold, pending the proclamation of government lots in Barangay 165 and the purchase of private lots in Barangay 156. But there is still a need to conduct an environmental study, as the Department of Public Works and Highways and Pasay City have declared the site a danger zone, and earmarked it for flood control. TAO-Pilipinas has linked the organization with environmental consultants, Seastems, Inc. and Manila Observatory for support on the environmental study. 2. Research Projects TAO-Pilipinas undertakes research to support the objectives of its programs, and provide knowledge to its network of people’s organizations, non-government organizations, professionals and people in the academe. The following are the research projects: 2.1.Integrating Disaster Risk Management (DRM) in Site Planning and House Design in Resettlement Projects

An action-research project funded through the Applied Research Grants for Disaster Reduction Programme by the ProVention Consortium and with support of TAOPilipinas, Inc. as host organization. Albay province in the Bicol region is still in the process of recovery after mudflows at the height of typhoon Reming (Durian) last November 30, 2006 flowed from the slopes of Mayon volcano burying surrounding villages and rendering thousands of families homeless and displaced. The urgent need to provide relocation for displaced families resulted in rapid reconstruction work in areas with less than minimum site development. The post-disaster rehabilitation work is an opportunity to integrate community-based disaster risk management in the planning and design of resettlement sites as capacitybuilding of communities and transfer of technology on safe building construction will help reduce damage to property and loss of life. The research looked into the recovery efforts taking place in Albay resettlement sites and studied the technical aspects of disaster-resilient shelter design and construction in the context of Albay’s vulnerability to typhoon and volcanic hazards. The research output can serve as a guide for stakeholders in developing relocation sites into more disaster-resilient areas for human settlement. It proposes methods and practices to help avoid generating new risks from unchecked construction practices and prevent creating inappropriately-planned resettlement sites and unsafe houses that add to the vulnerability of poor communities. 2.2.Sourcebook of Alternative Building Materials and Technologies (SABMAT) This project is envisioned as a compendium of alternative building materials that are appropriate, affordable, and locally available for social housing projects or for communities doing self-help building projects. A partnership between TAO-Pilipinas and the Polytechnic University of the Philippines College of Architecture and Fine Arts enabled the first phase of the project to be implemented in November 2006 to March 2007. Fourth year architecture students contributed to the project by researching selected alternative materials that were then presented to TAO’s partner communities and non-government organizations. The SABMAT is expected to grow and evolve as more materials are added to the compendium, and the materials are evaluated and tested by community organizations. 2.3.Research on Land Acquisition, Registration, Surveying and Titling Processes in Metro Manila Lack of employment, absence of livelihood and other opportunities in the rural areas have driven most people to migrate to urbanized cities and compete for available

urban space and limited land resources. This pattern of migration has made land a scarce and valuable resource often inaccessible to the poor. As a result, they resort to informal means of land acquisition. In Metro Manila, many Filipinos live in hazardous places such as land beside railroads or under bridges, while some live on lands owned by private individuals, corporations or the government. There are many factors that contribute to the predicament of the landless urban poor. Among these factors are their lack of information about the laws and processes in land acquisition and titling and the confusing process per se. This research aims to help in the struggle of informal communities to secure tenure by documenting and clarifying the processes of land acquisition, registration, surveying and titling. The first phase of the research was done with the help of interns Aaron Ching and Mark Lopez from the University of the Philippines Geodetic Engineering Department. This involved studying the laws that govern land management and land registration, and interviewing key resource persons from the academe, government offices, and representatives of urban poor communities. The output from this phase is currently being validated. The next step is to popularize the results and make it more accessible to the urban poor. 3. Capability Building Projects 3.1.Young Professionals Orientation and Training Program (YP-OTP) The Young Professionals Orientation and Training Program is the key project of of the Young Professionals’ Program. It is an annual seminar-workshop-immersion activity that aims to provide a balanced theoretical and practical learning experience to students and young professionals interested in working with marginalized groups. It is implemented in two stages: (1) the General Orientation Workshop on Social Housing and (2) the Community Integration Process. The General Orientation Workshop is a series of lectures on social housing issues, visits to selected housing sites, and stay-in community workshops. The Community Integration Process is a 6month internship/fellowship with urban poor communities that have concrete needs for technical assistance. The integration process provides participants valuable handson experience on participatory processes and allows for intense and direct community-young professional interaction, with both parties mutually benefiting from the process. 3.2.Community-Based Solid Waste Management Training This is a training for community leaders and members on proper waste segregation, recycling, waste reduction and reuse, urban gardening and livelihood using recyclable materials. Follow-up activities will guide people’s organizations on how to manage and operate an SWM program in the community and their own materials recovery facility. This training has been done in communities in Navotas and Pasay.

3.3.Community-Based Disaster Risk Management for Site and Building This training module covers both social preparations and design approaches to address existing vulnerabilities due to social factors, location and building design. It is expected that a disaster risk management committee will be formed to be responsible for the implementation of a disaster preparedness plan. It has been done in communities in Infanta, Quezon, and Albay, Bicol. CONTACT DETAILS Arlene Christy D. Lusterio Executive Director Office Add: 27-A Matiyaga St., Brgy. Central Diliman, 1100 Quezon City, Philippines Mailing Add: PO Box 27, UP Post Office, UP Campus Diliman, 1100 Quezon City, Philippines Telefax: (02) 4410998 Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.tao-pilipinas.org

UCCP-Masidlakon Center Development Foundation, Inc. The UCCP- Masidlakon Center Development Foundation, is engaged in primary health care, nutrition programs, zero waste management, window gardening of vegetables, and recycling. In particular it assists indigent families of Kawit, San Pedro, Lumbia, Dumagoc and Tuburan Districts of Pagadian City. The Center expands the Education Program to the indigenous people in the barangays of Deborok, Dituray, Kahayagan, Gubang, Sibatang and Dampalan Pagadian City to cater the needs of the children, Thus far, we have two (2) center based and 10 home based classes of pre-school. The Center Strengthen the Child Protection Program through Advocacy and organized the Provincial Inter-Agency Committee against Child Trafficking in pursuing the education of the communities, school and churches about the issues of child trafficking, child labor and street children. The Center provides Alternative Learning System (ALS) for the street children, out-of-school youth and victims and potential victims of trafficking in Pagadian City and Zamboanga del Sur.

CONTACT DETAILS Febie L. Marquez Project Administrator Kawit District, Pagadian City Tel: (062) 214-1537 Mobile: (+63) 928-454-9433

UCCP – PAG-UGMAD SA KABATAAN CENTER (UCCP-PKC) Pag-ugmad is a non-stock, non-profit organization of UCCP Davao City Church and a partner of Kindernothilfe (Child needs help) in Germany. It was founded in 1983, assisting 60 children from Bolton Isla. Now, Pag-ugmad has extended its reach assisting the communities of Agdao, New Carmen, Matina Biao and the Badjao Communities of Matina Aplaya and Sta. Cruz. The organization supports more than 1,000 children and young people. Pag-ugmad’s work is based on Christian faith and cooperation with churches, partners, networks and donors. Its scope of project-support ranges from day care centers to community development, aiming always to achieve widespread impact. Vision: Christ’s servants empowering children, their families and communities to pursue a growing relationship with God and to live a meaningful and abundant life. Mission: To organize and equip communities, families and children in depressed areas to pursue a growing relationship with God and live a meaningful and abundant life. Goals

    

Enhance the quality of involvement of church members’ in the ministry. Strengthen the organizational capability of Pag-ugmad to effectively carryout and fulfill its mission. Enhance the capability and capacity of communities to improve their living condition. Assist families develop/maintain a God-loving and improved family life. Assist children grow fully, enjoying their rights and yet performing their responsibilities.

Main Focus Points 1. Basic education In accordance with the UN-Convention for the Rights of the Child, Pag-ugmad considers access to basic education as a human right whose implementation contributes considerably to combating poverty. Consequently, Pag-ugmad promotes early childhood support, education programmes for children of school-going age and integrative education programmes for children at risk. 2. Children at Risk Despite all progress in development work, children are still frequently victims. Street children, working, children in conflict with the police and the law, and sexually abused children are in need of particular care and support to overcome their trauma and to gain a new perspective in life. Pagugmad supports these children through referrals to temporary shelters, legal assistance and psychosocial intervention. 3. The Rights of Children Children can and should be the subjects of their own development. The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child has established the necessary foundation for this hich needs to be safeguarded

and developed further. Pag-ugmad is committed to the implementation of the Rights of the Child. We inform children, young people and the people in their environment about these rights and call for their implementation. 4. Advocacy Pag-ugmad works on local and national levels by joining alliances, cooperating with networks and other organizations to achieve a global improvement of economic, social and political structural conditions. It participates in campaigns or initiates its own campaigns. 5. Community Development The development opportunities for children and young people are determined by their social environment. A community must therefore be given the necessary means to sustainably improve its living conditions. The community programme of Pag-ugmad are committed to encouraging peoples’ own initiatives and helping them to help themselves while keeping the main focus on the needs of the children. 6. Responsible Parenthood To address the issue of child neglect and maltreatment forcing children to stop schooling and work instead, systematic training for effective parenting, strengthening or formation of church related organizations or classes; family planning methods/reproductive health education are implemented. Family counseling is also extended to families with special needs. 7. Community-based Skills Training Skills training are being organized to equip the out-of-school children or youth with practical, employable skills that would help them in getting better paying employment through job placement or income-generating opportunities. 8. Poverty Alleviation Support Pag-ugmad believes that the income generating capabilities of the parents must be enhanced to eradicate or minimize the problem of working children and out of school youth and children in the community.

Programs and Projects 1. Widespread Impact Program Objectives: At the end of the 5-year program assistance, Pag-ugmad see that:  The families and communities are able to work together to bring about full and healthy lives for their children.  Basic health and education services and facilities are available for the care and development of children.  Opportunities for livelihood are increased for the families and community as a whole.



The number of children-at-risk from hunger, abuse and exploitation are reduced.

Beneficiaries: Specifically, the families of the 200 children under its fostership program and generally, the communities of these 200 children which includes Agdao, Bolton Isla and the Badjao communities – Matina Aplaya and Sta. Cruz. Project Impact: The lives of these 3,000 people are changed through the:  Fostership Program – Pre-school to College Education  Establishment of pre-school centers in Agdao, Bolton Isla and the Badjao Communities – Sta. Cruz & Matina-Aplaya  Provision of basic health and education services  Care and protection of Children-at-risk  Education on Responsible Parenting/ Poverty and alleviation support Project Indicators: Education  Children attending school and completing their studies according to set standards  Children are enjoying their rights and performing their responsibilities  Knowledge and practice of Christian values  Expressive of their love for God Responsible Parenthood/Poverty Alleviation Support  Couples are into responsible parenting  Improved economic sources  Family’s basic needs met  Availing and enjoying basic services  Complying with the provisions of Child 21  Attending a faith community  Participating in community affairs and contributing resources to improve community life Care and protection of children-at-risk  Problematic children identified and rescued  Functional Barangay Council for the Protection of Children (BCPC) and attends to children issues and problems  Alliances formed & mechanisms installed to address common concerns  Assisted children return to normal life and enjoying the provisions of Child 21.

2. Child Focused Community-Based Development Program (CFCDP) Objectives: At the end of the 5-year program assistance and through the collective efforts of the communities and families, Barangays Matina Biao and New Carmen are

transformed into child-focused communities in general, and in particular 250 children-atrisk are growing full and healthy lives. Beneficiaries: Generally, the communities of New Carmen (dumpsite area) and Matina Biao benefited from this program and specifically, the 250 children and their families under the pre-school scholarship program. Project Impact: Around 2,000 people in the communities of Matina Biao and New Carmen were reached by this program through:  Community organizing leading to the formulation and implementation of a unified program for children’s development and protection  Family empowerment, organizing and mobilization – Parents and other significant adults learned and were organized and mobilized to appropriately protect and develop children.  Child-Specific protection and development Project Indicators: Community organizing  Functional Barangay Development Council  Multi-sectoral Barangay Council for the development and protection of children are formed and institutionalized.  A collectively formulated barangay development plan  Improved capacities to plan, implement, manage, monitor and evaluate projects  Formal deliberations on Children’s development and protection were conducted among barangay officials and offices Family empowerment, organizing and mobilization  Complying with the provisions of Child 21  Christian Family seminars were attended by at least 70% of the total number of families.  Maternal and Child Care Program in place and operational Child-Specific protection and development  Identified child laborers and out-of-school children and youth are back to / has remained in school.  Pre-schoolers availed of the center’s SOAECE Program  Children are engaged in continuing character and value formation programs CONTACT DETAILS Leah Y. Genson Executive Director 415 Bonifacio St., Bgy 3-A 8000 Davao City Telefax: (082) 227-4656

Email: [email protected]

UP VISAYAS-BARANGAY INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT APPROACH FOR NUTRITION IMPROVEMENT OF THE RURAL POOR (UPV-BIDANI) Barangay Integrated Development Approach for Nutrition Improvement is an action – reasearch community outreach program of UP Visayas. It started in 1990 with funding from the Dutch Government. At present, it is a regular extension program of the university, with special funding from the DBM. UPV – BIDANI has been working in nine municipalities and forty – nine barangays in the province of Iloilo. It has trained teams from Panay State Polytechnic College and from Aklan State University to spread the good news of BIDANI in the provinces of Capiz and Aklan, respectively. Programs and Services The UPV – BIDANI assists in the rehabilitation of malnourished children and the prevention of the occurrence of malnutrition. It aims to increase food availability at the household level, and improve standard of living of rural poor. It enhances the capability of barangay people in planning and implementation of development activities and projects. It reinforces the capability of municipal agencies to support barangay development activities. It prioritizes women, youth and children in its programming. CONTACT DETAILS Vicente T. Balinas Program Director UP Visayas City Campus Gen. Luna Street, 5000 Iloilo City, Iloilo Telefax: (033) 336 – 5568 Email: [email protected]

ZAMBOANGA DEL NORTE CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS AND DEVELOPMENT (CESCOD) CESCOD is a non-government organization committed to engage communities, government and other concerned groups and individuals on a principled and pro-active basis to effect sustainable development and social change. Major Programs            

Organic Farming and Sustainable Agriculture Capability building/trainings for : farmers, women, LGUs, children and youth, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors Micro-enterprise/Livelihood assistance (Credit Facility/small loans program) Literacy Education for Adults (IPs and non-IPs) Mainstreaming Gender in Development Advocacy for social –economic-political issues Community Development/Rebuilding communities/Empowering communities Participation in Local Governance Ecology and environmental concerns Leadership trainings, Team building seminars etc for organizations and offices Educational Assistance for Marginalized Youth (Scholarship Program ) Networking

Network Affiliation    

PhilDHRRA Civil Society Counterpart Council for Sustainable Development (CSCCSD) Member of various national and local sectoral and/or issue-based coalitions and organizations Member of the City Development Council (Dipolog City) and other special bodies/committees/councils in Dipolog City

CONTACT DETAILS Fr. Enrico V. Montano Executive Director CESCOD Magsaysay cor Bonifacio St., Dipolog City Tel: (065) 212-7791 Telefax: (065) 212-2953 Email: [email protected]

Service Areas  

Agriculture and Fisheries Development Entrepreneurship, Business and Industry Promotion

DEPARTMENT OF AGRARIAN REFORM (DAR) The Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) is the principal agency responsible in implementing the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP). Specifically, DAR aims to improve land tenure through better access to and a more equitable distribution of land and the fruits thereof. It strives to enhance the welfare and promote the development of Program Beneficiaries through the coordinated delivery of essential support services. Unique to DAR are the Agrarian Reform Communities (ARCs) to which the development efforts of DAR converge. An ARC is defined as a barangay or cluster of barangays primarily composed and managed by Agrarian Reform Beneficiaries (ARBs) who are willing to organize and undertake integrated development of an area/or their organizations/cooperatives. DAR programs and projects are generally geared towards providing assistance that promotes agricultural productivity, agribusiness development, infrastructure development, enterprise development, institutional development and community development. Vision A nation where there is equitable land ownership with empowered agrarian reform beneficiaries who are effectively managing their economic and social development for a better quality of life. Mission To lead in the implementation of agrarian reform and sustainable development in the country through land tenure improvement and the provision of integrated development services to landless farmers, farm workers and small-landowners-cultivators and the delivery of agrarian justice as key to long lasting peace and development of the countryside. Goal To "transform the landless farmers and farmworkers into a new class of responsible, progressive, asset-owning farmer-rural entrepreneurs, creating millions of jobs for the rapidly growing rural labor force, trail-blazing the equitable distribution of income, and contributing significantly to national economic growth." CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 920-0380; 929-3460 www.dar.gov.ph

Agrarian Reform Communities Project (ARCP II) Description: The project is aimed to reduce poverty and thus improve the socio-economic status of the identified communities in selected ARCs and ARC clusters. Specifically, the project aims to increase the income of the ARBs and other farmers in the project areas and to contribute to improved quality of life in the ARCs in a sustainable manner. The project is expected to achieve the following outcomes: i) improved access to livelihood assets by the rural poor including the landless farm workers; ii) developed sustainable livelihoods, agribusinesses and long lasting improvements in the well-being of the poor and marginalized groups in the target communities. Location: Regions IV-B, V, VI, VIII, and IX Project Cost (in Million Pesos): Total Project Cost (TPC): Lending Party (LP): Government of the Philippines (GOP): Beneficiaries: 152 ARCs Project Duration: 2009-2014 Funding Agency: Asian Development Bank CONTACT DETAILS: Nelson G. Genito National Project Coordinator FAPsO Annex Building DAR Compound, Quezon City Tel: (02) 426-5177

8,647.210 5,378.400 3,268.810

Agrarian Reform Infrastructure Support Project III (ARISP III - JBIC) Description: The project espouses the integrated approach for the development of communities, which involves the combination of infrastructure, institutional development and agricultural & enterprise development support. Drawing up lessons from ARISP Phase I & II, the third phase shall pursue the development of specific communities and transform them into agricultural production zones that would supply raw materials & semi-processed produce required for the establishment of agri-business. Location: 54 Provinces Project Cost (in Million Pesos): Total Project Cost (TPC): Lending Party (LP): Government of the Philippines GOP: Beneficiaries: 130 ARCs 68,330 ARBs Project Duration: April 2008 - April 2014 Funding Agency: Government of Japan CONTACT DETAILS: Celerina G. Afable National Project Manager 3rd Floor FAPsO Building DAR Compound, Quezon City Tel: (02) 454-2136; 454-2150

7,964.00 5,973.00 1,991.00

Northern Mindanao Community Initiatives and Natural Resource Management Project (NMCIREMP - IFAD) Description: The project aims to reduce poverty for targeted households, indigenous peoples, coastal and lake fishermen and agrarian reform beneficiaries in Regions 10 and 13 through the establishment of community institutions at the settlement level and develop their capability to undertake development activities with the provision of infrastructure facilities, conduct of training and capability building process, provision of equity to selfhelp groups through micro-lending, provision of social support services and improvement of quality and coverage of agricultural extension services through training programs to extension workers and the LGUs. Location: Misamis Oriental, Agusan Norte, Agusan Sur, Surigao del Norte, and Surigao del Sur Project Cost (in Million Pesos): Total Project Cost (TPC): Lending Party (LP): Government of the Philippines (GOP):

1,130.584 728.833 401.751

Beneficiaries: 58,000 households of poor and disenfranchised segments of upland/coastal lake side communities IP in 21 ADS/ARBs in 73 ARCs Project Duration: 2003 - June 2009 (With proposed extension up to March 2010) Funding Agency: International Fund for Agricultural Development CONTACT DETAILS: Herminia Fe B. San Juan Director, PDMS / FAPsO-MES 1/F FAPsO Building DAR Compound, Quezon City Tel: (02) 920-4267; 426-7451

Tulay ng Pangulo Para sa Kaunlaran Pang Agraryo Description: The project involves the construction, installation and establishment of about 418 "universal bridges" (unibridges) in priority Agrarian Reform Communities (ARCs) and CARP covered areas. About 210 bridge sites involving about 5,694 lineal meters (lm) were identified for single lane bridging requirement while 208 bridge sites involving 4,908 lineal meters were identified for double lane bridging. The project would utilize permanent prefabricated modular steel technology, which will be imported from France. Location: Nationwide Project Cost (in Million Pesos): Total Project Cost (TPC): Lending Party (LP): Government of the Philippines (GOP): Beneficiaries: ARCs/CARPs covered areas Project Duration: 2008-2012 Funding Agency: Government of France CONTACT DETAILS: Narciso B. Nieto Undersecretary, FMAO/Project Implementation Officer, FAPs/ Executive Director, FAPsO FAPsO Annex Building DAR Compound, Quezon City Tel: (02) 474-5805; 920-4044

18,474.560 16,511.090 1,963.470

Mindanao Sustainable Settlement Area Development Project (MINSSAD - JBIC) Description: The project calls for the development of eight (8) settlement areas in Mindanao in collaboration with other government agencies, non-government organizations and peoples' organizations. It aims to alleviate poverty, institute agrarian change, spur economic growth in the settlement areas and ensure viable and sustainable development in the settlements. Location: Eight (8) settlements in Bukidnon, Davao Norte, Davao Oriental, Compostela Valley, Agusan Sur, and Surigao Norte Project Cost (in Million Pesos): Total Project Cost (TPC): Lending Party (LP): Government of the Philippines (GOP): Beneficiaries: Eight (8) settlement ARCs 21,186 Farmer Beneficiaries Project Duration: 2001 - 2009 Funding Agency: Government of Japan CONTACT DETAILS: Percival C. Dalugdug Project Director 4th Floor FAPsO Building DAR Compound, Quezon City Tel: (02) 426-9288

3,102.500 2,326.950 775.550

Second Agrarian Reform Communities Development Project (ARCDP 2 - WB) Description: The project aims to continue the momentum achieved by ARCDP I in program beneficiaries development and support delivery directed at increasing farmers' income and providing further opportunities for sustainable growth and poverty reduction. ARCDP II also promotes the expanded role and capacities of local institutions, particularly LGUs, in managing and sustaining local rural development initiatives and programs. In broader framework, the ARC development shall be integrated and linked with local priorities and directions of identified SAFDZs in the project areas. These objectives shall be achieved through the synergistic application of three (3) major components: community development and capacity building, agriculture and enterprise development, and rural infrastructure. Location: Ilocos Norte,Tarlac, Isabela, Batanes, Bohol, Zambales, Bataan, Occ. Mindoro, Quezon I and II, Camarines Sur, Albay, Masbate, Negros Oriental, Zamboanga Norte, Misamis Occ. Compostela Valley, Davao Norte Project Cost (in Million Pesos): Total Project Cost (TPC): Lending Party (LP): Government of the Philippines (GOP):

3,419.446 2,632.630 (US$50M) 786.816

Beneficiaries: 125 ARCs 82, 711 ARBs Project Duration: June 2003 - December 2007 (Extended to December 2009) With proposed additional $10M financing and extension up to Dec. 2009 to complete 22 irrigation sub-projects Funding Agency: World Bank CONTACT DETAILS: Herminia Fe B. San Juan Director, PDMS / FAPsO-MES 1/F FAPsO Building DAR Compound, Quezon City Tel: (02) 920-4267; 426-7451

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (DA) The Department of Agriculture is the principal agency of the Philippine government responsible for the promotion of agricultural development and growth. In pursuit of this mandate, it provides the policy framework, helps direct public investments, and in partnership with local government units (LGUs) provides the support services necessary to make agriculture and agri-based enterprises profitable and to help spread the benefits of development to the poor, particularly those in the rural areas. Mission, Objectives and Principles The Department’s primary mission is to increase the real incomes of farmers and fisherfolk, thereby contributing to the achievement of the national goals of alleviating poverty, generating productive opportunities, fostering social justice and equity, and promoting sustainable economic growth. Corollary to this mission are the following objectives:  To help ensure food security and support the national effort toward self-sufficiency in rice and corn;  To help attain a favorable balance of trade by enhancing the competitiveness of the agricultural and fishery sectors in both domestic and foreign markets;  To support the development of farmer and fisherfolk organizations; and  To promote the development of labor-intensive and employment-generating agroindustrial enterprises. In the pursuit of its mission and objectives, the Department adopts the following principles:  Private sector enterprise shall be encouraged to promote the efficient allocation and effective utilization of resources, consistent with the objectives of equity and social justice.  The maximization participation of the people in the development process shall be encouraged since development proceeds only through the favorable interaction of all sectors.  Development shall be promoted compatible with the preservation of the ecosystem in areas where agriculture and fisheries activities are carried out, exerting care and judicious use of natural resources in order to attain long-term sustainability.  Sound agricultural growth shall be pursued as the foundation for industrial development. Functions In fulfilling its mandate and mission, the Department performs the following functions: 1. The creation of a policy environment conducive to increased incomes in agriculture. The DA actively advocates for the adoption of policies supportive of long-term sustainable growth in the sector as well as for the repeal or amendment of policies, which impede such growth.

2. The provision of agriculture and fishery infrastructure support (i.e., irrigation facilities, farm-to-market roads, fish ports, etc.) to encourage private sector investments in agriculture and fisheries. 3. The generation, verification, and dissemination of information relevant to productivity and development. The Department undetakes research and development programs, which (i.) strengthen the linkage between research and extension; (ii.) develop and broaden the adoption of low-cost productivity-enhancing production and processing technologies; (iii.) identify and promote the sustainable use of resource capabilities; and (iv.) assess commodity marjets and conditions and prospects. 4. The production, testing, and dissemination of superior plant and animal germplasm. In support of private sector initiatives, the DA develops, produces and distributes superior crop varieties and breeds of livestock and fish suited to Philippine conditions, focusing on the extension, demonstration, and provision of parent stock and fish juveniles. 5. The facilitation of market access and the promotion of agro-based enterprises. The Department assists agricultural producers and agribusiness men, particularly lowincome farmers, in processing and marketing their produce, linking them with processors and buyers, helping forge marketing agreements, and facilitating access to the international market. Moreover, it assists agricultural entrepreneurs in availing of financing by directing them to possible sources and by expanding credit guarantee and insurance facilities. 6. Regulation. The Department is mandated to exercise regulatory control over particular agriculture-related areas and concerns. The exercise of this control is conducted for the following objectives:  To prevent the over-exploitation of resource to ensure their long-term productivity;  To protect the health and safety of the populace;  To prevent and/or contain the spread of plant, fish and animal pests and diseases;  To prevent manipulation in the markets of staple agricultural commodities of inputs;  To protect domestic agricultural producers from unfair competition of imports made cheap through subsidies by exporting countries;  To implement international commodity agreement which the Philippines has acceded to; and  To ensure the quality of Philippine agricultural exports and increase their share in the world market 7. Implementation of empowerment programs to provide access to the benefits of development to groups, which have been disadvantaged due to inequitable distribution of resources of market failures. CONTACT DETAILS:

The SECRETARY Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 928-8741 to 65 loc. 2209/2211/2212/2241; 920-4323; 920-43-58; 929-8183 Fax: (02) 926-6426 www.da.gov.ph

Ginintuang Masaganing Ani (GMA) Programs Ginintuang Masaganang Ani (GMA) – “Makapagpabagong Programa Tungo sa Masagana at Maunlad na Agrikultura at Pangisdaan” - will be the banner program for agricultural development, a transitional blueprint for putting Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA) to work. As such, it will focus on achieving food security and poverty alleviation, with the LGUs (local government units) and other stakeholders developing their own plans and programs suitable to their respective localities. Such plans and programs should be able to ensure food security by increasing productivity in irrigated areas, while addressing poverty alleviation by providing support to marginal areas to empower those who have the least. The program envisions a modernized and productive agriculture and fishery sector, being able to provide food at prices affordable to all, especially the marginalized sectors, which will eventually be empowered as the benefit from responsive support services provided them. GMA Programs employs the following strategies: 

Participatory approach. This means participatory planning, implementation and monitoring and evaluation would be done with all stakeholders. SUCs, NGOs and farmer's group would be active participants in the GMA program. Program areas, strategies and interventions would be identified with them. The main input for identifying GMA interventions is the local development plan of the provinces.



LGU-led program implementation. The local government units would be the lead players in the implementation of the GMA program. The DA (Department of Agriculture) and DILG (Department of Interior and Local Government), along with other concerned agencies will provide the necessary technical and financial support.



Area-based approach. The GMA program would identify interventions based on the domain specificity of the program areas. A situation analysis would be required focusing on the water, soil, climate, production, human resources, processing and marketing endowments of the program area. The comparative advantage or competitive edge as well as the scale economies present in the area, among others, will be the central criteria in the selection of program areas/interventions.



Capability-Building. The GMA would promote local capability-building in the areas of participatory planning - implementation, monitoring, evaluation, research and extension, processing, marketing and entrepreneurship, among others.



Focused targeting. Programs would be developed based on the situation of the people. Programs catering to the poor as well as the big farmers would be designed. Programs would be identified for "winners" or impact areas and also for marginal areas.



Productivity improvement. The GMA program would promote sustainable development not only in terms of environmentally-sound interventions but also in terms of project viability. Interventions, which would be identified, should be sustainable, meaning they should be worth continuing in terms of profit, management and resources.



Counterpart schemes. The DA, DILG, other concerned agencies and LGUs would enter into program financing arrangements which would entail counterpart funds from each partner, to be stipulated in a memorandum of agreement. The counterpart amount would be based on the partner's capacity. Contributions in kind, such as personnel, facilities and services are included.

The GMA Program covers all agricultural commodities - crops, livestock and fish - in the Network of Protected Areas for Agriculture and Agro-industrial Development (NPAAAD). 1. GMA LIVESTOCK PROGRAM Objectives The Ginintuang Masaganang Ani Livestock Program (GMA-LP) will help ensure food security, alleviate poverty, enhance incomes and profitability and achieve global competitiveness for the livestock and poultry sub-sector. It seeks to: 

     

Contribute in the development of agribusiness lands (pasture establishment) and reduction of costs of wage goods through productivity enhancement, more efficient logistics and improved retailing linkages (Goal 1 and Goal 2 of the Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan - Agribusiness Section, 2004-2010) Increase livestock production and improve livestock productivity to help ensure the availability, accessibility and affordability of livestock products. Increase the incomes of livestock farmers by providing access to technology, resources, support services and infrastructure; Ensure the compatibility of practices in the livestock and poultry enterprises with environmental standards; Transform the livestock industry from a resource-based to a technology-based industry; and Work for the global competitiveness of the domestic poultry and livestock enterprises. Provide a policy environment conducive to the continuing growth and development of the livestock and poultry industry.

Implementing Agencies Both the national livestock agencies and the regional field units implement the GMA Livestock Program:  Bureau of Animal Industry (BAI)  National Meat Inspection Service (NMIS)

 Philippine Carabao Center (PCC)  National Dairy Authority (NDA)  Livestock Development Council (LDC)  The Regional Field Units of the Department from Region I to XIII, CAR and ARMM. Implementation at the local level is mostly through the different Local Government units, which provide the front line services for the different program components. Strategies The strategies, articulated under the Agricultural and Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA), comprise the GMA-LP:  Production Support Services  Post Harvest Development Services  Marketing Development Services  Credit Facilitation Services  Extension Support, Education and Training Services  Research and Development  Regulatory Services  Information Support Services  Policy Formulation, Planning and Advocacy Services The program has two (2) components: the Manukan Project, and the Kambingan Project. The Manukan Project is an improved chicken production for meat and egg. There is a provision of initial stocks of one (1) cockerel and four (4) pullets per household. The Kambingan Project is a goat production scheme utilizing available farm hands and pasture around the household. There will be provision modules of goats. Target Clientele: Farming Sector Requirements: Marginal farmers CONTACT DETAILS: Carlos B. Mendoza, DVM GMA Director 4/F DA Bldg., DA Compound, Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City Fax: (02) 927-8405 Email: [email protected]

2. GMA HIGH VALUE CROPS COMMERCIAL PROGRAM The Ginintuang Masaganang Ani-High Value Crops (GMA-HVC) Program provides the national directions and framework for harmonizing local initiatives. High value crops offer alternative profitable opportunities to smallholders and lend well to value adding activities and marketing agreements or joint ventures with users or processors. The market orientation of high value crops production systems is imperative in a free market economy and within the full implementation of the Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program (CARP) where large corporations will have to explore new management, production and marketing approaches to sustain their business operations. Structural adjustments need to be made to involve smallholders, Policy reforms have been defined with some in full implementation providing clear signals to the private sector as basis for making medium and long term investment decisions. The GMA High Value Crops Program replaces the Gintong Ani - High Value Commercial crops Program (GA-H VCCP). The new program adopts a major shift towards market-oriented production systems by introducing the Commodity Producers Linkages with Users (Commodity-PLUS) as the basic reference for addressing the gaps in the commodity marketing systems. To cushion the impact of the currency crisis, the Program will encourage the production of selected commodities which are largely imported, e.g., mung bean and peanut, to conserve foreign exchange, and expand exports to generate additional foreign exchange. The new program will adopt the same policy and strategic framework, particularly the orientation of production systems to market opportunities or buyers specifications. The need to orient production systems to markets is imperative and inevitable as:  

 

The high value crops industry must be Competitive in a free market; There is renewed confidence by processors to make long-term investments since government policies are more responsive to private sector needs, such as the removal of Import restrictions and reduction of tariffs on agriculture inputs to zero to enhance the industry's competitiveness; The full implementation of the CARP covering the large plantations has provided affected corporations opportunities to explore new production, marketing, and management modalities with smallholders; and The AFMA provides for strengthening and redirecting the government bureaucracy toward & market orientation coupled with improved production resources.

Programs/Projects/Services  Provisions of seeds and planting materials  Provision of production inputs such as organic fertilizers, bagging materials, spray equipment, garden tools  Expansion of vegetable areas for off season production  Establishment of production facilities such as rainshelters/plastic houses, nurseries, greenhouses, etc.  Support to Programang Gulayang Masa (PGMA)

   

Establishment of techno demo areas to highlight the performance of new varieties technologies Intensification of transfer of technologies through trainings, publications and other tri-media campaign Establishment of common service facilities Conduct market intelligence/linkage and promotional activities to expand and/or open new markets

Target Clientele Farmers/Growers/Traders/ Processors/Importers/ Exporters Requirements  Cost Sharing  The recipient counterpart will be in the form labor, structure or land where the facility/equipment will be constructed/located. CONTACT DETAILS: Dr. Rene Rafael C. Espino Program Coordinator 4/F DA Bldg., DA Compound, Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City Fax: (02) 928-1070

3. GMA RICE PROGRAM The goals of the Ginintuang Masaganang Ani Rice Program are to:  Attain national food security at all times.  Reduce poverty incidence in the rural areas.  Increase net farm income.  Ensure sustainability of the natural resource base.  Enhance people empowerment. Specifically, the program seeks to:  Improve profitability as reflected by increase net farm income;  Provide adequate food supply that is accessible and affordable to everyone at all time;  Increase productivity through promotion of cost-effective technologies, and conservation and management of natural resources; and  Provide a favorable policy conducive to increase agricultural investments and global competitiveness. Phase 1. The program shall be implemented from October 1998 to June 1999 (dry season) and shall cover 300,000 to 500,00 hectares rice production areas in all provinces where there is available irrigation facilities.

Phase 2. This will start during wet season 1999 to wet season 2001 (4 seasons). All efforts will be undertaken to cover all ecosystems in the country. Yields will be analyzed where targets are attained and where problems arise so that proper measures or remedies shall be done to adjust the use or implementation of suitable technologies, i.e., varieties, balanced fertilization, pest management, and irrigation facilities. Phase 3. This last phase will start dry season 2001 to dry season 2004 (6 season). Production technologies shall be widely implemented to achieve high yields of 5-7 t/ha during wet season and 7-10 t/ha during dry season. Average yield shall be 5-6 t/ha, ushering in rice self-sufficiency for the country. The appropriate implementation mechanisms shall be prepared to achieve and yield targets of Phase 2 and 3 Strategies  Empower local government units (LGUs) to assume primary responsibility for food security and for direct supervision of rice production activities within their respective areas by developing provincial and municipal level rice self-sufficiency programs.  Provide technical support to LGUs to help attain the target yield increase.  Availment of trade and fiscal incentives by the private sector.  Focus national government support on strategic rice areas.  Promote production-intensifying but cost-reducing technologies through an intensive and extensive agricultural extension support program.  Develop complementation and counterparting schemes with local governments  Tap the expertise of state universities and colleges (SUCs) in accessing appropriate technologies, providing a forum for research extension linkage, and assisting in the evaluation program.  Increase public investment in irrigation, postharvest facilities, farm-t-market roads, and farm mechanization.  Improve the production-marketing systems to become more efficient and costeffective.  Make quality seeds and other inputs available to farmers at the right time.  Encourage/empower farmers-organizations to undertake a vertical of their rice enterprises.  Monitor closely the rice supply situation, particularly in rice deficit areas. Program Components:  Production Support Services  Irrigation Development Services  Other Infra/Post-Harvest And Farm Equipment  Market Development Services/Marketing Support Services  Extension Support, Education And Training Services  Research and Development Services  Regulatory Services/ Program Organization and Management  Information Support Services

Target Clientele Farmers Requirements Contact GMA Rice for specific requirements Other Info/Others Clustering approach shall be the main strategy in implementing the plan. This will facilitate the delivery of support services such as seeds, irrigation, postharvest, trainings, procurement of harvests by NFA, and market and credit assistance. This approach will also help the program to address location-specific needs of the industry. In irrigated areas, clusters can be organized among irrigators’ associations, agrarian reform communities (ARCs), cooperatives, and farmer groups within a 1-km radius of “puroks” or farms The clusters will be the convergence points of program interventions. The LGUs, farmers’ associations, POs and NGOs are to form clusters in areas where no cluster exists. Irrigators’ associations, agrarian reform communities, and farmer-cooperatives within a 1-km radius of the “puroks” or farms of a community can serve as nuclei of clusters. Each cluster should cover at least 40 ha in 2009 and at least 80 ha in 2010. Corresponding support from the national government will be provided, but this will be matched with counterpart resources from LGUs to enhance sense of responsibility and ownership of the respective provinces’ rice self-sufficiency plans. LGUs of the 49 focus provinces will implement the clustering approach in their localities as a main strategy to help infuse technological interventions to increase farmers’ rice productivity. As currently implemented by the GMA Rice Program, the approach organizes individual farmers into groups for manageability and efficiency in delivering technical assistance and services, executing intense technology diffusion, mobilizing learning opportunities, and for easier impact analysis All rice farmers in the barangays shall be masterlisted by Agricultural Technologists (ATs) with the direct assistance of farmers’ associations/cooperatives, POs and NGOs assigned in the clusters. The completed masterlists in the municipalities shall be submitted by the Municipal Agricultural Office (MAO) to the Office of the Provincial Agriculturist (OPA). This will serve as basis for all rice project interventions and for other purposes as may be requested by the Department of Agriculture, i.e. Regional Field Unit (DA-RFU), GMA Rice Program, and other stakeholders. Moreover, the masterlists and profiles of rice farmers will be used as databases showcasing information on the total number of rice farmers, total rice area planted per season, types of ecosystems, and irrigation types/sources. Operational interventions should be employed to ensure efficient implementation of these technology-based interventions. An archipelago with relatively limited land and no river delta to feed its irrigation system, the Philippines’ rice self-sufficiency plan should be

deeply rooted in its provinces. Thus, this plan advocates local government-centered (LGU) planning, intervention, and implementation. Technology interventions could be best delivered if the provincial governors will take “centerstage in increasing the rice productivity of their respective provinces. Governors, as “provincial champions”, are called forth to lead their mayors into ensuring that their respective municipalities and cities produce enough rice for their constituents throughout the year. Also, they are expected to assist rice-deficit provinces, and increase local rice stocks through bumper harvests at the provincial levels. CONTACT DETAILS: Frisco Malabanan Director 4/F DA Bldg., DA Compound Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City

4. GMA FISHERIES PROGRAM The Programang Makabago at Masaganang Ani sa Pangisdaan (GMA-PANGISDAAN) is designed to develop and manage the country's fisheries resources for food security and ensure socio-economic upliftment of subsistence fisherfolk nationwide. Development efforts will focus on the expansion and revitalization of productivity programs and provision of support activities through appropriate technology, research, extension, adequate financial and marketing assistance. On the other hand, management efforts will cover the conservation, protection and sustained management of the country's fishery and aquatic resources to ensure its long-term sustainability. The government recognized the various interrelated key issues and concerns besetting the Philippine fisheries sector. Development efforts and management interventions of the government will be focused to solve or at least minimize on the following key issues and concerns: A. Resource Management and Environmental Issues and Concerns  Resource Depletion in the Coastal Zone  Overfishing  Destructive Fishing  Siltation/Pollution B. Socioeconomic Issues and Concerns  Poverty among municipal fisherfolks C. Policy Issues and Concerns  Need for Strong Fisheries Regulation and Enforcement  Fisheries Information  Revision of Lease and Licensing Fees

D. Institutional Issues and Concerns  Need for Institutional Strengthening  Need for Human Resources Development  Access to credit E. Industry Issues and Concerns  Post-Harvest  Aquaculture Productivity Goals  Contribute to national food security at all times.  Ensure the rational and sustainable development, management and conservation of fishery and aquatic resources in Philippine waters including the EEZ and adjacent high areas  Reduce poverty incidence in the coastal areas  Enhance people empowerment in the fisheries sector Strategies  Empower LGUs to assume primary responsibility for food security and direct supervision of fish production activities within their respective areas by developing provincial and municipal level fish self-sufficiency programs  Provide technical support for LGUs to help them attain the target yield increase  Availment of trade and fiscal incentives by the private sector  Focus national government support on strategic areas  Promote production-intensifying but cost-reducing technologies within ecological limits  Develop complementation and counterparting schemes with LGUs  Tap the expertise of SUCs in accessing appropriate technologies, providing a forum for research extension linkages, and assisting in the evaluation program  Increase in public investment particularly on post-harvest facilities  Improve the production-marketing systems to become more efficient and most effective  Produce quality broodstock, seeds and fingerlings available to fisherfolks at the right time  Promote fisherfolk organizations  Conserve and protect the country's fisheries and aquatic resources GMA Fisheries Program is designed to provide national directions and framework to develop and manage the country’s fisheries resources for food security and ensures socioeconomic upliftment of subsistence fisherfolk. Development efforts will focus on the expansion and revitalization of productivity programs and provision of support activities through appropriate technology, research, extension and adequate financial and marketing assistance. On the other hand, management efforts will cover the conservation, protection and sustained management of the country’s fishery and aquatic resources to ensure its long-term sustainability.

Programs/Projects/Services  Production Support Services  Regulatory Services  Post-Harvest Development Services  Market Development Services  Extension Support, Education and Training Services Target Clientele Fisher folks Requirements Contact GMA Fisheries Program for specific requirements CONTACT DETAILS Malcolm I. Sarmiento Director BFAR Arcadia Bldg., Quezon Avenue Telefax: (02) 372-5048

5. GMA CORN PROGRAM GMA Corn Program will focus on the attainment of food security and poverty alleviation, with local government units and other stakeholders developing and managing their own corn production plans and programs suitable to their respective localities. These plans and programs will ensure food security by increasing productivity in prime corn lands, while addressing poverty alleviation by providing support to marginal corn. Programs/Projects/Services  Hybrid Seed Subsidy Program  OPV Seed Exchange Program  Organic-Based Agriculture Program  Support to White Corn, Cassava, soybeans, and Bio-fuel production  Biological Control Program  Pilot farm mechanization and tractor pool program Target Clientele Corn Farmers Requirements Contact GMA CORN Program for specific requirements CONTACT DETAILS

Asst. Sec. Dennis R. Araullo Program Coordinator

6. GMA SUGAR PROGRAM CONTACT DETAILS Nicolas A. Alonso Director Philippine Sugar Center Bldg. North Avenue, Quezon City Tel: (02) 920-2416; 920-4367 Fax: (02) 920-4325 Email: [email protected]

National Agriculture and Fishery Council (NAFC) The National Agricultural and Fishery Council (NAFC) is an attached agency of the Department of Agriculture (DA) mandated under Executive Order # 116, Series of 1987, to serve as an advisory body to the DA through policy recommendations on agriculture and fisheries-related issues and concerns; and establish and nurture a nationwide network of agricultural and fishery councils that will serve as a forum for consultative discussions within the agricultural and fishery sectors. Further, the NAFC, through DA Administrative Order # 6, Series of 1998, is tasked to assist the DA in the monitoring and coordination of the agriculture and fisheries modernization process; and, serve as the integrative and consultative structure for interagency and inter-sectoral collaboration in agriculture and fishery modernization.

Mission The National Agricultural and Fishery Council (NAFC) is a government agency committed to ensure participatory broad-based decision making in agriculture and fisheries by providing quality services to its nationwide network to private sector-led consultative councils toward the formulation of sound policy and program recommendations for sustained countryside development. Vision We envision NAFC as an effective and efficient catalyst and generator of private-sector commitment and participation in developing the agriculture and fisheries sectors as a basis of a vibrant national economy. We value people empowerment and good governance. Functions  Serve as consultative/feedback mechanism on the policies, plans and programs of the Department of Agriculture.  Monitor agriculture and fishery programs of all government agencies.  Assist DA in advocacy work among concerned government agencies.  Assist DA in mobilizing and evaluating the contributions of government agencies to agriculture and fishery modernization.  Promote consensus on, and support for, national and local budgets for agriculture and fisheries.  Support the continued development of the nationwide network of agriculture and fishery councils not only as a consultative network, but also as partners in the execution of agency functions. Activities 

Facilitation of private-public sector consultations and dialogues in agriculture and fisheries

The NAFC facilitates the conduct of regular consultations and dialogues between government and private sector in agriculture and fisheries. It undertakes this chiefly by providing technical and administrative assistance to the members of its nationwide consultative and feedback network. This network is composed of local agricultural and fishery councils (AFCs) at the local levels, and the national sectoral committees and the National Agriculture and Fisheries (NAF) Council at the national level. Apart from providing the fora for continuing discussions on agriculture and fisheries issues, problems and concerns, the consultative network also functions as an information delivery channel from the national to the local level, and a feedback mechanism, from the local to the national level. The NAFC also organizes special area or nationwide dialogues or consultations with the private sector on various pressing issues and problems facing agriculture and fisheries. 

Policy and Program Coordination and Implementation The NAFC also coordinates the crafting and implementation of agriculture-andfisheries-focused policies and programs toward integrating and harmonizing into a seamless whole all development interventions in the sectors. This activity feeds on the outputs of the consultations and dialogues between the government and private sector. Through this activity, the agency is able to identify policy contradictions and gaps, program and function overlaps between and among institutions, program and policy implementation weaknesses and like issues, problems and concerns besetting various sectors or geographic areas in agriculture and fisheries development. More importantly, the agency is able to bring these to the attention of competent authorities and singly or jointly with the agency stakeholders in both private sector and government, formulate and recommend measures to address them.



Resource Generation The NAFC assists the national government in generating resources to support the implementation of policies, programs and projects geared toward the development of agriculture and fisheries. It develops and maintains linkages with development assistance institutions of donor-countries and local agencies engaged in coordinating commodity assistance programs. It also formulates measures for the effective and efficient management of official development assistance, chiefly, the US Public Law 480 Program, the Japanese Grant for the Increase of Food Production, the Japanese Non-Project Type Grant, and Section 416 B Program of the US Agricultural Act of 1949.



AFMA Monitoring The Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act of 1997 (AFMA, Republic Act 8435) is a landmark legislation that aims to accelerate the pace of development of agriculture and fisheries. It prescribes a comprehensive set of policies and programs that aim to jumpstart agriculture and fisheries modernization. Department of Agriculture Administrative Order No. 6 (1998), the Implementing Rules and Regulations of RA 8435, mandates the NAFC to assist the DA in the broad-based monitoring of the agriculture and fisheries modernization process (Rule 113.1).

The NAFC has initially embarked on monitoring agency compliance with the deadlines for the completion of various groundwork activities set under the law. It has since started to upgrade its monitoring activity to include examination of the more substantive provisions of the law.

Services, Programs and Projects The NAFC’s mandate, functions and activities are translated into specific frontline services, programs and projects as follows: 1.

Agricultural and Fishery Consultative Services  Advocating broad-based participation in various consultative bodies nationwide which include the National Agriculture and Fisheries Council (NAF Council), National Sectoral Committees (NSCs) and Local Agricultural and Fishery Councils (AFCs)  Provision of technical and administrative secretariat support to the NAF Council, NSCs and AFCs  Provision of logistics and/or secretariat support in the conduct of national and local public consultations and other special events

2.

Monitoring Services  Provision of monitoring reports on the implementation of the Agriculture and Fisheries Modernization Act (AFMA)  Provision of monitoring reports on the implementation of bilateral programs which include the Grant Assistance for the Food Security Projects of Underprivileged Farmers (2KR); and U.S. PL-480 Program

3.

Coordination and Implementation of the following programs and projects: 3.1. Livelihood Enhancement for Agricultural Development (LEAD) Program

The LEAD Program is an intervention designed to support small-scale agricultureand fishery-based initiatives aimed at empowering marginal farmers and fishers. Specifically, it provides funds for their livelihood, capability building and marketing support undertakings. The livelihood projects are envisioned to serve as the proponents’ jumping board for gainful participation in modern agriculture and fishery practices. The capability building and marketing support undertakings are expected to enhance the potentials of the marginal farmers, fishers, rural women and farm youth in becoming successful entrepreneurs. The LEAD Program is under the Grassroots Support Section of the Special Projects Division (SPD) Types of Projects Funded 

Livelihood Projects. Specific projects covered shall generate income and promote employment. These include short gestating farm production, valueadding and other income generating endeavors. Prospective beneficiaries shall be granted interest-and-collateral-free start-up funds that are to be replenished on the basis of the project’s cash flow as approved by the NAFC. Qualified beneficiaries are People’s Organizations (POs) engaged in agricultureand fishery-related undertakings



Capability-Building Projects. This type of project includes technical-andmanagement-skills building for the farming and fishing sectors for competition in the light of the agriculture and fisheries liberalization. Under this category are trainings, seminars, symposia and establishment of training and multi-purpose centers. The project shall help facilitate the establishment of various networks and linkages among groups of farmers and fishers. Financial assistance, which is an outright grant, shall be accorded to qualified proponents. Qualified beneficiaries are POs and NGOs engaged in agriculture-and fisheryrelated undertakings, Local Government Units (LGUs) and Department of Agriculture - Regional Field Units (DA-RFUs)



Market Support Projects. These are projects aimed at enhancing the capabilities of the farming and fishing groups in marketing their produce. Agriculture and fisheries modernization demands that the marketing system be improved. The conduct of market matching, dialogues, trade fairs and exhibits are to be extended assistance and support. Financial assistance under this type shall be considered as an outright grant. Qualified beneficiaries are POs and NGOs engaged in agriculture-and fisheryrelated undertakings, Local Government Units (LGUs) and Department of Agriculture - Regional Field Units (DA-RFUs)

3.2. Young Farmers Program (YFP) The YFP, drawing guidance and support from other national agencies, local government units, the AFCs, academe and other stakeholders, promotes the development of agriculture and fisheries through coordination with funding agencies and provision of financial assistance to encourage the youth to venture into agribusiness. Specifically, the Program aims to encourage young graduates of agriculture, fisheries and business courses to venture into agribusiness and become successful Filipino entrepreneurs. Agri-based project proposals from these individuals are selected from among a shopping list provided and endorsed by the DA-RFUs, LGUs and SUCs. Approval shall be based on the viability and sustainability of the proposed projects. Applicants with approved project proposals shall undergo a classroom and hands-on training conducted by the DA, SUCs, LGUs and other training institutions coordinated by the NAFC. At present, the YFP is being handled by the Planning, Monitoring and Communication Group (PMCG) 3.3. Young Filipino Farmers Training Program in Japan [YFFTPJ] The YFFTPJ is the Philippines’ version or counterpart program of the ASEAN Young Farmer Leaders Training Program in Japan – a commitment of the Japanese Government to young farmers in the ASEAN region who have the potential to become key farmer leaders.

In general, the program aims to provide modern Japanese farming techniques to deserving young Filipino farmers. Specifically, it seeks to:   

Provide technical knowledge and skills in agricultural and cooperative management; Offer opportunities for an exchange of agricultural information of mutual interest among participants; and Provide opportunity for young Filipino farmers to imbibe Japanese work values and attitudes.

The program is composed of four phases, namely: 

Home Stay – a 60-day training module under the guidance of selected local host farmers focusing on farm activities, visits to other farms and agricultural institutions, conversational Nihongo and physical fitness.



Pre-departure Orientation Course – a 75-day training composed of various subject matters, which include among others, lectures on Values Formation and

Leadership Training, Farm Business Planning, Physical Fitness Course, Formal Nihongo Language Course, Farm Mechanization, Philippine Music Arts and Culture, Basic Japanese Culture and Tradition, Educational Tours and Historical Sites Visit and Computer Literacy. 

Training Proper in Japan which consists of 11 to 12 months on-farm training under Japanese host farmers.



Post Training Program - a three-day training on Volunteerism, People–Centered Development, and Orientation on AFCs, Project Proposal Preparation, and Entrepreneurship. Currently, this program is handled by the Stakeholders Extension Section of the Local Support and Coordination Division (LSCD)

3.4. Special Vehicle Loan Fund [SVLF] Program The SVLF is a motorcycle loan program for government employees of the DA and the agricultural workers based in LGUs. The program aims to increase mobility and improve performance of beneficiaries in the delivery of extension services. This program is implemented by the SVLF Management Staff of the Finance and Administrative Division (FAD) CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Apacible Hall, DA Compound, Elliptical Road, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 9204093 / 9278614 / 9204309 / 9262706 / 9288741 local 2600 / 2602 /2601

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE (DOF) The Department of Finance is principally responsible for the formulation, institutionalization and administration of the government’s fiscal policies, in coordination with other concerned agencies of government. It is also tasked to generate and manage the government’s financial resources as well as supervise the revenue operations of all local government units. Furthermore, the DOF is approves and manages all public sector domestic or foreign debt; and rationalizes and privatizes corporations and assets that are owned, controlled or acquired by the government. Vision  A strong economy with stable prices and strong growth;  A stable fiscal situation which could adequately finance government projects and budgetary programs;  A borrowing program that is also able to avoid the crowding-out effect on the private sector and minimize costs  A public sector debt profile with long maturities and an optimum mix of currencies that minimizes the impact of currency movements; and  A strong economic growth with equity and productivity. Mission The DOF shall take the lead in providing a solid foundation for the achievement of an economy that is dynamic and active in the world, globally competitive and onward looking. The SECRETARY DOF Bldg., BSP Complex Roxas Blvd., Metro Manila Tel: (02) 523-6054 Fax: (02) 526-8474 www.dof.gov.ph

OVERVIEW OF DOF’S FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNITS (LGUs)  Creation of the Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) thru Executive Order No. 41 to administer the Municipal Development Fund Revolving Fund for local government units established under PD 1914.  Its objectives include helping the LGU enhance its local revenue generation and promote economic growth through investment on local public enterprise and infrastructure project; and providing financial assistance to upgrade delivery of basic services and facilities which could not be funded through local incomes and transfer of fund from the national government.  Eligible borrowers include cities, provinces and municipalities  Eligible Subprojects for the Program: C. INFRASTRUCTURE 6.

Revenue Generating Projects such as Water Supply System, Local Electrification System, Slaughterhouse, Terminal, Wharf, Public Market, “Bagsakan Center”, Cold Storage Plant, Post-Harvest Facility, Food Processing Facility and Memorial Park.

7. Social Projects for Education such as School Buildings (including the furniture and facilities), Non-Formal Education and Training Center, Public Library (including books and the access to Electronic Information System) and Day Care Centers; and for Health such as Hospital, Health Center, Lying-in Clinic, Birthing Facility, Health Training Center, Baranggay Health Stations and other health facilities. 3. Environmental Projects under Solid Waste Management such as Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), Sanitary Landfill, Composing Facility; Water Management such as Sewerage System, Drainage System, Waste Water Treatment Facility (Biogas Digester); Air quality Management (Support to the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1990); and Land Conservation such as River/Seashore Protection and Sea Wall. 4. Other Infrastructure Projects such as Farm-to-Market Roads and other LGU priority infrastructure projects.

B. EQUIPMENT Procurement of Heavy Equipment for Construction and road Maintenance, Dump Truck, Equipment for the Operation of Slaughterhouse; MRF Equipment; and Medical and Dental Equipment.  For Loan Terms and Conditions, the Municipal Development Fund Project (MDFP) offers pure loan with fixed interest rate of 9% per annum with no equity required. Type of Subproject Infrastructure

Equipment

Repayment Period 15 years, inclusive of 3-year grace period on principal payment 10 years, inclusive of 2-year grace period on principal payment

 Application Requirements include: 11. Letter of Intent from the Local Chief Executive 12. Local Council Resolutions manifesting support for the project and authorizing the Local Chief Executive to enter into relevant agreements 13. Creation of Subproject Management Office 14. Project Proposal/Feasibility Study (pro-forma will be provided)  Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) in their issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity (Please see BLGF page)

MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT FUND OFFICE (MDFO) The Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) was created as an office under the Department of Finance (DOF) by virtue of Executive Order No. 41 on 20 November 1998 to acts as a source of credit financing to support LGUs in the implementation of their priority development projects and programs. It promotes LGU self-reliance in undertaking socioeconomic development programs through effective system of making ODA available to LGUs, assist low income LGUs to establish creditworthiness to help them access private funds. The MDFO has four (4) major thrusts, namely: 9. Administrator of the Municipal Development Fund – Second Generation Fund (MDFSGF) 10. Fund Administrator of Foreign-Assisted Projects (FAPs) implemented by other National Agencies. 11. Implementer of Projects/Programs 12. Policy Formulation The MDFO has a Policy Governing Board comprised of officials from DOF (chairperson), National Economic Development Authority (NEDA), Department of Budget and Management (DBM), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), DPWH, and the Executive Director of the MDFO that sets policy directions for the Office. Among the credit financing initiates administered by the MDFO are as follows: 3. Municipal Development Fund (MDF) Project On 29 March 1984, through Presidential Decree No. 1914, the Municipal Development Fund (MDF) was created as a special revolving fund for re-lending to Local Government Units (LGUs). It became an effective mechanism that enabled LGUs to avail of financial assistance from local and international sources for the implementation of various social and economic development projects. It provides concessional financing assistance to lower income class LGUs with revenue-generating subprojects. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs nationwide Eligible Proposals/Subprojects 5. Revenue/Non-revenue generating projects 6. Other infrastructure projects 4. Millennium Development Goal Fund (MDGF) MDGF supports the localization of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that alleviates poverty, promotes human development and prosperity among participating LGUs.

Eligible Borrowers: All 4th to 6th Income Class provinces and municipalities Eligible Proposals/Subprojects:  Procurement of light/heavy equipment  Infrastructure and civil works 5. Project Technical Assistance and Contingency Fund (PTACF) PTACF assists in accelerating LGU preparation and submission of feasibility studies and detailed engineering design. It creates a fund to finance the actual foreign exchange differentials of LGUs incurred in their project implementation. PTACF provides a source of financing for other technical assistance (TA) needs of LGUs. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs except highly urbanized cities CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: MDFO, Department of Finance 7/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila Tel: (02) 523-9935; 521-7192; 525-9185 to 87 Fax: (02) 523-9936; 525-9186 Email: [email protected]

BUREAU OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE (BLGF) BLGF is the Department of Finance’s arm (DOF) directly responsible over the fiscal and financial affairs of local government. Under a decentralized regime, BLGF provides a catalytic role in effective and sustainable management of fiscal and financial resources of LGUs, transforming them into self-reliant communities. It is vigilant and dedicated to pursuit of development and professionalization of its employees including those of the local treasury and assessment services. Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) required documents for the issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity:

3. Statement of Income and Expenditures for the last three (3) years duly certified and audited by the local accountant and auditor, (General Fund) with Pre-Closing Trial Balance. 4. Current year Annual Budget 5. Annual Investment Plan for 20% Development Fund 6. Certification of existing/absence of loan/loans duly certified by the Local Treasurer and lending institution with the following details:  Kind of Loans and Other Obligations  Purpose of Loans and Other Obligations  Name of the Lending Institution  Date of Approval and Maturity  Terms and Conditions (Interest & No. of years to pay)  Latest Balance of Loans & Other Obligations - Current - Arrearages  Annual Amortization Schedule (Segregate Principal & Interest) 7. Letter request from the Local Chief Executive indicating where to apply and purpose of the loan CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: Bureau of Local Government Finance Department of Finance 8/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila 1004 Tel: (02) 527-2780; 522-8773 Fax: (02) 527-2780 www.blgf.gov.ph

DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT (DILG) The DILG is the primary national government agency mandated to promote peace and order, ensure public safety and further strengthen local government capability aimed towards the effective delivery of basic services to the citizenry. Vision The Department is the primary catalyst for excellence in local governance that nurtures selfreliant, progressive, orderly, safe and globally-competitive communities sustained by Godcentered and empowered citizenry. Mission The Department shall promote peace and order, ensure public safety, and strengthen capability of local government units through active people participation and a professionalized corps of civil servants. Goals  Peaceful, safe, self-reliant and development-dominated communities  Improved performance of local governments in governance, administration, social and economic development and environmental management  Sustain peace and order condition and ensure public safety Objectives  Reduce crime incidents and improve crime solution efficiency  Improve jail management and penology services  Improve fire protection services  Continue professionalization of PNP, BFP, and BJMP personnel and services  Enhance LGU capacities to improve their performance and enable them to effectively and efficiently deliver services to their constituents  Continue to initiate policy reforms in support of local autonomy CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY A. Franciscon Gold Con. II, EDSA Cor. Mapagmahal Street, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 925-0330/31; 929-9406 Fax: (02) 925-0332 Email: [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

PHILIPPINE BASIC URBAN SERVICES INVESTMENT PROGRAM (PBUSIP) Funding Agency: ADB, DBP, MDFO and DILG Lead Implementing Agency: Infrastructure Investment – PFI/DBP and MDFO and ADB Capacity Development – DILG/MDFO Infrastructure Implementation – LGUs Project Duration: 10-Years starting 2nd Semester of 2010 Beneficiaries: 179 LGUs Target Program Location: Eligible LGUs in the Visayas (Region VI, VII and VIII) and in Luzon (Regions III, IV-A) and Mindanao (Regions X, XI, XII,) and NCR. Project Description: The Philippine Basic Urban Services Investment Program (PBUSIP) is an expansion of the Mindanao Basic Urban Services Sector Project (MBUSSP) that aims to continue to pursue improvement in the qualify of life of urban residents by building local capacities and providing investment support for urban sector development. Consistent with the priority development thrust of the MTPDP and the urban sector development strategies, the PBUSSP supports the national government’s efforts in promoting equitable economic growth in the urban sector addressing deficiencies in basic infrastructure, pursuing effective local governance and adopting a holistic approach to development of the urban sector The project is designed as a Multi-Trance Financing Facility (MFF) to be funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). It is co-executed by the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP), and the Municipal Development Finance Office (MDFO), with the DILG as the lead executing agency.

The goal of PBUSIP is to improve the standard of living, health and economic opportunities in local government units (LGUs) by enhancing the quality, coverage and reliability of the basic urban infrastructure and services among participating LGUs. It aims to support the capability of LGUs to fund basic infrastructure by introducing innovative financing models consistent with the LGU Financing Framework and further develop the technical capacity of LGUs to sustain the viable operations of these infrastructure facilities. The PBUSIP, referred herein as the Investment Program, is designed to be funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB). The Project will be co-executed by the DILG, the DBP and MDFO and may be implemented up to a 10-year period. The DILG will be the lead executing agency. The PBUSIP has two parts: Part A – Investment in Infrastructure and Services is designed to provide LGUs the financial resources to pursue infrastructure subprojects; Part B – Institutional Capacity Development and Policy Reforms ensures that the necessary capacity to implement and operate these infrastructures are made available to LGUs by introducing tools and systems that will facilitate the institutionalization of sustainable practices; Part A covers the provision of innovative financial assistance to pursue infrastructure projects through the MDFO and the Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP). The MDFO will provide the financial assistance to LGUs consistent with the National Government-Local Government Cost Sharing Arrangement. The DBP will extend credit financing for income

generating subprojects proposed by the cities and higher income class LGUs and loans to private proponents who will partner with LGUs for the implementation and operation of local development projects. Project Objectives 7. To improve the standard of living of residents in urban areas throughout the Philippines 8. To increase capacity of local governments and national agencies in urban management 9. To increase and mobilize resources to improve service delivery and enable better access of the population to basic urban infrastructure 



Project Coverage Eligible LGUs in Mindanao that have expressed their interest with manifested commitment but were not accommodated in the current phase due to fund limitations. These would include about 50 LGUs that have submitted their Letter of Intents with the attached Local Legislative Council resolutions to the DILG Eligible LGUs in the Visayas (Regions VI, VII, VIII) and in Luzon (Regions I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, and CAR) that have expressed their interest through the DILG Regional Offices. This would include additional 60 eligible LGUs Project Implementation Arrangement  Infrastructure Investment - Private Financing Institutions/ Government Financing Institutions (GFIs), MDFO and ADB  Capacity Development – DILG  Infrastructure Implementation – LGUs

Project Components 5. Investments in Infrastructure and Services  Subprojects of LGUs – possibly in association with the private sector proponents, for subsectors such as: local roads and bridges, water and sanitation, drainage, flood control, solid waste management, [public markets, bus terminals, public facilities such as municipal buildings, sports facilities, public parks, slaughterhouses, ice plants  Economic Infrastructure such as incubation centers for small and medium enterprises (SMEs)  Area development projects, economic zones/cluster development and others, with preference for revenue generating subprojects 6.   

Institutional Capacity Development and Reforms Strengthening program and project management systems Capacity development for urban management systems Policy reforms for sustainable urban services delivery

CONTACT DETAILS ENGR. ROLYN Q. ZAMBALES OIC – Director, OPDS

DILG-Office Of Project Development Services (OPDS), 5th Flr., A. Francisco Gold Condo II, EDSA, cor. Mapagmahal St., Diliman, Quezon City Attn to: MR. ROGELIO P. SUMNGAT Project Manager, PBUSIP Tel: (02) 9299601; 9299406; 925-1135 Fax: (02) 9296227 E-mail: [email protected] [email protected], [email protected] www.dilg.gov.ph

MILLENIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS FUND (MDG FUND)  



In November 2004, The DILG issued Memorandum Circular No. 2004-152 or the “Guide to Local Government in the Localization of the MDGs” The MDFO-Policy Governing Board, DOF passed Resolution No. 04-12-22-2005 establishing the MDG Fund and allocating Php 500 M for financing local initiatives in support of attaining the objectives of the MDG The DILG and DOF-MDFO agreed to jointly implement the MDG Fund under a Memorandum Order (MOA) signed on 6 August 2007

The Millennium Development Goals Fund is a locally-funded project jointly implemented by the DILG and the Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) of the DOF, with DILG responsible for capacity development, particularly on project preparation, implementation and operation and maintenance, and MDFO for Fund administration of the P500 M made available by MDFO from its Second Generation Fund (SGF) for relending to interested and eligible LGUs. The MDG Fund finances projects that clearly contribute to the attainment of any or all of Millennium Development Goals 1 – 7, such as those on water, sanitation, health, education and other socio-economic projects. Examples of such projects include, but not limited to: 8. Livelihood programs/projects such as cottage industries, handicraft industries, livestock production, etc including construction of livelihood centers/support facilities 9. Construction/rehabilitation/improvement of: - water supply systems - access roads such as farm-to-market roads, footbridges - public auction markets - health care centers - day care centers/pre-school institutions - RHUS/lying-in clinics which may include equipment and supplies - Municipal/barangay wharves/ports 10. Construction/provision of women resource centers and livelihood centers 11. Procurement of various seedlings and other farm equipment, other farm implements 12. Procurement of heavy equipment for SWM, road construction/maintenance 13. Establishment of HIV/AIDS and STD counseling and surveillance center/desks 14. Construction/installation of solar driers, multi-purpose pavement, post-harvest facilities, food processing, rice and corn mills, warehouses Objective

To support and fund LGU initiatives that directly contribute to the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals. Coverage  4th to 6th income class municipal LGUs can avail of the financing  Provincial LGUs may also avail of the financing in behalf of its 4th to 6th income class municipalities Components 3. Investment Support Component (ISC) - Provision of financial assistance for infrastructures and capital investment projects on soft credit scheme 4. Institutional Capacity Building Component (ICBC) - Provision of technical assistance and advisory services relative to the stages of the project cycle Financing Terms 3.

Softer-Support Projects Interest Rate: 7.5% per annum (fixed) Repayments Period: 6 years inclusive of 1 year grace period on principal

4.

Infrastructure Projects Interest Rate: 8.5% per annum (fixed) Repayments Period: 10 years inclusive of 2 year grace period on principal

Documentary Requirements 6.

Loan Application:  Letter of Intent – duly signed by the Mayor/Governor  Sangguniang Bayan Resolution  Feasibility study of project proposal

7.

Certification for Borrowing & Debt Service Capacity:  Name of LGU and Income Class  Statement of Actual Income and Expenditures for the last three (3) years duly certified and audited by the local accountant and auditor with the following supporting documents: - Trial balance - Balance sheet - Statement of operations - Report of revenue and receipts - Status of appropriation, allotments, and actual obligation incurred - Statement of cash flow

8.

Current Year Annual Budget

9.

Annual Investment Plan

10.

Certification of existing/absence of loans duly certified by the Local Treasurer and/or lending institutions with the following details:       

Kinds of loans and other obligations Purpose of loan and other obligations Name of lending institution/s Date of approval and maturity Terms and conditions (interest rate and repayment period) Latest balance of loan and other obligations: (Current & arrearages Annual amortization schedule (segregated into principal and interest)

CONTACT DETAILS: ENGR. ROLYN Q. ZAMBALES OIC, Director Office of Project Development Services 5/F, Francisco Gold Cond. II, EDSA cor. Mapagmahal St., Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 929-9601; 929-9406 E-mail: [email protected]

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (DOST) The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) is the premiere science and technology body in the country mandated to provide central direction, leadership and coordination of all scientific and technological activities, ensure that results are geared and utilized in areas of maximum economic and social benefits for the people, and formulate policies, programs and projects to support national development. DOST envisions a competent and competitive science and technology community with a social conscience. Guided by the principles of competence, competitiveness, and conscience, the DOST pursues six priority flagship programs, namely:      

Establishment of a Packaging R&D Center Expansion of Regional Metrology Centers Comprehensive Program to Enhance Technology Enterprises Integrated Program on Cleaner Production Technologies Science & Technology Intervention Program for the Poor, Vulnerable and Disabled Comprehensive Science & Technology Program for Mindanao

DOST performs functions to produce programs and projects related to science and technology. The functions include the following:          

Formulate and adopt a comprehensive National Science and Technology Plan, and monitor and coordinate its funding and implementation Promote, assist and, where appropriate, undertake scientific and technological research and development in areas identified as vital to the country's development Promote the development of indigenous technology and the adaptation and innovation of suitable imported technology, and in this regard, undertake technology development up to commercial stage Undertake design and engineering works to complement research and development functions Promote, assist and, where appropriate, undertake the transfer of the results of scientific and technological research and development to their end-users Promote, assist and, where appropriate, undertake the technological services needed by agriculture, industry, transport, and the general public Develop and maintain an information system and databank on science and technology Develop and implement programs for strengthening scientific and technological capabilities through manpower training, infrastructure and institution-building Promote public consciousness in science and technology Undertake policy research, technology assessment, feasibility and technical studies.

LGUs or their constituents can access a number of these programs and products. The next pages feature some of the programs and projects relevant to LGUs.

CONTACT DETAILS: The SECRETARY DOST Central Office DOST Bldg. Gen. Santos Ave., Bicutan Taguig, Metro Manila Tel: (02) 837-2071 to 82 Fax: (02) 837-8937 E-mail: [email protected] www.dost.gov.ph

DOST INVESTORS’ FORUM PROGRAM The Investors’ Forum Program aims to generate technology-based investment opportunities by bringing together government and private technology generators, businessmen, investors, industry associations, NGAs, academe and financial institutions interested in starting or improving technology-based business ventures. The forum features presentations on DOST commerciable technologies and its network agencies for adoption by interested cooperators including services and programs that can be availed by the SMEs. The program’s assistance covers mainly cost of conduct of fora, technology matching, consultations, seminars, etc. The following are the procedures in order to avail this program: 1. Letter of request addressed to TAPI Director (request should be submitted to TAPI at least four (4) months prior to the conduct of the activity) 2. Letter of endorsement from DOST Regional Office 3. Project Proposal incorporating the following: a. Title of the activity b. Implementing Agency/ies c. Date and venue d. Objective/s and expected output e. Methodology f. Technologies/Topics for presentation g. Resource Persons/Presenters h. Terms of Reference (TOR) with partner institution/s i. List of participants with complete names, addresses, contact numbers and type of business j. Detailed Line-Item-Budget with corresponding counterpart of proponent and other partner/funding institutions CONTACT DETAILS Engr. Evaristo M. Medina, Jr. Officer-in-Charge, Technology Information and Promotion Division Technology Application and Promotion Institute DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Avenue, Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 Tel: (632) 837-2071 to 82 loc. 2157/2167; 8381127

DOST TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER (DTTC) PROGRAM The DOST Technology Training Center (DTTC) Program promotes and hastens technology transfer and commercialization by providing technology training courses to entrepreneurs, industries, inventors and the academe in technology-based undertaking. The program supports preparation of training packages by accredited consultancy groups, development of training manuals/modules and production of self-learning videos on specific DOST technologies. The DTTC provides financial assistance to entrepreneurs, academe and industries for technology training cost, development of training manuals, or production of videos. The program also provide seed fund to cooperators to conduct technology training. The following are the procedures in order to avail this assistance: 1. Submit proposal to TAPI upon endorsement of DOST Regional Office 2. Training proposal should include: a. Program of activities (highlight topics, resource speakers, venue and date) b. Detailed Line-Item-Budget with corresponding cost sharing arrangement among participating agencies c. Management scheme (fees, expected income, target participants)

CONTACT DETAILS Rodelia R. Padilla Program Manager, DTTC, Technology Information and Promotions Division Technology Application and Promotion Institute DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Avenue, Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 Tel: (02) 837-2071 to 82 loc. 2157/2167; 8381127

S&T EXPERTS VOLUNTEER POOL PROGRAM (STEVPP) The S&T Experts Volunteer Pool Program (STEVPP) aims to bring scientists and experts to where they are needed—the countryside. It provides free short-term technical assistance to interested groups or clients, and provides experts services in technology transfer and commercialization, productivity enhancement, technical capability development/skills upgrading, technical assistance/advisory services, troubleshooting, training and seminars.

The STEVPP’s financial assistance covers mainly cost of transportation of expert, while the proponent/requesting party must cover food and hotel accommodation of expert. The following are the procedures in order to avail this assistance: 1. Submit formal request to the nearest DOST Regional Office/Provincial Office for STEVPP assistance 2. DOST Regional Office endorses request to TAPI CONTACT DETAILS Marissa A. Melosantos Program Manager, STEVP, Investment and Business Operations Division Technology Application and Promotion Institute DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Avenue, Bicutan, Taguig City 1631 Tel: (02) 837-2071 to 82 loc. 2165; 837-6186

DOST-ACADEME TECHNOLOGY-BASED (DATBED) PROGRAM

ENTERPRISE

DEVELOPMENT

The DOST-Academe Technology-Based Enterprise Development (DATBED) Program aims to develop entrepreneurial competencies of students and young professionals including out-of-school youths (OSYs) in selected academic institutions and non-governmental organizations; stimulates the development of entrepreneurial curriculum of schools; and creates income-generating projects for the participating institutions. The Program will function as a feeder program under DOST’s SET-UP in accelerating the establishment of small-scale technology-based enterprise in the countryside.

The financial assistance covers mainly cost of start-up projects of student-entrepreneurs, young professional and OSYs. In order to avail the assistance, the following eligibility/requirements should be met: Academic Institution 5. Preferably located or providing services to a depressed province 6. Offers tertiary science and technology courses and entrepreneurship development program 7. Has a student-faculty ration of at most 25:1 in the S&T courses and entrepreneurship development program 8. Existing facilities/resources available for use of the proposed technology-based projects Non-Government Organizations 5. 6. 7. 8.

Existing/completed youth development programs/activities Approved board resolution indicating interest to be accredited under the Program Availability of a core team of advisers/experts and program management support Registered at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) or Cooperative Development Authority (CDA)

The academic institution/NGO must submit letter of request to TAPI including the following requirements to avail this assistance: 4. Endorsement letter from DOST Regional Office 5. Comprehensive implementing plan for SETUP-DATBED Program to include the following: a. Project management plan b. Organization of core team of advisers c. Fund management plan d. Repayment scheme of recipients e. Selection of scheme for recipients f. Project monitoring scheme g. Loan administration and profit sharing mechanism 6. Submission of project proposal/s including business plan/feasibility study upon accreditation

CONTACT DETAILS: ARMAN P. BIONAT Program Manager, DATBED, Business and Operations Division

Investment

Technology Application and Promotion Institute DOST Compound, Gen. Santos Avenue, Bicutan, Taguig City Tel: (02) 837-2071 to 82 loc. 2165; 837-6186

DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY (DTI) The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) is the primary government agency with the dual mission of facilitating the creation of a business environment wherein participants could compete, flourish, and succeed and, at the same time, ensuring consumer welfare. Overall, DTI’s main role is to contribute to the country’s goal of achieving economic growth towards poverty reduction. The agency’s mandate calls for the expansion of Philippine exports, increase in investments, and the development and promotion of the country’s micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs). DTI must ensure that consumers’ rights are protected and that they are entitled to value for money. All these, DTI pursues through 33 foreign trade service posts, 16 regional offices, 81 provincial/city/area offices, 13 bureaus, 7 attached agencies, 7 attached corporations, and 10 service offices. DTI’s vision is to see the Philippines occupying its rightful place in a community of nations, prosperous and free. Together with business, DTI is an active and leading partner in propelling the Philippines toward a dynamic and thriving economy. DTI’s success is anchored on global competitiveness, with social responsibility and consumer welfare as the agency’s guiding principles. In all these, DTI adheres strictly to the tenets of professionalism, integrity, and transparency. DTI continues to be the Filipino people’s Agency of Choice, an organization where creativity, innovation, professional, and personal growth find full expression. CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY 4F, Industry and Investments Bldg., 385 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave. Makati City, Philippines 1200 Tel: (02) 899-7450 Fax: (02) 896-1166

Major Programs A. One Town, One Product-Philippines (OTOP-Philippines) OTOP-Philippines is a priority program of President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo to promote entrepreneurship and create jobs. Through OTOP-Philippines, local chief executives of every city and municipality take the lead in identifying, developing, and promoting a specific product or service which has a competitive advantage. It supports micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs) to manufacture, offer, and market distinctive products or services through the use of indigenous raw materials and local skills and talents. It offers a comprehensive assistance package through a convergence of services from local government units (LGUs), national government agencies (NGAs), and the private sector. This includes: (a) product development; and (b) credit provision through SULONG (SME Unified Lending Opportunities for National Growth) to support 3 million entrepreneurs and generate 6 to 10 million jobs. CONTACT DETAILS Office of the DTI-Regional Operations and Development Group (RODG) 7F New Solid Bldg 357 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 890-4697 Fax: (02) 890-4685

B. Rural Micro-Enterprise Promotion Programme (RuMEPP) RuMEPP aims to reduce rural poverty through increased economic development, job creation, and better incomes for poor rural households by promoting profitable and sustainable micro enterprises (MEs). It has three major components: microfinance credit and support, which increases financial resource of small business; micro enterprise promotion and development, which supports existing micro business with potential for growth and program management; and policy coordination that gives effective program management capacity to target business entrepreneurs. CONTACT DETAILS Office of the Project Manager (RuMEPP) 3F Trade and Industry Building 361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 751-0384 loc. 2368 / 751-3260 Fax: (02) 751-3260 E-mail: [email protected]

DTI Attached Agencies/Bureaus

1. Build-Operate-and-Transfer Center (BOT) The Build Operate and Transfer (BOT) Center takes its roots from the issuance of Administrative Order (AO) No. 105, s. 1989 creating the Coordinating Council of the Philippine Assistance Program (CCPAP) under the Office of the President (OP) for the overall implementation of the Philippine Assistance Program (PAP) and then later on, the BOT Program - Memorandum Order No. 166, s. 1993. The passage of the BOT Law (R.A. No. 6957) in July 1990, and the Amended BOT Law (R.A. No. 7718) in May 1994, strengthened the role of the CCPAP in coordinating and monitoring of projects implemented under the law. A novel legislation, the BOT Law was the cornerstone for the building of power plants by the private sector that solved the perennial and debilitating power block outs throughout the country in the 90's. CCPAP was then reorganized and converted to the Coordinating Council for Private Sector Participation (CCPSP) by virtue of Administrative Order No. 67 dated May 11, 1999 for the formulation of policies and guidelines and the coordination and monitoring of the Private Sector Participation (PSP) Program and projects of the government, including projects with ODA financing, pursued under the Amended BOT Law. Finally, with the issuance of Executive Order (EO) No. 144 in November 2002, the CCPSP was reorganized and converted to the BOT Center. Its attachment was transferred from the Office of the President to the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) for greater coordination in promoting investments in the BOT/PSP projects in order to accelerate and sustain economic growth. Mandate The Build-Operate-and-Transfer (BOT) Center is mandated to promote Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) in national and local infrastructure and development projects through the BOT Law, as well as to advocate policy initiatives in the continued evolution of the country's infrastructure privatization policy framework. This two-fold mandate shall be pursued through the following: a. Promotion of the Philippine BOT and PPP Program under the National Infrastructure Development Plan b. Provision of capacity building and hands-on training to Implementing Agencies (IAs) and local government units (LGUs) in developing and promoting their PPP-BOT projects. c. Provision of technical advisory assistance to IAs and LGUs through the BOT Center's Project Development Facility d. Provision of promotional and marketing support to various BOT/PPP investment opportunities of other government corporations and instrumentalities e. Institutionalization and implementation of an inter-agency PPP-BOT Strategic Promotion and Development Plan

f. Policy Advocacy g. Formulation of PPP-BOT policy guidelines to ensure transparent, consistent and expeditious preparation, review, approval and implementation of PPP-BOT projects h. Initiation and/or participation in PPP-BOT policy reviews/reform agenda i. Institutionalization of an advocacy program in pursuit of an effective and sustainable PPP-BOT program implementation Vision Efficient and sustainable infrastructure systems and services to meet basic needs of every Filipino and to spur economic development Mission To actively promote Public-Private Partnership as a cornerstone of the national infrastructure development Goal Increased private sector investments in infrastructure and development sectors and protection of public interest The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 4/F G.A. Yupangco Building 339 Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 896-4697; 897-6826; 895-3893 Fax: (02) 896-8452 Email: [email protected] www.botcenter.gov.ph

2. Bureau of Domestic Trade (BDT) BDT promotes efficient marketing and distribution of local products and services. It seeks to expand and strengthen linkages among the country’s small, medium, and large enterprises through information exchanges and market matching. BDT also conceptualizes, monitors, and evaluates programs, plans, and projects intended to create awareness on domestic marketing opportunities for new projects, new technologies, and investments.

CONTACT DETAILS Office of the Director Bureau of Domestic Trade G/F Trade and Industry Bldg. 361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 751-3223 Fax: (02) 751-3224

3. Bureau of Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprise Development (BMSMED) BMSMED initiates and implements programs and projects addressing the specific needs of MSMEs in the areas of technology development and transfer, financing, marketing, and training. As Secretariat to the Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprise Development (MSMED) Council, the Bureau is also tasked to review policies and strategies geared towards MSME development. CONTACT DETAILS Office of the Director Bureau of Micro, Small, and Medium Enterprise Development 5F 361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 751-5036 Fax: (02) 896-7916 E-mail: [email protected]

4. Bureau of Product Standards (BPS) BPS is the National Standards Body of the Philippines as established by Republic Act (RA) No. 4109 or the Philippine Standardization Law and Executive Order (EO) No. 133. It is mandated to develop, implement, and coordinate standardization activities in the Philippines. It is primarily involved in standards development, product certification, and standards implementation/promotion to raise the quality and global competitiveness of Philippine products at the same time to protect the interests of consumers and businesses. CONTACT DETAILS Office of the Director-in-Charge Bureau of Product Standards 3F Trade and Industry Bldg. 361 Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 751-3123 / 751-3125 Fax: (02) 751.4706 E-mail: [email protected]

5. Cottage Industry Technology Center (CITC) CITC provides skills training, technical consultancy, and common facility services to micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs) as well as to the country’s giftwares and holiday decors, fine jewelry, leather footwear, and home furnishing industries. CONTACT DETAILS Office of the Executive Director Cottage Industry Technology Center 20 Russet St., SSS Village, Marikina City Tel: (02) 941-4561 Fax: (02) 942-0880 E-mail: [email protected]

6. Philippine Trade Training Center (PTTC) PTTC is mandated to: - Develop training modules on export and import techniques and procedures - Raise the level of awareness of Philippine businesspeople on export opportunities and the availability of alternative sources of import products or diversified markets for export - Offer specialized courses for specific industry groups directed at overcoming barriers to overseas market penetration -

Conduct training programs in international trade practices, inspection techniques, and exhibition mounting

CONTACT DETAILS Office of the Executive Director Philippine Trade Training Center International Trade Center Complex Roxas Blvd., cor. Sen. Gil J. Puyat Ave. Pasay City Tel: (02) 468-8970 Fax: (02) 834-1341 E-mail: [email protected]

7. Product Development and Design Center of the Philippines (PPDCP) PDDCP promotes design as a tool for improving the quality and competitiveness of Philippine products. It services the design needs and requirements of MSMEs. Its programs and services include the following: -

Product Design and Development. Design, development, or improvement of products and labels responsive to market needs and requirements and manufacturer’s production capabilities.

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Design Research. Acquisition and dissemination of relevant design and market data and conduct of applied research projects to support product development activities of both designer and industry.

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Design Promotion. Increase awareness and appreciation of design and its use through exhibitions, seminars, dialogues, and publications.

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Product Design. Design of a new product, product adaptation, product diversification, or expansion of existing product or product line.

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Technology Updating Workshops. Hands-on learning and application of skills on techniques such as finishing to complement product development activities.

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Design and Technical Information. Information dissemination activities such as seminars on product development, design trends, and related topics.

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Library. Access to design and related information from local and foreign sources for designers and industry. CONTACT DETAILS

Office of the Supervising Director PDDCP Building, CCP Complex Roxas Blvd., Pasay City Tel: (02) 832-1112 to 19 local 108 Fax: (02) 832-3644 E-mail: [email protected]

8. Small Business Corporation (SB Corp.) SB Corp. envisions becoming the leader in small enterprise development financing and small credit delivery systems nationwide. It has focused on developing an appropriate mix of financing products that are responsive to the needs of SMEs in the country. Over the years, the Corporation has evolved its product line from generic credit and credit enhancement facilities—catering to both nearly bankable SMEs and small banks in need of liquidity support—to more evolved lines that focused the financing facilities to specific products and/or sectors. In total, there are 16 credit and credit guarantees programs being of offered by the Corporation. The credit facilities are divided between wholesale and retail lending, which targets banks engaged in MSME lending, and pre-bankable small to medium sized businesses. The credit guarantees services banks with SME accounts that need additional collateral cover. Retail Lending Retail programs provide an alternative source of funding to SMEs for financing various activities. Loans may be availed to finance letters of credit, confirmed purchase orders, receivables, working capital, and asset acquisitions. Wholesale Lending Wholesale programs focus on the liquidity needs of banks by providing them access to shortterm and medium-term financing. The Corporation has partnered with banks, non-governmental organizations, and cooperatives to extend its reach. Credit Guarantees The guarantee programs are designed to augment the collateral cover of SMEs to encourage banks to lend to small and medium sized enterprises with collateral deficiencies. CONTACT DETAILS The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) 17/F and 18/F Corporate Center 139 Valero St., Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-5720; 751-888 local 1801

Fax: (02) 813-5720 E-mail: [email protected]

NATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (NEDA)

The National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) is the country’s highest socioeconomic development planning and policy coordinating body. As the independent planning agency, NEDA is mandated under the 1987 Constitution to coordinate plans and policy aimed at achieving the development objectives of sustainable growth coupled with an equitable distribution of income and wealth. NEDA traces its roots in 1972 with the issuance of PD No. 107 when it assumed the functions previously vested in the National Economic Council (NEC), the Presidential Economic Staff (PES) and other ad-hoc bodies. Former President Corazon C. Aquino issued Executive Order No. 230 in 1987 reorganizing the NEDA. Under the reorganized set-up, the NEDA is composed of two separate and distinct entities – the Board and the Secretariat. The powers and functions of the NEDA reside in the Board which is the governing body that sets the major development policy direction for the country. Assisting the NEDA Board are the following interagency bodies:      

Development Budget Coordination Committee; Investment Coordination Committee; Social Development Committee; Infrastructure Committee; Committee on Tariff and Related Matters; and Regional Development Committee.

The NEDA Secretariat, on the other hand, serves as the research and technical support and secretariat of the NEDA Board. It provides through its organizational units technical staff support and assistance by preparing technical and discussion papers and proposals, conducting studies, and suggesting policy measures and other reform initiatives. Programs and Projects NEDA coordinates the formulation of medium-and long-term socioeconomic development plans; monitors approved national, sectoral and regional development plans, programs and projects; programs allocation of resources, particularly Build-Operate-Transfer (BOT) and ODA resources; and promotes and applies market mechanisms to rationalize economic incentives and rents. NEDA, through its regional offices, also performs the following functions relevant to LGUs’ development planning:  Serves as the technical staff and secretariat of the Regional Development Council (RDC);  Provides technical support to the RDC in coordinating the formulation and implementation of regional development plans and investment programs ;  Provides technical assistance and other consultative services to local governments and other government agencies;  Evaluates and reviews proposed programs and projects for consideration by the RDC;  Monitors and assesses project implementation in the region; and

 Coordinates with regional offices of other departments and agencies and with local government units (LGUs) and private sector/non-government organizations on matters pertaining to project monitoring and request of information for socioeconomic planning, evaluation and recommendation. The NEDA also prepares development plans, investment programs, economic situationers, and planning guidelines to help LGUs in formulating their respective development plans, programs and projects. Some of the LGU-relevant publications, data and information can be accessed in soft copy form from the NEDA websites, as well as in hard or compact disk forms from the NEDA regional offices. The NEDA’s regional offices also provide technical assistance to LGUs in areas such as project management, monitoring and evaluation, land use planning, socioeconomic profile preparation, etcetera. CONTACT DETAILS The NEDA Director-General 12 Saint Josemaria Escriva Drive Ortigas Center, Pasig City Tel: (02) 6313176 Fax: (02) 6313747 Email: [email protected] www.neda.gov.ph

NATIONAL FOOD AUTHORITY (NFA) The vision of the National Food Authority is to be at the forefront in providing excellent needed services to the food marketing industry towards global competitiveness and committed to ensuring food security. Mission  Pursue and accelerate the integrated growth and modernization of the food marketing industry  To provide excellent services towards attaining food security and the stabilization of the supply and prices of rice  Assist the food marketing industry move towards global competitiveness  Empower rice farmer Objectives  To provide appropriate and adequate support aimed at integrating, improving and modernizing food marketing systems and facilities  To provide and make available marketing and technical services that will ensure food security and stabilization of food supply and prices  To provide rice farmers initially with a market for their palay and eventually with the capability to profitably market their produce  To promote the upgrading and optimum utilization of grains post-harvest facilities and technology  To improve existing services and linkages NFA Programs 1. Support to Farmers 1.1. Direct Market Intervention Programs 1.1.1. Procurement Program This program is being implemented by NFA wherein the agency conducts its buying activities directly from farmers/farmers’ organizations at a support price. This program is undertaken to ensure and establish manageable buffer stock in line with the agency’s function of stabilizing consumer price level s and assuring an adequate and continuous supply of rice. This involves actual procurement from individual and organized small farmers at government support prices. 1.2. Indirect Market Intervention Programs 1.2.1. Farmer Option to Buy-Back

Farmers have the opportunity to buy back the same volume of palau stocks sold to the agency within a period of six (60 months for resale to traders, millers when palay prices are better than NFA’s support price 1.2.2. Grains Exchange Program for Farmers’ Organizations and Retailers Association (GEPFORA) Under this program, NFA accredited farmers’ organization can deposit their palay at a specified NFA warehouse and sell them in rice form to NFA licensed grains’ retaliers’ associations in another area using NFA’s network of grains retailers associations and NFA’s electronic trading (e-trading) system. Farmers’ Organizations which participated in the Farmers As Importer (FAI) Program may also utilize the GEPFORA in marketing their imported rice variety available using the NFA network of grains retailers and NFA e-trade system. Grains retailers associations shall also benefit from this program since they will have ready and direct access to more supply/source of local and imported rice. 1.2.3. Palay Marketing Assistance for Legislators and Local Government Units (PALLGUs) LGUs and legislators shall center into a marketing agreement with NFA where the farmer shall provide a premium in addition to the existing NFA support price of Php10.00/kg for the purchase of palay from farmers. The provision of such premium shall entitle the LGUs/Legislators to the right to buy the subject stocks from NFA. Said stocks may be stored in any designated warehouse for free for four months. If the stocks are not withdrawn after the four-month free storage period the NFA shall correspondingly charge the buyer with 1.5% carrying cist for the fifth until the 6th month, which is the maximum period of storage. Further, the NFA shall have the right to auction or sell the palay stocks if the buyer was not able to withdraw the same after six months of storage. 1.2.4. Corn Marketing assistance Program for Industry Producers/Users – Local Government Units /CMAPIPULGUs This program aims to help Corn farmers increase their income and at the same time assist corn users in sourcing their corn requirements. Under this program, corn buyers (commercial/industrial users and provide the latter with a premium amount that will be added to the existing NFA support price of Php7.00/kg for the purchase of yellow corn and Php8.50/kg for the purchase of white corn from NFA-accredited individual corn farmers (ICFs)/Corn Farmers Organizations (CFOs) 1.2.5. Industry Development and Regulation NFA continues to be one of the driving forces and catalyst for change and improvement of the grains industry. This involves the monitoring and enforcement of rules and regulations governing grains business, licensing and registration of all rice distribution of grains business for optimum utility and profitability. It also includes the promotion of

harmonious and productive relationship among rice and corn industry stakeholders to achieve sectoral efficiency, discipline and growth. The following programs are being undertaken to achieve the above objective: 

Licensing and Registration of Grains Business - Any person, natural or juridical, before engaging in the rice and/or corn business must first apply for a license and/or registration in the prescribed application form in triplicate copies to be signed by the applicant himself or by his authorized representative. This form can be secured from the NFA Regional or Provincial Office, where the grains business is located.

1.2.6. Total Quality Grains Management Program This program aims to synthesize existing and potential grains quality control procedures and techniques into an efficient management system for ensuring good quality rice in the agency. NFA shall get rid of low quality milled rice in its warehouses and shall sell only good quality milled rice to stakeholders. It includes the assessment of 580,000 bags of palay, 10.5 M bags of NFA stocks and non-fortifies milled rice stocks, sugar, corn and by-products of needed and shall be based on the number of bags subjected to quality audit. 1.2.7. Rice Fortification Program The NFA is the implementing agency of rice fortification program. In consonance with R.A. 8976 of the Food Fortification Act it mandates the fortification of rice, sugar, edible oil and micronutrient malnutrition in the country. NFA and DOH signed a MOA that the two agencies shall formulate rules and regulations and procedures on advocacy, training, laboratory analysis as well as the imposition of sanctions to those who will practice illegal trading/marketing of Iron Fortified Rice (IFR). 1.2.8. Private-Sector Importation In line with the government’s policy of removing the rice importation monopoly of NFA, all private grains businessmen (individual and entities) shall be allowed to undertake the rice importation which shall be part of the country’s food security requirement. The private sector importation has two windows:  

Window 1. Rice importation will be subject to payment of duties/tariff taxes and other fees that may be required be the bank and Bureau of Customs. Window 2. The NFA will be charging a Service Fee for the rice importation of the private sector using the NFA tax expenditures subsidy.

2. Consumer Protection 2.1. Distribution Program

Ensures that prices of staple rice and corn are reasonable and affordable to consuming public. This is undertaken through the various distribution strategies wherein rice is sold to different accredited market outlets, such as: 

Market-Based Outlets of accredited NFA retailers located in public markets which sell solely NFA rice at a maximum of 5 kilograms per family per week with prices ranging from PhP23.50-25.00 per kilogram

2.2. Community Based Outlets or Pro-Poor Outlets NFA dedicated outlets selling subsidized NFA rice and noodles located outside the market and in the DSWD-identified depressed barangays/areas; sells rice at a maximum of 2 kilograms per family per day to Family Access Cardholders only.        

NFA-Operated Rolling Stores NFA-Operated Stationary Stores Tindahan Natin – established in coordination with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and located in depressed areas Tinatin Natin Legislators’ Fund Tindahan sa Parokya – (inter-faith) are outlets handled by parishes selling NFA-rice at PhP18.25/kg in depressed areas Bigasang Bayan Outlets (BBO-LGU)  Stationary Outlets  Rolling Stores KALAHI Outlets LGU-identified outlets – are outlets identified by LGU located in the depressed areas

2.3. Food for School Program (Special Program) An emergency food augmentation program of the Department of Education (DepEd). It includes provision of one kilogram of NFA rice to identified public elementary grade pupils in exchange for their attendance to school and at the same time conduct values formation activities and productivity skills training for their parents. 2.4. Disaster and Crisis Preparedness Program (Special Program) A 24-hour Operation Center (OPCEN) activated during disasters and calamities to ensure the availability of rice within 24-hour response time upon occurrence, and stabilize rice supply and prices within a two-week period during emergency and crisis situation CONTACT DETAILS The ADMINISTRATOR National Food Authority Department of Agriculture North Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City

Tel: (02) 453-3900, 981-3800 Fax: (02) 453-3900 Email: [email protected] www.nfa.gov.ph

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES (DBP) The DBP’s mission to influence and accelerate sustainable economic growth of the country has led it to anchor its lending activities on the task of financing development. It has evolved already from its role of development financing. From the task of simply providing the necessary funds for projects, DBP now functions to meet the medium and long – term needs as well as the sustainability of key strategic sectors which are deemed vital to progress and growth. In line with the government’s thrust, the DBP has developed programs for the following priority sectors: 6. Infrastructure and Logistics The DBP provides funding support to projects that will enhance investments, production and trade. This would include projects that increase value-adding production capacity (such as power projects and acquisitions of plant and equipment) or projects that result in the utilization of otherwise idle existing production capacity. It also includes projects that facilitate the movement of goods, such as trading, transportation and communication. 7. Social Development The DBP provides funding support to investments in the areas of health care, education, housing, community development and livelihood. Investments in these areas are designed to directly address poverty alleviation initiatives. One of the Bank’s corporate social responsibility initiatives, the DBP Endowment for Education Program (DEEP), provides scholarship opportunities for higher education or technical courses to poor but deserving high school graduates. 8. Environment The DBP provides not only funding support, but also partnership arrangements to address the protection of natural resources and the mitigation of the degradation of the environment. Credit-based program would include projects to support new and renewable energy sources (hydro, geothermal, rural power projects), solid and hazardous waste management and pollution control. The “DBP FOREST” is a non-credit program where in partnership with community groups, LGUs and DENR, forest projects are undertaken. In these projects, a variety of high value fruit and forest trees are planted to prevent erosion, restore watersheds, and help absorb carbon emissions.

9. Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises The MSME sector acts as the seedbed for the development of entrepreneurial skills and innovation. It accounts for about 99.7% of the registered businesses in the country, from which 70% of the labor force earn a living. Thus, its contribution to the country’s economic development cannot be underemphasized. Hence, the DBP targeted this sector as one of its

priority sectors. A separate unit in Head Office for the Microfinance and the branches for SMEs assume the responsibility of assisting this sector, either credit or non-credit support. Tie ups with government agencies and state universities are forged to support the MSME Programs of the government. The advocacy for the Overseas Filipino Workers such as offering livelihood and training programs for returning OFWs and assisting them thru the One Town One Product or OTOP of the government, and eventually, offering them a full range of assistance including their families. 10. Commercial Lending The DBP also lends its hands to commercial activities of large corporations in the country. It complements the private banks in responding to expansion projects of big industries in the country. In the light of the lowering interest rates, the DBP has launched five (5) new deposit products:     

YES (Young Earners Savings for Kids); Payroll + Savings Account; Wisdom Account for Senior Citizens; High Earner Account for High-Net worth Individuals; and Deposito ng Bayaning Pilipino (for OFWs)

The DBP finances the following projects: 7. Industrial a. Large manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries b. Small and medium manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries c. Industrial Estate Projects 8. Public Utilities a. Land, air and water transportation b. Telecommunications c. Power generation and distribution d. Water supply and distribution 9. Community Development a. Housing b. Hospitals c. Schools d. Infrastructure e. Eco-Tourism 10. Agro-industrial

a. Post harvest-facility b. Agri-business 11. Focused Lending Programs a. Environmental  Pollution control and abatement  Waste minimization and recycling  Efficient use and/or management of natural resources  Occupational health and safety  Solid and hazardous waste management  Water supply and sanitation b. Micro-financing c. Lending program for franchises d. Program towards obtaining ISO 9000 certification e. New and renewable energy (NRE) projects f. Technology development and commercialization g. LGU financing program h. Sustainable Logistics Development Program  Road/Roro Ferry Network  Bulk Grains  Cold Chain 12. Other Programs a. Factoring b. Loans Against Hold Out on Deposit CONTACT DETAILS Benedicto Ernesto R. Bitonio, Jr. Executive Vice President Brillo L. Reynes Senior Vice President Makati Avenue corner Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 8189511 locals 3307, 3324; 817-0473; 840-0735 Fax: (02) 815-1517 Email: [email protected] http://www.devbankphil.com.ph

DBP LOAN PROGRAMS: 1. JICA-Logistics Infrastructure Development Project (LIDP) Priorities: Private and Public infrastructure development

Eligible Borrowers:  Private corporations with at least 70% Filipino capitalization/ownership  LGUs  GOCCs  Cooperatives Eligible Projects  Road RORO Terminal System (RRTS) - RORO Vessel RORO vessels to be deployed in Road RORO Terminal System (RRTS) connections - Other RRTS facilities  Terminal Facilities (Marshalling areas, passenger terminal building, parking areas, ramps)  Access Roads  Support Systems to include facilities such as lodging and resting areas  Shipyards for ship maintenance, repair and buildings of new units not limited to RORO vessels 

Toll Road, LGU Road and Maintenance Equipment - Construction - Support facilities (towing services, resting areas, IT facilities) - Road maintenance equipment



Packaging, Transport and Distribution Facility - Cargo handling equipment (cranes, transtrainer, handlift, forklift, racking system) - Cargo Trucks (wing vans and the like) - Truck tractors and prime mover units - Container/container vans - Delivery vehicles - Warehouses



Bulk Chain - Processing, trading posts and aggregating centers - Bulk trucking - Grains Terminal (including grains handling ports, silos, vacuvator – grain unloader and bulk handling equipment) - Bulk carriers, tankers (for domestic operations), specialized vessels such as barges, tugboats, supply vessels etc. - Warehouses - Other Post-Harvest facilities - Power generating equipment, back-up power supply or Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS)



Cold Chain - Processing, trading posts and aggregating centers - Reefer vans

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Cold chain transport equipment Refrigerated Fishing Vessels Cold storage facilities Power generating equipment for back-up power supply or UPS Warehouses

Subloan Size  Private Corporations: up to 80% of total project cost  LGUs/GOCCs/Cooperatives: up to 90% of total project cost  Maximum of sub-loan amount: Y1.5 billion Repayment Term: Up to 15 years Grace Period: Up to 5 years

2.

JICA-Industrial Support & Services Expansion Program II (ISSEP II) – SGF

Priorities: SME financing Eligible Borrowers:  SMEs,  Private enterprises,  Manufacturing and non-manufacturing enterprises with total assets less than P200 million before financing,  Filipino citizens or corporation organized under the laws of the Philippines, at least 70% of whose capital is owned by the citizens of the Philippines Eligible Projects:  Manufacturing  Support services to manufacturing such as communications, computer software, transportation and transport facilities, storage and warehousing  Cold chain - Processing & marketing centers - Aggregating centers - Reefer vans/transport equipment - Ice plants - Other cold storage facilities  Grains Highway - Feed mills - Rice mills - Bulk storage  Education strongly linked to manufacturing (include non-stock non-profit privatelysupported educational institutes that provide education strongly linked to SMEs, not limited to the maximum asset size of P200 million, excluding public educational institutions)  Fixed assets related to construction, expansion and modernization of projects such as improvements, machineries and equipment  Factoring transactions which are covered by Instant Working Capital Agreements with a tenor of at least one year  Working capital loans  Credit lines for working capital loans covered by Credit Line Agreements with a tenor of at least one year  Loans to MFIs  Refinancing of SME loans  The following expenditures shall be included in the total project cost, but are not eligible for financing.  General administration expenses;  Taxes and duties;  Purchase of land;  Compensation, and  Other indirect items

Subloan Size: Up to P100 million Repayment Term: Up to 15 years Grace Period: Up to 5 years

3.

JBIC-Industry Support Loan Project (ISLP)/JBIC 6

Priorities: Public and Private end-user industrial sectors. (CDM) Eligible Borrowers:  Private individuals/ corporations with at least 70% Filipino capitalization/ownership  Local Government Units (LGUs)  GOCCs Eligible Projects:  All projects in the industrial sector with identifiable direct or indirect business relations with Japanese enterprises or which will implement renewable energy projects  Any project eligible to be classified as Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project  Acquisition of fixed assets, machinery and equipment  Building/plant construction  Construction, rehabilitation, modernization or expansion of existing facilities  Civil Works  Working Capital requirements of the end user Note: Retroactive financing of eligible expenditures is allowed provided such expenditures were made not earlier than 20 June 2007. Subloan Size: Up to 70% of total project cost Repayment Term: Up to 11 years Grace Period: Up to 3 years

4. European Investment Bank Global Facility (EIB) Priorities: Commercial infrastructure, industry, agro-industry, tourism, related services including leasing & micro-finance, health & urban development Eligible Borrowers: Private & public enterprises Eligible Projects:  Capital asset acquisition & permanent working capital &/or interest during construction of priority SMEs.  Project involving purchase of used or 2nd-hand equipment provided that: - They are deemed essential for the project - Such 2nd-hand assets represent no more than 25% of the Sub-Loan Note: Total purchase price of such 2nd-hand assets does not exceed 50% of project’s total fixed asset *Total Project Cost – sum of all existing assets inclusive of land plus the sunk cost  Cost of the feasibility study  Pre-operating cost  Total amount of the new investment (equipment and corresponding working capital to be funded by the facility) Note: *100% financing in case of purchase of European-made equipment inclusive of the required working capital and a proportionate share in the cost of building which will house the purchase of European-made equipment. Subloan Size:  Up to 50% of the total project cost inclusive of all expenditures directly linked to the investment project.  Maximum – EUR 12.5 million  Minimum – EUR 100,000 Repayment Term: Up to 15 years Grace Period: Up to 5 years

LAND BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES (LBP) Since its creation in August 1963, the LBP has successfully balanced its universal banking and countryside development mission. The profits from its commercial banking operations have successfully financed development initiatives that benefited the small farmers, fisherfolk and other countryside-based small and medium entrepreneurs. CONTACT DETAILS Melinda C. Cruz Department Manager Landbank Head Office 1598 M.H. Del Pilar cor Dr. Quintos Street Malate, Manila Tel: (02) 405-7476 Fax: (02) 528-8541 Email: [email protected] http://www.landbank.com 2

Program: SUPPORT FOR STRATEGIC LOCAL DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT PROJECT (S2LDIP) Program Fund: US$100M Source of Fund: World Bank Loan Effectivity: March 2007 to December 2012 Program Objective: To improve living conditions, public health standards and the urban environment by providing upgraded and improved urban and rural infrastructure and services in line with the Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan’s strategic focus of eradicating poverty, good governance, and efficient delivery of basic services. The institutional capacities to provide improved urban and rural management and service of participating LGUs will also be strengthened; and To facilitate LGU’s access to viable financing options to fund the construction, upgrading and rehabilitation of basic urban and rural infrastructure facilities. Eligible Borrower:  LGUs (cities, municipalities, and provinces) nationwide  Public Utilities and Private Operators providing local infrastructure services. Eligible Projects: A. LGU Infrastructure facilities and utilities such as:  Water supply and distribution  Power production and distribution  Solid waste management facilities including construction of sanitary landfill  Waste water management  Housing  New site development for commercial purposes  Roads and bridges  Drainage and flood control  Schools and health clinics; and  Improvement of municipal enterprise and infrastructure facilities such as public markets, slaughterhouses, bus terminals, and other related income generating projects B. Goods and services for enhancement of revenue of income Loan Amount for LGUs:  For LGUs, the loan amount shall be based in the requirement of the sub-project but shall in no case exceed net borrowing capacity  For public utilities and private operators providing local infrastructure services, shall be based on the projected subproject cash flow but shall in no case exceed PhP500M Term of Loan:  Maximum of 15 years inclusive of two (2) years grace period on principal payment

Interest Rate:  1 to 5 years - 8%  6 to 10 years - 8%  11 to 15 years - 10% Commitment Fee: 0.25% on the undrawn loan amount Front-End Fee: 0.25% of the loan amount Processing Requirement  Sanggunian Resolution authorizing the Local Chief Executives to negotiate a loan with LBP  Approved budget for the current year  COA Audited Financial Statement for the past 3 years  List of elected officials and key officers  Schedule of IRA for the past 2 years  Copy of the Municipal Development Plan and Public Investment Program  BLGF certification on Net Borrowing Capacity for current year  Other standard documentary requirements of LBP For project involving construction  Project plans and specification  Cost estimates  Bill of materials  Work Programs/schedule duly approved by the local chief executive and the city/municipal/district engineer For machineries and equipment acquisition  List, description and estimated cost of machineries and equipment based on price quotation  Certification from the dealers/suppliers as to the availability of spare parts in the local market For projects involving construction  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report and Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) Collateral Documents  Real Estate Mortgage  Chattel Mortgage  Hold-Out on Deposits  Assignment of the LGU’s regular income including portion of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) which in no case shall exceed 20% of the LGU’s regular income  Assignment of a portion of the LGU’s Internal Revenue Allotment for the payment of the sub-loan

Program: KfW – LGU INVESTMENT PROGRAMME (KfW – LIP) Program Fund: EUR 15MM, approx Php935 MM Source of Fund: KfW of Germany Loan Effectivity: 06 September 2006 to January 2010 Program Objective: To facilitate the access of LGUs to long-term funds and address the longterm financing needs of LGU investment and development projects Eligible Borrower: Provinces, Cities, Municipalities, nationwide but preference shall be given to Visayas and Mindanao LGUs Eligible Projects:  Local roads and bridges including provision of maintenance equipment and improvement of streetlights  Sanitation, drainage and flood control, including construction of low-cost treatment facilities and provision for sludge collection and transportation  Water supply  Public market and bus terminal  Rehabilitation of public facilities, including purchase of equipment for environmental monitoring relating to general hygiene and sanitation, slaughter houses, public parks, parking spaves, hospitals, schools and other structures related to seashore facilities to accelerate productivity  Telecommunication and information technology  Ports  Mini-hydo-electric  Preparation of feasibility study  All other income generating projects except solid waste management projects Loan Amount for LGUs:  Php100 million per LGU Term of Loan:  Maximum of 15 years inclusive of 2 years maximum grace period on principal payments Interest Rate:  Up to 5 years  6 – 10 years  11 – 15 years

- 9% - 10% - 11%

Commitment Fee: 0.25% on the undrawn loan amount Processing Requirement:  Sanggunian Resolution authorizing the Local Chief Executive to negotiate a loan with LBP  Approved budget for the current year

     

COA Audited Financial Statement for the past 3 years List of elected officials and key officers Schedule of IRA for the past 2 years Copy of the Municipal Development Plan and Public Investment Program BLGF certification on Net Borrowing Capacity for current year Other standard documentary requirements of LBP

For project involving construction  Project plans and specification  Cost Estimates  Bill of Materials  Work program/schedule duly approved by the local chief executives and the city/municipal/district engineer For machineries and equipment acquisition  List, description and estimated cost of machineries and equipment based on price quotation  Certification form the dealers/suppliers as to the availability of spare parts in the local market For projects involving construction  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report and Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) Collateral Documents  Real Estate Mortgage  Chattel Mortgage  Hold-Out on Deposits  Assignment of the LGU’s regular income including portion of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) which in no case shall exceed 20% of the LGU’s regular income  Assignment of a portion of the LGU’s Internal Revenue Allotment for the payment of the sub-loan

LGU GUARANTEE CORPORATION (LGUGC) LGUGC is a private credit guarantee institution incorporated in March 1998 with the primary mandate of granting local government units (LGUs) access to private sources of capital by providing credit enhancement to LGU debt. LGUGC’s stockholders are the Bankers Association of the Philippines (BAP), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) and the Asian Development Bank. LGUGC’s primary goal is to make private financial resources available to creditworthy local government units (LGUs) through its credit guarantee. Its credit enhancement facilitates the entry of LGUs with infrastructure development projects in the capital market. Recently, LGUGC extended its guarantee services to water districts, electric cooperatives, state universities and colleges, and renewable energy technology projects. Vision To be the recognized private sector link in public-private partnerships for local development financing Mission   

Advocate for reforms that will mobilize resources of the private sector toward financing local government projects Continue to advocate for policy reforms for LGU bond flotation as a viable alternative local financing option Instill values of good governance to enhance the borrower’s enterprise management and creditworthiness, especially local governments and utility companies

Guarantees As of March 2009, LGUGC has guaranteed 16 bond deals, 2 LGU loans and 9 water district loans aggregating Php 4.0982 billion. Guaranteed projects include the following: public markets, slaughterhouses, jetty port, low-cost housing, hospitals, commercial complex with toll parking facilities, commercial centre with wet and dry stalls, convention center cum hostel facilities, academic center and multi-purpose gymnasium, integrated solid waste management facility, and water districts’ rehabilitation and expansion projects and bulk water supply. Services Offered 4. Guarantee LGUGC currently guarantees the indebtedness of LGUs, water districts (WDs), electric cooperatives, renewable energy providers and state universities and colleges. The guarantee fee is a function of the underlying borrower and project risks. Fees range from 0.5% to 2% per annum.

5. Credit Rating LGUGC implements an internal LGU Credit Screening and Rating System (LCSRS) and Water District Credit Rating System (WDCRS) in the absence of a formal stand-alone entity specializing in risk evaluating of LGUs and WDs. Both credit rating systems adopt internationally-accepted standards fit for sue diligence requirement of private financial institutions and individual investors. The system serves as the primary guide for the LGUGC and partner financial institutions to identify LGUs and WDs’ creditworthiness and their capacity to participate in the commercial credit market. It is also a tool for assisting LGUs and WDs implement good governance practices. LGUGC has an internal borrower risk rating system for other types of proponents. 6. Program Management LGUGC offers program management services. Currently, LGUGC is managing the guarantee fund for Electric Cooperative System Loss Reduction Project (ECSLRP) of the World Bank – Global Environment Facility thru the Department of Energy (DOE). LGUGC is likewise the program manager for the Capacity Building to Remove Barriers to Renewable Energy Development (CBRED) Loan Guarantee Fund of the UNDP. CONTACT DETAILS Lydia N. Orial President/CEO Unit 2801, 28/F Antel Corporate Centre 121 Valero Street, Salcedo Village Makati City Tel: (02) 750-4168/751-8764 to 68 Fax: (02) 888-4217 Email: [email protected] www.lgugc.com

PLANTERS DEVELOPMENT BANK (PDB) PDB was established in 1961 and is focused on lending to SMEs. It is one of the Top 250 among the Philippines Top 1,000 Corporations and is ranked as one of the Top 25 banks in the country. It is the provider of global expertise and resources through partnerships with the following:    

World Bank’s International Finance Corporation (IFC); The Netherlands Development Finance Company (FMO); Asian Development Bank (ADB); and German Investment and Development Company (DEG).

It is a consistent recipient of awards and citations for SME finance and development, including the first-ever President’s Citation for MSME Development in 2009 and the 2008 Outstanding SME Development Project Award in Asia-Pacific for the Plantersbank SME Business Park. Loan Packages Available Backed up by the various special loan programs funded by government financial institutions and multilateral agencies, the following credit facilities are offered by PDB: 1. Regular Credit Line: For working capital requirements available for one (1) year only. Credit line is renewable. 2. Short Term Loan and Medium Term Loan: For business expansion, equipment acquisition or factory construction with a fixed term up to 10 years. 3. Check Discounting Line (CDL): For working capital requirements wherein the bank liquefies one’s post-dated checks and makes available funds for use. This is a one-year facility where one can draw as high as 80% of his/her duly endorsed customer’s checks. 4. Domestic Bills Purchase Line: This facility immediately replenishes the day-to-day working capital requirements via purchase of dated checks without waiting for clearing time. 5. Back-to-Back Loan: This facility eases the business cash flow requirements without mortgaging the real estate property and other fixed assets. One can get instant cash while keeping the existing PDB time or term deposit placements. 6. Standby Domestic Letter of Credit (SDLC): A one-year credit line that guarantees the performance and completion of a specific business undertaking. 7. Program Loans: This facility enables one to avail of longer terms up to 15 to 20 years, stable interest, rate fixing options and higher loan amount. These loans are co-administered by the following agencies and their respective program loan facilities:

Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP)  Industrial Guarantee and Loan Fund (IGLF)  Industrial and Support Services Expansion Program (ISSEP) Landbank of the Philippines (LBP)  Countryside Loan Fund (CLF)  Agricultural Loan Fund (ALF) Social Security System (SSS)  Special Financing Program (SFP)  Financing Program for Educational Institutions  Financing Program for Tourism Projects  Hospital Financing Program  Special Financing Program for Vocational and Technical Schools Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP)  Rediscounting Credit Facility Small Business Guarantee and Finance Corporation  Funding for Investments in Regional Markets (SME-FIRM)  Funding Access for Short-Term Loans (SME-FAST)  Guarantee for Enterprises in Manufacturing and Services (SME-GEMS)  Guarantee Resources for Agri-business Investment (SME-GRAIN) Basic Requirements - Business has been profitably in existence for at least three (3) years - Managed by experienced competent team - Engaged in moral, legal and legitimate business 8. Small Biz Loan: A multi-purpose credit facility to help Small Entrepreneurs take the tension out of business expansion. General Requirements - Photocopy of 2 valid ID’s with signature (i.e. passport, driver’s license, company ID) - Bank Statements for the last 3 months - Copy of Title (TCT or CCT) - Updated Tax Declaration and Real Estate Tax Receipts - Master deed of Restrictions (for condominiums) Additional Requirements For those employed - Photocopy of latest Income Tax Return or W-2 Form / BIR Form 2316 - Latest one-month payslip or certificate of employment and compensation - For business owners/self employed - Latest audited financial statement of business with ITR duly stamped by BIR - Photocopy of DTI registration/Mayor’s permit of the business or photocopy of SEC Articles of Incorporation and by-laws

CONTACT DETAILS Consuelo V. Dantes Human Resources Department & Support Services Group Plantersbank Building, 314 Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-6955; 884-7650; 884-7600 loc. 7650 Fax: (02) 840-4123 Email: [email protected]

QUEDAN AND RURAL CREDIT GUARANTEE CORPORATION (QUEDANCOR) Agriculture plays a pivotal role in the country’s growth and development. The plethora of rural financial policy reforms and programs were designed to make the financial sector more market friendly and responsive to the credit needs of the agriculture sector. The premise is that access to adequate and timely credit is an essential ingredient to agricultural development. Reconstitution of QGFB to QUEDANCOR In 1992, Republic Act 7393 was issued reconstituting the QGFB into the Quedan and Rural Credit Guarantee Corporation (QUEDANCOR) with enlarged powers and resources. Since then, new financing programs were hatched, complemented with the necessary funding requirements and institutional arrangements with government and private agencies. The Office of the Government Corporate Counsel (OGCC) Opinion No. 083 dated 16 May 2001, empowered the Corporation to continue to engage in its lending and guarantee operations notwithstanding the issuance of EO No. 138, which prohibited the participation of governmentowned and controlled corporations in the implementation of government credit programs. This affirmation further motivated the Corporation to intensify its lending activities nationwide. In its 30 years of existence, QUEDANCOR has managed to evolve a collaborative working relationship with the country’s banking sector, government institutions, integrators, cooperators and non-government organizations (NGOs). Vision Greater access to credit and guarantee by agricultural stakeholders towards increased productivity and improved quality of life.

Mission Provide better and accessible guarantee system and convenient credit support mechanism. Mandate To accelerate the flow of investments and credit into the countryside to trigger growth and development, rural productivity and employment Strategic Direction The main thrust of the Corporation starting 2009 is to pursue two business tracks, namely: grow out of guarantee business and collection of old trade receivables and optimization of income from acquired assets. The goal is to generate the needed cash flow to pay the obligations and attain long term financial viability. For the first track, the Corporation will revert to guarantee operations and implement repackaged guarantee programs allowed under its charter particularly, the Agricultural Credit Guarantee for Rural Productivity for Production Inputs and Labor, Facilities, Machinery and Equipment (AGRICORP - PILFAME), Agricultural Credit Guarantee for Rural Productivity - Guaranteed Co-Financing Program for Agri-fishery Projects (AGRICORP - AFP) and Agricultural Credit Guarantee - Rural Productivity for Agrifishery Inventory Management (AGRICORP-AIM). CONTACT DETAILS

The PRESIDENT and CEO QUEDANCOR Center 34 Panay Avenue, Quezon City Tel: (02) 373-9706 Fax: (02) 373-9482

QUEDANCOR GUARANTEE PROGRAMS

1. Agricultural Credit Guarantee for Rural Productivity for Production Inputs and Labor, Facilities, Machinery and Equipment (AGRICORP - PILFAME) Loan Purpose Provide guarantee cover for loans of eligible borrowers engaged or will engage in viable agrifishery related activities/projects. Eligible Borrowers            

Farmers Fisherfolk Rural Workers Food Retailers Wholesalers Sole Proprietors Partnerships Corporations Agri-Business Enterprises Rural Cooperatives Federations and other similar organizations

Eligible Projects 

Projects for production inputs and labor by duly registered and viable rural cooperatives;



Projects involving acquisition/fabrication and upgrading/ repair of agri-fishery machinery/ implement and equipment, construction/ acquisition/ upgrading of agrifishery facilities (i.e. production and post harvest facilities, etc.) or structure and the like; and



For AFMA funded - Marketing/ trading/ distribution/ retailing/ wholesaling, packaging, processing or manufacturing of agri-fishery commodities such as grains, fisheries, livestock and poultry, high value commercial crops and its by-products.

Loanable Amount 

Shall be at the discretion of the Lending Entity (LE)



For coop wholesalers, the loanable amount shall be based on the submitted credit portfolio or list of beneficiaries with their corresponding agri-fishery projects

Interest Rate and Other Bank Charges

Interest rate and other bank charges shall be at the discretion of the LE. Guarantee Fee 3% p.a. of the guaranteed amount/outstanding principal which shall be paid by the LE to QUEDANCOR upon filing of Request for Guarantee Coverage. Term of Loan and Mode of Payment 

Term of the loan shall be based on the type of loan or project.



Monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or other mode of payment which may be deemed appropriate depending on the type of loan, commodity and/or cash flow of the project as recommended/approved by the LE and/or concurred by the authorized signatories of QUEDANCOR.

Loan Security Real Estate Mortgage (REM), Trust Receipt/Continuing Deed of Assignment of Stocks-InTrade with Trust Receipt, Deed of Assignment of Bonds/Risk-Free Assets such as Cash, Time Deposits, Government Securities, Investments and the like, Deed of Assignment of Acceptable Shares of Stocks in Government and Private Corporations, and/or Chattel Mortgage of machinery/equipment/facility subject of loan or directly related to the project. Evaluation and Approval Lending Entity:   

Conducts credit evaluation, BI/CI and collateral appraisal. Approves loan and endorses to QUEDANCOR for its own evaluation Releases loan upon receipt of endorsement by QUEDANCOR and receipt of approved Preparatory Clearance for Guarantee Coverage (PCGC).

QUEDANCOR:  

Conducts credit evaluation, BI/CI and collateral appraisal. Approves loan in accordance with the Specifications of Authority and endorses to LE for the request of approval of PCGC and release of loan.

2. Agricultural Credit Guarantee for Rural Productivity - Guaranteed Co-Financing Program for Agri-Fishery Projects (AGRICORP - AFP) Loan Purpose Provide credit and guarantee cover for the various agri-fishery and livelihood projects of eligible borrowers through a co-financing or guaranteed co-financing arrangement with the accredited LE. Eligible Borrowers              

Farmers, Fisherfolk, ARBs, Rural/urban workers, Retailers, Wholesalers, Sole proprietorships, Rural cooperatives, ABEs, NGOs/POs, Federation of cooperatives, Partnerships, Corporations, and Other similar organizations engaged or will engage in viable and highly profitable agrifishery and livelihood projects.

Eligible Projects 

Marketing/trading/distribution/retailing/wholesaling/packaging/processing/manufacturing of agri-fishery commodities, such as grains, fisheries, livestock and poultry and high value commercial crops and its by-products; and



Acquisition/fabrication and upgrading/repair of machinery and equipment, construction/acquisition/upgrading/repair of agri-fishery structures/facilities such as production and post production facilities/implements and other related activities.

Loanable Amount 

For Retailing/ Wholesaling. Initial loan amount shall be up to PhP25,000.00 for noncollateralized loans. The borrower may be allowed to avail of a higher loan amount at least after two (2) availments with good repayment record subject to the same security requirements



For Production Loan. The project cost of various agri-fishery commodities may be used as basis in determining the loanable amount depending on the commodity/crops to be planted,

and the financial capacity of the borrower as determined by LE and QUEDANCOR. However, the maximum loanable amount shall be the production costs for five (5) hectares. 

For other Agri-fishery related Business Activities/Projects. Depending on the borrower’s project cost, cash flow and/or capacity to pay/financial condition as determined by the LE and QUEDANCOR.

Interest Rate and Service Fee (SF) 

2% per month which shall be amortized within the term of the loan. Interest rate shall be computed using the straight-line or annuity factor method depending on the term and amount of loan;



Service fee shall be 3% per annum of the loan amount which shall be deducted from the loan proceeds. Succeeding SF based on the outstanding principal shall be collected every anniversary date of release of the loan.

Guarantee Fee 1.5% percent per annum based on the LE’s share on the outstanding principal to be paid within 3 days after release of the loan. Term of Loan and Mode of Payment 

Term of the loan shall be based on the type of loan or project.



Based on the cash flow or financial projections, the loan shall be payable weekly, monthly, quarterly or depending on the project or as determined by the LE and QUEDANCOR.

Loan Security 

For Loans up to P100,000.00 Deed of Assignment of Bonds/Risk Free Assets such as Cash/Time Deposits, Government Securities, Investments and the like; and Continuing Deed of Stocks-In-Trade with Trust Receipt (for food/market Retailers); and/ or Co-Maker/s.



For Loans above P100,000.00 REM, Trust Receipt/Continuing Deed of Assignment of Stocks-In-Trade with Trust Receipt, Deed of Assignment of Bonds/Risk-Free Assets such as Cash, Time Deposits, Government Securities, Investments and the like, Deed of Assignment of Acceptable Shares of Stocks in Government and Private Corporations, and/or Chattel Mortgage.

Evaluation and Approval

QUEDANCOR 

Upon receipt of loan application from the LE/borrower, the QOO-AMG shall verify completeness of the loan documents. If complete and in order, the documents are forwarded to QOO-CAG designated officer for the conduct of BI/CI, credit evaluation and appraisal of collateral. The QOO-AMG shall prepare the corresponding reports.



Processing of the loan/guarantee shall pass through the regular loaning procedures at the FO and CO as the case may be depending on the amount of loan. Upon approval of the loan/ guarantee, the QOO-AMG forwards the loan documents to the partner LE for their own evaluation, review and final approval.

Lending Entity 

The LE shall have the option to conduct its own evaluation/BI/CI/appraisal prior to approval of the loan by its authorized officers.

3. Agricultural Credit Guarantee - Rural Productivity For Agri-Fishery Inventory Management (AGRICORP-AIM) Loan Purpose To provide financing/additional working capital to farmers, fisherfolk, cooperatives, processors/millers and wholesalers to actively procure, process, mill and distribute agri-fishery commodities/stocks stored in a bonded warehouse or facility/structure. Eligible Borrowers         

Grains Businessmen, Farmers, Fisherfolk, Sole Proprietorship, Partnership, Corporations, Cooperatives, ABES, and Farmers Organizations

Eligible Commodity 

Grains (palay, corn grains, rice and corngrits)



Allied Products (with and without Regulation by Government Commodity Agencies)

Loanable Amount It shall be equivalent to 85% of the government support price/ reference price set by QUEDANCOR for the agri-fishery commodities/ stocks stored in a franchised warehouse/ facility or structure. Eligibility Requirements Must be a depositor of agri-fishery commodity stocks in a franchised warehouse Lending Entity (LE) Universal/Commercial/Savings/Thrift Banks and Rural Cooperative Banks Interest Rate At the discretion of the LE Guarantee Fee

3% per annum shall be paid by the LE to QUEDANCOR upon filing of the RGC. It shall be computed as follows: amount of loan x 85% x 3% x no. of days/360. The said fee shall not be subject to refund or rebate. Guarantee Coverage Up to 85% of the existence of the stocks. The guarantee cover shall be in favor of the originating LE, which directly extends the loan to an eligible client. In case the PN is rediscounted, the guarantee cover may be passed on to a secondary LE. Evaluation and Approval QUEDANCOR Issuance of Certificate of Quedan Franchise (CQF)   

Conducts credit and evaluation, BI/CI, inspection of facility/warehouse and appraisal of Property for bond compliance; Approves allowable franchise capacity upon receipt of Bond and Insurance documents; Issues Certificate of Quedan Franchise (CQF) and Quedan Receipts.

Lending Entity Approval of Credit Line 

Conducts credit and evaluation, BI/CI, inspection of facility/warehouse and appraisal of Property for bond compliance;



Approves credit line and releases loan.

SMALL BUSINESS GUARANTEE AND FINANCE CORPORATION (SMBGFC) The Small Business Guarantee and Finance Corporation (SBGFC) otherwise known as SB Corp. was created by Republic Act 6977, as amended by RA 8289 and RA 9501. SB Corp is charged with the primary responsibility of implementing comprehensive policies and programs to assist MSMEs in all areas, including but not limited to finance and information services training and marketing. SB Corp. is administratively attached to the Department of Trade and Industry and in under the policy and program supervision of the MSMED Council. Mission Develop and provide financial services and capacity building support programs in a progressive and sustainable manner to empower mSMEs as ciable businesses. Vision The champion for a globally competitive and viable MSME sector. Credit Delivery Strategy Small Business Corporation extends credit assistance to micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSME) through its Credit Delivery Strategy. This Strategy is anchored on our belief that the MSME sector, as the backbone of the Philippine economy, needs to be placed in a sort of “incubator” where their particular financing needs are addressed through credit interventions customized to their growth potentials. SBC envisions that its “micro-sized” borrower will soon grow into a small-sized business enterprise and eventually into a medium-sized enterprise ready to access the formal financing sector and compete in the global market. Under this Strategy, we operate four financing programs. A. Wholesale Microfinance Program. SBC conduit funds to our partner rural banks, microfinance institutions, and cooperatives, who in turn, re-lend the funds to eligible “preenterprises”. The pre-enterprises we assist include the graduating and start-up micros. Graduating micros refer to those unregistered yet existing enterprise that are willing to register as an enterprise, have a livelihood track record as well as credit track record with a micro-finance institution, and with tangible assets. Start up micros are starting enterprises that do not meet these qualifications yet. Our microfinance facilities aim to bring credit financing to enterprises at the grassroots and transform them into growing and full-blown, formal enterprises. B. Direct Lending to Registered micro, small and medium enterprises (MSMEs). The program is intended to bridge the financing gap of what we refer to as the “pre-bankable but viable” MSMEs that are at the moment “unserved” by the banking system. Through this program, we hope to provide a conducive environment for MSMEs by financing their business needs, training them to get credit track record and experience, and building up business size necessary to access bank financing in the future.

C. Credit Guarantee Program, which provides an entry point for small and medium enterprises (SME) to the banking system. The program targets what we call “near bankable SMEs” who can access the banks but cannot provide sufficient collateral for their loan. The credit guarantee answers this need by serving as alternative or supplemental collateral for the SME loan. Our credit guarantee facilities can be tapped by SMEs through our partner financial institutions. D. Finally, our fourth financing program is the wholesale lending for SMEs. Wholesale funds are conduited to our partner banks and institutions for re-lending to “already bankable” SMEs. Wholesale lending facilities can be accessed by SMEs by applying for SME loans through our partner banks and institutions. CONTACT DETAILS Services Wholesale Lending* and MSME Structure Finance

Area Coverage / Contact Person North Luzon Ms. Cynthia B. Area Office Tarroja South Luzon Area Office Visayas Area Office Mindanao Area Office

Credit Guarantees Nationwide Venture Investments Nationwide *includes Graduating Micros and Microfinance lending

Mr. Daniel M. Gonzales Mr. Cesar B. Antoni Ms. Dida M. Delute Mr. Hector M. Olmedillo Mr. Charles G. Belgica

Telephone

Email

(074) 424-7647

[email protected]

(02) 751-1888

[email protected]

(032) 232-1200 (082) 221-1488

[email protected]

(02) 751-1888

[email protected]

(02) 751-1888

[email protected]

CANADA Canada’s assistance to the Philippines began in earnest in 1986 following the People Power Revolution, which brought down the government of Ferdinand Marcos, and the subsequent election of Corazon Aquino as President. A commitment to substantially increase Canadian assistance was made in order to support the new government’s reform efforts and the restoration of democracy. The Canadian International Development Agency’s (CIDA) bilateral program has evolved over the years, from focusing on the democratic process immediately following the People Power Revolution, to more broadly supporting responsible governance and private sector development. Canada is currently contributing to poverty reduction in the Philippines through equitable, sustainable development. The objectives of CIDA’s strategy in the Philippines are to: foster efficient, responsive, transparent and accountable governance at all levels; and support the development of sustainable small and medium-sized enterprises that create more, better, and decent jobs for both men and women. This strategy is closely aligned with the Government of the Philippines’ Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan (2004–2010). Results 

Technical assistance to local governments has helped improve the delivery of services to the poor. In addition, greater participation by local communities in setting development plans in areas such as investment, taxation, and social services has increased local government accountability and responsiveness to the needs of the poor.



CIDA’s assistance has also helped the Government of the Philippines address corruption at the national level through projects that have increased transparency and efficiency in areas that include government procurement and tax collection.



Support given to small and medium-sized enterprises by providing business advice and market information and the strengthening of business-service organizations has helped create many business opportunities and jobs in the Philippines.



CIDA has helped women increase their participation in decision-making, exercise their rights, and reduce inequalities in their access to, and control over, resources. Support to the National Commission on the Role of Filipino Women has helped make this institution a regional model of national women’s machinery to promote gender equality.

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Laurenne Garneau Counsellor (Development) and Head of Cooperation Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 857-9004; 857-9133 Fax: (02) 843-1083; 857-9175 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: ASSISTANCE TO SMALL AND MEDIUM ENTERPRISES Maximum CIDA Contribution: C$ 5,000,000 Executing Agency: International Finance Corporation Status: Operational Project Duration: 2006 – 2011 Sector: Education/training in banking and financial services: 40% Business support services and institutions: 35% Small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) development: 25% Project Description: The project aims to assist the growth of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the Philippines through enhancement of the business environment for SMEs. The project has three components: 1) Improving access to finance by SMEs through targeted training of selected financial institutions; 2) Improving the business enabling environment through business regulation reforms in partner cities; and 3) Developing viable supply chains in agribusiness. The project also ensures gender equality and environmental sustainability in all its components. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. William Beloe Country Coordinator, PEP-Philippines

Ms. Narcisa Rivera Senior Program Officer

International Finance Corporation 11/F, Tower One, Ayala Triangle Ayala Avenue, Makati City

Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 857-9122 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Tel: (02) 848-7333 Fax: (02) 848-7339 Email: [email protected] Website: www.ifc.org

Project: CANADA FUND FOR LOCAL INITIATIVES Maximum CIDA Contribution: C$370,000 Executing Agency: Canadian Embassy Status: Operational Start - End: Annual Project Description: The Canada Fund for Local Initiatives is a Mission administered CIDA program that has been active in the Philippines since 1972. It provides direct funding assistance to community groups for small projects addressing technical, economic, educational, cultural, and/or social development issues. It complements CIDA’s bilateral and multilateral activities especially in sustainable development and poverty reduction. The general objective of all Canada Funds is to enhance the economic, cultural and social lives of the people of the eligible developing countries. Canada Fund seeks to assist communitybased organizations and NGOs in their efforts to develop self-reliance and sustainability, gain access and control of limited resources and assets, and contribute to ongoing, long-term and integrated community development programs. In line with the thrusts of CIDA, Canada Fund carries the following program priorities:  Basic Human Needs;  Women in Development (Gender Equality);  Human Rights, Democracy, and Good Governance;  Private Sector Development; and  Environment Canada Fund stresses the Social Development Priorities of health and nutrition, basic education, HIV/ AIDS, and child protection. Gender and environment remain as its cross-cutting themes. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Amina Lim Coordinator

Ms. Myrna Jarillas Senior Program Officer

Canadian International Development Agency 9th Floor, Salcedo Towers 169 H. V. dela Costa Street, Salcedo Village, (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 Makati City 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 813-8255 Tel: (02) 857-9137 Fax: (02) 892-8913 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] Email: [email protected] www.pcco.org.ph CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

Project: PROMOTING RURAL INDUSTRIES AND MARKET ENHANCEMENT (PRIME) Maximum CIDA Contribution: C$ 4,950,000 Executing Agency: Philippine Development Assistance Program Status: Operational Start - End: 2005 – 2009 Sector:  Business support services and institutions: 40%  Environmental policy and administrative management: 20%  Rural development: 30%  Non-agricultural alternative development: 10% Project Description: The Promoting Rural Industries and Market Enhancement (PRIME) Program will support the establishment of 50 microenterprises and strengthen three commodity-specific industries. The project will also help institutionalize PDAP so it can continue to assist rural micro-enterprises and industries after CIDA support. The project has four expected outcomes: (1) Microenterprise development. Participating rural poor communities have established viable rural microenterprises aimed at food security, increased household income and job creation; (2) Enhanced participation in the market. Microenterprises with industry potential are scaled up and connected with the market through appropriate market-participation mechanisms; (3) Program and policy analyses in support to rural microenterprises/industries. Industryspecific policy reform initiatives developed and directed towards relevant government agencies (national and local) that regulate and assist rural enterprises/industries; and (4) Strengthened institutional capacity of PDAP: Enhanced PDAP organizational capacity leading towards long-term institutional sustainability. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Jerry Pacturan Executive Director

Ms. Myrna Jarillas Senior Program Officer

78-B Dr. Lazcano St., Barangay Laging Canadian International Development Agency Handa, Quezon City (CIDA) Levels 6-8 RCBC Plaza, Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Telefax: (02) 373-0556; 374-8214 ; 374-8216 Tel: (02) 857-9137 Fax: (02) 843-1083 Email: [email protected] Email: [email protected] www.ifc.org CIDA Email: [email protected] CIDA Website: www.acdi-cida.gc.ca Embassy Website: www.manila.gc.ca

FINLAND Finnish development cooperation to the Philippines started in 1985. Finnish bilateral cooperation in the form of programs and project is directed to their main partner countries – Mozambique, Nicaragua, Tanzania, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Namibia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nepal, the Palestinian Autonomous Territories, Ethiopia and China. Finland also extends support to these countries through humanitarian aid, interest subsidies, support to development cooperation by NGOs, and even use of concessional credit. The Philippines has not been classified as an official “program country” for Finnish ODA. Finland prefers to implement its development cooperation endeavors in the Philippines indirectly, through multilateral international organizations, such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) and United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). Focus of Development Cooperation The Finnish government has made available four types of assistance to the Philippines under the development cooperation program: 5. Concessional Loan Scheme (CSL) is a credit facility that can finance social, environment and health sector projects, i.e., water and sewage disposal and management, water supply management, upgrading of hospitals and forestation projects. The facility can finance 85 to 100% of a project’s financial requirement with 0 percent interest, over a ten-year repayment period. Fully 50% of a contract value must be tied to Finnish goods and services. 6. Grant assistance is provided through co-financing with multilateral organizations and to national government agencies (bilateral projects) 7. Feasibility Study Grant Facility is provided through the Industrial Cooperative Fund can only be tapped by Finnish private/ business firms. The Finnish Government evaluates proposals to finance preparation of feasibility studies (FS) on a case-by-case basis and prefers co-financing by the GOP/ proponent agencies (cost-sharing 50-50) than to shoulder the full cost of the FS. 8. The Small Scale Funding Facility is provided annually to finance short-term projects implemented by NGOs, cooperatives, universities and other CSOs in support of the Indigenous Peoples, person with disabilities, and the academe. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland through the Department for International Development Cooperation is responsible for Finland’s official development assistance including bilateral and multilateral cooperate, development policies and guidelines, and coordination with other departments of the Ministry. Priority areas include projects focused in the following sectors:  Environment and technology development  Strengthening the immunization programme in the Philippines  Institutional strengthening of small and medium-scale enterprises in Mindanao  Reduction of child labour in small-scale mining  Improvement of the level and quality of micro-credit service

In addition to these, Finland supports indigenous people’s organization as well as disabled peoples’ organizations through funds for local co-operation facility. These activities focus particularly on income generation, capacity building and basic services. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer Embassy of Finland 21/F BPI Buendia Center, Sen. Gil Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 891-5011 to 17 Fax: (02) 817-1654 www.webdc.com.ph/finland

FRANCE The focus of French Development cooperation includes the following:         

Climate change & Energy Environment & Biodiversity Natural risk assessment and reduction Agriculture, Aquaculture & Food security Education & Research for development Health Heritage conservation Cultural diversity & Intercultural dialogue Human rights & Governance

The cultural, scientific, technical and audio-visual relations between France and the Philippines was developed within the framework of a Cooperation Agreement signed in 1978, the terms of which are updated on a regular basis. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of France 16/F Pacific Star Bldg., Makati Ave. corner Gil Puyat Ave. 1200 Makati City Tel: (02) 857-6900 Fax: (02) 857-6948 Email: [email protected] www.ambafrance-ph.org Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer

GERMANY The Federal Republic of Germany is committed to work with its partners for peace and the alleviation of poverty throughout the world and it acknowledges the need for concerted efforts to promote sustainable development everywhere. German Development Cooperation provides the following services:   





Analysis of framework conditions and possibilities for effective development cooperation in the host country, including continual critical monitoring of existing projects and programs Informing the Federal Government of the political, economic and social situation in developing countries Presenting the Federal Government's policy, as well as conducting a dialogues on the issue of sustainable development with as many social groups as possible in the host country, ranging from ministers to NGOs Coordinating German development cooperation with other donor countries and institutions, as well as with German implementing organizations such as the German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) and the Reconstruction Loan Corporation (KfW); and Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) Providing advice regarding, and serving as a point of contact for, scholarships within the framework of development cooperation.

Meanwhile, its key areas of development cooperation include the following: 13. Financial Cooperation Since many developing countries lack the financial resources to implement urgently required investments, without which a long-term improvement in the population's living standards would be difficult to achieve, the Federal Republic of Germany makes available funds to developing countries within the framework of German Financial Cooperation. Financing for identified projects occurs through low-interest credits, in order to create the structural prerequisites for sustainable development. The bulk of financial cooperation aid is implemented on behalf of the German Government by the Reconstruction Loan Corporation (KfW), which has it own representatives or offices in particular developing countries. German Embassies assist and cooperate with the KfW in the preparation, implementation and monitoring of projects. 14. Technical Cooperation Projects on the development of the health and primary-school system, food security and environmental protection are urgently required in many developing countries. Foreign knowhow and material available on the international market is barely within the capacities of developing countries. These emerging countries must therefore identify fields for which they can request assistance from industrialized countries. Within the framework of Technical Cooperation, German implementing organizations initiate projects in developing countries on behalf of the German Government in partnership with state institutions or NGOs in the host country. The German contributions are granted to the receiving country free of charge in the

form of inputs of material and equipment, as well as advisory services. Efforts are made to ensure that a disproportionate share of the funds provided is not used for administrative tasks. Technical Cooperation is utilized in conjunction with Financial Cooperation in focal areas in consensus with the partner countries. Intergovernmental arrangements are concluded for individual Technical Cooperation projects. The bulk of official Technical Cooperation is implemented by the GTZ which has its own offices in many developing countries. German Embassies assist the GTZ in identifying, preparing, implementing and monitoring its tasks and coordinate the work of the GTZ with other German and international implementing organizations. 15. Bilateral Development Cooperation The amount of funds that will be made available for development cooperation with individual countries is determined as part of the annual framework planning for financial and technical cooperation, to which the Federal Foreign Office contributes its foreign policy expertise, as well as by the Bundestag Committee on Economic Cooperation and Development (AWZ). On a regular basis, the Federal Government and the partner Government hold intergovernmental negotiations, where individual projects and programs to be promoted are selected. The commitments are then laid down in bilateral agreements or exchanges of notes that are binding under international law. 16. Private Sponsors of Development Cooperation An important task of the Federal Foreign Office, and in particular of the local German Embassies, in cooperation with the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, is to effectively coordinate the large number of development policy measures in a country or a region. Many private institutions are engaged in the field of development policy, ranging from churches to political foundations to NGOs. In addition to the few large sponsors who have considerable experience regarding work in foreign countries, there are many smaller and less experienced groups that are in particular need of advice and support in order to effectively contribute to sustainable development in countries in the South. German embassies act as points of contact in the host country for private sponsors; they also provide consular services to the German employees of private sponsors. Support for private sponsors is mainly provided through funds from the budget of the BMZ. 17. Public Private Partnership Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are projects implemented by the private sector agencies and which are in the interest of the company while at the same time advance development policy. Given their interest in the long-term economic success of their project it is initially these companies - whether from Germany or other European countries - which invest their own capital, staff and expertise into the project. The Federal Government supports these projects if they have a significant development policy component. Private companies with the cooperation of the German Investment and Development Company (DEG), the KfW, the GTZ or the

Foundation for Economic Development and Vocational Training (SEQUA) implement PPP initiatives. 18. Technical Cooperation Microprojects The members of German embassies regularly take note of minor but serious emergencies and can provide assistance as requested. Typical assistance might include the improvement of local health facilities or the sanitation situation (e.g. the construction of wells), the material requirements for primary education (e.g. the construction and maintenance of small school buildings) and improvements in family income (e.g. construction of small market buildings, creation of means of transport, support for trade-firm cooperatives). Within the framework of Technical Cooperation micro-projects, German embassies can immediately grant requests for assistance to be of benefit to development. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Office Address: Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany, 25/F RCBC Plaza Tower 2 6819 Ayala Avenue 1200 Makati City Mailing address: German Embassy Manila P.O. Box 2190, Makati CPO Makati City 1261 Metro Manila, Philippines Tel: (02) 702 3000; 892-1001 Fax: (02) 702 3015; 810-4703 Email: [email protected] www.manila.diplo.de; www.germanembassyphilippines.com Mr. Martin Mueller Director German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ) Manila Office 9/F PDCP Building

DEUTSCHER ENTWICKLUNGSDIENST (DED) – GERMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICE The German Development Service is one of the leading European development services for personnel cooperation. It was founded in 1963: since then more than 15,000 development workers have committed themselves to improve the living conditions of people in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Almost 1,200 development workers are currently working in 47 countries. Their aims are to fight poverty, promote a self-determined, sustainable development, and to preserve natural resources. The German Development Service also offers its services to international clients. DED places development workers at the request of governmental and nongovernmental organisations in its partner countries and on the basis of framework agreements with the respective governments. These development workers are professionally experienced and socially committed specialists who engage mainly in training, advisory capacity and planning tasks. DED Philippines In the Philippines, specifically in Mindanao and Visayas, the cooperation between the DED and local partners focuses on the following programmes:  Forestry and Environmental Management - Poverty reduction and ecological sustainability - Environment -friendly, economically viable and socially acceptable use of forest resources - Increasing income of rural communities - Control on waste management and environmental protection - Improvement of environmental education  Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Improvement of living conditions in coastal communities - Improvement of income generation of marginal small scale fisher folk - Protection and conservation of coastal habitats - Control on the use of marine resources  Sustainable Economic Development - Improvement of competitiveness on global markets - Local and regional economic development - Corporate Social Responsibility - Improvement of job opportunities - Satisfaction of demands for qualified workers  Civil Peace Service - Prevention and mitigation of violence in Mindanao - Facilitation of peace talks between conflict parties - Raising awareness for the root causes and impacts of violence - Strengthening of actors of civil society who advance peaceful coexistence

- Conflict sensitive programming of all DC projects (Do No Harm / PCA) Eligibility Below are the organizations that are eligible to apply:  NGOs and POs  LGUs  Regional Institutions  Industry Associations  Educational Institutions Considerations in requesting for assistance: If you belong to any of the organizations listed above, and  

 

You are based - In Mindanao or Visayas You are active in any of the following fields: - Forestry and Environmental Management - Integrated Coastal Zone Management - Sustainable Economic Development - Civil Peace Service You have a need for a particular expertise which cannot be found in the country You have the means to support the work of the expert CONTACT DETAILS

German Development Service in the Philippines 11/F PDCP Bank Center Building V.A. Rufino cor. L.P. Leviste Sts. Salcedo Village, Makati City Tel: (02) 812-5640 Fax: (02) 894-1486 www.ded.de

GERMAN TECHNICAL COOPERATION (GTZ) Among the entities implementing German development cooperation worldwide is the federally owned international enterprise Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Technische Zusammenarbeit GmbH better known as German Technical Cooperation or GTZ. Through 14,000 staff in 130 countries, GTZ supports complex reform and change processes, often operating under difficult environments (i.e. disaster and conflict areas) to ensure the delivery of sustainable benefits. Since 1971 GTZ has been improving the living conditions of Filipinos, as well. It has equipped them better for the future and brought together political decision-makers, civil society, and other local institutions to tackle problems jointly. In its current priority areas in the Visayas and Mindanao, GTZ supports programs in:           

Climate change adaptation and preservation of biodiversity Environment and rural development Peace building and conflict transformation Promotion and development of SMEs Health sector reforms Water supply and sanitation Solid waste management for LGUs Urban infrastructure planning Good governance through effective decentralization Micro-insurance innovations for social security; and Intra-Asean economic cooperation.

A greener, safer future GTZ helps bring the effects of climate change under control through forward-looking eco-solutions worldwide. Among its programs are to improve energy efficiency in buildings, fight deforestation, and promote renewable energy and sustainable city planning. In behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, GTZ is actively shaping the follow-on agreement to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol that will be adopted by the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen by end-2009. CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Jochem Lange Country Director GTZ Office Manila PDCP Bank Centre 9/Floor, V.A. Rufino cor. L.P. Leviste Sts Makati City Tel: (02) 812-3165 Fax: (02) 753-1441

Email: [email protected]

ISRAEL Israel’s official overseas development cooperation was launched in 1958 with the aim of sharing with the rest of the developing world the know-how and technologies which provided the basis for Israel’s own rapid development. MASHAV, the Hebrew acronym for the Center for International Cooperation, was established as a division of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and is responsible for international cooperation and assistance around the world, through the provision of guidance and training in Israel and abroad. Part of the center’s activity takes place in cooperation with other countries and international institutions, or with their financial assistance. The following activities are supported:  

  

Courses in Israel: international and national courses On-the-spot courses conducted at the request of the recipient country. Training courses concentrate in traditional areas where Israel has acquired experience such as agriculture and related sciences, rural and urban development, education, social and economic development, medicine and public health, environmental and natural resource protection, and advancement of women. Short-term consultancies: a MASHAV expert is sent at the request of GOP to provide rapid, specific advisory services, assistance in program implementation, conduct a survey on a specific topic or back-up for MASHAV experts on long-term projects. Long-term consultancies: MASHAV experts are dispatched at the request of the host country to assist in the design, implementation, management or general assessment of pilot or development projects; International partnerships: forging partnerships with other donor bodies, international organizations and NGOs in order to enhance efficacy of work in the developing world.

Focus of Development Cooperation The priority sectors of cooperation include the following:        

Agriculture Cooperation and labor studies Community development Rural development Medicine and public health Science and technology Education Advancement of women CONTACT DETAILS

The AMBASSADOR Embassy of Israel 23/F Trafalgar Plaza

105 H.V. Dela Costa Street Salcedo Village, Makati City 1227 Tel: (02) 894-0441 to 43 Fax: (02) 894-1027 Email: [email protected] http://manila.mfa.gov.il; http://mashav.mfa.gov.il

JAPAN The Philippines ranks as the third largest recipient of Japan’s ODA totaling US$9.4 billion. Through the decades, Japanese ODA has been contributing to Philippine’s development efforts in many fields, including irrigation, flood control, education, health care, earthquake detection, rural road network construction / improvement, water supply, and livelihood programs. The country receives assistance from Japan in various forms -loans, grants, and technical assistance. Respecting the self-help efforts of every developing country, Japanese ODA in principle, is extended upon the request of the recipient governments. In the case of the Philippines, government agencies and LGUs submit project proposals to NEDA for its evaluation. After the respective approval by NEDA and the ICC, the Philippine government makes an official request for its short-listed priority projects to the Japanese government, which then carefully appraises those projects and approves those that are most necessary and matured. Responsible for ODA policy and programming, the Japanese Embassy coordinates with two Japanese development assistance implementing agencies operating under the Government of Japan, namely the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) (www.jica.go.jp/philippine/index.html), which handles grant-aid and technical assistance and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) (www.jbic.go.jp/english), which handles loans. Source: http://www.ph.emb-japan.go.jp/bilateral/oda/index.htm CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of Japan in the Philippines 2627 Roxas Boulevard, Pasay City 1300 Tel: (02) 551-5710 Email: [email protected] www.ph.emb-japan.go.jp

JAPAN INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AGENCY (JICA) Following the completion of the merger between the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Japan Bank for International Cooperation (JBIC) in October 2008, the New JICA is developed to become the government agency responsible for the implementation of the yen loan, grant aid and technical cooperation aspects of Japan’s Official Development Assistance (ODA). With this, JICA’s programs continue to contribute to the economic and social advancement in developing countries. JICA's Priority Issues: 4. Sustainable Economic Growth Aimed at Creating Employment Opportunities 4.1. 4.2. 4.3. 4.4. 4.5.

Support for Financial Reform/Good Governance Investment Promotion Improvement of Transportation Network Enhancing Power and Energy Sector Tourism

5. Poverty Reduction 5.1. Livelihood Improvement 5.2. Enhancement of Basic and Social Services 5.3. Environment Protection and Disaster Prevention 6. Peace and Stability in Mindanao 6.1. 6.2. 6.3. 6.4.

Administrative Capacity Building Improvement of Basic Human Needs Economic Development Peace Building CONTACT DETAILS

Mr. Norio Matsuda Chief Representative JICA Philippine Office 40/F Tower 1 RCBC Plaza Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 889-7119 Fax: (02) 889-6850 Email: [email protected] www.jica.go.jp

KOREA Korea's development assistance is a rather recent phenomenon dating from the early 1980s, when the Korean government designed a program for sharing development experiences with fellow developing nations based on the spirit of South-South cooperation, self-help, and selfreliance among developing countries. In 1987, the Korean government established the Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) through which concessional loans for development projects are provided to the governments of developing countries. In 1991, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) was established as an arm of Korea's Official Development Assistance (ODA). KOICA was mandated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to execute technical cooperation programs, which were previously executed and administrated under authority of different ministries. ODA is administered through two major channels of development cooperation; bi-lateral and multi-lateral. Bi-lateral aid is divided in two forms: grants and loans. KOICA under policy guidance of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is administrator of grants, and implements two types of grants: 1) grant aid, which includes the Provision of Equipment and Project Aid; 2) Technical Cooperation, which includes Development Studies, the Invitation of Trainees, and the dispatch of Korean Overseas Volunteers and Experts. On the other hand, the bi-lateral soft loans or Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) loans are managed by the Export-Import Bank of Korea under the direction of the Ministry of Strategy and Finance. In terms of multi-lateral aid, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade is responsible for contributions to the United Nations and UN specialized agencies, etc, while the Ministry of Strategy and Finance oversees subscriptions to international development institutions such as the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the African Development Bank (AfDB). Korean assistance to the Philippines began in 1988. Korean bilateral assistance consists mainly of development loans and grants or technical cooperation. Focus of Development Cooperation Korean ODA, particularly grant assistance, focuses on the following strategic areas:     

Promoting human resources development Eradicating poverty and provision of basic human needs Promoting market economy and free trade Building the capacity of policy development and administration of recipients Contributing to addressing global issues as environmental degradation, population and gender

Loan assistance may expand further given Korea’s strong interest to assist priority activities in telecommunications, transport and energy sectors. The Korean Government is currently studying effective and efficient ways of extending its information technology cooperation program to the Philippines.

Programs and Projects 3. Concessional Loans (Economic Development Cooperation Fund) The Economic Development Cooperation Fund (EDCF) loan was established in 1987 under the management of Korea’s Ministry of Finance. Export-Import Bank (Eximbank) was officially introduced to the Philippines in 1988. The EDCF loan menu is provided on a per loan basis at 0.1 to 0.5 percent interest per annum, forty (40) years maturity inclusive of ten years grace period, 0.1 percent service charge of the amount of Letter of Commitment and generally tied procurement conditions.

4. Grants (Korea International Cooperation Agency) The Korean International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) administers Korean ODA grants and technical assistance programs. Project Aid provides for the construction of facilities (e.g., Korea-Philippines Friendship Medical Center). Development Studies are pre-investment studies in the areas of infrastructure (particularly irrigation, water supply and sewerage), agriculture, natural resources and urban development. Other Korean technical assistance includes Technical Training, Dispatch of Experts, Dispatch of Korean Overseas Volunteers, and Dispatch of Medical Doctors. Other Ongoing Korean-assisted projects include:

7. Luzon Transmission and Substation Expansion Project (US$ 14 M) 8. Laguidingan Airport Development Project (US$ 25 M) 9. Korea-Philippines Friendship Medical Center (US$ 3.8 M) CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR 10th Floor, The Pacific Star Building Sen. Gil Puyat corner Makati Avenue Makati City RP Tel: (02) 811-6139 to 46 Fax: (02) 811-8258 to 59 www.mofat.go.kr/mission/emb/embassy_en.mof? continent=AS&si_dcode=PH-PH&section=A; www.korea.net

KUWAIT Kuwait Fund has been in existence for 48 years now. The object of the Fund is to assist Arab and other developing countries in developing their economies by extending loans and providing guarantees; making grants by way of technical assistance and providing other types of technical assistance, and contributing to capital stocks of international and regional development finance institutions and other development institutions and representing the State of Kuwait in such institutions. The Fund's operations are focused primarily on the sectors of agriculture and irrigation, transport and communications, energy, industry, water and sewage in 101 countries worldwide. Eligible Entities The Fund may extend its assistance to different types of entities which include:   

Central and provincial governments, public utilities and other public corporations. Development institutions, whether international, regional or national and, in particular, development finance institutions. Corporate entities that undertake projects which are jointly owned by a number of developing countries as well as mixed or private enterprises that enjoy corporate personality, and are of a developmental nature and not merely oriented towards making of profit. Such enterprises must be either under the control of one or more developing country or have the nationality of any such country.

(Where the Borrower is an entity other than the state in the beneficiary country, the Fund usually requires that the state in such country enters into an agreement with the Fund whereby it guarantees the performance of the borrower's obligations under the respective loan agreement.) Forms of Assistance:   

 

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Direct loans or the provision of guarantees. Joint or parallel financing with other international, regional or national development finance institutions. Making of grants-in-aid to finance technical, economic and financial studies whether in relation to projects financed by the Fund or otherwise. Such studies may be of such types as pre-investment surveys, studies for the identification of Investment opportunities and projects, feasibility studies, project preparation, sectoral studies and the like. Advisory services in relation to technical, financial, economic and legal aspects of projects or programmes or development policies, or in relation to institution building in the field of development. Subscription to the capital or contribution to the resources of development finance institutions. Subscription to the capital of eligible developmental enterprises.

(The Fund does not provide financial assistance for budgetary or balance of payment support.)

The Philippines has been extended thus far a cumulative 45 Million dollars loan. Source: http://www.kuwaitfund.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=145&Itemid=134 CONTACT DETAILS Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development Mirqab Mubarak Al-Kabeer St. Kuwait City P.O. Box 2921 Safat 13030 Kuwait State of Kuwait Tel: (+965) 22999000 www.kuwait-fund.org

NETHERLANDS After the Second World War, development cooperation between the Philippines and the Netherlands at first took the form of mainly private assistance through non-governmental organisations. Based upon a long experience of educational work, Dutch missionaries initiated projects in the media, economic and health fields as well. Dutch ‘co-financing organisations’ which are partially funded by the government (such as Cordaid, ICCO and NOVIB), later created linkages with counterpart organisations in the Philippines. At first, Dutch development assistance was channelled via multilateral organisations like the UN specialised agencies and International Financial Institutions like the World Bank, European Commission and the Asian Development Bank as well as via nongovernmental organisations. The primary focus of the official Netherlands development assistance was on poverty alleviation through rural development. In financial terms the assistance peaked in 1996 with USD 18 million spent on ongoing activities. In 1998 a major reorientation of Dutch development policy took place, where various criteria were reassessed, including per capita annual income. In 1999 the Netherlands government announced that from then on the Philippines would only be eligible for bilateral assistance with regard to the environment sector. In 2004 development cooperation with the Philippines was cancelled altogether when the Dutch Minister for Development Cooperation decided to focus on other countries. The Philippines however still benefits from several Dutch global programs. Under the ORIO and PSI subsidy schemes, Dutch businessmen are provided assistance in their investment projects in the Philippines. Under the NUFFIC program, fellowships in selected post-graduate courses are granted to qualified Filipinos. The Senior Experts Program (PUM) sends retired executives to render expert technical advice on business projects in the country and the Center for Promotion of Imports from Developing Countries (CBI) provides technical training to Filipino business and staff of business support organisations and also sends technical consultants to the Philippines. The Embassy in Manila moreover supports NGOs through the small grants programme and the Human Rights Fund. Apart from these bilateral global programs, Dutch funding finds its way to the Philippines through multilateral channels such as the World Bank, UNICEF and the European Union. Programme Information 7. CBI CBI contributes to the equitable economic development of selected developing countries by providing export marketing and management support to their SME exporters and Business Support Organisations with the purpose of increasing exports to Europe. CBI stimulates and supports economic activities that are sustainable, socially responsible and environmentally sound. This implies compliance with international social standards, more specifically ILO Conventions, and European consumer health, safety and environmental requirements. Requirements are both legislative and market driven. CBI works with clients who subscribe and strive to comply with these standards and requirements.

Procedures: please check www.cbi.eu 8. Nuffic; Netherlands Fellowship Programme The overall aim of the NFP is to help alleviate qualitative and quantitative shortages of skilled manpower and to do so within the framework of sustainable capacity-building directed towards reducing poverty in developing countries. To maximize the fellowships’ impact on capacitybuilding, NFP-funded training must be linked to the institutional development of organizations. A wide range of organizations are eligible – governmental, private and non-governmental. They can include educational institutions, planning agencies, ministries, community-based organizations (CBOs), and private enterprises, for example. Procedures: please check www.nuffic.nl organizations/services/scholarships/nfp

or

http://www.nuffic.nl/international-

9. ORIO ORIO contributes to the development, implementation (construction and/or renovation), operation and maintenance of public infrastructure in developing countries. ORIO wishes to encourage the involvement of international business in the development and realisation of public infrastructure projects in order to utilise the knowledge, skills and developing power of the private sector. Grant applications are submitted by the central government. These applications may be initiated by companies, the so called private initiative. Selection of grant applications is made on the basis of competition. The applications will be assessed according to a number of impact and quality criteria. The available budget is allocated to the applications with the highest ranking. ORIO focuses on a limited number of priority sectors per country. Procedures: please check www.evd.nl/orio 10. PSI The Private Sector Investment programme (PSI) is a subsidy programme of the Dutch government. Its aim is to stimulate sustainable economic growth in developing countries by supporting innovative investment projects in these markets. The developing world offers great possibilities to entrepreneurs with ambition. But investing in emerging markets can be risky and difficult. Commercial financing is often unavailable. Cooperation with a local partner that, apart from capital, brings in knowledge of local business culture, is indispensable. PSI can ease some of the financial risks that an investment in one of these markets entails. If the application meets the criteria, PSI will subsidize 50 or 60 percent of the project budget. Procedures: please check www.evd.nl/psi 11. PUM

Sustainable economic growth in developing countries cannot be achieved if it does not benefit local societies. Industrious small and medium-sized firms play the most significant role in creating new employment. PUM therefore grants preference to local companies. PUM believes that ensuring a sustainable development of the private sector is the best way to fight poverty; there is no ideological basis. Its policy is practical and business-like: helping small and medium-sized businesses stand on their own two feet is more effective than theorising and moralising. PUM only provides help in response to specified requests: it works directly and cost-effectively. This method has proved to be extremely successful and has created a great deal of goodwill. Procedures: please check www.pum.nl 12. Small Embassy Projects and Human Rights Fund The Netherlands Embassy in Manila supports via this programme local organisations that promote good governance and human rights in the Philippines Procedures: Submit proposal to the Netherlands Embassy. Proposal screened by the Embassy. Decision will be made based on the quality of the proposal and available budget. CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 26th floor, Equitable Bank Tower 8751 Paseo de Roxas, Makati City Tel: (02) 786-6622 Email: [email protected] www.netherlandsembassy.ph

SPAIN Focus of Development Cooperation 

Financial cooperation: waste water & solid waste management, air & maritime safety, renewable energy, water supply levels I & II, basic health (mixed credit)



Grants: poverty alleviation (health, water supply, food security), support to peace process, transfer of technology, education and cultural cooperation, presentation of historical heritage



Technical cooperation (grants)



Mixed credit: 50 percent soft loan (1-2.5% interest rate, payable in 30 years inclusive of 10 years grace period) and 50 percent commercial loan (6-8% commercial / credit under the prevailing OECD consensus rate) CONTACT DETAILS

The AMBASSADOR Office Address: Embassy of Spain 27th Floor Equitable Bank Tower, 8751 Paseo de Roxas 1229 Makati City Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1114 Makati Central Post Office 1251 Makati City, Metro Manila Philippines Tel: (02) 817-6676; 817-5131; 817-9997 Fax: (02) 817-4892 Email: [email protected] www.mae.es/

Program: STRENGTHENING THE AGRO-INDUSTRIAL SECTOR OF BICOL AND CARAGA (PHASE 3) Funding Agency: AECID Lead Implementing Agency: Department of Agriculture Program Duration: November, 26 2008 to May 25, 2010 Target Program Location: Bicol and CARAGA General Objective: Reduction in the poverty levels of the farmers in the selected municipalities of the Bicol and Caraga regions. CONTACT DETAILS Gonzalo Serrano Program Manager/ Program Officer for Rural Development 28F Floor Rufino Pacific Tower, Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 848-9906 to 08 Fax: (02) 848-9909 Email: [email protected] www.aecid.es

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA U.S. Agency for International Development/Philippines The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is the principal agency responsible for managing U.S. Government assistance programs in more than 100 developing countries around the world. Under the overall foreign policy direction of the Secretary of State, USAID helps build and sustain democratic, well-governed states that respond to the needs of their people, reduce widespread poverty, and conduct themselves responsibly in the international system. The United States has a long-standing and successful development partnership with the Philippines. Over the past 30 years, U.S. Embassy Manila's USAID Mission has provided more than US$5 billion in total assistance, making the United States the largest grant donor to the Philippines. USAID/Philippines’ current programs support local efforts to promote the development of a more peaceful and prosperous Philippines that can better provide an improved quality of life and future for all Filipinos. Among the focus of development cooperation of USAID in the area of economic development are as follows: 1. ECONOMIC GROWTH The performance of the Philippine economy has improved over the past three years, as reflected by strong growth with low inflation, steady improvement in the government fiscal position, and continuing appreciation of the peso against foreign currencies. In 2007, the Philippine Government estimated GDP growth at 7.3%, the highest in 30 years and above the ASEAN 5 (Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand) average growth of about 6.3%. The growth was due to higher spending on infrastructure, a record external payments surplus, falling interest rates, recovering financial markets, and strong consumption fueled by remittances of overseas Filipino workers. Despite these improvements, the Philippines faces the broad challenges to reducing poverty and achieving domestically-generated and sustainable economic growth. At the broad level, there is much to be done to sustain and expand upon the economic gains. USAID's economic growth activities promote transparent institutions, improve tax collection efficiency and reduce tax leakages, improve trade facilitation and efficient customs administration, and promote economic development of Mindanao through the development of infrastructure, improvement of governance and social services, and expansion of economic opportunities. Areas: 3.1. Economic Reforms

USAID supports economic reform efforts that focus on sustaining good fiscal sector performance and removing barriers to investment and competition. Technical assistance focuses on priority areas such as: reforming policies, regulations, and administrative practices affecting international trade and investment; building the capacity of the public and private sectors to enable them to participate effectively in the international trading systems and negotiations; and strengthening activities that support trade liberalization. USAID is helping promote local and national economic competitiveness, improve business environment, remove barriers to public and private investment, improve tax and customs administration and budget management, reduce cost and policy constraints to trade, support the provision of economic infrastructure, and enhance competition in the provision of energy, port services, and air and maritime transport. USAID is helping provide an enabling environment to foster the adoption of new agricultural technologies, and supporting the expansion of the bank-provided microfinance to the microenterprise and micro-agriculture sectors. 3.2.Peace and Development Conflict in the Philippines is jeopardizing the country's economic and social development. The long-standing conflict in Mindanao has roots in the historical poverty and discrimination experienced by Muslims in the southern Philippines. USAID promotes the economic development of Mindanao through infrastructure projects such as ports, roads, warehouses, community centers, boat landings, solar dyers, water systems, and trading centers; improved governance and social services; expanded economic opportunities; improved agribusiness competitiveness; and expansion of export of targeted commodities, particularly fruits and vegetables. In agriculture, USAID is funding research to promote new technologies that will safeguard the local food supply and increase farmers’ incomes. USAID provides selected communities of former Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) combatants with pre- and post-harvest facilities needed to achieve more profitable farming and fishing, and implements community development activities for selected barangays in the Sulu Archipelago. USAID helps promote more efficient local governance, strengthen mechanisms for conflict resolution, and advance local economic development in Mindanao cities and municipalities. USAID is also supporting the expansion of the bank-provided microfinance to the microenterprise and micro-agriculture sectors. 3.3. Workforce Development USAID improves out-of-school youth (OSY) relevance of education and training in conflict-affected Mindanao under its Education Quality and Access for Learning and Livelihood Skills (EQuALLS) project. OSYs pursue local employment or livelihood opportunities by enrolling in EQuALLS’s workforce development programs. The project also gives post-training assistance to its OSY workforce development program completers in the form of industry immersion and referrals, as well as support in the formation of micro-entrepreneurial guilds.

From July 2006 to July 2011, the project will construct or renovate 400 Community Learning Centers and have 20,000 out-of-school youth participating in workforce development programs either through short-term livelihood skills training, or through technical-vocational certificate courses. EQuALLS is being implemented by a team of local and international organizations with expertise in education and youth development in Mindanao, led by the U.S.-based nonprofit organization Education Development Center. The project works closely with the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority and local government units for its OSY programs and with the public and private sectors for post-training assistance to our workforce development program completers. CONTACT DETAILS Elzadia Washington Acting Mission Director USAID Philippines 8th Floor, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines Tel: (02) 552-9900; 552-9800 Fax: (02) 551-9297; 552-9999 www.philippines.usaid.gov/ Myra Emata-Stokes Chief, Office of Program Resource Management 8/F, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines

USAID in MINDANAO Mindanao and the Sulu archipelago comprise about one-third of the Philippines' territory and one-quarter of the country’s total population of approximately 87 million. It has the highest levels of poverty in the Philippines, partly because of the longstanding conflict between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) and separatist groups within the Muslim population, which numbers over four million. After years of negotiations, one of the two main separatist groups, the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), signed a Peace Agreement with the GRP in 1996. USAID responded immediately with livelihood training, infrastructure development, and other economic incentives to facilitate the reintegration of former MNLF combatants. As economic growth in Mindanao has accelerated in recent years, negotiations between the primary remaining Muslim separatist group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), and the GRP have intensified. USAID is ready to support the consolidation of the peace process by quickly responding to the opportunity provided by such a GRP-MILF agreement. USAID directs 60% of its total assistance towards Mindanao, focusing on the following areas: 6. Peace and Security Helping communities in conflict-affected areas of Mindanao to rebuild a peaceful economy by providing former combatants the production inputs, training, and marketing assistance needed to become small-scale commercial farmers. 7. Economic Growth Promoting economic growth that provides business opportunities for as many individuals as possible by supporting producers associations and chambers of commerce. USAID is developing needed basic infrastructure, such as ports and bridges, and assisting rural banks to profitably provide loans and deposit services to microenterprises. Assisting local governments in Mindanao to effectively manage natural resources, improve urban environmental management, and use renewable energy supplied through public-private partnerships. 8. Democracy and Governance Partnering with local officials to combat corruption by focusing on transparency and accountability in public administration processes at the local level. 9. Health Working with Muslim Religious Leaders and local governments to improve the delivery of family health services, including the prevention of water-borne illnesses and infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS and TB.

10. Education Increasing access to quality education and livelihood skills in areas most affected by conflict and poverty and improving the quality of instruction—particularly in math, science, and English. USAID also provides vocational training opportunities for out-of-school youth. CONTACT DETAILS Elzadia Washington Acting Mission Director USAID Philippines 8th Floor, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines Tel: (02) 552-9900; 552-9800 Fax: (02) 551-9297; 552-9999 philippines.usaid.gov/ Myra Emata-Stokes Chief, Office of Program Resource Management 8/F, PNB Financial Center Pres. Diosdado Macapagal Blvd. 1308 Pasay City, Philippines

MULTI-LATERAL OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (ADB) ADB is a multilateral development bank owned by 67 members, 48 from the region and 19 from other parts of the world. ADB’s main instruments for helping its developing member countries are policy dialogue, loans, equity investments, guarantees, grants, and technical assistance (TA). Uniquely, the Philippines is not only Asian Development Bank’s (ADB’s) founding member and 11th largest shareholder, but also its host country. It is the fifth largest borrower, accounting for about 8% of total sovereign and nonsovereign lending. It is also one of the largest clients for private sector lending and equity investments, and is a supplier, winning bids under ADB loans and technical assistance (TA) projects. In response to assessments that ADB’s large program with the Philippines had yielded less than expected, and taking into account economic uncertainties, the Country Strategy and Program (CSP) for 2005–2007 was framed to make a significant break with past practice. In alignment with Philippine priorities, it had a tight strategic focus on fiscal consolidation, an improved investment climate, and the accelerated attainment of the Millennium Development Goals. There is greater selectivity of projects to be supported. The CSP’s flexibility has served its purpose well, allowing wide tolerance in the ADB–Philippines partnership and ensuring new operations do not run ahead of the political, macroeconomic, and sector supports needed for sustainability and high impact.

ONGOING ADB PROGRAM FOR LGUS 1. Program: Philippine Basic Urban Services Investment Project (PBUSIP) Lead Implementing Agency: Development Bank of the Philippines Program Duration: 2010-2019 Target Program Location: The PBUSIP will provide financing for priority economic and environmental infrastructure projects which support development in the three largest and most dynamic metropolitan regions of the country: (i) the Greater Manila Metropolitan Region. The Greater Manila Metropolitan Region is defined to include Metro Manila/National Capital Region (NCR), Region III (Batangas, Cavite, Laguna, Quezon, and Rizal), and Region IV (Bataan, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Tarlac, and Zambales)., (ii) Metro Cebu, (iii) Metro Davao. The PBUSIP project area will also encompass four LGU clusters in the island groups of Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao Program Description: The goal of the PBUSIP (the Program) The Investment Program is a sequel to Loan 1843PHI: Mindanao Basic Urban Services Sector Project (MBUSSP). is to improve the standard of living, environment and economic opportunities for urban areas. Its expected outcome is increased quality, coverage, and reliability of basic urban services and infrastructure in the participating cities, municipalities and provinces. The Investment Program will give

preference to three metropolitan regions of Manila, Cebu and Davao and four clusters of LGUs in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao which jointly pursue local economic development initiatives. The Program will be financed under a MFF with three tranches over a ten-year disbursement period up to 2019. CONTACT DETAILS Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) Sen. Gil Puyat cor. Makati Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 818-9511

FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION (FAO) The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations leads international efforts to defeat hunger. Serving both developed and developing countries, FAO acts as a neutral forum where all nations meet as equals to negotiate agreements and debate policy. FAO is also a source of knowledge and information. It helps developing countries and countries in transition modernize and improve agriculture, forestry and fisheries practices and ensure good nutrition for all. Since its founding in 1945, FAO have focused special attention on developing rural areas, home to 70 percent of the world's poor and hungry people. FAO is emerging as a “Knowledge Organization” for food and agricultural information, technical knowledge and human resources, and a forum for policy dialogue. Its work in these areas and on provision of global public goods and regulatory standards setting underpins and complements the activities in Member Countries that directly target food insecurity and raise the standards of living of their people. Focus of Development Cooperation FAO uses the expertise of its staff and consultants – agronomists, foresters, fisheries and livestock specialists, nutritionists, social scientists, economists, statisticians and other professionals – to collect, analyze and disseminate data which aid development. FAO provides the technical know-how and in a few cases is a limited source of funds, primarily through its Technical Cooperation Programme (TCP). The TCP is aimed at providing short-term, quick-impact technical support to address welldefined problems that constrain the ability of FAO’s member countries, either individually or collectively, to foster their agricultural and rural development and to reach the targets of the World Food Summit and the Millennium Development Goals. The main features of the TCP are its flexibility in responding to new technical issues, as well as emergencies; the focus of projects on clearly defined outputs and outcomes which can be attained within a short time horizon; its cost-effectiveness; and its catalytic role. By design and in practice, TCP fills critical gaps, complements other forms of assistance and creates conditions for raising additional funds for technical cooperation and investment, whether channeled through FAO or elsewhere. The focus of the programme is on improving household or national food security and rural livelihoods, as well as on reducing poverty. In the Philippines, FAO provides technical assistance and implements projects nationwide in policy formulation and advocacy; forestry and natural resources management; capacity building to increase agricultural productivity and promote sustainable use of resources; training, capacity and institution-building for prevention and control of transboundary animal diseases; mainstreaming disaster risk management and climate change adaptation; and restoration of agribased livelihood in typhoon/conflict-affected areas. CONTACT DETAILS FAO Representative in the Philippines

29th Floor, Yuchengco Tower 1, RCBC Plaza 6819 Ayala Avenue corner Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City 1226 Tel: (02) 901-0351 Fax: (02) 901-0361 Email: [email protected] www.fao.org

INTERNATIONAL FOOD AND DRUG (IFAD) The International Food And Drug (IFAD, a specialized agency of the United Nations, was established as an international financial institution in 1977 as one of the major outcomes of the 1974 World Food Conference. The Conference was organized in response to the food crises of the early 1970s that primarily affected the Sahelian countries of Africa. The conference resolved that “an International Fund for Agricultural Development should be established immediately to finance agricultural development projects primarily for food production in the developing countries”. One of the most important insights emerging from the conference was that the causes of food insecurity and famine were not so much failures in food production, but structural problems relating to poverty and to the fact that the majority of the developing world’s poor populations were concentrated in rural areas. IFAD is dedicated to eradicating rural poverty in developing countries. Seventy-five percent of the world’s poorest people – 1.05 billion women, children and men – live in rural areas and depend on agriculture and related activities for their livelihoods. Working with rural poor people, governments, donors, non-governmental organizations and many other partners, IFAD focuses on country-specific solutions, which can involve increasing rural poor peoples’ access to financial services, markets, technology, land and other natural resources.

IFAD’s Strategy in the Philippines IFAD’s current strategy in the Philippines has evolved from the government’s own strategic initiative – contained in its social reform agenda – from IFAD’s own strategic framework and key strategies for Asia and the Pacific region, and from lessons learned from past operations in the country. Past experiences have sharpened the focus of IFAD’s activities to concentrate on the least-favoured marginal upland and coastal areas, home to many of the country’s poorest people. Target groups include the indigenous peoples and people who benefited from agrarian reform in the uplands, coastal fishers, landless people and women, in general, who are among the poorest of the poor. IFAD works with the government and other partners to help reduce poverty in some of the poorest areas in the country: Bicol, Panay Island, Samar and Leyte, Northern Mindanao and Caraga. IFAD loans support:     

Decentralization, by strengthening capacities of local institutions Enterprise and market development Private sector involvement in operations Improved management of natural resources and the environment Access to assets, technologies and markets

Poor people’s access to the financial services that they need to improve their incomes is a crucial factor in breaking the poverty cycle. In the Philippines, IFAD supports institutions that

adopt the Grameen banking approach, providing microcredit in the form of small, every tiny, loans to borrowers who have little to no collateral. Programmes and projects financed by IFAD promote innovative approaches to some of the issues that perpetuate rural poverty. Key innovative features of IFAD operations in the Philippines focus on securing access to land in ancestral domains for indigenous peoples, on putting in place land use planning, and on helping indigenous peoples achieve better management of natural resources.

On-Going Operations 4. Second Cordillera Highland Agricultural Resource Management Project The project builds on the first Cordillera Highland Agricultural Resource Management Project, which has contributed to reducing poverty among indigenous peoples in the highlands of Cordillera Region in the northern Philippines. The second project concentrates on areas where poverty is most severe in all six provinces of the region: Abra, Apayao, Benguet, Ifugao, Kalinga and Mountain province. The aim is to reduce poverty and improve the livelihoods of indigenous peoples living in farming communities in the mountainous project area. The indigenous peoples consist of many tribes, whose main economic activity is agriculture. More than half of the people in the area are poor. 5. Rapid Food Production Enhancement Programme The programme will support the government’s 2009-2013 Rice Self-Sufficiency Plan, a nationwide effort to regain self-sufficiency in rice production and to respond to the rising food price crisis that emerged in 2008. IFAD’s investment will provide support for securing good quality seed to boost rice production and for rehabilitating and developing irrigation works. The programme includes two subprogrammes that are separate but mutually dependent:  

The Rapid Seed Supply Financing Project (RaSSFiP), to be implemented in 2009 The Irrigated Rice Production Enhancement Project (IRPEP), to be implemented from 2010 to 2015

The programme targets poor paddy farmers and poor irrigators’ associations in various ricegrowing areas, with the objective of achieving an increase in paddy production. 6. Rural Microenterpise Promotion Programme Building on the experiences of the IFAD-funded Rural Microenterprise Finance Project, the programme targets the poorest 19 provinces in five of the poorest regions in the country, focusing on areas with the highest potential for enterprise development. The aim is to raise the

incomes and improve the livelihoods of rural poor people by providing them with loans and other financial services and with business development services such as capacity-building, market linkages and product development. It will work with poor microentrepreneurs and other poor people involved in microenterprises, including women, young people and indigenous peoples. Although the programme will focus on formation and expansion of microenterprise at the lower and poorer end of the scale of assets, it will also include larger microenterprises, which are an important source of employment. The programme’s objective is to see increasing numbers of new and existing rural microenterprises expanding and operating profitably and sustainably. Investments will support microfinance and credit, microenterprise promotion and development, and programme and policy coordination. Programme operations will adhere to sound financial principles and resources will be concentrated in a limited area to avoid diluting their impact. Rural poor people will have a voice in programme planning and in adjustments that are required during implementation. Activities will pinpoint policy issues and opportunities.

Completed Operations 3. Northern Mindanao Community Initiatives and Resource Management Project Loan number(s) : I – 577 –PH 4. Western Mindanao Community Initiatives Project Loan number(s): I – 474 – PH CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Thomas Elhaut Director, Asia and Pacific Division Mr. Sana F.K. Jatta Country Programme Manager Via Paolo di Dono, 44 Rome, Italy

ALTERNATIVE PLANNING INITIATIVES, INC. (ALTERPLAN) ALTERPLAN is a non-stock, non-profit NGO that undertakes projects, programs and policy research, and generally provides services to its partners. The work the institution undertakes concerns space and the built environment as integral components or focal points for community development. As a technical service organization, Alterplan works in partnership with community-based organizations and other non-government organizations in building their capacities to analyze, implement, plan and steer area-based development. ALTERPLAN was incorporated in 1990 by a group of women-architects/planners whose vision was a just and democratic Philippines with a total environment that is nurturing of its citizens. The group realized in the course of its work with people’s organizations and NGOs in different regions that the role of architects and planners was not so much to design and build structures, but to ensure that the conditions in both the natural and the built environment were supportive of people’s aspirations. ALTERPLAN promotes a planning attitude that recognizes the ability and the right of people to plan and pursue their own destiny, within a society that allocates its resources fairly among its people. It provides services within a framework of integrated socio-physical area development planning. ALTERPLAN has immersed itself in working with communities, mostly urban poor, in examining and planning for resettlement and on-site development areas and in using planning tools to attain land tenure. Working with other NGOs involved in community organizing, ALTERPLAN has touched base with communities in urban areas within and outside Metro Manila. ALTERPLAN also works with local governments in efforts to institutionalize consultative processes in urban planning. ALTERPLAN has established gender and environment as core mandates within its vision. ALTERPLAN is a capacity-building organization whereby technical assistance based on the needs and requests of its partners is provided. With its network of consultants, it is able to access expertise for poor communities after determining with them their needs and plans of action. Programs and Services ALTERPLAN realizes the multi-disciplinary character of community development and so seeks to expand the perspective of the communities it assists to open up to each aspect of development: from the financial, technical, organizational, to the environmental and socioeconomic. This, the institution tries to do without overwhelming the community and losing sight of their internal capabilities and aspirations. The following are the services that ALTERPLAN offers:

 Design and implementation of training workshops and seminars. A number of urban poor communities, cooperatives, and other NGO’s have benefited from specialized modules that it has designed for their specific needs in community planning and cooperative housing.  Research, including policy research, related to its areas of concern. Among the studies that have been conducted are those on gender, medium-rise buildings as housing solutions, housing finance, solid waste management and cooperative housing development in the Philippines.  Library of resource materials that can be accessed by interested individuals or groups. CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Sarah Redoblado Executive Director Rm. 307, Bencom Bldg., 146 West Ave., Quezon City Tel: (02) 448-7287 Email: [email protected], [email protected] www.alterplan.org.ph

The ANDRES SORIANO FOUNDATION, INC. The Andres Soriano Foundation is a non-stock, non-profit foundation established by A Soriano Corporation (Anscor) in 1968 to contribute to national development through the practice and promotion of corporate social responsibility. Forging partnerships between the business sector – starting with Anscor and its affiliates and subsidiaries – and its various stakeholders, the Foundation implements integrated area development programs for beneficiary communities in the small islands of north-east Palawan. It also has grant program for NGOs and other institutions which have programs on fighting against cancer. Flagship Programs A. Small Islands Sustainable Development Program (SISDEP) Four key result areas: 5. Effective agenda-based governance aims to develop leadership capacities to manage community resources on a sustained basis, in alliance with the local government to ensure a favorable policy environment. 6. Resource management helps people’s organizations institutionalize efforts that protect and rehabilitate critical marine and territorial areas while respecting the need for socio-economic growth. 7. Economic mainstreaming harnesses sustainable on-shore livelihood opportunities that ease the pressure on marine resources. 8. Basic services provide access to potable water and pre-school education, and to reproductive health and family planning information. B. Cancer Abatement and Rehabilitation Efforts (CARE) ASF’s second flagship program dates back to the founding of the Andres Soriano Cancer Research Foundation in 1965. Three-pronged program of research and training, treatment services for indigent patients, and consensus building. CONTACT DETAILS Lemia Liguaton-Simbulan Executive Director A. Soriano Aviation Hangar, Andrews Avenue, 1300 Pasay City Tel: (02) 831-9941; 834-0874 Fax: (02) 834-0872

Email: [email protected]; [email protected] www.anscor.com.ph/foundation/foundation.html

AYALA FOUNDATION, INC. (AFI) Ayala Foundation, Inc. (AFI) is a nonstock, nonprofit organization that serves as the sociocultural development arm of the Ayala Group of Companies. AFI is also working to extend the benefits of recent technological developments to a greater number of Filipinos. Through these new technologies, AFI continues to work for the cultivation of Filipino ingenuity and talent, as well as the preservation of our rich culture, history and traditions. Programs and Services Related to Economic Development Entrepreneurship  Ayala Technology Business Incubator  Special Program on Cultural Tourism in Bohol CONTACT DETAILS Victoria Garchitorena President 10th Floor Ayala Wing, BPI Building 6768 Ayala Avenue corner Paseo de Roxas Makati City, 1226 Philippines Tel: (02) 752-1101 to 02 Fax: (02) 813-4487; 813-4488 Email: [email protected] www.ayalafoundation.org

BANGSAMORO WOMEN FOUNDATION FOR PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT (BMWFPDI)

The Bangsamoro Women Foundation for Peace and Development, Inc. (BMWFPDI) is a nonprofit organization established two months after the Peace Agreement was signed between the Government of the Philippines and the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) on September 2, 1996. The BMWF has more than 17,000 women followers, mainly families and supporters of the Moro combatants. A board of Trustees, composed of 13 members, provides the over-all policy and guidance to the BWFPDI. The foundation has collaborated and worked with the following organizations: CIDA, USAID, UNFPA, GTZ, TAF, US Embassy, all Moro NGO Consortium, Ford Foundation, PBSP, Kusog Mindanao Forum, Foundation for Phil. Environment, KADTUNTAYA Foundation Inc., NDFCAI-WED, ABANSE Pinay, Murid Center, PDAP, and Mindanao Council of Women Leader Forum. Its area of operation includes 17 provinces and 14 cities namely: The provinces of Basilan, Cotabato, Davao del Sur, Davao del Norte, Davao Oriental, Lanao del Sur, lanao Norte, Maguindanao, Palawan, Sarangani, Sultan Kudarat, Sulu, South Cotabato, Tawi-Tawi, Zamboanga del Sur, Sibugay and Zamboanga del Norte. The cities of Cotabato , Dapitan, Dipolog, General Santos, Iligan, Marawi, Pagadian, Pueto Princesa, Davao, Kidapawan, Koronadal, Tacurong, Zamboanga and Isabela. Vision: Empowered Bangsamoro women who are God fearing, self-reliant, just, progressive and, living in a healthy environment. Mission: To harness the potentials of the Bangsamoro Women through participation in the socio-economic, political and cultural field. Goal: To institutionalize the full integration, mainstreaming and participation of Bangsamoro women and children in the advancement of peace and development of Mindanao and its islands. Programs Related to Economic Development: 1. Livelihood a. The foundation provides small scale lending for women. b. Facilitates fund sourcing for livelihood to member organization. 2. Linkages, Partnership, Research and Documentation a. The foundation maintains linkages with all organizations and agencies that are supportive of gender developments. b. The foundation implements collaborative programs in partnership with other organization. The Foundation has implemented following donor-funded programs/projects:

Emergency Livelihood Assistance Project & LEAP Real Property Taxation & HRD Barangay/Municipal Planning and Budgeting/TAG Reproductive Health Program Livelihood Assistance Community Organizing & Livelihood Assistance Livelihood Assistance

GEM-USAID

1997-2005

TAF-USAID TAF-USAID

2003 2002 to date 1997-2003 2000 2001-2004 2000

Literacy Program

UNFPA SZOPAD-World Bank PBSP Prof Nur Misuari & Manila Bulletin World Ed. & ADB

Tobacco Survey Baseline Survey of National Objective for Health Hospital Assessment Capability Building & Livelihood

UP & DOH UP& DOH JSI US Embassy

2003 (2 mos.) 2002 (6 mos.) 2003 (3 mos.) 2007

CONTACT DETAILS Door 1, Salik Apt., Espino St., Rabago Extension, Cotabato City, 9600 Philippines Tel: (064) 421-6154 Email: [email protected]

1997-2001

CENTER FOR EMPOWERMENT AND RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, INC. (CERD) CERD is a non-government organization that is operating for 31 years now. It envisions empowered, self-reliant coastal communities sustainably living in harmony with abundant and diverse coastal and marine environment, and as such would like to contribute to saving and restoring coastal environment through capability building of local organizations; creation of model communities and learning areas; and building partnerships. CERD’s work with the fisherfolk communities started with researches on fisherfolk problems, consciousness raising activities and providing trainings. A research in 1984 showed that women played major roles in pre- and post- harvest phases of fishing, with some even participating in actual harvesting. This alerted CERD for the need to organize both men and women fishers in order to develop the fisheries sector.

MAJOR PROGRAMS AND SERVICES A. Fishery Integrated Resource Management for Economic Development (FIRMED) FIRMED is a multi-disciplinary approach to fishery management as it integrates such development strategies as community organizing, capability building, human resource development, sustainable fisheries management, socioeconomic and enterprise development; rehabilitation and conservation work, policy advocacy and networking; and institutional development towards addressing the problems and issues of men and women fishers, and the entire coastal community. It caters to the needs of other institutions engaged in coastal resource management and bio-diversity conservation. FIRMED program is currently being implemented in Biri and Mondragon in Northern Samar, and in Hinatuan and Marihatag in Surigao del Sur. FIRMED implementation has led to the establishment of several community based coastal resource management strategies and tools in Maqueda Bay and Samar Sea in Samar, Western Batangas, Matarinao Bay in Eastern Samar. Among these are 11 fish sanctuaries with total area of 1406 hectares; wherein 7 sanctuaries are from Hinatuan, 3 demarcated fishery management areas (DFMA) in Mondragon, mangrove reforestation and protection with a total of 975 hectares in 8 barangays. Currently also there are 2 municipal federations of fisherfolk organizations being assisted (Hinatuan and Mondragon) plus 4 barangay-based organizations in Biri. Both men and women fishers have been involved in the development and management of these initiatives. For the year 2007-2011 one of CERD’s Goals is “CERD institutional and program sustainability developed, operational and ensured”. Among the initiatives undertaken to achieve this goal is through technology testing and enhancement of marine based products such as seaweeds, milkfish, prawn, and capacity building of partner fishers towards engagement in livelihood and social enterprise development initiatives.

FIRMED Program Components 

Coastal Community and Household Organizing: Formation and strengthening of development structures for people’s empowerment and engagement of fisherfolk households in Community Based Coastal Resource Management.



Sustainable Fisheries Development: Participatory research on the status of the coastal and marine ecosystem and community situation to serve as basis for community planning; coastal and marine resource protection, rehabilitation and management strategies and tools and development of livelihood opportunities.



Livelihood & Enterprise Development: Provision of capital for livelihoods and enterprise development activities; technology testing/piloting; product development and marketing linkage and assistance



Capability Building: Continuing education and training of development workers, community leaders and PO members to enhance their skills, knowledge, attitudes and imbibe positive values towards sustainable development and people empowerment.



Fisheries Policy Advocacy and Participatory Governance: Lobby for the passage of appropriate barangay and municipal ordinances and national policies that address municipal fishers issues and agenda; influence the development planning processes from the barangay, municipal and bay-level to ensure that municipal (men and women) fishers issues and agenda are addressed.



Gender and Development: Mainstreaming of gender and development issues particularly of the municipal fisheries sector in the development processes at the PO level, in the community, and at the household level. Leadership and management skills of Women fishers are developed and enhanced. Coastal and marine resources utilized by women fishers are protected and managed. B. Gender and Development Program

The Gender and Development Program facilitates the development of gender-responsive projects among coastal communities. It provides relevant interventions at the household, PO and community levels through gender responsive researches, capacity building, creation of mechanisms for equal participation of men and women in development activities and decision making processes. This program also seeks to sharpen analysis of women and gender issues in the fisheries sector and coastal communities. Gender Mainstreaming program was implemented through the Enhancing Gender Relations in Coastal Resource Management in Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur Phase 1 & 2 from 2002-2007. Through this project Hinatuan was able to implement potable water in 2 islands and Botika ng Barangay in 2 other areas. C. Social Enterprise Program In 2008, as part of institutional sustainability strategy, the Social Enterprise Program was established initially in Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur. The Integrated prawn enterprise has twopronged goals: to generate profit to sustain its operations in the medium term and allow

expansion in the long term. It further aims to achieve this goal by proficiency in other farmed species and continued systems improvement on its current species. An equally important goal is to contribute to the reduction of poverty in coastal communities, i.e. a sustainable social enterprise entity that is instrumental to the coastal community poverty reduction through development and capacity building of municipal fishers to be responsible farm operators and social entrepreneurs, upholding always the highest standard of responsible aquaculture. The program has the prawn hatchery and prawn grow-out in fish pond that aims to generate funds for the continuous implementation of CERD programs and generate employment for PO members. CERD prawn fry facility has the capacity to produce 8 to 11 million fry per sixty (60) day production cycle. Four (4) PO individual members trained and employed as Hatchery Aide. One percent (1%) of produced per cycle is for reseeding of prawn fry to the wild. Thirty one (31) hectares of fish ponds operated with caretakers from partner fisherfolk organization. Municipal fishers are trained in the prawn fishpond operation: feeding, monitoring of growth rate, water exchange, and harvesting. CONTACT DETAILS Ma. Jovelyn T. Cleofe Executive Director 102-E R.L. Mendoza Bldg., Kamuning Road Quezon City, 1103 Philippines Tel: (02) 924-09-44 Telefax: (02) 925-16-42 Email: [email protected]

COMMUNITY CRAFTS ASSOCIATION OF THE PHILIPPINES (CCAP) CCAP is a non-government organization engaged in developing marginalized handicraft producer groups through social and entrepreneurial development activities actively engaged in Fair Trade. Objectives: 1. To develop member producers to become sustainable entrepreneurial development and value formation programs;

through

organizational,

2. To create opportunities for information exchange and market access to marginalized community-based craft producers; 3. To advocate Fair Trade Principles with focus on: A. Gender Equity; B. Environmental Sustainability; C. Child Protection; and D. Cultural Sensitivity 4. To strengthen its human resources through value formation and organizational capabilitybuilding; and 5. To promote CCAP as a leader in the craft industry. Programs and Services: 1. Organizational Development: Includes value formation trainings, social preparation activities, financial management and other trainings to strengthen organizational management, and Fair Trade. 2. Production and Technical Assistance: Constitute product development workshops, production management trainings, accessing support funding for facilities, structures, livelihood projects, and the like. 3. Development Marketing Assistance: Promotions for products created by craft producer groups through local and international trade fairs. 4. Networking and Advocacy: Assisting craft producer groups in their linkages with local government units, government and non-government organizations, and other institution engaged in entrepreneurial projects and Fair Trade. Eligibility Project partners, marginalized handicraft producer groups.

CONTACT DETAILS Mrs. Regina G. de Jesus President Mrs. Virginia L. Sadorra Executive Director Ms. Czarina S. Gragera Program Director CCAP Building, G. Araneta avenue, Quezon City 1100 Tel: (02) 712 2160; 416-5660; 781-4192 Fax: (02) 712-2169 Email: [email protected] http://www.ccapfairtrade.com

DEVELOPMENT ACADEMY OF THE PHILIPPINES (DAP) The Development Academy of the Philippines (DAP) is a government corporation established in 1973 with original charter created by Presidential Decree 205, amended by Presidential Decree 1061, and further amended by Executive Order 288. The Academy was founded by the following institutions: Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, Development Bank of the Philippines, Government Service Insurance System, National Economic and Development Authority, Philippine National Bank, Social Security System, and the Land Bank of the Philippines. The Academy was created for the following purposes: 

To foster and support the developmental forces at work in the nation's economy through selective human resource development programs, research, data-collection, and information services, to the end that optimization of wealth may be achieved in a manner congruent with the maximization of public security and welfare;



In line with the foregoing objective, to promote, carry on and conduct scientific, interdisciplinary and policy-oriented research, education, training, consultancy, and publication in the broad fields of economics, public administration, and the political and social sciences, generally involving the study, determination, interpretation and publication of economic, political and social facts and principles bearing upon development problems of local, national or international significance; and



To discharge a regional role in initiating and catalyzing exchange of ideas and expertise on development activities in the region of Asia and the Far East.

As the National Productivity Organization of the Philippines, DAP fulfills the country’s commitment to the Asian Productivity Organization. DAP envisions itself to be a world-class national development and productivity organization. It exists to:   

Build capacities and partnerships among the key sectors of Philippine society; Generate innovative, value-adding, and synergistic solutions to national and local concerns; and Promote sustainable human development and global competitiveness in partnership with international community organizations.

Services DAP offers the following services: 1. Training Services

DAP provides training services to develop and enhance individual and organizational capacities in various disciplines. DAP’s training services range from training needs assessment, program design, training management to training evaluation. DAP has regular training programs open to the public. These programs can also be customized to suit the needs of client organizations. training, education, technical assistance/consultancy, policy-and action-oriented research and publications in the areas of governance and accountability, productivity and quality, knowledge management, education and learning, and sustainable human development. 2. Consultancy and Research Services In line with its mandates, DAP provides services by way of technical assistance, management advisory, and policy-and action-oriented research in the fields of governance and accountability, productivity and quality, knowledge management, education and learning, and sustainable human development. 3. Conference Facilities DAP also provides training and conference facilities that are conducive to learning and productive work in Pasig and Tagayta City.

Operating Centers The core services of the Academy are carried out by its key operating centers. 1. Center for Governance (CFG) The Center for Governance is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on political, economic and administrative governance. It provides services to strengthen institutions and mechanisms to develop and effectively implement public policies and programs that promote transparent and accountable governance, observance of the rule of law, government effectiveness, effective regulation, control of corruption, citizen voice and participation. CFG has three program offices: Operations Management, Policy Research, and Local Governance and Development. Specifically, CFG offers research and consultancy services on the following areas:     

Basic social services Corruption prevention and integrity development for the NGAs and LGUs Impact analysis Operations, systems and/or performance review; Budget management (NGAs and LGUs).

Trainings offered by CFG are as follows:

          

Leadership, Excellence and Development for LCEs Effective Local Legislation Local Revenue Generation and Resource Mobilization Project Development and Project Management Strategic Planning Change Management Formulation of a Citizen’s Charter Gearing Up for Citizen’s Charter Implementation Public Service Ethics and Accountability Basic Policy Process Policy Appreciation Course for CESOs

2. Center for Knowledge Management (CKM) The Center for Knowledge Management is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on harnessing intellectual and human capital, and other knowledge-based assets towards performance excellence. CKM has three program offices: Human Capital Development, Knowledge Management Systems, and Knowledge Solutions Development. The main areas of research and consultancy of CKM are the following:         

Human resource and organization development Organization diagnosis Systems design and development KM Readiness Assessment Knowledge Mapping Knowledge Harvesting Documentation and Sharing of Best Practices Institutionalization of Communities of Practice (CoPs) Implementing KM in the Organization

Trainings offered by CKM are as follows:            

Basic and Advance Knowledge Management Benchmarking Basic Training Management Presentation and Facilitation Skills Development Technical Writing Customer Service Skills Performance Management and Evaluation Information Systems Strategic Planning Information Systems Development IMO Model Course 609: Training Course for Instructors IMO Model Course 312: Training Course for Assessors Open Source Softwares

3. Center for Quality and Competitiveness (CQC) The Center for Quality and Competitiveness is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on value chain productivity and technology enhancement, total quality management, productivity measurement and analysis, and sectoral productivity enhancement. It is responsible for the promotion of quality and productivity concepts, principles and practices to strengthen competitiveness and help organizations achieve performance excellence. CQC has four program offices: Service Quality Management, Value Chain Productivity Management, SME Productivity Development, and Agriculture Productivity Development. CQC currently offers the following research and consultancy services:    

Agricultural productivity Productivity among industries, SMEs Service quality standards Quality and productivity approaches

Trainings offered by CQC are as follows: 

Basic Quality and Productivity Improvement Approaches - 5S: Good Housekeeping for Improved Productivity - Trainer’s Training on Quality Circles - Basic 7 quality control tools for problem solving and decision making - Suggestion Scheme



Advanced Quality and Productivity Approaches - Total Productivity Maintenance - Total Quality Management - Six sigma - Just in time - ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System - ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS)



Integrated productivity and technology upgrading program - Practical industrial engineering (IE)



Productivity and quality measurement approaches - Measuring service quality - Benchmarking - Cost of quality

4. Center for Sustainable Human Development The Center for Sustainable Human Development is the Academy’s technical excellence and resource center on developmental strategies and solutions to help reduce poverty and meet the

Millennium Development Goals. CSHD has two program offices: Community Development and Environmental Management. CSHD currently offers the following research and consultancy services:    

Developing sustainable development indicators Sustainable environmental management alternatives and systems Developing strategies for disaster risk reduction Impact studies on climate change, development projects, tourism and the rural poor.

Trainings offered by CSHD are as follows:         

Ecotourism Planning and Development Waste management using 3 R’s (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle) Environmental Management Disaster Risk Reduction Renewable Energy and Clean Development Resource Optimization and Waste Minimization Nature interpretation and visitor management Doing renewable energy enterprises/business Ecotourism products identification and development

5. Graduate School of Public and Development Management  

Institute of Public Management Institute of Productivity and Quality

The Master in Public Management program, which is offered on a regular mode or customized for a particular agency, develops professional public managers who are focused on real, current and anticipated development issues. Current programs available are:      

Master in Public Management (MPM) MPM Major in Biodiversity Conservation and Management MPM Major in Local Governance Management MPM Major in Development and Security MPM Major in Public Service Management Graduate Certificate Course on Corruption Prevention (equivalent to 15 graduate units)

The Master in Productivity and Quality Management program is the first P & Q graduate program of its kind in the country and the Asia-Pacific region. It can be availed of through a regular program or a ladderized mode. Current program available:  Master in Productivity and Quality Management (MPQM) The Graduate School also offers competency-based certificate and diploma programs that can eventually lead to a master’s degree. Current programs available are:

     

Certificate Course on Development of Productivity Practitioners Certificate Course on ISO-QMS Lead Auditors Certificate Course on Productivity Measurement for Business Performance Certificate Course on Knowledge Management Certificate Course on Balanced Scorecard Certificate Course on Benchmarking

6. DAP sa Mindanao and DAP sa Visayas DAP has two regional offices that are responsible for the development of programs and projects at the local/community levels in Southern Philippines. These are: the DAP sa Mindanao and the DAP sa Visayas. Trainings offered by DAP sa Visayas are as follows:  SUC IGP Managers’ Course  Business Planning for SUC  Entrepreneurship Development Course for Women  Facilitation for Community Development  Natural Farming System for Green Productivity  Eco Business Development Using Biomass/Wastes  Development of Productivity Specialist Trainings offered by DAP sa Mindanao are as follows:  Technical Writing  Project Development and Management  Facilitating Training Sessions  Supervisory Skills Enhancement  Basic Productivity Tools and Techniques  ISO 9000 QMS  Effective Internal Quality Audit

Clients DAP’s clientele includes national line agencies, local government units, and government corporations. It also undertakes projects for international organizations and funding institutions, private firms including small and medium enterprises, non-government organizations, and the academe. Recent DAP Mandates Under Republic Act No. 9013 or “Philippine Quality Award Act of 2001”, DAP serves as Administrator of the Philippine Quality Award (PQA) for Performance Excellence in the Public Sector. In connection with this, DAP extends assistance to government agencies including GOCCs, LGUs and SUCs in PQA Assessment and Application Development.

Executive Order No. 605, s.2007 directed the institutionalization of the structure, mechanisms and standards to implement the Government Quality Management Program. As member of the Government Quality Management Committee, DAP is the lead agency tasked to promote awareness and develop organizational capabilities in the establishment of ISO 9000-certifiable Quality Management System (QMS) in public sector organizations. To facilitate the implementation of Republic Act No. 9485 or “Anti-Red Tape Act of 2007,” DAP is mandated to assist government agencies in the reengineering of systems and procedures and in the establishment of Citizen’s Charter for frontline services. Section 10 of RA 9485 also mandates DAP to assist CSC in undertaking the Report Card Survey, which shall be used to obtain feedback on how the provisions of the Charter are being followed and how the agency is performing.

CONTACT DETAILS Antonio D. Kalaw, Jr. President 6/F DAP Building, San Miguel Avenue Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1600 Tel: (02) 631-2153 Fax: (02) 631-2123 Email: [email protected] www.dap.edu.ph DAP Conference Center, Tagaytay City Barangay Sungay East, Tagaytay City 2720 Tel: (046) 483-1290 to 1292 Fax: (046) 483-1290/1292 www.daptagaytay.com.ph

EDUCATIONAL DISCIPLINE IN CULTURE AND ARTS FOR DEVELOPMENT AND SERVICES, INC. (EDCADS) In 1986, amidst the socio-political upheaval which ushered the EDSA revolt, a group of educators, artists, cultural workers, religious workers and activists convened and gave birth to a vision which metamorphosed into an institution, the Educational Discipline in Culture and Area-based Development Services, Inc. (EDCADS). EDCADS is a non-stock, non-profit organization founded in 1986, which gradually expanded both its mission and its services in response to a developing condition. From the community of artists and cultural workers, it in time became involved in the struggles of the peasant and Indigenous People. Soon enough, EDCADS was no longer confined in serving any specific sector but rather had reached and touched almost all the marginalized sectors in our society, specially those in the rural areas. Today, through its management, EDCADS has acquired its own assets, which includes a more than 600 square meters lot and a two-storey building housing its office with sufficient equipment and communication facilities; and a modest space for seminars and trainings. Track Record Cultural Work is an EDCADS’ Legacy and perhaps also its most definitive aspect. In the past EDCADS has become synonymous with culture and arts. However, EDCADS developed concepts that elevated cultural work into alternative approaches for community-based education, promotion and advocacy. This provides EDCADS with a distinct character and tactical advantage that sets it apart from other development institutions. One of the significant experiences of EDCADS in its dynamic evolution to become a “comprehensive” NGO, is its involvement in community development. For the past twenty three (23) years and through its projects, the EDCADS has contributed to the development of rural communities in the fields of community organizing, capability-building and systems enhancement, community-based education, promotion and advocacy, livelihood development and facilitating the provision of basic social services. EDCADS’ interventions benefited farmers, fisherfolks, women, youth, and indigenous people, among others. Its critical experience in projects with strong emphasis on community organizing provides the EDCADS with a well-grounded basis in formulating its distinctive strategies and approaches to development work. Vision “Empowered and sustainable communities of men and women in harmony with nature” Mission “Improve the capacity and livelihood of the rural poor” Goals



Enhance the capacity of self help groups and organization s for effective local governance and sustainable management of their resources; Strengthen community-managed health care initiatives linked with local health care structure and systems; Facilitate access to market, micro financing and technology development of community livelihood undertakings; Augment the physical, financial and personnel capability of EDCADS to support its operations for at least 10 years.

  

EDCADS Themes     

Family/Community Health Rural Organization/Institution Good Governance and Administration Local Livelihood Gender

The EDCADS upholds that community development must be a multi-pronged yet integrated intervention, aimed at the community. These interventions however, must involve a wide partnership that would include the People’s Organizations (POs), the Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), the Local Government Units (LGUs) and Line Agencies (LAs), and the Private Sector (PS). In a critical evaluation of the status of most POs, EDCADS had identified four (4) main areas that require substantial interventions. These areas of concern serve as the focus in defining the appropriate programs and services, which EDCADS aims to provide. These areas include:    

Capacity enhancement, Institutional building and strengthening, Services provision, and Administrative support.

On-Going Projects Related to Economic Development 1. Philippines-Australia Community Assistance Program (PACAP) - Enhancing IP Communities on the Mgt of Pinagalaan Watershed with Livelihood Development Project Objective: “To reduced poverty and improve the standard of living of poor communities through sustainable economic and social development” Project Area(s): Barangay Pinagalaan, Bayugan City Project Cost: PhP 2,527,105.00 Project Beneficiaries: Indigenous People (IPs) 2. Philippines-Australia Community Assistance Program (PACAP) - Enhancing IP Communities on the Mgt of Pinagalaan Watershed with Livelihood Development

Project Objective: “To reduced poverty and improve the standard of living of poor communities through sustainable economic and social development” Project Area(s): Barangay Pinagalaan, Bayugan City Project Cost: PhP 2,527,105.00 Project Beneficiaries: Indigenous People (IPs) 3. Department of Tourism (DOT) Caraga - Development of Community - Managed EcoTourism Enterprise Project Objective: “To capacitate the beneficiaries on the basic skills in entrepreneurship and product development and management” Project Area(s): Seven (7) Barangay-Beneficiaries in the Province of Dinagat Islands Project Cost: PhP P1,070,450.00 Project Beneficiaries: Community on the said area CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Mary May RC. Diaz Managing Director 177 Bougainvilla St., South Montilla Blvd., Butuan City

FOUNDATION FOR A SUSTAINABLE SOCIETY INC. (FSSI) FSSI works toward the economic empowerment of the poor in marginal rural and urban communities by providing funding support for eco-enterprises in the uplands (e.g., sustainable agroforestry), urban (solid waste management), croplands (e.g., coconut and high value crops), and coastal (e.g., seaweeds) areas. Programs and Services FSSI assistance is usually in the form of loans or special deposits. Grants may be provided for pre-operating expenses of pioneering projects and/or capability-building activities such as technical assistance, research, feasibility study, product research and development, pilot production, and test marketing. 1. Supports Sustainable Production (SP) and Sustainable Enterprises (SE) in the fields of agriculture (including fisheries and forestry), services and industry. 

Sustainable Production refers to projects engaged in the actual production of goods and/or provision of services to generate income for beneficiaries.



Sustainable Enterprises, on the other hand, would cover a wider range of institutions and activities. It can refer to an enterprise with a single business activity, such as a microfinance institution. It can also denote more complex organizations that have multiple lines of business, such as credit, processing, and marketing components.

2. Only projects that are community-oriented, ecologically sound, and economically viable will be supported and promoted. 3. Only community-oriented, ecologically sound and economically viable projects will be supported. 4. Projects should directly benefit and mobilize the enterprising poor. It should improve the social and economic status of women. 5. Focus will be provinces with low ranking in terms of Human Development Index (HDI) and 4th to 6th class municipalities 6. Only applications requiring support of at least P1M will be considered. 7. The proponent and/or beneficiary should provide equity or counterpart of not less than 25% of total project cost based on unencumbered assets. 8. Multi-year projects preferred. Eligibility Partner Criteria

 

2 years experience as an organization Collateral for loans

Processing Requirements for screening

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Project concept paper Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws True copy of Certificate of Registration Notarized Board Resolution stating intent to borrow Notarized Board Resolution offering collateral Audited Financial Statements for the last three years List of Donors/creditors and Funds Received for the last 3 years

Process

1. Submit proposal paper in FSSI project concept paper format to FSSI before June 30 of each calendar year 2. Project visit by FSSI and request for detailed project proposal 3. Decision on proposal given within 6 months of submission CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Unit E, 46 Samar Ave., cor Eugenio Lopez Street, South Triangle, Quezon City, 1103 Philippines Tel: (02) 411-4702-03 ext.13 Telefax: (02) 928-8671 Mobile: +639209537631 www.fssi.com.ph

INSTITUTE FOR SMALL SCALE INDUSTRIES – UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES (UP-ISSI) The UP ISSI is a research and training organization established in the Philippines through a bilateral project between the Government of the Republic of the Philippines and the Netherlands Government in 1966. The Institute became an integral unit of the University of the Philippines in 1969 by virtue of Republic Act No. 6041.

UP ISSI is the first institution in the country to focus on the development and growth of small enterprises so that they may fully contribute to the national goals of employment, equity, and growth. Through the years, the Institute has gradually expanded this thrust to include research, consultancy and extension, and information. Programs and Services The Institute’s activities are geared towards the following:    

Entrepreneurship, managerial, supervisory, and extension-oriented training Policy- and extension-oriented research Business diagnosis, management audit, and delivery of productivity improvement services Research and publication of case studies and success stories of small entrepreneurs

Among the popular course offerings are the following:      

Managers Course (which is now on its 91st run) Trainers Training on Entrepreneurship Development, Accounting for Non-accountants (which recently concluded its 18th run) Start Your Own Business Strategic Marketing and Creative Selling courses Programs on personal finance, quality management, project feasibility study preparation, appraisal, and monitoring. Courses that focus on programmable logic controls, instrumentation and automation as the Institute’s response to the growing need for engineers and other technical people for retraining.

Research capabilities include the conduct of impact assessment (the most recent of which is the BMBE Law) and evaluation studies and materials development. UP ISSI has a pool of specialists who assist small firms in improving their operation and designing and installing the necessary systems and procedures for expansion and growth. Information dissemination continues to be one of UP ISSI’s advocacies. Recently, the Institute has published, among others, four volumes of the Dreamers, Doers, Risk Takers series that feature the stories of small entrepreneurs who have parlayed their business into successful undertakings. The fourth volume, sub-titled, “Iskolar ng Bayan Gives Back,” is the Institute’s contribution to the centennial celebration of the University. Another publication is the Introduction to Entrepreneurship, which is on its fourth edition, to be relevant with the

changing times. UP ISSI uses its website (http://www.upd.edu.ph/~issi) and runs a webmail service ([email protected]) to reach a wider audience. Networks UP ISSI is a member of the Industrial Guarantee and Loan Fund (IGLF) Review Committee, which serves as the Fund’s Governing Board. Under Republic Act No. 9178. It is one of only six government agencies that “may avail of the [Development] Fund for technology transfer, production and management training, and marketing assistance to BMBEs.” More recently, Executive Order No. 793 issued by President Gloria M. Arroyo on April 24, 2009 designates UP ISSI as one of the members of the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprise Development (MSMED) Council. Partners UP ISSI draws the support of its major private sector partner in small enterprise and entrepreneurship development, the Small Enterprises Research and Development Foundation, Inc. (SERDEF), in implementing its various programs and projects. Among its other major partners are the Department of Trade and Industry, the Industrial Guarantee and Loan Fund, GTZ (the German Technical Cooperation Agency), the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). CONTACT DETAILS Prof. Ruperto P. Alonzo Director

Ms. Merceditas A. Esguerra Information Officer E. Virata Hall, E. Jacinto St. Diliman, Quezon City 1101 Tel: (02) 928-7076 to 79 Fax: (02) 920-6923 Email: [email protected] www.upd.edu.ph/~issi

JAIME V. ONGPIN FOUNDATION, INC. (JVOFI) Vision JVOFI as a leading institution in the formation of self-reliant communities capable of harnessing resources for equitable development. Mission Guided by the principle of holistic development and with utmost concern for the environment, the foundation shall uplift the sense of dignity of the Filipino communities it serves. Goals: 

On Program/Project Impact Enhance the capacity of client communities to plan, implement, manage and sustain projects.



On Environment Enable communities to develop and conserve their ecological resources.



On Productivity Assist impoverished families improve their incomes.



On Organizational Effectiveness, Efficiency and Sustainability Enhance the capability of the Foundation to pursue its mandate.

Project Financing (Sources or Schemes):  

Microfinance Grant funds from donors

On-going projects 1. Enterprise Development. This project promotes the enhancement of income generating or livelihood projects through microfinance, technical assistance & institutional development. The Foundation conceptualized the microfinance program to address the credit needs of the enterprising poor women of Baguio City and La Trinidad, Benguet. Source of Fund: Microfinance 2. Integrating Livestock Production, Environment Protection and Enterprise Development to Reduce Poverty in Western Isabela (InLivesPro Project). Through grant funds from Heifer International, the project seeks to provide livestock support to 50 selected families in barangays San Jose, Munos West and San Pedro in the municipality of Roxas, Isabela. The main objective of the livestock dispersal is to provide opportunity for the selected initial beneficiaries to earn additional income from sales of fattened chicken, goats and carabaos.

Source of Fund: Heifer International 3. Urban Partnerships for Sustainable Upliftment, Renewal, Governance & Empowerment Project (UPSURGE). The project seeks to sustain the accomplishments of the initial UPSURGE Project in the Fisherman's Village in Barangay Poro, San Fernando, La Union implemented by the Philippine Business Progress (PBSP). The project is funded by the World Bank-Partnership of Philippine Supoprt Service Agencies, Inc. (PHILSSA). Source of Fund: World Bank 4. Tobacco Farmers’ Cooperative Organizing and Capability Building Program aims to support the organizing and strengthening of tobacco farmers’ cooperatives or people’s organizations to implement the fuelwood plantation project in the provinces of La Union and Ilocos Sur. Source of Fund: Philip Morris Philippines Manufacturing Inc. Services NGOs/Pos/Private Sectors provided or can participate in Sec. 17 of RA 7160   

Microfinance/Enterprise Development Ecological Enhancement - Water system Development, Watershed Rehabilitation and Management, Solid Waste Management Special project on environment, agricultural development and capacity building

Linkages: International  Council on Foundations  Microcredit Summit of Practitioners

National  Association of Foundations  International Training Network on Water and Sanitation  Philippine Council on NGO Certification  Philippine Council for Microfinance Standards  Upland NGO Assistance Council

CONTACT DETAILS Ma. Rosario R. Lopez Executive Director 27 Sofia de Veyra Street, Corner Road 2, Quezon

Local  Alay sa Kalinisan, Inc.  Baguio Solid Waste Management Board  Baguio Regreening Movement  Cordillera Network of Development NGOs and POs  Regional Cooperative Development Council  Regional Development Council - Sectoral Committee on Environment and Social Development

Hill, Baguio Tel: (074) 446-2807/ 446-2843 Email: [email protected] www.jvofi.org

KADTUNTAYA FOUNDATION, INCORPORATED (KFI) The Kadtuntaya Foundation, Inc. (KFI) is a non-government, development oriented organization based in Cotabato City, born out of the need to respond to the socio-economic and cultural needs of the Moro people, particularly in Central Mindanao. KFI was established and registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission in July 1989. During its early operation, KFI’s main thrust was to bridge the gap between the Christians and Muslims whose relationship had been stained by decades of conflict and wars. KFI facilitated dialogues and understanding of Muslims and Christians, reducing prejudices, improving relationships, and forging mutual cooperation. Its focus then, was still in Cotabato City. In the following years, KFI expanded its areas of concern to include socio-economic programs such as helping organize communities and cooperatives, extending assistance to incomegenerating projects like malong weaving, and small entrepreneurship (e.g. sari-sari store, small and large livestock raising, buy and sell ventures, among others). To date, KFI has more than 50 staff and volunteer workers facilitating several projects in the Provinces of Maguindanao, Sultan Kudarat, Cotabato, and in the other provinces of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). KFI envisions politically empowered, economically sufficient, environmental friendly, genderconscious and culturally sensitive tri-people communities peacefully co-existing in equality, mutual respect and prosperity. It is committed to facilitate the empowerment of the people, especially the grassroots, so that collectively they can improve their socio-cultural, economic and political well being. KFI aims to: 13. Increase participation and involvement of men and women at the grassroots level in community decision-making processes and development activities through awareness building, leadership and PO formation, capability building and gender advocacy. 14. Improve means of livelihood and food security of grassroots at the household level at all times. 15. Reduce sources of conflicts and vulnerabilities of the grassroots communities that may result to displacement, loss of livelihood, morbidity or death. 16. Actively advocate for accountable and good governance to improve avenue for people’s participation, cooperation, transparency, and delivery of services. 17. Improve the situation of women and children, especially those in difficult circumstances through the promotion of their rights. 18. Promote environmental awareness and respect so that people become just to nature and caring stewards of the earth. To achieve this, KFI seeks all means to sustain its human, financial and material resources. Core Programs: 5. Moro Integrated Area Development (MIAD)

Being the core program, MIAD is the main concern and focal point of the organization’s interventions. It comprises four essential strategies. 5.1.Organizational Building and Strengthening (OBS) This is the primary approach by which KFI is able to facilitate the conscientization of the grassroots community as well as ensure their development in terms of asserting their rights and aspirations, particularly in the fields of governance and decision making. 5.2.Farming Enterprise and Economic Development (FEED) This strategy focuses on the improvement of prevailing farming practices through the introduction of viable farming technologies that are environment-friendly and sustainable. It is also through the FEED project that off-farm alternative income generating activities are facilitated for both men and women members of the community. 5.3.Community Social Services (CSS) Through the CSS strategy, the health and sanitation problems and concerns of the community are addressed. Health services include the promotion of Promotive and Preventive Health Care through the active involvement of health committees. Literacy projects provide basic writing, reading, and numeracy skills to adult illiterates geared towards greater involvement in family and community affairs. 5.4.Natural Resource Management and Tenure Improvement (NRMTI) It aims to facilitate, at the maximum, the acquisition of lands through the Claim of Ancestral Domain Title (CADT) and Agrarian Reform Program, at the minimum the improvement of tenure relationship of the landowners and the tenants through continued advocacy and campaign. 6. Governance and Peace This program aims at forging understanding and cooperation among the tri-people in Mindanao through continuing dialogues and joint community activities. It promotes the Culture of Peace towards prejudice reduction and improving inter-relationships. It also cultivates critical awareness among the grassroots on the roots of conflict in Mindanao as the basis of finding meaningful and long-tern peace. Strategies include peace consultations and dialogues, rightsbased advocacy, linkage and networking with LGUs, as well as establishing Zones of Peace. 7. Women & Children Development This program aims at providing gender-awareness/education and organizing support group to enhance understanding of the role of men and women in Muslim society. It provides scholarship for children and youth and enhances their capacity to lead and take active role in the promotion

of understanding of the rights and proper care f children through Child Rights Advocacy and Theater Development. 8. Disaster Management This program provides trainings and awareness on disaster preparedness and management. It helps organize community-based disaster coordinating councils, and provides relief assistance, shelter, psychosocial and economic rehabilitation to victims of disasters. List of Fund Sources for the Last Five Years: 27. Philippine Business for Social Progress 28. Terre Des Hommes – Germany 29. Cordaid – The Netherlands 30. Trocaire – Ireland 31. Bread for the World – Germany 32. Misereor – Germany 33. Catholic Relief Services – USA 34. Oxfam – GB/HK 35. Ausaid/ARMM SF 36. German Development Service (DED) 37. German Development Cooperation (GTZ) 38. Embassy of Japan in the Phil. 39. HEKS – Switzerland List of Network Affiliation: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Coalition Development NGOs Mindanao Emergency Response Network Consortium of Bangsamoro Civil Society AGONG Peace Network Kutawato Coalition of Development NGOs Well-Family Midwife Clinics Partnership Foundation, Inc.

Current Projects:

PROJECT TITLE 1. Empowering Communities Towards Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding in Central Mindanao 2. Empowering Communities Towards Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding in Central Mindanao 3. Mapayag, Adaon, Kiladap Integrated Area Development Program III (MADAKIL-IAD III) 4. Continuation of a Development Programme for a Group of Indigenous People in Saniag,

DONOR Cordaid OXFAM-HK

PROJECT SITE Datu Piang (5 brgys) Mamasapano (2 brgys) Datu Saudi Ampatuan (4 brgys) Datu Piang (8) Midsayap (2)

BFTW

Talitay (3 brgys)

Misereor

Brgy. Tomicor, Ampatuan, Maguindanao

Ampatuan, Maguindanao 5. Agricultural Development and Ecological Protection Towards Sustainable Economic Livelihoods in Fukol

CONTACT DETAILS Guiamel M. Alim Executive Director G/Floor, Community Training and Resource Center Bldg. Doña Pilar Street, Vilo Subdivision, Poblacion IV, Cotabato City 9600

Philippines P.O. Box 116 Tel: (064) 421-4222 Telefax: (064) 421-2072 Email: [email protected] [email protected] www.kadtun.org

HEKS

Barangay Fukol, Talayan

LOPEZ GROUP FOUNDATION, INC. The Lopez Group Foundation Inc. was incorporated on February 29, 2004 and is certified by the Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC). LGFI's coordinates and synergizes the CSR efforts of the Lopez Group’s 9 foundations and more than 15 companies. The Group's CSR programs are primarily in education, the environment, entrepreneurship, children’s rights, family planning, health, and disaster-relief and rehabilitation. LGFI builds partnerships and alliances and provides a reference for those who desire to collaborate or provide funding support. It is an active member of the League of Corporate Foundations (LCF), Association of Foundations (AF), Corporate Network for Disaster Response (CNDR), Public Relations Society of the Philippines (PRSP), Employers Confederation of the Philippines (ECOP), Philippine Association for Volunteer Efforts (PAVE) and the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines (FOCAP). CONTACT DETAILS 5/F Benpres Building Meralco Avenue corner Exchange Road Ortigas Center, Pasig City 1600 Tel: (02) 490-0779 Telefax: (02) 631-3128 Email: [email protected] www.lopezgroup.org

The CSR community of the Lopez Group include: ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation, Inc. 2/F Calderon Bldg. # 827 Edsa QC, Telephone: (02) 929 3273 / (02) 415 0545 Website: www.abs-cbnfoundation.com Email address: [email protected] ABS-CBN Foundation, Inc. Mother Ignacia Avenue, Quezon City 1103, Philippines Telephone: (02) 924 2740 / (02) 922 4842 Website: www.abs-cbnfoundation.com Don Senen Gabaldon Foundation 20/F JMT Corporate Condominium, ADB Ave., Ortigas Center, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 634 4092

Eugenio Lopez Foundation, Inc. (The Lopez Museum) G/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines

Telephone: (02) 631 2417 Website: www.lopezmuseum.org.ph Email Address: [email protected] First Philippine Conservation, Inc. 4/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 449 6086 to 87 / (02) 638 7670 Email: [email protected] Knowledge Channel Foundation, Inc. 5/F Benpres Building, Pasig City, Philippines Telephone: (02) 910 2033 – (02) 910 3181 Website: www.knowledgechannel.com.ph

MUSLIM-CHRISTIAN AGENCY FOR ADVOCACY, RELIEF AND DEVELOPMENT, INC. (MuCAARD) The Muslim Christian Agency for Advocacy, Relief and Development or MuCAARD has been working for over two decades in Mindanao. It has proven its effectiveness in the implementation of development programmes, its extensive reach among poor and marginalized households in the rural areas, and its wide acceptance among Muslims, Christians and indigenous tribal groups for its efforts in trying to eradicate poverty and social exclusion. Established in July 1984 as a consortium, it is the first genuine Muslim-Christian NGO in the Philippines assisting Peoples’ Organizations (PO) in improving their capacity to assist small farmers, fisher folks, women and urban poor. It has centered its activities in the island of Mindanao, specifically the provinces of Zamboanga del Sur, Lanao del Sur, Lanao del Norte, Bukidnon and North Cotabato including the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). These areas are recognized as amongst the poorest provinces in the country. (IBON Special Report March 2007) Mandate MuCAARD’s mandate is “To develop sustainable communities where Muslims, Christians and Tribal People can live together recognizing and respecting their different faiths and cultures where there is sustainable environment, political empowerment, economic equity, gender equality, unity and lasting peace.” This mandate is rooted in MuCAARD’s commitment to the practical expression of interfaith dialogue. This mandate is also in line with the UN Millennium Development Goals specifically MDG 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7. That is:      

To eradicate extreme poverty and hunger; To achieve universal education; To promote gender equality and empower women; To reduce child mortality; To improve maternal health; and To ensure environmental sustainability.

MuCAARD works with a network of POs through the four MTs, all of whom belong to poorest of the poor. Each Member Team is registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). They are coordinated with the Secretariat in Cagayan de Oro City who takes lead in many of the initiatives and provides the support they need such as Fund-Sourcing/Resource Locator; Training Provider/Resource Persons or respond to request for training and consultancy outside of MuCAARD network; Advocacy, Networking/Linkages; Monitoring and Evaluation; Auditing; Center of Communication; Assist in resolving critical issues affecting the Member Teams; Initiate contacts/develop new programs beneficial to MuCAARD network. Vision MuCAARD’s Vision is to create effective and accountable democratic communities based on sustainable development and founded on justice and equality – where sustainability includes the need to protect and rehabilitate the environment for our grandchildren. The agency dreams of a

Mindanao where people of all faiths and ethnicity can live in peace respecting the unity in our diversity and where everyone is included. The key to achieving our vision is through active people’s participation. Mission MuCAARD’s Mission is to consolidate and expand people’s involvement in local governance so that they can access resources and services and ensure the promulgation of equitable policies and laws. To strive against discrimination and oppression so that the women and the most vulnerable sectors of society can reach their full potential; that they are protected against natural and human disasters. To educate and create communities that can live sustainably providing a decent livelihood for their families and future generations. Goals 6. Good Governance - To ensure that Local Government Units (LGUs), MuCAARD and the local community work together so that agreed programmes and provision of services (health, education, infrastructure and others) are accountable and transparent reaching those who need them most and following the rule of law; 7. Peace Building – To organize and train barangay-based Peace and Development Councils and Advocates which include women. To promote and implement a system of Barangay Justice Service Systems (BJSS) to revitalize and modernize the traditional ways of settling disputes within the different tribal groups in order to prevent conflicts from exploding into violent encounters. Declaration of peace zones. Note: Good governance and sustainable livelihoods are also keys to peace building; 8. Sustainable Livelihoods – to encourage and enable rural communities to identify and implement projects that both protect, conserve and rehabilitate the environment as well as providing economic growth; 9. NGO-GO cooperation – To ensure that there is a genuine partnership between community and the local government so that community projects are based on felt needs; and 10. Disaster Risk Management – to reduce the toll of disasters through community participation in pre-disaster risk reduction planning and strategies, emergency response and post-disaster rehabilitation and reconstruction. Programs Related to Economic Development     

Cooperative Development and Income Generating Projects (Community-based Enterprise); Community Organization Community Development; Capability Building; Gender Equity and Development (Cross-cutting theme); and Issue Advocacy/Linkages and Networking (Cross-cutting theme)

Major Skills and Competencies     

Community Planning using the participatory tools, Community Organizing through Community Development Conducting and facilitating capability and capacity buildings to PO, NGOs, and Local Government Units, Linkaging with the Local Government Units that resulted to the formulation of municipal and barangay comprehensive development plans Conducting and facilitating program and project planning, monitoring and evaluation

Available Resources and Facilities     

Owned building in Cagayan de Oro where the head office is located with training and session hall Provincial offices in Bukidnon, Marawi City, Lanao del Sur, and Zamboanga del Sur Three service cars and motorbikes in the Members Enough desktops and laptops (Computers) in the head and provincial offices 27 committed and skilled regular staff

Member Teams Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Bukidnon Integrated Services Assistance Program, Inc. (MUCARD-BISAP)

Address Purok 3, Poblacion, 8721 Damulog, Bukidnon, Mindanao, Philippines

Target Beneficiaries  Manobo (Tribe)  Christian and Muslim farmers and women in Bukidnon province particularly in the municipalities of Damulog, Kibawe and Kadingilan.  Maguindanaon in Carmen, N. Cotabato

Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Community Services for Education and Economic Development, Inc. (MUCARD- CoSEED)

Purok Daisy, Poblacion, Vincenzo Sagun, Zambonaga del Sur,

Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Panginam O Masa, Inc. (MUCARD-POM)

Lombayao, Balindong, Lanao del Sur, Philippines

 Subanen (Tribe)  Christian and Muslim fisher folk, farmers, and women in Zamboanga del Sur province particularly in the municipalities of Dinas, Margosatubig, Pitogo and Vincenzo Sagun  Muslim Maranao farmers, women and children in the west of Lanao del Sur province particularly in the municipalities of Bacolod-Kalawi, Balindong, Kapatagan, Madamba and Madalem

Philippines

 Muslim Iranon in

Kapatagan, Lanao del Sur Muslim-Christian Agency for Rural Development – Ranao Integrated Assistance Program, Inc. (MUCARDRIAP)

Riverside, Madaya Lilod Marawi City, Philippines

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Imelda Ganaden-Manginsay

Overall Coordinator #12 11-15th Street, Nazareth Subdivision 9000 Cagayan de Oro City

Mindanao, Philippines Tel: (08822) 72-8542 (088) 857-2423 Fax: (088) 857-2423 Mobile: (+63)926-510-9040 Email: [email protected] www.mucaard.org

 Muslim Maranao farmers, youth and women in the East of Lanao del Sur and Lanao del Norte and in the City of Marawi particularly in the municipalities of Sanguiaran, Bubong, Ramain, Kapai, Piagapo and the Islamic City of Marawi in Lanao del Sur and in the municipalities of Balo-i, Pantar, Tagoloan and Munai in Lanao del Norte

NATIONAL CONFEDERATION OF COOPERATIVES (NATCCO) The National Confederation of Cooperatives (NATCCO) is a secondary level cooperative organization with a membership base that is spread across the Philippines. It was founded in 1977 by regional development cooperative federations. In 2004, it re-organized itself from a three-tier to a two-tier structure as part of its organizational transformation journey. As of September 2009, it has 337 primary co-operatives as members, four regional development councils (RDCs), four federations and unions, and one co-op insurance. The individual members are around 1.4 million (67 percent women) and their total assets amounting to about Php 46 billion in 2008. NATCCO member co-ops can be found both in the rural areas (64 percent) as well as urban places (36 percent). In general, 40 percent of the NATCCO members are into pure savings and credit operations, 56 percent are into multi-purpose operations, and a mere four percent are into pure service operations. It's also worth noting that 50-80 percent of the multi-purpose co-ops are into savings and credit. NATCCO’s vision is to be the most trusted world class financial cooperative network. Its Mission is to “deliver superior, relevant and ethical financial products and allied services anytime, anywhere.” To accomplish this mission, NATCCO’s flagship programs and services for its member-coops are focused on financial intermediation that includes: 6. Treasury & Credit NATCCO offers members Savings, Loans, and Investment Fund Management services 7. Cash Management NATCCO enables cooperatives to own, operate a remittance business. This profitable enterprise is made available to cooperatives through partnership with Western Union 8. Microfinance Innovations for Co-operatives (MICOOP) In partnership with qualified cooperatives, NATCCO sets up co-op branches in areas of high poverty incidence to provide microfinance services to enterprising poor. Its allied services include: 1. Training and Consultancy NATCCO aims to make the Filipino cooperative world class. Thus, cooperative leaders are given the best training that meets international standards set by the Association of Asian Confederation of Credit Unions (ACCU) and the International Cooperative Alliance (ICA).

2. Information Technology NATCCO is bringing the cooperative into the information age. Through IT, connectivity among cooperatives is enhanced. Likewise, co-op operations are made more efficient and effective NATCCO also provides web design and hosting services, cooperative-specific software development to enhance operations, and operation of automated teller machines. 3. Stabilization Fund Member co-ops contributing to this fund come together to help one another. It is a primary source of financing for cooperatives in financial distress. The failure of one cooperative affects the entire sector, so failure must be avoided at all cost. 4. Aflatoun Through this program, kids become responsible citizens and improve their lives by learning how to save and invest. NATCCO & primary co-ops tie up with local schools to educate children about finances and set up a system where children can deposit their savings in the cooperative. Aflatoun is approved by the Dept. of Education. 5. Mutual Benefit Association NATCCO provides cooperative members affordable insurance that covers not only the principal, but family members as well. 6. Enterprise Development NATCCO franchises Travel & Tours (Travel agency), Fonus (a funeral service cooperative), and CoopMart (retail outlets), which prove to be profitable to cooperatives, and useful to individual members since these enterprises provided low-priced but quality products and services. 7. Member Relations & Networking Group Knowing and managing the needs of NATCCO’s members is a full-time occupation. NATCCO conducts surveys of cooperatives, research, publish data, and create linkages among cooperatives. 8. Hostel NATCCO’s headquarters also has facilities for board and lodging for travelers and business facilities for small conferences. Since 1988, NATCCO has implemented a Gender and Development Program through its affiliate co-op organizations. It conducts Gender Sensitivity Training (GST) courses for its

members, staff, and leaders. It also implements various projects that enhance women's involvement in co-ops. NATCCO’s political arm is the Coop-NATCCO Partylist, primarily responsible for the drafting of the 2008 Cooperative Code (RA 9520), signed into law on February 17, 2009. Also in February 2009, NATCCO attained three International Standards Organization (ISO) Certifications: Quality Management, Environmental Management, and Occupational Health & Safety Management. The Network’s leaders felt that in order to help the cooperative sector become world class, NATCCO itself must first meet international standards in management procedures. LOCAL AFFILIATIONS  Philippine Cooperative Center  Caucus of Development NGO Networks

INTERNATIONAL AFFILIATIONS  The International Cooperative Alliance, Geneva, Switzerland  Association of Asian Confederation of Credit Unions, Bangkok, Thailand  Asian Women in Cooperative Development Forum

CONTACT DETAILS Diosdado L. Luna Development Communications Officer 227 J.P. Rizal Street, Project 4, Quezon City 1109 Tel: (02) 913-7011 to 15 Telefax: (02) 913-7016 Email: [email protected] www.natcco.coop

INTERNATIONAL PARTNERS Agriterra, the Netherlands Bank IM Bistum Essen, Germany Canadian Cooperative Association Child Savings International, Netherlands Cordaid, Netherlands Development International Dejardins, Canada Federation for a Sustainable Society, Inc., Switzerland ICCO InWEnt Germany Kooperativa Forbundet, Sweden Oikocredit PLAN International Rabobank, Netherlands

NGOs FOR FISHERIES REFORM (NFR) The NGOs for Fisheries Reform, Inc. (NFR) is a national coalition of 12 non-government organizations that promotes sustainable fisheries through the conduct of policy research and advocacy. It was established in 1994. NFR’s mission is to work as a catalyst for the creation of a policy environment that is conducive to fisherfolk empowerment as well as sustainable and equitable fisheries utilization, management and development. It seeks to mainstream sustainable development in fisheries through building and strengthening partnerships and ensuring the institutionalization of reforms at the national and local levels. In particular, NFR seeks to: 1) contribute to fisheries development that ensures the conservation of marine biodiversity; 2) promote policies and institutional arrangements that ensure effective management of fisheries resources at appropriate scales; and 3) improve policy advocacy work by strengthening links of local resource management initiatives to national level for effective policy reforms. It is a member-led coalition of twelve non-government organizations comprising the Board of Directors. The day to day operations is handled by the Secretariat headed by the Executive Director. Programs and Services NFR conducts policy research on varying fisheries issues and concerns particularly on four priority themes namely: fisheries management, women in fisheries, fisherfolk settlement and delineation of municipal waters. The policy research informs and complements NFR’s policy advocacy aimed at the executive (through formulation and passage of fisheries administrative orders) and legislative (through formulation and passage of house and senate bills). CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Dennis F. Calvan Executive Director 59-C Salvador St. PHILDHRRA Partnership Center, Varsity Hills Subdivision, Loyola Heights, Quezon City Telefax: (02) 927-0122 Email: [email protected]

PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH ORGANIZATION OF COMMUNITIES AND EDUCATION TOWARDS STRUGGLE FOR SELF-RELIANCE (PROCESS), BOHOL, INC. The Participatory, Research, Organization of Communities and Education towards Struggle for Self-Reliance (PROCESS)-Bohol, Inc. is a non-stock, non-profit organization, established in October 2, 1982 with the aim of creatively animating the formation of strong, autonomous people’s organizations and building up their capabilities for participatory and self-reliant development. PROCESS evolved from Sarilakas (from the Filipino term sariling lakas), a project sponsored by the International Labor Organization (ILO) and the then Ministry of Labor and Employment in 1981. Sarilakas was an attempt to stimulate grassroots initiatives among rural communities, particularly in the provinces of Antique and Batangas. Drawing from the Sarilakas experience, PROCESS continues to involve itself in the organization and empowerment of fishing and farming communities, particularly in the upland, lowland and coastal communities in Northern Luzon, Panay Island and the province of Bohol. PROCESS started its operation in Bohol on March, 1985 in the coastal municipality of Tubigon. Since then, PROCESS has expanded and facilitated the formation and strengthening of people’s organization (POs) situated province-wide comprising women, fisherfolks, farmers and urban poor sectors Currently, PROCESS-Bohol is covering 29 municipalities in the province of Bohol and 1 municipality in Southern Leyte. Total barangays covered is 58. Principles of Development PROCESS believes that grassroots organization should play a key role in transforming society and should effectively participate in local and national decision-making. By empowering the grassroots through their own collective reflection and action, PROCESS aims to make itself progressively immaterial as communities increasingly take control of their own destiny.

Vision: Improved quality of life of poor communities, particularly those of farmers and fishers who are God-loving, gender-sensitive and empowered, living in a healthy, just and equitable environment. Mission: To continuously empower the poor farmers and fishers towards effective and sustainable management of resources and promotion of just and gender-sensitive environment. Goal: Empowered POs that can claim and protect sectors’ rights, advance their interests and enhance their participation in society and governance. Objectives

2. To organize and institutionalize strong-gender sensitive people’s organizations (POs) at the barangay, municipal and provincial levels. 6. To facilitate active participation of partners in the rehabilitation, conservation, protection and sustainable use of natural resources through CBRM. 7. To provide education and enterprise interventions for the improvement of socio-economic condition of farmers and fishers. 8. To continuously build alliance for the enactment and implementation of local and national legislations, policies and programs relevant to the needs of the farmer and fisher sectors. 9. To develop and establish mechanisms for the sustainability of PROCESSS-Bohol operations Main Program/s Related to Economic Development 1. Integrated Coastal Resource Management Program (ICRMP) 2. Watershed Area Resource Management (WARM) Program Support Programs 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Research and Development Training and Consultancy Enterprise Development Legal Resource Development Community-Based Sustainable Tourism

Services 1. Community Organizing 2. Watershed Management 3. Water and Sanitation 4. Community-Based Coastal Resource Management 5. Training and Consultancy 6. Research and Development 7. Advocacy and Networking 8. Gender and Development 9. Family Planning and Reproductive Health 10. Population, Health and Environment (PHE) 11. Agro forestry 12. Project Monitoring and Evaluation 13. Financial Systems Installation 14. Consultancy Accreditations/Affiliations I.

Local Level 1. Bohol Alliance of NGOs (BANGON) 2. Bohol Initiators for Sustainable Agriculture Development (BISAD) 3. Bohol Coastal Resource Management Task Force (BCRMTF)

4. Bohol Integrated Water Resources Management Board 5. Abatan River Development Management Council 6. Wahig-Inabanga Watershed Management Council 7. Bohol Coastal Law Enforcement Council (CLEC) 8. Bohol Rescue Unit for Marine Mammals (BRUMM) 9. Provincial Development Council (PDC) 10. City Development Council (CDC) 11. Member of Provincial and Municipal Local Development Councils and local special bodies II.

Regional Level 1. Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) 2. Coastal Law Enforcement Alliance in Region 7 (CLEAR 7) 3. Regional Development Council 4. Population Network (PopNet 7) 5. Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) 6. Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR)

III.

National Level 1. Population, Health and Environment (PHE) Network 2. Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC) 3. Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) 4. Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) 5. Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) 6. National Water and Sanitation Association (NAWASA) of the Philippines. 7. Founding member of the Philippine Community-Based Sustainable Tourism Association (PhilCBSTA) 8. Philippine Watershed Management Coalition (PWMC) 9. Coastal Resource Management Network (CRMNet) 10. NGOs for Fishery Reform (NFR)

IV. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. V.

International Level Coastal Zone Asia Pacific (CZAP) Conservation Farming in the Tropical Uplands (CFTU) Indonesia, Cebu, Bohol, Leyte and Davao (INCEBOLEDA) watershed practitioners alliance Women in Leadership Development (WILD) World Agroforestry Centre/International Center for Research in AgroForestry (ICRAF) SEAFish for Justice – an alliance of CBCRM practitioners and advocated in Southeast Asia Alliance of Solidarity for Industrial Aquaculture (ASIA)

Academe 1. University of San Carlos (USC) – Water Laboratory

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Holy Name University (HNU) – Research University of Bohol (UB) Central Visayas State College of Agriculture, Forestry and Technology (CVSCAFT) University of Waikato, New Zealand Leyte State University

Achievements 1. Facilitated the formation and strengthening of Ubay Water Sanitation Cooperative (UWASCO) under the Central Visayas Water and Sanitation Project (CVWSP) funded by AusAID in collaboration with the provincial government of Bohol. This Coop successfully managed the municipal waterworks of the municipality of Ubay, Bohol. 2. Facilitated the formation and strengthening of Farmers Association of Owac (FAO) Owac, Bilar managing a successful Level 2 & 3 Water Systems Project. 3. Currently the Regional Chair of the PhilDHRRA-Visayas, a network of development NGOs in the Visayas Regions. 4. Vice Chair of PhilDHRRA- National 5. Facilitated the formation and strengthening of 58 people’s organizations (POs) in the provinces of Bohol and Southern Leyte. 6. All the POs formed are registered at the government registering agencies such as SEC, DOLE and CDA. All POS are accredited by the local government units at the municipal levels. 7. Facilitated the formation of 2 provincial federations: MAKAMASA – Bohol (a provincial federation of small fishers) and PAGKAINA –Bohol ( a provincial federation of rural women. These two federations are accredited by the provincial local government unit. 8. Recognized as one of the leading NGOs in Bohol working closely with the local government units with expertise on Water Systems Development, watershed management, coastal resource management and gender and development. 9. Nominated in the Social Development Excellence Awards for Local Governance by the Philippine Business for Social Progress- Visayas 10. Outstanding accredited co-partner in the partnership with the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) 11. Cited as an outstanding non-government organization by the government agencies, to wit: Provincial Agricultural and Fishery Council (1989), Presidential Commission for the Urban Poor and the City Government of Tagbilaran M(1994), Department of Labor and Employment (1995), Department of Agrarian Reform in the Belgian Integrated Agrarian Reform Support Program (1999) CONTACT DETAILS Emilia M. Roslinda Executive Director Purok 5, Esabo Road, Tiptip District, Tagbilaran City, Bohol, Philippines Tel: (038)416-0067; 500-1992 Mobile: (+63) 920-906-7446

Email: [email protected] www.processbohol.org

PHILIPPINE BUSINESS FOR SOCIAL PROGRESS (PBSP) PBSP was founded in 1970 by business leaders who believed that entrepreneurs should take a more active role in helping uplift the lives of the poor. With more than 240 member-companies, PBSP is the business sector’s vehicle in delivering organized, professional, and sustainable assistance to the underprivileged sectors such as landless farmers, fisherfolk, rural workers, urban poor, and indigenous communities, as well as micro, small- and medium-scale enterprises. Programs and Services: 6. Area Resource Management Program

  

Uses integrated and community-based approaches to poverty reduction in the country’s poorest provinces Organizes, trains and builds capabilities of poverty groups in selected communities to implement livelihood and informal micro-enterprises Provides livelihood and informal micro-enterprises access to credit and technical assistance until they qualify for formal sector financing 7. Small and Medium Enterprise Credit (SMEC) Program

 

Provides MSMEs access to credit; and Extends training and technical assistance to participating banks to hone their capabilities in handling the SME sector’s needs.

To access a SMEC loan can be accessed if borrower meet the following qualifications:    

For a sole proprietorship, the owner must be a citizen or permanent legal resident of the Philippines; For corporation, partnership, or business organization, Philippine nationals must own more than 50% of the enterprise; Have its principal place of business in the Philippines; and Have a 100% privately-owned business with total assets of not more than P100 million.

Eligible purpose of the SMEC loan are as follows:  

Starting a new business Expanding an existing business

Use of the SMEC loan are the following:   

To acquire fixed assets such as land, buildings and machineries For related services such as equipment installation, testing and commissioning As working capital

8. Business Advisory Program (BAP)



A unique business advisory service that aims to strengthen micro, and small enterprises by providing access to technology and expertise through volunteer advisers.



Has a roster of professionals who provide volunteer business advisory services in the following fields: - Marketing Management - Production Management - Organization and Management - Financial Management - Information and Communication Technology - Quality and Productivity Standards



Eligible Industry Sectors - Small manufacturing particularly those engaged in gifts, toys production, - Houseware manufacturing, furniture and shoes - Agribusiness particularly those engaged in off-farm production - Food processing enterprises - ICT service providers including Internet cafes and other knowledge-based - services - Tourism



To become a BAP Client: - Apply for BAP advisory services by accomplishing the Application for Assistance Form. - PBSP-BAP will assess and validate your application and conduct diagnosis of your business needs. 9. Philippine Business in Development (BiD) Challenge



A business plan competition supporting innovative business ideas that reduce poverty.



Participants are provided with coaches to help them write their complete business plans. Participants are also exposed to a network of interested investors at the BiD Network website and at an annual Marketplace event where investors and entrepreneurs meet face-to-face.



Top business plans are awarded with prize money.



To join the Philippine BiD Challenge, apply online at http://philippines.bidnetwork.org and submit a 3-page business concept. The business concept should be: - Creation of new business or expansion - With a total investment of PhP 350,000 or more - Profit-generating in a span of 3 years - Addresses a specific social concern

Those who pass the first screening shall submit a complete business plan. They are provided with coaches to help them craft their full-blown plans. Source(s) of Funds:  Contributions of Member-companies  United States Agency for International Development (USAID)  United Nations – World Food Program (WFP)  International Youth Foundation (IYF)/USAID  Fundacion Humanismo y Democracia (H+D)/Agencia Española de Cooperacion Internacional para el Desarollo (AECID)  The Asia Foundation  United Way International/Citi Foundation  Canadian Executive Service Organization (CESO)  Angelo King Foundation, Inc.  Asian Development Bank  British Embassy Eligibility: Project Partners/Beneficiaries/Sectors  Local NGOs and POs  All Sectors CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Gil T. Salazar Executive Director Philippine Social Development Center Magallanes corner Real Streets, Intramuros, 1002 Manila Tel: (02) 527-7741 to 48 Fax: (02) 527-3743 Email: [email protected] Website: www.pbsp.org.ph

PHILIPPINE CEFE NETWORK FOUNDATION INC. (FORMERLY COMPETENCYBASED ECONOMIES THROUGH FORMATION OF ENTERPRISE, CEFE) The Philippine CEFE Network Foundation is a dynamic, innovative & development oriented organization which believes that entrepreneurship plays a key role in the country’s development. It offers a program comprised of a set of training instruments designed to stimulate positive interventions in the small and medium enterprise development process. This program is particularly geared for new and existing businesses, farmers, educators, and decision makers, and diverse target groups. Programs/courses are offered through local network of CEFE partner organizations, CEFE Trainers/Consultants. Programs and Services: CEFE Courses:  New Business Creation Course  Business Improvement /Management Course  Basic and Advance Entrepreneurship Courses for Farmers  Training of Trainers on CEFE Methodology  Facilitators Training on Entrepreneurship CEFE Products:  BEST Game Kit  Entreseries Games - Entrefarm (Enterprising Farmers) Game - Entrefish (Enterprise Fishing ) Game - Entresoc (Enterprising Society) Game - Entrecraft (Enterprising Handicrafts ) Game - Entrepow (Enpowering the Poor) Game CEFENet Services:  Needs Assessment  Curriculum/Course Development  New product development  Structured learning Exercise Development  Organizational Development and Capability Building on Enterprise  International and Local Licensing for CEFE Trainers  Trainers Exchange through the CEFE International  Regional Networking and Linkaging Services  Research and development CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Nanette S. Villanueva

Executive Director

10 Kasaganaan St. Kasibulan Village Cainta, Rizal Tel: (02) 655-3296 Email: [email protected][email protected] www.cefephil.net

PHILIPPINE PARTNERSHIP FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN RURAL AREAS (PhilDHRRA) The Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) is a network of sixty - seven (67) non-government organizations (as of 2007) involved in various development activities in rural communities all over the country. Today, PhilDHRRA continues to be a national network of social development organizations (SDOs) committed to the pursuit and realization of agrarian reform and rural development in the Philippines. It is part of the chain of DHRRA networks throughout the Asian region aspiring for a common vision of rural development in their respective countries. Now in its 20th year of development work, it operates in 70 of the 75 provinces in the Philippines. A national secretariat and three regional secretariats in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao manage the day-today operations of the network. Central Strategies PhilDHRRA reaffirms the Sustainable Integrated Area Development (SIAD) as its overall framework in conducting programs in rural communities. It is anchored on the need to integrate the various initiatives in a geographically defined area to address diverse yet interrelated issues of the people. As a framework, it needs to be translated into specific programs depending on specific needs of the communities, the resources and capacities available. The strategy assumes that the development and implementation of SIAD programs are the main responsibility of the NGO members. The role of PhilDHRRA as a network is to provide support to them so that they may become more capacitated to implement those program and projects at the ground level. With its commitment to rural development, the members of the network adopted the Integrated Provincial Sustainable Agriculture, Agrarian Reform and Rural Development (IPSAARRD) as its core strategy. Concretizing this strategy are initiatives in SIAD in areas where PhilDHRRA members operate. IPSAARRD:  Observes the key principle of equity-led sustainable development by focusing on contiguous lowland/upland/coastal ecosystem areas at the provincial level;  Targets comprehensive integration of existing programs and efforts by building on their gains and strengths and fusing local governance and reproductive health into their implementation;  Strives to ensure resource tenure, sustainable productivity and cooperative development; and,  Fortifies multipartite partnership mechanisms to enclose political boundaries for more concerted development efforts. Servicing the needs of NGOs in the rural areas in general, the following is the competency the network has focused on that is related to Economic Development:

Agrarian Reform and Rural Development Organizing rural communities particularly among the farmers (lowland), indigenous peoples (upland and forested areas), and the fisherfolks (coastal communities) – building their capabilities for self-help and self-determination. Cutting across is the concern for gender equity. Implementation of community-based projects using the SIAD framework, with particular focus on: 1. Resource tenure (land distribution, protection of ancestral domains and indigenous people’s rights, coastal resource management); 2. Land productivity consistent with the principles of sustainable agriculture; 3. Forest and environmental protection; and 4. Community based - enterprises The Tripartite Partnership for Agrarian Reform and Rural Development (TriPARRD) was launched in 1989. The program utilizes a tripartite approach of active partnership among NonGovernment Organizations (NGOs), People’s Organizations (POs), and Government Organizations (GOs) to expedite land transfer, build strong and viable POs, and increase farmers’ income through improved productivity and optimal land use. Initially, it operated in the provinces of Antique, Bukidnon and Camarines Sur; and expanded to include the provinces of Iloilo and Davao del Norte (now Compostela Valley). Also through the tripartite approach, the Tripartite Partnership for Upland Development (TriPUD) ensures the meaningful participation of upland communities in developing and implementing community-based upland resource management plans. TriPUD’s areas covered the provinces of Sorsogon, Davao del Norte and Leyte. The Tripartite Partnership for Marine and Aquatic Resource and Rural Development (TriMARRD) sought to secure the use of municipal waters for small fishers by influencing local ordinances, and the passage of relevant laws (e.g. National Fisheries Code). CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Anna Maria Leida “Chem” N. Pacaño National Coordinator PhilDHRRA National 59 C. Salvador St., Loyola Heights Quezon City 1108 Philippines Tel: (02) 436-0702 Fax: (02) 426 0385 Email: [email protected] www.phildhrra.net Mr. Macario “Mac” Jusayan Regional Coordinator PhilDHRRA Luzon 59 C. Salvador St., Loyola Heights Quezon City 1108 Philippines

Telefax: (02) 426-0710 Email: [email protected] Ms. Luz Angeles “Luchie” Almagro-Blanco Regional Coordinator PhilDHRRA Visayas 102 Arbor Ville, Borromeo Compound, Barangay Kalunusan 6500 Cebu City Tel. (032) 253-4200 Email: [email protected] Mr. Rolando “Rollie” Abando Regional Coordinator PhilDHRRA Mindanao  6 Lunar St., Doña Vicenta Village, Davao City  Burgos Pacana St., Cagayan de Oro City Tel. (082) 227-7647 (Davao City) Tel. (08822) 722820 (Cagayan de Oro City) Email: [email protected]

RAMON ABOITIZ FOUNDATION INC. The Ramon Aboitiz Foundation’s vision, in its 42 years of existence in development work in the Visayas and Mindanao, has consistently been “Touching People, Shaping the Future.” It has worked towards elevating lives through a comprehensive approach that champions best practices in community development. The position calls for the foundation to be: collaborative—adhering to an inclusive process as a venue for sharing knowledge to gather the best resources, and providing opportunities to establish partnerships; holistic—conceptualizing programs that look into multi-issues and draw comprehensive solutions, according to the foundation’s and the partners’ resources, with the end of empowering people; and a role model—leading communities to sustained change and results by utilizing best practices at the same time exploring innovative solutions, and setting an example to other development partners by promoting their work and causes. Focus Areas 6. Integrated development, with specific concerns in community development, health and the environment 7. Culture and heritage 8. Leadership and citizenship 9. Micro-finance and entrepreneurship 10. Education. Services 5. 6. 7. 8.

Grants and awards Institutional development and planning Knowledge sharing and advocacy Services and facilities

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Dominica B. Chua

Chief Operating Officer 35 Lopez Jaena Street, Cebu City 6000 Tel: (032) 418-7234 Email: [email protected]

SEEP BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SERVICES (BDS) The SEEP Business Development Services (BDS) Working Group is dedicated to developing micro, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) that increase income and employment around the world, by:   

Identifying, documenting and disseminating best practices in BDS; Educating the public and funders about the importance of BDS, and about practitioner perspectives on BDS strategies; Contributing to global standards and guidelines; networking with and learning from fellow BDS Working Group members and sharing that learning with other SEEP members.

The BDS Working Group has 3 main goals, and several activities to help accomplish each: 



Goal 1: Identify, Document and Disseminate Best Practices in BDS -

Activity 1: SEEP Guide to Business Development Services and Resources The major collaborative work effort of the BDS working group.

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Activity 2: Deliver BDS Training State of the Art in BDS: in July in Washington, DC and potentially at other sites as opportunities arise. The Working Group provides input to the Action for Enterprise and the BDS Coordinator.

Goal 2: Educate the public and funders about the importance of BDS, and about practitioner perspectives on BDS strategies. Theme: to maintain poverty alleviation and economic development as the main goal of BDS initiatives.



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Activity 1: Continue reactive Donor Dialogue and dialogue with the Microenterprise Coalition

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Activity 2: Launch an Education campaign about BDS Secondary Activity of the BDS Working Group Members.

Goal 3: Network with and learn from fellow BDS Working Group members, and share learnings with other SEEP members. -

Activity 1: Hold month meetings in which learning takes place, as we accomplish the above goals. Primary activity of the BDS working group members.

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Activity 2: BDS WORKING GROUP LISTSERVE: SEEP Members may join the working group listserve and hear about working group meetings, discussions and be kept

up-to-date about BDS events. Secondary activity of the BDS working group members. OBJECTIVES: The SEEP Business Development Services (BDS) Working Group is dedicated to developing micro, small and medium sized enterprises (SEs) that increase income and employment around the world, by: 

Identifying, documenting and disseminating best practices in BDS;



Educate the public and funders about the importance of BDS, and about practitioner perspectives on BDS strategies; Contribute to global standards and guidelines; and



Network with and learn from fellow BDS Working Group members and share that learning with other SEEP members.

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Hina Shah Director ICECD E-1/41, Sterling City, Bopal 380 058 Gujarat, India

E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]

SENTRO PARA SA IKAUUNLAD NG KATUTUBONG AGHAM AT TEKNOLOHIYA, INC. (SIKAT) Established in 1991, SIKAT promotes community-based coastal resource management, conducts researches in sustainable fisheries, and advocates for fisheries policy reform. SIKAT undertakes community organizing assistance, popular education and sustainable livelihood development. Program and Services 1. Romblon Passage Integrated Coastal Resource Management- the program aims to empower the municipal fishers in protecting and managing their coastal resources to promote social and economic justice & equity, enhance gender-fairness and holistic development to actualize participatory democracy. The program components include community organizing, resource management, sustainable livelihood, law enforcement and community-based social services. 2. Fisherfok Settlement Model-Building- the project aims to explore the different tenurial tools and strategies to acquire tenurial security for the coastal settlers. Area of Operation  Province of Zambales  Province of Romblon CONTACT DETAILS Chito E. Dugan Executive Director 73-F Maginoo St., Brgy. Central, Quezon City 1101 Telefax:(02) 927-2325

E-mail: [email protected] www.sikatphil.org

SILAY-MAGALONA FOUNDATION, INC. (SIMAG) SIMAG Foundation, Inc. started as a socio-economic committee in 1987 to respond to the sugar crises affecting the sugar industry in the province of Negros Occidental specifically in the district of Silay City and Municipality of E.B. Magalona in the northern side of the province. The committee was composed of volunteer citizens of the district, mostly sugarcane planters, who joined hands to combat the widespread poverty and malnutrition affecting the sugar workers and their families. The word “SIMAG” comes from the Foundation’s areas of coverage; Silay City and the town of E.B. Magalona. During the infancy stage of the organization, it initiated various projects primarily to address the hunger and malnutrition problems such as: feeding program for the malnourished children, introduction and implementation of the Bio-Intensive Gardening concept in every household, agricultural projects such as planting of cash crops like rice, corn, peanut, monggo through a land-sharing scheme with the planter-owners under the Food for Work Program of the government. The SIMAG FOUNDATION, INC. was then officially established in 1989 by the Asociacion de Hacenderos de Silay-Saravia, Inc. (AHSSI) and the Associated Planters of Silay-Saravia, Inc. (APSSI). It now seeks to wholistically improve the quality of life of the sugar workers and their families in the milling district of Silay City and E.B. Magalona covering over 320 large and small farms. With an integrated three-fold approach in Livelihood, Health and Education, SIMAG has over the years organized and financed Community Cooperatives in over a hundred farms, trained and assisted about a hundred Volunteer Health Workers throughout the area, and provided scholarships to almost a thousand deserving high school and college students. Through the continued support of Association Planters - members, with skilled, experienced and committed managers and staff, in close coordination with government and non-government agencies, and in active partnership with the farm community leaders, SIMAG envisions the flowering of empowered sustainable communities capable of contributing to the progressive development of the sugar industry and the province. Vision st Advancing to the 21 Century Serve as catalyst in transforming a home in a sugarcane farm to a prosperous household in a progressive community. Mission Professionalizing Grassroot Organizations Assist each SIMAG member in maximizing his full potential by providing professional opportunities and services Goals and Objectives



To harness all available human, natural and material resources for the social, political, economic and spiritual upliftment of the quality of life of the working communities in Silay and E.B. Magalona.



To facilitate and engage in activities which can provide relief assistance primarily to distressed families of sugar workers, and secondarily to other beneficiaries which may be decided by the Board.



To facilitate and provide educational services which will improve the livelihood skills, health care, community-oriented values and democratic ideals of the working communities.



To facilitate the implementation of livelihood projects that could address the food deficiency and malnutrition problems, and which could provide or generate extra income.



To facilitate, engage and promote basic social services which will improve the living conditions of the working communities.

Program Areas: A. Livelihood - Financial/Loan Assistance - Capability Building Training - Skills Training B. Health - VHW Training, Volunteerism & Family Management - Botika ng Barangay - Environmental Sanitation (Clean & Green) C. Education - Educational Assistance Program for Elementary, High School & College - Personal Safety Lessons - Summer Learning Experience (College Scholars) - Education Reform Project D. Special Projects - Children Development Project Partners LOCAL  Asociacion de Hacenderos de Silay-Saravia, Inc.  Associated Planters of Silay-Saravia, Inc.

NATIONAL  Philippine NGO Support Program (PHANSuP) Inc.  Philippine Center for Population and

INTERNATIONAL  Les Amis De Soeur Emmanuelle (ASMAE), France  British Embassy – UK

 Sugar Industry Foundation, Inc.  Department of Labor and Employment  Department of Health  Department of Education – Silay City Division Office  Technical Education and Skills Development Authority  Province of Negros Occidental  City Government of Silay  Municipal Government of E.B. Magalona  Office of Congressman Jose Carlos Lacson  Office of Board Member Manuel Fredrick “Manman” Ko  Negros-Japan Human Resource Exchange Association, Inc. (NJRHEA)  Hope Foundation, Inc.  Monde Nissin Corporation

       

Development, Inc. (PCPD) Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse (CPTCSA) Philippine Educational Theater Association (PETA) Philippine NGO Council on Population, Health & Welfare, Inc. (PNGOC) Philippine Council for NGO Certification (PCNC) Association of Foundations, Inc. (AF) Institute of Reproductive Health Philippines (IRH) National Pharmaceutical Foundation, Inc. (NPF) Philippine Development Assistance Programme, Inc. (PDAP)

CONTACT DETAILS Ms. Fely D. Flores Administrative Manager

Mr. Francis Joseph J. Jalandoni Executive Director G/F AHSSI Building, Rizal St., Barangay Mambulac, 6116 Silay City, Negros Occidental Telefax: (034) 495-1549

E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected]

SURIGAO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (SEDF) The Surigao Economic Development Foundation Inc. was formed in 1985 as a private sector’s response to the damages of super Typhoon Nitang in September 1984. From rehabilitation work and community development, the foundation had consolidated its efforts to two main services: the Grameen-based PADAYON Microfinance and the PAGLAUM Sustainable Development Programs. SEDF’s mission is to advocate, support, initiate, develop and implement sustainable development programs and projects that empower women, men and their communities to develop themselves. It intends to contribute to the poverty alleviation of the people of Surigao del Norte and Caraga by: 1. Maintaining and expanding coverage if Grameen-based, and other microfinance programs and services; 2. Implementing sustainable development–focused projects in partnership with local, national and international agencies, LGUs and communities; 3. Initiating and cooperating in the consolidation of development efforts with developmentoriented NGOs & other partners to share and maximize use of resources; and 4. Forging and strengthening network and linkages to influence local and regional policy directions towards an integrated development approach. SEDF’s PADAYON Microfinance Program is concurrently serving the Provinces of Surigao del Norte and Dinagat Islands and one town of Agusan del Norte. Its PAGLAUM Sustainable Development Program includes projects on coastal resource management, protected landscape and seascape protection, biodiversity conservation and alternative, ecology-friendly income generating initiatives. CONTACT DETAILS Amparito Carmen C. Cubil Executive Director 0780 Ortiz St., Surigao City Tel: (086) 826-4446; 826-6287

TAMBUYOG DEVELOPMENT CENTER (TDC) Founded in 1984, Tambuyog called attention to declining fishery resources and unabated proverty in coastal communities through interdisciplinary research, creative information and education campaign, community organizing, policy advocacy and constituency building. Tambuyog traces its roots in the communities along Lingayen Gulf in Pangasinan, where researched from the University of the Philippines conducted research and organizing. Hence, the name of tambuyog, a Pangasinense word for carabao’s horn which symbolizes the call for unity. Its founding was a response to the situation where efforts in community development were focused mainly on peasants and the agriculture sector, while the issues of the fisherfolk remained at the periphery. An important result of Tambuyog’s work after a decade is the substantial amount of data it has gathered on the political, social and economic situation in coastal communities, and the status of various aquatic resources and the coastal environment. Linking the biological with social, economic and political analysis, Tambuyog developed an alternative model or approach to development – community-based coastal resource management (CBCRM). The CBCRM approach centers on the role of communities in the management of their resources – too often overlooked by government programs – and their rights to enjoy the benefits resulting from their collective actions. In Tambuyog’s belief, communities ultimately are the best resource managers because they have the greatest stake in the preservation of resources which they depend on for survival. The gap between the ideal and the present capacities to manage remains, though. But through the exchange and synergy of indigenous or local knowledge with communities may be able to slowly manifest ownership of the coast resources. This assertion to “ownership”, “claim”, or “entitlement” --- called community property rights --- marginalized sectors of the fishing industry. Vision 1. Tambuyog as a dynamic and leading service provider and advocacy center for sustainable fisheries and aquaculture operating from the local to the regional level; 2. Organized fishers, composed of men and women, enjoying exclusive use of fishing grounds with optimum yield from the sustainable utilization of capture fisheries and socially and environmentally responsible aquaculture; 3. Empowered , prosperous and interdependent coastal communities with options in life; 4. Socially and environmentally responsible and globally competitive fisheries industry that provides socio economic benefits for Filipinos 5. Government that is responsive, accountable, and effective in environmental management and sustainable fisheries industry development with stakeholder participation; and 6. Healthy and productive environment Mission

Lead the advocacy, facilitate mechanism for and provide services on the enhancement of community property rights, the creation of community-based social enterprises and effective fishery resource governance, integrating gender for the sustainable development of the fishing industry from local up to international level. Goal Integration of fishery resource governance and social enterprise development to increase bargaining power and reduce poverty among small fishers towards the sustainable development of the fishing industry. Objectives 1. Transformation of fisheries into a viable and sustainable industry with institutions and markets internalizing costs 2. Improved the fisheries management and trade policies at the regional and global level 3. Establishment of community based social enterprises owned, operated or managed by fishers and their partners 4. Enhanced participation and entitlements of women in sustainable fisheries development by addressing their gender needs and interests 5. Development of TDC into an organization with networks that have strong capacity to influence public and private sectors in East and South East Asia

CONTACT DETAILS Ma. Socorro Perpetita M. Mercader

Executive Director Unit 321 Eagle Court Condominium 26 Matalino Street, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 928-6289 Telefax: (02) 926-4415 Email: [email protected] www.tambuyog.org

UCPB-CIIF FINANCE and DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (COCOFINANCE) Due to the restrictions imposed by banking laws and regulations on commercial banks, the UCPB–CIIF Finance and Development Corporation (COCOFINANCE) was created on November 3, 1994 to extend concessional credit facilities for small coconut farmers. Thus, Cocofinance is considered a social arm of the UCPB-CIIF Group. In addition to providing concessional credit, the COCOFINANCE is engaged in enterprise development, i.e., the provision of business development services, such as marketing, trading and management support services and other trainings, to enhance the viability of livelihood activities of accredited coconut farmers’ organizations. Vision “To be the lead provider of opportunities in improving the quality of life of small coconut farmers and coconut producing communities.” Mission “To transform coconut communities into productive and self-sustaining villages by providing enterprise development opportunities and accessible credit facilities.” Ultimately, the COCOFINANCE envisions that its assistance will increase the coconut farming sector’s income by: 1. Broadening the base of farmer-borrowers with access to affordable credit; 2. Increasing productivity through improved yields, good infrastructure, better technology, market linkage support, and capability building; 3. Giving farmers ownership and control of post-harvest facilities; and 4. Providing small coconut farmers secondary or alternative sources of income. To achieve these goals, the company has financed the livelihood projects of coconut farmers through cooperatives and rural financial institutions (RFIs) as conduits. With the infusion of additional funds in 2003, the company added other programs -- the Buklod- Unlad (BUKO) Program, Magniniyog Tungo sa Tunay na Pag-unlad (MATUTUPAD) Program and the Cocopreneur Financing Program. It has also been working with the CIIF Oil Mills Group for the involvement of coconut farmers in livelihood activities while participating in the latter’s supply chain through the Coconut Farm Development Program. The BUKO program finances livelihood/ income-generating activities of coconut farmers’ wives/ daughters. The MATUTUPAD program is intended to improve the stability and maturity level of coconut farmer organizations and finance their members’ economic projects. As a result of these efforts, the company has helped numerous coconut farming households. The COCOFINANCE continues to search for the best alternatives of improving the income of coconut farming communities given their meager resources.

Summary of COCOFINANCE Lending Programs 1. Cooperative Micro-Enterprise Credit Program (Window I) Objective: Provide micro credit to farmer-based and owned cooperatives and organizations for relending to fund income generating activities of coconut farmer members Client: Cooperatives Eligibility Requirements:  CDA Registered  In operation for at least 3 years  At least 30% or 100, whichever is lower, of the coop's membership are coconut farmers  Must meet criteria on membership size, paid-up capital, networth, net profit and capital build-up  Credit and background checkings yield no adverse findings  No outstanding past due dealings Loan Features:  Loan Amount : Up to 200% of the coop/CFO's unimparied capital or Debt-Equity Ratio of 3:1, whichever is lower  Eligible Borrowers: Coconut Farmers  Interest Rate: 10.5% p.a  Security Support: PDC, JSS 2. Rural Financial Institution Micro-Enterprise Credit Program (Window II) Objective: Provide funds to RFI's (in coconut producing provinces where there are no or limited number of accredited coops) to be used for relending to finance the income generating activities of coconut farmers Client: Rural Banks / Cooperative Banks Eligibility Requirements:  RFI's service areas must be predominantly coconut-producing and/or growing  Capital to risk asset ratio of at least 10%  Past due ratio of not higher that 15%  Had profitable operations for the last 3 years  Have a paid-up capital that meets BSP requirements  Willing to serve the legitimate credit needs of UCFDC's target clientele, i.e., coconut farmers  No outstanding past due dealings  Must meet the reserve requirements of the BSP  Credit and background checkings yield no adverse findings  Latest BSP Examination must show no adverse findings

Loan Features:  Loan Amount : Minimum - 500,000 maximum - up to the extent of allowable expansion of risk assets of RFI  Eligible Borrowers: Coconut Farmers  Interest Rate: 91-day T-bill rate or 9%-10.50% p.a., whichever is higher  Security Support: PDC, JSS

3. Small and Medium Enterprise Credit Program (Window III) Objective: Provide funds for working capital or fixed assets acquisition to the cooperative or the cooperative member's project. Client: Cooperatives/ coconut farmer- members endorsed by cooperatives Eligibility Requirements: Must be an accredited cooperative/CFO or coconut farmer member of accredited cooperative/CFO Loan Features:  Loan Amount: Project Cost, DER of 80:20  Eligible Borrowers: Cooperatives Coconut farmer- members  Interest Rate: 10.5% p.a. for working capital and 12% p.a. for fixed asset acquisition  Security Support: REM, CHM, PDC, JSS

4. Maniniyog-Tungo sa Tunay na Pag-Unlad (MATUTUPAD) Program Objectives:  To fast track the achievement of maturity level of the coconut farmer's organization as a viable business unit such that the usual 3-year development period can be overcome;  To finance the business requirement of at least 50,000 farmers over a 2-year period;  To increase real household income of target farmers by 20% over a 5-year period Client: Cooperatives; Coconut Farmers and Farm Workers Organizations (CFFOs) Eligibility Requirements:  Organized group of coconut farmers registered with appropriate government agency  Must have authority to enter into contracts, borrow and lend money  Minimum of 50 regular members, of whom at least 80% are coconut farmers/farm workers  Minimum paid-up capital of P 25,000 or P 500 per member  No existing past due loans with other lending institutions  Must be willing to adopt systems and procedures prescribed by UCFDC  Must be willing to cooperate with and support each member of the group

Loan Features:  Loan Amount: P 75,000.00 or 3x paid-up capital  Eligible Borrowers: Coconut farmers as defined by PCA  Interest Rate: 12% p.a.  Security Support: PDC, JSS

5. Buklod-Unlad (BUKO) Program A. Conduited BUKO Client: Grameen / ASA model Implementing Institutions Eligibility Requirements: 1. At least 2 years experience 2. Micro-finance Portfolio at Risk of not more than 5% 3. Overall past due ratio of not more than 15% 4. With Manual of Operations for Micro-Finance 5. With software for Micro-Finance 6. No loans in arrears with any credit institution Loan Features: Loan Amount : Up to P10.0 M per BUKO site to be opened Eligible Borrowers : Wives of coconut farmers Interest Rate : 9.75%; 10.5%; or12% p.a. depending on existing pass-on rate Security Support : PDC, JSS

6. Cocopreneur Financing Program Objective: The program shall provide financial support to entrepreneurs in the form of loans for coco-based businesses / projects. Client: Single proprietorship or Corporations engaged in a business making use of the coconut or coconut by-products Eligibility Requirements:  Borrower must have no past due dealings with any other creditor  Project must have been in operation for at least 3 years.  Borrower must project a sincere concern for the improvement of livelihood of coconut farmers in the proposed area of operation  Projects with a pre-identified market or pre-contracted marketing agreement shall be given priority. Loan Features:  Loan Amount : -Up to P 10.0 M loan to Coconut Farmer ratio of P 80,000 : 1 - DebtEquity Ratio of 80:20 or 4:1, whichever is lower  Eligible Borrowers: Entrepreneurs  Interest Rate: For working capital - 12% per annum For asset acquisition -14% per annum



Security Support: All acceptable collaterals and/or any negotiable instruments, preferably but not limited to Real Estate Mortgage, Chattel Mortgage, Surety Agreement or JSS and other marketable bank instruments

Summary of Business Development Services 1. Market Support Objective: Generate or expand existing markets clients for increased revenues. Client: Client-entrepreneurs; cooperatives and their coconut farmer members Eligibility Requirements: Active clients of Cocofinance Features: Clients are sponsored to participate in trade fairs and market encounters at the regional or national level. 2. Networking Objective: Discuss issues challenges and prospects affecting the affairs of cooperatives and other clients; also serves as forum for clients to interact and trade. Client: Client-entrepreneurs; cooperatives and their coconut farmer members Eligibility Requirements: Active clients of Cocofinance Features: Clients assemble quarterly at the regional level. Arrangments are made by the Branch Office. A representative From the Head Office participates. 3. Systems Installation Objective: To assist cooperatives in putting systems, procedures and guidelines in place to hasten the achievement of maturity and stability of the organization Client: Cooperatives Eligibility Requirements: Active clients of Cocofinance Features: Starts with Operations diagnosis, VMG formulation, strategic planning and ends with an action plan. The Action Plan is reviewed regulary. The action Plancontains not only revenue targets but also the timetable for the formulation and establishment of policies, systems, procedures as guide in the operations of the cooperative. 4. Livelihood Skills Training

Objective: Provide clients with ideas of other business opportunities that they may go into to augment their income. Client: Client-entrepreneurs; cooperatives and their coconut farmer members; coconut farmer borrowers of client-rural financial institutions and MFIs Eligibility Requirements: Active clients of Cocofinance and their coconut farmer borrowers Features: Usually done locally, local Resource Persons are invited to conduct livelihood skills trainings. In the absence of resource persons, a video of livelihood packages is shown to clients for them to be able to generate business ideas. 5. Other Trainings Objective: To equip directors, officers and staff of cooperatives with skills, knowledge and behavior needed in running the cooperative and implementing projects; and for all members of the cooperative to achieve cohesion and sustainability. Client: Client-entrepreneurs; cooperatives and their coconut farmer members; coconut farmer borrowers of client-rural financial institutions and MFIs Eligibility Requirements: Active clients of Cocofinance and their coconut farmer borrowers Features: Trainings such as Leadership, Management, Good Governance, Values Enhancement, etc. are conducted when needed. Trainins on Credit Management, Bookkeeping, etc. are also conducted when needed.

CONTACT DETAILS Mr. Ronald A. Budomo Area Head 3/F Duran Bldg., Bonifacio St. Cabanatuan City Telefax: (044) 464-2714 MS. LESLIE SUMINISTRADO Area Head 3/F GLT Bldg., 188 Merchan Cor. Cabana St., Lucena City Telefax: (042) 373-4062 MR. MARTE OLAGUERRA Area Head 2/F Unit B-3 DMG Comercial Bldg.

Peñafrancia Ave., Naga City Telefax: (054) 472-4003 MR. APOLINARIO JAMIN JR. Area Head 3/F RLB Bldg., CPG North Ave., Cogon District, Tagbilaran City Telefax: (038) 501-7255 MR. EDWIN GO 2/F UCPB Bldg., F. Ramos St., Cebu City Telefax: (032) 412-5811 MR. MARK DAÑO 3/F Lhuillier Bldg., Osmeña Cor. Heyes St., Cagayan De Oro Telefax: (088) 856-1431 MS. JANE CALERO Area Head 2/F Jesena Bldg., Lopez Jaena St., Iloilo City Telefax: (033) 320-6725 MS. JOANNE MAY RAMIREZ Area Head 206-B Bajada Bldg., JP Laurel Ave., Davao City Telefax: (082) 221-8972

XAVIER SCIENCE FOUNDATION Xavier Science Foundation is an independent organization which operates to receive, administer and grant funds devoted to projects on sustainable development of non-stock, non-profit academic and non-academic institutions including local government units (LGUs). It assists in strengthening these institution’s facilities, teaching, research and extension capabilities. Xavier Science Foundation was established on September 13, 1968 by the late Fr. William F. Masterson, S.J. in his vision to develop Mindanao as a center for agricultural development. It is with this vision that XSF over three decades has supported development works directed to poverty reduction and social empowerment through agriculture. Since its beginning in 1968, XSF have grown to become a respected member of the social development community. XSF has supported varied development programs and projects with traditional Philippine government institutions as well as bilateral partners from the international community and emerging corporate foundations in the country. Programs and Projects 1. Agriculture education - Offer scholarships to high school graduates or graduating seniors interested to pursue college education in Xavier University-College of Agriculture. 2. Knowledge generation - Dedicated to develop and advance scientific research, environment protection and conservation and development of human resource, agri-enterprise and sustainable agriculture in Mindanao. 3. Development projects - Commit its resources to the upliftment of the marginal sectors through various programs on institution building, rural social leadership and management training and sustainable agriculture development, among others. CONTACT DETAILS Roel R. Ravanera Executive Director Xavier Science Foundation, Inc. 2/F Agriculture building, College of Agriculture Xavier University, Corrales St., Cagayan de Oro City Tel: (088) 309-0221 Telefax: (088) 858-3116 local 3100 Email: [email protected]

XSF Finance Office SEARSOLIN, Manresa Complex

Fr. Masterson Avenue, Upper Balulang Cagayan de Oro City Tel: (08822) 72-7701

ZAMBOANGA DEL NORTE CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS AND DEVELOPMENT (CESCOD) CESCOD is a non-government organization committed to engage communities, government and other concerned groups and individuals on a principled and pro-active basis to effect sustainable development and social change. Major Programs            

Organic Farming and Sustainable Agriculture Capability building/trainings for : farmers, women, LGUs, children and youth, indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors Micro-enterprise/Livelihood assistance (Credit Facility/small loans program) Literacy Education for Adults (IPs and non-IPs) Mainstreaming Gender in Development Advocacy for social –economic-political issues Community Development/Rebuilding communities/Empowering communities Participation in Local Governance Ecology and environmental concerns Leadership trainings, Team building seminars etc for organizations and offices Educational Assistance for Marginalized Youth (Scholarship Program ) Networking

Network Affiliation    

PhilDHRRA Civil Society Counterpart Council for Sustainable Development (CSCCSD) Member of various national and local sectoral and/or issue-based coalitions and organizations Member of the City Development Council (Dipolog City) and other special bodies/committees/councils in Dipolog City

CONTACT DETAILS Fr. Enrico V. Montano Executive Director CESCOD Magsaysay cor Bonifacio St., Dipolog City Tel: (065) 212-7791 Telefax: (065) 212-2953 Email: [email protected]

Service Areas:  Natural Resource Management  Waste Management, Pollution Control and Urban Land Quality

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES (DENR) The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) is the primary government agency responsible for the conservation, management, development and proper use of the country’s environment and natural resources, including those in reservations, watershed areas and lands of the public domain, as well as for the licensing and regulation of all natural resources utilization, as may be provided by law. Given such mandate, the DENR envisions passing on to Filipinos a renewed hope in people’s ability to chart a new direction for development and a legacy of a self-sustaining environment, mindful of people’s rights to a life of dignity. Its mission is to be the dynamic force behind people’s initiatives in the protection, conservation, development and management of the environment through strategic alliances and partnerships, participatory processes, relevant policies and programs, and appropriate information technology towards sustainable development. Although DENR is the principal government agency responsible for conserving, managing, developing and ensuring the proper use of the country’s environment and natural resources, the LGUs were vested significant environmental management functions under the Local Government Code of 1991 which include among others the following:

 Enforcement of pollution control laws, subject to supervision, control and review by the DENR; and  Solid waste management. With the issuance of Department Administrative Order No. 30, series of 1992, key functions, such as forest management, protected areas and wildlife, environmental management, mines and geo-sciences development and land management were devolved to LGUs. This eventually puts LGUs at the forefront of natural resources protection and management. Not all LGUs, however, have both financial and technical capability to perform the devolved functions effectively. This section is, therefore, important to LGUs that need additional financial and technical assistance in performing their environment-related functions. CONTACT DETAILS The SECRETARY DENR Central Office Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 928-0691 to 93 loc. 2003, 2008, 2201, 2134, 2182, 2147

Email: [email protected] http://www.denr.gov.ph

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT BUREAU

The Environmental Management Bureau is a line bureau of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), mainly responsible for carrying out the environmental management functions of the Department. Specially, EMB is tasked to: a. Advise the Secretary on matters relating to environmental management, conservation and pollution control; b. Formulate and implement comprehensive plans, policies, projects and activities and set appropriate environmental quality standards (water, air and noise) for the prevention, control of pollution and protection of the environment; c. Recommend rules and regulations for Environmental Impact Assessment and provide technical assistance for their implementation and monitoring; d. Exercise direct supervision over its regional offices in the implementation of plans and programs. The Central and Regional Offices of the Bureau discharge both staff and regulatory functions: -Issue permits, clearances under RAs 8749, 9003, 6969, 9275 and PD 1586 and monitor compliance to said laws e. Provide secretariat assistance to the Pollution Adjudication Board and conduct public hearings on pollution cases and strengthen the prosecution of violators; f. Provide secretariat support to the National Solid Waste Management Commission as provided for in Sec. 4 of RA 9003. Formulates rules and regulations in the proper disposition of solid wastes, toxic and hazardous substances; g. Develop and implement a research and development program in support of the following: -Environmental criteria and standards formulation; -Environmental and compliance monitoring; and -Study of existing and potential environmental problems and issues h. Implement a system for the recognition of environmental laboratories i. Promote public information and education to encourage participation of an informed citizenry in environmental quality planning and monitoring j. Serve as focal point agency for international agreements/commitments on environment

EMB is also mandated to implement on a nationwide scale the five (5) important environmental laws through the following programs:

Environmental Management and Pollution Control Program

 Environmental Impact Assessment Law (PD 1586). The EIS system is a planning tool that ensures the environmental soundness of development projects which are categorized as environmentally-critical projects (ECPs) and those located in environmentally-critical areas (ECAs). The EMB strictly enforces the EIA law to enhance the viability of development projects while at the same time unveiling their potential adverse impacts for prevention and/or mitigation. Its key responsibilities lie in the formulation of guidelines in EIA preparation, review of EIA submissions, and ECC compliance monitoring.

 Clean Air Act of 1999 (RA 8749). The Bureau conduct investigation/ monitoring of air pollution from industrial sources, setting of air quality standards, formulation of national program for air pollution management, promotion of cooperation and self-regulation with industry focusing on pollution prevention, certification of non-burn technologies for waste destruction, issuance of permit to operate air pollution devices, issuance of permits for emission trading/averaging, elevation of charges to the PAB for issuance of CDOs.  Clean Water Act (RA 9275). EMB is mandated to formulate and implement more stringent policies and strengthen partnerships with other stakeholders and that include the LGUs, to improve water quality in all parts of the country. The Bureau works towards the effective implementation of the most critical components of the CWA; e.g., discharge fee system, classification of water bodies, effluent inventory, review/revision of effluent standards and water quality criteria/guidelines, conduct investigation/ monitoring of water pollution from industrial sources, elevation of charges to the PAB for issuance of CDOs. Toxic Substances and Waste Management Program

 Toxic Substances and Hazardous Waste Management Act (RA 6969). The law mandates the Bureau for the complete management of toxic or harmful chemicals and wastes under

the cradle to grave management approach (all aspects of its life cycle from importation, manufacture, distribution, transport, use and disposal). The Bureau strictly monitors the movement and disposal of hazardous wastes in the country through the issuance of clearances and permits. Likewise, it is vigorously keeping track of toxic chemicals and hazardous wastes by closely monitoring and apprehending violators of RA 6969. The Bureau also provides technical assistance to hospitals nationwide on the proper handling and disposal of healthcare wastes.  Ecological Solid Waste Management Act (RA 9003). The law provides for a systematic, comprehensive and ecological solid waste management program to come up with solutions to address the garbage problem in the country. The Bureau provides secretariat support to the National Solid Waste Management Commission in the implementation of the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act and extends support to LGUs through the formulation of policies and guidelines, implementation of programs and projects on ESWM (e.g., IEC, MRF establishment, composting, etc.) and provide technical assistance in planning, establishment of sanitary landfills, closure and rehabilitation of open and controlled dump sites and capability building. CONTACT DETAILS The DIRECTOR

EMB Building, DENR Compound Visayas Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City Tel: (02) 927-1517 (Director’s Office) 928-1221 (Pollution

Adjudication Board Secretariat) 920-2252 (NSWMC Secretariat) 928-1212 (Environmental Quality Division) Fax: (02) 927-1518 Email: [email protected] www.emb.gov.ph

ECOSYSTEMS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT BUREAU The Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau (ERDB) is the principal research unit of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). The Bureau together with the Regional Ecosystems Research and Development Service (ERDS), implements research, development and extension (RDE) programs and projects toward addressing ecological problems that pertain to the country’s major ecosystems types namely: the forest, upland farms, grassland and degraded areas, and the coastal zone and freshwater and urban ecosystems. RDE Banner Programs (2007-2011)  



 







Vulnerability assessment of priority watersheds in the Philippines Identifies priority hazards and critical factors for the development of corresponding disaster preparedness measures. Determination of carrying capacity of various areas/sites for resources conservation, ecotourism and sustainable development Determines sustainable resource use, biodiversity conservation and protection, and ecotourism development of protected areas, community-based forest management project sites, Coastal Environment Program sites in small island ecosystem, and grazing lands. Rehabilitation and ecological restoration of degraded and marginal landscapes and seascapes Develops rehabilitation technologies and establishes demonstration areas for technology application for highly degraded areas (mined-out, coastal and urban areas). Development of strategies for the production of quality planting materials Ensures the sustainable supply of high-quality seeds of important indigenous and exotic species nationwide. Determination of appropriate extension strategies to facilitate adoption of Environment and Natural Resources ENR technologies Formulates guidelines addressing the need for technology transfer and extension strategies of the DENR Research Sector. Adaptation strategies to climate change Reviews existing policies and legislations affecting climate change impacts on the coastal areas, determine the best practices and document coping mechanisms of coastal communities as affected by climate change, documents the impact of coastal perturbations on biological materials, and recommends adaptation options based on coastal protection, retreat, and accommodation strategies. Mitigation measures and strategies for climate change Documents experiences, successful strategies and research findings on mitigating climate change from various ecosystems; evaluates the mitigating capability of the different vegetative cover in mangrove areas and determines phytoremediation of various plant species on polluted waterways in urban and industrial areas. Survey, inventory and documentation of selected bio-fuel species Comes up with a compendium on the availability, extent and distribution of the selected tree species as raw materials for biofuels.







Developing ecotourism strategies for biodiversity conservation and livelihood opportunities Prepares a pre-feasibility and/or design scoping study in pursuing an ecotourism project in selected potential ecotourism sites, formulates an ecotourism management plan in identified ecotourism sites, establish a model of ecotourism project in ERDB’s Los Baños Experiment Station. Carbon stock, biomass and volume assessment of forest plantations in the Philippines Generates data on the volume, biomass and carbon stock in forest plantations of selected species for provincial and regional database, and facilitates use of data by the DENR Forestry Sector and the wood, furniture and handicraft industries. Promoting bio-safety and bio-security emphasizing on environmental risk and impact assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (GMOs) and potentially harmful exotic species (PHES) Undertakes awareness and capacity-building activities on biosafety, monitors and assesses post-commercial impacts of GMOs in selected agro-ecosystems, assesses the socio-economic impact of GMO utilization and identifies suitable indicators as basis for decisions to commercialize products of modern technology.

Priority RDE Programs/Projects on ENR (2009-2010) A. Climate Change 1. Adaptation strategies to climate change impacts on the upland and coastal ecosystem 2. Mitigation strategies and measures on climate change 3. Vulnerability assessment of priority watersheds 4. Carbon stock and volume assessment of forest plantations in the Philippines 5. Survey and inventory and documentation of selected biofuel species 6. Rehabilitation and ecological restoration of degraded and marginal landscapes and seascapes 7. Socio-Economic and policy assessment of foreshore areas 8. Acid deposition adverse impacts on plants and soils in heavily polluted zones of Metro Manila 9. Impacts of climate change on the extent and magnitude of flooding and landslide in selected major watersheds 10. Economic pricing of raw water from watershed to ensure sustainability of quantity, quality and timing 11. Improving urban water supply and sanitation system 12. Development of appropriate method for water pollution control in selected creeks and rivers 13. Pilot-testing of community-based micro hydropower generation 14. Community-based reforestation through establishment of fuelwood plantations 15. Assessment of land tenure security in watershed areas in relation to water production 16. Water foot-printing documentation for selected household, community or business in the Philippines

B. Upland Ecosystem Development 1. Development Strategies for the production of quality planting materials 2. Generation of appropriate technologies for agroforestry schemes using Jathropa in the uplands 3. Determination of possible management options for selected old government reforestation projects 4. Mangrove-friendly nipa aquaculture system as livelihood and tsunami mitigation system 5. Rationalization on the disposition of pasture and grazing lands in the Philippines 6. Malapapaya-agroforestry production technology for coconut farms 7. Community-based butterfly farming at Makiling Forest Reserve, Los Baños, Laguna 8. Impact Assessment and enhancement of DENR Charcoal Briquetting technology 9. Methods/schemes in the propagation of malunggay 10. Determination of growth, structure and composition of dipterocarp forest for the second cutting cycle 11. Silvicultural management practices for the sustained production of quality rattan for the furniture and handicraft industries 12. Demonstration and application of production and utilization technologies for rattan sustainable development in the ASEAN member countries 13. Package of ERDB S & T Interventions on nursery establishment and propagation of commercial and ornamental bamboo species 14. Development and management of pilot bamboo plantation in selected areas in Laguna 15. Financial analysis of Malapapaya [Polyscia nodosa (Blume) Seeman ] - coconut agroforestry systems 16. Recycling of Agricultural and Forest Waste Products (Charcoal Briquetting Project) C.

Ecotourism 1. Determination of carrying capacity of various areas/sites for resources conservation, ecotourism and sustainable development 2. Developing ecotourism strategies for biodiversity conservation and livelihood opportunities 3. Rehabilitation strategies and ecotourism development for mine tailings areas in Bagacay, Hinabangan, Western, Samar 4. A comprehensive diagnostic assessment to enhance ecotourism in Brgy. Kinabuhayan and Taytay in Mts. Banahaw-San Cristobal Protected Landscape

D.

Biodiversity Conservation 1. Promoting biosafety and biosecurity emphasizing on environmental risk/impact assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and potentially harmful exotic species (PHES)

2. Ecological analysis of Lamao Forest Reserve as ecotourism site for biodiversity conservation in Limay, Bataan 3. Bioecological characteristics of migratory water birds at urban and peri-urban wetlands in relation to climate change 4. Genetic evaluation of forest trees and non-wood forest species 5. Development of guidelines/criteria for successful earthballing, transporting and transplanting of live trees 6. Assessment of biodiversity in marine protected areas within the Coral Triangle 7. Development of pest surveillance system for forest invasive species in the Philippines 8. Ecology and stand dynamics of Kandelia candel (L) Bruce 9. Research investigation on the bioecology and sustainable use of the janitor fish (Pterygoplichthys sp) in Laguna de Bay 10. Biodiversity assessment of Pasig River and its tributaries: The Ecosystems approach 11. Ecosystems approach in the assessment of the environmental impacts of Herbicide-tolerant (Ht) corn on wild biodiversity in corn production systems in Luzon, Philippines 12. Tree domestication strategy using selected indigenous species and mycorrhizal application E.

Technology Transfer/IEC 1. Determination of appropriate extension strategies to facilitate adoption of ENR technologies 2. Production and dissemination of IEC materials on Climate Change 3. Packaging of matured technology on Pooc 1:4 agroforestry (multi-cropping agroforestry) 4. Updating of guidebook on development and management of forest plantation 5. Production of ERDB brochures and publications pocket folder 6. Establishment/maintain demonstration areas of ENR management technologies

CONTACT DETAILS DIRECTOR

Ecosystems Research and Development Bureau College, Los Baños, Laguna 4031 Tel: (049) 5363628; 5362229; 5362269 Fax: (049) 5362850 Email: [email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected] www. erdb.denr.gov.ph

NATIONAL MAPPING AND RESOURCE INFORMATION AUTHORITY (NAMRIA) The National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA) is the country’s central mapping agency. It is an attached agency of the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR). NAMRIA contributes to the country’s economic development by using state-of-the-art technology to produce maps, charts, and statistics which are basic tools for planning and decision making. The agency envisions to be a highly professionalized, technologically advanced, and globally competitive agency that cares about the environment and natural resources. NAMRIA’s core functions include the following:  Topographic Base Mapping NAMRIA produces updated topographic base maps and thematic maps at various scales in support of the government’s development planning, environmental management, and multihazard mapping, among other programs. Digital and cartographically enhanced large-scale topographic maps (1:10,000 scale) provide more detailed information on administrative boundaries, drainage systems, existing infrastructure, major establishments, road networks, topography, vegetation, and other economic indicators showing the present development in the area at barangay level. Similarly, medium- and small-scale maps (1:50,000 and 1:250,000 scale) are support tools for applications at municipal and provincial levels. Administrative maps indicate political boundaries of provinces and regions of the country.  Development of the National Geodetic Network Executive Order (EO) No. 45, s. 1993 (as amended by EO 280, s. 2000 and EO 321, s. 2004) mandates the use of the Philippine Reference System of 1992 (PRS92) as the standard reference system for all surveying and mapping activities in the country by CY 2010. NAMRIA is spearheading the implementation of PRS92 Project in coordination with the DENR regional offices, particularly the Lands Management Bureau, the Forest Management Services, and the Lands Management Services. The project aims to transform old maps and surveys into PRS92. It also aims to upgrade the horizontal and vertical control networks of the country and ensure the reliability, completeness, and accuracy of PRS92 as the national geodetic network. The other key activities of the project are the upgrading and densification of geodetic control points, the conduct of leveling and gravity surveys, and the installation and upgrading of tide monitoring stations.  Land Classification NAMRIA’s land classification function involves demarcating, segregating, delimiting, and establishing the best category, kind, and use of a public land. Its objective is to determine through interbureau action which portion of the public domain is suitable as a forestland and which could be released as agricultural (alienable and disposable) land. Lands which are found suitable for agricultural purposes and declared as such are then slated for distribution to qualified beneficiaries.

 Hydrographic Surveys and Nautical Charting NAMRIA is responsible for the surveying and charting of the country’s maritime zones/areas which are the archipelagic waters, contiguous zone, Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), Extended Continental Shelf (ECS), and territorial sea. The agency regularly conducts hydrographic, bathymetric, oceanographic, and geophysical surveys wherein marine geographic information are presented in the form of nautical charts, bathymetric maps, thematic maps, tide and current tables, and special maritime publications. These are basic requisites for safe and efficient maritime travel and trade, marine environmental protection, infrastructure engineering, military defense, and scientific studies and researches. NAMRIA undertakes its survey activities utilizing its two multidisciplinary survey vessels, BRP HYDROGRAPHER PRESBITERO and BRP HYDROGRAPHER VENTURA, which are equipped with modern hydrographic, oceanographic, and navigational systems.  Delineation of Maritime Boundaries NAMRIA provides inter-agency technical assistance on the country’s entitlement for ECS and establishment of its baseline in accordance with the provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), and in fulfilling other international obligations/requirements provided for by the International Hydrographic Organization and the International Maritime Organization. NAMRIA is involved in the delineation of the national maritime jurisdiction in accordance with the provisions of the UNCLOS. NAMRIA is a member of the ECS Technical Working Group (TWG) which is fully engaged in the preparation of the Philippine submission to the UN Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf. The ECS TWG is headed by the DENR Secretary under the supervision of the Commission on Maritime and Ocean Affairs (CMOA), Office of the President.  Geographic Information Management NAMRIA integrates geographic and resource data to facilitate their access, analysis, and conversion into useful information. It develops and maintains databases and information systems and networks, packages information materials, and disseminates geographic and resource information. The agency is in the forefront of developing a national spatial data infrastructure (NSDI), which is the integration of technologies, policies, and people that provide the means through which government, private and academic organizations efficiently produce, manage, and share geographic or spatial data. Products and Services NAMRIA products like maps, nautical charts, satellite imageries, aerial photographs, and publications are available to the general public. The agency offers these following services:  Surveys (hydrographic, physical oceanographic, geodetic, topographic and photogrammetric, and land classification);  Mapping;  Hydrography;  Remote sensing;  Systems development and programming; and  Database management.

NAMRIA products are available for sale in the agency’s 20 map sales offices/outlets. The agency likewise maintains the National Oceanographic Data Center, the Geomatics Training Center, the Muntinglupa Magnetic Observatory, the National Remote Sensing Center, an Information Center/One-Stop Shop, a museum, and a library. CONTACT DETAILS DIRECTOR

01 Global Lawton Avenue, Taguig, Metro Manila, 1201 Philippines Tel: (02) 810-4831; 884-2835; 884-2836 Fax: (02) 843-5873 www.namria.gov.ph

DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE (DOF) The Department of Finance is principally responsible for the formulation, institutionalization and administration of the government’s fiscal policies, in coordination with other concerned agencies of government. It is also tasked to generate and manage the government’s financial resources as well as supervise the revenue operations of all local government units. Furthermore, the DOF is approves and manages all public sector domestic or foreign debt; and rationalizes and privatizes corporations and assets that are owned, controlled or acquired by the government. Vision  A strong economy with stable prices and strong growth;  A stable fiscal situation which could adequately finance government projects and budgetary programs;  A borrowing program that is also able to avoid the crowding-out effect on the private sector and minimize costs  A public sector debt profile with long maturities and an optimum mix of currencies that minimizes the impact of currency movements; and  A strong economic growth with equity and productivity. Mission The DOF shall take the lead in providing a solid foundation for the achievement of an economy that is dynamic and active in the world, globally competitive and onward looking. The SECRETARY DOF Bldg., BSP Complex Roxas Blvd., Metro Manila Tel: (02) 523-6054 Fax: (02) 526-8474 www.dof.gov.ph

OVERVIEW OF DOF’S FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNITS (LGUs)  Creation of the Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) thru Executive Order No. 41 to administer the Municipal Development Fund Revolving Fund for local government units established under PD 1914.  Its objectives include helping the LGU enhance its local revenue generation and promote economic growth through investment on local public enterprise and infrastructure project; and providing financial assistance to upgrade delivery of basic services and facilities which could not be funded through local incomes and transfer of fund from the national government.  Eligible borrowers include cities, provinces and municipalities  Eligible Subprojects for the Program: D. INFRASTRUCTURE 8.

Revenue Generating Projects such as Water Supply System, Local Electrification System, Slaughterhouse, Terminal, Wharf, Public Market, “Bagsakan Center”, Cold Storage Plant, Post-Harvest Facility, Food Processing Facility and Memorial Park. 9. Social Projects for Education such as School Buildings (including the furniture and facilities), Non-Formal Education and Training Center, Public Library (including books and the access to Electronic Information System) and Day Care Centers; and for Health such as Hospital, Health Center, Lying-in Clinic, Birthing Facility, Health Training Center, Baranggay Health Stations and other health facilities. 3. Environmental Projects under Solid Waste Management such as Materials Recovery Facility (MRF), Sanitary Landfill, Composing Facility; Water Management such as Sewerage System, Drainage System, Waste Water Treatment Facility (Biogas Digester); Air quality Management (Support to the Philippine Clean Air Act of 1990); and Land Conservation such as River/Seashore Protection and Sea Wall. 4. Other Infrastructure Projects such as Farm-to-Market Roads and other LGU priority infrastructure projects. B. EQUIPMENT Procurement of Heavy Equipment for Construction and road Maintenance, Dump Truck, Equipment for the Operation of Slaughterhouse; MRF Equipment; and Medical and Dental Equipment.  For Loan Terms and Conditions, the Municipal Development Fund Project (MDFP) offers pure loan with fixed interest rate of 9% per annum with no equity required.

Type of Subproject Infrastructure

Equipment

Repayment Period 15 years, inclusive of 3-year grace period on principal payment 10 years, inclusive of 2-year grace period on principal payment

 Application Requirements include: 15. Letter of Intent from the Local Chief Executive 16. Local Council Resolutions manifesting support for the project and authorizing the Local Chief Executive to enter into relevant agreements 17. Creation of Subproject Management Office 18. Project Proposal/Feasibility Study (pro-forma will be provided)

CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: MDFO, Department of Finance 7/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila Tel: (02) 523-9935; 521-7192; 525-9185 to 87 Fax: (02) 523-9936; 525-9186 Email: [email protected]

 Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) in their issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity (Please see BLGF page)

MUNICIPAL DEVELOPMENT FUND OFFICE (MDFO) The Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO) was created as an office under the Department of Finance (DOF) by virtue of Executive Order No. 41 on 20 November 1998 to acts as a source of credit financing to support LGUs in the implementation of their priority development projects and programs. It promotes LGU self-reliance in undertaking socioeconomic development programs through effective system of making ODA available to LGUs, assist low income LGUs to establish creditworthiness to help them access private funds. The MDFO has four (4) major thrusts, namely: 13. Administrator of the Municipal Development Fund – Second Generation Fund (MDFSGF) 14. Fund Administrator of Foreign-Assisted Projects (FAPs) implemented by other National Agencies. 15. Implementer of Projects/Programs 16. Policy Formulation The MDFO has a Policy Governing Board comprised of officials from DOF (chairperson), National Economic Development Authority (NEDA), Department of Budget and Management (DBM), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), DPWH, and the Executive Director of the MDFO that sets policy directions for the Office. Among the credit financing initiates administered by the MDFO are as follows: 6. Municipal Development Fund (MDF) Project On 29 March 1984, through Presidential Decree No. 1914, the Municipal Development Fund (MDF) was created as a special revolving fund for re-lending to Local Government Units (LGUs). It became an effective mechanism that enabled LGUs to avail of financial assistance from local and international sources for the implementation of various social and economic development projects. It provides concessional financing assistance to lower income class LGUs with revenue-generating subprojects. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs nationwide Eligible Proposals/Subprojects 7. Revenue/Non-revenue generating projects 8. Other infrastructure projects 2. Philippine Water Revolving Fund (PWRF) PWRF leverages Official Development Assistance (ODA), Private Financing Institutions (PFI) funding. This financing window develops financing mechanism acceptable to PFIs but at the same time affordable to water utilities. It also develops financing mechanism with revolving capacity and a mechanism to implement EO 279.

Eligible Borrowers:  Water districts, LGUs  Consortium or joint ventures  Privately-owned corporations  Private financial institutions Eligible Proposals/Subprojects:  Water extraction  Water transmission, water supply treatment  Water distribution, collection of wastewater  Wastewater treatment and disposal  NRW reduction and efficiency enhancing measures  Refinancing of water project loans 3. Project Technical Assistance and Contingency Fund (PTACF) PTACF assists in accelerating LGU preparation and submission of feasibility studies and detailed engineering design. It creates a fund to finance the actual foreign exchange differentials of LGUs incurred in their project implementation. PTACF provides a source of financing for other technical assistace (TA) needs of LGUs. Eligible Borrowers: All LGUs except highly urbanized cities

CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: MDFO, Department of Finance 7/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila Tel: (02) 523-9935; 521-7192; 525-9185 to 87 Fax: (02) 523-9936; 525-9186 Email: [email protected]

BUREAU OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE (BLGF) Department of Finance’s arm (DOF) directly responsible over the fiscal and financial affairs of local government. Under a decentralized regime, BLGF provides a catalytic role in effective and sustainable management of fiscal and financial resources of LGUs, transforming them into selfreliant communities. It is vigilant and dedicated to pursuit of development and professionalization of its employees including those of the local treasury and assessment services. Bureau of Local Government Finance (BLGF) required documents for the issuance of the Certificate of Maximum Borrowing Capacity and Debt Service Capacity: 8. Statement of Income and Expenditures for the last three (3) years duly certified and audited by the local accountant and auditor, (General Fund) with Pre-Closing Trial Balance. 2. Current year Annual Budget 3. Annual Investment Plan for 20% Development Fund 4. Certification of existing/absence of loan/loans duly certified by the Local Treasurer and lending institution with the following details:  Kind of Loans and Other Obligations  Purpose of Loans and Other Obligations  Name of the Lending Institution  Date of Approval and Maturity  Terms and Conditions (Interest & No. of years to pay)  Latest Balance of Loans & Other Obligations - Current - Arrearages  Annual Amortization Schedule (Segregate Principal & Interest) 19. Letter request from the Local Chief Executive indicating where to apply and purpose of the loan

CONTACT DETAILS The EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Submit application requirements to: Bureau of Local Government Finance Department of Finance 8/F EDPC Building Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) Complex Roxas Boulevard, Manila 1004 Tel: (02) 527-2780; 522-8773 Fax: (02) 527-2780 Website: www.blgf.gov.ph

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES (DBP) The DBP’s mission to influence and accelerate sustainable economic growth of the country has led it to anchor its lending activities on the task of financing development. It has evolved already from its role of development financing. From the task of simply providing the necessary funds for projects, DBP now functions to meet the medium and long – term needs as well as the sustainability of key strategic sectors which are deemed vital to progress and growth. In line with the government’s thrust, the DBP has developed programs for the following priority sectors: 11. Infrastructure and Logistics The DBP provides funding support to projects that will enhance investments, production and trade. This would include projects that increase value-adding production capacity (such as power projects and acquisitions of plant and equipment) or projects that result in the utilization of otherwise idle existing production capacity. It also includes projects that facilitate the movement of goods, such as trading, transportation and communication. 12. Social Development The DBP provides funding support to investments in the areas of health care, education, housing, community development and livelihood. Investments in these areas are designed to directly address poverty alleviation initiatives. One of the Bank’s corporate social responsibility initiatives, the DBP Endowment for Education Program (DEEP), provides scholarship opportunities for higher education or technical courses to poor but deserving high school graduates. 13. Environment The DBP provides, not only funding support, but also partnership arrangements to address the protection of natural resources and the mitigation of the degradation of the environment. Credit-based program would include projects to support new and renewable energy sources (hydro, geothermal, rural power projects), solid and hazardous waste management and pollution control. The “DBP FOREST” is a non-credit program where in partnership with community groups, LGUs and DENR, forest projects are undertaken. In these projects, a variety of high value fruit and forest trees are planted to prevent erosion, restore watersheds, and help absorb carbon emissions. 14. Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises The MSME sector acts as the seedbed for the development of entrepreneurial skills and innovation. It accounts for about 99.7% of the registered businesses in the country, from which 70% of the labor force earn a living. Thus, its contribution to the country’s

economic development cannot be underemphasized. Hence, the DBP targeted this sector as one of its priority sectors. A separate unit in Head Office for the Microfinance and the branches for SMEs assume the responsibility of assisting this sector, either credit or non-credit support. Tie ups with government agencies and state universities are forged to support the MSME Programs of the government. The advocacy for the Overseas Filipino Workers such as offering livelihood and training programs for returning OFWs and assisting them thru the One Town One Product or OTOP of the government, and eventually, offering them a full range of assistance including their families. 15. Commercial Lending The DBP also lends its hands to commercial activities of large corporations in the country. It complements the private banks in responding to expansion projects of big industries in the country. In the light of the lowering interest rates, the DBP has launched five (5) new deposit products: YES (Young Earners Savings for Kids); Payroll + Savings Account; Wisdom Account for Senior Citizens; High Earner Account for High-Net worth Individuals and the Deposito ng Bayaning Pilipino (for OFWs) The DBP finances the following projects: 13. Industrial a. Large manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries b. Small and medium manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries c. Industrial Estate Projects 14. Public Utilities a. Land, air and water transportation b. Telecommunications c. Power generation and distribution d. Water supply and distribution 15. Community Development a. Housing b. Hospitals c. Schools d. Infrastructure e. Eco-Tourism 16. Agro-industrial a. Post harvest-facility b. Agri-business

17. Focused Lending Programs a. Environmental  Pollution control and abatement  Waste minimization and recycling  Efficient use and/or management of natural resources  Occupational health and safety  Solid and hazardous waste management  Water supply and sanitation b. Micro-financing c. Lending program for franchises d. Program towards obtaining ISO 9000 certification e. New and renewable energy (NRE) projects f. Technology development and commercialization g. LGU financing program h. Sustainable Logistics Development Program  Road/Roro Ferry Network  Bulk Grains  Cold Chain 18. Other Programs a. Factoring b. Loans Against Hold Out on Deposit CONTACT DETAILS Benedicto Ernesto R. Bitonio, Jr. Executive Vice President Brillo L. Reynes Senior Vice President Makati Avenue corner Sen. Gil Puyat Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 8189511 locals 3307, 3324; 817-0473; 840-0735 Fax: (02) 815-1517 Email: [email protected] www.devbankphil.com.ph

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CREDIT FACILITY: JICA-Environmental Development Project –Water Supply (EDP)/ Philippine Water Revolving Fund (PWRF) PRIORITIES: Water Supply ELIGIBLE BORROWERS:  Local Government Units (LGUs)  Water Districts (WD)  Private Corporations operating as Water Service Provider (WSP)  Consortium or JV of WD and/or LGUs and/or private groups organized for the development and/or operation of a water infrastructure / service  PFIs on the condition that the end users will be WDs, LGUs, consortium or JV of WDs / LGUs / private groups ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: o Water Supply and Sanitation including the development of water supply and sanitation services (Philippine Water Revolving Fund Category) o Water abstraction or extraction for water supply o Water supply transmission o Water supply treatment o Water distribution o Collection, treatment and disposal of waste water o Collection of wastewater o Treatment and disposal of wastewater o Investments for non-revenue water reduction or other efficiency-enhancing measures, such as but not limited to computerization of accounts, billing and collection system, installation of energy-saving equipment o Refinancing of water project loans (up to 10% of total PWRF portfolio, subject to review) o Other development projects of water service providers that will expand and/or improve delivery of service SUBLOAN SIZE: Equity Requirements: a) Private Corporations: minimum of 20% based on total project cost b) Cooperatives/ Associations: minimum of 10% based on total project cost c) GOCCs: minimum of 10% based on total project cost d) LGUs: 10% based on total project cost; however the equity may be waived by DBP on a case to case basis REPAYMENT TERM: Up to 15 years Maturity period may be extended up to 20 years depending on projects cash flow GRACE PERIOD: Up to 3 years

CREDIT FACILITY: JICA-Environmental Development Project – Other Environmental Projects & Water Supply contributing to Poverty Reduction (EDP/Non-Water) PRIORITIES: Waste Management, Pollution Control and New and Renewable Energy ELIGIBLE BORROWERS:  Private Corporations  Government Owned and Controlled Corporations (GOCC)  Local Government Units (LGU)  Cooperatives/Associations ELIGIBLE PROJECTS:  New and Renewable Energy covering the development of new and renewable energy including the following: o Construction of power plants o Transmission and distribution lines that will contribute to energy saving and resource conservation o Alternative fuels o Transaction costs for clean development mechanism  Industrial Pollution Control covering the installation or construction of facilities that will prevent, reduce or control industrial pollution. Eligible under Industrial Pollution Control are projects which cater to/involved in: o Cleaner production /waste minimization/pollution prevention o Conservation of natural resources o Reprocessing of industrial and common municipal wastes to useful materials/products o Occupational health and safety environmental monitoring equipment and instruments o Alternative fuel supply infrastructure facilities (conversion/retrofitting shops) o Equipment and/or technology supply e.g., conversion kits, cylinder tanks  Solid/Health Care/Hazardous Waste Management covering the collection, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal of solid/health care/hazardous wastes SUBLOAN SIZE: LGUs*, Water Districts, GOCCs, Cooperatives / Associations: 90% of the total project cost Private Sector: 80% of the total project cost *DBP may waive 10% equity required from LGUs and water districts on a case to case basis when needed. REPAYMENT TERM: Up to 15 years Maturity period may be extended up to 20 years depending on projects cash flow GRACE PERIOD: Up to 5 years

CREDIT FACILITY: JICA-Industry Support Loan Project (JBIC 6 – ISLP) PRIORITIES: Public and Private end-user industrial sectors. (CDM) ELIGIBLE BORROWERS:  - Private individuals/ corporations with at least 70% Filipino capitalization / ownership  Local Government Units (LGUs)  GOCCs ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: All projects in the industrial sector with identifiable direct or indirect business relations with Japanese.  enterprises or which will implement renewable energy projects  Any project eligible to be classified as Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project  Acquisition of fixed assets, machinery and equipment for the construction of goods and services and for trading  Building/plant construction  Construction, rehabilitation, modernization or expansion of existing facilities  Civil Works  Medium and long-term working Capital requirements of the end user Retroactive financing of eligible expenditures is allowed provided such expenditures were made not earlier than 20 June 2007 SUBLOAN SIZE: Up to 70% of total project cost Maximum Loan – Y3.5 billion REPAYMENT TERM: Up to 11 years GRACE PERIOD: Up to 3 years

CREDIT FACILITY: Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency Credit Facility (SIDA) PRIORITIES: Procurement of goods & services for projects that promote protection of the environment and compliance with environmental rules and regulations ELIGIBLE BORROWERS: Private and Public Enterprises ELIGIBLE PROJECTS:  Support for the environmental investments as well as industries undergoing restructuring;  Investments in energy saving equipment; and  Investments supporting on-going or planned TA project, within the framework of PhilippineSwedish development cooperation.  Capital equipment, machinery and services (no second-hand) goods. Competitive lenders will be obtained from at least two Swedish bidders. SUBLOAN SIZE: Up to 70% of the total project cost. Maximum loan per project - $4 M Minimum loan per project - $500,000 REPAYMENT TERM: Start: Feb. 3, 2011 End: Aug. 3, 2019 GRACE PERIOD: Up to 6 months

CREDIT FACILITY: KfW-Credit Line for Solid Waste Management Project (CLSWMP) PRIORITIES: Solid waste collection, disposal and recycling ELIGIBLE BORROWERS:  LGUs  Private Enterprises  Government Owned and Controlled Corp. (GOCCs) ELIGIBLE PROJECTS:  Waste storage, collection and transport including collection vehicles and related equipment  Facilities and equipment for waste treatment and processing  Construction of sanitary landfills including acquisition of equipment for waste disposal  Closure and rehabilitation of existing dump sites  Consulting services for the project preparation and implementation SUBLOAN SIZE: Private -up to 80% of total project cost LGUs - up to 90% of total project cost REPAYMENT TERM: Up to 12 years GRACE PERIOD: Up to 3 years

CREDIT FACILITY: WB-Rural Power Project (RPP) – Additional loan PRIORITIES: Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution ELIGIBLE BORROWERS: Type A: Renewable Energy Service Companies /Corporations (RESCO), Qualified Third Parties (QTP), NGOs, Cooperatives other than ECs & LGUs Type B: Renewable Energy Technology (RET) system purchasers and suppliers which may be a household, LGU or community Type C: Electric Cooperatives (ECs) Type D: Eligible private sector proponents (Private Distribution Utilities such as Electric Corporations) Participating Financial Intermediaries: Micro-finance institutions, Rural Banks, Thrift Banks and loans associations, credit cooperatives and credit NGOs ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Type A  Development and construction of small-scale energy generation and mini-grid rural electrification projects thru conventional and renewable energy resources. Type B  Stand-alone renewable energy rural system electrification project, including the marketing, sale, purchase, and installation of RET systems. Type C  Improvement of power supply system safety, reliability, efficiency, and power service quality for existing customers, through rehabilitation and capacity upgrades of the existing supply system (including purchase of secondhand sub-transmission facilities  Removal of supply system constraints  Institutional development of Electric Cooperatives Provision of the necessary hardware, software, motor vehicles, tools and equipment to improve employee productivity, safety, and efficiency of customer service provision. SUBLOAN SIZE: Up to 90% of total project cost REPAYMENT TERM and GRACE PERIOD: Up to 15 years with 5 years grace period for types A, C & D loans Up to 6 years with 6 months grace period for type B loans Up to 10 years with 6 months grace period for PFI

LAND BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES (LBP) Since its creation in August 1963, the LBP has successfully balanced its universal banking and countryside development mission. The profits from its commercial banking operations have successfully financed development initiatives that benefited the small farmers, fisherfolk and other countryside-based small and medium entrepreneurs. CONTACT DETAILS Melinda C. Cruz Department Manager Landbank Head Office 1598 M.H. Del Pilar cor Dr. Quintos Street Malate, Manila Tel: (02) 405-7476 Fax: (02) 528-8541 Email: [email protected] www.landbank.com 4

Program Title: SUPPORT FOR STRATEGIC LOCAL DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT PROJECT (S2LDIP) Program Fund: US$100M Source of Fund: World Bank Loan Effectivity: March 2007 to December 2012 Program Objective: To improve living conditions, public health standards and the urban environment by providing upgraded and improved urban and rural infrastructure and services in line with the Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan’s strategic focus of eradicating poverty, good governance, and efficient delivery of basic services. The institutional capacities to provide improved urban and rural management and service of participating LGUs will also be strengthened; and To facilitate LGU’s access to viable financing options to fund the construction, upgrading and rehabilitation of basic urban and rural infrastructure facilities. Eligible Borrower:  LGUs (cities, municipalities, and provinces) nationwide  Public Utilities and Private Operators providing local infrastructure services. Eligible Projects: A. LGU Infrastructure facilities and utilities such as:  Water supply and distribution  Power production and distribution  Solid waste management facilities including construction of sanitary landfill  Waste water management  Housing  New site development for commercial purposes  Roads and bridges  Drainage and flood control  Schools and health clinics; and  Improvement of municipal enterprise and infrastructure facilities such as public markets, slaughterhouses, bus terminals, and other related income generating projects B. Goods and services for enhancement of revenue of income Loan Amount for LGUs:  For LGUs, the loan amount shall be based in the requirement of the sub-project but shall in no case exceed net borrowing capacity  For public utilities and private operators providing local infrastructure services, shall be based on the projected subproject cash flow but shall in no case exceed PhP500M Term of Loan:

Maximum of 15 years inclusive of two (2) years grace period on principal payment Interest Rate: 1 to 5 years - 8% 6 to 10 years - 8% 11 to 15 years - 10% Commitment Fee: 0.25% on the undrawn loan amount Front-End Fee 0.25% of the loan amount Processing Requirement  Sanggunian Resolution authorizing the Local Chief Executives to negotiate a loan with LBP  Approved budget for the current year  COA Audited Financial Statement for the past 3 years  List of elected officials and key officers  Schedule of IRA for the past 2 years  Copy of the Municipal Development Plan and Public Investment Program  BLGF certification on Net Borrowing Capacity for current year  Other standard documentary requirements of LBP For project involving construction  Project plans and specification  Cost estimates  Bill of materials  Work Programs/schedule duly approved by the local chief executive and the city/municipal/district engineer For machineries and equipment acquisition  List, description and estimated cost of machineries and equipment based on price quotation  Certification from the dealers/suppliers as to the availability of spare parts in the local market For projects involving construction  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report and Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) Collateral Documents  Real Estate Mortgage  Chattel Mortgage  Hold-Out on Deposits  Assignment of the LGU’s regular income including portion of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) which in no case shall exceed 20% of the LGU’s regular income



Assignment of a portion of the LGU’s Internal Revenue Allotment for the payment of the sub-loan

Program Title: KfW – LGU INVESTMENT PROGRAMME (KfW – LIP) Program Fund: EUR 15MM, approx Php935 MM Source of Fund: KfW of Germany Loan Effectivity: 06 September 2006 to January 2010 Program Objective: To facilitate the access of LGUs to long-term funds and address the longterm financing needs of LGU investment and development projects Eligible Borrower: Provices, Citie, Municipalities, nationwide but preference shall be given to Visayas and Mindanao LGUs Eligible Projects:  Local roads and bridges including provision of maintenance equipment and improvement of streetlights  Sanitation, drainage and flood control, including construction of low-cost treatment facilities and provision for sludge collection and transportation  Water supply  Public market and bus terminal  Rehabilitation of public facilities, including purchase of equipment for environmental monitoring relating to general hygiene and sanitation, slaughter houses, public parks, parking spaves, hospitals, schools and other structures related to seashore facilities to accelerate productivity  Telecommunication and information technology  Ports  Mini-hydo-electric  Preparation of feasibility study  All other income generating projects except solid waste management projects Loan Amount for LGUs: Php100 million per LGU Term of Loan: Maximum of 15 years inclusive of 2 years maximum grace period on principal payments Interest Rate: Up to 15 years 6 – 10 years 11 – 15 years

- 9% - 10% - 11%

Commitment Fee: 0.25% on the undrawn loan amount Processing Requirement:  Sanggunian Resolution authorizing the Local Chief Executive to negotiate a loan with LBP

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Approved budget for the current year COA Audited Financial Statement for the past 3 years List of elected officials and key officers Schedule of IRA for the past 2 years Copy of the Municipal Development Plan and Public Investment Program BLGF certification on Net Borrowing Capacity for current year Other standard documentary requirements of LBP

For project involving construction  Project plans and specification  Cost Estimates  Bill of Materials  Work program/schedule duly approved by the local chief executives and the city/municipal/district engineer For machineries and equipment acquisition  List, description and estimated cost of machineries and equipment based on price quotation  Certification form the dealers/suppliers as to the availability of spare parts in the local market For projects involving construction  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report and Environmental Compliance Certificate (ECC) Collateral Documents  Real Estate Mortgage  Chattel Mortgage  Hold-Out on Deposits  Assignment of the LGU’s regular income including portion of Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) which in no case shall exceed 20% of the LGU’s regular income  Assignment of a portion of the LGU’s Internal Revenue Allotment for the payment of the sub-loan

LGU GUARANTEE CORPORATION (LGUGC) LGUGC is a private credit guarantee institution incorporated in March 1998 with the primary mandate of granting local government units (LGUs) access to private sources of capital by providing credit enhancement to LGU debt. LGUGC’s stockholders are the Bankers Association of the Philippines (BAP), Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) and the Asian Development Bank. LGUGC’s primary goal is to make private financial resources available to creditworthy local government units (LGUs) through its credit guarantee. Its credit enhancement facilitates the entry of LGUs with infrastructure development projects in the capital market. Recently, LGUGC extended its guarantee services to water districts, electric cooperatives, state universities and colleges, and renewable energy technology projects. Vision To be the recognized private sector link in public-private partnerships for local development financing Mission   

Advocate for reforms that will mobilize resources of the private sector toward financing local government projects Continue to advocate for policy reforms for LGU bond flotation as a viable alternative local financing option Instill values of good governance to enhance the borrower’s enterprise management and creditworthiness, especially local governments and utility companies

Guarantees As of March 2009, LGUGC has guaranteed 16 bond deals, 2 LGU loans and 9 water district loans aggregating Php 4.0982 billion. Guaranteed projects include the following: public markets, slaughterhouses, jetty port, low-cost housing, hospitals, commercial complex with toll parking facilities, commercial centre with wet and dry stalls, convention center cum hostel facilities, academic center and multi-purpose gymnasium, integrated solid waste management facility, and water districts’ rehabilitation and expansion projects and bulk water supply. Services Offered Guarantee LGUGC currently guarantees the indebtedness of LGUs, water districts (WDs), electric cooperatives, renewable energy providers and state universities and colleges. The guarantee fee is a function of the underlying borrower and project risks. Fees range from 0.5% to 2% per annum.

Credit Rating LGUGC implements an internal LGU Credit Screening and Rating System (LCSRS) and Water District Credit Rating System (WDCRS) in the absence of a formal stand-alone entity specializing in risk evaluating of LGUs and WDs. Both credit rating systems adopt internationally-accepted standards fit for sue diligence requirement of private financial institutions and individual investors. The system serves as the primary guide for the LGUGC and partner financial institutions to identify LGUs and WDs’ creditworthiness and their capacity to participate in the commercial credit market. It is also a tool for assisting LGUs and WDs implement good governance practices. LGUGC has an internal borrower risk rating system for other types of proponents. Program Management LGUGC offers program management services. Currently, LGUGC is managing the guarantee fund for Electric Cooperative System Loss Reduction Project (ECSLRP) of the World Bank – Global Environment Facility thru the Department of Energy (DOE). LGUGC is likewise the program manager for the Capacity Building to Remove Barriers to Renewable Energy Development (CBRED) Loan Guarantee Fund of the UNDP. CONTACT DETAILS LYDIA N. ORIAL President/CEO Unit 2801, 28/F Antel Corporate Centre 121 Valero Street, Salcedo Village Makati City Tel: (02) 750-4168/751-8764 to 68 Fax: (02) 888-4217 Email: [email protected] www.lgugc.com

BILATERAL OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

CZECH REPUBLIC Accession of the Czech Republic to the European Union followed by accession to ASEM in 2004 represent two important milestones in economic relations between the Republic of the Philippines and the Czech Republic. In addition to the most conspicuous supplies in the past (train coaches for MRT-3, aircrafts L410-Let, diesel generating sets, sugar cane mills, rifles, packing machines, etc.) many opportunities from the Czech Republic for Philippine importers remain still undiscovered such as machine tools. In terms of the overall level of production of machine and working tools, the Czech Republic is ranked seventh in Europe and 14th in the world, mobile-type airports, machines and equipment for open-pit and underground mining, personal cars SKODA, components for the automobile industry and accessories for personal cars, heavy duty trucks TATRA, sewage and water treatment plants, industrial and water pumps, building and roadmaking machines, food-processing machines, glass products, food products, drugs and pharmaceuticals, outfit of medical centers, fertilizers etc. I. Development Assistance A. Measures Ensuring Reliable and Sustainable Drinking Water Supply for Metro Manila after Damages Caused by Catastrophic Typhoon Project/MWSS The project involves the rehabilitation of the existing Umiray-Angat Mini-Hydro Power Plant in particular, requires detailed description of damages, design of the plant rehabilitation, equipment supply and installation and design and implementation of protection measures, and training of local staff. Location: Region III and IV-A Total Czech ODA funds: €1,300,000 + Local funding €450,000 Duration: 2006-2010 B. Improvement of solid waste management in Naga City Improve the solid waste management of Naga City; Technical assistance to the city government in including its solid waste management which includes conversion of waste to energy project and redesigning of modern sanitary landfill Location: Municipality of Naga City, Naga City Total Czech ODA funds: €390,000 Duration: 2007 – 2009 C. Feasibility study of the rehabilitation of the cascade of the mini hydropower plants in Baguio Map out the current situation and the scope of work and finances needed for the rehabilitation of the existing mini-hydropower plants; Expert assistance to the municipal government in establishing the overview of the needs and costs of rehabilitation

Location: City of Baguio Total Czech ODA funds: € 20,000 Duration: Aug – Dec 2008 II. Humanitarian Aid In 2006, humanitarian aid of the Czech Republic, amounted to 22 000 EUR for oil spill removal. A total of 13 000 EUR in connection with the typhoon Durian was also part of the Czech Republic’s humanitarian assistance.

CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of the Czech Republic in the Philippines 30th Floor Rufino Pacific Tower 6784 Ayala Avenue, Makati City Tel: (02) 811-1155/56/58 Fax: (02) 811-1020 Email: [email protected] www.mfa.cz/manila

FINLAND Finnish development cooperation to the Philippines started in 1985. Finnish bilateral cooperation in the form of programs and project is directed to their main partner countries – Mozambique, Nicaragua, Tanzania, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Namibia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Nepal, the Palestinian Autonomous Territories, Ethiopia and China. Finland also extends support to these countries through humanitarian aid, interest subsidies, support to development cooperation by NGOs, and even use of concessional credit. The Philippines has not been classified as an official “program country” for Finnish ODA. Finland prefers to implement its development cooperation endeavors in the Philippines indirectly, through multilateral international organizations, such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) and United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO). Focus of Development Cooperation The Finnish government has made available four types of assistance to the Philippines under the development cooperation program: 9. Concessional Loan Scheme (CSL) is a credit facility that can finance social, environment and health sector projects, i.e., water and sewage disposal and management, water supply management, upgrading of hospitals and forestation projects. The facility can finance 85 to 100% of a project’s financial requirement with 0 percent interest, over a ten-year repayment period. Fully 50% of a contract value must be tied to Finnish goods and services. 10. Grant assistance is provided through co-financing with multilateral organizations and to national government agencies (bilateral projects) 11. Feasibility Study Grant Facility is provided through the Industrial Cooperative Fund can only be tapped by Finnish private/ business firms. The Finnish Government evaluates proposals to finance preparation of feasibility studies (FS) on a case-by-case basis and prefers co-financing by the GOP/ proponent agencies (cost-sharing 50-50) than to shoulder the full cost of the FS. 12. The Small Scale Funding Facility is provided annually to finance short-term projects implemented by NGOs, cooperatives, universities and other CSOs in support of the Indigenous Peoples, person with disabilities, and the academe. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Finland through the Department for International Development Cooperation is responsible for Finland’s official development assistance including bilateral and multilateral cooperate, development policies and guidelines, and coordination with other departments of the Ministry. Priority areas include projects focused in the following sectors:  Environment and technology development  Strengthening the immunization programme in the Philippines  Institutional strengthening of small and medium-scale enterprises in Mindanao  Reduction of child labour in small-scale mining  Improvement of the level and quality of micro-credit service

In addition to these, Finland supports indigenous people’s organization as well as disabled peoples’ organizations through funds for local co-operation facility. These activities focus particularly on income generation, capacity building and basic services.

CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer Embassy of Finland 21/F BPI Buendia Center, Sen. Gil Puyat Ave., Makati City Tel: (02) 891-5011 to 17 Fax: (02) 817-1654 www.webdc.com.ph/finland Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer

FRANCE The focus of French Development cooperation includes the following: -

Climate change & Energy Environment & Biodiversity Natural risk assessment and reduction Agriculture, Aquaculture & Food security Education & Research for development Health Heritage conservation Cultural diversity & Intercultural dialogue Human rights & Governance

The cultural, scientific, technical and audio-visual relations between France and the Philippines was developed within the framework of a Cooperation Agreement signed in 1978, the terms of which are updated on a regular basis.

CONTACT DETAILS The AMBASSADOR Embassy of France 16/F Pacific Star Bldg., Makati Ave. corner Gil Puyat Ave. 1200 Makati City Tel: (02) 857-6900 Fax: (02) 857-6948 Email: [email protected] www.ambafrance-ph.org Mr. Ikka Ketola Chief Trade Officer

GERMANY The Federal Republic of Germany is committed to work with its partners