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Shoreline Park Design Plan, Brooklyn Basin, October 7

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OA K L A N D P L A N N I N G C O M M I S S I O N S U B M I S S I O N

Shoreline Park Design Plan, Brooklyn Basin
Prepared for Signature Development / Zarsion by ROMA Design Group, October 7, 2015

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Brooklyn Basin will create a variety of open space experiences that
provide for public access and enjoyment of the Bay
Approximately 30 acres of open spaces are planned along the
bayfront edges of Brooklyn Basin, creating a diverse network of
parks, promenades, and plazas along the shoreline linked by a
pedestrian and bicycle trail system that extends from Jack London
Square on the west to Estuary Channel and along the entire
perimeter of Brooklyn Basin to Shoreline Park.
On the west, Estuary Park will be improved and expanded
Urban Quay – Clinton Basin

for a variety of recreational opportunities; Channel Park will
feature a meadow with vegetated edges for passive recreation
and enjoyment of the bay; South Park provides a quiet setting
with panoramic views up and down the Estuary; Gateway Park
provides a dramatic vista to Clinton Basin and is connected to wide
promenades and commercial recreational uses along its edge. At
the far eastern end, Shoreline Park is located in a portion of the
site that was extensively modified to accommodate break-bulk

Play fields – Estuary Park

PAGE 2

cargo handling activities.

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

GATEWAY PARK

CHANNEL PARK

ESTUARY PARK

SOUTH PARK

SHORELINE PARK

CLINTON BASIN
Place for Social Gathering – Gateway Park

Rendering of Brooklyn Basin

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Greenway Trail – Channel Park and South Park

PAGE 3

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Shoreline Park will engage the Estuary and heighten the opportunity
for viewing and enjoying its diversity of activities
The Estuary contributes significantly to Oakland’s civic identity,
creating continuity from the airport to the port and along the
bay and into Lake Merritt. It provides an intimate stage of water
activity, offering unique views to passing vessels and a direct
connection to the opposite shore. The scale, beauty and everchanging spectacle of the Estuary demand a restrained design
approach that reveals its intrinsic qualities and builds upon the
power of its setting. Rather than compete with the waterfront
Sculling on the Estuary

or mimic a pastoral park inland, Shoreline Park will heighten the
sense of the waterfront and derive its identity by relation with it.
Broad waterfront promenades, view corridors extending from
adjacent streets, axial vistas, changes in grade and stepped seating
areas will open up to the Estuary in different ways, creating
unobstructed and tiered places for viewing and experiencing
everyday activities as well as seasonal pageants and special events,

Sailing on the Estuary

PAGE 4

such as lighted boat parades and races.
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Oakland Urban Waterfront

Coast Guard Vessels

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Paddle boarders

Container Ships at the Port of Oakland

PAGE 5

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Landscape elements and linear recreational activities will reinforce the
shoreline edge and meeting place of land and water
Shoreline Park extends over a half mile along the shoreline,
connecting Clinton Basin with the Embarcadero. A variety of
shoreline conditions will be created along its length, from an
extended overlook, to a defined water basin, to a pile supported
structure and wood trestle that recalls its maritime legacy. At the
same time, the street pattern of the community creates not only
visual corridors but also linkages to the activities, whether on Main
Street, 8th Avenue, Brooklyn Way or the Embarcadero. Ninth
Avenue reinforces the shoreline and the activities of the park.
The design approach is to strengthen the “line of force” of the
water’s edge and make it more visible and perceptible, to enhance
the opportunities for linear recreational activities, which are both
fundamental to the waterfront setting and to provide for some of
the most popular forms of recreation today, creating connections
Tree-lined Promenade

PAGE 6

back into the community, reuniting the city and the bay.

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

LI N K AG ES A N D
V I E W CO RRI D O R S
8TH AVENUE

BROOKLYN WAY

MAIN STREET

C L A SS I BI KE WAY
EM

BA

RC
A

DE
RO

9TH AVENUE

B AY TR A I L
Waterfront Promenade

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Class I Bikeway

PAGE 7

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

The central plaza will become a civic gathering place that recalls its
maritime heritage and creates opportunities for a variety of activities
The design for Shoreline Park builds upon the nature of the pilesupported structure that underlies the central plaza and expresses
its maritime heritage. It is intended to express its authentic
identity as a deck over water rather than be treated as if part of
land and it builds upon the maritime role of the Ninth Avenue
terminal building.
The design references the building scale and form and incorporates
Lounge Chairs

an adaptive reuse of building materials, including recycled wood
members for decking and remnant elements that speak to the
essential qualities of the place. Within this context, changes in
grade and stepped edges provide opportunities and suggestions
for informal everyday activities while allowing for major special
events, such as markets, fairs, theatrical performances, and
dancing, that would happen on occasion. This kind of landscape
approach brings together the industrial landscape in a modern way
to create an attractive and engaging park setting.

Stepped Edges
PAGE 8

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Rendering of Central Plaza
THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

PAGE 9

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

A carefully conceived program of managed events and activities will
establish a culture of use and lead to a vibrant, self-regulating place
Shoreline Park is the first park to be built at Brooklyn Basin and it
will involve a significant transformation of the existing industrial
landscape. Critical to its success, particularly in the early years
before the area is fully populated, will be the programming and
management of a variety of activities that are welcoming to
individuals and groups of all sizes throughout the year.
Shoreline Park is composed of a series of bold gestures with spatial
Outdoor Dining

variety that foster activity and reinforce the sense of place. Rather
than being filled up with specific facilities, the park is intentionally
designed to be more flexible and adaptable for a variety of activities and experiences that can change over time. Programming
will be organized such activities as children’s play, education and
discovery tours, yoga, fishing, twilight dancing and concerts, weekend markets, community dining, and gathering for races and other
events on the Estuary. Staffing of the park will further a sense of
security and safety until it becomes a self-sustaining space.

Children’s Event
PAGE 10

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Informal Musical Performance

Yoga
THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Farmer’s Market

Carts

Dancing
PAGE 11

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Umbrellas will create an ephemeral landscape with shade and color
and will be a visually appealing and amenable setting for activities
The Central Plaza is envisioned as a flexible open space capable
of adapting to a variety of recreational activities, civic gatherings
and special events over time. Its flexibility and adaptability can
be furthered by the placement of large scale umbrellas that
create shade and shelter, thus fostering a more comfortable and
attractive environment for visitors to linger and assemble, as
individuals and in small groups as well as large crowds. They also
create another layer of elements that can help structure activities
within the plaza as well as special events. Stainless steel sleeves
integrated within the wood decking will be used to support
stanchions for umbrellas and other shade structures. When not
in use, the umbrellas can be stored in the Terminal Building and
the plaza remain open and unobstructed. Artfully composed and
strategically placed within the plaza, the umbrellas will create an
ephemeral landscape of ever-changing elements that add color,
pattern, scale and amenity to the life of the plaza.

PAGE 12

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Plaza Plan - example of potential locations for umbrellas

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

PAGE 13

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

The west extension from the plaza contributes to the episodic
experience of place and enhances “staying activities”
Shoreline Park is composed of a number of special places that help
punctuate the shoreline, create destinations within it, and provide
for a variety of experiences. The west end of the park features a
series of unique coves, outlooks, water’s edge relationships, and
landscape treatments as well as numerous places to sit, stop and
linger.
At the western end of the Central Plaza, the change in direction
Counter top Seating

of the shoreline will be heightened by an arbor/trellis structure
creating a defined space with landscaped planters and stepped
seating. A water basin will be configured further to the west, with
high seating overlooking it on either side and steps going directly
into the water. On the opposite side of the basin, a double row
allee planting of tall trees is proposed along the shoreline as well as
diagonally connecting to Clinton Basin. At grade plantings adjoins
this area, further adding amenity and biodiversity.

Concrete Steps to the Estuary
PAGE 14

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

9TH AVENUE

RENDERING
POINT OF VIEW
WOOD AND CONCRETE
SEATING STEPS AT BAY’S EDGE
(SEE PAGE 22, SECTION CC)
VISTA POINT
SWIVEL CHAIRS

SCULPTURE OPPORTUNITY
HIGH COUNTERTOP SEATING
BOTH SIDES

ARBOR/TRELLIS (SEE PAGE 22)
WOOD STEPPED SEATING

Vista Point

Rendering of Bay Trail Edge, with views west down Estuary to San Francisco
THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Informal Gathering Space
PAGE 15

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

The Terminal Building provides a focus for adjacent open space
activities and a distinctive gateway to Shoreline Park
To the east of the Central Plaza, the 9th Avenue Terminal Building will
become a major focus with activities that spill out around its edges
and into the park. The trestle structure will provide for a unique
walking experience separated from the shoreline with views back
to it. A large landscaped area will create a strong entry element to
Shoreline Park from the Embarcadero, providing views into a diversity of Bay Friendly plantings and rain gardens that will work to filter
Cafes spill out from the building

storm water and enhance overall environmental quality.
The spaces created within the eastern end of the park provide for a
variety of experiences, from picnicking and café seating, to special
activities and the flexible use of the parking lot for food trucks,
markets and a number of other temporary activities. Multiple views
and access points will be created to and along the Estuary as well
as connections to the Bay Trail and shoreline to the east as well as
directly to the Embarcadero.

Temporary food trucks in the parking lot
PAGE 16

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

B R O O K LY N WAY

EM

SURFACE PARKING
& TEMPORARY EVENTS

B

A

R

C

A

D

ER

O

9TH AVENUE

CLASS I BIKEWAY
BIKE
PARKING

RAIN GARDEN

PICNIC AREA

BAY TRAIL

9TH AVENUE
TERMINAL BUILDING

CAFE EXTENSION AREAS

TRESTLE BRIDGE

Bay Friendly plants create gateway to the park

Rendering of Bay Trail and 9th Avenue Terminal Building, looking west
THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Example of public access on a trestle bridge
PAGE 17

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Public art, interpretive elements and wayfinding can add to the
experience and understanding of place
All of Shoreline Park is intended to become an artful composition
that is lasting, meaningful and appropriate to its environmental
setting. Within the park, public art and interpretive elements
will be incorporated to further add to the dimensionality and
understanding of place.
Opportunities for public art will be created along the promenade
and offshore to engage the visitor, reveal and heighten a sense of
the landscape and add meaning to the perception of place.
Narrative opportunities include the historic location of the 9th
Avenue building, expanding upon its maritime role as a break-bulk
cargo terminal and its relevance to Oakland and the Bay Region.
The rain gardens and other landscaped areas within the park will
also provide an opportunity for interpretive signage that describes
the plantings and their contributions to water quality, habitat and
local landscape identity.
Major Public Art
PAGE 18

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

SCULPTURE OPPORTUNITY
PARK WAYFINDING
AT KEY ENTRIES
PARK WAYFINDING
AT KEY ENTRIES
SCULPTURE
OPPORTUNITY

SCULPTURE
OPPORTUNITY

INTERPRETIVE
SIGNAGE
INTERPRETIVE SIGNAGE
ON GUARD RAIL

Interactive Elements

CART OPPORTUNITY
INTERPRETIVE MARKERS
ON COLUMN BASES

Wayfinding Signage

Interpretive Signage

Column Marker Medallions

Bay Discovery

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Marine Mammal Sculptures

Public Art and Engagement

PAGE 19

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Reclaiming and repurposing salvaged materials will advance
sustainability and heighten the sense of continuity with the past
The deconstruction of the 9th Avenue Terminal offers the opportunity to salvage and reuse many building materials in a sustainable
manner. Wood decking and beams, steel trusses, iron castings,
steel sash clerestory, cast drains and mooring cleats have potential
reuse value to fulfill functional and recreational needs in an artistic
Example of the potential reuse of materials for an artistic work

and craftsman-like manner. The roof deck can be reclaimed and
milled for use as the decking of the Central Plaza. Heavy timbers
can be used to create grade changes. Wood and metal can be used
to fabricate furnishings. Steel trusses can be reused for the trellis,
for directional signage or sculptural elements.
Salvaged materials harken back to the former identity of the
marine terminal, but should not trivialize or caricature it. Rather,
they should be used in a simple and straightforward fashion to
successfully realize the transformation of this place to its new

Example of the potential reuse of materials to create a trellis structure

PAGE 20

recreational use and identity.

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Wood decking and beams provide opportunities for paving in the Plaza

Unique rail elements can add interest to paved areas

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

Cast drains retained in place where feasible

Metal trusses and columns offer reuse opportunities for artistic works and furnishings

Mooring cleats relocate & reuse along shoreline

Column locations for interpretive markers

PAGE 21

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Well crafted furnishings and sustainable, high quality materials will be
used that are appropriate to the local waterfront setting
A vocabulary of elements utilizing wood, timber, stone, concrete
and steel, and in addition to those salvaged from the marine
terminal, will add authenticity, integrity and identity to Shoreline
Park. These materials will be of a robust nature, capable of
withstanding heavy anticipated use as well as the specific demands
of a marine environment. They will also be appropriately finished,
detailed and executed to create a variety of furnishings, fixtures
and elements that do not over-assert themselves into the park
Arbor/Trellis with Vine Planting

landscape, but rather create a timeless quality of understated
simplicity and elegance. The park elements will reflect a high
standard of quality that, at the same time, does not depend on
extraordinary maintenance and upkeep and can carry through the
rest of the open spaces in Brooklyn Basin. In this way, they will help
to create a park identity that is unique, attractive and sustainable
for use today and into the future.

Seating Steps at Water’s Edge
PAGE 22

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

PAGE 23

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK

Lighting will provide continuity to the park, unify the shoreline and
create an attractive and sustainable night-time environment
Lighting is carefully conceived to reinforce the relationship of the
park to its most significant features and make them as evident
at night-time as they are during the day. Lighting will be focused
POULSEN ALBERTSLUND MAXI
POWDER COATED WITH
CUSTOM POLE

along the entire shoreline perimeter in a cadence and rhythm
every approximately 50 feet. The lighting will help dramatize the
natural setting of the water’s edge and give it greater prominence
in evening hours.

12’
ALUMINUM GUARD RAIL

Within the park, the perimeter lighting will create a soft
illuminated sparkle effect adjacent to the water, where it will
heighten the continuity of the shoreline. Modern light fixtures are
planned of a pedestrian scale and will be 12 feet in height. These

42’

will be integrated into the railing or in places where a railing is not
needed, on independent poles. LED luminaires on dimmers will
30” WIDE
LIGHT POST BASE

12” HIGH
CURB WITH REVEAL

be used along with appropriate night sky protection with an even
uniform lighting that is inviting, comfortable and distinctive.

PAGE 24

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Snap Shot # 1
Scale 1" = 60'

LUMINAIRE SCHEDULE
Symbol

Label

Qty

Catalog Number

Description

Lamp

F1

67

F2

21

LUMEC CPLS60W30LED4K-ES- Capella
LE3F

ALBERTSLUND
MINI POST
LED/3000K (2014)
(PRO-RATED)

CAST GRAY PAINTED
METAL POST TOP
FITTER WITH 3
VERTICAL POSTS AND
MOLDED WHITE
PLASTIC TOP
REFLECTOR

TWO WHITE MULTI-CHIP
LIGHT EMITTING DIODES ALB-MIN-PT- Absolute
LED_54W
(LEDS), ONE 35mm LED
LED_3000K_V
VERTICAL BASE-UP
2_ITL82672
POSITION, ONE 19mm
(PRO).ies
LED VERTICAL BASEDOWN POSITION.

F3

6

HESS AMERICA
"PENDO" LED

PEN380-LED with Clear
Lens, 3000K

(DOS LE3F) White 72W
SSL c/w Advance Driver
XITANIUM 72W24V @
120.00V

LED ARRAY

File

Lumens

LLF

Watts

1.00

55

Absolute
CPLS60W30LED4KES-LE3F
(S1102221m).i
es

1.00

62.59

PEN380-LED- Absolute
3000K.ies

1.00

42.55

F1

F1

F1

F1

F1

F1

APPROXIMATELY 50 FT BETWEEN LIGHTS

THE VISION FOR SHORELINE PARK: CONCEPTS AND PRECEDENTS

PAGE 25

H
MEAN

I GH

TIDE

E
LIN
DC

’ BC

100

S

D

AN

EB

ELIN

R
HO

MAIN STREET / 6TH AVENUE

TH E DESIGN PL AN DR AWI NGS

8TH AVENUE

9T

B R O O K LY N WAY

SECTION D-D

H
A
V
EN
U
E
9TH AVENUE

SECTION C-C

PARKING

UPPER DECK +4

MAIN DECK +2

100’

BCD

C SH

ORE

LINE

BAN

D

9TH AVENUE
TERMINAL
BUILDING

BAY TRAIL +0

MEA

N HIG

H TID

E LIN

E

SECTION A-A
SECTION B-B

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN

26

0

60’

120’

240’

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

20’
TRESTLE

14’
CLASS I
BIKEWAY

NINTH AVENUE

PARKING

30’
BAY TRAIL

32’
BIKE/PEDWAY

SECTION A-A

0

8’

16’

32’

30’ BAY TRAIL

NINTH AVENUE
16’
SIDEWALK

14’
CLASS I
BIKEWAY

SECTION B-B

0

8’

16’

32’

CROSS SECTIONS
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

PAGE 27

NINTH AVENUE

16’
SIDEWALK

14’
CLASS I
BIKEWAY

42’
BAY TRAIL

SECTION C-C

0

CIRCULAR PLANTING
BIKE/PEDWAY BEYOND

RAIN GARDEN

20’
NO MOW MEADOW

16’

8’

32’

30’
BAY TRAIL

EXISTING
SEA WALL

SECTION D-D

0

8’

16’

32’

CROSS SECTIONS
28

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

15.5’
CONCRETE SIDEWALK

14’
CLASS I BIKEWAY
10’ ASPHALT, 2’ GRANITE ON EACH SIDE
TREES IN PLANTERS

CONCRETE PLANTER WALLS WITH
LIGHTWEIGHT FOAM WHERE NEEDED

GRANITE CLAD PLANTER WALLS & CAPS

CROSS SECTION AT NINTH AVENUE EDGE OF CENTRAL SPACE
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

0

2’

4’

8’

PAGE 29

WOOD DECKING SUPPORTED BY JOISTS, BEAMS & POSTS
REUSE OF TERMINAL BUILDING ROOF ELEMENTS IF FEASIBLE

GRANITE
PLANTER WALL
CLADDING & CAPS

WOOD DECKING SUPPORTED BY JOISTS, BEAMS & POSTS
REUSE OF TERMINAL BUILDING ROOF ELEMENTS IF FEASIBLE

GRANITE STEPPED SEATING WITH
LIGHTWEIGHT FOAM SPACERS WHERE NEEDED

CROSS SECTION AT UPPER DECK EDGE OF CENTRAL SPACE
30

0

2’

4’

8’

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

GRANITE STEPPED
SEATING

30’
CONCRETE DECK AT
BAY TRAIL & PIER EDGE

GRANITE CLAD CONCRETE PLANTER WALLS

WOOD DECKING SUPPORTED BY JOISTS AND SLEEPERS
REUSE OF TERMINAL BUILDING ROOF ELEMENTS IF FEASIBLE

CROSS SECTION AT MAIN DECK EDGE OF CENTRAL SPACE
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

0

2’

4’

8’

PAGE 31

CC
DD

PERMEABLE ASPHALT WITH
2’ GRANITE BAND ON EACH SIDE

16’
CONCRETE SIDEWALK WITH
6’ LANDSCAPED TREE WELLS
30’
BIKE/PEDWAY

14’
CLASS I BIKEWAY

MOVEMENT AREA

WOOD SEATING
AND STAYING AREA

36’ BAY TRAIL
CONCRETE WITH 6’ LANDSCAPED TREE WELLS
CONCRETE STEPPED SEATING
ADJACENT TO RIP RAP EDGE

DETAIL SECTION CC
32

0

4’

8’

16’

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

GUARD RAILS &
PERIMETER LIGHTING

BENCHES
RAIN GARDEN

20’

30’ BAY TRAIL

NO MOW MEADOW

CONCRETE WITH TREE WELLS

RIP-RAP

EXISTING
SEA WALL

DETAIL SECTION DD
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

0

4’

8’

16’

PAGE 33

E
U
N

ALLEE AND SHORELINE TREES
H

A

V

E

POTENTIAL PLANT MATERIALS

8

T

ALLEE AND SHORELINE TREES
Brachychiton populneus (Bottle Tree)
Lophostemon conferta (Brisbane Box)
Podocarpus gracilior (Yew Pine)
Quercus frainetto (Italian Oak)

LOW FLOWERING PLANTS

9TH AVENUE

RAIN GARDEN
NO MOW MEADOW GRASS

GARDEN TREES AND PALMS
Arbutus 'Marina' (Marina Strawberry Tree)
Butia capitata (Pindo Palm)
Chamaerops humilis (Mediterranean Fan Palm)
Melaleuca quinquenervia (Paperbark Tree)
Melaleuca styphelloides (Prickly melaleuca)
Quercus agrifolia (Coast Live Oak)
Quercus lobata (Valley Oak)
SHRUBS, GROUNDCOVER AND GRASSES
Aeonium haworthii (Pinwheel)
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Little Sur' (Little Sur Manzanita)
Artemisia pynocephala ‘David’s Choice’
Ceanothus hearstiorum (Hearst Ranch Buckbrush)
Coprosma petriei “Verde Vista”
Dietes iridiodes
Erigeron glauca (Wayne Roderick Daisy)
Hemerocallis x yellow (Daylily)
Hesperaloe parviflora (Red Yucca)
Limonium californicum (Western Marsh Rosemary)
Limonium perezii (Sea Lavender)
“No Mow” Meadow Grasses
Rosa meidiland Series Red (Red Meidiland Rose)
Salvia l. “Santa Barbara” (Dwarf Bush Sage)
Senecio mandraliscae
Zauschneria septrentrionalis “Mattole River”
Note: Preliminary plant list includes candidates for landscape, to be finalized
in the design process in consideration of Bay Friendly practices.

ALLEE AND SHORELINE TREES

ALLEE AND SHORELINE WEST GARDENS
34

0

15’

30’

60’

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Nyssa sylvatica (Tupelo Tree)
ALONG BOTH SIDES OF 9TH AVENUE & CLASS I BIKEWAY

9TH AVENUE

PLANTER TREES WITH MIXED SHRUBS,
GROUNDCOVER & GRASSES

FLOWERING PLANTS AT ENTRY &
ADJACENT TO 9TH AVENUE

POTENTIAL PLANT MATERIALS

PLANTER TREES WITH MIXED SHRUBS,
GROUNDCOVER & GRASSES

TREES AND PALMS
Arbutus 'Marina' (Marina Strawberry Tree)
Arbutus unedo (Strawberry Tree)
Brahea edulis (Guadalupe Palm)
Butia capitata (Pindo Palm)
Chamaerops humilis (Mediterranean Fan Palm)
Melaleuca quinquenervia (Paperbark Tree)
Olea europaea, “Swan Hill” Olive
Phoenix reclinata (Senegal Date Palm)
Tristaniopsis laurina (Kanooka)
SHRUBS, GROUNDCOVER AND GRASSES
Agave Blue Flame
Arctostaphylus edmundsii “Carmel Sur' (Carmel Sur Manzanita)
Calamagrostis x acutifolia cultivars (Feather Reed Grass)
Ceanothus maritimus (Maritime California Lilac)
Coprosma petriei “Verde Vista”
Cordyline indivisa (Blue dracaena)
Dietes bicolor

SHRUBS, GROUNDCOVER AND GRASSES (continued)
Dymondia margaretae (Dymondai)
Festuca glauca (Blue Fescue)
Hakea suavedens (Sweet Hakea)
Hesperaloe parviflora (Red Yucca)
Lavendula angustifolia (English Lavender)
Leymus arenarius (Blue Lyme Grass)
Limonium californicum (Western Marsh Rosemary)
Phormium tenax (Coastal Flax)
Phormium Jubilee
Lomandra confertifolius “Seascape”
Muhlenbergia capillaris (Muhly Grass)
Muhlenbergia rigens (Deer Grass)
Rosa Meidiland (Pink Meidiland Rose)
Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus' (Creeping Rosemary)
Salvia chamaedryoides (Germander Sage)
Salvia cacalifolia (Guatemalan Leaf Sage)
Salvia l. “Santa Barbara” (Dwarf Bush Sage)
Salvia mellifera (Black Sage)

Note: Preliminary plant list includes candidates for landscape, to be finalized in the design process in consideration of Bay Friendly practices.

CENTRAL PLAZA PLANTER LANDSCAPE
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

0

15’

30’

60’

PAGE 35

POTENTIAL PLANT MATERIALS
RAIN GARDEN TREES
Cercocarpus betuloides (Mountain Mahogany)
Quercus agrifolia (Coast Live Oak)
Quercus lobata (Valley Oak)
Platanus X acerifolia “Columbia” (London Plane Tree)

M

B

A

R

C

A

D

E

R

O

T

H

A

V

E

N

U

E

E

9

SHRUBS, GROUNDCOVER AND GRASSES
Arctostaphyles densiflora 'Howard McMinn' (Howard McMinn Manzanita)
Arctostaphylos edmundsii 'Little Sur' (Little Sur Manzanita)
Artemisia pynocephala “David’s Choice” (David’s Choice Artemisia)
Ceanothus x concha (California Lilac)
Chondropetalum tectorum (Cape Rush)
Cistus salvifolius 'Prostratus' (Sageleaf Rockrose)
Dietes bicolor (African Iris)
Festuca glauca (Blue Fescue)
Frangula californica 'Mound San Bruno' (California Coffeeberry)
Griselinia littoralis
Hemerocallis x yellow (Daylily)
Leymus arenarius
Limonium californicum (Western Marsh Rosemary)
Lomandra longifolia “Breeze”
Lomandra confertifolius “Seascape”
Muhlenbergia capillaris 'Autumn Blush' (Pink Muhly)
Muhlenbergia rigens (Deer Grass)
Loropetalum chinense
Rosa californica (California Wild Rose)
Salvia l. “Santa Barbara” (Dwarf Bush Sage)
Salvia mellifera (Black Sage)
Note: Preliminary plant list includes candidates for landscape, to be finalized
in the design process in consideration of Bay Friendly practices.

EMBARCADERO GATEWAY
36

0

15’

30’

60’

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Aeonium haworthii (Pinwheel)

Dietes iridoides (African Iris)

Zauschneria septentrionalis “Mattole River”

Ceanothus hearstiorum (Hearst Ranch Buckbrush)

Anigozanthus “Big Red” (Red Kangaroo Paw)

Erigeron glauca (Wayne Roderick Daisy)

Limonium perezii (Sea Lavender)

Nyssa sylvatica (Tupelo Tree)

Lophostemon conferta (Brisbane Box)

Brachychiton populneus (Bottle Tree)

Quercus frainetto (Italian Oak)

Coprosma petriei “Verde Vista”

PLANT PALETTE: ALLEE, SHORELINE AND OTHER LINKAGES
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

PAGE 37

Salvia chamaedryoides
(Germander Sage)

Festuca glauca (Blue Fescue)

Arctostaphylos edmundsii “Little Sur”

Cordyline indivisa (Blue dracaena)

Ceanothus maritimus
(Maritime California Lilac)

Arbutus 'Marina' (Marina Strawberry Tree)

Rosmarinus officinalis 'Prostratus'
(Creeping Rosemary)

Olea europaea, “Swan Hill” Olive

Melaleuca quinquenervia (Paperbark Tree)

Phormium Jubilee

Hesperaloe parviflora (Red Yucca)

Lavendula angustifolia (Lavender)

PLANT PALETTE: PLANTER LANDSCAPE
38

SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN • OCTOBER 7, 2015

Juncus patens, Elk Blue

Chondropetalum tectorum (Thatching Reed)

Frangula californica, “Mound San Bruno”

Sisyrinchium californicum (Yellow Eyed Grass)

Cistus salvifolius, “Prostratus” (Sageleaf Rockrose)

Cercocarpus betuloides (Mountain Mahogany)

Rosa californica (California Wild Rose)

Carex divulsa (Berkeley Sedge)

Ceanothus x Concha

Quercus lobata (Valley Oak)

Platanus X acerifolia “Columbia” (London Plane Tree)

Quercus agrifolia (Coastal Live Oak)

Muhlenbergia capillaris (Pink Muhly Grass)

RAIN GARDENS
SHORELINE PARK DESIGN PLAN: THE DESIGN PLAN DRAWINGS

PAGE 39

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