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What would you advise the boss - about firing the employee for the garnishment orders, and about garnishment generally?

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DISCUSSION POST #1 TOPIC #1 What would you advise the boss - about firing the employee for the garnishment orders, and about garnishment generally? I would advise the boss that if he was to fire the employee he would be in violation of Title III Section 304 (a) of the Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCAP) which restricts any employer from firing an employee due to the garnishments ("Garnishments", n.d.). It does not matter how many court orders for the same case about the same garnishment is received for the employee, the employer would be violating federal law if he was to fire the employer ("Garnishments", n.d.). If the employer was to disregards this law and fire the employee anyhow he could be receive $1,000 fine and/or sentenced to a year in jail states Section 304 (b) of Title III ("Garnishments", n.d.). A month later another garnishment order arrives - this time for a different case; a judgment was entered against the employee in a personal injury case (a car accident), the employee had proper notice of the court proceedings but chose not to defend, and judgment was entered against him. Would your advice to your boss change? How? In this scenario there is a second garnishment from a completely separate case. Yes Title III of the Consumer Protection Act (CCAP) protects an employee from being fired from garnishing however the back door to this law is that the second garnishing does not have the same protection ("Wages and Hours Worked: Wage Garnishment", n.d.). This means that this law does not protect the employee from being fired for the second garnishment ("Wages and Hours Worked: Wage Garnishment", n.d.), therefore my advice to the employer would be that the employer could be discharge and is not protected by law on this garnishment. ~Alexiya B. Embery References "Garnishments". (n.d.). United States Department of Labor. Accessed on August 30, 2017. Retrieved from https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/wages/garnishments "Wages and Hours Worked: Wage Garnishments". (n.d.). United States Department of Labor. Accessed on August 30, 2017. Retrieved from https://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/elg/garnish.htm DISCUSSION POST #2 TOPIC 1 According to the federal wage garnishment law, Consumer Credit Protection Act's Title III (CCPA), an employee is protected from being fired for having a wage garnishment for one indebtedness. (Department of Labor, 2017) Section 304 of the CCPA, specifically states that an employer cannot fire an employee for the sole reason of having a garnishment against their pay. (Department of Labor, 2017) As a consequence of disobeying the employee garnishment laws, employers may have to pay a fine up to $1,000, serve up to one year in prison or both. (Law, 1970) However, an employee can be discharged from their organization if their garnishments exceed more than one indebtedness. (Department of Labor, 2017) I would advise my boss to refresh themselves on the law and apply some critical thinking to the current circumstances. Her/his actions may have a negative impact on the organization. Of course, I would have to familiarize my boss and other managers on the current topic. It would be a valuable lesson learned and a prevention tool for potential illegal actions by management. I believe informing the employee about their rights and providing awareness training to him/her about the circumstances of garnishments.

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DISCUSSION POST #1 TOPIC #1 What would you advise the boss - about firing the employee for the garnishment orders, and about garnishment generally? I would advise the boss that if he was to fire the employee he would be in violation of Title III Section 304 (a) of the Consumer Credit Protection Act (CCAP) which restricts any employer from firing an employee due to the garnishments ("Garnishments", n.d.). It does not matter how many court orders for the same case about the same garnishment is received for the employee, the employer would be violating federal law if he was to fire the employer ("Garnishments", n.d.). If the employer was to disregards this law and fire the employee anyhow he could be receive $1,000 fine and/or sentenced to a year in jail states Section 304 (b) of Title III ("Garnishments", n.d.). A month later another garnishment order arrives - this time for a different case; a judgment was entered against the employee in a personal injury case (a car accident), the employee had proper notice of the court proceedings but chose not to defend, and judgment was entered against him. Would your advice to your boss change? How? In this scenario there is a second garnishment from a completely separate case. Yes Title III of the Consumer Protection Act (CCAP) protects an employee from being fired from garnishing however the back door to this law is that the second garnishing does not have the same protection ("Wages and Hours Worked: Wage Garnishment", n.d.). This means that this law does not protect the employee from being fired for the second garnishment ("Wages and Hours Worked: Wage Garnishment", n.d.), therefore my advice to the employer would be that the employer could be discharge and is not protected by law on this garnishment. ~Alexiya B. Embery References "Garnishments". (n.d.). United States Department of Labor. Accessed on August 30, 2017. Retrieved from https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/wages/garnishments "Wages and Hours Worked: Wage Garnishments". (n.d.). United States Department of Labor. Accessed on August 30, 2017. Retrieved from https://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/elg/garnish.htm DISCUSSION POST #2 TOPIC 1 According to the federal wage garnishment law, Consumer Credit Protection Act's Title III (CCPA), an employee is protected from being fired for having a wage garnishment for one indebtedness. (Department of Labor, 2017) Section 304 of the CCPA, specifically states that an employer cannot fire an employee for the sole reason of having a garnishment against their pay. (Department of Labor, 2017) As a consequence of disobeying the employee garnishment laws, employers may have to pay a fine up to $1,000, serve up to one year in prison or both. (Law, 1970) However, an employee can be discharged from their organization if their garnishments exceed more than one indebtedness. (Department of Labor, 2017) I would advise my boss to refresh themselves on the law and apply some critical thinking to the current circumstances. Her/his actions may have a negative impact on the organization. Of course, I would have to familiarize my boss and other managers on the current topic. It would be a valuable lesson learned and a prevention tool for potential illegal actions by management. I believe informing the employee about their rights and providing awareness training to him/her about the circumstances of garnishments.

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