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Yurani's Tales: An Introduction to Hindu Culture

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Content


Yurani’s Tales
Christina Y. Doodnauth
Spring 2014
Bachelor of Technology in Visual Communications
Senior Project Pitch Book
Department of Visual Communications:
Art + Graphic
An Introduction to Hindu Culture
Yurani’s Tales
Christina Y. Doodnauth
Spring 2014
Product Description
Unique Value Proposition
Target Audience
Competition
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Contents
Visual Strategy
Marketing Strategy
Distribution Strategy
Additional Areas
Cultural Relevance
Business and Post-Graduation Plan
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Executive Summary
heYurani’s Tales is a collection of illustrated books containing stories
of the Hindu deities along with cultural material that introduces Hindu culture
to Indo-Caribbean American children between the ages of four to eight. The
Yurani’s Tales collection targets parents, grandparents, and relatives who wish to introduce
Hindu culture to the children in their lives. Yurani’s Tales encourages children to be more
inquisitive and take pride in their background by shedding light on traditions and beliefs
they see in their everyday lives. Yurani’s Tales solves the problem of the loss of Hindu culture
in the Indo-Caribbean American community by providing knowledge about the culture,
religion and traditions in a simple and interesting way.
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ne thing that I love the most about being Indo-Caribbean is the
incredibly diverse culture. Indo-Caribbean peoples can be a part of Hindu,
Muslim, or Christian faiths and because of the closely knit community it is
common to see people celebrate holidays and keep traditions from all three religions.
Growing up as an Indo-Caribbean American, we are surrounded by different faiths and
cultures and we adapt to that. However, being faced with so many different cultures can
cause some people to lose touch with their own culture. Many members of the Hindu
Indo-Caribbean American community have expressed that they feel disconnected and
unknowledgeable when it comes to Hindu culture.
Introduction
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My earliest memories of culture were shared
with my grandmother whom I called my Nani,
which means my mother’s mom. My Nani was one
of the few people I can remember embracing culture
in her everyday life. She was caring and selfless, and
always called her grandchildren once a week to
remind them that education, practicing religion and
following traditions were important.
In Kindergarten, I learned that it was considered
“uncool” to be “Indian”. I liked my culture, but I
hid it so I wouldn’t be considered one of those kids
who were “super religious” or “actually believed in
more than one god.” After elementary school I can’t
remember taking pride in my culture until my junior
year in high school.
When my Nani passed away in 2010, I realized that I never asked her about her life in Guyana, and how she
kept her culture alive in New York. But the worst is she is not here to show my cousins our culture. I do not
know anything about our Hindu traditions. I found that many people my age, and even some older also do
not have this knowledge, and many do not even notice until it is too late.
Hindu culture is a big part of the Indo-Caribbean identity. The lack of knowledge and interest leads me to
wonder: when our elders are gone, will the Hindu culture, which lasted over thirty thousand years, cease to
exist in our community? I can’t imagine growing up without dressing in the traditional wear or celebrating
Diwali. It is sad that my younger cousins do not have someone to inspire them to watch a Hindi movie, or
listen to the music. I’m lucky to have my mom to teach me, but teaching is not the only problem. If people
are not interested in Hindu culture, then the knowledge means absolutely nothing.
My Nani,
Rettia Roopnarine.
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Left to right: Nani, me, and my mom..
In order to solve this problem I came up with Yurani’s Tales. Surveys show that adults who
are introduced to a subject as a child, grow up with interest in that subject. The best way to introduce a
child to something is by telling them a story. Children and adults love stories and my research shows that
Indo-Caribbean parents (like most parents) share story time with their children. Realizing that I can use
story time to my advantage, I visited a few libraries and bookstores and noticed a lack of Hindu resources
for children. I found books about other cultures, like a few children’s Bibles. Quick surveys in the bookstore
informed me that adults who owned an illustrated children’s Bible still refer back to the book from time to
time. My research showed me that in order to encourage a child to grow up participating in the culture, the
Yurani’s Tales books need to be relevant, easy to understand, and use illustrations as a means to attract and
interest the child.
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Product Description
he Yurani’s Tales collection is sold in a series of four books. These books
teach, and stimulate an interest in Hindu culture, while encouraging children to
read. The main character, Yurani, walks readers through the stories of the deities.
These stories help to explain cultural and traditional practices, and introduce prayers, food,
and the music of the Hindu culture.
Stories of Hindu Culture tells beginning stories of Rama, Krishna, Shiva, and the story
of creation. This book features traditions and celebrations of Diwali and Phagwah. The
first book is written for the beginning to intermediate reading level, for readers aged
four to six. A teaser of Stories of Hindu Culture has been executed for the senior project.
Rama the Warrior has more stories of the life of Rama and is written for an
intermediate to advanced reading level for children between the ages of seven to eight.
Pure Krishna (T.T.) tells children about the adventures of Krishna. This book is written
for intermediate to advanced readers.
The Trinity and the Goddesses (T.T.) is the fourth book in the collection and it is for
intermediate to advanced young readers. This book has stories about the Trinity, Shiva,
Vishnu, and Brahma, and the other Hindu deities that were not mentioned in the
previous books.
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Each book has a music, and holiday section. At the
end of each story there is a sidebar called Channa
Chat. This is where Yurani tells the readers about
terms or ideas that relate to, or are mentioned in
the story, but is not part of it. The name comes from
the Indo-Caribbean word for chick pea, which is
channa. Since it is only a tiny bit of information at
the end of each story, the name seemed fitting.
Right and bottom:
Channa Chat
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Spread from the music section
of Stories of Hindu Culture
Spread from the Diwali holiday section,
example of pattern use.
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Stories of Hindu Culture will be sold for $18.99 USD. Yurani’s Tales’
competitors sell in a range of ten to twenty dollars. The Yurani’s Tales
books will be more pricey however, the price is fair when the content
of the books are taken into consideration.
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Unique Value Proposition
he Yurani’s Tales books are the only children’s books on the market
that delivers the knowledge of Hindu culture and Hindu religion. These
books use the stories of the Hindu deities, the gods and goddesses, to
introduce kids to religious and moral ideals while discussing traditional clothing,
music, musical instruments and songs, foods and sweets. The Yurani’s Tales books also
explain Hindu and Indo-Caribbean terminology.
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Target Audience
ndo-Caribbean children in the four to eight age group, and their parents
make up the main target audience for Yurani’s Tales. They are the first and second
generations of Indian descent from the Caribbean countries such as Guyana,
Trinidad and Tobago, and Jamaica. This includes children who are curious about their
culture but have no one to teach them. The parents have at least a high school education
and want an easily comprehensible, yet interesting way to pass Hindu culture to their
children. Some parents are also looking for a way to refresh their own knowledge. Story
time is one of the first activities that parents engage in with their child and reading
Yurani’s Tales encourages a reconnection to the Hindu culture for the parents, in addition to
teaching Indo-Caribbean culture to their children.
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Melini is thirty-six years old and a first
generation Indo-Caribbean American. Melini
lived in Queens since she arrived in New York from
Guyana at the age of fourteen. When she married
Eric, a practicing Catholic, they moved to Brooklyn.
Melini is a practicing occupational therapist and Eric
is a real estate lawyer. They have a six-year-old son
named Alex. Melini has very little knowledge of her
culture, but wants her son to learn.
Melini turns to her mother for advice and her mom
suggests taking an active role in the community so
Alex can learn by example. Melini takes her family
to mandir and to the Diwali festival, but since Alex
does not know what is going on, he gets bored.
Melini finds some resources that can help her, but she
is frustrated because she does not have enough time
to read the long, detailed stories.
“…members of Indo-Caribbean American community
have expressed that they feel disconnected from their
culture, and struggle with teaching it to their children.”
The “Disconnected Hindu”
Melini and Alex, age 6
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Melini and her husband normally read stories to Alex. On a trip to the library, Melini sees
a poster for Yurani’s Tales: Stories of Hindu Culture. Melini took one of the free Yurani’s Tales
bookmarks with a book description, website url, and ordering information. After deciding
that the book is age appropriate, easy for Alex to understand, and most importantly, it
captures his attention. Even Eric enjoys reading Yurani’s Tales. The books allow Melini to
bond with her son over Hindu culture.
Yurani’s Tales poster
at the children’s
room in the library.
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The “Curious Child”
Roshini, age 8
Roshini is second-generation Indo-Caribbean
American, born in New York. Her dad is an
Indo-Trinidadian and her mother is Indo-Jamaican.
Their family lives in East Islip where there is a very
small Indo-Caribbean community. Roshini’s dad is
an auto mechanic and her mom works as a clothing
store manager. The family practices Hinduism at
home, but only prayer. Roshini has never experienced
the festivals, parades, or any other cultural events.
She loves learning about her friends’ cultures so not
knowing her own made her feel ashamed and sad.
Roshini dreams about going to the mandir, festivals,
and parties with her cousins. She asks her parents to
attend Indo-Caribbean cultural events as a family,
but they are always working. Roshini looks for
information on Hindu culture, but only finds books
and web results that are not easy to understand.
She fears that because of her environment and her
American friends, she will always be detached from
her own culture.
“Both of my parents worked all week and no
one was around to take me to mandir so I
didn’t have an option.”
—Anjanie Roopnarine
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Right: Yurani’s Tales,
Stories of Hindu Culture bookmark
Bottom: Yurani’s Tales Facebook
When her class attended the Islip Arts Council Book Fair, Roshini noticed the display for Yurani’s Tales. She
took a free Yurani’s Tales bookmark home to her mom, who visited Facebook to check out reviews and then
ordered the book through her Amazon account. Stories of Hindu Culture allows her to relate to extended family.
Roshini’s love for her culture reminds her parents’ of their youth growing up in a rich Hindu Indo-Caribbean
community. Their family attends cultural events every so often now.
www.yuranistales.com
#yurani stal es
Hey don’t l ose
your page!
Visit the Yurani’s Tales
website for information

Stories of Hindu Culture!
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Maiya is a sixty-two years immigrant from
Trinidad. She has trouble teaching her four-year
old grandson, Chris, about Hindu culture. Maiya
does not work so she takes care of Chris during the
day. The adults in the family are very active in their
community, but are having a hard time getting Chris
to participate.
Maiya has tried everything to get Chris attention
when it comes to culture, but she finds that Chris is
unwilling to cooperate and completely uninterested.
She feels that Hindu culture is very important to pass
it on to her grandson and she worries that if they do
not find something to spark his interest now, he will
never have any cultural background. Maiya tries
taking Chris to mandir and events at the community
center. She puts the television to the Indo-Caribbean
channel and tells him about holidays, but Chris still
complains that it is boring. He wants to play and
watch the colorful characters on the cartoon channels.
This leads Maiya to fear that American culture is just
more attractive.
“…American culture is
just more attractive.”
The “Weary Grandmother”
Mayia and Chris, age 4
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Stories of Hindu Culture on Amazon.com
When Maiya tells her friends about her problem, they recommend a new book that their grandchildren love,
Yurani’s Tales: Stories of Hindu Culture. Maiya passes the name onto Chris’ mother, who reads comments on
Facebook and previews the book on her Kindle before buying the traditional book for her son. Chris likes the
illustrations and constantly talks about the stories. Now that he knows the reasons behind customs, he finds
Hindu culture exciting and is willing to go to the community events.
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Competition
urani’s Tales’ four direct competitors are the Classic Indian Stories for
Children, the Amma Tell Me Series, The Little Book of Hindu Deities, and The
Ramayana Book Series. These competitors are illustrated books about the
deities. The indirect competition includes the original Ramayan by Valmiki, the
Ramayana television series (2008), and the animated movies, Krishna Makhan Chor and
the Ramayana, The Legend of Prince Rama. These competitors teach the stories of deities,
but they are harder for a young children to understand and don’t teach the culture.
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The Little Book of Hindu Deities
Classic Indian Stories for Children
The Little Book of Hindu Deities by Pixar animator Sanjay Patel, acts as an introduction to
all Hindu deities by giving readers a brief biography about each. The target audience of
this book are adults 18 and over, with an interest in anime style illustration and curiosity
about Hindu myth. The illustrations attract readers with a manga-like style and bright
colors that create a new way to perceive Hindu mythology. The book appeals to readers
from all cultures and is available for purchase all over the world. The Little Book of Hindu
Deities is only sold as a paperback. The language is not simple enough to be read by young
children, but the book serves as a good reference for adults who wish to introduce their
children to deities.
The Classic Indian Stories for Children series, by Harish Johari, Vatsala Sperling and Pieter
Weltvrede, retell some of the most famous stories in Hindu myth. The books target children
over the age of eight in the Western countries. The Classic Indian Stories for Children series
uses a very traditional Indian style of illustration for the cover and in the book that to
help tell the story. The Classic Indian Stories for Children series is only available in traditional
print format, but the lack of digital copies does not seem to hurt the success of the series.
The books are fairly easy to comprehend, but younger children will need guidance when
reading the stories.
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Amma Tell Me
The Amma Tell Me series by Bhakti Mathur has six books in the series. The Amma Tell
Me books acts as a good introduction to the stories of the Ramayana and the Bhagavad Gita.
These books target young children of the Hindu culture. The illustrations are modern and
can effectively attract the interest of a child. The books are available in Asia, the United
Kingdom and the United States. The books are not available digitally. This book is written
using simple and modern words that a child can understand.
The Ramayana
The Ramayana book series by T.R. Banhot has several books in the series but they
only focus on the story of Prince Rama. This was the only book found in the public library
on Hindu culture for children. The book is outdated and uses very small body copy in large
blocks of text that is not easily legible. Also the illustrations are blurry and did not seem to
print well. These books are printed and distributed by Dreamland Productions in India.
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Yurani’s Tales’ indirect competitors are the
original Ramayan by Valmiki and the Ramayan
Television Series. The Ramayan is the extravagant poem
that tells the story of the entire life of Prince Rama.
The book is long, not illustrated and tedious to read,
even for adults. The Ramayana Television Series (2008),
Ramayana, The Legend of Prince Rama, and Krishna
Makan Chor movies tells about the lives of Rama and
Krishna and show culture, but these are not books.
The series and movies play on the Indo-Caribbean/
Indian channel, but in Hindi with English subtitles.
A child who does not know how, or is just starting
to read would not understand the story by watching.
The television series gives some insight to the Hindu
culture and life, although it does not explain any of
the concepts and traditions the viewers see.
Indirect Competitors
Above: The Ramayana T.V. Series
Below left to right: Krishna Makan Chor,
The Ramayan by Valmiki, and
The Ramayana, The Legend of Prince Rama
Opposite page: Competitive Matrix
Over age 10 Under age 4
Hindu Culture
Hindu Religion
Yurani’s Tales sweet spot is on the x-axis in the
right quadrants showing that Yurani’s Tales targets the
four to eight age group and introduces both culture and
religion. The sweet spot is marked by the logo.
Competitive Matrix
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Sweet Spot
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Cultural Relevance
urani’s Tales conducted surveys and interviews with the target audience
to find out if there is a problem with knowledge of Hindu culture and if the
Yurani’s Tales books are needed. A survey was conducted online with Survey Monkey
and in person at the Shri Radha Krishna Mandir. This survey found that eighty-five percent
of parents wished that there was an easier way to teach their children culture. Through one
on one interviews, Yurani’s Tales met with 13 out of 20 Indo-Caribbean parents who have
looked for and want age appropriate resources for children. Many parents stated they are
hesitant in their ability to teach culture and that’s why they try to enforce going to mandir
in hopes that the child will experience religion and culture. Yurani’s Tales also met with adults
in their late teens to early 20s who felt the reasons they lost connection were due to the lack
of information provided, the feeling that they were forced to participate, and felt that other
cultures were more appealing.
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Culture is what defines a
community. It is the collected
values, ideals, foods, celebrations
and language that is passed on
from one generation to another. In
the Indo-Caribbean communities,
culture is diminishing slowly.
In October 2013, Yurani’s Tales
conducted surveys and interviews
both online, and in person, at the
Shri Radha Krishna Mandir. This
survey found that only 37.5% of
Indo-Caribbean parents that grew
up in the United States felt that
they were raised with a substantial
knowledge of Hindu culture. When
asked why they thought that was
so, one person replied, “my parents
felt that becoming Americanized
was the priority.”
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The survey also found that 88% percent of these parents had trouble
getting their own child interested in culture and 44% said that they did
not even know where to begin.
“…becoming Americanized was the priority.”
10%
Have children who love and
are active in their culture
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Child participates but shows
no interest
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Parents don’t try; don’t know
where to begin
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Have children who refuse
to participate
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right and colorful visuals are necessary to attract Yurani’s Tales’ young
target audience. The Hindu Indo-Caribbean culture is also very colorful so
Yurani’s Tales incorporated a multitude of colors into the branding. Research
showed that in order to capture the attention of the Yurani’s Tales audience effectively the
logo should incorporate the main character of the book. The following section discusses
the development of the logo and instances of where and how the logo is placed on a
background or black and white along with colors that are used.
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Visual Strategy
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Research
Through the process of discovery mapping,
Yurani’s Tales came up with four brand DNA that
summarized the brand: children, community,
education, and entertainment. Children are the
main target audience and the books are written
and designed to fit their needs. Through discovery
mapping, Yurani’s Tales came up with several design
concepts. The most popular with kids was the use of a
character, Yurani, as the logo.
Yurani’s Tales conducted research and testing to see
which typefaces are the most legible for the youngest
children. The two typefaces that tested very well with
a kindergarten teacher and her class were Gill Sans
Infant and Bembo Infant. The Bembo Infant family
was chosen for the Yurani’s Tales books because it has
more of a traditional “fairy tale” look.
Above: Images that represent brand DNA
Bottom left to right: Bembo typeface
used in books and discovery mapping.
Bembo Infant
Bembo Infant
Bembo Infant
Bembo Infant
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Logo Development
The Yurani’s Tales logo was inspired by handwritten Hindi
writing called Sanskrit. The logo is hand drawn and the character Yurani
ties the logo together with the tail encircling the letters and forms the
y’s descender. The logo color is Hibiscus Red, inspired by the Caribbean
hibiscus flower. Red is the main color of Hinduism. The color represents
purity and is used in many religious ceremonies and celebrations.
The logo evolved from straight forward sanskrit looking
watermark to a more playful “kid-friendly” mark. The idea to use the
monkey as the “i” seen in the image to the left was scratched because the
character was too small and lose details that make the logo fun.
Left: Hibiscus flower
Above: Logo development
Inspiration
Logo Development
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Brand Visual Toolkit
Display Typeface
Bembo Infant Bold
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh
Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp
Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx
Yy Zz 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
Bembo Infant Regular
Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii
Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq
Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0
The secondary colors are used on the collateral
and ancillary pieces for marketing and advertising,
and on the website and on some parts of the book
product. Hibiscus red is the primary color of the
Yurani’s Tales brand, but the secondary palette of each
book will change slightly. The palette for Stories of
Hindu Culture consists of Hibiscus red, Champa gold
and Tulsi green.
Example of text use in Stories of Hindu Culture
Body
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Main Color Palette
Hibiscus Red
0 100 50 0
Champa Gold
0 100 50 0
Saffron Orange
0 58 100 0
Honest Blue
63 0 0 0
Tulsi Green
79 9 51 0
Secondary Palette
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The color palette is used in the various patterns created to add an
Indian textile look to the illustrations in Stories of Hindu Culture.
Above: Pattern Palette
Opposite page: Yurani’s Tales logo
Pattern Palette
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The logo will be placed on all collateral and ancillary material, social media, and marketing items. Primarily
the logo will be in color on a white background. However, for the marketing purposes of Stories of Hindu
Culture, the logo on will be placed on a Champa gold background at 74% opacity.
There is a version of the logo for black and white
use and for smaller placement with no facial detail.
Logo Use Guidelines
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Marketing Strategy
Achieve brand awareness
Direct traffic to Yuranistales.com
Reach the main target audience
Communicate with customer
Promote word of mouth marketing
Validate the company
Yurani’s Tales will use this marketing strategy to:
urani’s Tales marketing strategy’s objective is to gain brand awareness,
reach the target audience in a cost efficient way, encourage donations to
Indiegogo and validate authenticity of the brand. To do this, Yurani’s Tales has
implemented a multilevel marketing strategy using social media, public relations, and
content, event, and guerilla marketing.
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Yurani’s Tales Social Media
Key Metrics of Success for Social Media
Amount of comments
Number of likes, tags, shared/retweeted posts
Total users of #yuranistales
Page followers
Number of users who click link to Yurani’s Tales website
to spread the use of #yuranistales. Yurani’s Tales’ Twitter
account will post updates about events and books. All
social media pages will be linked and have a link to
website and to Indiegogo for funding. As an incentive
for crowdfunding, donators will receive a “thank you”
shout out on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. They will
be updated at least twice a week with book event
updates, book information and teasers, and photos.
Customers will be able to ask questions, and leave
comments and reviews.
The Yurani’s Tales social media pages will bring
brand awareness to Hindu Indo-Caribbeans and the
overall Hindu community.
Advertisements and links to the page will be posted in
Hindu culture, Indian diaspora, and Indo-Caribbean
groups on the Facebook page. When users click to
the page they will see a description, updates and
photos. They will be prompted to like the page and
continue to Yuranistales.com. The Instagram account
will use photography of past and future events, and
book previews to build brand awareness and lead
customers to the website. Yurani’s Tales will use photos
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Content Marketing
Content marketing utilizes the Yurani’s Tales
website, the Channa Chat e-newsletter, and the
Yurani’s Tales website to share information on books,
events, upcoming merchandise, to encourage visitors
to buy the books, share links to social media pages,
and spread the word about promotions and discounts.
Top left to right: Yurani’s Tales Twitter
page on laptop and Instagram page on
the phone.
Bottom: Yurani’s Tales website
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Key Metrics of Success for Content Marketing
Daily visitors
Subscribers to e-newsletter
Subscribers who purchase books
Visitors that share the link to website
Keywords used to get traffic to the website
Clicks to website from the e-newsletter
Blog followers
Blog post comments and hits
Blog followers who purchase the books
Yurani’s Tales Channa
Chat E-newsletter.
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Public Relations
Public relations marketing for Yurani’s Tales focus on distribution press release kits that contain
a press release, Q&A about the book, sell sheet, Yurani’s Tales’ business cards and giveaway items. These will
have contact information and urge the receivers to learn more about Yurani’s Tales, to inspire media outlets to
feature the Yurani’s Tales books, and will allow Yurani’s Tales to gain access to larger potential audience. These
kits will be sent to local newspapers, the New York Times, local radio, and local and national television programs.
Yurani’s Tales sell sheet
and press kit envelope.
Key Metrics of Success for Public Relations
Amount of comments
Number of likes, tags, shared/retweeted posts
Total users of #yuranistales
Page followers
Number of users who click link to the
Yurani’s Tales website
“…will allow Yurani’s Tales
to gain access to a larger
potential audience.”
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Event Marketing
Event marketing will help Yurani’s Tales get one on one time with customers and the target
audience. Yurani’s Tales will hold book readings at mandirs, community centers, public libraries, local
bookstores, and religious stores. Yurani’s Tales will also make appearances at book fairs and expos, student
Hindu culture or Indo-Caribbean culture clubs, and campus events. These events will inspire customers to buy
the books, meet the author, stimulate interest and allow author to deliver the unique value proposition through
book talks and readings, and give out promotions and discounts.
Key Metrics of Success for Event Marketing
Customers who purchase the book in person
Ancillaries and collateral distributed
Promotional codes used in purchases on Yuranistales.com
In-person subscribers to the e-newsletter
Social media likes, posts and retweets of day of the event
Number of users who click link to Yurani’s Tales website
Event flyer for book reading at
the public library
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Guerrilla Marketing
Key Metrics of Success for
Guerrilla Marketing
Likes and shares videos and photos receive
Uploads posted to social media pages
Collateral and ancillaries distributed
Promotional codes used on the website
Guerilla marketing tactics during events will encourage spectators to post videos and photos on
social media, thus promoting the use of #yuranistales. Yurani’s Tales can use the guerilla marketing event to
create a viral video, increase traffic to website, increase brand interest among the target audience, give away
promotional discounts, and spread Yurani’s Tales by word of mouth.
An example of a guerilla marketing tactic is a reenactment of the story of Phagwah, at the Phagwah parade
in Richmond Hill. The social media sites, website, blog, and newsletter can alert subscribers and followers that
Yurani’s Tales will make an appearance at the parade. Prior to the reenactment, flyers will be circulated at the
event to encourage the public to post their videos or photos with #yuranistales.
Example of the Yurani’s Tales guerrilla
marketing event at the Diwali festival.
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1 Resaul, Judy. “The girls at
Diwali Mela.” 2012. JPEG.
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Distribution Strategy
he objective is to get the Yurani’s Tales product into the hands of the
children ages four to eight and their parents by making it available in where
they shop. The initial distribution strategy falls within a range of the direct
to the consumer to selective channels, as the product is sold on the Yurani’s Tales website,
Amazon, and local bookstores and religious stores in the Indo-Caribbean community in
Richmond Hill, NY.
This strategy allow customers to purchase directly from Yurani’s Tales website and thus, build
a relationship with the brand, or gives the option to purchase from a retailer that they
already trust. Buyers will view Yurani’s Tales as easily accessible online and in the brick and
mortar setting, which allows customers to purchase book quickly with no hassle.
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Direct to Consumer and Selective
The Yurani’s Tales books is available for sale
directly from the Yurani’s Tales website. This allows
consumers to learn about the books on the website
and if interested, purchase right away. Selectively,
the Yurani’s Tales will sell on Amazon.com, at local
bookstores and religion stores. This allows customers
to purchase from a store with which they already
have established a relationship.
Above: Yurani’s Tales on Amazon.com
Right: Places to purchase Yurani’s Tales
near me on Google Maps
“This allows customers to
purchase from a store with
which they already have
established a relationship.”
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Intensive Distribution
Provide the opportunity to buy books anywhere
Be available to general public
Gain national awareness
Intensive Distribution will accomplish
these objectives:
Key Metrics of Success for
Intensive Distribution
Yurani’s Tales’ ultimate goal is to have an intensive distribution
channel where the books will sell at major stores like Walmart and Costco,
and all bookstores. Stocking the books in these stores reveal that Yurani’s
Tales has reached mass-market appeal.
Top: Stories of Hindu Culture in Walmart
Bottom: Locations of Walmart distributors
in just half of the United States.
Visitors to the website that purchase a book
Books sold by each distributor, and the amount of users
Users who leave feedback for other shoppers
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Additional Areas
ver the past semester, I went to a friend’s day-care to do some
prototype testing. I showed the caregivers and children the logo options and
illustrations, and I asked those who could read do so out loud. My goals were
to find out what logo/animal character appeals more to the target age, find out if the
typeface is legible, and get feedback on illustrations and the stories themselves.
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Top left to bottom right: Logo options
shown to children ages five to eight and
their caregivers.
At the day care, I laid each illustration out on a desk
and asked the kids which was their favorite, second
favorite, and least favorite. For the children, the
competition was between the owl and the monkey,
but the clear winner was the monkey. Adults favored
the lotus and the tree, but after I told them more
about Yurani’s Tales, they also chose the monkey.
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When I had my photoshoot for the Yurani’s Tales
poster imagery, I took the time to read Rama I: Exile,
Rama II: The Return, and The Story of Creation to
my model since she is part of my target audience. I
asked her several questions afterward:
Me: What was your favorite story?
Geegi: I like the Rama stories, with the demons.
Me: What did you think of the Story of Creation?
Geegi: It was good, but the Rama one has pictures.
Me: Do the illustrations help? What did you like
about them?
Geegi: They are fun to look at while you listen. And
the monkey is funny.
Me: Did you learn anything from that story?
Geegi: I learned what aarti means, and I didn’t
know Rama was a hero. I mean he is a god, but he
has a life too, it’s cool.
Me: Does this make you want to know more about
his life?
Geegi: Yeah, and the sword Janaka. You should
make one about the sword.
Available on Amazon.com and at our website at www.yuranistales.com
Order your copy of
Stories of Hindu Culture!
Anjanie as Goddess Latchmi, Justine and
Geegi reading Yurani’s Tales.
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urani’s Tales aims to bring Hindu culture back to Indo-Caribbean
communities. The primary product is the collection of illustrated books that
introduce Hindu culture to Indo-Caribbean children between the ages of four
to eight through stories of the gods and goddesses.
A secondary goal of Yurani’s Tales is to make Hindu culture mainstream. Greek culture is
a big part of American life and Yurani’s Tales aspires to reach that peak of popularity that
Greek mythology has already, with Hindu culture.
In the future, Yurani’s Tales will expand to a paid membership based website that will offer
interactive features such as games and animated videos. These features will allow children
to further connect with their culture.
Business and
Post Graduation Plan
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Total costs for senior project are approximately $1527. The fees for the copy editors are two
hundred dollars. The Stories of Hindu Culture teaser that is being produced costs eighty dollars to print and
hand bind one copy. The ancillary items cost three hundred and ten dollars and the collaterals cost two
hundred and twenty-five dollars. Photography was four hundred, the GoDaddy domain and hosting was
twelve dollars, and miscellaneous costs are an estimated three hundred dollars.
Copy editors fees:
Cultural consultants:
Print and bind book:
Ancillaries:
Collateral:
Photography props and models:
GoDaddy domain and host:
Miscellaneous:
Total Costs for Senior Project:
$200
No fee
$80
$310
$225
$400
$12
$300
$1527
Senior Project Costs/Fees
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Yurani’s Tales will raise the necessary funds through personal
investment, including family and friends, and Indiegogo. Indiegogo is a
crowdfunding service that allows users to keep all the money they have
raised, whether or not they have met their initial goal. Yurani’s Tales
will offer different incentives to donors based on the amount of money
they pledge. The perks help to get people interested in Yurani’s Tales and
promote word of mouth marketing.
Personal Investment and Crowdfunding
$1 Hall of Famer: receive a shout out on our
social media sites and be added onto our Hall of
Fame on Facebook
$5 Getting Personal: Get your very own,
personalized Yurani’s Tales bookmark
$15 On the Books: Be one of the first to receive
your very own copy of the Yurani’s Tales book,
Stories of Hindu Culture before it goes on sale
Indiegogo Incentives
$25 Dedicated Reader: Receive a personalized
bookmark and a copy of Stories of Hindu Culture
$70 Love the Totes: Get the Yurani’s Tales tote
bag, personalized bookmark and a copy of Stories
of Hindu Culture when it is released
$100 Yurani Karma: Receive the Yurani’s Tales
tote bag, personalized bookmark and a copy of
Stories of Hindu Culture, and the limited edition
Yurani’s Tales handmade copy of Stories of Hindu
Culture (prior to release in 2017)
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Yurani’s Tales will approach Sadhana and the
Indo-Caribbean Alliance (ICA). Both sponsors will first
be contacted through email with a brief explanation
of core idea and a request to pitch project at their
next board meetings. At these meetings, Yurani’s Tales
will present members with a press kit.
Sadhana is an organization working to remind
people of the Hindu faith, of the ageless principles of
tolerance and inclusiveness. They seek to revive the
idea of faith in action or “sadhana,” a main concept
in the Hindu philosophy, religion, culture, and history.
Yurani Tales seeks to address the problem of the loss of
Hindu culture in the Indo-Caribbean community
and will emphasize how the children’s book is
beneficial to the Sadhana organization as a means to
reach young children in the community.
The Indo-Caribbean Alliance works on a broader level
to create programs and services that preserve and
unify the Indo-Caribbean and South Asian culture.
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Partnerships
Top right: Yurani’s Tales
potential partners
Right: The book basket at
Sadhana’s children’s room
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If Yurani’s Tales is still short of the necessary funds, the business will apply for a
loan through Capital One and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). Yurani’s Tales will
present a pitch to these banks demonstrating the cultural relevance and need, along with
press kits and giveaway items.
Small Business Loans
Future Yurani’s
Tales Work Force
Yurani’s Tales will hire a team to cover all
promotional aspects post-graduation. The social
media manager will keep track of Yurani’s Tales’
Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram pages. Two graphic
designers will be hired to assist with production of
promotional kinetic typography book trailer in
the future. Yurani’s Tales is hiring another designer/
illustrator to work on character illustrations and web
development and design.
Yurani’s Tales will assist ICA’s mission by encouraging children to participate in these events
and show interest in the culture and community. Both of these sponsorships will benefit
Yurani’s Tales by increasing brand awareness
Pitching Yurani’s Tales
to local banks
“…preserve and unify the Indo-Caribbean
and South Asian culture.”
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April 2015
Reach out to
Sadhana and ICA for
possible partnerships
June 2014
Resume Illustrations
September 2014
Book trailer for
Stories of Hindu Culture
January 2015
Release Stories of Hindu Culture
March 2015
Event marketing at Phagwah parade
Post-Graduation Timeline,
May 2014 to June 2017
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Between June 2014 to mid October, the
complete Stories of Hindu Culture prototype will be
tested and finalized. The book will release in January
2015, and Yurani’s Tales will begin the marketing
phase. In March 2015, Yurani’s Tales will make their
first event marketing appearance at the Phagwah
parade to kick off the marketing and crowdfunding
campaign. Yurani’s Tales will reach out to Sadhana and
ICA about partnering. In addition, local bookstores
and religious store owners will be contacted about
releasing the Yurani’s Tales books in their stores.
June 2015
Start writing and
researching for
Rama the Warrior
Sept. 2015
Add new features to
website, coloring pages
June 2017
Release paid membership
web product.
Post Graduation Timeline
During this phase Yurani’s Tales will follow every detail
of the multilevel marketing section. There will be
appearances at book fairs and expos, cultural events,
and “open mic” nights, all of which will help Yurani’s
Tales promote for Stories of Hindu Culture. Yurani’s
Tales will also begin development of the second
book, Rama the Warrior in June 2015, and begin the
idea and brainstorming process of creating the paid
membership based web product.
October 2016
Release Rama the
Warrior for Diwali.
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In July 2016, news about the web product will be
released on the social media and in the e-newsletter
to make current customers aware that this additional
companion product to teach children culture, will be
available soon. The book trailer for Rama the Warrior
will be released in August 2016 and the Yurani’s
Tales work force will begin creating the interactive
elements of the website, such as the games and videos.
Yurani’s Tales will also start brainstorming on what
other types of child merchandise we can produce
to promote a connection with Hindu culture. Some
previous ideas will be revisited, such as the illustrated
Indo-Caribbean/Hindu/ U.S. calendar, and a
children’s recipe book.
From August 2016 to October of the following year,
Yurani’s Tales will finish creating the second book,
Rama the Warrior, to be released in time for Diwali.
Yurani’s Tales will continue to follow the production
and promotion cycle for book three and four, Pure
Krishna (T.T.) and The Trinity and The Goddesses (T.T.).
Stories of Hindu Culture product shot
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Yurani’s Tales potential partnership organization, Sadhana, begins their Hindu class for children in October 2015.
Yurani’s Tales hopes to be the main resource used to teach these children Hindu culture and religion. Yurani’s
Tales will continue to market for Rama the Warrior until April 2016. The Yurani’s Tales membership-based web
product will be offered to a few users for beta testing and the site will launch in June 2017.
Post-Graduation expenses will exceed the senior project costs. In total Yurani’s Tales will need $3580. Publishing,
printing, and shipping with Lightning Source is $1547 for one hundred copies of the book. The ancillary items
will cost seven hundred and seventy-five dollars and the collateral will cost one hundred and fifty-seven
dollars. Yurani’s Tales will need six hundred dollars for AdWords and Facebook advertisements and miscellaneous
fees are estimated at five hundred dollars.
Book production (100 copies)
Ancillaries
Collateral
Advertising (Google Adwords and Facebook)
Miscellaneous (Hosting, unforeseen costs)
Total Funding Necessary:
Post Graduation Cost for the Next Year.
$1547
$775
$157
$600
$500
$3580
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Appendix and Bibliography
he following section contains the events attended, all supporting
research, and the key findings of supporting interviews, as well as the
bibliography, and acknowledgements.
Appendix A: Events..........................................................................73
Appendix B: Supporting Research.....................................................78
Appendix C: Supporting Interviews...................................................83
Bibliography...................................................................................85
Acknowledgements..........................................................................87
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Matt Mahurin at FSC
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Spoke about his life, how he got into illustration
and he told us he “wore many hats”. Hearing
that inspired me and made me feel hopeful. Matt
demonstrated his illustration style using a tablet and
photoshop. I tried to do the same after the demo but
it didn’t work for me, but practice makes perfect.
The Stand Out Online by FindSpark
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Emily Miethner explained in depth how to get
noticed by the people or organization you follow.
The event was more for someone trying to get a
job, but learning to get noticed by people because of
what you tweet and how you tweet, and the use of
hashtags will help me with senior project when I am
promoting Yurani’s Tales, Stories of Hindu Culture.
Matt Mahurin
9/24/13
Stand Out Online
10/8/13
SVA Art of Horror
10/15/13
Michael Paraskevas
10 22/13
September October
Event Timeline
3 Miethner, Emily. Stand Out Online: Twitter and
LinkedIn Intensive. The Center for Social Innovation. New
York, NY. 8 Oct. 2013.
2 Mahurin, Matt. Matt Mahurin, Lecture,
Demonstration, and Reception. Farmingdale State College.
Farmingdale, NY. 24 Sept. 2013.
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Design Thinking
11/11/13
Louise Fili
11/26/13
Heart Plus Humor
2/25/2014
A Beautiful Book…
3/3/2014
November February March
SVA Presents The Art of Horror
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This event featured Scott Snyder, Sean Murphy,
Rafael Albuquerque, Nathan Fox, Mark Doyle, and
Phil Jimenez as the host and moderator. The artists
spoke about their inspirations and collaborating to
create comic books, and their illustration styles and
techniques. The thing that I really took home with
me was how the use of line and color can set a mood
or feeling for the illustration.
Michael Paraskevas at FSC
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Michael spoke about his career as an illustrator
and how he got into children’s books and showed
some of his up and coming works and even gave a
demonstration using a type of acrylic paint. I found
his illustration style very interesting. He sets one layer
of paint and works it over with a lighter color to get
a desired look.
4 Jimenez, Phil. SVA Presents the Art of Horror.
School of Visual Arts (SVA). New York, NY. 15 Oct. 2013.
5 Paraskevas, Michael. Michael Paraskevas,
Lecture, Demo & Animation, and Reception. Farmingdale
State College. Farmingdale, NY. 22 Oct. 2013.
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Design Thinking at Columbia University
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Adam Royalty, from Stanford Institute of Design led
this workshop on the work process that students from
the Stanford Institute of Design used as they designed
cost efficient products that solved a problem faced
by the poor people of third-world, under developed
countries. This process enforced what we learned in
class. We also had the opportunity to get a first look
at the Extreme by Design documentary.
Louise Fili Lecture at FSC
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Louise spoke to us about her life, career and portfolio.
I liked that she borrowed from her own previous work
to use with new projects. That tells you just because
you did something once it doesn’t mean you can’t do
it again with a different spin. I was very inspired by
the way she designed copyright pages in the books
she worked on. I would like to incorporate that into
my senior project.
Design Thinking Workshop
Design Thinking Workshop
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6 Royalty, Adam. Design Thinking by Stanford Institute
of Design. Columbia University. New York, NY. 11 Nov. 2013.
8 Fili, Louise. ELEGANTISSIMA: The Design &
Typography of Louise Fili. Farmingdale State College.
Farmingdale, NY. 22 Oct. 2013.
7 Lee, Irina. “Design Thinking Workshop.” 2013. JPEG.
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Heart Plus Humor with Lin Oliver
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Heart Plus Humor with Lin Oliver was amazing. I
came away with more knowledge about writing and
creating a storyboard for kids. Lin Oliver spoke about
what is essential, what does the writer want readers
to take away from books, the illustrations, or even
animated movies.
A Beautiful Book Is A Compliment to
the Author and a Declaration of Love to
the Reader
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The event description mentioned that the author,
Bertram Schmidt, would be talking about how good
typography choices and manufacturing helped the
book to survive the 21st century, but it was more
about the book, which I didn’t mind. I gained a lot of
inspiration for both my pitch book and core product,
especially from the moth pattern book. I enjoyed
looking at the spreads and looking at how the grids
were used dynamically in each book.
Flores, Paula. “Moth Book Pattern.”
2013. JPEG.
9 Oliver, Lin. “Heart Plus Humor With Lin Oliver.” So-
ciety of Children’s Books Writers and Illustrators. 138 West 15 St.,
New York, NY. 25 Feb. 2014. Lecture.
10 Friderichs, Bertram. “A Beautiful Book Is A Compli-
ment to the Author and a Declaration of Love to the Reader.” 347
W36th St., New York, NY. 3. Mar 2014. Lecture.
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Supporting Research
“52 Types of Marketing Strategies.” CultBranding.com. Cult
Branding, 10 Oct. 2013. Web. 13 Feb. 2014.The article briefly
explain 52 marketing strategies that are in use today. Among
these strategies are close range marketing which uses bluetooth
or Wifi technology to send advertisement to customers in close
proximity and undercover marketing which leaves details to
the imagination. For example, movie trailers that don’t tell
much of the movie.
Alfano, Kathleen, Ph.D. “Developing a Baby’s Love of Reading.”
Fisher-Price. Fisher-Price, n.d. Web. 03 Nov. 2013. Fisher Price
has their doctors and psychologists at their Child Research
centers write child development tips and articles. This article
outline the benefits of reading to a child at a young age. One
benefit that is applicable to the cultural relevance of Yurani’s
Tales is that reading to a young child encourages a love for
books and the subjects of the book.
Aquent. “Mastering the Creative Brief.” AIGA. AIGA | the
Professional Association for Design, 9 Nov. 2011. Web. 03 Feb.
2014. Creative briefs allow designers to manage their projects
and keep the work running smoothly. The article outlines all
topics that need to be mentioned in the brief and discusses how
to write the brief.
Baroncini-Moe, Susan. “Five Ways to Get Speaking Engagements
to Market Your Business.” MarketingProfs. MarketingProfs LLC,
14 Nov. 2013. Web. 02 Mar. 2014.
In order to have people ask you to speak about a business, you
first need to become a better speaker, know your material,
promote yourself as a speaker, build the right relationships, and
speak for free. Speakers should practice speaking everywhere
and anywhere for free and promote these free events to their
subscribers and on their websites. The article also recommends
posting clips of these speaking events on the website or Youtube.
Speakers also need to be experts on their topic and build
relationships and network with professionals because you’ll
never know when someone who knows that you are an expert
will ask you to speak.
Belosic, Jim. “10 Big Brand Facebook Tactics Any Business Can
Use.” Social Media Examiner. Social Media Examiner RSS, 24
Mar. 2014. Web. 2 Apr. 2014.
Belosic discusses ten tactics that big brands use to Facebook
market. Capitalize on major events and holidays, use the
audience to come up with new ideas, show the fans the fun
because it’s okay to be silly if it gets them engaged in posts,
follow the 70/20/10 rule, 70% brand building, 20% other
sources, and 10% self-promotion. The Facebook page should
give good customer service, have consistent posts, always
respond to everyone, be interesting, and tell stories.
Bhugra, Dinesh, and Matthew Becker. “Migration, Cultural
Bereavement and Cultural Identity.” World Psychiatric
Association, (WPA) 4.1 (2005): 18-24. NCBI. National
Center for Biotechnology Information, Feb. 2005. Web. 12
Mar. 2014. This article discusses how why people migrate, can
lead to stress and bereavement, the loss of cultural identity.
Cultural identity includes a persons religion, rites of passage,
language, diet and leisure activities. Religion is usually the
key component that holds everything together. Though
assimilation immigrant communities adapt to their host
cultures and lose their identities in the process.
Carusone, Antonio. “8 Simple Ways to Improve Typography in Your
Designs.” Aisle.One. Antonio Carusone, 6 Apr. 2009. Web. 03
Jan. 2014. Aisle.One is an online resource for graphic design,
typography, and the grid. This particular article discusses
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details that allow designers to create beautiful and consistent
typography. These simple ways are keeping track of the
measure, leading, hanging quotes, the vertical rhythm, widows
and orphans, emphasis without interruption, scale, and keeping
neat rags.
Chandler, Stephanie. “The Hidden Benefits of Social Media
Marketing: Why Your Strategy May Be Working Better
Than You Think.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, 12 Mar. 2013.
Web. 27 Mar. 2014. Social media helps brands to gain brand
recognition, build a community, get repeated exposure,
establish authority and influence, and increase website traffic.
Brands with social media get ahead of the curve, get attention,
and it gives your company a competitive advantage over those
who do not utilize it. All of this leads to a big win in the end.
“Colors in Hinduisms : Civilizations : Colors And Culture :
Colors.”ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, n.d. Web. 10 Mar.
2014. This article compiles the specific colors used in Hinduism
and gives the specific meaning of each. Red is the most used
color. It is used in most rituals, and is a symbol of power
and respect. Blue is mostly seen as the color of some of the
deities skin, like Krishna. Blue is a sign of creation and is also
identified with people who have strong moral character. The
other colors mentioned are white, saffron, green, and yellow.
Condrell, Kenneth, Ph.D. “Nine Reasons Why Parents Should
Read to Preschoolers.” Fisher Price. Mattel, 2012. Web. 23
Oct. 2013. An article on the advice section of the Fisher Price
website that encourages parents to read with their children.
The article states why this action is essential to children
learning basic speaking and listening skills, developing bonds
with parents, and encouraging a love reading that will prove
beneficial throughout their lives.
Di Benedetto, Stephen. “Parents Take to Books in Digital Age.”
Northwest Herald [McHenry County] n.d.: n. pag. NW
Herald.com. Shaw Media, 24 July 2013. Web. 25 Oct. 2013. A
survey from the Pew Research Center of 3,000 parents with
children ages 18 and younger found that more than 9 out
of 10 parents believe it is more important for their children
to read books in print format. Lauren Rosenthal, head of
the youth department at Crystal Lake Public Library said its
common to see parents and children reading and borrowing
printed books. She discusses what is lost in digital books.
Eridon, Corey. “Inbound Hub.” The Benefits of Blogging: Why
Businesses Do It, and You Should Too. Hubspot, 6 Nov. 2013.
Web. 10 Feb. 2014. The article talks about how business
blogging helps companies. It can brings traffic into website
if you blog often and use a social media that is linked to the
blog and website. Once you have the traffic call to actions on
the blog can help you convert that traffic into leads. Examples
of call to actions are free trials or discounts for signing up to
your website or e-newsletter. Blogs also help to establish you
as the authority on your business and will bring the business
long-term results.
Greenfield, Jeremy. “E-Book Revenue Continues Growth.” Digital
Book World. F+W Media, 15 June 2012. Web. 31 Oct. 2013.
Although ebook and downloaded audiobook revenue was up
50% in March 2012, the overall book trade revenue fell from
March 2011 to then. Children’s ebooks revenue increased
173.9% in March and appears that it will only keep increasing
now that Disney, Sesame Street Workshop, Callaway Digital
Arts and more are moving to the ebook stage.
Griswold, Wendy. Cultures and Societies in a Changing World.
Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge, 1994. Print. This book talks
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about how important culture is even in today’s modern,
contemporary societies. Discusses why culture is important to
both individual and society.
Haden, Jeff. “5 Unusual Ways to Become a Better Speaker.” Inc.
com. Inc, n.d. Web. 16 Apr. 2014. This article shares five tips
that will help readers become better speakers. The first is you
should share an emotional story; second, pause for 8 to 10
seconds so the audience has time to wonder why you stopped.
Ask the audience questions, but don’t give an answer. Don’t
think about the sales, the main point is to make sure everyone
listening benefits from you and the last tip is find one thing
that no one really knows and enlighten your audience.
Hellmann, Libby F. “Five Reasons to Publish a Print Version of
Your Ebook by Libby Hellmann.” Libby Hellmann. PML
Media, 20 June 2013. Web. 16 Jan. 2014. Digital books may be
cheaper and easier to carry around, but there are five reasons
that authors should publish printed books also. These are the
print demand and recent ease of production, bookstores and
POD market, no batteries required in print books, and the
promotional events are catered to printed books.
Hemus, Alexander. “The Ultimate Book Press Release.”
Standoutbooks. The Alliance of Independent Authors, 23 June
2013. Web. 01 May 2014. A press release should be short and
sweet, think one page or approximately 400 words. Headlines
are very important because it is the first thing read and need
to be bold and catchy. Include the date and the city and the
first paragraph should sum up the idea. The other paragraphs
will add detail to the introduction and its good to include a
quote in the press release. In the end, it is good to end with a
boilerplate, which is like a short biography. To finish all press
releases end with END at the bottom of the main content.
Kell, John. “Scholastic Book Fairs Hold Own, for Now, in Digital
World.”The Wall Street Journal. Dow Jones & Company, 18
July 2012. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. This article on WSJ online talks
about how Scholastic book fair continues to be a strong
marketing and distribution strategy despite small and local
bookstores closing. The Scholastic team believes that word-
of-mouth book recommendations at these fairs are the best
way to reach the target audience, the children because the
company takes books right into the schools. Although the
sales have jumped from 2007 to 2011, book industry experts
say that as people continue to show interest in digital books,
Scholastic will feel the impact.
Lazaris, Louis. “Smashing Magazine.” Designing Websites for Kids:
Trends and Best Practices. A Smashing Media Company, 29
Nov. 2009. Web. 21 Jan. 2014. Lazaris talks about the multiple
elements that go into creating a website for a child. The design
should “stimulate the senses”. The elements mentioned are
bright, vivid color combinations, give off a happy mood, relate
to children, using nature, large elements such as images and
buttons. Large and relatable imagery is important because
they grab and hold the child’s attention. Navigation should
also be very simple and stand out on the page.
Noble, James T. “How to Define Your Target Audience the Right
Way.”Marketing Blog. Raven, 18 Jan. 2013. Web. 03 Nov. 2013.
To successfully market a campaign it is necessary to know
who specifically is in your target audience. To do this, there
are several questions and steps you can take. It is good to
know all the details of your product or service and then find
out who will benefit most from it. Once you discover your
target consumer creating a persona will help you imagine
how to best reach them.
Oliver, Lin. “Heart Plus Humor With Lin Oliver.” Society of
Children’s Books Writers and Illustrators. 138 West 15 St,
New York, NY. 25 Feb 2014. Lecture. Lin Oliver spoke about
essentially what do you want the reader to take away from
the book, the illustration, or even the movie. Ideally readers
would finish with a sense of empathy that is achieved through
writing with humor in the right way. Her tips are that kids
want to see the bad guy, the one with authority go down,
because they relate to that. Children are always told to listen,
the best way to get humor is to write it as it relates to them.
Peterson, Valerie. “What to Expect from Your Book Marketing
Department.”About.com Book Publishing. About.com, n.d.
Web. 22 Feb. 2014. There are a few marketing tactics you can
depend on you publisher for when an author publishes with
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a reputable company. Their book will be represented in their
catalog and other marketing collateral, at trade shows such
as the Bookseller Expo America, on their website and with
online booksellers. There are other book marketing tactics that
are more expensive like point-of-sale ads that publishers could
look into if the author is interested.
Reed, Mary. “Advantages of Ebook Publishing.” Advantages of
Ebook Publishing. Mary Reed Public Relations, n.d. Web. 25
Oct. 2013. The article discusses eight positive points to keep
in mind when deciding whether or not to publish a book
digitally. Ebook publishing brings the work exposure, it is
fast and inexpensive, and growing more popular with readers
everyday. Ebooks are revised and updated easily, can be a
good marketing tool for businesses, and can help the author
get noticed by traditional publishers.
Sambuchino, Chuck. 2014 Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market.
Cincinnati: Writer’s Digest, 2013. Print. The Children’s Writer’s
& Illustrator’s Market provides information on the latest trends
in the children’s book market on illustrations and trends in
writing. The book gives helpful tips for aspiring writers and
illustrators on getting their work out to publishers and steps to
self publishing.
Severn, Steven. “Types of Guerrilla Marketing.” Guerrilla Cheese
Marketing. Guerrilla Cheese Marketing RSS, n.d. Web. 17 Mar.
2014. Guerrilla Cheese Marketing is a blog by Steven Severn
that outlines several types of experimental marketing tactics.
These are ambient marketing, presence marketing, grassroots,
wild postings, undercover and buzz marketing, alternative and
experimental marketing, interactive marketing and guerrilla
marketing. The blog offers examples of each tactic and
explores how other brands are using them.
Strizver, Ilene. “Typography for Children.” Fonts.com. Fonts.
com, n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2014. Strizver talks about tips about
typography for children. Typefaces should be open and
rounded with large x-heights. The article mentions a few
things to avoid like using condensed or extended typefaces, do
not use hairline or bold weights, and be careful when using
italics. These styles cause changes in the letter shape and will
be hard for the child to identify. An ideal type size14 to 24
point and 4 to 6 points of leading. The length of the lines
should be short and never use heavy blocks of type. The article
mentions that you shouldn’t use decorative type for body copy,
but it is fine to use for headlines and titles because it is not as
many words to read.
Wallin, Luke, Eva S. Gordon, and Lesley Bolton. “Marketing and
Publicity.”The Everything Guide to Writing Children’s Books:
How to Write, Publish, and Promote Books for Children of All
Ages. Avon, MA: Adams Media, 2011. 203-28. Print. A good
marketing strategy will not only help sell the book, but it also
sells the author. One somewhat pricey strategy is to send out
books before publishing date for reviews. Press releases are
a more cost efficient way to get reviews and Media Tie-ins,
which use magazines, radio and television to promote or
“feature” your book. Author participation is using the author’s
connections to market, such as the school they attended or
their local newspaper. Goodreads is a social media site that
can make connections with teachers and parents who will
take an interest in the book. School, library, and community
center visits: face-to-face and free promotion.
Warikoo, Natasha. “Cosmopolitan Ethnicity: Second Generation
Indo-Caribbean Identities.” Becoming New Yorkers. By Philip
Kasinitz, John H. Mollenkopf, and Mary C. Walters. New
York: Russel Sage Foundation, 2004. 361. Print. Cosmopolitan
ethnicity is what emerges from the minority group being
surrounded by multi-ethnic societies. The assimilation is not
directed to only one ethnic group so the second generation
children pick and choose variants of their ethnicity. Females
are more involved with “Indian” culture than males. Although,
according to the 2000 census, there were about 240,000
Guyanese and Trinidadian Indo-Caribbean immigrants living
in New York state, only 10% of them marked Asian Indian as
their racial identity.
Wemmer, Kristen. “Starting Out Organized: Website Content
Planning The Right Way.” Smashing Magazine. A Smashing
Media Company, 17 Mar. 2010. Web. 16 Feb. 2014. A few
tips for the pre-web coding phase are using card sorting,
content inventories, paper and sketch boards, site map
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diagrams, wireframes, content plain text, and a jumpchart. A
combination of these processes will allow the development to
not be tedious and allow your client to help with input and
revisions before the coding begins.
Verma, Michelle. “Hindu Religious Education: Two New Jersey
Sites.” The Pluralism Project at Harvard University. Harvard
College / Dr. Charles Harrington, Oct. 2004. Web. 20
Nov. 2013. The Pluralism Project aims to help Americans
acknowledge and manage the idea that religious diversity is
growing through the sharing of resources and information.
The site contains information and statistics about all the
religious sects in the United States. The article states the
findings of Michelle Verma: that there are two locations in
New Jersey teaching Hindu religion to the communities youth.
The site doesn’t specify whether this community Indian or
Indo-Caribbean.
Vora, Shivani. “Raising a Hindu Kid in New York.” The New York
Times. The New York Times, 26 Mar. 2013. Web. 03 Dec. 2013.
This article was written from the point of view of an Indian
Hindu who immigrated to the United States who felt the
challenges of keeping with her traditions as she grew up. The
author never realized she was losing touch with her culture
until after she married and had her first child. She wanted to
teach her about her religion, but felt “inadequately equipped”.
Zipkin, Nina. “How Do I Build a Business Plan?
(Infographic).”Entrepreneur. Entrepreneur Media, Inc., 17 Feb.
2014. Web. 04 Mar. 2014. This article features an infographic
of the 10 key elements to a successful business plan. It first
outlines why business plans are necessary and then asks the
reader to identify the need that the business fulfills and how,
and asks what makes this business unique. Then the writer
names their key stakeholders, and the size of, and who makes
up the target audience. Then the infographic gives pointers on
promotional strategies, how to break down the revenue, work
on the budget and then devise a plan to break even.
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Supporting Interviews
Quantitative Takeaways
17 out of 19 Indo-Caribbean Americans interviewed
believe that Hindu culture is essentially the Hindu
religion.
12 out of 19 Indo-Caribbeans think that it would be
easier to teach children Hindu culture if the resources
were more appealing and age appropriate.
85% of Indo-Caribbeans I surveyed want an easier
way to teach their child culture.
All parents interviewed (9 out of 9) felt that their
child’s interests, what they watch, read and listen to,
influenced them.
Qualitative Takeaways
Growing up in the US, some adults felt “forced” to
go to mandir and felt that this turned them off from
learning.
Children who learned about culture and religion at
an early age grew up with an interest in their culture.
Culture also leads to a community rich in morals
and beliefs.
Key Findings
“I think because I was exposed to it young, I had more interest as opposed to my younger
sister, and I was, and still am curious about everything I learned when I was younger.”
Lildharrie, Sean. Personal interview. 30 Oct. 2013.
“Both of my parents worked all week and no one was around to take me to mandir so I
didn’t have an option. I just stopped going after we moved.”
Roopnarine, Anjanie. Personal interview. 1 Nov. 2013.
“I don’t feel very connected, I enjoy cultural food and I do go to mandir maybe once a
year and attend some family functions. I guess I could do more, but I don’t really find the
time.”
“Kids today, they seem so much older, they think they know it all, and social life influences
them more than the family life. If parents are busy and working who is there to teach
kids or tell them stories? I think about my cousins, and I feel bad for them. I had my
grandmother to teach me, but they missed out on those days.”
Sooknauth, Cathy. Personal interview. 30 Oct. 2013.
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“As a child it was religious functions and mandir, and those books from the Hare Krishna;
those were enjoyable. Maybe my kids are not getting a chance to experience their culture
because it is hard to find interesting sources of that knowledge.”
Amir, Andrea. Personal interview. 31 Oct. 2013.
“When I came here life moved so fast. I had to be enrolled in high school and I love to learn
so the drive to learn new things became more important and relevant because it is right
there in your face as opposed to having to make time to learn culture.”
Wydrowski, Amelia. Personal interview. 30 Oct. 2013.
Interviews
Amir, Andrea. Personal interview. 31 Oct. 2013.
Bishun, Paul. Personal interview. 2 Nov. 2013.
Gobin, Brian. Personal interview. 17 Nov. 2013.
Gobin, Rohan. Personal interview. 22 Nov. 2013.
Gobin, Sabrina. Personal interview. 22 Nov. 2013.
Issacs, Anne. Personal interview. 14 Nov. 2013.
Kilawan, Aminta. Personal interview. 19 Nov. 2013.
Khan, Nadia. Personal interview. 2 Dec. 2013.
Latchminarine, Andrew. Personal interview. 30 Nov. 2013.
Leonard, Justine. Personal interview. 1 Nov. 2013.
Lildharrie, Sean. Personal interview. 30 Oct. 2013.
Misra, Jaiwant. Personal interview. 8 Nov. 2013.
Prasad, Anand. Personal interview. 6 Dec. 2013.
Persaud, Nandani. Personal interview. 8 Nov. 2013.
Ramnarine, Emilee. Personal interview. 21 Nov. 2013.
Ramgobin, Geegi. Personal interview. 14 Mar. 2014.
Roop. Personal interview. 1 Nov. 2013.
Roopnarine, Anjanie. Personal interview. 1 Nov. 2013.
Roopnarine, Savitri. Personal interview. 1 Nov. 2013.
Sankar, Shuk. Personal interview. 12 Nov. 2013.
Sharma, Melissa. Personal interview. 22 Nov. 2013
Sooknauth, Cathy. Personal interview. 30 Oct. 2013.
Tejiram, Nadya. Personal interview. 6 Nov. 2013.
Wydrowski, Amelia. Personal interview. 30 Oct. 2013.
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I want to thank everyone who helped me get to this point; all my professors, especially Professors Lee and
Kolk; my family at school and at home. I could not have made it through the year without my dorm mates
and everyone at Residence Life supporting me. I also want to thank my cousins who took time out of their
day to help me with my photoshoot, Anjanie, Justine, and Geegi.
Thanks all of our fantastic guest lecturers who took the time to come to our classroom and share their own
experiences with us, my advisor, Allison Puff, who met with me once a week and George Fernandez for guiding
me the past four years. Also, I have to give all my thanks to our wonderful FSC alumni who supported us
throughout the semester, Rudy Calderon, Frank Corrao, and Patrick Flanagan who gets double thanks for his
assistance with printing our Demo Day posters.
Thank you so much to my family. My Nani and Nana, my mom, Sharon, my sister, Cathy, my brother,
Charles, my boyfriend, Paul and the one who pulled all-nighters with me every weekend, my dog Terry.
Finally thank you to everyone who helped me with research and interviews, Pandit Jaiwant and Nadya
Tejiram for being patient with me while I learned my culture, and all of my classmates who have become
pretty much my family.
If there is anyone who I may have forgotten to acknowledge, thank you as well.
Acknowledgements
Top left: Family photo
Bottom left: Professor Lee and
Professor Kolk
Right: Class photo
Warikoo, Natasha. “Cosmopolitan Ethnicity: Second Generation
Indo-Caribbean Identities.” Becoming New Yorkers. By Philip
Kasinitz, John H. Mollenkopf, and Mary C. Walters. New York:
Russel Sage Foundation, 2004. 361. Print.
WriteWork contributors. “Why is culture important?” WriteWork.com.
25 Jan. 2004. Web. 24 Nov. 2013.

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