020 Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protection

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Safety Policy and Procedure

Policy Number 020

Authorized By: The Cianbro Companies
Alan Burton



Title: Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protection

Effective Date: 04/18/94



Page 1 of 18


1 Status

1.1 Update of existing policy, effective 06/03/11.

2 Purpose

2.1 Provide installation and maintenance procedures for temporary power equipment and systems
and identify requirements and procedures for live circuit work and arc flash personal protection.

3 Applicability

3.1 This policy applies to all subsidiary companies and departments of The Cianbro Companies.

3.2 All organizations are required to comply with the provisions of this policy and procedure. Any
deviation, unless spelled out specifically in the policy, requires the permission of the Corporate
Safety Officer or designee.

4 Definitions

4.1 Arc Flash: A dangerous condition of extreme heat (energy) created by an electrical explosion.
(A secondary dangerous condition resulting from an electrical explosion would be molten and
solid metals and plastics.)

4.2 Arc Flash Hazard: A dangerous condition associated with the possible release of energy
caused by an electric arc.

4.3 Arc Flash Protection Boundary: An approach limit at a distance from exposed live parts within
which a person could receive a second degree burn if an electrical flash were to occur. The arc
flash boundary for systems which are 600 volts or less shall be a minimum of four feet unless
specifically calculated.

4.4 Bonded: The electrical interconnection of conductive parts to maintain a common electrical
voltage.

4.5 Competent Person: A person who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in
the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to team
members, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them.

4.6 Energized: Electrically connected to or having a voltage.

4.7 Exposed To: Capable of being inadvertently touched or approached nearer than a safe
distance by a person. It is applied to parts that are not suitably guarded, isolated, or insulated.

4.8 Flame-Resistant (FR): The property of a material whereby combustion is prevented, terminated,
or inhibited following the application of a flaming or non-flaming source of ignition, with or
without subsequent removal of the ignition source.

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 1
Arc Flash Protection
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 2
Arc Flash Protection
4.9 Flash Hazard Analysis: A study investigating a workers potential exposure to arc-flash energy,
conducted for the purpose of injury prevention and the determination of safe work practices, arc
flash boundary and the appropriate levels of PPE.

4.10 Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI): A fast-acting circuit breaker that senses small
imbalances in circuit current (5 milliamps or more) caused by current leakage to ground and in
a fraction of a second shuts off the electricity. The purpose of the GFCI is to provide protection
from electrical shock to the user.

4.11 NEC (NFPA 70): National Electrical Code is the standard for electrical installations.

4.12 NFPA 70E: National Fire Protection Association (publication) 70E is the Standard for Electrical
Safety in the Workplace.

4.13 Qualified Person: A person who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or
professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training and experience has
successfully demonstrated their ability to solve or resolve problems relating to the subject
matter, the work, or the project.

4.14 Voltage: The greatest difference of potential between any two conductors of a circuit.

4.15 Working On: Touching, handling, connecting or disconnecting energized parts.

5 Policy

5.1 When temporary electrical equipment and systems are installed and maintained, or when any
temporary or permanent live circuit work occurs, Cianbro will meet applicable OSHA standards,
the NEC and NFPA 70E requirements.

6 Responsibilities

6.1 The Corporate Safety Officer or designee is responsible electrical safety and arc flash
protection under this policy.

6.2 The top Cianbro manager of the job site is responsible for the implementation of this policy on
the job site.

6.3 Corporate Safety is responsible for maintaining this document.
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 3
Arc Flash Protection

7 Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protection Index

7.2 Training................................................................................................................................................ 3
7.3 Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) for Personnel Protection..................................................... 3
7.4 Power Cord Inspection Program......................................................................................................... 4
7.5 Portable Electric Generators/Welders/Light Stands............................................................................ 5
7.6 Temporary Lighting............................................................................................................................. 5
7.7 Special Conditions............................................................................................................................... 6
7.8 Electrical Surveys................................................................................................................................ 7
7.9 Cianbro Arc Flash Protection Policy and Procedure........................................................................... 8
7.10 Safety At Home................................................................................................................................. 16
9 Related Documents......................................................................................................................... 17
9.1 Appendix A Cianbro Wiring Procedures for Portable Cords................................................................. 18


7.1 On our construction projects, we widely use temporary power and portable tools. Hazards are
created when cords, cord connectors, cord and plug connected equipment, and
receptacles are improperly used and maintained. Generally, flexible cords are more
vulnerable to damage than other electrical equipment and deserve special attention. In
addition, we often work around energized electrical circuits from operating a 120 V
breaker by properly trained team members to working in cabinets with exposed live
parts by qualified electricians.

7.2 Training

7.2.1 All team members must be trained in the requirements of this policy.

7.2.2 Team members who are required to work within the limited approach boundary as
defined in NFPA 70E must be qualified and have additional training. See 050 Electrical
Operations Program Safety Policy and Procedure for specific training topics required.

7.2.3 Training shall include identifying and understanding the relationship between the
electrical hazard and potential injury.

7.2.4 Training shall be documented with name, date, trainer, and content and sent to the
Cianbro Training Center for retention through entry into our system.

7.3 Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) for Personnel Protection

7.3.1 The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) is a fast-acting circuit breaker that senses
small imbalances in the circuit (5 milliamps or more) caused by current leakage to
ground and in a fraction of a second shuts off the electricity. The purpose of the GFCI
is to provide protection from electrical shock to the user.

A. GFCI protection is required on all 120-volt single-phase 15, 20, and 30 amp
receptacle outlets. The GFCI plug receptacles, panel breakers or cord pigtails
must be in place before using a cord set so the cord set and all down stream loads
are protected.
B. All 120 volt 15, 20, and 30 amp single-phase outlets, cord sets, and cord and plug
connected equipment shall be protected by GFCI.
C. GFCI devices like plug receptacles or cord pigtails are required to be tested each
day before use. This is to be done by the person using the GFCI. The test is
performed by pushing the test button on the GFCI, the reset button will pop out
and the electricity will be shut off. This will be verified by having the user plug a
tool or light into the GFCI, turn the tool switch on and make sure there is no power
to the tool. A competent person may also verify by using a voltage tester to make
sure there is no power. A plug-in GFCI tester can be used to test the device for
proper trip functions. If the button does not pop out, take the GFCI out of service
either by tagging it out or if it’s a portable device, tag it out of service (out of order,
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 4
Arc Flash Protection
for repair, damaged, etc.) and return it to the tool crib for repair by a qualified
electrician.
D. GFCI circuit breakers located in electrical panels used to protect outlet circuits
must be tested at least monthly, after any violent thunderstorm or more often if
required by the manufacturer. GFCI circuit breakers tests shall be documented.
Know what systems are protected that may be in use, before checking a GFCI
breaker or cord pigtail device.
E. OSHA requires testing of GFCI devices used for personnel protection.
F. Refer to Cianbro Electrical Operations Program for GFCI testing procedure.

7.4 Power Cord Inspection Program

7.4.1 Cianbro has a power cord inspection program that requires inspection of all outlets,
cord sets, and cord/plug connected tools and equipment cords before use.

7.4.2 Implementation of this program is the responsibility of the supervisor in charge. It is the
responsibility of every team member to verify that each cord set (extension cord) and
any equipment connected by cord and plug is visually inspected before each day's use
for defects such as deformed or missing prongs, damaged insulation, indications of
possible internal damage or incorrect quarterly identification. Equipment found
damaged shall be removed from service, tagged, and not used until repairs have been
made by a qualified electrician.

7.4.3 The project manager/superintendent or supervisor in charge shall ensure a qualified
person is assigned the responsibility to conduct quarterly inspections of all outlets, cord
sets, and cord/plug connected equipment. This specifically includes 240 and 480 volt
cords and all other cords but does not include those cords that are 120 volt single-
phase 15, 20, and 30 amps or those cord sets in storage. The following tests and
inspections shall be performed.

A. Conduct visual inspections for external defects and possible internal damage.
B. With the use of testers, test to determine correct connections and whether or not
the outlet, cord set, or cord/plug connected equipment is properly grounded.
C. Inspections and tests must be performed before first time use, (new equipment or
cords) before equipment is used following repairs or suspected damage and
before every quarter of each calendar year.
D. Rental or other equipment shall also be inspected and tested in the same way.

7.4.4 Quarterly checks and tests must be accomplished and documented by using the proper
colored electrical tape wrapped around the cord approximately three to six inches from
the male plug end. Remove old quarter tape before applying new color tape.

A. Equipment shall be marked as follows.

Test/Inspection
Month
Quarter Tape Color Memory Code

December J an, Feb, Mar White Snow/Winter
March Apr, May, J un Green Grass/Spring
J une J ul, Aug, Sep Red Hot/Summer
September Oct, Nov, Dec Orange Foliage/Fall

B. Remove old tape and apply new color each quarter.
C. Double-insulated tools, other than 120 volt single-phase 15, 20, or 30 amp, should
also be taped in the same manner to document that a visual inspection has been
done.
D. Electrical equipment that remain in a fixed location like a field office trailer; do not
have to be checked per this power cord inspection program.
E. Quarterly intervals shall not exceed three months. In order to ensure turnover from
quarter to quarter, tests and inspections should start during the month prior to the
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 5
Arc Flash Protection
start of the new quarter and should be completed by the first day of the new
quarter.

7.4.5 Subcontractors must also show evidence of their assured equipment grounding
conductor (AEGC) or GFCI program and method of documenting inspection or checks.
They may adopt our electrical program; however, they shall be fully responsible for
inspection/testing and controlling their equipment.

7.4.6 Repairs to cord sets or the electrical components of power tools must be made by a
qualified electrician. This includes plug and cap connections. The only exception to this
is that qualified persons other than electricians may make repairs to 120 V cord
assemblies (repairs to cords and plugs, not internal repairs to power tools) if they have
been approved through the procedure contained in SD1070 found out on Cianbro.net.

7.4.7 See 9.1 Appendix A for Cianbro Wiring Procedure for Portable Cords.

7.4.8 See SD1070 for Authorized Electrical Cord Repair Person Requirements.

7.4.9 Cable Stripping methods and tools require special planning to avoid personal injury
from cuts.
Specialty cable/wire stripping tools shall be used whenever possible.
Some cable stripper tools that work well are:
A. MK01A, ABECO- cable stripper, 3/8 to 1 inch diameter cable
B. Ideal 45-129 - cable stripper, for larger size cables
C. Rotastrip ABECO - cable stripper, works well, blades will brake
D. Stripmaster - cable stripper, works well, less fatigue to wrist
E. Reflex T, - cable stripper, works well, light and easy to use

7.4.10 Only as a last resort and as determined to be a safer method, shall utility or personal
knives be used. A job hazard analysis (J HA) must be completed and justification
documented in the activity specific plan allowing the use of utility or personal knives.

A. Cut resistant sleeves and cut resistant gloves shall be used for all cable and wire
stripping when using a utility or jack knife.
B. Proper instructions/training shall be given on how to safely strip cable/wire.
C. Refer to Safety Policy and Procedure Numbers 017 – Hand and Finger Protection
and 031 – Personal Protective Equipment for additional information in regard to
working with sharp tools or objects.

7.5 Portable Electric Generators/Welders/Light Stands

7.5.1 Portable electric generating equipment shall be equipped with GFCI’s or portable plug-
in GFCI’s shall be used.

7.5.2 Under the following conditions, the frame of the generator does not need an external
ground (such as using a ground rod) if:
A. The generator supplies only equipment mounted on the generator such as light
stands, arrow boards, welders, etc. and/or plug and cord connected equipment.
B. When mounted on a vehicle or barge, the frame of the generator is bonded to the
frame of the vehicle or barge, and the generator supplies only equipment located
on the vehicle and/or cord and plug connected equipment.
C. The generator is bonded to its supporting frame and if on a trailer or vehicle to the
frame of the trailer or vehicle.

7.5.3 In all other cases, generators shall be grounded by a ground rod or connection to the
building grounding system as required.

7.6 Temporary Lighting

7.6.1 Temporary area lighting is required to be supplied by its own circuit. Temporary lighting
circuits are not to be used for any other purposes.
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 6
Arc Flash Protection

7.6.2 Portable electric lighting used in wet or other conductive locations such as drums,
tanks, and vessels shall be low voltage (12 volts or less) or 120 volts protected by
GFCI’s.

7.7 Special Conditions

7.7.1 Written activity plans must be developed which address the specific work to be
accomplished and all electrical hazards associated with it. Activity plans should be
based on inspection of the work area and elimination, isolation, or control of identified
hazards including “Process Safety Management” (PSM) consideration. A competent
supervisor must be assigned to coordinate planning and monitor activities. Activity
plans must be communicated with all persons associated with the work to be involved
prior to the start of work.

7.7.2 Unanticipated or Unique Electrical Hazards

A. Unique electrical hazards created during work performed by Cianbro team
members shall be reported to the client including what measures are in place to
control the hazard.
B. Unanticipated electrical hazards identified during the work activity shall be reported
to the client including what measures are in place to control the hazard and to
prevent the hazardous condition from reoccurring.

7.7.3 Work on Energized Panels or Equipment

A. Work on energized panels or equipment is prohibited. Whenever possible,
electrical equipment must be de-energized, tested, and positively locked-out in
accordance with our Zero Energy State Safety Policy and Procedure prior to
conducting any work on or around it (“Tick Tracers” are not to be used when
identifying or testing for energized conductors.) Energized work will only be done,
as an exception, when the work cannot be done with the equipment in an
electrically safe working condition. Only electricians approved by the Cianbro
Electrical Committee and designated as persons qualified to work on live electrical
parts are authorized to perform work in energized panels or equipment. For work
on or near live electrical parts reference NFPA 70E Article 130.1 “Working on or
Near Live Parts - J ustification for Work”. This indicates that if live parts are not
placed in electrically safe working condition, the work to be performed shall be
considered energized electrical work and shall be performed by written permission
only. Unqualified workers are not allowed in these areas unless the space has
been placed in an electrically safe working condition.
B. A completed Cianbro Energized Work Permit is required. A detailed activity plan
developed with review and input by a qualified electrician is also required. Required
PPE and insulated tools (with current inspection date if applicable) must be used
by the qualified electrician when working on or around energized circuits where
incidental contact or an arc flash could occur.

7.7.4 Work on live circuits will require using specialized equipment and protective clothing
following OSHA, NEC, and NFPA 70E guidelines.
A. All insulating personal protective equipment must be inspected before use each
day and after any incident that could possibly have damaged the PPE.
B. Rubber insulating PPE must be tested periodically. Refer to 050 Electrical
Operations Program Safety Policy and Procedure for specific intervals (not to
exceed 6 months for gloves or 12 months for other insulating PPE).

7.7.5 Work on or adjacent to live circuits in confined spaces or enclosed areas with limited
space will require the use of protective shields, barriers, or insulating materials to
prevent team members from inadvertently touching electrical hazards. Ladders used for
access to such areas must be non-conductive. Protective barriers must also be
considered if team members are required to work with or handle conductive materials
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 7
Arc Flash Protection
adjacent to electrical hazards. Adequate lighting must always be provided in areas that
contain live electrical parts.

7.7.6 There must be a minimum of two Cianbro team members, one being a qualified
electrician, working at all times in an Electric Room when panels are open. No team
member will ever be left alone.

7.7.7 All other work in an Electric Room will be evaluated for electrical hazards by a qualified
electrician. If electrical hazards are not found to exist, work may proceed until change
in conditions occurs. Should a change in conditions occur, work will be stopped and be
re-evaluated by a qualified electrician.

7.7.8 Fifty (50) amp cord caps and connector bodies for both 480v and 240v cord
connections used in temporary power systems are subject to failure under various
environmental conditions. Items such as moisture and dust penetrate the plug’s
terminals and contacts. Several considerations for protection against failure are as
follows:
A. Temporary systems can be hard-wired very cost effectively, eliminating plug-in
connections completely.
B. Cords may be custom made by a qualified person (in the field or in Pittsfield)
where long runs are needed in order to eliminate plug-in connections.
C. Locate plug-in connections out of wet/moist areas.
D. Keeping plug-in connections above floors or ground.
E. Cover plug-in connections to allow water to run off without contacting the plugs.
F. When plug-in connections must be used in a moist/wet environment,
manufacturer’s specified boots shall be installed with coupling rings, kept off wet
surfaces, and covered in a manner which will allow water to run off.

7.8 Electrical Surveys

7.8.1 The following should be surveyed routinely:
A. Are electric panels completely and accurately labeled? Panels greater than 600
volts between phases shall be labeled “High Voltage”. Is each circuit accurately
labeled?
B. Are electric panels clearly accessible and not blocked off?
C. Are electrical boxes and panels properly located, supported, covered, and
openings sealed (no open holes)?
D. Are all light bulbs properly covered, guarded, and not broken? Metal guards must
be grounded as required by National Electrical Code.
E. Are power cords routed up and out of travel ways?
F. Are lugs and leads on electric welders properly insulated?
G. Are Cianbro conex boxes correctly wired to the Cianbro standard?
(Available from Cianbro Equipment LLC.)
H. Are buried cables properly flagged and signed?
I. Have overhead power lines been marked for work that requires cranes to be in the
area?
J . Are installations and modifications of electrical equipment being performed only by
licensed electricians and qualified persons?
K. Does this site have electrically safe working conditions? Has a detailed activity
plan been developed? Has the Cianbro Energized Work Permit been filled out if
energized work must be done? Does this site have electricians qualified to do
energized work and certified by the Electrical Safety Committee?
L. Are insulated tools and protective clothing and equipment available for work on
energized systems?
M. Has protective equipment and clothing been inspected each day before use for
rips, tears, and damage?
N. Do environmental conditions exist which create the conditions of working in or
around water? (Rain, snow, foggy conditions).
O. Are all electrical receptacles, covers, and cord plugs intact and free from cracks?
P. Old style Cianbro 240/480 volt distribution boxes should not be used in wet
environments unless covered or protected.
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 8
Arc Flash Protection
Q. New style Cianbro 240/480 volt distribution boxes must be used with the covers
closed at all times other than when installing or removing a cord. Extension cords
must enter from under the cover and not through the side where they would be
subject to damage by the cover.

7.9 Cianbro Arc Flash Protection Policy and Procedure

7.9.1 Cianbro team members and subcontractors shall perform work on electrical equipment
and circuits in a de-energized electrically safe state if at all possible. The tables of
NFPA 70E will be utilized, unless more accurate information is available from a system
specific Arc Flash Hazard Study, to determine Arc Flash Hazard/Risk Categories.
Required personal protective equipment based on the Arc Flash Hazard/Risk Category
for that portion of the electrical system being worked on will be used. In addition, a live
work permit including a hazard analysis is required to be completed with appropriate
signatures before any energized work is performed.

7.9.2 See SD1063 for Cianbro Energized Electrical Work Permit available on
Cianbro.net>Standard Operating Procedures – SOP.

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 9
Arc Flash Protection

Table 130.7(C)(9) Hazard/Risk Category Classifications



Task Performed on
Energized Equipment
Hazard/Risk
Category
Voltage
Rated Gloves
Insulated
Hand Tools
Panelboards or Other Equipment
Rated 240 V and Below - Note 1






Perform Infrared Thermography and other non-contact inspections
outside the restricted approach boundary

0 N

N
Circuit breaker (CB) or fused switch operation with covers on 0 N N
CB or fused switch operation with covers off 0 N N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing

1 Y

Y
Remove/Install CB's or fused switches 1 Y Y
Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts)

1 N

N
Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized
electrical conductors and circuit parts)

0 N

N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts of utilization
equipment fed directly by a branch circuit of the panel board


1 Y


Y

Panelboards or Switchboards Rated >240 V
and up to 600 V (with molded case or insulated
case circuit breakers) - Note 1








Perform Infrared Thermography and other non-contact inspections
outside the restricted approach boundary

1

N

N
CB or fused switch operation with covers on 0 N N
CB or fused switch operation with covers off 1 Y N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing

2*

Y

Y
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts of utilization
equipment fed directly by a branch circuit of the panel board


2*


Y


Y

600 V Class Motor Control Centers (MCC's)
Note-2 except as indicated






Perform Infrared Thermography and other non-contact inspections
outside the restricted approach boundary

1

N

N
CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors closed 0 N N
Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch 0 N N
CB or fused switch or starter operation with enclosure doors open

1

N

N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing

2*

Y

Y
Work on control circuits with energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts 120 V or below, exposed

0

Y

Y
Work on control circuits with energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts >120 V, exposed

2*

Y

Y
Insertion or removal of individual starter "buckets"
from MCC - Note 3 4 Y N
Application of safety grounds, after voltage test 2* Y N
Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized
electrical conductors and circuit parts) - Note 3

4

N

N
Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized
electrical conductors and circuit parts) - Note 3

1

N

N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts of utilization equipment fed directly by a branch
circuit of the motor control center


2*


Y


Y

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 10
Arc Flash Protection
600 V Class Switchgear (with power circuit
breakers or fused switches) - Note 4






Perform Infrared Thermography and other non-contact inspections
outside the restricted approach boundary

2

N

N
CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors closed 0 N N
Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch 0 N N
CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors open 1 N N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing

2*

Y

Y
Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts 120 V or below, exposed

0

Y

Y
Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts >120 V, exposed

2*

Y

Y
Insertion or removal of CB's from cubicles,doors open or closed

4

N

N
Application of safety grounds, after voltage test 2* Y N
Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare,
energized electrical conductors and circuit parts) 4 N N
Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized
electrical conductors and circuit parts) 2 N N
NFPA 70E TABLE 130.7 (C) (9) Hazard/Risk Category Classifications
Hazard/Risk Voltage Insulated Task Performed on
Energized Equipment Category Rated Gloves Hand Tools

Other 600 v Class (277 V through 600 V, nominal)
Equipment - Note 2 (except as indicated)






Lighting or small power transformers (600 V, maximum)
Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts)

2*

N

N
Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized electrical conductors
and circuit parts)

1

N

N
Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing

2*

Y

Y
Application of safety grounds, after voltage test 2* Y N
Revenue meters (kw-hour, at primary voltage and current) Insertion or
removal

2*

Y

N
Cable trough or tray cover removal or installation 1 N N
Miscellaneous equipment cover removal or installation 1 N N
Insertion or removal of plug-in devices into or from busways 2* Y N




Arc-Resistant Switchgear Type 1 or 2
(for clearing times of < 0.5 sec with a perspective fault current not
to exceed the arc resistant rating of the equipment)

CB operation with enclosure door closed 0 N N
Insertion or removal (racking) of CB's from cubicles,doors closed

0

N

N
Insertion or removal of CB's from cubicles, door open 4 N N
Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts 120 V or below, exposed

2

Y

Y
Insertion or removal (racking) of ground and test device with door closed

0

N

N
Insertion or removal (racking) of voltage transformers on or off the bus
door closed

0

N

N


NEMA E2 (fused contactor) Motor Starters, 2.3kV Through 7.2 kV

Perform Infrared Thermography and other non-contact inspections
outside the restricted approach boundary 3 N N
Contactor operation with enclosure doors closed 0 N N
Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch 0 N N
Contactor operation with enclosure doors open 2* N N
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 11
Arc Flash Protection

Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing 4 Y Y

Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts 120 V or below, exposed 0 Y Y

Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts >120 V, exposed 3 Y Y

Insertion or removal (racking) of starters from cubicles, doors open or
closed 4 N N
Application of safety grounds, after voltage test 3 Y N

Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts) 4 N N

Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized electrical conductors
and circuit parts) 3 N N


Insertion or removal (racking) of starters from cubicles, of arc-resistant
construction, tested in accordance with IEEE C37.20. 7, doors closed
only 0 N N

NFPA 70E TABLE 130.7 (C) (9) Hazard/Risk Category Classifications
Task Performed on Hazard/Risk Voltage Insulated
Energized Equipment Category Rated Gloves Hand Tools
Metal Clad Switchgear, 1 kV through 38 kV
Perform Infrared Thermography and other non-contact inspections
outside the restricted approach boundary 3 N N
CB operation with enclosure doors closed 2 N N
Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch 0 N N
CB operation with enclosure doors open 4 N N

Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing 4 Y Y

Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts 120 V or below, exposed 2 Y Y

Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and circuit
parts >120 V, exposed 4 Y Y

Insertion or removal (racking) of CB's from cubicles, doors open or
closed 4 N N
Application of safety grounds, after voltage test 4 Y N

Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts) 4 N N

Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized electrical conductors
and circuit parts) 3 N N

Opening voltage transformer or control power transformer compartments 4 N N


Other Equipment 1 kV Through 38 kV
Metal - enclosed interrupter switchgear, fused or un-fused

Switch operation of are-resistant-type construction, tested in accordance
with IEEE C37.20.7, doors closed only 0 N N
Switch operation, doors closed 2 N N

Work on energized electrical conductors and circuit parts, including
voltage testing 4 Y Y

Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized electrical
conductors and circuit parts) 4 N N

Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized electrical conductors
and circuit parts) 3 N N
Outdoor disconnect switch operation (hookstick operated) 3 Y Y
Outdoor disconnect switch operation (gang-operated, from grade) 2 Y N
Insulated cable examination, in manhole or other confined space 4 Y N
Insulated cable examination, in open area 2 Y N

General Notes (applicable to the entire table):
(a) Rubber insulating gloves are gloves rated for the maximum
line-to-line voltage upon which work will be done.
(b) Insulated and insulating hand tools are tools rated and tested
for the maximum line-to-line voltage upon which work will be done,
and are manufactured and tested in accordance with ASTM F 1505,
Standard Specification for Insulated and Insulating Hand Tools.
(c) Y = yes (required), N = no (not required).
(d) For systems rated less than 1000 volts, the fault currents and
upstream protecti ve device clearing times are based on an 18 in. working distance.
(e) For systems rated 1 kV and greater, the Hazard/Risk Categories are based on a 36 in. working distance.
(f) For equipment protected by upstream current limiting fuses with arcing fault current in their current
limiting range (1/2 cycle fault clearing time or less), the Hazard/Risk Category required may be reduced by
one number.
Specific Notes (as referenced in the table):
1. Maximum of 25 kA short circuit current available; maximum of 0.03 sec (2 cycles) fault clearing time.
2. Maximum of 65 kA short circuit current available; maximum of 0.03 sec (2 cycles) fault clearing time.
3. Maximum of 42 kA short circuit current available; maximum of 0.33 sec (20 cycles) fault clearing
time.
4. Maximum of 35 kA short circuit current available; maximum of up to 0.5 sec (30 cycles) fault clearing time.

7.9.3 Flame Retardant Arc Rated Garments

A. Team members working on energized electrical equipment or circuits, or exposed
to the hazards of an electrical arc flash, shall wear long sleeved flame retardant
shirt, pants and/or outer garment designed to meet the requirements of the Cianbro
Flash Protection Matrix and NFPA 70E Table 130.7(C) (10) Protective Clothing and
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Matrix.

B. Proper Inspection, Use, and Care of FR Arc Rated Garments

Arc Rated clothing is intended to be used while team members are within the Arc
Flash/Blast boundary, and not as a part of their daily working attire unless
otherwise specified.
This clothing is to be purchased and maintained by Cianbro.
Proper inspection and use is the responsibility of the user.

1. Inspection:
• Inspect the garment thoroughly for cleanliness
• Be sure there are no stains in garment as this could indicate the presence
of contaminants.
• Check for embedded foreign materials or foreign fibers.
• Inspect for excessive wear, or torn fabric before each use.
• Look for signs of repair such as stitches, patches etc.
• Check hood shield or face shield for damage and for excessive scratches
which could limit visibility.
• Do not use the garment if it does not pass inspection.

2. Use:
• Be sure to fasten all closures to eliminate the possibility of skin
exposure to an Arc event.
• Be sure to use the correct Arc Rated garment for the task, as per NFPA
70E requirements.
• Take care not to snag or tear the fabric, as it cannot be repaired by
conventional means. The integrity of the garment will be jeopardized by
repairs with inferior materials. If damaged remove it from service.
• If garment is exposed to an arc event, remove it from service.
• Take care not to expose the garment to oils and grease which could be
absorbed into the fabric, causing it to burn if involved in an arc event.

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 12
Arc Flash Protection
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 13
Arc Flash Protection
3. Care and Cleaning:
• Follow manufacturer’s recommendations for proper care and cleaning.
• Be sure that the garment is washed after using. Hygiene can become an
issue when garments are shared by team members.
• Do not wash Arc Rated garments with other garments, as this can cause
foreign material to become embedded in the Arc Rated fabric.
• Do not use fabric softeners, or bleach while cleaning these garments.
• Store the garments in a clean container, and in a safe location.
• Be sure to protect face shields from scratches and other damage while
storing them.

7.9.4 When exposed to electrical hazards, team members shall not wear conductive articles
such as key or watch chains, rings, wristbands, necklaces or other jewelry, or belt
buckles which could come into contact with live parts unless such articles are covered
to prevent contact.

7.9.5 Team members whose job classification may require them to work on, or be exposed
to, energized equipment or circuits and wear flame retardant garments shall be
prepared to do so. The team member should not need to leave the job site to change
clothing in order to be in compliance. Flame retardant coveralls, suits, or other
garments, where warranted, shall be added over acceptable cotton or other natural
fiber work clothing at the job site.

7.9.6 Shock arc flash boundaries shall be delineated and marked by red barricade tape with
appropriate information tags.

7.9.7 Flash Protection Matrix

A. The intent of the Flash Protection Matrix is to specify the minimum necessary
clothing and personal protective equipment to be worn while working on or near
energized electrical equipment within the flash protection boundary. (per NFPA
70E Table 130.7(C)(10) Protective Clothing and Personal Protective Equipment
(PPE)
B. Hazard/Risk 4 work should not be undertaken due to the extreme nature of forces
which would be present should there be an electrical explosion.
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 14
Arc Flash Protection

Table 130.7(C)(10) Protective Clothing and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Hazard/Risk Category Protecti ve Clothing and PPE

Hazard/Risk Category 0
Protective clothing, Nonmelting (according to ASTM F
1506-00) or untreated natural fiber
Shirt (long sleeve)
Pants (long)

FR protective equipment Hard hat
Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR)
Hearing protection (ear canal inserts)
Leather gloves (AN) (note 2)

Hazard/Risk Category 1
FR clothing, minimum arc rating of 4 (note 1) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (note 3)
Arc-rated pants (note 3)
Arc-rated coverall (note 4)
Arc-rated face shield or arc flash suit hood (note 7)
Arc-rated jacket, parka or rainwear (AN)

FR protective equipment

Hard hat

Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR)

Hearing protection (ear canal inserts)

Leather gloves (note 2)

Leather work shoes (AN)

Hazard/Risk Category 2
FR clothing, minimum arc rating of 8 (note 1) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (note 5)
Arc-rated pants (note 5)
Arc-rated coverall (note 6)
Arc-rated face shield or arc flash suit hood (note 7)
Arc-rated jacket, parka or rainwear (AN)

FR protective equipment Hard hat
Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR)
Hearing protection (ear canal inserts)
Leather gloves (note 2)
Leather work shoes

Hazard/Risk Category 2*
FR clothing, minimum arc rating of 8 (note 1) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (note 5)
Arc-rated pants (note 5)
Arc-rated coverall (note 6)
Arc-rated arc flash suit hood (note 10)
Arc-rated jacket, parka or rainwear (AN)

FR protective equipment Hard hat
Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR)
Hearing protection (ear canal inserts)
Leather gloves (note 2)
Leather work shoes

Hazard/Risk Category 3
FR clothing, minimum arc rating of 25 (note 1) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (AR) (note 8)
Arc-rated pants (AR) (note 8)
Arc-rated coverall (AR) (note 8)
Arc-rated arc flash suit jacket (AR) (note 8)
Arc-rated arc flash suit pants (AR) (note 8)
Arc-rated arc flash suit hood (note 8)
Arc-rated jacket, parka or rainwear (AN)

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 15
Arc Flash Protection
FR protective equipment Hard hat
FR hard hat liner (AR)
Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR)
Hearing protection (ear canal inserts)
Arc-rated gloves (note 2)
Leather work shoes

Hazard/Risk Category 4
FR clothing, minimum arc rating of 40 (note 1) Arc-rated long-sleeve shirt (AR) (note 9)
Arc-rated pants (AR) (note 9)
Arc-rated coverall (AR) (note 9)
Arc-rated arc flash suit jacket (AR) (note 9)
Arc-rated arc flash suit pants (AR) (note 9)
Arc-rated arc flash suit hood (note 9)
Arc-rated jacket, parka or rainwear (AN)

FR protective equipment Hard hat
FR hard hat liner (AR)
Safety glasses or safety goggles (SR)
Hearing protection (ear canal inserts)
Arc-rated gloves (note 2)
Leather work shoes


AN =As needed (optional)
AR =As required
SR =Selection required
Notes:
1. See Table 130.7(C) (11). Arc rating for a garment or system of garments is expressed in cal/cm².
2. If rubber insulating gloves with leather protectors are required by Table 130.7(C) (9), additional leather or arc-rated gloves are
not required. The combination of rubber insulating gloves with leather protectors satisfies the arc flash protection requirement.
3. The FR shirt and pants used for Hazard/Risk Category 1 shall have a minimum arc rating of 4.
4. Alternate is to use FR coveralls (minimum arc rating of 4) instead of FR shirt and FR pants.
5. FR shirt and FR pants used for Hazard/Risk Category 2 shall have a minimum arc rating of 8.
6. Alternate is to use FR coveralls (minimum arc rating of 8) instead of FR shirt and FR pants.
7. A face shield with a minimum arc rating of 4 for Hazard/Risk Category 1 or a minimum arc rating of 8 for Hazard/Risk Category
2, with wrap-around guarding to protect not only the face but also the forehead, ears and neck (or, alternatively, an arc-rated arc
flash suit hood), is required.
8. An alternate is to use a total FR clothing and hood, which shall have a minimum arc rating of 25 for Hazard/Risk Category 3.
9. The total clothing system consisting of FR shirt and pants and/or FR coveralls and/or arc flash coat and pants and hood shall
have a minimum arc rating of 40 for Hazard/Risk Category 4.
10. Alternate is to use a face shield with a minimum arc rating of 8 and a balaclava (sock hood) with a minimum arc rating of 8
and which covers the face, head and neck except for the eye and nose areas.

7.9.8 Fall Protection PPE
A Fall protection PPE shall be Arc Flash/Flame resistant rated for the applicable
Hazard/Risk category.
B. Specific information on products can be obtained from manufacturers such as
DBI/SALA-Fall Protection.

7.9.9 Testing
A. Testing requires PPE and tools suitable for the hazard/risk category of the
equipment or circuits being tested.
B. The proper test instrument must be chosen. Test instruments, equipment, and their
accessories will meet the requirements contained in ANSI/ISA-61010-1-Safety
Requirements for Electrical Equipment for Measurement, Control, and Laboratory
Use – Part 1 General Requirements, for rating and design requirements for voltage
measurement and test instruments designed for use on electrical systems 1000
volts and below.
C. For voltages over 50 volts, the test instrument shall be verified both before and
after an absence of voltage test is performed (Live, dead, live test). The person
Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 16
Arc Flash Protection
performing the test must be qualified according to the guidelines in 050 Electrical
Operations Program Safety Policy and Procedure.

7.9.10 High Voltage Line Work
Refer to 046 Electrical Transmission and Distribution Safety Policy and Procedure.

7.9.11 Switchyard and Substation Work
Refer to 051 Electrical Substations Safety Policy and Procedure.

7.10 Safety At Home

7.10.1 OSHA estimates that approximately 1000 electrocutions occur annually in the home.
This is around three times the number of electrocutions in the workplace. One of the
key contributors is that people are generally complacent when it comes to using
electrical appliances and tools at home. They feel they are in a “Safe Zone” and never
give safety a thought. The fact that the use of electrical equipment has increased,
combined with the frequent use of equipment by basically untrained people has done
much to increase the risk. As construction workers we should strive to set a good
example of safety in the home even though we may feel that it is a “Safe Zone”.

7.10.2 Following are several examples which could eliminate the possibility of electric shock or
electrocution.
• Use GFCI protection whenever we use electrical equipment outside, near
plumbing fixtures, in damp basements, near swimming pools, etc.
• Test each GFCI device based on the manufacturer’s recommendation at a
minimum.
• Understand which outlets are required by the National Electrical Code to be
GFCI protected.
• Take steps to ensure that electrical outlets are protected from contact by
children, and explain the hazards to them.
• Disconnect power when working on any portion of a circuit.
• Unplug cords when working on tools, equipment, or lights (even when changing a
light bulb).
• Avoid cutting trees that are within reach of a power line.
• Avoid using aluminum ladders or ariel lifts near power lines.
• Avoid working near service drops without involving the power company for advise
and protection.
• Determine the location of buried cables prior to digging with a machine or by
hand.

8 Budget / Approval Process

8.1 Purchase and maintenance of company supplied tools and equipment is the responsibility of
Cianbro Equipment, LLC.

8.2 Fire Retardant Clothing

8.2.1 Electricians engaged in normally de-energized installations are not required to furnish
FR clothing. Projects will furnish and maintain required FR clothing as needed.

8.2.2 Electricians, utility line workers and any personnel that work in live substations are
subject to the Cianbro Fire Retardant Clothing policy.

8.3 Cost of following this policy is the responsibility of the projects.

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 17
Arc Flash Protection
9 Related Documents

9.1 See attachments

9.2 Documents available on Cianbro.net or Cianbro.net>Standard Operating Procedures - SOP

Authorized Electrical Cord Repair Person Requirements SD1070 SOP
Authorized Electrical Cord Repair Person Exam SD1068 .Net
Energized Work Permit SD1063 SOP

9.3 Please Note: Training manual for presenter and student is available on Cianbro.net>Standard
Operating Procedures – SOP. 11.0 November_Electrical_&_ZES and 11.1
November_Electrical_&_ZES.

9.4 Authorized Electrical Cord Repair Person Exam Answers located on Cianbro.net| Resources|
Safety Resources.
9.1 Appendix A Cianbro Wiring Procedures for Portable Cords

Cianbro Wiring Procedures For Portable Cords
This wiring procedure is to be used with the new style plugs only.
This replaces the Safety Policy and Procedure dated 6-86.

Notes: 1. Bryant catalog numbers are for reference only.


Blue Box Receptacle/Spider Basket
EQUIPMENT GROUND GREEN WIRE
EQUIPMENT GROUND GREEN WIRE
Hot
Black
Wire
Neutral
White
Wire
Hot
Red
Wire
Neutral White Wire
30 Amp 125/250V,Gr.
NEMA L14-30 BRYANT
Receptacle 71430FR
Nylon Plug 71430NP
Nylon Connector 71430NC
Hot Black Wire
20 Amp 125V, Gr.
NEMA L5-20 BRYANT
Receptacle 70520FR
Nylon Plug 70520NP
Nylon Connector 70520NC
EQUIPMENT GROUND GREEN WIRE EQUIPMENT GROUND GREEN WIRE
Neutral
White
Wire
Hot
Black
Wire
Hot
Red
Wire
Hot Black Wire
50 Amp 125/250V, Gr. BRYANT BOOTS
Receptacle CS6369 7116B
Nylon Plug CS6365N 7117B
Nylon Connector CS6364N
Nylon Male Base CS6375N
Hot Red Wire
50Amp 480V, 3 Phase Gr. BRYANT BOOTS
Receptacle 3769 7116B
Nylon Plug 3765N 7117B
Nylon Connector 3764N
Nylon Male Base 3775N

Policy: 020 Electrical Safety and Rev. 06/03/11 Page 18
Arc Flash Protection

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