03 Aopa Collision Avoidance Article

Published on February 2017 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 45 | Comments: 0 | Views: 335
of 12
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content

 

S   A   F   E   T   Y

 

A   D   V   I   S   O



Oper ations and Pr of iciency No.

4

Collision Avoidance Strategies and Tactics Maintaining Separat ion D e s p i te   im p r o ve me nt s  in   th e   ge n e r a l   avi a ti o n   (G A )   sa f e t y

r e c o r d i n   r e c e n t   y e a r s , t h e   n u m b e r   o f   m i d a i r   c o ll i s i o n s (M AC s)  shows  no  corr e sp ond ing d e cline . M AC s  continue  to occur  about  thirtee n  times  a  year  on  ave rage, of ten  resulting in   mu l ti p le   f at a lit ie s. O n  th e   gr o u nd , c o ll i si o n s  c au se d   b y runway incursions are still a conce rn f or GA. Instead of  waiting  until  af ter  tak eoff   to  begin  the ir  collision  avoid ance  scan,

p i lo t s ca n  avo i d a  r u nway  in cu r si o n b y  in cr e a si ng th e i r vigilance immediately af te r engine start.

C o  o llisi  llisi o  o n  n  a v  vo  o    i i d  d a  a n  n c  c e  e , o t t h  e   a i i r  r   a n  d   b o  h  i n  n  t h  h e  n d  e  g r  ro     u  o n  n  t h  h e  o un  n   d  d ,  is   a si c  e  o f f   t h  e  m o s  t  b a  s t  n e  h e  o n  r e  e s  sp  p    o  o n  n si  si b  b ili t t i i e  e s  s  o f f  a 

p il  il o  o t t  f l l y    i i ng  ng  i n  n  v is  is u  u a  a l l  c o  o n  nd  d    i i t t i i o  o n  n s  s .

C o ll is io n  avo id an ce , b o t h  in   the   ai r   a nd   o n  t he   gr o u nd , i s one of  the most basic responsibilitie s of  a p ilot f lying in visual conditions. During p  prrimary  training , p ilots  are  taught  to k ee ee p their  eye s  o utside  the   cock pit  and loo k   f or   traff ic. This  Saf ety Advisor  goe s  a  step f urther  and teaches p ilots  how  to  visually i d e n t i f y   p o t e n t ia l   c o ll i s io n   t h r e a t s   a n d   co ve r s   p r o c e d u r e s t h a t   c a n   l e ss e n   t h e   r i s k   o f   a n   i n - fl i g h t   c o ll i s i o n   o r   r u n w a y incursion.

H istory of  MAC s M any  of   the  rules  and pr p rocedures  that  app ly  to  f light  in  cont r o ll e d a i r s p a c e   a r e   t h e   l e g a c y   o f   M A C s . I n  1956, a ll  1  128 28 pe op le   aboard lost  their  live s  whe n  a  DC -7 and a  Lock hee d Constellation  collid ed  ove r  the  Grand  Canyon  in  VFR  conditions. This tr agedy led  to  pub lic  outcry  f or  the  moder nizatio n of   the   air  traff ic  control  syste m, re su lting  in  the   mo re   e ff e ct i ve   sy s t e m  t h at  we   have   t o d ay.

D i e g o   i n v o l v i n g   a   B o e i n g  727

A 1978 co ll ision  o ve r   S an

d a   C e ss n a  1 72 — b o t h und e r   r ad ar   co ntr o l—cau se d the  d e aths  o f  144   144 p e op le   and re sulte d   in  e ve n  tighte r  re strictions  on  flights  in  he avily  traf f ick ed   are as. C ongress  p asse d   the   Airp ort  and   Airway  Saf e ty Exp ansion  Act  af te r  the  1986 co llision  of   a  DC -9 and   a  sinan

gle -e ngine   Pipe r  over  C erritos, Calif ornia, n th

a

a

t

an

which  claime d the

n th

un

h

lives  of  82  82 pe ople  i   e  ircr f    d 15 o   e  gro d. T e A ir p o r t   a nd A ir wa y   S a f e t y  Ex p an si o n   A c t  n o w  r e q u i r e s  all

civil  air  carr ie r  aircraf t  to  be   e quipp e d   with  Traff ic  Ale rt  and

Collision Avoidance Systems (TC AS).

Saf e

Pilots.

Saf e Sk ies 

www.a .as sf .or g

 

Aircraf t Design

Considerat ions

T he  d e s i gn   o f   t h e   a i r c r a f t  i ts e l f   c a n  a ls o   h i n d e r   v i si b i l i ty. Wi n d s h i e l d

d i s t o r t i o n , p l a c e m e n t   o f   wi n d o w  a n d wi n d shield p osts, and other structural  eleme nts can aff e ct what a pilot  see s. The  brain  re quires  input  f rom  both  eyes  to  accur ate ly  inte r p re t  the   visu al  cu e s  it  r e ce ive s. If   a  wind shie ld p ost  or  othe r  ob stru ction  blo ck s  the   vision  o f   one   e ye , the brain  may  not p erceive the o b je ct - even with the o ther  eye

p r o v i d i n g   i n p u t . Th e   N TS B   h a s   c o n c l u d e d

th i s  c o u l d b e   a

causal  f actor  in  some   mid air  coll isions. A  high  glare   shie ld can also block  vision, which is espe cially problematic during climbout.

H aze and f og can impact the eyes’ abilit y to discern collision threats.

T he  p o si t io n  o f   th e   su n   mu st   a ls o   b e   co n si d e r e d.

W he n

l o w   o n   t h e   h o r i z o n , i t   m a k e s   a n y   t r a ff i c   b e t w e e n   t h e

o b se r ve r   an d

t h e   s u n   v e r y  d i ff i c u l t   t o   s ee .

O p e r a tin g  in

these  cond itions r equ ires extra vigilance.

Opt ical Ill usions

O ptical  illusions  can  aff ect  what  we  see   in  flight. For  examp le , an  a ir cr af t  at  a  sli ghtly   lo we r   alt itu d e   co ming  to wa r d you  may  loo k   lik e   it’s  above   you  and  app e ar  to  d esce nd  as scanning f or t raff ic, the pi ot must be aware of  th  the b ind spots l that can be creat ed by aircraf t del sign. When

it  come s  close r. At  night, a  p ilot’s  ab ility  to   ju d ge   d istance pprroach  to  a  ru nway  is ab o ve   the   gr o u nd   while   o n  visu a l  app imp aire d. Fortunate ly, sp otting  aircraf t  in  f light  isn’t  usually

 prr o b le m  at  nigh t, mu c h  o f   a p a

 prr o p e r ly   ill u mina te d since   a p

i r c r a f t   i s   m u c h   e a s i e r   t o   s e e   a t   n i g h t   t h a n   a n   a i r c r a f t

o p e r a t in g   i n  d a yl i g ht   ho u r s . T he   e x ce p t io n   to   t hi s  r u le   i s ide ntif ying  aircraf t  be low  you  that  blend  in  with  lighting  on the grou nd.

No   matt e r   ho w  goo d a

t h e   v i s i b i l i t y   i s   f r o m   t h e   c o c k p i t ,

ir cr af t  have   b lind sp o ts.

a

ll

High -win g  air cr af t  have   r e d uc e d

d  can  have   the ir  vie w  of  t r a ff i c   b l o c k e d   w h e n   m a k i n g   t u r n s   i n   t h e   p a tt e r n   a s   t h e wing  is  lo we r e d   in  the   d ir e ctio n   o f   the   tur n. Lo w -wing  air visibility  of   aircraf t  above   the m,

an

c r a f t   h a v e   a   l a r g e   b l i n d s p o t   b e n e a t h   t h e m   t h a t   m a y Other Factors

obscure   conflicting  traff ic  when d esce nding  into  the p attern

In  add ition  to  atmosp heric  cond itions  and op tical  illusions,

or  while   on  f inal  app pprroach. Pilots  must  recognize   and com-

ge , r e sid u al a lco ho l  in t he

p e nsate   f or  visual  limitations, whe the r  it’s  raising  a  wing  to che ck   f o r   t r a ff i c  b e f o r e   mak i ng  a   tu r n  in  a  h igh- wi ng  a ir -

i r r i t a n t s   i n   t h e   a i r, f a t i g u e , b l oo d st r e am, ab

an

a

d   lo we r   o xy ge n   le ve ls  c an   all   i mp ac t  t he

ility of  your eyes to pe rf orm at the optimum level.

Saf e

Pilots.

Saf e Sk ies 

p l a n e , o r   m a k i n g   s h a l l o w   S - t u r n s   w h e n   c l i m b i n g   o r descend ing in any aircraf t.

Pg. 3

www.a .as sf .or g

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Side-to-side scanning method.

Front -to-side scanning method.

Start at the lef t of  your visual area and mak e a methodical sweep to the right, pausing in each block  o  of  viewing to f ocus your eyes. At the end of  the  scan, r e turn  to the  p ane l.

Start at the center block  o  of  your visual f ield (center of  f ront windshield); move to the lef t, f ocusing in each block  then swing quick ly back  to the  ce nte r block  af te r re aching the  last blo ck  o  on the lef t and repeat the perf ormance to the right.

Figure 3. Block  Syst em Scan

to   e ach  o the r.

Wh e n   o b s e r v e d

f rom  the   cock p it,

t he   co n

-

flicting target will loo k  lik e  a small, stationary speck  until it is

    distance  f rom  which  it  may  be   too  close  to  avoid. This is  called   the   “ blossom  e ff e ct.”  If   a  p ilot  see s  an  aircraf t  that r e m a i n s   i n   t h e   s a m e   s p o t   i n   t h e   w i n d s h i e l d   ( u n l e ss   i t   i s at a

Eff icient

scanning requires eff ect ive management of  oth  other f light task s. s.

Today ’s GP S re ceivers are extre mely capable,

Blossom Eff ect 

a

but they are 

lso   p ilot  wo rk lo ad   inte nsive   –  p articu lar ly  whe n  mu ltip le

directly  ahead and moving  in  the  same d ire ction), there  is  a h i g h  p r o b a b i l i t y   t h e   t w o   a i r c r a f t   w i ll   c o ll i d e   u n l e ss   o n e changes  their  course . O nce  a  thre at  has  bee n  identif ied, it’s essential  to  k ee ee p  the  other  aircraf t  in  sight  until  the  threat  is

waypo ints  must  be  inserted into   a  f light p lan. GPS  receive rs

resolved.

Phases of  Flight M idair  collisions  can  happ e n  in  any p hase   of   flight. Avoidance   strate gie s  nee d   to   be   ad ju ste d   to   re fle ct  the   flight  e nvironment and risk s associate d with each particular phase.

Cock pit Resource Management  Eff e ctive   cock p it  re sour ce   manage me nt  (C RM )  re q uire s  an

e ff ic ie n t  sca n . Th e   m o r e  q u ic k ly   i ns t r u me nt s  an d ga u ge s can  be   monitored   and  inte rpreted , the   more  time   available t o   s can  f o r   t r aff i c. An  e x p e r i me n t   co nd u c te d   wi th   mi li tar y p ilots  f ound   the   ave rage   time   nee d e d   to  cond uct  an  e ff e ctive  scan was a to tal of  20  20 seconds – 17 seconds f or the outside scan, and three  se cond s f or the  p ane l scan. As d emonstrate d by the military p ilots, consid erably more time  should be  de voted to scanning outside than inside. C RM   a l s o   in c lu d e s   e ff e ct i ve   ma n a ge me n t   o f   d i s t r a c t io n s such as passe ngers, avionics, and chart manage ment task s.

Saf e

Pilots.

Saf e Sk ies 

 prr o gr amm e d o n   th e   gr o u nd to  p  prr o vi d e sh o u l d a lwa ys   b e  p more  time  f o r scanning in the  air.

 and C limb Tak eoff  an

Nearly 11 percent  of   all  midair  collisions  occur d uring  tak e -

o ff   a n d c l i m b . E n s u r e   t h a t   t h e   r u n w a y   i s   c l e a r   b e f o r e

de parting and  listen f or other  inbound  aircraf t. Don’t f orget to   mak e   p o sitio n  r e po r ts  and   u nde r stand   o the r ’s  r e p o r ts  at nontower ed  airpo rts. During  climb  out  use  shallo w  S -turns o r   lowe r   the   no se   o cc asio nall y  to   ge t  a  b e tt e r  vie w  o f   the

rea d ire ctly  in  f ront  of   the   aircraf t. Pilots  can  also  transition - c l i m b   s p ee d s   t o   g a i n   b e tt e r   f o r w a r d v i s i b i l i t y (although some climb pe rf ormance  will be sacrif iced ). a

to  cr u ise

Pg.



www.a .asf  sf .or g

 

p o ss i b l e   t ha t  t he   p il o t  may   no t  e ve n  k no w  whe r e   h e   i s  i f  h e ’ s   u n f amil iar   with   th e   f ie l d.

Typ icall y, incu r sio ns  b y   GA

ircraf t  result  in  go-around s  or  reduced separation  betwee n

a

conflicting traff ic rather than accide nts. To reduce the chances of  a runway incursion, always revie w t h e   l a y o u t s   o f   d e s t i n a t i o n   a n d   d e p a r t u r e   a i r p o r t s   d u r i n g

your f light planning .

Accidents A  C e ssna 172 and   a  C e ssna 152 collide d   on  the   runway  at Sar asota, Flo rid a’s  towe r e d   air p or t, re su lting  in  f o ur   f atalitie s .

Accord ing  to  the   NTSB  re p ort, conf usion  in  the   towe r

d lack   of   attention  in  the  cock pit  we re  f actors  in  the  accid e n t . T h e  152 h a d b e e n   c l e a r e d f o r   t a k e o ff . T h e  172, which  was  ho ld ing  sho rt  f o r   an  inte r se ctio n  de p ar tur e , was then cle are d onto the r unway, and taxie d right into the path of  the 152 on its tak eoff  roll. The controlle r thought the  172 an

he ’d

cleared onto  the  active  was  the  aircraf t  waiting  behind

the 152.

And

those  aboard the  172

involve d in the accide nt

pp are ntly d idn’t look  f or traff ic  bef ore  p  prrocee ding onto the active   ru nway. This  accid e nt  und e rsco re s  the   f act  that  p ilots n ee d   t o   m a i n ta in   c o n s t a n t   v ig i l a n c e , w h e t h e r   u n d e r   t h e a

control of  ATC p ersonnel or not.

Avoiding Runway Incursions The   No ve mb e r, 1996 co ll isi o n  o f   a   Bee ch   King  A ir   a nd   a



Bee ch 1900 in  Q uincy, Illinois  illustrate s  the  potential  con-

se q u e n ce s  o f   i nc u r sio ns   a t  n o n to we r e d a ir p o r ts. C o ck p i t



Vo i ce   Re co r d e r   (C V R)   t a p e s   f r o m  t h e  1900 i nd i ca t e   th a t

 Re view the  anticipate d taxi route  bef ore  taxi (prior to d eparture) and en route (prior to land ing).  Listen caref ully to ATC  instructions at towered f ield s. The route  you’re given may not be  the  one  you expected.

conf usion  and lack   of   attention  and comm unicatio n p laye d mmu

prominent  roles  in  this  disaste r. The   1900 1900   was  on  a  straight-



in  app pprro ach  f o r  Runway 13, and   anno unce d   its  inte ntions on  the   C TAF. The   King  Air  announce d   it  was  going  to  tak e -



o ff   o n  Ru nway 4  4.. The   cr e w  o f   the  1900 ask e d if   the   King Air   was  go ing  to   ho ld u ntil  the y  land e d.

Ho we ve r,

  th i r d aircraf t  at  the   airp or t, a  Pip e r  C he rok ee ee  behind the  King  Air o n   Ru n w a y   4 , r e s p o n d e d   t h a t   h e   w o u l d   h o l d , a n d   t h a t t r ans miss i o n   was   p ar t iall y  b l o c k e d , app ar e n tl y  le ad in g  th e 1900 cr e w  to   b e lie ve   the   tr ansmiss io n  was  f r o m  t he   Kin g a





A i r. T h e  1900 co n t i n u e d wi t h   i t s   l a n d i n g   a s   t h e   Ki n g   A i r

comme nced its tak e off  roll. The y collide d

 the intersection o f   the   two   r u nways, claiming  the   live s  o f   all   tho se   ab o ar d both aircraf t. at





 Re ad

back  all taxi instructions.

 If  unce rtain, conf irm pe rmission to cross any and all runways prior to cro ssing them.  Acquire  airport diagrams f or all airports, espe cially those with which you are  unf amiliar. To p  prrint f ree  airport dia.org / ta taxi. grams, go to www.asf .o  If  in d oubt, ask  f or p  prrogre ssive  taxi instructions.  Look  f or traff ic bef ore tak ing the runway. Ensure that no conflicting traff ic exists be f ore  be ginning the   tak eoff .  At nontowered airports with inte rse cting runways, check  f or traff ic on the crossing runway as we ll as the one you intend to use f or de parture ; do the  same  when land ing at these  airports.

Saf e

Pilots.

Saf e Sk ies 

Pg.



www.a .as sf .or g

 

Collision Avoidance Check list  You

now have the k no nowledge to minimize the threat of  collisions in the air and on the ground. Use the f oll owing tact ics to enhance the saf et y of  every f light.

Use sunglasses Sunglasses that block  out UV rays help protect your vision and

red uce e ye f atigue. Re d / yellow spectrum lenses mak e it easier to see  through haze. Polarized le nses reduce glare , but this may  be  a  d etr iment  to  spo tting  traff ic  as  the   glint  of   light bouncing o ff  an aircraf t is o f ten the very thing that helps mak e it visible.

Observe proper procedures Use  corr ect cruising altitude s and  traff ic patte rn p roced ure s. Announce  your p osition  at  nontowere d  airp orts. Re cognize that not e ve ryone f ollows the ru les.

Plan your f light  Kn o w   y o u r   r o u t e , t h e   f r e q u e n c i e s   y o u ’ ll   n ee d   a l o n g   t h e w a y, a n d   t he  p e r t i n e n t  in f o r m at i o n   f o r   y o u r   d e s t in a t io n . Fo ld char ts  and p r e se t  navigational  aid s  to   maximize   scan t i m e . Pr o gr a m   y o u r   av i o n i c s   ( i n c l u d i n g  G P S   u n i t s )   o n   t h e ground to  minimize  he ads- down  time   in  the   air. Anticipate where  you may f ind  high  traff ic / high work lo ad  are as. Avoid the se  areas  if   possib le  o r  plan  on  be ing  extr a  vigilant  dur ing tho se phase s of  the  f light. Equip yourself  If   yo u   o p e ra te   an  a ir cr a f t  witho u t  ra d io s  o r   tr ansp o nd e r s, conside r  installing  them  to  enhance   your  saf e ty. Re gulations re quire   that  aircraf t  e quipp e d with  transp onde rs  must  have the m on during flight in controlled airsp ace. Educat e passengers A s   p a r t   o f   yo u r   p r e fl i g h t  b r i e f i n g , e x p l a in   b a s ic   s c ann i ng p r oce d u re s  to  p ass e nge rs  and   have   the m  assist  in  sp otting tr aff ic. Exp lain  FAA  r ad ar   ad viso r y p  prroce d ure s, so  the y  can help locate traff ic called by ATC.

Communicat e When  flying  in  co ntr olle d airsp ace , f amiliar ize  yourse lf   with th e   r e q u i r e d c o mm u nicatio n p  prro ce d u r e s. At  no ntowe re d mmu a

ir p o r t s,

out.

b e g in   a nn o u n c in g   y o u r   p o si t i o n   w h e n  1  10 0 m il e s

Improve your visibilit y

Bu gs  or   othe r  co ntaminants  o n  you r  wind shie ld can  block 

  i r cr af t   f r o m  vie w  an d mak e   i t  m o r e  d iff i cu lt   t o   f o cu s p rop e rly. During  climb out, mak e   S -turns  f or  imp rove d   f orw a r d   v is i b il i t y. O n c e   y o u ’ v e   r e a c h e d   a   s a f e   a l t i t u d e , u se cruise -climb airspee ds to get a better view over the nose . an a

Scan f or t raff ic!  U se   t he   t e c hn i q u e s p r e s e n t e d i n   th i s  S a f e t y   A d vi s o r   ( see

Pa ge  5 ). Re m e mb e r   to  d e vo t e   mo r e   ti me   to   sca nn in g  f o r traff ic ou tside than scanning the  instru ments inside .

Use aircraf t lights I n s t a ll   a n d u s e   a d d i t i o n a l   l i g h t i n g   t o   h e l p o t h e r  p i l o t s

s ee   y o u r   a i r c r a f t . U s e   y o u r   l a n d i n g   l i g h t   o n   a pp r o a c h ,

dep arture, airp ort.

d  climbout  –  e specially  within 10

an

miles  o f   any

Saf e

Pilots.

Saf e Sk ies 

Pg. 10

www.a .as sf .or g

 

When When itit comes comes to to air air safety, safety pilots turn to one source:

www.asf.org

There’s always something new that today’s pilots need to know. To keep up with the ever-changing world of general aviation, you need a resource that evolves with it. At www.asf.org, the AOPA Air Safety Foundation is evolving at the speed of aviation. Log on today to take advantage of all the FREE tools at the Internet’s premier aviation online safety center — where there is always something new.

FREE! Available Available 24 Hours a Day, Day, 7 Days a Week!

Safe Pilots. Safe Skies: Every Pilot’s Pilot’s Right … Every Pilot’ Pilot’ss Responsibility The AOPA Air Safety Foundation 421 Aviation Way • Frederick, MD 21701-4798 1.800.638.3101

Saf e

Pilots.

Saf e Sk ies 

Pg. 11

www.a .as sf .or g

 

EXPLORE  ASF’S SAFETY PRODUCTS Safety Advisors • Safety Highlights • Nall Report  Videos • Seminar-in-a-Box ® Program

and many more... 421 Aviation Way • Frederick, MD 21701 • 800/638-3101 • www.asf.org These ASF products were made possible through contributions from pilots like you.

© Copyright 2006, AO PA Air Saf ety Foundation 421 Aviation Way, Frederick , M D 21701 800 / 638 638 -3101 E-mail: asf @aopa.org Web: www.asf .o .o r g Publisher: Bruce Landsberg Ed itors: Leisha Bell, Brian Peterson, Jennif er Storm Writer: James Wynbrandt Intern: Bill M astick  SA15 Edition 2 8/06

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close