1009-CTTC.pdf

Published on December 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 12 | Comments: 0 | Views: 246
of 5
Download PDF   Embed   Report

HVAC DESIGN

Comments

Content

Energy Savings:  Variable‐Speed Drives in Chilled Water Systems  The following article was contributed by Carrier Corporation.  Articles highlighting novel HVAC  technologies should be submitted to Chapter Technology Transfer Committee Chair Mark  Maguire ([email protected]) for consideration in future newsletters.  Variable frequency drive use has rapidly grown in the past decade in HVAC systems as  advancements in VFD technology and reductions in first cost have increased return on  investment.  VFD’s have increased in performance and reliability, leading to VFD’s being  standard in VAV and in secondary and primary pumping applications.  Why do VFD’s save energy?    The energy savings on centrifugal devices (fans, pumps, compressors) coupled with a variable‐ speed drive are dictated by the ideal fan laws (or pump affinity laws).   

  Power is proportional to speed cubed;  this is why VFD’s save energy and have become  prevalent in centrifugal devices.  As can be seen from the graphs above, lowering the speed  reduces the power requirement greatly.  The relationship between lift and speed is also very  important in applying VFD’s to centrifugal chillers.  The centrifugal compressor lift is not a  mathematical function of speed as it is for duct and pipe systems;  this relationship is examined  further later.  How do VFD’s work?  VFD’s convert AC power to DC, then convert back to AC at a desired frequency.  Incoming 3  phase AC power passes through a rectifier, separating the alternating current.  Capacitors  convert the rectified current to DC.  An inverter made up of IGBT’s switch to create the desired  electrical current to match the desired motor speed.   

  Variable Speed Pump Basics  VFD’s are applied to pumps to reduce energy costs and increase control.  Designing the optimal  system for energy efficiency and reliability requires a fundamental understanding of the Pump  Affinity Laws.  Speed control allows the system to supply the required flow at the lowest  possible system pressure and power, generating operational costs savings.   

  Variable Condenser Water Flow  If the flow rate is varied through a chiller condenser, it is critical to respect the onboard chiller  safeties such as high condenser pressure.  Variable condenser flow is not the norm, especially  for centrifugal chillers that depend on head pressure reductions at part load.  In centrifugal  chillers, reduced condenser water flows may elevate head pressures, resulting in a loss of  efficiency and possible chiller instability.  Examine the effect on the entire system (chillers,  pumps, cooling towers) when considering variable condenser water flow.  Variable Speed Drives in Chiller Applications  A centrifugal chiller is a turbomachine that follows the same laws of operation as pumps and  fans.  Similarly, centrifugal chillers can unload with either inlet guide vane control or by  reducing compressor speed with vfd’s.   

  A centrifugal compressor must move enough compressed refrigerant flow to produce tons of  capacity, and produce enough lift to overcome system head pressure (difference between  condensing and suction temperature).  The key differences between pumps and chillers:  Pumps:  the system head is a function of flow  Chillers:  the system head is a function of condenser water temperature and not directly related  to flow.  When can a centrifugal compressor reduce speed?    When less flow is required:  vfd’s can slow down to move less mass flow  or refrigerant when less than design capacity is required.    When less lift is required:  for a fixed duct or piping system, the lift or  system pressure is a function of the flow.  However, for chillers, whenever the condensing  temperature is less than design (e.g., 85°F tower water), the vfd can reduced speed, saving  energy.  Centrifugal chillers with vfd’s save energy even at full tonnage when entering  condenser water temperature is not at design (e.g., 85°F).  Reduced head pressure allows a  vfd/compressor to move more capacity at lower speeds while consuming less energy.  How much energy does a vfd save on water‐cooled chillers?  Is full‐load kW/ton a good indicator of kWh consumption?  No – chiller plants rarely operate at  100% capacity and design condenser water temperatures.  Philadelphia weather data shows  that the majority of chiller run hours occur at average 65‐75°F entering condenser water  temperatures.  Variable‐speed operation is ideal because of the large amount of operating 

hours that occur at less than 85°F entering condenser water temperature.  Optimize the chiller  for maximum efficiency at the maximum number of run hours by using a vfd. 

 

 

Sponsor Documents

Recommended

No recommend documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close