2007 BCC Caterlog

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Choosing a college is such a big decision. There are so many choices— so many elements to consider. How can you make the choice that’s right for you?

Bristol Community College

where students come first
Why do you want to go to college?
As you decide on a college, make sure you take time to consider why so many students like you come to Bristol Community College. Surprising? Why? Bristol Community College is that place nearby, the one you’ve heard about. Perhaps you already have some opinions. But the more you look, the more you see that the advantages we offer can make BCC a very smart choice for you — and your future.

Obvious question, right? You want to go to college because you want a secure future–you want the education and the skills that will enable you to chart a bright, successful road ahead. But college is an expensive proposition. It costs money and time and energy. Is it worth it? Yes, it is. Statistically, those with a two-year degree earn an average of $400,000* more in a lifetime than those with only a high school diploma. An education makes you more marketable, more employable, more flexible, more able to weather economic cycles and keep learning and growing. And more than just its financial benefits, a good college education makes you think, challenges the status quo–in short, makes you question and equips you to find answers. A college education is an investment in yourself and your future. But nothing says that spending more on your education necessarily gets you more. That’s where Bristol Community College comes in. At Bristol Community College, you can earn an education that will work for you. And at BCC, you don’t have to mortgage your future to get it.
*American Association of Community Colleges

2
Introduction to BCC

Bristol Community College
Know the secret.
The more you know about choosing Bristol Community College– the more you see it makes so much sense. Why? It’s a center for opportunity You can find the tools you need to make a great future at Bristol Community College. Compare our resources, our faculty, our services -- there’s not a better choice for getting started and getting ahead.

I have gotten a lot from BCC. Plus, I saved a phenomenal amount of money.
Holly Brown-Ayers ‘06 Communication 2005-2006 editor, The Observer

It’s affordable. You know how the news is full of stories about the high cost of education? Well, not at Bristol Community College! This year, a full-time (30 credits) course load at BCC costs about $3,900. Compare that to private colleges. Major magazines, including U.S. News and World Report and Fortune, say that community colleges are the best way to get the most for your college tuition. It’s been a big secret–but now YOU know! It’s transferable. Earn the first two years of a four-year degree at Bristol Community College, and you are likely to find yourself actively recruited by great colleges and universities. Students who earned an associate’s degree at Bristol have transferred to such institutions as Brown University, Northeastern University, University of Massachusetts, Bridgewater State College, Bryant University, Wellesley College, Roger Williams University, Boston University, New York University, Providence College, and many others. Many colleges offer special scholarships and aid for community college graduates.

Plus, students who plan to transfer to the University of Massachusetts or state colleges can take advantage of Joint Admission, which guarantees qualified graduates admission as juniors to the four-year institution. And transfer students with a “B” average or better qualify for Tuition Advantage, a 33% discount on tuition at the state college or university. (See Transferring for more.) It’s smart. Is “name brand” better? No way! At Bristol you have access to great learning resources, from the best in computer labs to the most comprehensive library and media resources. Plus, you get the personal attention of faculty members who are committed to teaching — that’s why they’re here! As teachers first and foremost, they get involved in your learning, and put you first. What else do you need? Read on to discover more about Bristol Community College and why BCC is where students come first.

3
Introduction to BCC

Bristol Community College is a two-year, public comprehensive

the SMART

community college offering career and transfer programs of study that lead to associate’s degrees or certificates. Refer to Academic Information for information on these degrees and certificates.

The BCC at Attleboro Center offers courses towards degrees and certificates, or you can take classes in Attleboro towards completing programs at another BCC location. Students get all the services they need to succeed in the intimate setting. We have satellite campuses offering evening classes in New Bedford and Taunton. You have another option to get here — don’t come at all. We offer an ever-growing selection of courses and programs on the Web for people who want to take courses from the comfort of their own home. Refer to the Distance Learning section.

CHOICE
I felt BCC was really the right place for me to go. Going to Bristol was probably one of the best decisions that I have ever made.
Jim Mathes ‘83 Business Administration Executive Director SMILES, Inc.

Accreditation Bristol Community College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). Accreditation by this Association indicates that the institution has been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards agreed upon by qualified educators. See page 186 for more information, including ways to contact NEASC. The Health Sciences programs carry professional accreditation as well. Please refer to the program listings for details. Get here from there Bristol Community College’s suburban Fall River campus is directly off route 24 and route 195. We are only 20 minutes from New Bedford or Taunton and 30 minutes from Attleboro. Many Rhode Island residents find us easy to reach too. Public buses make regular stops at our Fall River and New Bedford Campuses and the Attleboro Center. Bristol Community College’s New Bedford Campus at the Star Store offers a full-service, comprehensive campus for more than 1,100 students. Headstart to College, an innovative learning project specifically designed for students who have been away from school for a while, is based at the New Bedford Campus. The Campus offers 13 degree options and 8 certificate programs that can be completed solely at the New Bedford site, as well as courses that can be used toward completing programs at our Fall River Campus. It is located directly off of route 18 in downtown New Bedford.

4
Introduction to BCC

Who chooses BCC?
At BCC, I got a rocksolid foundation that gave me incredible life independence. I knew that no matter where I was, I could support myself. That gives you the ability to try new things.
Kathleen Torpey Garganta ‘73 Director - Attleboro Center

It’s easier to answer “who doesn’t.” Actually, there’s no “typical student”– because you will find so many different types of people. We have traditional-aged students, senior citizen students, students representing various ethnic groups, students who are parents, working students looking to improve job skills – people who have many different priorities and come from diverse life situations. They come from every town and community in our service area, from Attleboro to Wareham, as well as from nearby Rhode Island and several foreign countries. In Fall 2007, more than 6,900 students are expected to enroll in credit classes days, evenings, and weekends. We know that our students manage college, family, work, and studies. So choosing BCC means choosing support that makes college manageable. You can take classes days, evenings, weekends, and even all summer. Our student support services, including financial aid, tutoring, and academic advisement, are available into the evening. You fit college into your life – we don’t fit you into ours. If you have dreamed about college but think it can’t be done, look into BCC. It will be hard work – possibly the greatest challenge you’ve ever had.

But our students prove that it can be done and that it’s worth it.

5
Introduction to BCC

Facilities for learning
BCC offers students access to some of the most modern equipment and resources available to support and enrich their education. The College has campuses in Fall River and New Bedford and learning center in Attleboro. It also uses local facilities as satellite locations.
In addition to the Fall River Campus, BCC also offers services at the following locations: New Bedford Campus — This campus offers a comprehensive collection of day, evening, and weekend classes and services to support student success. The space in the former Star Store offers six classrooms, a multidisciplinary computer lab, a science lab, and library space conveniently located near public transportation and public parking in downtown New Bedford. Free tutoring and academic/career/personal counseling is available to students. BCC at Attleboro –– The newest BCC site offers classrooms, a science lab, computer labs, and other learning facilities conveniently located in downtown Attleboro. All learning services are offered here, with small classes and personal attention. Student offices, the BCC Bookstore, Fitness Center, cafeteria and lounge and bill payments in the Student Accounts office are also here. Free wireless access is available from your laptop. The Siegel Health Technologies Building — Health Sciences programs are based here, with the BCC Child Care Center, Nursing lab, Occupational Therapy Assisting lab, Dental Hygiene clinic, and College snack bar.

Intellectual and artistic stimulation, the opportunity to develop marketable skills, and more confidence that’s what I found at BCC.
Kelly Arruda ‘07 Graphic Design

The Business Technologies Building — Free wireless access is here for your use. Find a 60-station open computer lab for student use and a computer help desk for any computer-related problem. Six network computer labs for business, office administration, and computer information systems, including a full multimedia learning lab, are here. The BCC Writing Lab, a center staffed by faculty and peer tutors who provide students help with writing assignments in any program of study, is based here.
The Eileen T. Farley Learning Resources Center – The library provides access to more than a million print and non-print materials, and access to online databases and electronic resources. Free wireless access is also available. See page 7 for more information about the resources found here. The Engineering Building — Access computer integrated manufacturing, soil, hydraulics, and pneumatics labs, computer-aided design (CAD) stations, a robotics lab, and classrooms, as well as academic support programs in the Center for Developmental Education including the Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC) and Office of Disability Services (ODS). The Hudnall Administration Building — Administrative offices, including Admissions, Campus Security, and Financial Aid, are found here. The Science Building — Physics, chemistry and biology labs, a greenhouse, planetarium, aquaculture lab, and classrooms, as well as a Macintosh computer laboratory, are available to students. The Mathematics and Science Building offers dedicated science labs, a multidisciplinary computer lab, environmental technology learning center, community services, and an interactive lecture hall.

Satellites — Evening classes are held in centers at Taunton High School and Greater New Bedford Regional Vocational Technical High School.

The Fall River Campus includes these nine buildings:
The Margaret L. Jackson Arts Center — Find a professionallyequipped, 700-seat theater, with dressing rooms, scene shop, and costume and makeup rooms, plus art studios, graphic design computer lab, and exhibit space. The Grimshaw-Gudewicz Art Gallery has been added to the Jackson Arts Center for community and student use. In the College’s television studio and post-production facility, students in the College’s Communication program use the professional three-camera studio, digital portable cameras, and digital editing workstations. The facility is also headquarters for Fall River Community Television, Fall River’s public access television station, where local residents learn the intricacies of television production. Free wireless internet is available. The Commonwealth College Center — Enrollment Services is here including Admissions, Advisement, Counseling, Financial Aid, Health Services, Placement Testing, Registration, Records, and Student Life.

6
Introduction to BCC

Educational resources
Learning is about the seeking of ideas – of students and me grappling with ideas together.
Dr. Howard Tinberg, Professor of English 2004 Carnegie/CASE Community College Professor of the Year

The faculty – fellow learners committed to teaching
Learning is at the heart of all we do. That love of learning is led by a faculty with advanced degrees and professional experience that translate into real-life preparation for your future. And while their credentials alone make them impressive, it is their commitment to teaching and to the community college student that really sets them apart. And others have agreed. Many faculty have been honored for teaching and scholarship. Most recently, Dr. Howard Tinberg, Professor of English, was named national Outstanding Community College Professor of the Year. He is the third BCC professor to receive recognition from this prestigious program in the last seven years. Bristol Community College is one of only four colleges with more than one national winner. But it’s not only awards that distinguish our faculty. We have published playwrights, business consultants, working artists, active healthcare providers – professionals who are admired for their expertise. They teach at Bristol Community College because they want you to share all they have learned.

Rylan Brenner, Professor of Theatre and Artistic Director for BCC Theatre Rep, won a directing fellowship with the American College Theatre Festival at the Kennedy Center, Washington, DC.

Keeping pace with technology
The College’s high-tech labs and courses stay up to date with the rapidly changing environment. Ample on-campus computer facilities; updated science labs; wireless access; “Smart” classrooms, and the latest in teaching technology; distance learning opportunities; and more, allow you to take maximum advantage of technology’s power. Technology also enables you to take courses from wherever you are. We have distance learning courses where you can learn via the World Wide Web, and experience individualized, student-centered instruction. See Distance Learning elsewhere in this catalog.
Dr. Howard Tinberg, Professor of English and Director of the College’s Writing Lab, was named national Community College Professor of the Year.

7
Introduction to BCC

The Eileen T. Farley Learning Resources Center — high-tech learning tools
Considered one of the most comprehensive centers in the Massachusetts community college system, the Farley LRC provides access to the many different media needed for scholarship and enjoyment. The Library, located on the main floor, provides access to: • An extensive collection of print and electronic reference materials as well as online resources. Many of these materials are available from home or office via the Internet. More than 3 million titles through the SAILS online library network Interlibrary Loans, which put the resources of state and national academic libraries within the reach of students and faculty Individual assistance with research and academic assignments from professional librarians Online “Ask a Librarian” reference service via the LRC Web page (at www.bristol.mass.edu/lrc) The Internet via more than 30 public workstations and wireless service to student and faculty laptop computers Campus closed circuit audio and video network via library viewing stations More than 68,000 books More than 400 journals and newspapers 40,000-plus videotapes, DVDs, slides and audio compact disks Media equipment, including projectors, tape players and cameras for on-campus use College archives, including works by faculty and staff, College publications, and the Lizzie Borden collection

• •

• • • •

The Farley LRC extensive collection includes: • • • • •

8
Introduction to BCC

Bristol Community College

Extra support when you need it
The Tutoring and Academic Support Center, located in the Engineering building at the Fall River campus, provides tutors for almost every College course and training in general study skills. Tutoring and learning resources are also offered at the New Bedford campus at Star Store. Academic computing labs can be found for every major discipline and give students access to the technology they need to master their material. Technology stays up to date, and generous lab hours offer students ample access. Every student may apply for a free e-mail address for personal and academic use.

Stepping beyond BCC
As much as you’ll enjoy your time with us, we know you’re preparing to move on. From the moment you step on campus, we’ll work with you to plan your next step. With a broad range of student services in financial aid, academic advisement, career planning, transfer counseling, and job placement, we can help you plan your career at BCC to best support your goals–or to help you figure out what those goals should be. No pressure–just support to help you get there.

Learning made real
Classrooms resonate with practical learning that prepares you for your next step after BCC. Programs incorporate real-time learning experiences, whether working with a local business to develop a web site, preparing a marketing proposal, practicing clinical skills, or whatever you can imagine. In most programs you can take advantage of internships, field placements, and optional Cooperative Education positions, where you earn wages and credit toward your degree and experience toward your résumé.

Making the smart choice
Can you see why Bristol Community College is the smart choice for you? We can help you get where you want to go. Sure, you could pay a lot more — but why? Come find out for yourself why Bristol Community College is where students come first.

9

Programs of study
Arts & Sciences
DEGREE PROGRAMS

Programs of study
A = certificates and degrees offered at Attleboro Center NB = certificates and degrees offered at New Bedford Campus at Star Store
Oracle Database Security Windows 2003 Administration 75 76 76

11

Animation & Motion Graphics Art/Fine Arts Communication (NB) General Studies (A & NB) Health Sciences (A & NB) Graphic Design Liberal Arts & Sciences (A) Humanities Math and Science Professional (NB) Theatre Artistic Technical Web Design & Media Arts

12 14 16 17 18 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 28 29 29 30 24 24

Marketing Retail Management (NB) Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management (NB) Sport Management Tourism and Hospitality Services

45 45 46 46 47

Human Services and Public Safety
DEGREE PROGRAMS

119

Center for Developmental Education
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
General Studies Prep General Studies Prep-ESL Preparatory General Studies Prep Career Prep TRIO QUEST for Success program Disability Services Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC)

Engineering, Technology, and Environment
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Engineering Technology Career Biomanufacturing Technology Civil Technology Electro-Mechanical Technology Electronics Technology Environmental Technology Manufacturing Technology Mechanical Technology Structural Technology Engineering Transfer Engineering Science Environmental Science Technology Education

77
78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 88 89 90 90 91 91 92 92 93 93

49
50 51 52 54 55 55

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Art Fine Arts Graphic Design Web Design Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

Computer Information Systems
Business Information Systems (A & NB) Computer Networking Computer Programming Computer Science (transfer) Game Development Game Creation Game Programming Information Systems (transfer) Multimedia and Internet (A) Security Webmaster

Criminal Justice (A & NB) 120 Culinary Arts Baking & Pastry 122 Culinary Arts 124 Deaf Studies (transfer) 126 Deaf Studies C-Print™ option 127 Early Childhood option 128 Human Services option 129 Deaf Studies Interpreter (transfer) 130 Early Childhood Education (NB) 132 Early Childhood Education (transfer) (A & NB) 134 Elementary Education (transfer) (A & NB) 136 Fire Science Technology (A & NB) 137 Human Services (NB) 138

57
58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 68 69 69 70 70 71 71 72 72 73 73 74 74 75

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Deaf Studies Prep (A) Deaf Studies Professional Early Childhood Education (NB) Fire Investigation Specialist Fire Prevention Specialist Funeral Service Preparatory Human Services (NB) Infant/Toddler Instructional Paraprofessional Law Enforcement Thanatology

DEGREE PROGRAMS

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

OTHER INFORMATION

Liberal Arts and Sciences electives Cultural Diversity electives

Business
DEGREE PROGRAMS

31
32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 43 44 44

Business Administration Career Options: Accounting Entrepreneurship Financial Services Banking Financial Management Real Estate and Insurance General Management (A & NB) Leisure Services Management Sport Tourism & Hospitality Marketing Management (A) Retail Management Business Administration (A & NB) (transfer)

Applied Construction Technology Applied Manufacturing Biotechnology Computer Aided Design and Drafting Foundations of Technical Careers Geographic Information Systems Surveying Water Quality Professional

Health Sciences
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Clinical Laboratory Science Complementary Healthcare Dental Hygiene Healthcare Information Nursing Occupational Therapy Assistant

95
96 98 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 112 113 114 115 116

139 139 140 141 141 142 142 143 144 144 145

Office Administration
DEGREE PROGRAMS

147

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Accounting e-commerce Fashion Merchandising International Business

A+ Certification Basic Web Page Development (A) Computer Game Development Computer Programming Desktop Publishing Technology (A & NB) Fundamental Computer Skills (NB) Help Desk Software Support Information Technology Fluency Information Technology Teaching JAVA Master JAVA Programmer Multimedia Development (A) NetworkTech Novell Network Administration Open Source

Office Administration Executive Administrative Assistant 148 Legal Administrative Assistant 149 Medical Administrative Assistant 150

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Histology Medical Assisting Medical Administrative Practices (NB) Medical Coding Medical Transcription Phlebotomy Pre-Radiology Technology Therapeutic Massage

Administrative Assistant C-Print™ Captioning Foundations of C-Print™ Legal Office Assistant Office Support (NB) Office Technology Management (A)

151 151 152 152 153 153

Instructors are great – they really help you learn. It is amazing how much I know.
Renee Fernandes ‘05 Nursing

Arts and Sciences
Why choose Arts and Sciences?
These degree programs offer the challenge and rigor of the liberal arts and sciences to prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities. Students can choose general preparation through the Liberal Arts and Sciences degree or more specialized professional preparation in Art, Communication, and Theatre. Courses taken in these programs are accepted at most baccalaureate institutions as equivalent to the first two years of a bachelor’s degree. Many four-year colleges offer special scholarships for community college graduates and transfer students. Many programs are eligible for the Massachusetts Joint Admissions program. See information for each program. Certificate programs offer skill development and the opportunity to test an area of interest.

DEGREES
Animation & Motion Graphics Art/Fine Arts Communication General Studies Health Sciences Graphic Design Liberal Arts & Sciences Humanities Math & Science Professional Theatre Artistic Technical Web Design & Media Arts 25 26 27 21 22 23 12 14 16 17 18 20

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Art Fine Arts Graphic Design Web Design Portuguese/English Community Interpreting 28 28 29 29 30

OTHER INFORMATION
Liberal Art and Science electives Cultural Diversity electives 24 24

12
Arts & Sciences
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Art Transfer (Animation and Motion Graphics Concentration) Credits required: 65 Program director: Marisa Millard, Associate Professor of Graphic Design

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

ART

Animation & Motion Graphics
General Courses _____ ART 10 History of Art: Renaissance to Modern _____ ART 12 Survey of Modern Art _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics Modern College Mathematics _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Visual Art Colloquium Drawing I Drawing II Two Dimensional Design Two Dimensional Design II Three Dimensional Design II Computer Graphics Web Animation Digital Photography Graphic Design I Typography Design Careers in the Visual Arts Multimedia Design Character Animation Motion Graphics 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The program addresses the increased need for professionals in the design industry to work in interactive design. • Design courses use industry-standard software and hardware in a dedicated design computer lab. Students develop technical proficiency with the software to produce their creative projects. • Students develop a presentation-quality portfolio by graduation to showcase their conceptual problem-solving ability, communication design skills, and their grasp of the appropriate design technology. • Courses can also apply to the Graphic Design and Web Design certificates and programs. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Fall Semester 1: ART 09, ART 10, ART 13, ART 17, ART 39, ENG 11 Spring Semester 2: ART 12, ART 14, ART 26/30, ART 47, ART 52, ENG 12 Fall Semester 3: ART 27, ART 38, ART 40, ART 43, MTH 19/25, one program elective Spring Semester 4: ART 49/51, one Lab Science elective, one Behavioral/Social Sciences elective, 2 program electives Animation focus: ART 28, 36, 44, 48, 49, CED 11 Motion Graphics focus: MUS 17, ART 36, 48, 51, COM 59, CED 11

In this program students gain a foundation in design and drawing and develop skills in visual communication and interactive design with a focus on the creative process. In their second year, they choose electives to emphasize either an animation or motion graphics concentration.

Studio Foundation _____ ART 09 _____ ART 13 _____ ART 14 _____ ART 17 _____ ART 26 or 30 _____ ART 39 _____ ART 47 _____ ART 52 Advanced Studio _____ ART 27 _____ ART 38 _____ ART 40 _____ ART 43 _____ ART 49 or 51

Hints for Success
Refer to Additional Information pg. 15 for scheduling guidance and speak to Marisa Millard, for help in selecting advanced program electives. Discuss scheduling of program-specific and general education courses with your advisor to ensure your timely completion.

After BCC

• Students can transfer to four-year B.F.A. programs in animation, new media, interactive design, motion graphics, broadcast design, or electronic imaging. • The program is designed for immediate entry into the job market if desired.

Program Electives Choose three of the following based on your choice of concentration: _____ ART 28 Introduction to Illustration 3 credits _____ ART 36 Electronic Imaging 3 credits _____ ART 44 Drawing III 3 credits _____ ART 48 Design Studio 3 credits _____ CED 11 Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits _____ COM 59 Video Field Production and Editing 3 credits _____ MUS 17 Sound Design for Multimedia 3 credits Choose ART course; must be _____ ELECTIVE approved by program coordinator) 3 credits

2007-2008

13

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

14
Arts & Sciences
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Art Transfer Credits required: 64 Program Director: Wade Kramm, Instructor

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

Art Transfer Option

Art/Fine Arts
This program provides a strong foundation in art to prepare students for transfer into senior institutions and a career in the visual arts. Students work within a structured curriculum that emphasizes visual perception, technical skills, and an artistic philosophy geared toward individual success. Following a common one-year foundation program, students choose advanced courses to focus on their individual goals and build a strong portfolio.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The Art program has approximately 100 students and 10 dedicated faculty of working artists and designers. • The program offers a strong individual support system for students. • Most studio art courses are offered only one semester per year and only during the day Art history courses, ART 13 and ART 39 are often offered throughout the year. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1 (Fall, first year): ART 09, ART 10, ART 13, ART 17, ART 18, ENG 11 Semester 2 (Spring, first year): ART 12, ART 14, ART 26, ART 30, ENG 12 Semester 3 (Fall, second year): ART 11, ART 40, ART 44, two advanced ART electives, MTH 19 or 25 Semester 4 (Spring, second year): CED 11, three advanced ART electives, one Lab science, one Behavioral/social science

General Courses _____ ART 10

History of Art: Renaissance to Modern _____ ART 11 History of Art: Ancient, Medieval & World Art _____ ART 12 Survey of Modern Art _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective
See page 192 for behavioral/social science and lab science electives choices: choose with program director or academic advisor.

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

Studio Foundation _____ ART 09 _____ ART 13 _____ ART 14 _____ ART 17 _____ ART 18 _____ ART 26 _____ ART 30 Advanced Studio

Visual Art Colloquium Drawing I Drawing II Two Dimensional Design Three Dimensional Design Two Dimensional Design II Three Dimensional Design II

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
After BCC
Use summer courses to lighten course load. Students should limit their outside job work load to 16 hours per week.

_____ ART 40 Careers in the Visual Arts 2 credits _____ ART 44 Drawing III 3 credits Choose five advanced studio electives from the following: _____ ART 19 _____ ART 20 _____ ART 22 _____ ART 23 _____ ART 28 _____ ART 31 _____ ART 32 _____ ART 33 _____ ART 39 _____ CED 11 Painting I Painting II Printmaking I Printmaking II Introduction to Illustration Sculpture Photography I Photography II Computer Graphics Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Required

• Students transfer to Massachusetts College of Art, Maryland Institute of Art, Minneapolis College of Art & Design, The California College of Arts and Crafts, Art Institute of Boston, UMass Dartmouth, and others. • BCC has transfer articulation agreements with the Art Institute of Boston, UMass Dartmouth, Roger Williams University and Bridgewater State College. • Graduates transfer to 4-year studio art programs such as painting, sculpture, printmaking, and photography, as well as art education and art history programs. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Students may also choose advanced studio electives from the Graphic Design advanced program courses listed on page 20.

2007-2008

15

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

Additional information

Sequencing: Students should plan to complete all Studio Foundation program courses before taking any of the Advanced Studio program courses. This course sequencing is important. Since all studio art courses build upon one another, the knowledge and technical skills gained through the Studio Foundation program courses will greatly improve a student’s chances of success in the Advanced Studio program courses. Scheduling restrictions: It is important for all art students to take ART 09 Visual Arts Colloquium in the fall semester of their first year (and ART 10 if possible), as well as ART 40 Careers in the Visual Arts and ART 44 Drawing III in the fall semester of their last year. Timely completion: Due to the heavy studio course load in the Art/Fine Arts, Graphic Design, and Web Design program options, as well as sequencing requirements and scheduling limitations, students should carefully follow the Recommended Course Sequence. Plan to take approximately three studio program courses every semester (9-11 credits) for full-time study, or approximately two studio art courses per semester for part-time study (6-8 credits) in addition to the general and elective course requirements. Consider taking General Education courses in the summer to help with the course load.

16
Arts & Sciences
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Communication Credits required: 62/63 Program director: Elizabeth R. Alcock, Assistant Professor of Communication

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

Communication
Students develop a critical understanding of the fundamentals of communication in theory and practice, learn to analyze and anticipate the role of communication in historic and contemporary society, develop specific skills, and prepare to transfer into a four-year college or university communication program.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The program introduces students to the fundamentals of human communication and offers an opportunity to explore mass communication and organizational communication. Students develop writing, speaking, analytical, and critical thinking skills appropriate for a broad range of communication professions. • Based on advising and assessment of individual needs and direction, students may select a cluster of communication-related courses and gain practical experience through field-based learning in an area related to mass communication or organizational communication. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Take ENG 11, SPH 11, ENG 12 and the two laboratory sciences first • Take COM 20 before COM 11 and 12. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: (Fall, first year): ENG 11, HST 11, COM 20, MTH 19 or 25, Behavioral/Social Science Elective Semester 2: (Spring, first year): ENG 12, HST 12, COM 11, SPH 11, Laboratory Science Semester 3: (Fall, second year): COM 40, COM 12, two Program Electives, Laboratory Science Semester 4: (Spring, second year): one COM elective, Program Electives, one Free Elective, and one Behavioral/Social Science

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ HST 11 West and the World I 3 credits 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Free Elective 3/4 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for 4 credit lab science elective courses: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective 4 credits Introduction to Communication

Program Courses _____ COM 20 _____ COM 11 _____ COM 12 _____ COM 40 Program Electives _____ ELECTIVE

(Take first before other COM)

Hints for Success
Participating in student media or Fall River Community Television located on the Fall River campus helps students develop skills and explore career choices.

Mass Communication News Writing and Reporting Organizational Communication

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

After BCC

• Graduates may continue their education at a four-year institution or pursue a position in the communication field after BCC. • BCC has articulation agreements with Bridgewater State College, Bryant University, and Roger Williams University. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

(Choose from COM 41, 42, 57, 59 or [COM 51 or CED 11]) 3 credits Choose 3 electives, according to transfer requirements or career goal, from among COM 41, 42, 57, 59, (COM 51 or CED 11), ART 50, CIS 10, 11, ECN 11, 12, ENG 30, (MAR 11 or 55), SPH, THE 16, 21. COM 60 (1 credit) is an optional program elective:

_____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

17
TRANSFER PROGRAM

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting
Degree offered: Associate in Arts or Associate in Science in General Studies Credits required: 60 Program Director: Albert D. Roy, Jr., Professor of Mathematics

General Studies
General Studies allows students to tailor their own program with the help of an academic advisor.

Program Requirements _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Science _____ ELECTIVE(S) (Choose 3-4 credits from MTH,

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The General Studies program is ideal for students who want to explore various fields of study and/or career options or have goals that cannot be met in any other program of the College. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. • Students interested in Health Sciences should choose the General Studies Health Sciences option (next page). RECOMMENDED SEQUENCE • Ordinarily, students should complete the required 24 credits as early as possible. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS • All electives should be approved by the student’s advisor. • Students may choose Cooperative Education as an elective (CED) • Students who plan to transfer should refer to the Transfer Compact on page 153.

except MTH 01, 1N, 4N, 07, 08) 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective 3 credits Select 34-36 credits of college-level courses to achieve a total of at least 60 credits. Consult an academic advisor to choose _____ ELECTIVE(S) 34/36 credits

Hints for Success
All electives must be approved by the student’s advisor.

After BCC

• General Studies graduates have entered a broad range of careers including: medical records supervisor, executive secretary, cook, police officer, corrections officer, program coordinator, secretary, and receptionist. • Many students transfer to state and private colleges and universities under the Transfer Compact and other articulation agreements.

18
Arts & Sciences
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in General Studies (Health Sciences Option) Credits required: 60/62 Program director: Albert D. Roy, Professor of Mathematics

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

HEALTH SCIENCES

General Studies
General Courses _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Choose 3-9 credits: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ PSY 51 General Psychology 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students may elect any course for which prerequisites are met. • Take required developmental courses as early in your college career as possible. • Students interested in transferring to a four-year college or university should select the Liberal Arts program. • Students planning to major in Medical Transcription or Medical Administrative Assistant should take MAA 70.

This program is designed to help prepare students for application to the College’s Health Sciences programs. It does not guarantee admission to any program but does guide students in choosing courses that provide sound preparation for admission to those programs.

Hints for Success
Consult with your advisor to select electives that meet your goals. Take CSS 11 during your first semester.

After BCC

• Many successful Health Science graduates began their college careers in the College’s General Studies or Liberal Arts programs. Admission to Health Sciences is competitive, but this program provides students a structured way to complete the necessary courses to make themselves more competitive candidates. Refer to the program description for the program of interest elsewhere in the catalog for Admissions standards.

Program Courses _____ CSS 11 College Success Seminar 1 credit Choose 2-3 credits: (For programs in which HCI 13, HLT 13, or HLT 15 are required, MAA 70 does not substitute for them.) _____ HCI 13 or Medical Language 3 credits _____ HLT 13 and Medical Language Module I 1 credit _____ HLT 15 or Medical Language Module II 1 credit _____ MAA 70 Medical Terminology 3 credits Program Electives (21-24 credits) Choose from college-level courses on the next page to earn a total of 60/62 credits.

2007-2008

19
Recommendations for selecting electives

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

Program Electives - Choose 21-24 credits

Select electives with a program advisor to tailor your program to meet your goals. Be sure to tell your advisor if you plan to apply for internal transfer into a BCC Health Sciences program. Students may select any course for which the prerequisite is met. All electives should be approved by the student’s advisor. DHG, MED, all OTA except OTA 11, PLB, MAS, MAT, NUR, RAD, and most HCI courses are restricted to students in these programs.
Work-Based Learning Electives ____CED 11 Cooperative Work Experience I ____CED 12 Cooperative Work Experience II Humanities Electives ____HUM 72 Coping with Life and Death ____PHL 52 Ethics: Making Ethical Decisions in a Modern World ____SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech ____SPH 60 Intercultural Communication Behavioral/Social Science Elective ____SOC 11 Principles of Sociology 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

The General Studies Health Sciences option offers students a chance to prepare for selected career programs. By following the recommendations listed for electives, students develop necessary knowledge and take career courses early in their academic careers. General education and science elective recommendations are grouped below by the Health Science program in which they are required. If you are interested in that program, choose the indicated courses as part of your elective coursework. Consult with your advisor before selecting, as some courses have prerequisites.
Clinical Lab Science ____BIO 39 ____BIO 54 Elements of Microbiology Human Physiology 4 credits 4 credits

Complementary Healthcare ____BIO 17 Physiology of Wellness Dental Hygiene ____BIO 20 ____BIO 39 ____CHM 15 ____CHM 16 ____SOC ____SPH 11 Nursing ____BIO 39 ____PSY 52 ____PSY 55 Medical Assisting ____BIO 15

3 credits

Science Electives (choose with advisor based on the potential program of interest) ____BIO 15 Survey of Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 credits ____BIO 17 Physiology of Wellness 3 credits ____BIO 20 Introduction to Nutrition 3 credits ____BIO 21 Fundamentals of Biological Science I 4 credits ____BIO 39 Elements of Microbiology 4 credits ____BIO 54 Human Physiology 4 credits ____CHM 11 General College Chemistry I 4 credits ____CHM 12 General College Chemistry II 4 credits ____CHM 15 Inorganic Chemistry and Introduction to Organic Chemistry 4 credits ____CHM 16 Organic and Biochemistry 4 credits Students who intend to transfer to another college or university should select the Liberal Arts Transfer program. Completion of this program option does not imply or guarantee acceptance into any of Bristol Community College’s health career programs.

Introduction to Nutrition 3 credits Elements of Microbiology 4 credits Inorganic Chemistry and Introduction to Organic Chemistry 4 credits Organic and Biochemistry 4 credits Elective 3 credits Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits

Elements of Microbiology Child Development Abnormal Psychology

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Survey of Anatomy and Physiology

4 credits

20
Arts & Sciences

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Art Transfer (Graphic Design Concentration) Credits required: 64 Program director: Marisa Millard, Assistant Professor of Art PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program offers small classes and individual attention, with a dedicated faculty of working graphic designers and artists. • Students develop their creative and technical potential while building a strong portfolio for use in transferring or towards the job market. • Graphic design classes use industry-standard software and hardware in a dedicated design computer lab. RECOMMENDATIONS • Limit outside commitments as much as possible because this program requires a substantial time commitment. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1 (Fall, first year): ART 09, ART 10, ART 13, ART 17, ART 18, ENG 11 Semester 2 (Spring, first year): ART 12, ART 14, ART 26, ART 39, ENG 12 Semester 3 (Fall, second year): ART 11, ART 27, ART 40, ART 44, MTH 19/25, one program elective (ART 38, ART 32 or CED 11) Semester 4 (Spring, second year): ART 37, ART 42, one program elective (choose from ART 28, ART 32, ART 36, ART 48 or CED 11), one Lab science elective, one Behavioral/Social Science elective

Graphic Design
This program provides a strong foundation in drawing and design, preparing students for transfer into a senior institution and a career in graphic design, Web and multimedia design, advertising design, and electronic imaging. Students utilize traditional media and computer graphics within a structured curriculum. Studio courses emphasize visual perception, creative thinking, aesthetics, technical skills, and exploration of the design process.

General Courses _____ ART 10

History of Art: Renaissance to Modern _____ ART 11 History of Art: Ancient, Medieval & World Art _____ ART 12 Survey of Modern Art _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Elective Courses See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Studio Foundation _____ ART 09 _____ ART 13 _____ ART 14 _____ ART 17 _____ ART 18 _____ ART 26 _____ ART 39 Advanced Studio _____ ART 27 _____ ART 37 _____ ART 40 _____ ART 42 _____ ART 44 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE Visual Art Colloquium Drawing I Drawing II Two Dimensional Design Three Dimensional Design Two Dimensional Design II Computer Graphics Graphic Design I Graphic Design II Careers in the Visual Arts Publication Design Drawing III
(Choose from ART 32, 38, or CED 11) (Choose from ART 28, 32, 36, 48, or CED 11)

3 credits 4 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
Refer to Additional Information pg. 15 for scheduling guidance and speak to Marisa Millard, for help in selecting advanced program electives.

After BCC

• Recent graduates have transferred to Massachusetts College of Art, Minneapolis College of Art & Design, Art Institute of Boston, UMass Dartmouth and others. • Graduates qualify for Joint Admissions. BCC has articulation agreements with UMass Dartmouth and The Art Institute of Boston. • Graduates transfer to 4-year studio art programs in graphic design, electronic imaging, communication design, web design, multimedia design, media arts, animation and illustration, as well as art education programs.

2007-2008

21
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities Concentration) Credits required: 60 Program director: Deborah Lawton, Associate Professor of English

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

HUMANITIES OPTION

Students receive a solid introduction to liberal arts and sciences to prepare for transfer to a four-year institution. Select the Humanities option if you plan to transfer to a bachelor of arts program in anthropology, economics, English, foreign language, history, humanities, multidisciplinary studies, philosophy, political science, psychology, sociology, or other general education majors.

Liberal Arts & Sciences
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 _____ ENG _____ ENG _____ MTH
(Choose from MTH 10, 19, 25 or higher) 3 credits Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits Choose foreign language courses, if needed, from the list on page 24: _____ Foreign Language - Level 12 0/12 credits (Requirement: completion of a foreign language at the 12 level at BCC or 4 years of a foreign language at the high school level with a “B” average or better)

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature English 50 level elective English 50 level elective Mathematics

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many students begin their Bachelor of Arts degree at BCC as a cost-effective way to finance their college education. Graduates transferring to public institutions fulfill the Commonwealth Transfer Compact. • Academic and transfer advisors assist students in selecting courses to fulfill program requirements and general education requirements at senior institutions to ensure a smooth transfer • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. CHOOSING ELECTIVES • Select electives from the approved list of Liberal Arts and Sciences electives and Cultural Diversity electives • Not all courses that fulfill the Cultural Diversity requirement are offered every semester. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HST 11 or 13, foreign language, math, behavioral/social science Semester 2: ENG 12, HST 12 or 14, foreign language, humanities, behavioral/social science Semester 3: ENG 50+, lab science, foreign language, humanities, behavioral/social science Semester 4: ENG 50+, lab science, foreign language, humanities, elective (One of these courses must be a cultural diversity course.)

Choose one course from the Cultural Diversity Electives on page 24: _____ ELECTIVE Cultural Diversity 0/3 credits Choose three courses from the Behavioral & Social Science electives on page 24. No more than 6 credits may be taken in one area. Consider using a cultural diversity course with a Behavioral & Social Science designation to satisfy one of these requirements: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits Choose three courses from the Humanities electives on page 24. Consider using a cultural diversity course with a Humanities designation to satisfy one of these requirements: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Humanities 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Humanities 3 credits Choose two courses from the Science electives on page 24. The two semesters need not be in the same subject: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science 4 credits Program Electives Choose electives as needed from any of the lists of approved courses on page 24. Select electives to meet the general education and program guidelines of the desired transfer school(s): _____ ELECTIVE(S) 1/13 credits
(Jointly satisfies a Behavioral & Social Science or Humanities requirement, or is an additional course.)

Hints for Success
If proficiency in a foreign language is established by academic or other prior experience, a student may not receive additional program credit for a course in the same language at the same level.

After BCC

• Recent graduates have transferred to Massachusetts state colleges and the University of Massachusetts as well as a variety of private colleges. • BCC has articulation agreements with Roger Williams University and Capella University.

22
Arts & Sciences
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts & Sciences (Math and Science Concentration) Credits required: 60 Program director: Deborah Lawton, Associate Professor of English

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

MATH AND SCIENCE OPTION

Liberal Arts & Sciences
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits MTH 10 or MTH 13 or MTH 14 or MTH 15 (choose two): _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits _____ MTH 15 Calculus II 4 credits Choose appropriate Math and Science electives. Work closely with an advisor to determine which courses are most useful to your career/ transfer goals, e.g., MTH 14, 15, 53, 54 or 2 semesters of lab science: _____ ELECTIVE Restricted 8 credits Choose one course from the Cultural Diversity Electives on page 24: _____ ELECTIVE Cultural Diversity 0/3 credits Choose one course from the Humanities electives on page 24. Consider using a cultural diversity course with a Humanities designation to satisfy this requirement: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities 3 credits Choose three courses from the Behavioral & Social Science electives on page 24. No more than 6 credits may be taken in one area. Consider using a cultural diversity course with a Behavioral & Social Science designation to satisfy one of these requirements: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits Choose two courses from the Science electives on page 24. The two semesters need not be in the same subject: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science 4 credits Program Electives Choose electives as needed from any of the lists of approved courses on page 24. Select electives to meet the general education and program guidelines of the desired transfer school(s): _____ ELECTIVE(S) 12/15 credits
(Jointly satisfies a Behavioral & Social Science or Humanities requirement, or is an additional course.)

Students receive a solid introduction to liberal arts and sciences to prepare for transfer to a four-year institution. Select the Math and Sciences option if you plan to transfer to earn a Bachelor of Science in biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, medicine, or physics.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many students begin their Bachelor of Arts degree at BCC as a cost-effective way to finance their college education. Graduates transferring to public institutions fulfill the Commonwealth Transfer Compact. • Academic and transfer advisors assist students in selecting courses to fulfill program requirements and general education requirements at senior institutions to ensure a smooth transfer. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Take RDG 09 or RDG 10 in the first semester if required and meet prerequisites for English and math courses as soon as possible. See course descriptions for details. • Lab science courses may also require a year of high school lab science or CHM 10 as a prerequisite. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HST 11 or 13, lab science, behavioral/social science, math Semester 2: ENG 12, HST 12 or 14, lab science, humanities, math Semester 3: Behavioral/social science, two math/science electives, elective Semester 4: Behavioral/social science, 3-4 electives tailored to goals (One of these courses must be a cultural diversity course.)

Hints for Success
Consider choosing Cultural Diversity courses to meet Humanities and Social Sciences requirements.

After BCC

• Students transfer to prepare for a variety of professions and careers from computer science to biology. • Recent graduates have transferred to Massachusetts state colleges and the University of Massachusetts as well as to a variety of private colleges. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Roger Williams University.

2007-2008

23
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts & Sciences (Professional Concentration) Credits required: 60 Program director: Deborah Lawton, Associate Professor of English

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

PROFESSIONAL OPTION

Liberal Arts & Sciences
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 _____ MTH
(Choose from MTH 10, 19, 25 or higher) 3 credits Choose one 2-course History sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits Choose foreign language courses, if needed, from the list on page 24: _____ Foreign Language - Level 02 0/6 credits (Requirement: completion of a foreign language at the 02 level at BCC or 3 years of a foreign language at the high school level with a “C” average or better)

Students receive a solid introduction to liberal arts and sciences to prepare for transfer to a four-year institution. Select the Professional option if you plan a career in health and service, journalism, library science, or other professional fields. This option allows you to choose elective courses to customize a program of study.

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature Mathematics

3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many students begin their Bachelor of Arts degree at BCC as a cost-effective way to finance their college education. Graduates transferring to public institutions fulfill the Commonwealth Transfer Compact. • Academic and transfer advisors assist students in selecting courses to fulfill program requirements and general education requirements at senior institutions to ensure a smooth transfer. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. CHOOSING ELECTIVES • Select electives from the approved list of Liberal Arts and Sciences electives and Cultural Diversity electives. • Cultural Diversity courses also meet Humanities or Behavioral and Social Science requirements. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HST 11 or 13, foreign language, math, behavioral/social science Semester 2: ENG 12, HST 12 or 14, foreign language, humanities, elective Semester 3: Lab science, behavioral/social science, 3 electives Semester 4: Lab science, behavioral/social science, 2-3 electives (One of these courses must be a cultural diversity course.)

Choose one course from the Cultural Diversity Electives on page 24: _____ ELECTIVE Cultural Diversity Choose one course from the Humanities electives on page 24. Consider using a cultural diversity course with a Humanities designation to satisfy this requirement: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities 3 credits Choose three courses from the Behavioral & Social Science electives on page 24. No more than 6 credits may be taken in one area. Consider using a cultural diversity course with a Behavioral & Social Science designation to satisfy one of these requirements: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits Choose two courses from the Science electives on page 24. The two semesters need not be in the same subject: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science 4 credits Program Electives Choose electives as needed from any of the lists of approved courses on page 24. Select electives to meet the general education and program guidelines of the desired transfer school(s): _____ ELECTIVE(S) 19/25 credits
(Jointly satisfies a Behavioral & Social Science or Humanities requirement, or is an additional course.)

Hints for Success
If proficiency in a foreign language is established by academic or other prior experience, a student may not receive additional program credit for a course in the same language at the same level.

After BCC

• Students transfer to prepare for a variety of professions from nursing to education. • Recent graduates have transferred to Massachusetts state colleges and the University of Massachusetts as well as a variety of private colleges. • BCC has articulation agreements with Roger Williams University and Capella University.

24

Liberal Arts & Sciences Electives
Choose electives from this list. Note: A cultural diversity course may also satisfy one of the program requirements for a humanities or social science elective. Behavioral and Social Science Electives AMC 11, 12 ANT 11 All ECN All GVT All PSY All SSC All SOC Cultural Diversity Electives (not all courses are offered
every semester)

Science Electives AST 11, 12 All BIO All CHM except CHM10 GLG 16 All PHY All SCI except 16, 30, 31, 32 General Electives Students may also choose from other categories of electives. ACC 11, 12 All AMS except AMS 81 (AMS 01, 02 were formerly ASL 11, 12) ANT 11 BUS 51, 53, 55 CAD 15, 18 CSS 13 CED 11, 12 (work-based training) All COM except COM 51 CRJ 11,13, 18, 19, 21 51, 58 CIS 10, 11, 12, 51, 58, 59, 60, 62 All DAN DST 11 ENG 14, 15 ETK 13 ESL 22, 23, 24, 25 ENV 11 All FRN beyond option requirement except 81 HLT 11,51 SER 11 MAN 11 MAR 11,55 All MTH above 08 except MTH 11 All POR beyond option requirement except 10 and 81 All SPA beyond option requirement except 81

A cultural diversity course may also satisfy a humanities or social science elective requirement. See designations below. Humanities designation DST 11 ENG 17, 50, 57, 59, 61, 63 and 64 HST 52, 57, 59, 61, and 65 HUM 52 and 54 RDG 12 SPH 60 Behavioral/Social Science designation GVT 12 PSY 61, 63, and 68 SSC 14 SOC 56 and 61 Humanities Electives All ART DST 11 ENG 17 or above All HUM All MUS All PHL All THE All SPH All HST (beyond 6 credit requirement) Foreign language at the 51-52 level

Foreign Language Proficiency Electives
(for Humanities and Professional Options)

AMS 01, 02, 11, 12 FRN 01, 02, 11, 12 POR 01, 02, 11, 12 SPA 01, 02, 11, 12

2007-2008

25

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

ARTISTIC OPTION

TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts & Sciences (Artistic Theatre Concentration) Credits required: 60 Program director: Rylan Brenner, Professor of Theatre/English

Theatre
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ ENG 58 Shakespeare _____ HST 11 West and the World I _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Core Courses _____ THE 11 _____ THE 15 _____ THE 17 _____ THE 18 _____ THE 24 Introduction to the Theatre Director’s Workshop Theatre History -The Early Years Theatre History -The Modern Years Script Analysis 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits

This Theatre option offers conservatory-like theatre training that has enabled graduates to transfer successfully to nationally recognized programs. Students receive an intense immersion in the demanding art of theatre, as well as a solid liberal arts base for transfer. Students primarily interested in design and technical theatre should choose the Technical Option.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students experience hands-on training in state-of-the-art facilities. • The program enjoys a strong reputation nationally, which helps ease transfer to four-year institutions. • BCC THEATRE REP, the College’s resident acting company, offers ample opportunities for developing stage craft. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Plan to give time to learn your craft. Developing theatre skills is demanding. You will be an active part of your education. Plan your studies to include extracurricular involvement in theatre work. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HST 11, THE 11, THE 12, MTH 19 or 25 Semester 2: ENG 12, HST 12, THE 24, THE 13, Behavioral/Social Science Semester 3: THE 17, THE 22, THE 14, ENG 58, THE 21 Semester 4: THE 18, THE 15, THE 23, Lab Science

Hints for Success
All theatre courses may be taken without prerequisites. It may help some students to take an acting course in conjunction with Rehearsal and Performance (THE 22/23).

Concentration Courses _____ THE 12 Actors’ Workshop _____ THE 13 Scene Study _____ THE 14 Playwriting _____ THE 21 Voice Production _____ THE 22 Theatre Rehearsal and Performance (Fall) _____ THE 23 Theatre Rehearsal and Performance (Spring)

After BCC

• Alumni have worked in all aspects of theatre performance and administration locally and nationally. • Many students have continued their studies in theatre at Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, Hofstra University, Long Island University, Marymount Manhattan College, Emerson College, University of Southern California, Goddard College, Boston University, Rhode Island College, University of Rhode Island, Bridgewater State College, North Carolina School of Arts, and others. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Roger Williams University and Bridgewater State College.

26
Arts & Sciences
TRANSFER PROGRAM Liberal Arts & Sciences concentration

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

TECHNICAL OPTION

Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences (Technical Theatre Concentration) Credits required: 60 Program director: Rylan Brenner, Professor of Theatre/English PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students gain strong practical and theoretical theatre training supported by a foundation in the liberal arts and sciences. • The conservatory-like environment immerses students in hands-on theatre work and provides a strong base for transfer to four-year institutions. RECOMMENDATIONS • Plan to give time to learn your craft. Developing theatre skills is demanding. You will be an active part of your education. Plan your studies to include extracurricular involvement in theatre work. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HST 11, THE 11, THE 27, MTH 19 or 25 Semester 2: ENG 12, HST 12, THE 24, THE 28, Behavioral/Social Science Semester 3: THE 17, THE 32, THE 26, ENG 58, THE 20 Semester 4: THE 18, THE 33, THE 15, Lab Science

Theatre
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ ENG 58 Shakespeare _____ HST 11 West and the World I _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Introduction to the Theatre Director’s Workshop Theatre History -The Early Years Theatre History -The Modern Years Script Analysis 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits

This Theatre option offers preparation and skills training in technical areas of theatre, including costume, lighting, sound, scenic design and construction, stage management, and directing. Students primarily interested in acting, performance work, and playwriting should choose the Artistic Theatre Option.

Core Courses _____ THE 11 _____ THE 15 _____ THE 17 _____ THE 18 _____ THE 24

Hints for Success
Participating in the production opportunities offered by BCC THEATRE REP, the on-campus theatre company, provides a wide range of practical experience in technical theatre.

After BCC

• Theatre students have continued their education at various transfer institutions, including New York University, Emerson College, Boston University, Marymount Manhattan College, Roger Williams University, U.C.L.A., Bridgewater State College, North Carolina School of Arts, Rhode Island College, U. Mass. – Boston and others. They have performed and worked in a variety of national and regional theater groups in New York, Europe, Boston, and on tour. Several students have gone on to create their own theatre companies in Colorado, New England and New York City.

Concentration Courses _____ THE 20 Costume Design _____ THE 26 Sound Design and Production _____ THE 27 Scenic Design _____ THE 28 Lighting Design _____ THE 32 Theater Production (Fall) _____ THE 33 Theatre Production (Spring)

2007-2008

27
CAREER PROGRAM

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Art Transfer (Web Design & Media Arts Concentration) Credits required: 64 Program director: Marisa Millard, Assistant Professor of Art

Web Design & Media Arts
This program provides students with the necessary foundation to enter the job market for careers in Web design, Web animation, multimedia design, and media arts, or to transfer to a 4-year BFA program in these fields. Course work emphasizes the creative process. Students develop a professionallevel graphic design portfolio showcasing their visual communication skills as well as their grasp of industry-standard design technology.

General Courses _____ ART 10

History of Art: Renaissance to Modern _____ ART 11 History of Art: Ancient, Medieval & World Art _____ CIS 44 Internet Developer _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamentals Statistics or Modern College Mathematics See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Visual Art Colloquium Drawing I Drawing II Two Dimensional Design Two Dimensional Design II Web Design I Computer Graphics Graphic Design I Careers in the Visual Arts Web Design II Advanced Web Design Studio Art or other approved elective Art Elective

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program offers small classes with a dedicated faculty of working graphic designers and artists. • This program is appropriate for students who cannot commit to a 4-year program at this time although courses are also transferable to a 4-year program for Web design. • Graphic design classes use industrystandard software and hardware in a dedicated design computer lab. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1 (Fall, first year): ART 09, ART 13, ART 17, ART 39, ENG 11, CIS 44 Semester 2 (Spring, first year): ART 12, ART 14, ART 26, ART 35, ENG 12 Semester 3 (Fall, second year): ART 10, ART 40, ART 45, ART 27, MTH 19/25, one program elective (choose from ART 32, ART 38, ART 44, CED 11 or CIS elective) Semester 4 (Spring, second year): ART 46, Choose two program electives from ART 28, ART 36, ART 37, ART 42, ART 43, ART 47 or ART 48), one Lab science elective, one Behavioral/Social Science

Related Information
See pg. 15 for additional information about course scheduling and sequencing Related programs: Students planning to transfer to a 4-year program should consider the Graphic Design transfer program, pg. 20. Also, see the Web Design certificate, pg. 29.

Studio Foundation _____ ART 09 _____ ART 13 _____ ART 14 _____ ART 17 _____ ART 26 _____ ART 35 _____ ART 39 Advanced Studio _____ ART 27 _____ ART 40 _____ ART 45 _____ ART 46 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE

After BCC

Choose from ART 32, 44, or CED 11, or CIS 3 credits Choose from ART 28, 36, 37, 42, 43, 47, 48 Choose from ART 28, 36, 37, 42, 43, 47, 48

Art Elective

• Students develop a professional-quality portfolio reflecting drawing, image-creation, type design and layout, conceptual problem-solving ability, and mastery of industry-standard graphics software and peripherals. • This program satisfies a need in the workplace for applicants with a firm grounding both in communication design and art, and in current design technology

28
Arts & Sciences
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT
Art
Credits required: 27 Program director: Ron Lister, Professor of Art

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

Art
The Art Certificate is an intensive investigation into the student’s choice of applied art. Students design their own program to increase their knowledge of the arts and their competency and skill in various mediums and methods and to make their leisure time more enjoyable.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The program is small and taught by working artists. • Students may transfer courses into the Art Transfer degree program. • Students should follow the same sequence of all studio arts courses as recommended for the Art Transfer program.

Course Requirements With the help of an advisor, students choose 27 credits of ART courses. See the course descriptions for more information.

RECOMMENDATIONS • Students are recommended to confine outside work to no more than 15 hours per week. Students are also encouraged to keep Wednesday evenings free to participate in open studios.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT
Fine Arts
Credits required: 27 Program director: Ron Lister, Professor of Art

Fine Arts
This program offers students an introduction to the fine arts. Students can explore art, music, theatre, dance, and English, and additional electives in literature, the humanities and history. All courses transfer into a degree program.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students may transfer courses into a degree program at BCC or at another institution. • Consult with the program coordinator to design a program that meets your needs, interest, and background. RECOMMENDATIONS • If enrolled part time, take ENG 11, an ART elective, MUS elective, and THE elective first.

Program Courses _____ ELECTIVE Theatre elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Art elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Music elective 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 83 Creative Writing Seminar 3 credits To complete required program credits, students select four electives appropriate to their interests and background with the approval of an advisor. Refer to Art, Dance, English, Music, and Theater course descriptions
for possibilities:

_____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE

Elective Elective Elective Elective

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

29
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Certificates: Arts • Fine Arts • Graphic Design • Web Design • Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

Graphic Design
This certificate prepares students for careers in graphic design, including advertising, print, Web, and multimedia design. This certificate is particularly suited for those with a background in art or design who want to update skills.

Graphic Design

Credits required: 27 Program director: Marisa Millard, Assistant Professor of Art

Program Courses _____ ART 13

(Note: students with satisfactory drawing portfolio may take ART 28 instead of ART 13, with permission of director.)

Drawing I

3 credits

_____ ART 27 Graphic Design I 3 credits _____ ART 37 Graphic Design II 3 credits _____ ART 38 Typography Design 3 credits _____ ART 39 Computer Graphics 3 credits _____ ART 42 Publication Design 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Choose two electives from ART 35, ART 36, ART 43, ART 48: _____ ELECTIVE Graphic Design Elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Graphic Design Elective 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students use the state-of-the-art Design Macintosh lab and industry-standard graphic software and peripherals. • Students gain a firm foundation in the creative process and use of visual language for communication and develop a professional-quality portfolio RELATED PROGRAMS • Graphic Design transfer program, Web Design & Media Arts career program AFTER BCC • Graduates work in graphic design firms, advertising agencies, publishing houses, and in Web design and in-house design departments of companies.

Web Design
This certificate prepares students to respond to the needs of the new media design industries, specifically the Web design specialization. Students receive a firm grounding in the basics of design and current design technology, with a strong emphasis on visual communications and design skills.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM Web Design

Credits required: 27 Program director: Marisa Millard, Assistant Professor of Art

Program Courses _____ ART 27 _____ ART 35 _____ ART 37 _____ ART 39 _____ ART 42 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ENG 11

Choose from ART 45, 46, or 47 Choose from CED 11, ART 14, 36, 48 Choose from CED 11, ART 38, 43, CIS 45

Graphic Design I Web Design I Graphic Design II Computer Graphics Publication Design Art Elective

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program is intended to help students enter the job market directly into careers in multimedia design, Web design, and Web animation. • Courses in this program transfer into the Associate in Art program in Web Design & Media Arts career option and Graphic Design option.

Art or other approved elective Art or other approved elective

Composition I: College Writing

30
Arts & Sciences
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM Portuguese/English Community Interpreting

2007-2008

Degrees: Animation & Motion Graphics option • Arts/Fine Arts • Communication • General Studies • General Studies (Health Sciences option) • Graphic Design option • Liberal Arts & Sciences (Humanities, Math and Science, Professional), • Theatre (Artistic, Technical) • Web Design & Media Arts

Credits required: 27 Program director: José F. Costa, Professor of Portuguese

Portuguese/English Community Interpreting
This certificate prepares bilingual students to work as interpreters in a variety of community settings. Students develop specialized vocabulary and communication skills and learn the standards and practices of professional interpreters and translators.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS • Interpreters are required to demonstrate written and oral fluency in both English and Portuguese. • Passing score on the written and oral Portuguese exam and passing grade in ENG 11 are prerequisites to LUS 51. • Students with prior experience as interpreters should consult with the Program Director or PEL Coordinator to discuss Prior Experiential Learning (PEL) credits. PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students with a Bachelor’s degree can prepare to take the Office of Court Interpreter Services (OCIS) certification exam. • The program follows Massachusetts Medical Interpreters Association (MMIA) guidelines.

Program Courses _____ LUS 51 _____ LUS 52 _____ LUS 53 _____ LUS 54 _____ LUS 90 _____ POR 21 _____ POR 50 _____ SPH 60 _____ CRJ 11 or CRJ 13 or MAA 70

Fundamentals of Interpreting and Translating Portuguese Written and Sight Translation for English and Portuguese Interpreting I (Portuguese to English) Interpreting II (English to Portuguese) Fieldwork in Interpreting Portuguese for Interpreters The Portuguese Language in the World: An Introduction to the Lusofonia Intercultural Communication Introduction to Criminal Justice or Criminal Law or Medical Terminology

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Program requirements
Health Requirement: Students enrolled in the program must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, and other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Health.

Criminal Offender Record Information (C.O.R.I.)
Students may be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Investigation) check to identify any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from being assigned to a fieldwork agency that requires such a check.

Fieldwork
Students should make necessary arrangements in order to be available for specific schedule requirements by fieldwork agencies. Students must carry personal health insurance and liability insurance when required. Students must provide their own transportation to fieldwork agencies.

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Business Administration Career Options: Accounting Entrepreneurship Financial Services Banking Financial Management Real Estate and Insurance General Management Leisure Services Management Sport Tourism & Hospitality Marketing Management Retail Management Business Administration (transfer) 38 39 40 41 42 34 35 36 37 32 33

Business
Why choose Business?
Degree programs focus on the education and skills needed in today’s global business environment. Practical courses coupled with general education offerings enhance development of critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills, as well as adaptability and teamwork. The latest in technology and learning tools support your education for a wide range of employment opportunities. The career program prepares students to enter the work-force directly, while the transfer program is for students who plan on immediately earning a baccalaureate degree. Many career students continue on to obtain a baccalaureate degree. Certificate programs provide specific career skills development as well as the opportunity to test an area of interest or enhance a degree program. Students who complete a certificate program can continue to obtain a degree.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Accounting e-commerce Fashion Merchandising International Business Marketing Retail Management Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management Sport Management Tourism and Hospitality Services 43 43 44 44 45 45

46 46 47

32
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration option

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) Business Administration (transfer)

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration (Accounting Concentration) Credits required: 64/65 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • The faculty have years of practical experience that makes your education relevant to the workplace. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take BUS 11, ENG 11, and ACC 11 first to position themselves for the accounting course sequence in their second year. Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester, followed by BUS 11 and ENG 11. Take BUS 53 in spring, second year. • ACC 14 requirement can be satisfied by completing ACC 50.

Accounting
The Business Administration career program provides training in the critical thinking, problem- solving, and communication skills students need to compete in today‘s global business environment. In this option, students can focus on accounting and qualify for entry-level accounting positions. All the Business programs share common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

General Courses _____ CIS 11

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, MAN 11, ENG 11, AMC 11 or HST 11 Semester 2: ACC 12, MAR 11, ENG 12, ECN 11, AMC 12 or HST 12 Semester 3: CIS 11, ACC 51, Science elective, ACC 55, Choice of one: ACC 50, 53, 56, 57, 58, 59, one business elective Semester 4: BUS 51, SPH 11, ACC 52, Choice of two: ACC 50, 53, 56, 57, 58, 59, one business elective

Hints for Success
After BCC
Service-Learning gives students the opportunity to acquire knowledge in their chosen profession.

• Graduates work as junior staff accountants, bookkeepers, loan service representatives, tax preparation assistants, credit and collection associates, and junior financial analysts. • The program is designed for students who plan to enter the workforce immediately after graduation. BCC has a transfer articulation agreement with Johnson & Wales University. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II 4 credits _____ ACC 14 Introduction to QuickBooks Pro 1 credit _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ BUS 51 Business Law 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications 1 credit Concentration Courses _____ ACC 51 Intermediate Accounting I 3 credits _____ ACC 52 Intermediate Accounting II 3 credits _____ ACC 55 Federal Taxation I 3 credits Choose three courses from the list below for a total of 9 credits: _____ ACC 50 Small Business Financial Software 3 credits _____ ACC 53 Cost Accounting 3 credits _____ ACC 56 Federal Taxation II 3 credits _____ ACC 57 Managerial Accounting 3 credits _____ ACC 58 Auditing 3 credits _____ ACC 59 Analysis of Financial Statements 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE (Choose from ACC, BNK, BUS, CED, MAN, MAR, RES, or RMN) 3 credits

2007-2008

33
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration (Entrepreneurship Concentration) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

Entrepreneurship
The program focuses on developing skills in finance, human resource management, management principles, marketing, purchasing, and sales for establishing and operating a new business.

General Courses _____ CIS 11

Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC is the home of the Bristol Academic Center for Entrepreneurship. It works with the National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship to encourage local high school and middle school students to consider entrepreneurship. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, ENG 11, MAN 11, SPH 11 Semester 2: ACC 14, CIS 11, ENG 12, MAN 51, BUS 53, MAR 11 Semester 3: HST 11 or AMC 11, BUS 51, MAN 54, ECN 11, MAR 14 Semester 4: HST 12 or AMC 12, MAN 52, MAN 90, MAR 55, RMN 18, Science

(Choose a 4-credit lab if transferring to a 4-year school)

3/4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
The Bristol Academic Center for Entrepreneurship provides resources and support for start-up businesses

Core Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ BUS 11 _____ BUS 51 _____ MAN 11 _____ MAR 11 _____ RMN 18

Principles of Accounting I Business and Financial Mathematics Business Law Principles of Management Principles of Marketing Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications Concentration Courses _____ ACC 14 Introduction to QuickBooks Pro _____ BUS 53 Corporation Finance _____ MAN 51 Human Resources Management _____ MAN 52 Purchasing _____ MAN 54 Small Business Management _____ MAN 90 Managing an Enterprise _____ MAR 14 Sales Principles _____ MAR 55 Advertising Principles

After BCC

• Students are ready to open their own businesses and other enterprises. Many senior institutions offer four-year degrees in entrepreneurship. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

34
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration Option: Financial Services (Banking concentration)
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Financial Services) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) Business Administration (transfer)

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Banking
General Courses _____ ECN 11 _____ ECN 51 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Principles of Economics — Macro Money and Banking Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SPH 13 Interpersonal Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics _____ BUS 51 Business Law _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications Concentration Courses _____ BNK 10 Principles of Banking _____ BNK 12 Real Estate Lending _____ BNK 14 Introduction to Commercial Banking _____ BUS 12 Personal Financial Planning _____ BUS 53 Corporation Finance _____ ELECTIVE Choose from ACC 50, ACC 59, BNK,
BUS 13, BUS 60, MTH 19, MAN 90, MAR 14, MAR 53, or CED 11

The Business Administration career program emphasizes critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills that students need to compete in today’s global business environment. This concentration assists students to prepare for a career in Banking. All business programs share many common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many financial firms are located in the region. • The faculty have years of practical experience that make your education relevant to the workplace. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester. Next they should take ACC 11, BUS 11 and ENG 11 to position themselves for proper course sequence in following semesters. BUS 53 should be taken in spring, second year. If student may transfer in future years, take HST, not AMC, and a 4-credit science. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, ENG 11, MAN 11, HST 11 or AMC 11, RMN 18 Semester 2: ACC 12, MAR 11, ECN 11, ENG 12, HST 12 or AMC 12 Semester 3: BNK 10, BUS 51, SPH 13, ECN 51, science elective Semester 4: BNK 12, BNK 14, BUS 12, BUS 53, one business-related elective

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
After BCC
Cooperative Education gives students the opportunity to earn wages and academic credit while they acquire knowledge in their chosen profession.

• Graduates work as tellers, loan service representatives, and customer service representatives. • While the career program is designed for students who expect to work in the profession immediately after graduation, many students elect to continue their studies at senior institutions. Typical transfer colleges include: Bentley College, Bridgewater State College, Bryant University, Rhode Island College, Roger Williams University, Simmons College, Stonehill College, and University of Massachusetts. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

2007-2008

35
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration Option: Financial Services (Financial Management)
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Financial Services) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Financial Management
General Courses _____ CIS 11 Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 or 13 Fundamentals of Speech or 3 credits Interpersonal Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II 4 credits _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ BUS 51 Business Law 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications 1 credit Concentration Courses _____ ACC 55 Federal Taxation I 3 credits _____ ACC 56 Federal Taxation II 3 credits _____ ACC 59 Analysis of Financial Statements 3 credits _____ BUS 12 Personal Financial Planning 3 credits _____ BUS 53 Corporation Finance 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Choose from ACC 50, BNK 10, BNK 14,
BUS 13, BUS 60, MAN 90, MAR 14, MAR 53, CED 11, or ECN 51

The Business Administration career program emphasizes critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills that students need to compete in today’s global business environment. This concentration assists students to prepare for a career in Financial Management. All business programs share many common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The faculty have years of practical experience that makes your education relevant to the workplace. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester. Next they should take ACC 11, BUS 11 and ENG 11 to position themselves for proper course sequence in following semesters. BUS 53 should be taken in spring, second year. If student may transfer in future years, take HST, not AMC, and a 4-credit science. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, ENG 11, MAN 11, HST 11 or AMC 11 Semester 2: ACC 12, MAR 11, ECN 11, ENG 12, HST 12 or AMC 12 Semester 3: ACC 55, ACC 59, BUS 12, BUS 51, CIS 11, RMN 18 Semester 4: ACC 56, BUS 53, SPH 11 or 13, Science elective, one business-related elective.

Hints for Success
Cooperative Education gives students the opportunity to earn wages and academic credit while they acquire knowledge in their chosen profession.

After BCC

3 credits

• Graduates work as mutual fund customer service representatives and broker assistants, loan service representatives, insurance representatives, credit and collection associates, and junior financial analysts. • The career program is designed for students who plan to enter the work-force immediately after graduation. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

36
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration Option: Financial Services (Real Estate & Insurance)

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) Business Administration (transfer)

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Real Estate & Insurance) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many real estate and insurance firms are located in the region. • The faculty have years of practical experience that makes your education relevant in the workplace. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester. Next they should take ACC 11, BUS 11, and ENG 11 to position themselves for proper course sequence in their second year. If students may transfer in future years take HST not AMC and a 4-credit science. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, ENG 11, MAN 11, AMC 11 or HST 11 Semester 2: ACC 12, MAR 11, ECN 11, ENG 12, HST 12 or AMC 12, RMN 18 Semester 3: BUS 17, CIS 11, MAR 14, RES 11, SPH 11 or SPH 13 Semester 4: BUS 18, BUS 51, MAR 53, RES 12, Science elective

Real Estate and Insurance
General Courses _____ CIS 11 _____ ECN 11 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 _____ SPH 11 or 13 Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

The Business Administration career program emphasizes critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills that students need to compete in today’s global business environment. This concentration assists students to prepare for a career in Real Estate & Insurance. All business programs share many common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

Fundamentals of Speech or Interpersonal Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics _____ BUS 51 Business Law _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications Concentration Courses _____ BUS 17 Principles of Insurance I _____ BUS 18 Principles of Insurance II _____ MAR 14 Sales Principles _____ MAR 53 Sales Management _____ RES 11 Introduction to Real Estate _____ RES 12 Real Estate Practice

Hints for Success
After BCC
Cooperative Education gives students the opportunity to earn wages and academic credit while they acquire knowledge in their chosen profession.

• Graduates may work as mutual fund customer service representatives and broker assistants, loan service representatives, insurance representatives, credit and collection associates and junior financial analysts. • The career program is designed for students who expect to work in the profession immediately after graduation. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

2007-2008

37

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

General Management
Students enrolled in the Business Administration career program receive training in the critical thinking and problem solving skills they need to compete in today’s global business environment. All the Business programs share common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration option

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration (General Management Concentration) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • The faculty have years of practical experience in national and global business that makes your education relevant to the workplace. • This concentration assists students to prepare for a variety of careers. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take BUS 11, ENG 11, RMN 18, and ACC 11 first to position themselves for the proper course sequence in their second year. Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester, followed by BUS 11 and ENG 11. Take MAR 14, MAR 53 and BUS 53 in second year. If not sure about concentration, take BUS 13 during first semester. • Choose electives to pursue specific interests, such as purchasing or human resources.

General Courses _____ CIS 11 _____ ECN 11 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

_____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II

Hints for Career Preparation
Choose electives that focus on your areas of interest.

_____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II 4 credits _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ BUS 51 Business Law 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications 1 credit Concentration Courses _____ BUS 13 Introduction to Business Functions and Practices 3 credits _____ MAN 90 Managing an Enterprise 3 credits For business electives below, choose from ACC, BNK, BUS, CED, MAN, MAR, RES, RMN _____ ELECTIVE Business elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Business elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Business elective 3 credits

After BCC

• Graduates work as quality control specialists, shift supervisors, management analysts, and assistant managers of retail stores. • The career program is designed for students who expect to work in the profession immediately after graduation. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

38
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration option

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) Business Administration (transfer)

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Sport Leisure Services Management Concentration) Credits required: 62/63 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students can prepare for positions in private club sport, amateur sport, or service agencies such as camps, YMCAs, Boys and Girls clubs, and other recreational organizations. • If you plan to transfer to complete a bachelor’s degree, contact Transfer Affairs at ext. 2227 for advice on course selection for maximum transferring of courses. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: LSM 11, BUS 21, BUS 11, MAN 11, ENG 11 Semester 2: ENG 12, ACC 11, CIS 11, LSM 23, MAR 11 Semester 3: LSM 31, LSM 33, AMC 11 or HST 11, SPH 11, ECN 11 Semester 4: LSM 41, LSM 43, AMC 12 or HST 12, Science, COM 41

LEISURE SERVICES MANAGEMENT

Sport
General Courses _____ CIS 11 Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science Elective 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ COM 41 Public Relations 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits Concentration Courses _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits _____ INT 10 Work-Based Experience 1 credit _____ LSM 11 Introduction to Sport Management 3 credits _____ LSM 23 Sport as Popular Culture 3 credits _____ LSM 31 Facility Design and Event Management 3 credits _____ LSM 33 Sport Marketing and Sales 3 credits _____ LSM 41 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport 3 credits _____ LSM 43 Budgeting and Financing Sport 3 credits

The program prepares students for entry-level positions in sport management. It offers students the opportunity to develop strong communication, organizational, and critical-thinking skills as well as practical preparation for entry into this growing career field.

Hints for Success
Consult with advisor to choose electives.

After BCC

• Students may transfer courses to Bridgewater State College to complete a bachelor’s degree in physical education. Other colleges also offer comparable bachelor’s degrees. • Students can expect to be qualified for positions in the growing leisure services field. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

2007-2008

39
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration option

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

LEISURE SERVICES MANAGEMENT

Tourism & Hospitality
General Courses _____ CIS 11 Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ COM 41 Public Relations 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications 1 credit Concentration Courses _____ BUS 20 Group Tour Planning 3 credits _____ BUS 21 Introduction to Travel, Tourism & Hospitality 3 credits _____ BUS 22 Tour Destination Planning 3 credits _____ BUS 23 Meeting Planning and Convention Sales and Service 3 credits _____ BUS 24 Sales and Customer Service for Tourism and Hospitality 3 credits _____ BUS 26 Hotel and Motel Management & Operations 3 credits _____ CED 11 Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Tourism & Hospitality Services Concentration) Credits required: 62/63 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • The tourism and hospitality concentration introduces students to the principles of travel, geography, and culture. It is closely related to the Leisure Services Management - Sport concentration and shares many of the courses in that program. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BUS 20, BUS 21, BUS 11, MAN 11, ENG 11 Semester 2: ENG 12, ACC 11, CIS 11, BUS 23, MAR 11, RMN 18 Semester 3: BUS 22, BUS 26, AMC 11 or HST11, SPH 11, ECN 11 Semester 4: BUS 24, CED 11, AMC 12 or HST 12, Science, COM 41

Tourism is one of the world’s largest career fields. This program offers students the opportunity to develop strong communications, organizational, and critical-thinking skills as well as practical preparation for entry into this growing career field.

Hints for Success
Consider a semester studying abroad or a semester of Co-op at Disney World.

After BCC

• This program prepares students for entry-level positions in a broad range of tourism and hospitality positions. Students can directly enter the workforce or may transfer to a four-year college or university including Johnson & Wales University. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Johnson and Wales University. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

40
CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration option

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) Business Administration (transfer)

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Marketing Management Concentration) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • The faculty have years of practical experience that makes your education relevant to the workplace. • This concentration assists students to prepare for a career in marketing and sales. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take BUS 11, ENG 11, and ACC 11 first to position themselves for the proper course sequence in their second year. Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester, followed by BUS 11 and ENG 11. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, MAN 11, ENG 11, AMC 11 or HST 11, RMN 18 Semester 2: ACC 12, MAR 11, ENG 12, ECN 11, AMC 12 or HST 12 Semester 3: MAR 14, Business elective, CIS 11, MAR 55, Science elective Semester 4: MAR 53, BUS 51, MAN 52 or BUS 53, SPH 11, Business elective

Marketing Management
The Business Administration career program provides training in the critical thinking and problem solving skills students need to compete in today’s global business environment and to understand marketing. All the Business programs share common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

General Courses _____ CIS 11

Hint for Career Preparation
After BCC
• Graduates work as marketing agents, customer service representatives, loan service representatives, sales associates, marketing assistants, and salespeople. • The program is designed for students who plan to enter the workforce immediately after graduation. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

Cooperative Education gives students the opportunity to earn wages and academic credit while they acquire knowledge in their chosen profession.

Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II 4 credits _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ BUS 51 Business Law 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications 1 credit Concentration Courses _____ MAR 14 Sales Principles 3 credits _____ MAR 53 Sales Management 3 credits _____ MAR 55 Advertising Principles 3 credits _____ BUS 53 or Corporation Finance or MAN 52 Purchasing 3 credits For business electives below, choose from ACC, BNK, BUS, CED, MAN, MAR, RES, RMN: _____ ELECTIVE Business elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Business electives 3 credits

2007-2008

41

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

Retail Management
The Business Administration career program provides training in critical thinking and the problemsolving skills students need to compete in today’s global business environment. In this option, students can focus on retail management and prepare for entry-level retail management positions. All the Business programs share common courses, so students can switch easily between concentrations.

CAREER PROGRAM Business Administration option

General Courses _____ CIS 11

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Career (Retail Management Concentration) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • The faculty have years of practical experience in national and global business to make your education relevant to the workplace. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take BUS 11, ENG 11, and ACC 11 first to position themselves for the proper course sequence in their second year. Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester, followed by BUS 11 and ENG 11. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ACC 11, BUS 11, CIS 11, ENG 11, RMN 11 Semester 2: MAR 11, MAN 11, ENG 12, RMN 12, RMN 14, RMN 17 Semester 3: MAR 55, RMN 16, AMC 11 or HST 11, SPH 11 Semester 4: BUS 51, PSY 51, RMN 15, RMN 18, AMC 12 or HST 12, Science elective

Hints for Success
Take advantage of field trips, trade shows, and other retail events.

Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ PSY 51 General Psychology 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits Core Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits _____ BUS 51 Business Law 3 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits Concentration Courses _____ MAR 55 Advertising Principles 3 credits _____ RMN 11 Retail Management — Principles of Buying 3 credits _____ RMN 12 Retail Management — Merchandising Strategies 3 credits _____ RMN 14 Retail Management — Fundamentals of Fashion & Textiles 3 credits _____ RMN 15 Creative Fashion Presentation, Promotion, and Visual Merchandising 3 credits _____ RMN 16 Retail and Fashion Merchandising Field Study 3 credits _____ RMN 17 Fundamentals of On-Line Retailing 1 credit _____ RMN 18 Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications 1 credit

After BCC

• Graduates work as entry-level retail sales people and assistant managers at retail operations. • The career program is designed for students who expect to work in the profession immediately after graduation. • BCC has a transfer articulation agreement with Johnson & Wales University. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Becker College.

42
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Business Administration Transfer Credits required: 64 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) Business Administration (transfer)

Business Administration
Students in this program complete the first two years of a baccalaureate program with a solid background in accounting, management, and marketing. Graduates transfer to senior colleges and universities and can take advantage of articulation agreements negotiated with four-year colleges and universities. Those transferring to public colleges and universities can qualify for Joint Admissions and Tuition Advantage.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The transfer program is designed for students who plan to transfer to a four-year institution to complete their baccalaureate program. • The faculty have years of practical experience in national and global business to make education relevant to the workplace • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Take MTH 31, ENG 11, and ACC 11 first to position yourself for the next course sequences. Students should take any required developmental courses in their first semester, followed by MTH 31 and ENG 11 during the second semester.

General Courses _____ ECN 11 _____ ECN 12 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Principles of Economics — Macro Principles of Economics — Micro Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

_____ HST 11 West and the World I _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics _____ MTH 32 Calculus with Applications _____ MTH 51 Fundamental Business Statistics _____ MTH 52 Statistics for Decision Making See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Choose 6 credits of foreign language or

3 credits of humanities and 3 credits of free elective or 3 credits of foreign language and 3 credits of free elective

Hints for Success
Ask the Transfer Affairs office for advice on electives for transferring.

After BCC

• Recent graduates have transferred to Bridgewater State College, Bryant University, Rhode Island College, Roger Williams University, Simmons College, Stonehill College, and University of Massachusetts. • BCC has articulation agreements with Bryant University, UMass Dartmouth, Roger Williams University, Regis College, Paul Smith College, Capella University, and the University of Phoenix. • The College has a 2+2 agreement with Bryant University that guarantees acceptance of this program’s credits and offers scholarships for academic merit.

_____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective 4 credits Program Courses _____ ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits _____ ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II 4 credits _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management 3 credits _____ MAR 11 Principles of Marketing 3 credits For business electives, check transfer requirements and choose from ACC, BNK, BUS 51, BUS 53, BUS 55, CED, MAN, MAR, RES, RMN; choose any humanities or social science elective _____ ELECTIVE Business, humanities, or social science elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Business, humanities, or social science elective 3 credits Transfer Compact: Students can fulfill requirements of the Transfer Compact by taking one additional behavioral or social science elective. Students not taking foreign languages should take one additional humanities elective.

2007-2008

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

43
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Accounting
Credits required: 29 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Accounting
This certificate provides updated accounting expertise for people already working in the accounting field. It may also be used by students without an accounting background to develop entry-level career skills. Most of the courses can be transferred to a Business Career associate degree program.

Program Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ ACC 12 _____ ACC 50 _____ ACC 51 _____ ACC 52 _____ BUS 53 _____ ENG 11 _____ ACC 53 or ACC 55 or ACC 57 _____ ACC 56 or ACC 59

Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Small Business Financial Software Intermediate Accounting Advanced Accounting Corporation Finance Composition I: College Writing Cost Accounting I or Federal Taxation I or Managerial Accounting Using Excel Federal Taxation II or Analysis of Financial Statements

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Job opportunities include general accounting, accounts payable, accounts receivable, and payroll positions. • Many courses will transfer to the associate’s degree programs in Business Career or Business Transfer. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, ACC 11, ACC 50 Semester 2: ACC 12, BUS 53 Semester 3: ACC 51, ACC 53 or ACC 55 or ACC 57 Semester 4: ACC 52, ACC 56 or ACC 58 or ACC 59

e-commerce
This certificate provides students with the knowledge to use e-commerce technologies for small business operations. Most of the courses can be transferred to a Business Career associate degree program.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT e-commerce
Credits required: 20/22 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Program Courses _____ BUS 52 _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 44 _____ CIS 46 _____ ELECTIVE(S) _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 54 _____ ACC 14 or BUS 15 or RMN 17

Honors e-commerce Business Creativity Internet Developer Applications for Web Development
Choose 1-3 credits from CIS

Composition I: College Writing Small Business Management Introduction to QuickBooks Pro or Fundamentals of an Enterprise or Fundamentals of On-Line Retailing 1 credit

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1/3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many courses will transfer to the Associate’s degree programs in Business Career or Business Transfer. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, MAN 54, BUS 52, ACC 14 or BUS 15 or RMN 17 Semester 2: CIS 13, CIS 44, CIS 46, CIS Elective

44
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Fashion Merchandising
Credits required: 28 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) • Business Administration (transfer)

Fashion Merchandising
The certificate is designed to prepare students to enter a fashion career. Courses in retail management, art, human behavior, and psychology aim to enhance career opportunities and lay a foundation for further study if desired.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Many courses will transfer to the Associate’s degree program in Retail Management. • Students can consider such career options as fashion coordinator, fashion consultant, designer, or presenter. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, ART 13, MAR 11, RMN 11, CIS 13 or RMN 16 Semester 2: RMN 14, RMN 15, SPH 11 or SPH 14, RMN 17 or RMN 18, PSY 51 or MAR 14.

Program Courses _____ ART 13 _____ ENG 11 _____ MAR 11 _____ RMN 11 _____ RMN 14 _____ RMN 15

Drawing I Composition I: College Writing Principles of Marketing Principles of Buying Fundamentals of Fashion & Textiles Creative Fashion Presentation, Promotion, and Visual Merchandising _____ CIS 13 or Business Creativity or RMN 16 Retail and Fashion Merchandising Field Study _____ MAR 14 or Sales Principles or PSY 51 General Psychology _____ RMN 17 or 18 Fundamentals of On-Line Retailing or Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications _____ SPH 11 or 14 Fundamentals of Speech or Professional Speaking

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT International Business
Credits required: 27 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

International Business
This certificate offers students an opportunity to combine business, language, and history knowledge to aid in their preparation for a career in international business.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This certificate offers students an opportunity to combine business, language, and history knowledge to aid in their preparation for a career in international business. • Many courses will transfer to the associate degree program in Business Career or Business Transfer. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: MAN 11, MAR 11, ECN 11, Foreign Language elective Semester 2: ENG 11, BUS 53, BUS 60, HST 54 or HST 56 or HST 57, Foreign Language elective

Program Courses _____ BUS 53 _____ BUS 60 _____ ECN 11 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 11 _____ MAR 11

Corporation Finance International Business Principles of Economics — Macro
Choose from HST 54, HST 56, or HST 57 Choose two semesters of FRN, POR, or SPA

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Foreign Language

Composition I: College Writing Principles of Management Principles of Marketing

2007-2008

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

45
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Marketing
Credits required: 24 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Marketing
This certificate prepares students to supervise and assist in retail operations, including management, buying, and retail support. Courses transfer into the Business associate degree programs.

Program Courses _____ CIS 11 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 11 _____ MAR 11 _____ MAR 14 _____ MAR 53 _____ SPH 11 or 13

Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits
Choose from ACC, BUS, MAN, MAR, or RMN

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program will prepare students for entry-level jobs in marketing. • Most credits can be utilized for Business Career or Business Transfer degrees.

Composition I: College Writing Principles of Management Principles of Marketing Sales Principles Sales Management Fundamentals of Speech or Interpersonal Speech

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Retail Management
This certificate prepares students to supervise and assist in retail operations, including management, buying, and retail support. Courses transfer into the Business associate degree programs.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Retail Management
Credits required: 29 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Program Courses _____ BUS 11 _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 11 _____ RMN 11 _____ RMN 12 _____ RMN 14 _____ RMN 15 _____ RMN 16 _____ RMN 17 _____ RMN 18 _____ MAR 14 or PSY 51

Business and Financial Mathematics Composition I: College Writing Principles of Management Retail Management — Principles of Buying Retail Management — Merchandising Strategies Retail Management — Fundamentals of Fashion & Textiles Creative Fashion Presentation, Promotion, and Visual Merchandising Retail and Fashion Merchandising Field Study Fundamentals of On-Line Retailing Workshop in Team Development and Managerial Communications Sales Principles or General Psychology

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program prepares students for entrylevel jobs in retail. • Courses focus on developing specialized knowledge in retail business, including basic management and buying, as well as new technologies, and economic and legal issues. • Certificate candidates can transfer prior learning credits to BCC. RELATED BUSINESS PROGRAMS • Associate degrees in Business Administration transfer and career. • Certificates in Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management, and Tourism & Hospitality Services Management.

46
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management
Credits required: 28/29 Program director: Cecil E. Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

2007-2008

Business Degrees: Business Career (Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Financial Services - Banking, Financial Management, Real Estate and Insurance, General Management, Leisure Services Management - Sport, Tourism & Hospitality, Marketing Management, Retail Management ) • Business Administration (transfer)

SMALL BUSINESS AND

Entrepreneurial Management
Program Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ BUS 53 _____ CIS 11 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 11 _____ MAN 54 _____ MAR 11 _____ SPH 14 Principles of Accounting I 4 credits Corporation Finance 3 credits Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits
Choose 3-4 credits from ACC, BNK, BUS, CED, MAN, MAR, RES, RMN 3/4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students work with program faculty and area resources to receive intensive, practical training in business plan preparation. RELATED BUSINESS PROGRAMS • Associate degrees in Accounting, Financial Management, Marketing Management, General Management, Real Estate and Insurance, Banking, and Business Administration transfer program.

This certificate prepares students to start and operate a small business. The program introduces students to management, marketing, accounting, and finance, essential areas for business development. All courses can be transferred into the associate degree program in Business Administration.

Composition I: College Writing Principles of Management Small Business Management Principles of Marketing Professional Speaking

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Sport Management
Credits required: 27/28 Program director: Cecil Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Sport Management
The certificate introduces students to the basics of sport and leisure service management. Courses in the certificate may be transferred to the associate’s degree program in Leisure Services Management.

Program Courses _____ COM 41 _____ ENG 11 _____ ELECTIVE _____ LSM 11 _____ LSM 23 _____ LSM 31 _____ LSM 33 _____ LSM 41 _____ LSM 43

Public Relations Composition I: College Writing Free elective Introduction to Sport Management Sport as Popular Culture Facility Design and Event Management Sport Marketing and Sales Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport Budgeting and Financing Sport

3 credits 3 credits 3-4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

Certificates: Accounting • e-commerce • Fashion Merchandising • International Business • Marketing • Retail Management • Small Business and Entrepreneurial Management • Sport Management • Tourism and Hospitality Services

47
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Tourism and Hospitality Services
Credits required: 27 Program director: Cecil Leonard, Associate Professor of Business Administration

Tourism and Hospitality Services
This certificate prepares students for careers in the tourism and hospitality industry. By choosing these courses as electives, students can enhance their Business associate’s degree. Tourism and hospitality is the world’s largest employment field. Job opportunities are exciting and varied.

Program Courses _____ BUS 11 _____ BUS 20 _____ BUS 21 _____ BUS 22 _____ BUS 23 _____ BUS 24 _____ BUS 26 _____ CED 11 _____ ENG 11

Business and Financial Mathematics Group Tour Planning Introduction to Travel, Tourism & Hospitality Tour Destination Planning Meeting Planning and Convention Sales and Service Sales and Customer Service for Tourism and Hospitality Hotel and Motel Management & Operations Cooperative Work Experience I Composition I: College Writing

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Job opportunities include: tour escort, convention and visitors bureau coordinator, sales, concierge, and dining room supervisor. • Students may earn credit in field placements at such sites as Disney World, Colette Tours, Massachusetts Information Centers, Newport Historical Society, and the New Bedford Whaling Museum. • BCC has a transfer articulation agreement with Johnson & Wales University.

The faculty have years of practical experience that makes your education relevant to the workplace.
Cecil Leonard Associate Professor of Business Administration

Center for Developmental Education
Why choose the Center for Developmental Education?
The CDE offers a variety of academic programs and support services designed to enhance your college academic skills. You may choose the General Studies Prep program if you have been away from school for a while, have a non-traditional educational background (GED), or if English is not your first language. Your choice to use the academic support services of the CDE will strengthen your overall academic performance and pave the way to a successful college experience.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
General Studies Prep preparatory General Studies Prep-ESL preparatory General Studies PrepCareer Prep 50 51 52

ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES
TRIO QUEST for Success program Disability Services Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC) 54 55 55

50
Center for Developmental Education General Studies Prep • General Studies Prep ESL • General Studies Prep Career Prep • TRiO QUEST
PREPARATORY PROGRAM General Studies Prep Program
Program director: Susan Boissoneault, Assistant Dean for Developmental Education

2007-2008

• Office of Disability Services • Tutoring & Academic Support

Center

General Studies Prep
This program provides students the opportunity to develop college-level skills in math, reading, and writing. Students whose native language is not English should choose the English as a Second Language concentration on the next page.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • General Studies Prep students receive individualized interpretation of their placement test score and academic advisement at the time of testing. This program helps students build a solid foundation for success at BCC. • Students interested in pre-career options should refer to the description on page 52. • Students in this program receive priority acceptance into the QUEST for Success program (see page 54) which provides a range of services to help students achieve their goals. ENTERING THE PROGRAM • Students may apply directly to this program or may be admitted to this program following a review of their educational background. Some students in this program have been out of school for several years; some did not complete high school; others did not take college preparatory courses in high school. RELATED PROGRAMS • General Studies Prep - ESL concentration, General Studies degree program. • Pre-career options in Art, Business, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, Engineering, and Health Sciences.

Program Courses _____ CSS 11

College Success Seminar

1 credit

Developmental Courses _____ ENG 10 _____ MTH 01 _____ MTH 1N _____ MTH 4N _____ MTH 07 _____ MTH 08 _____ RDG 09

(Enroll in courses indicated by placement testing or needed as prerequisites for degree program.)

Basic Writing Skills Arithmetic Review Introduction to Algebra Algebra and Essential Geometry Intermediate Algebra Part I Intermediate Algebra Part II Fundamentals of Reading Development _____ RDG 10 College Reading and Learning Strategies General Education and Career Elective Courses

3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Some of these degree credit courses have prerequisites. Ask an advisor for recommendations based on BCC degree program desired. Pre-career option students need 6-8 career credits.

Hints for Success
After the Program
If eligible, take advantage of the TRIO QUEST for Success Learning Labs. Choose Pre-career options to prepare for transfer to other programs. Register early.

• After successful completion of the program, including developmental courses, students transfer to a degree or certificate program. In some cases this may be as easy as completing a change of program form; in other cases, students must complete an internal transfer application. See individual degree programs or your advisor for details on how to apply. • Students who have successfully completed this program have been accepted into nearly every BCC degree or certificate program and transferred to UMass Dartmouth and other four-year institutions.

Behavioral/Social Science Elective 3 credits MTH - Choose required MTH course in desired program 3 credits _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Career Prep Option Elective or introductory course for desired program: _____ ELECTIVE(S) 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE(S) 3/4 credits _____ SPH 11 or 13 Fundamentals of Speech or Interpersonal Speech 3 credits Academic Support Courses: as recommended _____ CSS 13 Career Exploration and Development Seminar 1 credit _____ CSS 15 Technology Tools for College Success 3 credits _____ RDG 01 Study Skills: Learning How to Learn 1 credit

_____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE

2007-2008

51
• Office of Disability Services • Tutoring & Academic Support

Center for Developmental Education General Studies Prep • General Studies Prep ESL • General Studies Prep Career Prep • TRiO QUEST
Center

General Studies Prep - ESL
Students who need intensive instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) are admitted to the General Studies Prep program’s ESL concentration. Reading, writing, grammar, and conversation are offered at the intermediate and advanced levels. The ESL Skills Specialist determines placement based on placement test results.

PREPARATORY PROGRAM General Studies Prep Program English as a Second Language concentration
Contact: Regina Pirtle, ESL Skills Specialist and Program Coordinator ext. 2476 PROGRAM INFORMATION • ESL courses prepare students to do college work in English. They are open only to students whose first language is not English. Students registered in ESL courses must have the written approval of the Asst. Dean for Developmental Education or his/her designee before registering in other BCC courses. Students are placed into the Intermediate or Advanced level after placement testing. The ESL Skills Specialist determines placement based on placement test scores. • Students who meet eligibility requirements receive priority acceptance into the Quest for Success support program (see page 54), which provides services that help students achieve their goals. • Bristol Community College welcomes International students each semester. Students who have completed their secondary school education may attend Bristol Community College on an F-1 student visa. International students may be admitted to General Studies Prep / ESL or the program of their choice if they have demonstrated English proficiency. All BCC students are tested by the college’s Director of Testing and may be referred to the ESL Program Coordinator for additional testing. • Students attending BCC on an F – 1 student visa must be enrolled in a degree program as a full-time student (12 credits or more per semester). RELATED PROGRAMS • General Studies Prep • Pre-career options in Art, Business, Computer Information Systems, Criminal Justice, Engineering, and Health Sciences.

Program Courses _____ CSS 11 College Success Seminar 1 credit ESL Courses: Courses may be required based on testing. Except for ESL 22, 23, 24 and 25, these courses do not earn credit toward a degree. _____ ESL 12 Intermediate English Grammar 3 credits _____ ESL 13 Intermediate English Vocabulary and Reading Skills 3 credits _____ ESL 14 _____ ESL 15 _____ ESL 22 _____ ESL 23 _____ ESL 24 _____ ESL 25 Intermediate English Writing Skills 3 credits Intermediate English Conversation Skills 3 credits Advanced English Grammar Review 3 credits Advanced English Vocabulary and Reading Skills 3 credits Advanced English Written Expression Advanced English Conversation 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
If eligible, take advantage of the TRIO QUEST for Success Learning Labs. Register early.

After the Program

• Students who complete this program have a solid foundation in the academic uses of the English language. • After successful completion of ESL program courses and proficiency tests, students may transfer to a degree or certificate program and may take any required developmental courses and/or general education courses needed. • Students who have completed required ESL courses have entered nearly every degree or certificate program at BCC, and transferred to U Mass Dartmouth and other four-year institutions.

52
PREPARATORY PROGRAM General Studies Prep Program (Career Prep Option)
Program director: Susan Boissoneault, Assistant Dean for Developmental Education PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students in the pre-career programs should take their required developmental courses in the first semester, and take career courses as indicated. Students must complete 6–8 credits of career electives in the Pre-Career Option selected. OPTIONS • Each option lists recommended courses for that particular career track. Choose courses in the desired track as electives in General Studies Prep. Choose courses with the help of your advisor. • Completion of the Pre-Career Option does not guarantee admission to selective programs such as Nursing Career. Students must apply for internal transfer to these programs and meet entrance requirements for admission. RECOMMENDATIONS PRE-BUSINESS BUS 11: Take after MTH 01 MAN 11: Take as part of a learning community with RDG 10, if available. PRE-COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS CSS 15: This course is designed for those with no computer experience. Take CIS 11 if you are an experienced user of the Internet, word processing and other applications. CIS 12 or 13 or 53: Choose one of these three courses in spring if you have taken CIS 11 in the fall semester PRE-CRIMINAL JUSTICE CRJ 11: Choose a learning community (if available), if taken in fall semester. CRJ 15: Take this course in spring semester. PRE-ENGINEERING CAD 15 and ETK 13: Take these courses together in the second semester with MTH 08, if required. PRE-HEALTH SCIENCES MAA 70: Take this course to major in Medical Administrative Assistant RELATED PROGRAMS • General Studies Prep - ESL concentration, General Studies Prep, General Studies degree program, Quest for Success Program

2007-2008

Center for Developmental Education General Studies Prep • General Studies Prep ESL • General Studies Prep Career Prep • TRiO QUEST
Center

• Office of Disability Services • Tutoring & Academic Support

General Studies Prep – Career Prep
The General Studies Prep program offers Pre-Career Preparation Options to help students build a solid foundation to prepare to enter selected career programs. The course recommendations can help students build academic skills and develop career competencies. In some cases, such as Web Design and Business Administration, students get a head start by taking career courses early in their academic programs.

Pre-Business _____ BUS 11 _____ BUS 13 or

Hints for Success
Choose options in your desired career track as electives in General Studies Prep. Choose courses with the help of your advisor.

MAN 11 or MAR 11 Pre-Art/Web Design _____ ART 13 Drawing I 3 credits _____ ART 39 Computer Graphics 3 credits Pre-Computer Information Systems _____ CIS 11 Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits _____ CSS 15 Technology Tools for College Success 3 credits _____ CIS 12 or Introduction to Programming (COBOL) or Business Creativity or CIS 13 or 3 credits CIS 53 Operating Systems Pre-Criminal Justice _____ CRJ 11 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 credits _____ CRJ 15 Report Writing and Information Systems 3 credits Pre-Engineering _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits Pre-Health Sciences _____ BIO 15 or Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology or 4 credits Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIO 33 and BIO 34 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 8 credits _____ HCI 13 or Medical Language or 3 credits HLT 13 and Medical Language Module I and Medical Language Module II or 2 credits HLT 15 or MAA 70 Medical Terminology 3 credits

Business and Financial Mathematics 3 credits Introduction to Business Functions and Practices or Principles of Management or Principles of Marketing 3 credits

Allow the College to help you discover your interests and tap into your potential. Suddenly, your dreams will be realized and you (like me) will be doing what you once thought impossible.
Roy Ashton III ‘04 Valedictorian

54
Center for Developmental Education General Studies Prep • General Studies Prep ESL • General Studies Prep Career Prep • TRiO QUEST
Center
QUEST SERVICES QUEST for Success offers exclusive services for participating students that ease the transition to college: • Course selection with specially trained advisors. • Special orientation program • Free College Success Seminars • Self-paced learning labs for developmental courses (see descriptions at right) • Special scholarship opportunities • Supplemental Instruction • Academic transfer, career and personal counseling • Field trips, and cultural enrichment activities SPECIFIC ACADEMIC SERVICES • QUEST Math Lab, located in B-109, extension 2986. • QUEST Writing Lab, located in B-204, extension 2692 • QUEST Reading Lab, located in B-100, extension 2611 • QUEST ESL Lab, located in B-110, extension 2476 COLLEGE-WIDE RESOURCES • Tutoring & Academic Support Center (TASC), Dr. Ron Weisberger, Coordinator is located in B-110, extension 2295. The TASC provides individual and group tutoring, Supplemental Instruction group study sessions, and individual programs for ESL and reading students. • Office of Disability Services, Jan Baptist, Director, is located in B-104, extension 2955. The Office assists students with learning disabilities or physical challenges.

2007-2008

• Office of Disability Services • Tutoring & Academic Support

TRiO QUEST for Success program
QUEST is a comprehensive support program that addresses students’ academic, career and personal development needs. Designed to help students who may be the first in their families to attend college, who come from low-income backgrounds, or who may have a disability, QUEST is funded in part through a TRIO Student Support Services grant from the U.S. Department of Education.

The QUEST Writing Lab (B-204 ext. 2692) offers both Basic Writing Skills (English 10) and College Writing (English 11). Students may finish these courses in one semester each or may require an additional semester to build writing or research skills. QUEST Writing Lab courses provide a classroom writing experience with additional support services that students can benefit from, such as: • Tutorial support • Individualized instruction • Self-paced grammar instruction • One-to-one assistance with word processing and online research. • All students in QUEST may take advantage of the QUEST Writing Lab during Open Lab hours. The QUEST Reading Lab (B-100 ext. 2611) offers Fundamentals of Reading Development (Reading 09), College Reading and Learning Strategies (Reading 10), and Advanced English Reading and Vocabulary (ESL 23) in a supported, modified self-paced format. Students work in large groups, small groups and individually to develop reading skills they need to succeed in college. Lab support includes: one-to-one instruction, computerized curriculum, and Internet research skills. Open Lab hours provide individual assistance for all QUEST students. The QUEST ESL Lab (B-110 ext. 2476) provides individual support, tutorials, and language practice for students in English-as-a-SecondLanguage courses. The ESL Lab is located in the Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC) and is directed by the ESL Skills Specialist. Work in the Lab may include the use of audiotapes, computer software, one-to-one or group tutoring sessions, conversation practice, and assistance with writing. All students in ESL are assigned at least one lab hour each week, but most students spend many hours improving their language skills in the TASC. In fact, many ESL students go on to become peer tutors in the TASC! All QUEST labs are equipped with Skillsbank Plato and Learning Plus software.

SPECIFIC ACADEMIC SERVICES INCLUDE:
The QUEST Math Lab (B-109 ext. 2986) offers developmental mathematics courses including Arithmetic Review (MTH 01), Introduction to Algebra (MTH 1N), Algebra & Essential Geometry (MTH 4N), and Intermediate Algebra (MTH 07 and 08). Students in the Math Lab progress at their own pace to master each topic, with extra support provided if needed. Students may complete a course in less than one semester, or they may take up to one academic year (two consecutive semesters). Learning resources include small group study, computer-assisted learning and mini-lectures. Each lab class is led by an instructor and supported by one-on-one instruction/tutoring from the Math Skills Specialist and the QUEST tutors. Open Lab hours also provide extra individualized tutoring if desired.

2007-2008

55
• Office of Disability Services • Tutoring & Academic Support

Center for Developmental Education General Studies Prep • General Studies Prep ESL • General Studies Prep Career Prep • TRiO QUEST
Center

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON QUEST

Eligibility
General Studies Prep (see page 50) students receive priority acceptance to QUEST services, but QUEST is open to eligible students in any program. Students may request information about the QUEST program through the admission process. At the time of placement testing, interested students may apply for participation in the program. Students interested in this TRiO Program can contact Assistant Dean Susan Boissoneault, QUEST Project Director at any time.

DISABILITY SERVICES Jan Baptist, Director, extension 2955
Disability Services provides support services that enable students with disabilities to fully participate in the life of the academic community. Disability Services provides the following services to students with documented disabilities: accommodations, assistive technology and training, self-advocacy and leadership training, coordination of services with local agencies such as Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission, Massachusetts Commission for the Blind, and Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Disability Services also provides screening for learning disabilities based upon faculty referral and/or self-report. Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact Disability Services early to allow adequate time to arrange accommodations prior to the beginning of classes. A minimum of 3 - 6 weeks may be needed to arrange for certain accommodations. Learn more about Disability Services at www.bristol.mass.edu. Go to the Academic quick link and then Academic Support Programs. Click directly on Disability Services. To make an appointment in New Bedford, call ext. 4000.

Participation Requirements
Students in the QUEST Program are required to complete CSS 11, the College Success Seminar. QUEST students enroll in a designated course section at no charge. Students are also required to attend QUEST Day orientation and to allow staff to monitor their academic progress. QUEST students are enrolled in a degree program, are usually attending full-time, and take the majority of their classes before 4pm. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND GRADING IN CDE PROGRAMS
Grading in Self-Paced Learning Labs: Students who successfully complete a QUEST self-paced learning lab course earn grades of A, B, or C including plus and minus grades. Students who make satisfactory progress and complete at least 50 percent of the required coursework will receive a grade of “S” (Satisfactory) and must register for the same lab course the following semester. The “S” grade is not final and does not apply to the degree or the Grade Point Average (G.P.A.). Students who do not make satisfactory progress and complete less than 50 percent of the course requirements will receive a grade of “U” (Unsatisfactory) and must register for the same course in a traditional lecture section in the following semester. “U” grades are treated in the same way as “F” grades with regard to satisfactory progress, academic standing, and G.P.A. Academic Standing and Dismissal: Full-time students in the General Studies Prep program, including ESL students, are placed on probation if they fail to complete a minimum of 9 credits of coursework with a minimum grade of “C- ” after one semester. Students may be dismissed from the college if they fail to complete the 9credit minimum after two semesters. Dismissed students may reenroll only as non-degree students and are not eligible for financial aid.

TUTORING & ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER Dr. Ronald Weisberger, Coordinator, extension 2295
The CDE’s Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC) is a nationally recognized comprehensive learning center. The TASC provides individual and group tutoring in an accepting and supportive environment and encourages collaborative learning. Students will also find self-paced, computer supported instruction in reading, writing and math; the latest in multimedia software, audiovisual and print materials to supplement their classes, access to the Internet, and a community of students who want to make their college career a success. Tutoring is offered for most BCC courses. Our peer tutors are highly trained and certified by the College Reading and Learning Association. Supplemental Instruction (SI) offers designated group study sessions led by a master tutor who attends class, leads a content review, and demonstrates effective learning and study methods. Learn more about tutoring at www.bristol. mass.edu. Go to Academic quick link and then Academic Support Programs. Click directly on The Tutoring and Academic Support Center. For tutoring services in New Bedford, call ext. 4000.

The Honors Program opened me to new experiences. It prepared me for the next step after BCC. Your whole perspective of the world changes.
Beth-Ann Donovan ’03 Communication

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Business Information Systems 58 Computer Networking Computer Programming Computer Science (transfer) Game Development Game Creation Game Programming Multimedia and Internet Security Webmaster 62 63 65 66 67 59 60 61

Computer Information Systems
Why choose Computer Information Systems?
Degree programs offer a sound foundation in basic information system management and allow students to specialize in high-demand technology fields. Programs allow immediate workforce entry or transfer to a four-year program. Certificate programs develop specific professional skills and can be used to enhance degree programs.

Information Systems (transfer) 64

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
A+ Certification Basic Web Page Development Computer Programming Fundamental Computer Skills Help Desk Software Support Information Technology Teaching JAVA Master JAVA Programmer Multimedia Development NetworkTech Open Source Oracle Database Security 68 68 69 70 71

Computer Game Development 69 Desktop Publishing Technology 70

Information Technology Fluency 71 72 72 73 73 74 75 75 76

Novell Network Administration 74

Windows 2003 Administration 76

58
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Computer Information Systems Option
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems Concentration) Credits required: 62/65 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems PROGRAM INFORMATION • The program offers state-of-the-art education in the computer area. We are constantly in touch with industry and we develop and offer courses that prepare students for today’s jobs. Many students take more than the required courses because the technology available at BCC is truly outstanding! • With one additional Engineering course, students in this program are prepared to take the A+ Certification examinations, the recognized industry standards for computer service technicians. • Programs are based in the Business Technologies building, where seven computer labs provide computer access for students. • The optional Cooperative Education program places students in computerrelated positions, where they can earn course credit, wages, and experience. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 11 and/or 22, CIS 13, CIT 20 Semester 2: CIS 24, CIS 50 or 61 or CIT 32, CIS elective Semester 3: CIS elective, CIS 24, CIS 50 or 61 or CIT 32 Semester 4: CIS 56, (CIS 30 or CIS 31 or CIS 65*) CIS 54 Note: *CIS 65 is a fall course. To take this course, students adjust their courses and take this in the third semester and move another course to the fall semester.

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Business Information Systems
This program prepares people to solve computer– based problems for business. They learn to work with a variety of applications, create and maintain Web pages, and perform basic computer maintenance. Their well-rounded computer background is highly valued by employers.

General Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Fundamentals of an Enterprise 1 credit Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits _____ ACC 11 or 50 Principles of Accounting I or Small Business Financial Software 3/4 credits _____ ECN 12 or Principles of Economics — Micro or PSY 51 General Psychology 3 credits _____ MTH 19 or Fundamental Statistics or MTH 25 or Modern College Mathematics or MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics 3 credits Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits CIS Business Elective or CIS Elective or ETK 69 (choose one): _____ ELECTIVE Choose from CIS 11, 23, 30, 31, 39, 45, 46, 50, 61, 65, 68, 70, CIT 31, 32 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Choose 3-4 credits from ACC, MAN, MAR 3/4 credits _____ ETK 69 Computer Configuration & Repair 4 credits Business Creativity Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation The Microcomputer Environment Internet Developer Operating Systems Systems Analysis and Design Seminar Visual Basic Hardware Fundamentals Microcomputer Applications 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit

Program Courses _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 17

Hints for Success
Students with little background in computers and office applications take CIS 11. Take OFC 02 to strengthen keyboarding skills. Take CIS 53 in first semester.

_____ CIS 24 _____ CIS 44 _____ CIS 53 _____ CIS 54 _____ CIS 56 _____ CIT 20 _____ CIS 22 _____ CIS 50 or CIS 61 or CIT 32

After BCC

• Recent graduates are in high demand and have moved into various types of employment, including positions with titles such as help desk technician, office specialist, computer sales, or consultant. Some have started their own businesses. Frequently, they serve as the computer person in a small company. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Oracle and SQL or Database Programming and Management with Access or Open Source Database

(Take CIS 11 if skills are needed prior to CIS 22.)

3 credits

3 credits

Program Electives _____ ELECTIVE

Choose from CIS 11, 23, 30, 31, 39, 45, 46, 50, 61, 65, 68, 70, CIT 31, 32 3 credits

2007-2008

59

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

Computer Networking
This option provides a strong background in networking technologies for employment as a network administrator. Students gain the knowledge and hands-on experience with Microsoft’s Networking Operating System (Windows 2003), Novell’s Networking Operating System (NetWare 6.5), and Linux/Unix. The program includes all topics required to test for A+ Certification, Network+ Certification, and Linux+ Certification. BCC is a Novell Academic Training Partner. The program includes topics required to test for Novell Certified Administrator.

CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Computer Networking Concentration) Credits required: 64/65 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

General Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Fundamentals of an Enterprise Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Science

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

OPTION INFORMATION • BCC’s program is one of a few college degree programs to offer preparation for network certification combined with course work to develop high proficiency. • Programs are based in the Business Technologies building, where seven computer labs provide computer access for students. • The optional Cooperative Education program places students in computer-related positions where they can earn course credit, wages, and experience. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students with little background in computers and office applications should consider taking CIS 11. Take OFC 02 if you wish to strengthen your keyboarding skills. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 17, CIS 53 Semester 2: CIS 31, CIS 33, CIS 63 Semester 3: CIS 32, CIS 64, CIS 65 Semester 4: CIS 34, CIS 66, CIT 25

Program Courses _____ CIS 17 _____ CIS 31 _____ CIS 32 _____ CIS 33 _____ CIS 34 _____ CIS 53 _____ CIS 63 _____ CIS 64 _____ CIS 65 _____ CIS 66 _____ CIT 25 _____ ETK 69

Hints for Success
Students with little background in computers and office applications take CIS 11. Take OFC 02 to strengthen keyboarding skills. Take CIS 53 in first semester.

Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation 3 credits NetWare Systems Manager I 3 credits NetWare Systems Manager II 3 credits Networking Technologies 4 credits Network Installation and Configuration Seminar 4 credits Operating Systems 3 credits Introduction to UNIX/Linux and Shell Programming 3 credits UNIX/Linux System Administration 3 credits Windows Server Administration I 3 credits Windows Server Administration II 3 credits Network Security 3 credits Computer Configuration & Repair 4 credits

After BCC

• Recent graduates hold positions as a network and telecommunications architecture manager, associate systems engineer, network administrator, help desk technician, support services representative, computer systems engineer, senior information technologist, technical director and consultant. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

60
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Computer Programming Concentration) Credits required: 62/68 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students have access to outstanding state-of-the-art technology and learn from faculty in touch with the needs of industry locally and nationally. Courses are constantly evolving to reflect current trends. • The optional Cooperative Education program places students in computer-related positions, where they can earn course credit, wages, and experience. Computer Programming Option Program Electives: Students may not take both CIS 73 and CIS 45 for credit, and may not get credit for both CIT 43 and CIS 60 or for both CIT 45 and CIS 62. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 17, CIS 53, CIT 20 Semester 2: CIS 12/47/56/60/73, elective Semester 3: CIS 51/62/67/74/CIT 72, CIS 50 Semester 4: CIS elective, CIS programming elective, CIS 52

Computer Programming
The Computer Programming Career option prepares students for entry-level programming positions in business and industry. Course work focuses on the skills to analyze business problems and develop computerized solutions using multiple programming languages. Those who like to solve problems, enjoy the fascination of computers, and want a career in constant demand find this program an excellent choice.

General Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ ECN 12 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
Courses required in the Computer Programming option are available over the Internet. Students can complete a degree entirely via distance learning. This is an exciting option for students with time and distance considerations!

• Recent graduates have successfully started their own businesses or gone to work as programmers, programmer analysts, systems administrators, systems analysts, software developers, help desk technicians and consultants. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Fundamentals of an Enterprise 1 credit Principles of Economics — Micro 3 credits Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits _____ ACC 11 or Principles of Accounting I or 3/4 credits ACC 50 Small Business Financial Software _____ MTH 10 or Elementary Functions or 3 credits MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE(S) Choose 3-4 credits from ACC 12, ACC, MAN, MAR, or a CIS elective 3/4 credits Program Courses _____ CIS 17 Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation 3 credits _____ CIS 50 Oracle and SQL 3 credits _____ CIS 52 Program Development Seminar 3 credits _____ CIS 53 Operating Systems 3 credits _____ CIT 20 Hardware Fundamentals 1 credit CIS 12, 47, 56, 60, or 73 (choose two): _____ CIS 12 Introduction to Programming (COBOL) 3 credits _____ CIS 47 Interactive Websites 3 credits _____ CIS 56 Visual Basic 3 credits _____ CIS 60 or Introduction to C++ Programming 3 credits CIS 73 Object-Oriented JAVA Programming I 4 credits CIS 51, 62, 67, CIT 72, or CIS 74 (choose two): _____ CIS 51 Advanced COBOL Programming 3 credits _____ CIS 67 Advanced Visual Basic 3 credits _____ CIT 72 Advanced Interactive Programming 3 credits _____ CIS 62 or C++ Object Oriented Programming 3 credits CIS 74 Object-Oriented JAVA Programming II 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Choose from CIS 22, 24, 31, 37, 39, 40, 41,

_____ ELECTIVE

44, 45, 47, 56, 60, 61, 62, 63, 65, 67, 68, 70, 73, 74, CIT 32, 43, 45, 72, 80 3 credits Choose 3-4 credits from CIS 37, 44, 45, 47, 56, 60, 61, 62, 67, 68, 73, CIT 32, 43, 45, 72, 80

3/4 credits

2007-2008

61

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

Computer Science (transfer)
The Computer Science Transfer option prepares students to finish their education in Computer Science at a four-year institution. The CIS faculty worked closely with the Computer Science faculty at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth and the resulting program provides a seamless transition to Computer Science at UMass Dartmouth. The program also parallels the computer science offerings at other local colleges and universities.

TRANSFER PROGRAM Computer Science

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Computer Science Transfer Concentration) Credits required: 70 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems PROGRAM INFORMATION • Programs are based in the Business Technologies building, where seven computer labs provide computer access for students • The optional Cooperative Education program places students in computer-related positions, where they can earn course credit, wages, and experience. • The program is a state joint admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should talk with the Transfer office for information about colleges . RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 73, CIT 73 Semester 2: CIS 74 Semester 3: CIS 76, CIS 77 Semester 4: CIS 75, CIS 78

General Courses _____ ECN 12 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 _____ ENG 15 _____ MTH 14 _____ MTH 15 _____ MTH 43 _____ MTH 44 _____ BIO 21 or CHM 13 or PHY 11 _____ BIO 22 or CHM 14 or PHY 12

Principles of Economics — Micro Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature Technical Writing Calculus I Calculus II Discrete Structures I Discrete Structures II Fundamentals of Biological Science I or Fundamentals of Chemistry I or General Physics I Fundamentals of Biological Science II or Fundamentals of Chemistry II or General Physics II

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits

4 credits

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
Students not prepared for calculus should consider taking math courses in the summer. Students without keyboarding experience should take OFC 02.

Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective Program Courses _____ CIS 73 _____ CIS 74 _____ CIS 75 _____ CIS 76 _____ CIS 77 _____ CIS 78 _____ CIT 73 Object-Oriented JAVA Programming I Object-Oriented JAVA Programming II Software Specification and Design Introduction to Procedural Programming Introduction to Computer Systems Computer Organization and Design Object-Oriented Concepts

After BCC
4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits

• Recent graduates have transferred to: Bridgewater State College, Rhode Island College, Roger Williams University, Bryant College, and University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. • BCC has a transfer articulation agreement with UMass Dartmouth.

62
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

GAME DEVELOPMENT

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Game Development: Game Creation Concentration) Credits required: 64/65 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students have access to a broad range of technology, including a dedicated multimedia lab. • Classes are offered days, evenings, and weekends. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 17, CIT 40, CIT 41, CIT 42 Semester 2: CIT 43, CIT 44, CIT 50 Semester 3: CIT 46, CIT 53, CIT 65 Semester 4: CIT 56, CIT 60, CIT 66

Game Creation
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I _____ PSY 51 or General Psychology or SOC 11 or Principles of Sociology or SOC 12 The Sociology of Social Problems _____ SPH 11 or Fundamentals of Speech or THE 11 Introduction to the Theatre Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

The program prepares students for entry into the video game industry. It offers those who want to combine a love of games, fun, and competition with the development of serious computer skills and prepare for a rapidly expanding career field. In the last two semesters, course work mimics industry development as students work in teams to propose and develop a game for distribution. This program is for the student interested in the overall creation and packaging of games.

Core Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ CIS 17

Hints for Success
Courses in the Game Development certificate program transfer into this program.

After BCC

_____ CIT 40 _____ CIT 41 _____ CIT 42 _____ CIT 43 _____ CIT 65 _____ CIT 66

• BCC has established partnerships with several computer game developers. Students have been given the opportunity to do internships and paid work.

Fundamentals of an Enterprise 1 credit Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation 3 credits Electronic Game Development I 3 credits Visual Concepts for Game Designers 3 credits Computer Game Level Building 3 credits Programming and Game Developers I 3 credits Computer Game Pre-Production 1 credit Game Production 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Concentration Courses _____ CIT 44 Electronic Game Development II _____ CIT 46 Game and Sound Production _____ CIT 50 Modding I _____ CIT 53 Game Design on Paper _____ CIT 56 Modding II _____ CIT 60 Advanced Game Analysis

2007-2008

63

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

GAME DEVELOPMENT

Game Programming
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I _____ PSY 51 or General Psychology or Principles of Sociology or SOC 11 or SOC 12 The Sociology of Social Problems Fundamentals of Speech or _____ SPH 11 or THE 11 Introduction to the Theatre Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II West and the World I and _____ HST 11 and _____ HST 12 West and the World II US History to 1877 and _____ HST 13 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

The video gaming industry is the fastest-growing segment of the entertainment business. This program develops a strong programming background for entry-level positions to bring game action to the screen. In the last two semesters, course work mimics industry development as students work in teams to propose and develop a game for distribution.

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Game Development - Game Programming Concentration) Credits required: 64/65 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students have access to a broad range of technology, including a dedicated multimedia lab. • Classes are offered days, evenings, and weekends. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 17, CIT 40, CIT 41, CIT 42 Semester 2: CIT 32, CIT 43 Semester 3: CIT 45, CIT 55, Elective (CIS 44, 56 or 73), CIT 65 Semester 4: CIT 58, CIT 59, CIT 66

Core Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ CIS 17 _____ CIT 40 _____ CIT 41 _____ CIT 42 _____ CIT 43 _____ CIT 65 _____ CIT 66

Hints for Success
Courses in the Game Development certificate program transfer into this program.

Fundamentals of an Enterprise 1 credit Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation 3 credits Electronic Game Development I 3 credits Visual Concepts for Game Designers 3 credits Computer Game Level Building 3 credits Programming and Game Developers I 3 credits Computer Game Pre-Production 1 credit Game Production 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

Concentration Courses _____ CIT 32 Open Source Database _____ CIT 45 Programming for Game Developers II _____ CIT 55 Topics in Game Programming _____ CIT 59 Fundamentals of Game Engine Design _____ CIT 70 Data Structures in the Game Environment _____ ELECTIVE(S) (Choose 3-4 credits from CIS 44,
CIS 56, or CIS 73)

After BCC

• The nearby Boston area offers access to a thriving computer game industry. The College has close relationships with a number of these firms. Students are encouraged to build on the programming skills developed in this program to enhance their knowledge and marketability.

64
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
TRANSFER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Information Systems Transfer Concentration) Credits required: 64/73 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC offers many technical courses frequently not available at four year institutions. • The optional Cooperative Education program places students in computer-related positions, where they can earn course credit, wages, and experience. • The program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take CIS 11 as their first course unless they have previous computer experience or took computer courses in high school. • Students should talk with the transfer office for information about colleges. • Students can meet the Transfer Compact by taking two behavioral and social sciences courses. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 17 or CIS elective Semester 2: CIS 12, 56, 60 or 73 Semester 3: CIS 51 or 67 or 62 or 74, CIS 50 or 61 Semester 4: CIS elective

Information Systems (transfer)
This program enables students to complete the first two years of a bachelor’s degree in Computer Information Systems, Business Information Systems, or Management Information Systems, to transfer to a senior institution with a solid background in programming and accounting.

General Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ ACC 12 _____ ECN 12 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Take courses that transfer to the college of your choice or which develop technical skills:

Principles of Accounting I Principles of Accounting II Principles of Economics — Micro Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ HST 11 West and the World I _____ HST 12 West and the World II See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE(S) Choose 3-5 credits from MTH _____ ELECTIVE(S) Choose 3-4 credits from MTH _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE Free Elective Free Elective Free Elective Oracle and SQL or Database Programming and Management with Access

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/5 credits 3/4 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3/4 credits 3/4 credits 3/4 credits

Program Courses _____ CIS 50 or _____ CIS 61

Hints for Success
After BCC
Before completing half their credits, students should choose their transfer institution so they can tailor electives to their future plans.

3 credits

Program Electives _____ ELECTIVE(S) Choose 3-4 credits from CIS 51, CIS 62,
CIS 67, or CIS 74

• Recent graduates have transferred to: Bridgewater State College, Rhode Island College, Roger Williams University, Bryant University, and University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth. • BCC has a transfer articulation agreement with Roger Williams University.

_____ ELECTIVE(S) Choose 3-4 credits from CIS 12, CIS 56,
CIS 60, or CIS 73

3/4 credits 3/4 credits

_____ FREE ELECTIVE

_____ CIS 17 or

Students are strongly encouraged to consider taking a programming course as their elective if the college to which they plan to transfer will accept it 3/4 credits

_____ ELECTIVE

Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation or

Choose from CIS 12, 51, 56, 60, 62, 67, 73, or 74

3 credits

2007-2008

65

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

Multimedia and Internet
Graduates work with industry-standard software to create Web sites, interactive CDs, and other multimedia tools. Students can specialize in either production or programming by choosing concentration courses listed in the gray area.

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Multimedia and Internet Concentration) Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems PROGRAM INFORMATION • A sophisticated multimedia lab is dedicated for the use of students in this program. • The optional Cooperative Education program places students in computer-related positions, where they can earn course credit, wages, and experience. RECOMMENDATIONS • Sign up for a free e-mail account to communicate with the CIS faculty outside of normal hours. • Plan to spend large blocks of time developing proficiency. MULTIMEDIA PRODUCTION FOCUS

General Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Fundamentals of an Enterprise Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech _____ MAN 54 or Small Business Management or MAR 55 Advertising Principles _____ MTH 19 or Fundamental Statistics or MTH 25 or Modern College Mathematics or MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ ELECTIVE Science Business Creativity Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation Introduction to Multimedia Development Internet Developer Seminar in Desktop Publishing, Imaging and Multimedia Design Macromedia Flash Hardware Fundamentals Web Design I or Electronic Publishing or Applications for Web Development

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits

CIT 58

Introduction to Digital Audio Recording 3 cr ELECTIVE (choose from BUS 52, MAN 54, MAR 55, CED 11 or any CIS or ART course, including a series of three one-credit CIS courses and the one-credit ACC 14) 3 cr ART 39 or Computer Graphics or CIS 27 Desktop Publishing 3 cr COM 42 or Writing for Organizations or ENG 15 Technical Writing 3 cr CIS 36 or Advanced FlashMX or CIT 32 or Open Source Database or COM 59 Video Field Production and Editing 3 cr

Hints for Success
If you have no computer background, take CIS 11 the summer before starting your degree program.

Core Courses _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 17 _____ CIS 29 _____ CIS 44 _____ CIS 69 _____ CIS 85 _____ CIT 20 _____ ART 35 or CIS 28 or CIS 46 Concentration Course

MULTIMEDIA PROGRAMMING DEVELOPMENT FOCUS
CIS 36 CIS 47 CIT 32 ELECTIVE

ELECTIVE

Advanced FlashMX 3 cr Interactive Web Sites 3 cr Open Source Database 3 cr (choose from CIS 45, CIS 50, CIS 53, CIS 63, CIT 58, COM 59) 3 cr (choose from CIS 45, CIS 50, CIS 53, CIS 63, CIT 58, CIT 72, COM 59) 3 cr

After BCC

• The growth of the Internet and the demand for people who can effectively use multimedia applications make the skills developed in this program highly marketable. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Select 15 credits based on concentration focus (see gray area)

66
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems (Security Concentration) Credits required: 64/65 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Security
Computer security is a continually changing and evolving issue for businesses. This program prepares students for critical roles in developing solutions to security problems by providing theoretical concepts of information security and the methodologies to apply learning to practical problem-solving and prevention.

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIS 53, CIS 65, CIS 33, CIS 63 Semester 2: CIT 25, CIS 66, CIS 64, CIS 17, CIT 20 Semester 3: CIT 26, CIT 27, CIT 28 Semester 4: CIT 39

General Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Fundamentals of an Enterprise Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ ELECTIVE Science

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

Program Courses _____ CIS 17 _____ CIS 33 _____ CIS 53 _____ CIS 63

Hints for Success
Many BCC courses are offered via the Internet for online learning.

After BCC

• This new program prepares students for high-demand roles to protect critical functions in all types of enterprises. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, contact Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) for advice on appropriate courses for transfer.

_____ CIS 64 _____ CIS 65 _____ CIS 66 _____ CIT 20 _____ CIT 25 _____ CIT 26 _____ CIT 27 _____ CIT 28 _____ CIT 39

Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation 3 credits Networking Technologies 4 credits Operating Systems 3 credits Introduction to UNIX/Linux and Shell Programming 3 credits UNIX/Linux System Administration 3 credits Windows Server Administration I 3 credits Windows Server Administration II 3 credits Hardware Fundamentals 1 credit Network Security 3 credits Firewall Security 3 credits Operating Systems Security 3 credits Information Security and Disaster Recovery 3 credits Security Seminar 4 credits

2007-2008

67

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

Webmaster
This option is designed to give students the knowledge and skills necessary to design, develop, implement and maintain a Web site. The student will learn the technical skills necessary for developing a site that handles static and interactive Web communications and for developing and maintaining the server side of the Web site.

CAREER PROGRAM Computer Information Systems Option

Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Computer Information Systems (Webmaster Concentration) Credits required: 63/65 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

General Courses _____ BUS 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Fundamentals of an Enterprise Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MAR 55 Advertising Principles _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech _____ MTH 19 or Fundamental Statistics or MTH 25 or Modern College Mathematics or MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science _____ ELECTIVE Science Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation Internet Developer Applications for Web Development Interactive Web Sites Internet Seminar Oracle and SQL Operating Systems Introduction to UNIX/Linux and Shell Programming Macromedia Flash Hardware Fundamentals Open Source Database Advanced Interactive Programming

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program will help to put you in the lead in Internet development and implementation. • It offers state-of-the-art education in the computer area, with the latest equipment. We offer courses that prepare students for today’s jobs. Many students take more than the required courses because the technology available is truly outstanding. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIT 20, CIS 17, CIS 44 Semester 2: CIS 46, CIS 53, CIS 85, CIT 32 Semester 3: CIS 47, CIS 50, CIS 63 Semester 4: CIT 72, CIS 49, CIS Elective

Program Courses _____ CIS 17 _____ CIS 44 _____ CIS 46 _____ CIS 47 _____ CIS 49 _____ CIS 50 _____ CIS 53 _____ CIS 63 _____ CIS 85 _____ CIT 20 _____ CIT 32 _____ CIT 72 Program Electives _____ ELECTIVE

Hints for Success
Students should start taking the required CIS courses upon entering this program.

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits

After BCC

• The Web has become an integral part of business and society. Most companies and organizations are looking to the Web to market their products, serve their clientele, and meet their competition. The demand for people capable of handling the Web needs of companies is rapidly expanding.

Choose from CIT 35, CIS 36, CIS 45, CIS 48, CIT 58, or CIT 80 3/4 credits

68
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION A+ Certification
Credits required: 10 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

A+ Certification
Students learn how to maintain a computer and solve operating system and hardware problems. Students completing this certificate cover the material tested on the A+ Certification Examination, a recognized industry standard for computer service technician certification.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • A+ students are prepared to sit for certification exam after completing CIS 53, 24 and ETK 69 courses. RECOMMENDATIONS • If you have no prior computer experience, take CIS 11 before beginning this certificate program. • Sign up for a free e-mail account to communicate with the CIS faculty outside of normal hours. • Take CIS 53 in the first semester. • To finish in a year, take CIS 53 and CIS 24 during the first semester.

Program Courses _____ CIS 24 _____ CIS 53 _____ ETK 69

The Microcomputer Environment 3 credits Operating Systems 3 credits Computer Configuration & Repair 4 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Basic Web Page Development
Credits required: 12 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Basic Web Page Development
This certificate program is designed to meet today’s demand for knowledgeable Internet users and developers. Students learn to develop Web pages for specific goals and to access the Internet for research and communications.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This certificate is designed for users experienced in either the application development or programming areas. Students without basic computers skills must complete CIS 11 prior to starting the certificate. • This certificate helps students develop skills and expertise to design effective Web pages. • This certificate would supplement any college program.

Program Courses _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 44 _____ CIS 45 _____ CIS 46

Business Creativity Internet Developer Introduction to Java for Internet Developers Applications for Web Development

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

69
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Computer Game Development
Credits required: 27 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Computer Game Development
Students gain an understanding of all aspects of electronic game production. Each student participates as a team member in the creation of an electronic game.

Program Courses _____ CIT 40 _____ CIT 41 _____ CIT 42 _____ CIT 43 _____ CIT 44 _____ CIT 45 _____ CIT 46 _____ CIT 47 _____ ENG 11

Electronic Game Development I 3 credits Visual Concepts for Game Designers 3 credits Computer Game Level Building 3 credits Programming and Game Developers I 3 credits Electronic Game Development II 3 credits Programming for Game Developers II 3 credits Game and Sound Production 3 credits Production for Game Developers 3 credits Composition I: College Writing 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Provides foundation skills in game development. • Develops the skills necessary for employment by electronic game development companies in basic entry-level positions. • Due to the fast-track nature of the course, students may need to follow up with additional sample work or study to gain employment.

Computer Programming
A certificate in Computer Programming gives students mastery of basic programming concepts. The student becomes literate in at least three programming languages and achieves advanced mastery of more sophisticated concepts in at least one programming language.

Program Courses Choose 3-4 credits of a first semester programming language: _____ CIS 12 Introduction to Programming (COBOL) 3 credits _____ CIS 56 Visual Basic 3 credits _____ CIS 60 Introduction to C++ Programming 3 credits _____ CIS 73 Object-Oriented JAVA Programming I 4 credits Choose 3-4 credits of the second semester of the programming language previously taken: _____ CIS 51 Advanced COBOL Programming 3 credits _____ CIS 62 C++ Object Oriented Programming 3 credits _____ CIS 67 Advanced Visual Basic 3 credits _____ CIS 74 Object-Oriented JAVA Programming II 4 credits Database Programming (choose 3 credits): _____ CIS 50 Oracle and SQL 3 credits _____ CIS 61 Database Programming and Management with Access 3 credits _____ CIT 32 Open Source Database 3 credits Elective - Programming (choose 3-4 credits from CIS 12 CIS 51, CIS 44, CIS 47, CIS 50, CIS 56, CIS 60, CIS 62, CIS 67, CIS 73, CIS 74; CIT 43, CIT 45): _____ ELECTIVE(S) 3/4 credits Elective - Programming Language (choose 3-4 credits from CIS 12, CIS 47, CIS 56, CIS 60, CIS 73; CIT 43): _____ ELECTIVE(S) 3/4 credits

CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT Computer Programming

Credits required: 15/19 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems REQUIREMENT • Students without basic computer skills should enroll in CIS 11 prior to enrolling in this certificate. Students who need basic keyboarding skills should enroll in OFC 02 prior to enrolling in this program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Sign up for a free e-mail account to communicate with the CIS faculty outside of normal hours. • Plan to spend large blocks of time developing proficiency.

70
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Desktop Publishing Technology
Credits required: 12 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Desktop Publishing Technology
The certificate in Desktop Publishing Technology provides training in the computer skills needed to work in the pre-press environment. Courses focus on using industry-standard pagination and digital imaging software and deal with basic writing and editing.

REQUIREMENTS • Students entering this certificate program must understand the basic concepts of an operating system, spreadsheet, and a database. Students without keyboarding skills should complete OFC 02. • Those without computer experience must take CIS 11 before starting the program. CIS 22 is also helpful.

Program Courses _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 27 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 15

Business Creativity Desktop Publishing Composition I: College Writing Technical Writing

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Fundamental Computer Skills
Credits required: 8 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Fundamental Computer Skills
Students will learn word processing, spreadsheets, and databases and how to use the Internet for research and exploration. This certificate is designed for people who need to learn to use computers effectively on the job or at home or to make a career change.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program assumes no prior computer knowledge and is aimed at those nervous about acquiring those skills. • This program could be used to develop a level of computer literacy that would be an asset in any college program. RECOMMENDATIONS • Sign up for a free e-mail account to communicate with the CIS faculty outside of normal hours. • Plan to spend large blocks of time developing proficiency.

Program Courses _____ CIS 06 _____ CIS 11 _____ CIS 22 _____ OFC 02

May be waived by previous course or passing a keyboarding test administered by the Office Administration department.

Internet User 1 credit Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits Microcomputer Applications 3 credits Computer Keyboarding 1 credit

2007-2008

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

71
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Help Desk Software Support
Credits required: 29 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Help Desk Software Support
Students learn problem-solving skills and acquire the ability to deal with general computer issues raised by the user both in person, over the phone, and via email. Students work at preparing support material for use in areas such as Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) support .

Program Courses _____ CIS 15 _____ CIS 22 _____ CIS 23 _____ CIS 24 _____ CIS 44 _____ CIS 53 _____ CIT 20 _____ CIT 21 _____ CIT 22 _____ CIT 23 _____ ENG 11

Database Fundamentals Microcomputer Applications Advanced Microcomputer Applications The Microcomputer Environment Internet Developer Operating Systems Hardware Fundamentals Help Desk Methods Troubleshooting Applications Applied Help Desk Support Composition I: College Writing

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students who would like to continue their education are encouraged to earn the A+ certificate and one of the networking certificates to advanced their knowledge in the more technical areas of support. • Students learn skills to troubleshoot and resolve software problems using a variety of software.

Information Technology Fluency
This certificate covers the concepts, skills, and understanding needed for students to apply their information technology knowledge to their professional life.

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Information Technology Fluency
Credits required: 9 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Program Courses _____ CIT 11 _____ CIT 12 _____ CIT 13

Information Technology Fluency I 3 credits Information Technology Fluency II 3 credits Information Technology Fluency III 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Curriculum follows Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Research Council guidelines for ensuring basic technology literacy. • The third course in this sequence involves a project applying knowledge to your field of interest. • Available online via Distance Learning. • Consider using this certificate to add information technology studies to your degree program in any field. • This program assumes the online ability to check a Web site and use email.

72
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT Information Technology Teaching
Credits required: 15 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Information Technology Teaching
This certificate is designed to provide paraprofessionals, teachers, and students preparing to teach with the competencies needed as an Instructional Technology Specialist.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Much of this certificate will be available as online courses. • This program assumes the ability to work online to check a Web site and use email.

Program Courses _____ CIT 11 _____ CIT 12 _____ CIT 13 _____ CIT 14 _____ CIT 15

Information Technology Fluency I Information Technology Fluency II Information Technology Fluency III Technology for Teachers Seminar I Technology for Teachers Seminar II

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION JAVA Master
Credits required: 8 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

JAVA Master
The JAVA Master certificate allows IT professionals to enhance JAVA skills and become knowledgeable in Enterprise and JAVA Server Pages.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Program prerequisite: earned JAVA Programming Certificate or permission of the CIS department. • Those who successfully complete this certificate can sit for tests for the JAVA Business Component Developer Certificate and the JAVA Web Component Developer Certificate.

Program Courses _____ CIS 79 _____ CIT 80

J2EE - Enterprise JAVA Beans (EJB) 4 credits J2EE - JAVA Server Pages (JSP) and Servlets 4 credits

2007-2008

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

73
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION JAVA Programmer
Credits required: 12 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

JAVA Programmer
JAVA is becoming a very popular language and a language that many IT professionals need to learn to upgrade their skills. This certificate covers the material needed to sit for the JAVA2 Programmer Certificate exam offered by Sun. Course material matches UMD Computer Science courses.

Program Courses _____ CIS 73 _____ CIS 74 _____ CIS 75

Object-Oriented JAVA Programming I Object-Oriented JAVA Programming II Software Specification and Design

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Some programming background would be a plus. • The material must be taken in the threesemester sequence because the material progressively builds

Multimedia Development
This certificate emphasizes the technical expertise needed to create and develop professional documents, presentations, and Web pages as well as work in business creativity and marketing.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Multimedia Development
Credits required: 24 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Program Courses _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 27 _____ CIS 28 _____ CIS 29 _____ CIS 44 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 54 or MAR 55

Business Creativity Desktop Publishing Electronic Publishing Introduction to Multimedia Development Internet Developer (CIS) Composition I: College Writing Small Business Management or Advertising Principles

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Basic ability to use computers as a business tool and ability to use the Internet and email is expected. • Courses can transfer into an associate degree program in Computer Information Systems. • A multimedia lab dedicated to this program enables students to work with state-of-the-art hardware and software to produce sophisticated projects. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students without basic computer skills should enroll in CIS 11 prior to enrolling in this program. Students who need basic keyboarding skills should enroll in OFC 02 prior to enrolling in this program.

74
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT NetworkTech
Credits: 25 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

NetworkTech
This certificate allows students to learn the practical aspects of fixing hardware and software and also the basics of operating systems and networking computers.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students are prepared for employment as A+ technicians and as Windows server administrators. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students are encouraged to sit for the A+ Certification exam. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, CIS 24, CIS 53, CIS 65 Semester 2: ENG 15, CIS 63, CIS 66, ETK 69

Program Courses _____ CIS 24 _____ CIS 53 _____ CIS 63 _____ CIS 65 _____ CIS 66 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 15 _____ ETK 69

The Microcomputer Environment Operating Systems Introduction to UNIX/Linux and Shell Programming Windows Server Administration I Windows Server Administration II Composition I: College Writing Technical Writing Computer Configuration & Repair

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Novell Network Administration
Credits required: 9 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Novell Network Administration
Students prepare to use NetWare administrative tools to set up, manage, and use basic network services, including file systems, network printing, and security. Students will learn how to install and configure all software necessary for using a NetWare network.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Prepares students for Novell NetWork Administration exam • Novell NetWork Administration students can sit for certification exam after completing CIS 53, 31, and 32 courses. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students without basic computer skills should enroll in CIS 11 prior to enrolling in this program. Students who need basic keyboarding skills should enroll in OFC 02 prior to enrolling in this program.

Program Courses _____ CIS 31 _____ CIS 32 _____ CIS 53

NetWare Systems Manager I NetWare Systems Manager II Operating Systems

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

Certificates: A+ Certification • Basic Web Page Development • Computer Game Development • Computer Programming • Desktop Publishing Technology • Fundamental Computer Skills • Help Desk Software Support • Information Technology Fluency • Information Technology Teaching • JAVA Master • JAVA Programmer • Multimedia Development • NetworkTech • Novell Network Administration • Open Source • Oracle Database • Security • Windows 2003 Administration

75
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Open Source
Credits required: 12 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Open Source
Program Courses _____ CIS 44 _____ CIT 30 _____ CIT 31 _____ CIT 32

Open Source is software code available for others to look at, modify, and use. It provides an alternative-computing platform that is far more under the control of the user and developer. It also meets the need for training required by companies and government agencies beginning to use open source products.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Basic knowledge of computers, operating systems, and application software is of value but is not required.

Internet Developer Open Source Applications Open Source Operating System Open Source Database

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Oracle Database
This certificate is designed for the working professional looking to enhance skills or the CIS student seeking expanded skills for the workplace. Many of the design and query skills learned are applicable when working with other databases.

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Oracle Database
Credits required: 12 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Program Courses _____ CIS 39 _____ CIS 50 _____ CIS 68 _____ CIS 70

Database Design Oracle and SQL Oracle with Forms and Reports Oracle Database Administration

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

76
Computer Information Systems Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Security
Credits required: 12 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

2007-2008

Computer Information Systems (Business Information Systems, Computer Networking, Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Development Creation and Programming, Information Systems, Multimedia and Internet, Security, Webmaster)

Security
Expertise in computer security is in high demand. This certificate prepares students entering the computing field and professionals to upgrade their skills. It offers additional skills as part of the Networking degree option or the Webmaster degree option.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Before taking this certificate, complete CIS 33 and CIS 53, and either have taken or currently be enrolled in CIS 63. Those with prior professional experience can request permission from the CIS department.

Program Courses _____ CIT 25 _____ CIT 26 _____ CIT 27 _____ CIT 28

Network Security Firewall Security Operating Systems Security Information Security and Disaster Recovery

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Windows 2003 Administration
Credits required: 9 Program director: Priscilla F. Grocer, Professor of Computer Information Systems

Windows 2003 Administration
Learn to use Windows administrative tools to set up, manage, and use basic network services, including file systems, network printing, and security. Students will learn how to install and configure all software necessary for using a Windows 2003 network.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Plan to spend large blocks of time developing proficiency. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students without basic computer skills should enroll in CIS 11 prior to enrolling in this program. Students who need basic keyboarding skills should enroll in OFC 02 prior to enrolling in this program.

Program Courses _____ CIS 53 _____ CIS 65 _____ CIS 66

Operating Systems Windows Server Administration I Windows Server Administration II

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Engineering Technology Career Biomanufacturing Technology Civil Technology Electro-Mechanical Technology Electronics Technology

Engineering, Technology, and Environment
Why choose Engineering, Technology, and Environment?
Degree programs provide solid technical skill development to enter the workforce immediately or for transfer to a four-year program. Advanced computer access, close attention from faculty members, and a full array of support services for learning complex material distinguish these programs. Certificate programs allow students to develop specific professional skills and can be used to enhance degree programs.

78 79 80 81

Environmental Technology 82 Manufacturing Technology 83 Mechanical Technology Structural Technology Engineering Transfer Engineering Science (transfer) Environmental Science (transfer) Technology Education (transfer) 86 88 89 84 85

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Applied Construction Technology Applied Manufacturing Biotechnology Computer Aided Design and Drafting Foundations of Technical Careers 90 90 91 91 92

Geographic Information Systems 92 (GIS) Surveying Water Quality Professional 93 93

78
CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Biomanufacturing

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology Credits required: 69 Program director: Mary Cass, Coordinator and Assistant Professor of Manufacturing Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • The primary focus is developing an understanding of engineering principles applied to solving technical problems. • Students develop expertise in computers, automated equipment, and working in a laboratory environment. • This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities (e.g., work). • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BIO 21, ENG 11, ETK 19, MTH 17, PHY 01 Semester 2: ENG 12, ETK 20, ETK 79, MTH 19, Humanities/Arts Semester 3: BIO 26, BIO 39, CHM 13, ETK 64, HST/AMC Semester 4: CED 11, ETK 63, ETK 70, HST/ AMC, Behavioral/Social Science

Biomanufacturing Technology
This option prepares students for technical positions in biotechnology and pharmaceutical manufacturing industries. Students learn to use manufacturing equipment and to understand biological and chemical processes in a hands-on, practical environment.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
If you have no computer background, take ETK 13 prior to other technical courses. Skills learned in SCI, MTH, and ENG courses are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

• Graduates of this program can enter the workforce as biomanufacturing, bioprocess or pharmaceutical manufacturing technicians. Salaries start at up to $30,000 and the field offers rapid advancement potential. Regional job growth is predicted to exceed 10 percent annually.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Humanities 3 credits Core Courses _____ CED 11 Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits _____ ETK 19 Electrical Circuits I 4 credits _____ ETK 20 Electrical Circuits II 4 credits _____ ETK 63 Industrial Automation 3 credits _____ ETK 64 Hydraulics-Pneumatics 4 credits _____ ETK 70 Thermodynamics 3 credits _____ ETK 79 Engineering Material Science 4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ BIO 21 Fundamentals of Biological Science I 4 credits _____ BIO 26 Introduction to Biotechnology 3 credits _____ BIO 39 Elements of Microbiology 4 credits _____ CHM 13 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 credits _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 19 Fundamental Statistics 3 credits

2007-2008

79
CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Civil

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Students are prepared to work as technicians for

Civil Technology
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective courses: _____ ELECTIVE or Behavioral/Social Science or SSC 17 Technology and Society 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Humanities/Arts or SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ CAD 58 Civil Drafting and Design 3 credits _____ ENV 15 Hazardous Waste/Waste Management 4 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits _____ ETK 54 Statics 3 credits _____ ETK 56 Surveying 4 credits _____ ETK 57 Soils and Foundations 3 credits _____ ETK 58 Surveying II 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Core Electives Choose from ETK, ENV, CAD, CED 11, CED 12, or PHY 02: _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ CHM 11 General College Chemistry I 4 credits _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

engineering consulting firms, construction companies, land developers, government agencies, and surveyors.

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Civil Concentration) Credits required: 67/70 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students receive many hours of hands-on experience as well as exposure to background theory in modern laboratories and computer labs taught by faculty with many years of professional experience. • Students may complete math prerequisites at BCC. • Some courses may be offered only in the evening. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, ETK 13, MTH 17, or MTH 10 & 13, PHY 01, AMC/HST Semester 2: CAD 15, ENG 12, MTH 18 or MTH 14, AMC/HST, Humanities/Arts or SPH 11 Semester 3: CAD 58, CHM 11, ENV 15, ETK 56, ETK 54 Semester 4: ETK 57, ETK 58, SSC 17 or Behavioral/Social Science, ETK 99 or Technical elective, Technical elective SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES: Transfer: PHY 02, ETK 53 (with MTH 10, 13, 14) Structural: ETK 52, ETK 53 Environmental: ENV 11, ENV 51 Computer-Aided Design: CAD 18, CAD 53 GIS: ENV 30, ENV 31 Cooperative Education: CED 11, CED 12

Hints for Success
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, ENG, and ETK 13 are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

After BCC

• Alumni work for land development companies, surveyors, and city, town, and state governments. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

80
CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Electro-Mechanical

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (ElectroMechanical Concentration) Credits required: 68/72 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program is especially valuable to the person who wants technical diversity. It will open employment doors to many jobs that require multidisciplinary competencies. • Take ENG 11, MTH 17, PHY 01, ETK 19, ETK 13 first. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, ETK 13, ETK 19, PHY 01, MTH 17 or MTH 10 & 13 Semester 2: CAD 15, ETK 20, ETK 67, MTH 14 or MTH 18, PHY 02 or CHM Elect. Semester 3: ENG 12, ETK 75, AMC/HST, ETK 54, Technical elective Semester 4: AMC/HST, SSC 17 or Behavioral/Social Sciences, SPH 11 or Humanities/Arts, ETK 99 or Technical electives, Technical elective SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES For students who want to specialize, choose these electives: Electrical: ETK 49, ETK 69, ETK 76 Manufacturing: ETK 41, ETK 42, ETK 63 Mechanical: ETK 59, ETK 62, ETK 79 Computer Aided Design: CAD 18, CAD 19, CAD 20 Cooperative Education: CED 11, CED 12 Transfer: CAD 18, ETK 62, ETK 76 (with MTH 10, 13, and 14)

Electro-Mechanical Technology
This program prepares students for high-tech industries as technical employees who can work on equipment that uses both electrical and mechanical engineering principles.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, ENG, ETK 13, and ETK 19 are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

After BCC

• Graduates work as engineering aides, field service technicians, technical representatives, maintenance technicians, and automation technicians. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 11 and _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 13 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE or Behavioral/Social Science Elective or SSC 17 Technology and Society 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Humanities/Arts Elective or SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits _____ ETK 19 Electrical Circuits I 4 credits _____ ETK 20 Electrical Circuits II 4 credits _____ ETK 54 Statics 3 credits _____ ETK 67 Digital Computer Fundamentals I 4 credits _____ ETK 75 Electronic Theory I 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Core Electives Choose from CAD and ETK courses; CED 11, CED 12: _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Chemistry or (Choose from CHM 11, 12, 13, 14) PHY 02 Technical Physics II 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

2007-2008

81

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Electronics Technology
This specialized program prepares students for telecommunications, a growing industry in Massachusetts and the United States. The industry offers jobs in computer network installation, fiber optics, wireless data network, and computer telephony integration. Graduates may transfer to a bachelor of science in technology program.

COMPUTERS AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS

CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Electronics (Computers and Telecommunications)

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, ENG, ETK 13, and ETK 19 are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 11 and _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 13 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Humanities/Arts Elective 3 credits Core Courses _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits _____ ETK 19 Electrical Circuits I 4 credits _____ ETK 20 Electrical Circuits II 4 credits _____ ETK 49 Computer Communications Fundamentals 4 credits _____ ETK 67 Digital Computer Fundamentals I 4 credits _____ ETK 69 Computer Configuration & Repair 4 credits _____ ETK 75 Electronic Theory I 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Core Electives Choose from ETK, CAD, CED 11 CED 12, CIS 24, CIS 53, CHM 13: _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ PHY 02 Technical Physics II 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Computers and Telecommunications Concentration) Credits required: 67/70 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • All technical courses use computer applications, and laboratories are equipped with modern test equipment. Every technical course has a related laboratory, which provides hands-on experience. • Not all courses are offered every year. Read course descriptions to plan course schedule. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, ETK 13, ETK 19, MTH 10 & 13 or MTH 17, PHY 01 Semester 2: ETK 20, ENG 12, ETK 67, MTH 18 or MTH 14, PHY 02 Semester 3: ETK 49, ETK 75, Technical Elective, AMC/HST, Behavioral/Social Science Semester 4: ETK 69, AMC/HST, Humanities/Arts, ETK 99 or Technical Elective SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Transfer: ETK 54, CHM 13 (with MTH 10, 13, and 14) A+ Certification: CIS 24, CIS 53 Industrial Automation: ETK 63, ETK 64 Cooperative Education: CED 11, CED 12

After BCC

• Graduates can work as an equipment installation technician, central office technician, computer technician, engineering assistant, manufacturing lab technician, fiber optics technician, field service and installation technician, or customer support specialist. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

82
CAREER PROGRAM An Environmental Engineering Technology option: Environmental
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Environmental Concentration) Credits required: 67/71 Program director: Robert Rak, Coordinator of Environmental Technology

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Students consider issues of safe land use, water resources, and hazardous waste management.

Environmental Technology
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 11 and _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 13 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE or Behavioral/Social Science Elective or SSC 17 Technology and Society 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Humanities/Arts Elective or SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ ENV 11 Introduction to Environment 3 credits _____ ENV 15 Hazardous Waste/Waste Management 4 credits _____ ENV 30 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 3 credits _____ ENV 31 Applications of Geographic Information Systems 3 credits _____ ENV 51 Water Supply and Hydrology 4 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits _____ INT 10 Work-Based Experience (or select CED 11 as Technical Elective) 1 credit _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Core Electives Choose from ETK, ENV, or CAD, CED 11, CED 12, GLG 16, SCI 12, SCI 19, SCI 31, SCI 32: _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ CHM 11 General College Chemistry I 4 credits _____ CHM 20 Environmental Chemistry 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Complete MTH 17, ENG 11, CHM 11, ENV 11, and ETK 13 in the first semester to stay in the sequence of course offerings. • If students require additional courses to strengthen particular skills, take these as early as possible. • Many courses are offered in the summer • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, MTH 10 & 13 or MTH 17, CHM 11, ETK 13, ENV 11 Semester 2: ENG 12, MTH 14 or MTH 18, CHM 20, CAD15, AMC/HST Semester 3: ENV 15, ENV 30, AMC/HST, SPH 11 or Humanities/Arts, Technical Elective Semester 4: ENV 51, ENV 31, Behavioral/ Social Sciences or SSC 17, Technical Elective, INT 10 or CED, ETK 99 or additional Technical Elective SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Water Treatment: ENV 53, ENV 55, ETK 62, SCI 12 Aquaculture: ETK 62, SCI 19, SCI 31, SCI 32 Computer Aided Design: CAD 18, CAD 53, CAD 58

They prepare for entry-level positions in the rapidly expanding enviro-tech industry with an in-depth review of the regulatory process.

Hints for Success
After BCC
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, CHM, ENG, ETK 13, and ENV 11 are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

• Graduates work for environmental engineering firms and as technicians helping companies deal with environmental concerns. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

2007-2008

83

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Manufacturing Technology
This option prepares students to enter highlyautomated manufacturing industries as automation specialists and manufacturing technicians. Students in the program learn to solve complex manufacturing problems using computer-aided design, evaluation and simulation techniques, and engineering principles. The curriculum covers such aspects of manufacturing engineering as materials processing (traditional and CNC), material science, hydraulics, computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM), and computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM).

CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Manufacturing Engineering Technology

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Manufacturing Technology Concentration) Credits required: 65/67 Program director: Mary Cass, Coordinator of Manufacturing Technology

Hints for Success
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, ENG, ETK 13, and ETK 41 are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Humanities/Arts Elective Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting _____ CAD 19 Advanced Computer Aided Design _____ CAD 22 Computer Aided Manufacturing _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians _____ ETK 41 Materials Processing I _____ ETK 42 Materials Processing II _____ ETK 62 Electrical Machinery _____ ETK 63 Industrial Automation _____ ETK 64 Hydraulics-Pneumatics _____ ETK 79 Engineering Material Science _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program is especially valuable to the person who wants technical diversity. It will open employment doors to many jobs that require multidisciplinary competencies. • Take ENG 11, MTH 17, PHY 01, ETK 19, ETK 13 first. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ETK 41, CAD 15, ENG 11, MTH 10 & 13 or MTH 17, PHY 01 Semester 2: ETK 42, CAD 19, ENG 12, ETK 13, MTH 18 or MTH 14 Semester 3: AMC/HST, CAD 22, ETK 62, ETK 64, Behavioral and Soc. Sci. Elective Semester 4: AMC/HST, ETK 63, ETK 79, ETK 99 or Technical Elective, Humanities and Arts Elective SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Transfer: ETK 54 (with MTH 10, 13, and 14) Cooperative Education: CED 11

(choose from ETK, CAD, or CED 11) 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Math & Science Courses _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

After BCC

• Graduates work as engineering aides, field service technicians, technical representatives, maintenance technicians, and automation technicians. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

84
CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Mechanical Engineering Technology

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Mechanical Concentration) Credits required: 66/69 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students gain hands-on experience with mechanical systems (hydraulics, pneumagnetics, mechanisms), materials, and computer-aided design. • Take ENG 11, ETK 13, MTH 17, PHY 01, and CAD 15 first. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CAD 15, ENG 11, ETK 64, MTH 10 & 13 or MTH 17, PHY 01 Semester 2: ETK 13, ETK 79, MTH 14 or MTH 18, PHY 02, ENG 12 Semester 3: ETK 54, ETK 62, AMC/HST, Technical elective, CAD 18 Semester 4: AMC/HST, Behavioral/Social Science or SSC 17, Humanities/Arts or SPH 11, ETK 99 or Technical Elective, ETK 59 SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Transfer: ETK 19, ETK 20 (with MTH 10, 13, and 14) Manufacturing: ETK 41, ETK 42, ETK 63 Computer Aided Design: CAD 19, CAD 20 Cooperative Education: CED 11, CED 12

Mechanical Technology
This option prepares students as technicians and mechanical designers. Students learn aspects of mechanical engineering such as strength of materials, materials science, hydraulics, and computeraided design.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Take PHY and ENG before attempting upper-level Engineering (ETK) courses.

• Graduates work as mechanical designers, manufacturing technicians, industrial technicians, design technicians, and CAD designers. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE or Behavioral/Social Science Elective or 3 credits SSC 17 Technology and Society _____ ELECTIVE or Humanities/Arts Elective or 3 credits SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ CAD 18 Computer Aided Design 3 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits _____ ETK 54 Statics 3 credits _____ ETK 59 Strength of Materials 4 credits _____ ETK 62 Electrical Machinery 3 credits _____ ETK 64 Hydraulics-Pneumatics 4 credits _____ ETK 79 Engineering Material Science 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Core Electives Choose from CAD and ETK courses; CED 11, CED 12: _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ PHY 02 Technical Physics II 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

2007-2008

85

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Structural Technology
This option prepares students to work as technicians for engineering consulting firms, construction companies, architects, government agencies, structural materials testing and structural manufacturing companies.

CAREER PROGRAM An Engineering Technology option: Civil Engineering/Structural

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
Complete MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, ENG, and ETK 13 are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE or Behavioral/Social Science Elective or SSC 17 Technology and Society 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Humanities/Arts Elective or SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ CAD 53 Construction Drawing 3 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineeers and Technicians 3 credits _____ ETK 52 Construction Estimating 3 credits _____ ETK 53 Elements of Structural Design 4 credits _____ ETK 54 Statics 3 credits _____ ETK 56 Surveying 4 credits _____ ETK 57 Soils and Foundations 3 credits _____ ETK 58 Surveying II 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE or Technical elective or 3/4 credits ETK 99 Engineering Projects 3 credits Math & Science Courses _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits _____ PHY 02 Technical Physics II 4 credits _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I 4 credits _____ MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II 4 credits For students interested in transfer, MTH 10, 13, and 14 can be substituted for MTH 17 and 18 _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Civil/Structural Concentration) Credits required: 67/69 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students learn in modern laboratories on the latest computers and software and are taught by faculty with many years of professional experience. Students receive many hours of hands-on experience as well as exposure to background theory. • Students who haven’t taken basic math courses in high school may complete math prerequisites at BCC. • Some courses are offered only in the evening. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, MTH 10 & 13 or MTH 17, PHY 01, ETK 13, CAD 15 Semester 2: ENG 12, MTH 14 or MTH 18, PHY 02, CAD 53, HST/AMC Semester 3: ETK 52, ETK 54, ETK 56, HST/ AMC, Humanities/Arts or SPH 11 Semester 4: ETK 53, ETK 57, ETK 58, Behavioral/Social Science or SSC 17, ETK 99 or Technical Elective SUGGESTED TECHNICAL ELECTIVES Transfer: ETK 79 (with MTH 10, 13, and 14) Computer Aided Design: CAD 58 GIS: ENV 30 Cooperative Education: CED 11

After BCC

• Graduates work as home building contractors, design construction technicians, structural computer-aided designers, and industrial and commercial building fabricators. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, consult with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) and the transfer institution to maximize transferable credits.

86
TRANSFER PROGRAM An Engineering Transfer option: Engineering Science

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Engineering Science Transfer Concentration) Credits required: 64/69 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • Take MTH 14 (or prerequisite math course if required), CAD 25, ENG 11, ETK 13, and CHM 14 first. • Students may also elect to be in the UMass Dartmouth/BCC Cooperative Education program. • Summer courses will reduce fall and spring semester course loads.

Engineering Science (transfer)
This program prepares students for transfer to engineering science programs at 4-year colleges and universities. Those transferring to public colleges and universities can qualify for Joint Admission and Tuition Advantage (see “Transferring”). Students entering this program should be prepared for calculus (or take the prerequisite MTH courses), be computer literate (or take ETK 13), and, for Civil and Environmental, be familiar with CAD (or take CAD 15).

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
Complete all prerequisites and MTH sequence without delay. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, and ENG are applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

• Graduates of this program have successfully transferred to many four-year institutions, including Brown University, Northeastern University, University of Massachusetts, University of Rhode Island, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. • Graduates can take advantage of articulation agreements to ensure transferability of courses. • Current articulation agreements include Mass. Maritime Academy, Roger Williams University, UMass Dartmouth, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ ENG 15 Technical Writing 3 credits _____ HST 11 West and the World I 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE or Behavioral/Social Science or ECN 11 Principles of Economics Macro 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE Humanities/Arts 3 credits Core Courses _____ ETK 14 Engineering Applications of MATLAB 1 credit Core Electives Choose 4-5 electives from: BIO 21, CAD 15, CAD 19, CAD 58, CHM 14, CIS 76, ETK 13, ETK 19, ETK 29/31, ETK 30/32, ETK 54/55, ETK 56, ETK 58, ETK 59, ETK 64, ETK 67, ETK 70, and ETK 79: _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ CHM 13 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits _____ MTH 15 Calculus II 4 credits _____ MTH 53 Calculus III 4 credits _____ MTH 54 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 credits _____ PHY 11 General Physics I 4 credits _____ PHY 12 General Physics II 4 credits

2007-2008

87

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

ENGINEERING SCIENCE DISCIPLINES To choose the best electives for your career interests, consider the descriptions of the various disciplines and match your choices to the recommendation. When in doubt, speak to an advisor.

Civil & Environmental Engineering
Plan, design, build, inspect and maintain a wide variety of facilities including bridges, roads and highways, industrial manufacturing, sanitation, water and wastewater treatment facilities. Civil Engineers plan construction costs and materials, prepare drawings, and survey land. Environmental Engineers are involved with recycling and the prevention, control, or correction of pollution and other environmental hazards. Recommended electives for UMD: •CAD58 Civil Drafting & Design •CHM14 Fund. of Chemistry II •ETK29/31 Electrical Engineering I w/ Lab •ETK56 Surveying I •ETK58 Surveying II

Electrical & Computer Engineering
Design, develop, test, manufacture and operate electrical and electronic equipment such as communication equipment, radar, industrial and medical measuring or process control devices, navigational equipment, computers and computer networks. Computer engineers work on both computer hardware and software (programming) problems. Recommended electives for UMD: •CIS76 Introduction to Procedural Programming •ETK19 Electrical Circuits I •ETK67 Digital Computer Fundamentals •ETK29/31 Electrical Engineering I w/ Lab •ETK30/32 Electrical Engineering II w/Lab

Other Engineering Disciplines
Students in this program can prepare themselves to continue their degree at a variety of transfer institutions in the engineering discipline of their choice including: •Aerospace & Automotive •Biomedical & Biotechnology •Chemical and Petroleum •Industrial & Facilities •Materials & Biomaterials To insure transferability consult with your advisor, applicable transfer agreements, and/or transfer institutions before selecting electives.

Mechanical Engineering
Perhaps the broadest of all engineering disciplines, mechanical engineering is generally combined into three areas: energy, structures and motion in mechanical systems, and manufacturing used in combination to design, develop, test, and manufacture industrial machinery, consumer products, and other equipment. Recommended electives for UMD: •CAD19 Advanced Computer Aided Design I •CHM14 Fund. of Chemistry II •ETK29/31 Electrical Engineering I w/ Lab •ETK30/32 Electrical Engineering II w/Lab •ETK79 Engineering Material Science

88
TRANSFER PROGRAM A Liberal Arts and Sciences option: Environmental Science
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Liberal Arts and Sciences (Environmental Science Transfer Concentration) Credits required: 61/69 Program director: Robert Caron, Professor of Biology

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Environmental Science (transfer)
Students prepare for transfer to four-year bachelor’s degree programs in Environmental Science. Those transferring to public colleges and universities can qualify for Joint Admissions and Tuition Advantage. See your advisor or the transfer counselor for more details.

General Courses _____ BIO 21 _____ BIO 22 _____ CHM 13 _____ CHM 14 _____ ELECTIVE

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Get started on math courses immediately, particularly if you need developmental work. Choose your electives with the help of your program advisor. • This program is a state joint admissions eligible program.

Fundamentals of Biological Science I Fundamentals of Biological Science II Fundamentals of Chemistry I Fundamentals of Chemistry II Foreign Language

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 6 credits

Hints for Success
Plan your program to allow for prerequisites and other courses offered only in the fall or the spring. Plan your program each semester with your program director or advisor.

After BCC

• BCC has transfer articulation agreements with Unity College (Maine), Paul Smith College, and Roger Williams University.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SCI 12 Principles of Ecology 4 credits _____ HST 11 West and the World I 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ CIS 11 or Introduction to Business Information Systems or ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits MTH 10 or MTH 13 or MTH 14 or MTH 15 or MTH 19 (choose two): _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ MTH 14 Calculus I 4 credits _____ MTH 15 Calculus II 4 credits _____ MTH 19 Fundamental Statistics 3 credits Elective Courses _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science
(Choose from SSC 17, SSC 14, GVT 11, ECN 11, ECN 12)

_____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

(Level 02: Successful completion of a foreign language at the 02 level at BCC or three years of foreign language at the high school level with a “C” average or better. Students who have satisfied the foreign language requirement in high school must complete 6 credits in advanced foreign language OR 3 credits Humanities/Arts elective and 3 credits from the list of Program electives below.)

3 credits Program Electives Choose from BIO 29, BIO 39, CED 11, CED 12, CHM 20, ENV 11, ENV 15, GLG 16, PHY 01, PHY 02, SCI 19, SCI 32: _____ ELECTIVE - Restricted 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE - Restricted 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE - Restricted 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE - Restricted 3/4 credits

2007-2008

89
TRANSFER PROGRAM An Engineering Transfer option: Technology Education

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Technology Education (transfer)
This program is the first two years of a degree leading to a technology teaching career. Successful completion of a bachelor’s degree meets the initial licensure requirements of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and other states.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Engineering Technology (Technology Education Transfer concentration) Credits required: 65/70 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE (COURSE DESIGNATIONS ONLY): Semester 1: ENG 11, ETK 13, MTH 10, MTH 13, PHY 01, Core elective Semester 2: AMC/HST, CAD 15, ENG 12, SPH 11, Core elective Semester 3: CHM 13, ETK 41, ETK 51, ETK 62, Core elective Semester 4: AMC/HST, CAD 18, SSC 17, PSY 51, Core electives (2)

Hints for Success
Complete prerequisite courses and math sequence early. Skills learned in MTH, PHY, and ENG will be applied in later courses. This program is challenging. Limit outside responsibilities.

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech 3 credits Choose one from PSY 51 or SSC 17: _____ PSY 51 General Psychology 3 credits _____ SSC 17 Technology and Society 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits Core Courses _____ CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits _____ CAD 18 Computer Aided Design 3 credits _____ ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians 3 credits _____ ETK 41 Materials Processing I 3 credits _____ ETK 51 Construction Methods and Materials 4 credits _____ ETK 62 Electrical Machinery 3 credits Program Electives Choose from ART 39, BIO 17, BUS 15, CAD 53, ETK 19, 42, PHY 02, PSY 53, or any other transferable ETK, ENV or CAD courses. Consult with your advisor and/or transfer intitutions before selecting electives: _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits _____ ELECTIVE Technical elective 3/4 credits Math & Science Courses _____ CHM 13 Fundamentals of Chemistry I 4 credits _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions 3 credits _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry 2 credits _____ PHY 01 Technical Physics I 4 credits

After BCC

• Graduates can transfer to technology education programs at four-year colleges and universities.Upon certification, the graduate is eligible to teach in the public schools (grades 5-12) in the common core cluster areas of: Communication, Construction, Manufacturing, Power Energy and Transportation. Current trends within education, including an increased emphasis on technical literacy, have led to predictions of large shortages of technical educators within the near future.

90
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Applied Construction
Credits: 20/21 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Applied Construction Technology
This certificate program introduces students to the construction profession and provides them with the applied technical skills necessary for employment as construction technicians or to direct a construction project. Students learn the process of constructing a building from the ground to finish, develop an in-depth working knowledge of construction estimating techniques, and gain practical experience in preparing working drawings for building construction. Due to the greater use of CAD equipment by architects and engineers, as well as drafters, students will also develop drafting techniques using computer-aided design and drafting software, including AutoCAD.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Certificate courses can apply to BCC’s Structural Technology and Civil Technology degree programs. Students may earn this certificate and the degree simultaneously. • Students interested in transferring to a Bachelor degree program in Engineering should select MTH 10 and MTH 13. • Students are prepared for employment as A+ technicians and as Windows server administrators. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CAD 15, ETK 52, MTH 17 (or MTH 10 and MTH 13) Semester 2: CAD 53, ENG 11, ETK 51

Program Courses _____ CAD 15 _____ CAD 53 _____ ENG 11 _____ ETK 51

Computer Aided Drafting Construction Drawing Composition I: College Writing Construction Methods and Materials _____ ETK 52 Construction Estimating Choose MTH 17 or MTH 10 and 13: _____ MTH 10 Elementary Functions _____ MTH 13 Trigonometry _____ MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 4 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Applied Manufacturing Technology
Credits required: 13 Program director: Mary Cass, Coordinator of Manufacturing Technology

Applied Manufacturing
Students learn to use standard machine-shop equipment and operate and program CNC machinery to become manufacturing technicians. They will understand the materials to be processed and technical drawing through the use of AutoCAD.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program serves as a solid base for continuing on toward an associate degree, with all courses transferring to BCC’s Electro-Mechanical, Manufacturing, and Mechanical Technology programs • This program utilizes BCC’s NSF-funded Computer-Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Laboratory facility. • Students must have previously completed Algebra II and geometry, in high school or at BCC, before enrolling in certificate courses. • CAD15 should be taken prior to or concurrently with ETK 41. • Graduates are prepared for positions as machine technicians or machine tool programmers/operators.

Program Courses _____ CAD 15 _____ ETK 41 _____ ETK 42 _____ ETK 79

Computer Aided Drafting Materials Processing I Materials Processing II Engineering Material Science

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

2007-2008

91
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Biotechnology

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Biotechnology
Learn the essential knowledge and develop lab skills for entry-level biotech positions, including setting up sample analysis, maintaining automated instruments, and preparing materials for research scientists.

Credits required: 28 Program director: Robert Rak, Coordinator of Environmental Technology

Program Courses _____ BIO 21 _____ BIO 26 _____ BIO 40 _____ CED 11 _____ CHM 16 _____ ENG 11 _____ MTH 19 _____ BIO 39 or CHM 25 or CHM 26

Fundamentals of Biological Science I 4 credits Introduction to Biotechnology 3 credits Cell Biology 4 credits Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits Organic and Biochemistry 4 credits Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Fundamental Statistics 3 credits Elements of Microbiology or Biochemistry or Chemistry of Nucleic Acids 4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Massachusetts is a national leader in Biotechnology and needs well-trained workers for this growing field.

Computer Aided Design and Drafting
This one-year certificate program provides students with the needed skills to become a professional Computer Aided Architectural Draftsperson, Civil Draftsperson, or Mechanical Designer in the engineering industry. Students learn fundamental concepts of engineering drawing through advanced computer-aided design techniques.

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Computer Aided Design and Drafting
Credits required: 12 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair of Engineering and Technology

Program Courses _____ CAD 15 _____ ETK 13 or CIS 11
Architectural option:

Computer Aided Drafting 3 credits Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians or Introduction to Business Information Systems 3 credits Computer Aided Design Construction Drawing Computer Aided Design Civil Drafting and Design 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

_____ CAD 18 _____ CAD 53
Civil option:

_____ CAD 18 _____ CAD 58
Mechanical option:

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program serves as a solid base for continuing on toward an associate degree, with all courses transferring to BCC’s Civil, Electro-Mechanical, Environmental, Manufacturing and Mechanical and Structural Technology programs. • Students utilize high-tech computer equipment and the latest AutoCAD and SolidWorks software • ETK 13 should be taken prior to or concurrently with CAD15. • Graduates are prepared for positions as architectural & civil CAD operators/ drafters, and mechanical designers.

_____ CAD 19 _____ CAD 20

Advanced Computer Aided Design 3 credits Advanced Computer Aided Design II 3 credits

92
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Foundations of Technical Careers
Credits required: 12 credits Program director: Linda Hutchison, Director of Foundations of Technical Career Programs

2007-2008

Engineering, Technology, and Environment Degrees: Engineering Technology (Biomanufacturing Technology, Civil Technology, Electro-Mechanical Technology, Electronics Technology – Computers & Telecommunications, Environmental Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Mechanical Technology, Structural Technology) • Engineering Transfer (Science) • Environmental Science Transfer • Technology Education Transfer

Foundations of Technical Careers
This program serves as a solid base for starting an engineering program. Students learn fundamental concepts in computer applications, technical communications, and engineering drawing, and are introduced to diverse technical career opportunities. Courses transfer into the Engineering Technology program of the student’s choice.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program is funded by a National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education grant. • Students can gain entry-level skills for several technical fields or transfer courses into Engineering Technology degree programs. • Engineering students at BCC have access to a wide range of high-technology learning labs and materials designed in collaboration with local employers.

Program Courses _____ CAD 15 _____ COM 18 _____ ETK 12 _____ ETK 13

Computer Aided Drafting Communication Skills Introduction to Engineering and Technology Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Geographic Information Systems

Credits required: 12 Program director: Robert Rak, Coordinator and Associate Professor of Environmental Technology PROGRAM INFORMATION • This certificate introduces students to GIS and provides them with the skills necessary to layer various types of data in an electronic format and to study and identify relationships among the data. • Graduate employment opportunities are at all levels of many businesses and government agencies, including construction, finance, real estate, retail, land use planning, environmental firms, and emergency response agencies. • This program serves as a solid base for continuing toward an associate degree with courses transferring to BCC’s Environmental Technology program.

Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
Geographic Informational Systems (GIS) provides a powerful tool in any academic discipline to analyze relationships among data. It is commonly used in business, environmental, geographical, political, law enforcement, and social science applications.

Program Courses _____ ENV 30 _____ ENV 31 _____ ETK 13 _____ SSC 14

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems Applications of Geographic Information Systems Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians Introduction to Geography

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

93

Certificates: Applied Construction Technology • Applied Manufacturing • Biotechnology • Computer Aided Design and Drafting • Foundations of Technical Careers • Geographic Information Systems • Surveying • Water Quality Professional

Surveying
Surveying is the art, science, and technology of determining or establishing the position of points through field measurements. This certificate program introduces students to the surveying profession and provides them with the basic skills necessary to obtain employment as surveying technicians.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Surveying
Credits required: 24/25 Program director: Anthony Ucci, Department Chair and Professor of Engineering Technology

Program Courses _____ CAD 15 _____ CAD 58 _____ ENG 11 _____ ETK 13 _____ ETK 56 _____ ETK 58 _____ MTH 10 and MTH 13 or MTH 17

Computer Aided Drafting Civil Drafting and Design Composition I: College Writing Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians Surveying Surveying II Elementary Functions and Trigonometry or Technical Mathematics I

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 2 credits 4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Certificate courses can apply to BCC’s Structural Technology and Civil Technology degree programs. Students may earn this certificate and the degree simultaneously. • The program is suitable for individuals wishing to enter the surveying profession, as well as for practicing surveyors who may lack formal education. The courses are transferable to many two and four-year degree programs. • This program serves as a solid base for continuing toward an associate degree with courses transferring to BCC’s Civil and Structural Technology and Engineering transfer (Civil) programs.

Water Quality Professional
This certificate provides students with skills for entering careers in water and wastewater treatment. Coursework prepares students for the Massachusetts operator certification examinations or can be used as contact hours by those already in the field. Courses can be transferred to the Engineering Technology degree program.

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Water Quality Professional
Credits required: 13 Program director: Robert Rak, Coordinator of Environmental Technology

Program Courses _____ ENV 11 _____ ENV 53 _____ ETK 13

Introduction to Environment Wastewater Technology I Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians Water Supply and Hydrology

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

Drinking Water Treatment Plant Operator:

_____ ENV 51

Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator:

_____ ENV 55

Wastewater Technology II

4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students choose the Drinking Water or Wastewater option for preparation for the certificate exam of their choice. • Field Operators may use coursework to fulfill state license Training Contact Hours (TCHs) requirements. • Some prerequisites may be required before enrolling in courses in this program. These courses may be completed at BCC, or credit may be transferred from another institution or granted through BCC’s Prior Experiential Learning (PEL) program. • This program serves as a solid base for continuing toward an associate degree with courses transferring to BCC’s Environmental Technology program.

Health Sciences
Why choose Health Sciences?
Careers in Health Sciences provide career mobility, flexibility, and security. Students focus on theoretical and professional skill development. Clinical skills are gained in on-campus labs and clinics and through off-campus clinical placements.

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Clinical Laboratory Science Complementary Healthcare Dental Hygiene Healthcare Information Nursing Occupational Therapy Assistant 96 98 100 102 104 106

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Histology Medical Assisting Medical Administrative Practices Medical Coding Medical Transcription Phlebotomy Pre-Radiology Technology Therapeutic Massage 108 110 112 112 113 114 115 116

96
Health Sciences Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Clinical Laboratory Science Credits required: 70 Program director: TBA

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Clinical Laboratory Science
Students completing the CLS curriculum will be prepared to work in a modern clinical laboratory performing a wide range of laboratory procedures used in the detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. They develop academic and technical competence in the major areas of clinical laboratory practice--hematology, clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology, and immunohematology.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students will complete a clinical placement in one of the affiliating agencies in southeastern Massachusetts. • The CLS degree provides a foundation that allows graduates to pursue medical education, sales, and computer careers. • Some courses in this program are only offered during the day. PROGRAM ACCREDITATION • The program is accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 8410 West Bryn Mawr Ave., Suite 670, Chicago, IL 60631. Telephone 773-714-8880. • Graduates are eligible to take the national certification examinations. PRIOR TO ADMISSION • To be most successful, applicants should have taken math through algebra II, high school-level biology and chemistry. (These courses may be taken at BCC before admission to the program). • Students are advised to complete two to four of the general education courses such as ENG 11, 12; HST, PSY 51, MTH 19, Humanities, prior to program admission. Computer literacy is also important. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, CHM 15, BIO 54, MED 10, AMC 11 or HST 11, MTH 19 Semester 2: ENG 12, CHM 16, BIO 39, MED 21, AMC 12 or HST 12, PSY 51 Semester 3: MED 30, MED 32, MED 34 Semester 4: MED 41, MED 43, MED 49, Humanities elective

General Courses _____ BIO 39 _____ BIO 54 _____ CHM 15 _____ CHM 16 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Elements of Microbiology Human Physiology Inorganic Chemistry and Introduction to Organic Chemistry Organic and Biochemistry Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
The Clinical Lab Technician must have good interpersonal skills in order to be a member of the health care team. The student should also enjoy the sciences and have good math skills.

After BCC

• Many clinical laboratory technicians work in hospital laboratories. Career opportunities are available in physician office labs, HMO’s, private labs, biotechnology labs, industrial labs, the Armed Services, and veterinary clinics. • Many graduates pursue advanced degrees in other medical specialties such as cytology, histology, nursing, microbiology, and chemistry.

_____ MTH 19 Fundamental Statistics _____ PSY 51 General Psychology Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective Program Courses _____ MED 10 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science _____ MED 21 Urinalysis _____ MED 30 Hematology _____ MED 32 Medical Microbiology I _____ MED 34 Immunology-Serology _____ MED 41 Clinical Biochemistry _____ MED 43 Immunohematology _____ MED 49 Medical Microbiology II

2 credits 2 credits 5 credits 6 credits 3 credits 6 credits 5 credits 4 credits

Apply by January 15 for priority consideration.

2007-2008

97

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Admission Requirements
Applicants must have completed high school algebra I and II, chemistry and biology with a minimum grade of “C-.” This is a competitive program. Successful candidates have excelled in high school and/or College science and math courses.

Essential Functions
To meet course requirements, students must possess the following basic abilities: • Cognitive ability to learn and use the body of knowledge necessary to meet the program curriculum requirements and qualify to enter the profession. • Physical ability, including sufficient mobility and motor coordination to safely collect and process patient specimens and perform testing procedures using a microscope, computer, and diagnostic instruments. • Visual acuity to read and interpret procedures, physician orders and test results, monitor instrument performance, focus a microscope, and differentiate colors. • Hearing ability to respond to equipment signals, requests and messages from patients, physicians and staff. • Communication skills to communicate with patients, physicians and staff. • Emotional stability to allow professional interaction with patients and staff, respect patient confidentiality, use reasonable judgment and accept responsibility for actions.

Requirements upon Admission
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunization as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, are required by clinical agencies. Upon admission to the CLS Program, students will be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Information) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives.

Additional Costs
Students must carry professional liability insurance, personal health insurance, and are responsible for purchasing uniforms, safety supplies, and certification examination fees.

Grade Requirements
A minimum grade of “C-” is recommended in CHM 15, BIO 54, CHM 16, and BIO 39 to provide the necessary foundation for MED courses. Students must achieve a “C” in the college-based component of the MED courses to complete the clinical component and must achieve a “C” in all MED courses.

Advanced Standing Opportunities
Challenge examinations are available for applicants with previous clinical experience who meet departmental criteria.

98
Health Sciences Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Complementary Healthcare Credits required: 62 Program director: Susan Ellingwood, Department Chair, Instructor in Complementary Healthcare and Therapeutic Massage

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Complementary Healthcare
The first year leads to a certificate in Therapeutic Massage. The second year is designed to build upon the certificate program, adding further skill in assessment, technique, and holistic theory.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Graduates who pass the National Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork may apply to local Boards of Health for licensure • This program will also enhance the skills of healthcare professionals in nursing, occupational therapy, and home health care. ADDITIONAL COSTS • Students are responsible for the cost of uniforms, professional liability insurance, certain standardized achievement test registrations, and the National Certification Examination of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. • They must carry health insurance throughout their enrollment in the program. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BIO 33, MAT 11, 12, 13, ENG 11 Semester 2: BIO 34, HCI 37, MAT 22, 24, HLT 31 Semester 3: Summer (MAT 26) Semester 4: HST/AMC, PSY 51, MAT 33, BIO 17, ENG 12, HLT 13 Semester 5: HUM elective, HST/AMC, MTH 19/MTH 25, MAT 44, CIT 11

General Courses _____ BIO 17 _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
Many students begin this program with successful completion of the Therapeutic Massage certificate program.

• Graduates work in hospitals, nursing homes, chiropractic offices, physicians offices, health spas, cruise ships, rehabilitation programs, fitness centers, and private offices.

Physiology of Wellness Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective Program Courses _____ CIT 11 Information Technology Fluency I _____ HCI 37 Human Disease Processes and Procedures _____ HLT 13 Medical Language Module I _____ HLT 31 Muscle Structure & Function _____ MAT 11 Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practice I _____ MAT 12 Musculoskeletal Anatomy for the Massage Professional _____ MAT 13 Survey of Complementary Care _____ MAT 22 Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practice II _____ MAT 24 Massage Therapy Practice Management _____ MAT 26 Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practicum _____ MAT 33 Oriental Bodywork _____ MAT 44 Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practice III _____ MAT 46 Special Topics in Therapeutic Massage

3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

99

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Additional Admission Requirements
Applicants must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. certificate. They must also have completed high school biology or chemistry and algebra 1 with a minimum grade of “C-.” Applicants must include a letter outlining their interest in, knowledge of, and exposure to therapeutic massage and complementary healthcare. Recommended deadline for filing is January 15th for all fall admissions.

Essential Functions
Students need to possess certain cognitive, physical, and physiological abilities in order to successfully complete the requirements of the program and ultimately practice in the profession. Please discuss particulars with the program director.

Requirements upon Admission
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunization as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, may be required by clinical agencies. Upon admission to the program, students will be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Information) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working as a student in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives.

Grade Requirements
Students must receive a minimum grade of “C-“in all required courses. Failure to earn a “C-“or better in a clinical course will result in dismissal from the program. Clinical Practicum hours must be completed within 18 months of the academic coursework.

Additional Costs
Students are responsible for the costs of lab coats, uniforms, professional liability insurance, standardized testing, name tag, lab supplies, national certification exam, and transportation to clinical placement sites. Students should be prepared to travel up to one hour from campus to clinical assignments. Students are also required to attend a variety of community activities. Graduates must apply to local boards of health for licensure to practice as a massage therapist.

100
Health Sciences Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Dental Hygiene Credits required: 73 Program director: Kristine Bishop Chapman, Assistant Professor in Dental Hygiene

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Dental Hygiene
The Dental Hygiene program prepares graduates to practice dental hygiene in private practice dental offices, school and public health departments, and research facilities. Students receive a thorough background in the sciences and in dental hygiene subjects. They learn and develop their clinical technique in the on-campus dental hygiene clinic.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Some courses in this program are only offered during the day. • A grade of “C” or better must be attained in each clinical course, and a “C-” or better in all DHG courses. • Students planning to transfer into this program should seek advice from the program director on which courses to take. PROGRAM ACCREDITATION • The program in Dental Hygiene is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association, which is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Post Secondary Accreditation and by the US Department of Education. • Graduates take the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination and the Northeast Regional Board Examination. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, BIO 33, PSY 51, DHG 11, DHG 13, DHG 15, DHG 19 Semester 2: BIO 34, CHM 16, DHG 20, DHG 22, DHG 24, DHG 26, DHG 28 Semester 3: ENG 12, BIO 39, DHG 30, DHG 31, DHG 33, DHG 35, DHG 37 Semester 4: SPH 11, HST, SOC, BIO 20, DHG 40, DHG 42, DHG 44

General Courses _____ BIO 20 _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ BIO 39 _____ CHM 16 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
Many students find that taking the General and Elective courses before entering the program allows full focus on the challenging Dental Hygiene curriculum.

• Graduates have worked as registered dental hygienists in general and specialty facilities and as dental hygiene educators, consultants, dental sales representatives, and public and community health coordinators.

Introduction to Nutrition Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Elements of Microbiology Organic and Biochemistry Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Sociology Elective _____ ELECTIVE History Elective Program Courses _____ DHG 11 Dental Anatomy and Oral Histology _____ DHG 13 Orientation to Clinical Dental Hygiene _____ DHG 15 Medical-Dental Emergencies _____ DHG 19 Head and Neck Anatomy _____ DHG 20 Dental Hygiene Theory 2 _____ DHG 22 Clinical Dental Hygiene 2 _____ DHG 24 Oral Radiography _____ DHG 26 Periodontology for Dental Hygienists _____ DHG 28 Pharmacology for Dental Hygienists _____ DHG 30 Pain Control in Dental Hygiene _____ DHG 31 Dental Hygiene Theory 3 _____ DHG 33 Clinical Dental Hygiene 3 _____ DHG 35 General and Oral Pathology _____ DHG 37 Dental Materials _____ DHG 40 Dental Hygiene Theory 4 _____ DHG 42 Clinical Dental Hygiene 4 _____ DHG 44 Community Dental Health

3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 4 credits 2 credits 2 credits 1 credit 4 credits 2 credits

Submit completed application by January 15 for priority consideration.

2007-2008

101

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

ADMISSION TO THE DENTAL HYGIENE PROGRAM
Admission is competitive. Applicants must have completed high school algebra I and II, biology, and chemistry, with grades of “C-” or better. Successful candidates have typically excelled in high school and/or college science and math courses and have typically taken above the minimum required to be considered of admission. Admission decisions are based on the applicant’s demonstrated academic success. Meeting minimum requirements for admission does not guarantee admission. Final selection is based on the applicant pool and space available. In the admissions process, recent academic experience is weighted more heavily than earlier experience. Biology and chemistry courses are weighted more heavily than other courses. The strength and quality of an applicant’s high school academic program is also considered. This chart is a guideline for judging an applicant’s competitiveness: Very competitive High school courses
(Algebra I and 2; geometry/ Many lab science and math trigonometry/pre-calculus, calculus, courses with grades of A biology, chemistry, and physics (all science AP or college prep; with lab) (if any) Many lab science and math courses with A’s and B’s Lab science courses with A’s and B’s B’s and C’s in lab science and math

Competitive

Generally not competitive

College courses

Lab science courses with grades of A

B’s and C’s in lab science

These BCC courses are strongly recommended: BIO 33, 34, 20, 39; CHM 15 and 16. Applicants with a GED or ATB test need to complete high school algebra I & II, biology, and chemistry with grades of “C-” or better before consideration for admission to the program. The Admissions Office holds information sessions for health science applicants each semester and can provide more information.

Additional Requirements
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunization as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, may be required by clinical agencies. Upon admission to the Dental Hygiene program, students will be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Information) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working as a student in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives. All students must be CPR Certified by the American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers). Students must present evidence of certification before beginning DHG 22 and must maintain certification until the completion of DHG 42.

Additional costs
Students must carry professional liability insurance and provide their own transportation to off-campus clinical assignments. They are responsible for purchasing instruments and uniforms, and paying CPR and Board application fees.

Essential Functions
Essential functions required of students accepted into the program include the ability to speak and write with clarity, to provide safe standard of care, possess motor skills and coordination to meet the needs of the patient, utilize intellectual, emotional, and cognitive factors, and visual acuity to coordinate patient care and manage procedures in a dental care facility.

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Health Sciences Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM Healthcare Information (Medical Records)
Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

2007-2008

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Healthcare Information Credits required: 70 Program director: Edward Dobbs, Program Coordinator, Healthcare Information Program PROGRAM INFORMATION • The Healthcare Information program prepares students to become Registered Health Information Technicians. Employment prospects for graduates are excellent. • Some courses in this program are only offered during the day. • During the second year of the program, students do directed clinical practices at healthcare provider organizations throughout southeastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Students are responsible for providing their own transportation. • Medical Coding students should take HCI 37 and BIO 15 as a prerequisite to HCI 39 and HCI 42. • Healthcare Information students should take HCI 37 and BIO 34 as a prerequisite to HCI 39 and HCI 42. PROGRAM ACCREDITATION • The Healthcare Information program is accreditated by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education. Program graduates are eligible to apply to sit for the national qualifying examination for certification as a Registered Health Information Technician. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BIO 33, ENG 11, HCI 11, HCI 13, AMC/HST Semester 2: BIO 34, CIT 11, ENG 12, HCI 22, AMC/HST, Humanities Semester 3: CIT 12, HCI 33, HCI 35, HCI 37, HCI 39 Semester 4: HCI 42, HCI 44, HCI 46, MAN 11, MTH 19, PSY 51

Healthcare Information
Students learn medical and legal principles for documenting, using, and controlling health information. They prepare for employment in Health Information or Medical Records departments in a variety of healthcare settings.

General Courses _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ CIT 11 _____ CIT 12 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
Students have found it advantageous to complete as many general courses as possible before starting to take HCI-designated courses.

After BCC

• Graduates are actively recruited for such positions as health information department supervisor, medical coding specialist, health information technician, medical record coordinator, and medical coder.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Information Technology Fluency I Information Technology Fluency II Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ MAN 11 Principles of Management _____ MTH 19 Fundamental Statistics _____ PSY 51 General Psychology Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective Program Courses _____ HCI 11 Introduction to Healthcare Information _____ HCI 13 Medical Language _____ HCI 22 Medical Ethics and Jurisprudence _____ HCI 33 Retrieving and Reporting Medical Data _____ HCI 35 Directed Clinical Practice I _____ HCI 37 Human Disease Processes and Procedures _____ HCI 39 International Classification of Disease Coding _____ HCI 42 Coding of Procedures and Healthcare Reimbursement _____ HCI 44 Information Systems Regulation and Management _____ HCI 46 Directed Clinical Practice II

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

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Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Special admission requirements
Accepted applicants must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. certificate or pass an Ability to Benefit examination, demonstrate successful completion of either chemistry or biology with laboratory component with a minimum grade of “C-,” and pass Placement Tests in reading and mathematics or complete developmental courses in reading and/or mathematics.

Essential Functions in the Healthcare Information Program
Graduates from the Healthcare Information program are required to possess the following abilities. 1. Visual acuity - sufficient to read and analyze materials contained in medical records in paper and computer-generated formats. 2. Manual dexterity - sufficient to access and work with records stored in filing and computer systems. 3. Emotional stability - sufficient to maintain record completion and medical confidentiality standards of the profession. 4. Mobility - sufficient to allow access to areas within the healthcare facility in which healthcare information is generated, stored, and analyzed. 5. Communication skills - sufficient to allow for communication with fellow healthcare information staff and professionals, healthcare facility staff and providers, clients of the facility and their families, and individuals from outside of the facility who seek information regarding clients.

Additional requirements and costs
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Students are responsible for associated costs such as textbooks, lab supplies, professional liability insurance, and must carry personal health insurance throughout enrollment in the program. Students must provide their own transportation to clinical assignments.

Criminal offender record information (C.O.R.I)
Upon admission into the program, students will be required to submit to a Criminal Offender Record Information (C.O.R.I.) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent individuals from working in contracted health facilities, which could prevent students from completing the program objectives.

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Health Sciences Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Nursing Credits required: 68 Program director: Gail MacDonald, Associate Professor of Nursing

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Nursing
This program prepares students for practice as entry-level staff nurses in a variety of healthcare settings.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students must achieve a minimum “C” in all Nursing courses in order to remain in the program and graduate. • Students learn to apply the nursing process to assist clients in maintaining or regaining homeodynamics when threatened with common health problems. • Clinical assignments include a variety of healthcare settings in southeastern Massachusetts. Students must be prepared for assignments throughout the region and provide their own transportation. • Graduates take the National Council Licensure Examination for licensing as a registered nurse. PROGRAM ACCREDITATION • The Nursing program is fully accredited by the National League for Nursing, Accrediting Commission, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10006, (212) 363-5555 and has full approval status from the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing. APPLYING FOR READMISSION • Those seeking readmission should apply by mid-April for Fall and mid-November for Spring. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, BIO 33, PSY 51, NUR 11 Semester 2: ENG 12, BIO 34, PSY 52, NUR 12 Semester 3: BIO 39, PSY 55, NUR 51 Semester 4: NUR 52, NUR 53, Humanities and Math or History electives chosen from courses that fulfill General Education requirements.

General Courses _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ BIO 39 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Elements of Microbiology Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ PSY 52 Child Development _____ PSY 55 Abnormal Psychology See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective _____ ELECTIVE or History Elective or ELECTIVE Mathematics Elective Program Courses _____ NUR 11 Fundamentals of Nursing _____ NUR 12 Parent-Child Health Nursing _____ NUR 51 Nursing Care of the Adult I _____ NUR 52 Nursing Care of the Adult II _____ NUR 53 Trends in Nursing

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 8 credits 8 credits 9 credits 9 credits 1 credit

Hints For Success
Many students find that taking all general and elective courses before entering the program allows for full focus on the challenging Nursing curriculum.

Submit completed application by January 15 for priority consideration.

After BCC

• Graduates have secured a variety of positions in healthcare settings. • Many students transfer to complete the baccalaureate degree. Graduates have transferred to UMass Dartmouth, Fitchberg State, UMass Boston, Framingham State, Regis College, and Salve Regina University. • BCC has transfer articulation agreements with Framingham State College, Regis College, Salve Regina University and UMass Dartmouth.

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Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

ADMISSION TO THE NURSING PROGRAM
Admission to Nursing is very competitive. Standardized testing is required for consideration of admission. Admission decisions are based on the applicant’s demonstrated academic success. Meeting minimum requirements for admission does not guarantee admission to the Nursing Program. Final selection is based on the applicant pool and space available. Applicants must have completed high school algebra I, biology, and chemistry, with grades of “C-” or better. Successful candidates have typically excelled in high school and/or college science and math courses and have typically taken above the minimum required to be considered for admission. Students must earn a “C” or better in all required nursing courses to continue in the program. In the admissions process, recent academic experience is weighted more heavily than earlier experience. Biology and chemistry courses are weighted more heavily than other courses. The strength and quality of an applicant’s high school academic program is also considered. This chart is a guideline for judging an applicant’s competitiveness: Very competitive Competitive Generally not competitive High school courses
(Algebra I and 2; geometry/ trigonometry/pre-calculus, calculus, chemistry, biology, physics (all science AP or college prep; with lab) Many lab science and math courses with grades of A Lab science courses with grades of A Many lab science and math courses with A’s and B’s Lab science courses with A’s and B’s B’s and C’s in lab science and math B’s and C’s in lab science

College courses
(if any)

BIO 33, 34, and 39 are strongly recommended. Applicants with a GED or ATB test need to complete required courses (high school algebra I, biology, and chemistry) before consideration for admission to the program. The Admissions Office holds information sessions for health science applicants each semester and can provide more information.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Additional experience required
All students must be CPR Certified by the American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers). Students must present evidence of certification before beginning NUR 11 and maintain certification until the completion of NUR 52. Any student readmitted to NUR 12, 51 or 52 must present, on entry to the course, evidence of CPR certification, which is valid through completion of the program.

Requirements upon admission
Upon admission to the Nursing Program, students will be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Information) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working as a student nurse in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives. Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunization as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, are required by clinical agencies.

Additional costs
Students are responsible for the cost of uniforms, professional liability insurance, standardized achievement testing, their graduate nursing pin, and the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. They must carry health insurance throughout their enrollment in the program.

Licensing information
To be eligible for licensure in Massachusetts, graduates must complete all program requirements for graduation, present satisfactory evidence of “good moral character” as defined by the Board of Registration, and pay the required licensure fees. Eligibility for licensure is decided by the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing. Contact the Program Director for more information.

Advanced standing opportunities
Challenge examinations are available for NUR 11 for those applicants with previous nursing experience who meet established criteria. Contact the Nursing Department for complete information. Students are responsible for special testing fees and pre- and co-requisite courses.

Accelerated option for LPNS
Graduates of the practical nursing programs at Diman Regional Vocational Technical High School, Bristol-Plymouth Regional Technical School, Southeastern Technical Institute, and Upper Cape Cod Regional Vocational Technical School may be eligible for entry into the third semester of the nursing program. Deadline for applications is May 1 or Dec. 1, prior to semester seeking admission. Contact the Program Director for more information.

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Health Sciences Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Occupational Therapy Assistant Credits required: 72 Program director: Johanna Duponte, Department Chair and Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC graduates are recognized as skilled entry-level practitioners by the clinical community and area employers. Students develop academic knowledge, clinical skills, and professional behavior through classroom, lab, and clinical experiences. • Certificate courses in American Sign Language, Therapeutic Massage, and Thanatology complement the OTA program. • Basic computing skills are required to complete the coursework. • Some courses in the program are only offered during the day. COMMITMENT Students should be prepared to: • Commit a great deal of time to the OTA studies, and decrease outside obligations including work obligations during the final semester of full-time fieldwork. • Attend off-campus activities and professional development opportunities. ACCREDITATION • The OTA program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the AOTA • Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Certification Examination for the OTA. • For more details on accreditation, see Accreditation section on the next page. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE • Semester 1: ENG 11, HLT 13, BIO 33, PSY 51, OTA 11, OTA 17 • Semester 2: ENG 12, MTH 19 or 25, BIO 34, OTA 21, 25, 27 • Semester 3: AMC/HST, HUM elective, OTA 33, 35, 37 • Semester 4: OTA 41, OTA 43, OTA 44

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Occupational Therapy Assistant
Occupational Therapy addresses functional performance abilities through the provision of purposeful activities (occupations). Occupational therapy services restore, reinforce, and enhance the performance of skills necessary for activities of daily living, work, school, and leisure. Clients range from newborns to elders. This program prepares students to work with other healthcare clinicians under the supervision of registered occupational therapists in acute care, rehabilitation, home-health, long-term care, school, habilitation, residential, out patient and wellness settings.

General Courses _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ HLT 13 Medical Language Module I _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
Many students find that completing all except the Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) courses before entering the program allows maximum attention to OTA coursework.

After BCC

• Graduates have taken positions as Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants in area schools, acute care, rehab and psychiatric hospitals, residential and day habilitation programs, sub-acute rehab, transitional care and outpatient settings. • Graduates may transfer to Occupational Therapy programs at senior institutions. Specific prerequisite requirements and transfer credit are determined by the transfer institution. • BCC has an articulation agreement with Salem State College.

Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVES Humanities/Arts Elective Program Courses _____ OTA 11 Introduction to Occupational Therapy _____ OTA 17 Psychosocial Performance _____ OTA 21 Cognitive and Sensorimotor Performance _____ OTA 25 Movement in Human Performance _____ OTA 27 Psychosocial Therapeutic Modalities _____ OTA 33 Common Conditions of Physical Dysfunction _____ OTA 35 Professional Practice Skills _____ OTA 37 Developmental / Pediatric OT Practice _____ OTA 41 Level II Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice – A _____ OTA 43 Level II Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice - B _____ OTA 44 Seminar in Occupational Therapy

Choose one - MTH 19 recommended for transfer

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 5 credits 5 credits 2 credits

Apply by January 15 for priority consideration.

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readmission (allowed once only) is dependent upon available space and will be based on the recommendations of the faculty and Department Chair. Students must also successfully complete all required coursework, clinical and program objectives and competencies in order to graduate. Level II fieldwork must be completed within 18 months of the academic coursework.

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Additional Admission Requirements
Applicants must have completed high school algebra I, biology and chemistry with grades of “C-” or better. This is a competitive program. Successful candidates have typically excelled in high school science and math courses. Applicants are advised to observe or volunteer in an occupational therapy setting or with organizations that provide services for the disabled. Applicants must include a letter outlining their interest in, knowledge of, and exposure to occupational therapy. Recommended deadline for filing an application is January 15 for fall admission.

Requirements upon Admission
Upon admission to the OTA Program, students will be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Information) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from participating in clinical assignments in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives. The Massachusetts Board of Allied Health Professions requires applicants to report any history of felonies or misdemeanors and may deny licensure to those applicants. Further information is available from the Board at www.state.ma.us/reg/boards/ah or at 617-727-3071. The Disciplinary Action Committee of the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) may refuse to administer the certification exam, and/or deny certification to any individual charged with or convicted of a felony. For further information, contact the NBCOT, 800 S. Frederick Avenue, Suite 200, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20877-4150. (301) 990-7979.

Additional Costs
Students accepted into the program are responsible for associated costs such as lab coat, name tag, clinic supplies, graduate pin, review course, national certification exam, conferences, professional meetings, mentor contact, liability insurance, licensing fees, and fieldwork related costs. Students are also required to attend off-campus professional meetings and a variety of community activities.

Clinical Affiliations
Transportation to the fieldwork sites is the student’s responsibility. Students should be prepared to travel an hour or more from campus. Students are advised to discontinue outside work obligations during full-time fieldwork affiliations in the fourth semester. The availability of clinical affiliations depends on the ability of area healthcare providers to accept students. In some cases, affiliations will be completed in the Fall (5th) semester.

Technical Standards
Students need to possess certain cognitive, physical, and psychosocial abilities (technical standards) in order to successfully complete the requirements of the program and ultimately practice in the profession. Please discuss particulars with the program director. ACCREDITATION The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, PO Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. AOTA’s phone number is (301) 652-2682. Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Certification Examination for the Occupational Therapy Assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination and completion of all program requirements for graduation.

Health Requirements
Once accepted into the program, students must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunization as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year, and must be certified by the American Heart Association (Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers) in C.P.R. Course C for Healthcare Providers. Students are required to maintain health insurance throughout their enrollment and maintain C.P.R certification through completion of the program. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, are required by clinical agencies.

Grade Requirements
Students must receive a minimum grade of “C” in all required occupational therapy assistant courses. Failure to earn a “C” or better in a clinical course will result in program dismissal. Application for

108
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Histology
Credits required: 12 Program director: Lisa Wright, Coordinator

2007-2008

Health Sciences Degrees:

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Histology
This program is a credit-granting program that provides specialized preparation and hands-on practical learning for a high-demand field. It is aimed at students studying Clinical Laboratory Science and laboratory professionals already in the field who are interested in pursuing a career in histology.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students who complete the program and obtain an associate’s degree and one year of full time experience in histology will be eligible to take the national certification examination. Contact the program director for more information. ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS Students must possess the following basic abilities: • Cognitive ability to learn and use the body of knowledge necessary to meet the program curriculum requirements and qualify to enter the profession. • Physical ability, including sufficient mobility and motor coordination to safely process patient specimens and perform procedures using a microscope, computer, diagnostic and processing instruments. • Visual acuity to read and interpret procedures and quality control results, monitor instrument performance, focus a microscope, and differentiate colors. • Hearing ability to respond to equipment signals, requests and messages from physicians and staff. • Communication skills to communicate effectively with patients, physicians and staff. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: MED 61 and MED 63 Semester 2: MED 63

Program Courses _____ MED 61 _____ MED 63 _____ MED 65

Introduction to Histotechnology Histology Techniques I Histology Practicum I

3 credits 2 credits 7 credits

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Admission Requirements
Applicants must have completed high school algebra 1, chemistry, and biology with a minimum grade of “C-.” Applicant must also have completed BIO54, Human Physiology or BIO33 and 34, Anatomy and Physiology I and II. This is a challenging program. Successful candidates have excelled in high school and/or college science and math course.

Requirements Upon Admission
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, are required by clinical agencies. Upon admission to the CLS program, students will be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Information) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working in contracted health facilities which will prevent students from completing the program objectives.

Hints for Success
Students who complete the program and obtain an associate’s degree and one year of full time experience in histology will be eligible to take the national certification examination. Contact the program director for more information.

Additional Costs
Students must carry professional liability insurance, personal health insurance, and are responsible for purchasing uniforms, lab coats, safety supplies, and examination fees.

After BCC

• The regional and national shortage of histotechnicians/histologists provides ample career opportunities.

Grade Requirements
A minimum grade of “C-” is recommended in BIO54 or its equivalent to provide the necessary foundation for MED courses. Students must achieve a “C” in the college-based component of the MED courses to progress to the clinical course and must achieve a “C” in all clinical courses. Apply by January 15 for priority consideration.

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Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

110
Health Sciences Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Medical Assisting
Credits required: 29 Program director: Hope Burns, Assistant Dean for Health Sciences

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Medical Assisting
The medical assistant program prepares multiskilled practitioners with clinical, administrative, and managerial skills. The medical assistant practitioner works primarily in ambulatory settings such as medical offices and clinics.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • A medical assistant functions as a member of the healthcare delivery team. Medical assistants can focus as needed on specific clinical or administrative tasks, including phlebotomy, EKG technician, patient care technician, or office manager/supervisor. • Graduates of BCC are eligible to apply to sit for the American Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) to be credentialed as a Certified Medical Assistant (CMA). • Some courses in this program are only offered during the day. • The Bristol Community College Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Curriculum Review Board of the American Association of Medical Assistants Endowment (AAMAE), Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 35 East Wacker Drive, Suite 1970 Chicago, IL 60601-2208 (312) 553-9355 RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HLT 13, BIO 15, HLT 21, MAA 71, MAS 11 Semester 2: HLT 15, HLT 22, HCI 24, MAS 12, MAS 22

Program Courses _____ BIO 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ HCI 24 _____ HLT 13 _____ HLT 15 _____ HLT 21 _____ HLT 22 _____ MAA 71 _____ MAS 11 _____ MAS 12 _____ MAS 22

Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology Composition I: College Writing Survey of Medical Coding and Billing Medical Language Module I Medical Language Module II Basic Lab Procedures for the Health Sciences Intermediate Lab Procedures for the Health Sciences Administrative Medical Assisting Procedures Medical Assisting I Medical Assisting II Medical Assisting Clinical Practicum and Theory

4 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

Hints for Success
Applicants should be familiar with computers and word processing software.

After BCC

• Recent graduates work as entry-level medical assistants and patient care technicians. • This program is designed for graduates to enter the workforce immediately. However, many elect to continue their studies in other healthcare fields.

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111

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Admission requirements
Applicants must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. certificate to demonstrate successful completion of high school biology, algebra I, and typing with a minimum grade of “C-”. In lieu of a typing course, students may demonstrate a keyboarding speed of 20 wpm with no more than three errors. This is a competitive program. Successful candidates have excelled in science and/or math courses.

Program Essential Functions
The practice of medical assisting involves communication with patients and direct-patient care activities. Certain cognitive and psychomotor capabilities are required for the safe and skillful performance of these activities. In order to make satisfactory progress through the medical assisting program, a student must meet the following criteria: 1. Visual acuity such as that needed for preparation and administration of medications, observation and measurement of laboratory values, physical assessment activities, and varied administrative tasks. 2. Hearing ability such as that required to receive verbal messages from patients and staff members and to utilize varied medical equipment. 3. Motor skills and coordination as needed to implement the skills required to meet the healthcare needs of patients and also to operate computers and technical equipment. 4. Communication skills such as those of speech, reading and writing as needed to interact with and interpret patient needs and communicate these as necessary to provide safe and effective care. 5. Reading, writing and cognitive skills such as those required for written examination, research papers, and the composition of business letters and other business/office related communications. 6. Mathematical skills such as those required for calculating drug dosages and financial record-keeping for the physician’s office or healthcare facility. 7. Intellectual and emotional ability to coordinate patient care and manage activities with an ambulatory care facility.

Additional requirements and costs
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, may be required by clinical agencies . Students are responsible for associated costs such as uniforms, lab coats, textbooks, lab supplies, professional liability insurance, and must carry personal health insurance throughout enrollment in the program. Students must provide their own transportation to clinical assignments.

Criminal offender record information (C.O.R.I)
Upon admission into the program, students will be required to submit to a Criminal Offender Record Information (C.O.R.I.) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent individuals from working in contracted health facilities, which could prevent students from completing the program objectives.

112
Health Sciences Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Medical Administrative Practices
Credits required: 27 Program director: Victoria Revier, Coordinator and Associate Professor of Medical Administrative Programs PROGRAM INFORMATION • The medical field offers a wide variety of career choices. Medical office skills provide excellent job mobility. • Graduates work as administrative assistants in medical offices, hospitals, or related sites. • All credits transfer into the Medical Administrative Assistant degree. • OFC 13 and OFC 17 are the appropriate pre- or co-requisites for MAA 74. RECOMMENDATIONS • The prerequisite for OFC 14 is OFC 13. Students who have not achieved the skill level equivalent to OFC 13 should consult with the program director. RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration degree - Medical Administrative Assistant option RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BIO 15, OFC 14, ACC 14, MAA 70, MAA 72 Semester 2: OFC 17, MAA 75, ENG 11, MAA 74, MAA 79

2007-2008

Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

Medical Administrative Practices
This certificate prepares students to become medical administrative assistants. Students learn computer applications, medical terminology, medical transcription, accounting, billing, and office procedures.

Program Courses _____ ACC 14 _____ BIO 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ MAA 70 _____ MAA 72 _____ MAA 74 _____ MAA 75 _____ MAA 79 _____ OFC 14 _____ OFC 17

Introduction to QuickBooks Pro Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology Composition I: College Writing Medical Terminology Medical Transcription Medical Insurance Forms Preparation Medical Office Procedures Medical Office Portfolio Development Advanced Word Processing Applications (see recommendations) Introduction to Microsoft Office

1 credit 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 3 credit

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Medical Coding
Credits required: 27 Program coordinator: Edward Dobbs, Program Coordinator Healthcare Information

Medical Coding
This certificate provides students with knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, human diseases and their treatment, and medical language of major body systems. Students also learn how to provide disease and procedure codes in both of the medical coding systems used in the healthcare industry, and how to communicate those codes to medical insurers and government programs that pay medical providers for medical services.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This certificate prepares students for CCA, CCS, and CCS-P certification examinations offered by the AHIMA RECOMMENDATIONS • To enroll in the Healthcare Information Degree program, substitute BIO 33 and BIO 34 for BIO 15. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, BIO 15, HCI 13, CIT 11, MAA 74 Semester 2: HCI 37, HCI 39, HCI 42, HCI 45, MAA 79 RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration degree – Medical Administrative Assistant option, Healthcare Information degree (Medical Records)

Program Courses _____ BIO 15 _____ CIT 11 _____ ENG 11 _____ HCI 13 _____ HCI 37 _____ HCI 39 _____ HCI 42 _____ HCI 45 _____ MAA 74 _____ MAA 79

Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology Information Technology Fluency I Composition I: College Writing Medical Language Human Disease Processes and Procedures International Classification of Disease Coding Coding of Procedures and Healthcare Reimbursement Medical Coding/Billing Externship and Seminar Medical Insurance Forms Preparation Medical Office Portfolio Development

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits 1 credit

2007-2008

113

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

Medical Transcription
This certificate prepares students to satisfy the demand for quality medical documentation, focusing on the necessary concepts, terminology, transcription methodology, and general knowledge of medical office practice needed by the successful medical transcriptionist.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Medical Transcription
Credits required: 29 Program director: Victoria Revier, Coordinator and Associate Professor of Medical Administrative Programs

Program Courses _____ BIO 15 _____ ENG 11 _____ OFC 14 _____ MAA 70 _____ MAA 72 _____ MAA 73 _____ MAA 75 _____ MAA 79 _____ OFC 17 _____ OFC 20

Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology Composition I: College Writing Advanced Word Processing Applications (see recommendations) Medical Terminology Medical Transcription Advanced Medical Transcription Medical Office Procedures Medical Office Portfolio Development Introduction to Microsoft Office Text Editing

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credit 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Graduates can choose to work in large or small settings, or work for themselves. The skills developed provide excellent job mobility. • All credits transfer into the Office Administration degree program. RECOMMENDATIONS • The prerequisite for OFC 14 is OFC 13. Students who have not achieved the skill level equivalent to OFC 13 should consult with the program director. RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration degree -- Medical Administrative Assistant option RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BIO 15, OFC 14, MAA 70, OFC 20, MAA 72 Semester 2: OFC 17, MAA 73, ENG 11, MAA 75, MAA 79

114
Health Sciences Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Phlebotomy
Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

2007-2008

Credits required: 6 Program director: Lisa Wright, Coordinator

Phlebotomy
Students completing the two-semester program will be prepared to perform routine and special blood collection procedures as well as process the specimens prior to testing in a modern clinical laboratory. A three-week clinical placement

PROGRAM INFORMATION • A phlebotomist must have good interpersonal skills and enjoy working with the public. • GED students should take BIO 11 or CHM 10 and MTH 01 prior to applying for admission. • Some courses in this program are only offered during the day.

Program Courses _____ MED 10 _____ PLB 13

Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science 2 credits Principles and Methods of Phlebotomy 4 credits

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS To meet course requirements, students must possess the following basic abilities: • Cognitive ability to learn and use the body of knowledge necessary to meet program requirements and qualify to enter the profession • Physical ability, including sufficient mobility and motor coordination, to safely collect and process patient specimens and access areas within the healthcare facility where services are required • Visual acuity to read and interpret test requests and physician orders • Hearing ability to respond to messages from patients and staff • Communication skills to communicate with patients, physicians, and staff • Emotional stability to allow professional interaction with patients and staff, to respect patient confidentiality, use reasonable judgment, and accept responsibility for actions.

Admission Requirements
Applicants must possess a high school diploma or G.E.D. equivalent. Preference will be given to applicants with a minimum high school grade of “C-“ or better, or a G.E.D. score of 250 or better. Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must test free from Tuberculosis before entering the program and each year.

strengthens practical skills.

Grade Requirements
MED 10 includes 45 hours of lecture/lab scheduled during the fall semester. PLB 13 includes 45 hours of lecture/lab, plus 120 hours of clinical training scheduled in the spring semester. A minimum grade of “C” is required in MED 10 to continue with the PLB 13 course. Students must achieve a minimum of “C” in the college-based component of PLB 13 in order to complete the clinical course component, and a minimum of a “C” in the PLB clinical component to receive a passing course grade.

Hints for Success
Students should have completed a high school-level science course such as biology or chemistry as well as mathematics. A medical terminology course and basic computer literacy course are also helpful.

Additional Requirements
Upon Admission to the Program students must carry professional liability insurance, personal health insurance and are responsible for purchasing uniforms and for certification examination fees. Upon admission to the Phlebotomy Program students will be required to submit to a Criminal Offender Record Information (C.O.R.I.) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, are required by the clinical agencies. Apply by January 15 for priority consideration.

After BCC

• Phlebotomists work in physicians’ offices, clinics, hospitals, and private hospitals. • Upon completion students are eligible to take national certification examination.

2007-2008

115

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

Pre-Radiology Technology
This program prepares students to apply for an associate’s degree program in radiology technology.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Pre-Radiology Technology
Credits required: 29 Program director: Hope Burns, Assistant Dean for Health Sciences

Program Courses _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ CIT 11 _____ CIT 12 _____ ENG 11 _____ HLT 13 _____ HLT 15 _____ MTH 10 _____ PHY 01 _____ RAD 11

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Information Technology Fluency I Information Technology Fluency II Composition I: College Writing Medical Language Module I Medical Language Module II Elementary Functions Technical Physics I Orientation to Radiology Technology

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC does not currently have a Radiology Technology program but plans to institute one in the future. • Admission to radiology technology programs is competitive. This certificate program enables students to complete general education requirements required at most two-year radiology technology programs and provides an introduction to the field. • The program also prepares students for many other Health Sciences degree programs. Contact Admissions, ext. 2516, for more information.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CIT 11, MTH 10, BIO 33, PHY 01, HLT 13 Semester 2: CIT 12, ENG 11, BIO 34, HLT 15, RAD 11

Admission Requirements
Applicants must have high school algebra I and II, geometry, and biology or chemistry with grades of “C-“ or better. Successful candidates excel in high school math, science and computer courses.

Grade Requirements

Hints for Success
Students completing the program will have a better understanding of career options and employment opportunities in the field of Radiology Technology. Some courses are only available during the day.

Students must achieve a minimum of “C” in all courses in order to transfer credits to an associate’s degree program. Priority consideration in associate degree programs will be given to graduates who have excelled in required math, science and computer technology courses.

After BCC

• Students are encouraged to apply to associate degree Radiology Technology programs after completion of certificate. Students should choose BCC courses that meet the requirements of the associate degree programs of choice. Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) can help.

116
Health Sciences Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Therapeutic Massage
Clinical Laboratory Science • Complementary Healthcare • Dental Hygiene • Healthcare Information • Nursing • Occupational Therapy Assistant

2007-2008

Credits required: 29 Program director: Susan Ellingwood, Instructor in Complementary Healthcare and Therapeutic Massage

Therapeutic Massage
The program prepares students to pursue a career as certified massage therapists. Certified massage therapists are employed by physicians, chiropractors, rehabilitation centers, and business and industry, and also own their practices.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Graduates may apply to local Boards of Health for licensure. • The program provides a foundation to pass the National Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. • This program will also enhance the skills of healthcare professionals in nursing, occupational therapy, and home healthcare. ADDITIONAL COSTS • Students are responsible for the cost of uniforms, professional liability insurance, massage supplies and equipment, certain standardized achievement test registrations, and the National Certification Examination of Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork. They must carry health insurance throughout enrollment in the program. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: BIO 33, MAT 11, 12, 13 Semester 2: ENG 11, BIO 34, HCI 37, MAT 22, MAT 24 Semester 3: Summer (MAT 26)

Program Courses _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ ENG 11 _____ HCI 37 _____ MAT 11 _____ MAT 12 _____ MAT 13 _____ MAT 22 _____ MAT 24 _____ MAT 26

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Composition I: College Writing Human Disease Processes and Procedures Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practice I Musculoskeletal Anatomy for the Massage Professional Survey of Complementary Care Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practice II Massage Therapy Practice Management Therapeutic Massage Clinical Practicum

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 2 credits

Hints for Success
After BCC
Consult with program director to choose courses, whether enrolling full time or part time.

• This certificate complements a variety of human services and healthcare degree programs.

2007-2008

117

Certificates: Histology • Medical Administrative Practices • Medical Assisting • Medical Coding • Medical Transcription • Phlebotomy • Pre-Radiology Technology • Therapeutic Massage

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Additional Admission Requirements
Applicants must have a high school diploma or G.E.D. certificate. They must also have completed high school biology, chemistry and algebra 1 with a minimum grade of “C-.” Applicants must include a letter outlining their interest in, knowledge of, and exposure to therapeutic massage and complementary healthcare. Recommended deadline for filing is January 15th for all fall admissions.

Essential Functions
Students need to possess certain cognitive, physical, and physiological abilities in order to successfully complete the requirements of the program and ultimately practice in the profession. Please discuss particulars with the program director.

Requirements upon Admission
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, Hepatitis B immunization, and other immunization as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and must have a tuberculosis test each year. Additional laboratory tests, including drug screening, may be required by clinical agencies. Upon admission to the program, students will be required to submit to a Criminal Offender Record Information (C.O.R.I.) check that identifies any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent students from working in contracted health facilities, which will prevent students from completing the program objectives.

Grade Requirements
Students must receive a minimum grade of “C-“in all required courses. Failure to earn a “C-“or better in a clinical course will result in dismissal from the program. Clinical Practicum hours must be completed within 18 months of the academic coursework.

Additional Costs
Students are responsible for the costs of lab coats, uniforms, professional liability insurance, standardized testing, name tag, lab supplies, national certification exam, and transportation to clinical placement sites. Students should be prepared to travel up to one hour from campus to clinical assignments. Students are also required to attend a variety of community activities. Graduates must apply to local boards of health for licensure to practice as a massage therapist.

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Criminal Justice Culinary Arts 120 122 124 126 127 128 129 130 132 134 136 137 138

Human Services and Public Safety
Why choose Human Services and Public Safety?
Degree programs offer practical training for those interested in public service, coupled with general education courses that enhance critical thinking and problem solving. These programs are geared toward immediate work entry, but many students transfer courses to four-year programs. Certificate programs allow students to develop specific professional skills and can be used to enhance degree programs.

Baking and Pastry Culinary Arts Deaf Studies (transfer) Deaf Studies C-Print
TM

option

Early Childhood option Human Services option Deaf Studies Interpreter (transfer) Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Education (transfer) Elementary Education Fire Science Technology Human Services

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM
Deaf Studies Prep Deaf Studies Professional Early Childhood Education Fire Investigation Specialist Fire Prevention Specialist Funeral Service Preparatory Human Services Infant/Toddler Instructional Paraprofessional Law Enforcement Thanatology 139 139 140 141 141 142 142 143 144 144 145

120
Human Services Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Criminal Justice Credits required: 60/62 Program director: Barry M. McKee, Professor of Criminal Justice PROGRAM INFORMATION
• The faculty represent all of the major fields of the criminal justice system, and students benefit from their years of formal study and professional experience. • Our graduates are actively recruited by criminal justice and private security agencies as well as by four-year institutions. • This program is a state joint admissions eligible program. • The Criminal Justice Program is accredited by the State and Board of Higher Education for the PCIPP (Political Career Incentive Pay Program). (Quinn Bill approved.)

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Criminal Justice
The Criminal Justice program prepares students for careers in police, corrections, private security, and other related criminal justice work, and to transfer to a baccalaureate institution. Current criminal justice practitioners can take courses to upgrade skills.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

PROGRAM REQUIREMENT

• To maintain enrollment in the Criminal Justice program, students are required to achieve a grade of “C” or better in all Criminal Justice courses and to maintain a cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.0 or better.

RECOMMENDATIONS

• Students are encouraged to join the Criminal Justice Society, a student-run social and service organization, and to get involved with the community and actively participate in community service projects to better understand and appreciate the world they have chosen to serve.

RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CRJ 11, CRJ 13, ENG 11, SOC 11, HST 11 or HST 13 or AMC 11 Semester 2: CRJ 15, CRJ 18, ENG 12, MTH 19 or 25, HST 12 or HST 14 or AMC 12 Semester 3: CRJ 19, CRJ 51, CRJ 58, PSY 51, Science elective Semester 4: CRJ 56, CRJ 59, SPH 11, GVT 51, Open elective

Hints for Success
After BCC
New students should register for CRJ 11 and CRJ 13 as well as ENG 11, SOC 11, and a History or American Civilization course.

• Graduates work as state and local police officers and detectives, correctional officers, special agents with the United States Customs Service and Federal Marshal Service, college instructor, grant coordinators for the National Institute of Justice, lawyers, probation officers, and officers and managers in private security agencies. Others are social workers and drug rehabilitation counselors. Several local chiefs are BCC grads. • BCC has transfer articulation agreements with UMass Dartmouth, UMass Lowell, Roger Williams University, Salve Regina University, Johnson & Wales University, and Bridgewater State College. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ GVT 51 Urban Government and Politics _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ SOC 11 Principles of Sociology _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science _____ ELECTIVE Free Elective Program Courses _____ CRJ 11 Introduction to Criminal Justice _____ CRJ 13 Criminal Law _____ CRJ 15 Report Writing and Information Systems _____ CRJ 18 Law Enforcement Management and Planning _____ CRJ 19 Police and Community Relations _____ CRJ 51 Criminology _____ CRJ 56 Criminal Investigation _____ CRJ 58 Criminal Procedure _____ CRJ 59 Introduction to Criminalistics

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 3/4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

121

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

122
Human Services Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Applied Science in Culinary Arts (Baking and Pastry Option) Credits required: 61/62 Program director: John J. Caressimo, CCE, CCC, Professor of Culinary Arts

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

CULINARY ARTS OPTION

Baking and Pastry
General Courses _____ CIS 09 Hospitality Management Information Systems _____ CSS 11 College Success Seminar _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SOC 52 The Sociology of Human Relations _____ BUS 11 or Business and Financial Mathematics or MTH 19 or Fundamental Statistics or MTH 25 Modern College Mathematics See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE History Elective _____ ELECTIVE Science Elective Program Courses _____ CUL 15 Sanitation for Culinarians _____ CUL 16 Nutrition for Culinarians _____ CUL 25 Foodservice Operations and Career Development _____ CUL 36 Purchasing for Culinarians _____ CUL 50 Art Skills for the Baker _____ CUL 51 Baking Technology _____ CUL 52 Essentials of Baking I _____ CUL 62 Essentials of Baking II _____ CUL 63 Introduction to Showpieces and Displays _____ CUL 64 Advanced Pastry Arts I _____ CUL 65 The Art of the Cake _____ CUL 66 Advanced Pastry Arts II _____ CUL 67 The Capstone Experience for the Baker 3 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students requiring developmental courses in math, reading, or English should complete those course prior to enrolling in any culinary courses. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CUL 15, CUL 16, CUL 50, CUL 51, CUL 52, CSS 11, CIS 09 Semester 2: ENG 11, CUL 62, CUL 63, (BUS 11 or MTH 19 or 25) Semester 3: CUL 64, CUL 65, SOC 52, History Elective, Science Elective Semester 4: ENG 12, CUL 25, CUL 36, CUL 66, CUL 67

This program provides students with the opportunity to develop the skill to work in the hospitality/ foodservice field as bakers, pastry chefs, and baking personnel in any type of foodservice establishment.

3 credits 3/4 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 4 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
After BCC
Students requiring developmental courses in math, reading, or English should complete those courses prior to enrolling in any culinary courses.

• BCC has transfer articulation agreements with Newbury College and Paul Smith College. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

2007-2008

123

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Special Requirements
To successfully complete the program, students should have their own transportation and should limit outside work commitments. Students must be available to work required Culinary Arts functions.

Essential functions
Students accepted into the program must possess the following basic abilities: •Physical ability to be able to: -Stand for long periods of time (4 to 10 hours) during a normally protracted class and work day. -Work in a kitchen environment where the temperature can exceed ambient temperature. -Lift and move heavy weight (such as wait-trays, small equipment and institutional size supplies - 25-50 lbs.) •Sufficient communication skills to allow for successful interaction between the students and the public. •Sufficient mobility and motor coordination to complete assigned tasks in the kitchen and dining room in a safe, efficient manner, according to acceptable industry standards. •Ability to learn and apply the body of knowledge necessary to meet the program curriculum and successfully enter the foodservice profession

Additional Costs
Students are responsible for the costs of their uniforms, kitchen and bakeshop tools, and texts.

124
Human Services Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Applied Science in Culinary Arts Credits required: 67/68 Program director: John J. Caressimo, CCE, CCC, Professor of Culinary Arts

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Culinary Arts
The Culinary Arts program prepares the student for employment in the food service/hospitality industry. The classes focus on a variety of practical skills necessary to compete in today’s foodservice business as well as the theoretical knowledge to enable our graduates to stand in the forefront of the industry.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students requiring developmental courses in math, reading, or English should complete those course prior to enrolling in any culinary courses. ARTICULATION OPTION • Students graduating from area high schools and vocational-technical centers who participate in the College Tech-Prep program and maintain a grade of B or better and have the recommendation of their Culinary Arts instructor will be able to obtain credit for certain introductory level Culinary courses depending upon the articulation agreements between their school and Bristol Community College. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: CUL 10, CUL 11, CUL 13, CUL 15, CUL 16, CSS 11, CIS 09 Semester 2: CUL 12, CUL 14, CUL 33, CUL 19, ENG 11 Semester 3: CUL 31, CUL 23, SOC 52, ENG 12, Science Elective Semester 4: CUL 24, CUL 25, CUL 32, CUL 36, History Elective (Bus 11 or MTH 19 or MTH 25)

General Courses _____ CIS 09

Hints for Success
After BCC
Students requiring developmental courses in math, reading, or English should complete those courses prior to enrolling in any culinary courses.

• Graduates can work in the kitchens, dining rooms, or bakeshops of a wide variety of establishments from small local restaurants to large international organizations and can also transfer for further study to four-year colleges including Johnson and Wales. • BCC has transfer articulation agreements with Newbury College, Paul Smith College, and Johnson and Wales University. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with transfer affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Hospitality Management Information Systems _____ CSS 11 College Success Seminar _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SOC 52 The Sociology of Human Relations _____ BUS 11 or Business and Financial Mathematics or MTH 19 or Fundamental Statistics or MTH 25 Modern College Mathematics See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE History Elective _____ ELECTIVE Science Elective Program Courses _____ CUL 10 Art Skills for the Culinarian _____ CUL 11 Essentials of Culinary Arts I _____ CUL 12 Essentials of Culinary Arts II _____ CUL 13 Dining Room Functions I _____ CUL 14 Mixology and Bar Management _____ CUL 15 Sanitation for Culinarians _____ CUL 16 Nutrition for Culinarians _____ CUL 19 Baking Skills for Cooks _____ CUL 23 Advanced Table Service _____ CUL 24 The Capstone Experience for Culinarians _____ CUL 25 Foodservice Operations and Career Development _____ CUL 31 Advanced Culinary Techniques I _____ CUL 32 Advanced Culinary Techniques II _____ CUL 33 Dining Room Functions II _____ CUL 36 Purchasing for Culinarians

3 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits 3/4 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 2 credits 3 credits 3 credits 2 credits 6 credits 6 credits 2 credits 2 credits

2007-2008

125

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Special Requirements
To successfully complete the program, students should have their own transportation and should limit outside work commitments. Students must be available to work required Culinary Arts functions.

Essential functions
Students accepted into the program must possess the following basic abilities: •Physical ability to be able to: -Stand for long periods of time (4 to 10 hours) during a normally protracted class and work day. -Work in a kitchen environment where the temperature can exceed ambient temperature. -Lift and move heavy weight (such as wait-trays, small equipment and institutional size supplies - 25-50 lbs.) •Sufficient communication skills to allow for successful interaction between the students and the public. •Sufficient mobility and motor coordination to complete assigned tasks in the kitchen and dining room in a safe, efficient manner, according to acceptable industry standards. •The ability to learn and apply the body of knowledge necessary to meet the program curriculum and successfully enter the foodservice profession

Additional Costs
Students are responsible for the costs of their uniforms, kitchen and bakeshop tools, and texts.

126
Human Services Degrees:
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Deaf Studies Transfer Credits required: 66 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Deaf Studies
Deaf studies explores the language, culture, history and contemporary issues of Deaf people. Fundamental to our program are both competency in American Sign Language and a desire to work with Deaf people and not for them. This program prepares students, both deaf and hearing, who are interested in a professional career working with Deaf, hard-of-hearing or late-deafened persons to transfer to a four-year college or university in the field of their choice.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Deaf Studies provides a foundation for interpreters, but not an interpreter training program (ITP). Students wanting to become professional interpreters will transfer on to an ITP and must pass a theoretical and practical exam to become “qualified interpreters.” • Students who have taken non-credit “sign language” classes in the past, or who have signing Deaf family members, should meet with the program director to discuss Prior Experiential Learning (PEL) opportunities. • Students will spend an additional hour per week engaged in language lab activities with every ASL class taken. Students are expected to attend various Deaf events and get involved in the ASL/Deaf Studies Club throughout their studies to apply their language skills and develop them further in real-world, practical situations. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: AMS 01, AMS 81, DST 10, DST 11, ENG 11, SOC 11 Semester 2: AMS 02, AMS 82, DST 51, ENG 12, PSY 51, SPH 11 Semester 3: AMS 11, AMS 83, DST 13, MTH 19 or 25, HST 11, Science Elective Semester 4: AMS 12, AMS 84, DST 52, HST 12, Science Elective, Social Science Elective,

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
After BCC
Students should spend 3 – 6 hours per week outside of class learning and using American Sign Language.

• The Program is a state joint admissions eligible program. • Graduates of the program can transfer to obtain professional credentials in the field of their choice: Interpreting (freelance, legal or staff); education (deaf education, special education, early childhood education, teacher aide, interpreter-aide, ASL teacher, adult basic education); early intervention and human service (advocacy, disability services, vocational rehabilitation, communication access and assistive technology); or related fields such as speech and language pathology, audiology, etc.

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ SOC 11 Principles of Sociology _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics _____ HST 11 West and the World I _____ HST 12 West and the World II See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Program Courses _____ AMS 01 Elementary American Sign Language _____ AMS 02 Elementary American Sign Language II _____ AMS 11 Intermediate American Sign Language I _____ AMS 12 Intermediate American Sign Language II _____ AMS 81 Visual/Gestural Seminar I _____ AMS 82 Visual/Gestural Seminar II _____ AMS 83 American Sign Language Seminar _____ AMS 84 ASL Seminar II _____ DST 10 Introduction to Deaf Studies _____ DST 11 Deaf Culture _____ DST 13 The Deaf Community in Society _____ DST 51 Deaf History _____ DST 52 Deaf Literature and ASL Folklore

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

127

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

C-PRINT™

CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Deaf Studies (C-Print™ Concentration) Credits required: 63 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

Deaf Studies
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Composition II: Writing about Literature 3 credits _____ SOC 11 Principles of Sociology 3 credits _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics 3 credits Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and 3 credits _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II 3 credits _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and 3 credits _____ HST 12 West and the World II 3 credits _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and 3 credits _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 3 credits See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective 4 credits Program Courses _____ AMS 01 Elementary American Sign Language 3 credits _____ AMS 02 Elementary American Sign Language II 3 credits _____ AMS 11 Intermediate American Sign Language I 3 credits _____ AMS 12 Intermediate American Sign Language II 3 credits _____ AMS 81 Visual/Gestural Seminar I 1 credit _____ AMS 82 Visual/Gestural Seminar II 1 credit _____ AMS 83 American Sign Language Seminar 1 credit _____ AMS 84 ASL Seminar II 1 credit _____ CIS 03 Working with Laptops 1 credit _____ DST 10 Introduction to Deaf Studies 3 credits _____ DST 11 Deaf Culture 3 credits _____ DST 13 The Deaf Community in Society 3 credits _____ DST 51 or 52 Deaf History or Deaf Literature and ASL Folklore 3 credits _____ OFC 35 C-Print™ Basics 6 credits _____ OFC 40 C-Print™ Captioning Skill Development and Practicum 6 credits

This program provides a foundation in Deaf studies as well as specialized workforce skills. C-Print™ is a computerized notetaking system developed at the National Technical Institute of the Deaf and is widely used in educational settings. Students in this option are prepared to work upon graduation as an entry-level freelance C-Print™ captionist.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC offers several Deaf Studies options to meet your career and academic goals. (See also: Deaf Studies, Deaf StudiesEarly Childhood option, Deaf Studies Human Services option, Deaf Studies Prep certificate and Deaf Studies Professional certificate.) • This is not a real-time captioning (CART) program as seen on TV. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: AMS 01, AMS 81, DST 10, DST 11, ENG 11, SOC 11, CIS 03 Semester 2: AMS 02, AMS 82, DST 12, ENG 12, MTH 19 or 25, Science Elective Semester 3: AMS 11, AMS 83, DST 13, OFC 35, History/American Civilization Elective Semester 4: AMS 12, AMS 84, DST 51 or 52, OFC 40, History/American Civilization Elective

Hints for Success
Students should spend 3 – 6 hours per week outside of class learning and using American Sign Language.

After BCC

• Graduates of the program can seek employment as C-Print™ captionists or can seek transfer at a four-year college or university.

128
Human Services Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Deaf Studies (Early Childhood Concentration) Credits required: 69 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

Deaf Studies
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ PSY 52 Child Development _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II West and the World I and _____ HST 11 and _____ HST 12 West and the World II US History to 1877 and _____ HST 13 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Program Courses _____ AMS 01 Elementary American Sign Language _____ AMS 02 Elementary American Sign Language II _____ AMS 11 Intermediate American Sign Language I _____ AMS 12 Intermediate American Sign Language II _____ AMS 81 Visual/Gestural Seminar I _____ AMS 82 Visual/Gestural Seminar II _____ AMS 83 American Sign Language Seminar _____ AMS 84 ASL Seminar II _____ DST 10 Introduction to Deaf Studies _____ DST 11 Deaf Culture _____ DST 13 The Deaf Community in Society _____ ECE 11 Introduction to Early Childhood _____ DST 51 or 52 Deaf History or Deaf Literature and ASL Folklore Education _____ ECE 13 Safe and Healthy Early Childhood Learning Environments _____ ECE 22 Special Needs in Early Childhood _____ ECE 34 Preschool Curriculum Planning _____ ECE 51 Practicum I and Seminar I 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC offers several Deaf Studies options to meet your career and academic goals. (See also: Deaf Studies, Deaf Studies-C-Print option, Deaf Studies-Human Services option, Deaf Studies Prep certificate and Deaf Studies Professional certificate.) • Graduates wishing to work with infants and toddlers may also opt to take ECE 33 Infant and Toddler Development and ECE 37 Infant and Toddler Curriculum during or after their studies RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: AMS 01, AMS 81, DST 10, DST 11, ENG 11, PSY 51 Semester 2: AMS 02, AMS 82, ECE 11, ENG 12, PSY 52, ECE 13, Science Elective* Semester 3: AMS 11, AMS 83, DST 13, ECE 22, ECE 34, History/American Civilization Elective Semester 4: AMS 12, AMS 84, ECE 51, DST 51 or 52, MTH 19 or 25*, History/American Civilization Elective *Students could choose to take these courses during the summer semester.

This program provides a foundation in Deaf studies as well as specialized course work in early childhood education that prepares students for OCCS certification. Students in this option are seeking either entry-level or assistant positions in early childhood Deaf education settings or they plan to transfer and specialize in early childhood or special education at the baccalaureate and/or graduate level to seek a professional career in early intervention, parent/Deaf infant programs, Deaf education, or other related fields.

Hints For Success
After BCC
Students should spend 3 – 6 hours per week outside of class learning and using American Sign Language.

• Graduates of the program can seek entry-level employment or assistant positions in educational programs for the Deaf/hard-of-hearing, agencies of/for the Deaf, special education settings, and private daycare centers. • Graduates can also opt to seek transfer to a four-year program and specialize in a related educational field such as Deaf education, special education, or early childhood education.

2007-2008

129

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

HUMAN SERVICES

CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Deaf Studies (Human Services Concentration) Credits required: 65 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

Deaf Studies
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ SOC 11 Principles of Sociology _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Program Courses _____ AMS 01 Elementary American Sign Language _____ AMS 02 Elementary American Sign Language II _____ AMS 11 Intermediate American Sign Language I _____ AMS 12 Intermediate American Sign Language II _____ AMS 81 Visual/Gestural Seminar I _____ AMS 82 Visual/Gestural Seminar II _____ AMS 83 American Sign Language Seminar _____ AMS 84 ASL Seminar II _____ DST 10 Introduction to Deaf Studies _____ DST 11 Deaf Culture _____ DST 13 The Deaf Community in Society _____ DST 51 or 52 Deaf History or Deaf Literature and ASL Folklore _____ SER 11 Introduction to Social Welfare _____ SER 51 Principles and Methods of Interviewing _____ SER 91 Field Experience and Seminar I 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits

This program provides a foundation in Deaf studies as well as specialized course work in Human Services. Students in this option are seeking either entry-level or assistant positions in Deaf human service settings or they plan to transfer and specialize in social work, human services, vocational rehabilitation, or other related fields at the baccalaureate and/or graduate level to seek a professional career.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • BCC offers several Deaf Studies options to meet your career and academic goals. (See also: Deaf Studies, Deaf Studies-CPrint option, Deaf Studies-Early Childhood Education option, Deaf Studies Prep certificate and Deaf Studies Professional certificate.) RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: AMS 01, AMS 81, DST 10, DST 11, ENG 11, PSY 51 Semester 2: AMS 02, AMS 82, ENG 12, SOC 11, SER 11, SER 51 Semester 3: AMS 11, AMS 83, DST 13, SER 91, History/American Civilization Elective Semester 4: AMS 12, AMS 84, DST 51 or 52, MTH 19 or 25*, Science Elective*, History/American Civilization Elective, *Students could choose to take these courses during the summer semester.

Hints for Success
Students should spend 3 – 6 hours per week outside of class learning and using American Sign Language.

After BCC

• Graduates of the program can seek entrylevel employment positions in human service agencies and agencies of/for the Deaf. • Graduates can also opt to seek transfer to a four-year program and specialize in a related human services field. Transfer students can make future professional contributions in the areas of social work, advocacy, disability services, vocational rehabilitation, communication access and assistive technology, independent living skills, residential homes, substance abuse, mental health, etc. • Graduates and graduate transfers can enjoy a range of client/setting options.

130
Human Services Degrees:
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Deaf Studies Transfer (Interpreter Transfer Concentration) Credits required: 65 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

INTERPRETER

Deaf Studies
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SOC 11 Principles of Sociology _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech _____ SPH 13 Interpersonal Speech _____ SPH 60 Intercultural Communication _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics Choose one 2-course HST sequence: _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Program Courses _____ AMS 01 Elementary American Sign Language _____ AMS 02 Elementary American Sign Language II _____ AMS 11 Intermediate American Sign Language I _____ AMS 12 Intermediate American Sign Language II _____ AMS 81 Visual/Gestural Seminar I _____ AMS 82 Visual/Gestural Seminar II _____ AMS 83 American Sign Language Seminar _____ AMS 84 ASL Seminar II _____ DST 10 Introduction to Deaf Studies _____ DST 11 Deaf Culture _____ DST 13 The Deaf Community in Society _____ DST 21 Introduction to the ASL/English Interpreting Profession _____ DST 22 Fundamental Pre-Interpreter Skills _____ DST 51 or Deaf History or PHL 52 Ethics: Making Ethical Decisions in a Modern World 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This is not an interpreter training program. • This program prepares students to transfer as juniors into a baccalaureate Interpreter Training/Preparation program. • Strong American Sign Language skills (with earned grades B- or better) required for successful transfer. • Students wanting to become professional interpreters must transfer on, graduate, and pass a practical and theoretical national examination to become certified, “qualified interpreters.” RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: AMS 01, AMS 81, DST 10, DST 11, ENG 11, SOC 11 Semester 2: AMS 02, AMS 82, ENG 12, DST 51/PHL 52, SPH 11 Semester 3: AMS 11, AMS 83, DST 13, MTH, Science, HST Semester 4: AMS 12, AMS 84, DST 21, DST 22, SPH 60, HST

This transfer program provides a foundation in Deaf studies as well as specialized course work to prepare for future interpreter studies. Students in this option aspire to become professional American Sign Language/English Interpreters and thus, plan to transfer to a four-year institution that offers interpreter training.

Hints for Success
After BCC
Students should spend 3-6 hours per week outside of class learning and using American Sign Language.

• Past graduates have transferred to Northeastern University and University of Southern Maine for Interpreter Training. Most interpreter programs require relocating.

2007-2008

131

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

132
Human Services Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM Early Childhood Education

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education Credits required: 63 Program director: Ravitha Amarasingham, Department Chair of Early Childhood Education

This program prepares students for careers in early childhood education. Students select a concentra-

Early Childhood Education
General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ HST 13 United States History to 1877 _____ HST 14 United States History from 1877 _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ PSY 52 Child Development See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE (Choose 3 credits from ENG, HST 52,
HST 59, HST 65, SOC 11, SOC 12, SOC 51)

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students intending to enroll in a teaching practicum and seminar must meet with the Department Chair the semester before enrollment to ensure that the students meets all prerequisites and requirements. • For the certificate program, see page 140. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, PSY 51, ECE 11, ECE 12, Math elective Semester 2: ENG 12, PSY 52, ECE 22, ECE 13, Lab Science Semester 3: HST 13, ECE 21, ECE 34, ECE 51, Humanities/Arts Semester 4: HST 14, select courses in concentration, elective

tion to prepare for certification as Lead Teacher in that particular area. The Early Childhood Education program integrates course work with direct experience and respects the diversity reflected in children and families.

_____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE Core Courses _____ ECE 11

Mathematics Humanities/Art Elective Lab Science Elective

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits

Hints for Success
After BCC
Take any required developmental courses early in your program. Students wishing to transfer need to work closely with their advisor to be sure that appropriate courses are taken.

• Students would qualify for director certification in Early Childhood Education from OCCS (Office for Child Care Services) with 18 months of added experience. • Students may continue their education in fields such as Human Services, Special Needs, or Elementary Education.

Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 credits _____ ECE 12 Observing, Recording, and Analyzing Early Childhood Settings 3 credits _____ ECE 13 Safe and Healthy Early Childhood Learning Environments 3 credits _____ ECE 21 Guiding Young Children 3 credits _____ ECE 22 Special Needs in Early Childhood 3 credits _____ ECE 34 Preschool Curriculum Planning 3 credits _____ ECE 51 Teaching Practicum I and Seminar I 4 credits Concentration Courses Infant-Toddler: _____ ECE 23 Infant-Toddler Development 3 credits _____ ECE 36 Infant-Toddler Curriculum Planning 3 credits _____ ECE 53 Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II - Infant-Toddler Setting 4 credits Preschool: _____ ECE 32 Language Arts Across Preschool 3 credits _____ ECE 52 Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II - Preschool Setting 4 credits _____ ELECTIVE (Choose 3 credits from: ECE 44, ECE 91, or ECE 92) 3 credits School-Age Child: _____ ECE 25 Social Emotional Development School-Age Child 3 credits _____ ECE 38 School-Age Child Care Curriculum 3 credits _____ ECE 55 Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II - School-Age Child Care Setting 4 credits

2007-2008

133

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Health
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must have a tuberculosis test each year.

Criminal Record Check
Students may be required to submit to a C.O.R.I (Criminal Offender Record Investigation) check to identify any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I check may prevent student assignment to a fieldwork agency that requires such a check.

Academic Expectations
All Early Childhood students must achieve grades of “C-” or better in all subject courses with an ECE designator.

Fieldwork
Early Childhood students are very physically active during this program, which requires a practicum experience. They may be required to hold and/or restrain children, provide diapering of an infant or the cleanup of an activities area. Students must be able to move quickly and have sufficient visual and hearing acuity to accurately monitor children in their charge. Transportation to fieldwork sites is the responsibility of the student. Students should be prepared to travel up to an hour from campus for these assignments.

134
Human Services Degrees:
TRANSFER PROGRAM Early Childhood Education

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Early Childhood Education Credits required: 60 Program director: Ravitha Amarasingham, Department Chair of Early Childhood Education

TRANSFER

Early Childhood Education
General Courses _____ BIO 11 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 General Biology I Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ HST 11 West and the World I _____ HST 13 United States History to 1877 _____ MTH 21 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ PSY 52 Child Development _____ SCI 13 Physical Science _____ SSC 14 Introduction to Geography See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices. _____ ELECTIVE (recommend ECN 11, ECN 12, GVT 11,
MTH 22)

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program meets the criteria of the Early Childhood Education transfer compact with Bridgewater State College, Salem State College, Fitchburg State College, Framingham State College and Mass. College of Liberal Arts. • Students intending to enroll in a Teaching Pre-Practicum and Seminar must meet with the Program Chair the semester before enrollment to ensure that the student meets all prerequisites and requirements • Students taking ECE 60 must have 26 general education credits with an overall GPA of 2.5 or better and a grade of “C” or better in ECE 11 and ECE 12. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, PSY 51, HST 11, ECE 11, SSC 14 Semester 2: ENG 12, PSY 52, MTH 21, ECE 12, elective Semester 3: HST 13, SCI 13, ECE 60, electives (2) Semester 4: BIO 11, ECE 61, electives (2)

This program is designed for students planning to transfer to a four-year institution. The Teaching Pre-Practicum course is specifically designed to promote straightforward transfer. Students interested in immediate entry into the workforce should consider the Early Childhood Education career program.

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits

_____ ELECTIVE

Hints for Success
Consult with your advisor about choosing electives for transferring.

After BCC

• Students may continue their education in fields such as Human Services, Special Needs, or Elementary Education. • Students could transfer to a four-year college and earn a degree in Early Childhood Education. An articulation agreement exists between Lesley University and BCC.

3 credits Choose electives with a faculty advisor to prepare to enter an academic major at the selected transfer institution: _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits Program Courses _____ ECE 11 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 3 credits _____ ECE 12 Observing, Recording, and Analyzing Early Childhood Settings 3 credits _____ ECE 60 Playing, Thinking, and Development of the Young Child (PreK-Grade 2) 3 credits _____ ECE 61 Teaching Pre-Practicum 4 credits

(recommend ART, MUS, THE, SPH 11, ENG 51-56, PHL 51, 52)

Humanities Elective

2007-2008

135

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Health Requirements
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must have a tuberculosis test each year.

Criminal record check
Students may be required to submit to a C.O.R.I. (Criminal Offender Record Investigation) check to identify any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent student assignment to a fieldwork agency that requires such a check.

Academic expectations
All Early Childhood students must achieve grades of “C-” or better in all subject courses with a ECE designator.

Fieldwork
Early Childhood students are physically very active during this program, which requires a practicum experience. They may be required to hold and/or restrain children, provide diapering of an infant or the cleanup of an activities area. Students must be able to move quickly and have sufficient visual and hearing acuity to accurately monitor children in their charge. Transportation to fieldwork sites is the responsibility of the student. Students should be prepared to travel up to an hour from campus for these assignments.

Requirements for ECE Transfer Compact Option
Students who opt for this track need to pass the Communications and Literacy Skills Test (CLST) of the Massachusetts Teacher Education Licensure (MTEL) conducted by the Department of Education prior to acceptance into a teacher education licensure program. In addition, state colleges may set other requirements such as minimum acceptable grade(s) and/or courses accepted for transfer. It is the student’s responsibility to identify these requirements.

136
Human Services Degrees:
TRANSFER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Arts in Elementary Education Credits required: 62 Program director: Catherine Adamowicz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Elementary Education
This program is based on requirements of the Elementary Education Compact, but is flexible enough to adapt to any other baccalaureate education program. Students take the first two years of an elementary education program for transfer to a senior institution. Articulation agreements ensure transfer to many colleges and universities. Those transferring to Massachusetts public colleges and universities can qualify for Joint Admission and Tuition Advantage.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students in this program can earn credits for transfer by taking EDU 20. • EDU 20 requires 27 credits on the transcript and an overall GPA of 2.5 or better. • Bridgewater State College and UMass Dartmouth accept students through Joint Admission. For other institutions, students should decide where they want to transfer as early as possible to best tailor their program to transfer. FOREIGN LANGUAGE • Successful completion of a foreign language at the 02 level at BCC or three years of foreign language at the high school level with a “C” average or better. Students who have satisfied the language requirement in high school must complete six credits of free electives in addition to the electives listed. Discuss foreign language requirements for transfer with program director. • This program meets the criteria of the Elementary Education transfer compact with UMass Dartmouth, Bridgewater State College, Fitchburg State College, Framingham State College, Mass. College of Liberal Arts and Worcester State College. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, HST, MTH 21, PSY 51, Foreign Language Semester 2: ENG 12, HST, MTH 22, Foreign Language, PSY 52 Semester 3: SSC 14, Laboratory Science, 3 electives Semester 4: EDU 20, Laboratory Science, 3 electives

Program Courses _____ BIO 11 _____ EDU 20

General Biology I Foundations of Education with Teaching Pre-Practicum _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ HST 11 West and World I _____ HST 13 United States History to 1877 _____ MTH 21 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I _____ MTH 22 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ PSY 52 Child Development _____ SCI 13 Physical Science _____ SSC 14 Introduction to Geography See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE (Recommend ECN 11, ECN 12 or
GVT 11)

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits

_____ ELECTIVE

Humanities Elective

(Recommend ART, MUS, THE, SPH 11, ENG 51-56, PHL 51, PHL 52) 3 credits

Hints for Success
Students should decide where they want to transfer as early as possible in order to tailor their program for transferring to a senior institution.

Foreign Language 02 Level or Program Electives: _____ ELECTIVE Foreign Language

After BCC

• The Program is a state joint admissions eligible program. • Alumni from this program have gone on to work as classroom teachers, reading specialists in the reading recovery program, administrators, and guidance counselors. • BCC has a transfer articulation agreement with Lesley University.

(Completion of a foreign language at the 02 level at BCC or 3 years of foreign language at the high school level w/ a “C” average or better. Students who have satisfied the language requirement in high school must complete an additional 6 credits of program electives.)

6 credits Program Electives Choose electives with faculty advisors to tailor your program for transfer: _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits _____ ELECTIVE 3 credits

2007-2008

137
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Fire Science Technology Credits required: 62/65 Program director: Fire Chief Stephen J. Rivard

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

Fire Science Technology
This program offers advanced training to upgrade and promote fire department personnel and others in fire protection and insurance underwriting. It can serve as a basis for transfer to a baccalaureate degree program.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Hints for Success
FIR 11 and FIR 13 should be taken within the first 12 credits.

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SCI 16 Science, Technology, and Society: The Chemistry of Hazardous Toxic Materials _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech _____ MTH 11 or Technical Mathematics for Fire Science or MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I _____ PSY 51 or General Psychology or SOC 11 Principles of Sociology Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE Lab Science Elective Program Courses _____ FIR 11 Introduction to Fire Protection _____ FIR 13 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention _____ FIR 16 Hazardous Materials: Incident Management _____ FIR 54 Report Writing _____ FIR 56 Organization and Management of Fire Departments _____ FIR 59 Building Construction _____ FIR 61 Fire Hydraulics Program Electives Choose 9-12 credits from FIR 50, 53, 55, 57, 58, 63, 70, 71, CRJ 11, 21, or 56: _____ ELECTIVE(S) _____ ELECTIVE(S) _____ ELECTIVE(S)

3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The core of specialized courses combined with a liberal arts and sciences foundation gives students the technical and theoretical background they need. • Some courses are only offered in the evening. PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES (CHOOSE 3) FIR 70 Emergency Medical Care I FIR 71 Emergency Medical Care II FIR 50 Fire Investigation FIR 53 Firefighting Tactics & Strategy FIR 57 Leadership and Command FIR 58 Plans Review & Building Codes FIR 55 Related Fire Codes & Ordinances FIR 63 Fire Protection Systems and Equipment CRJ 11 Introduction to Criminal Justice CRJ 21 Juvenile Offenders CRJ 56 Criminal Investigation

After BCC

• Graduates are serving as local fire chiefs, captains, lieutenants, firefighters, fire inspectors, fire investigators, and insurance adjusters. • Recent graduates have transferred to Salem State College and Providence College for bachelor programs in Fire Science. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

3/4 credits 3/4 credits 3/4 credits

138
Human Services Degrees:
CAREER PROGRAM
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Human Services Credits required: 63/64 Program director: Kevin J. Garganta, MSW, Ed.M., Associate Professor of Human Services

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Human Services
The Human Services program prepares students for entry-level positions in social services by combining academic courses with a practical agency internship. The curriculum also prepares students to transfer to four-year degree programs in social work, psychology, sociology, human services, or other related majors.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program combines traditional classroom study, skills-based courses, and the practical experience gained from the required field placement/ internship. This academic and real-world experience prepares students for their first social services job after BCC or for their four-year degree program. • The Human Services Program is fully available at both the Fall River and New Bedford Campuses. Many courses are also available at other BCC locations. • SER 91/92 includes an agency internship that places special time demands on students and is ideally taken in the last year of study. • Students who wish to complete their degree within a two-year period should begin the SER 11/SER 51/SER 91/SER 92 sequence of courses in their first fall semester. • This program is a state Joint Admissions eligible program. RELATED PROGRAMS • A certificate in Thanatology and/or Deaf Studies will enrich career preparation. Students should consult with the program director to select appropriate electives.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ PSY 52 Child Development _____ PSY 54 Psychology of Personality _____ PSY 55 Abnormal Psychology _____ PSY 58 Introduction to Behavior Modification _____ SOC 11 Principles of Sociology _____ SOC 12 The Sociology of Social Problems _____ MTH 19 or 25 Fundamental Statistics or Modern College Mathematics _____ ELECTIVE Health Elective
(Choose with program director or academic advisor)

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Hints for Success
After BCC
Students should take ENG 11, SOC 11, and any developmental courses if required in their first semester. Review elective choices in history, humanities, health, science, and mathematics with advisor to best prepare for transfer and/or career choice.

• Graduates have become mental health assistants, case managers, intake specialists, community organizers, counselors, domestic violence workers, residential staff and house managers, client advocates, substance abuse workers, social service aides, and a wide variety of other related positions. • The most popular transfer choices include: Bachelor of Social Work programs at Bridgewater State College or Rhode Island College, and sociology or psychology at UMass Dartmouth. Work with program director early to select courses to maximize transfer possibilities. • BCC has transfer articulation agreements with Lesley University and Capella University. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 and American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 and West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 and US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Humanities Elective Program Courses _____ SER 11 Introduction to Social Welfare _____ SER 51 Principles and Methods of Interviewing _____ SER 91, 92 Field Experience and Seminar I, II (12 credits total)

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits each

2007-2008

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

139
CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT Deaf Studies Prep

Deaf Studies Prep
This certificate program is designed for students interested in American Sign Language and Deaf people but unsure of their career goal(s). It is also a great concentration for students in non-Deaf Studies degree programs that seek specialized skills and knowledge in a competitive job market.

Credits required: 17 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

Program Courses _____ AMS 01 _____ AMS 02 _____ AMS 81 _____ AMS 82 _____ DST 10 _____ DST 11 _____ ENG 11

Elementary American Sign Language Elementary American Sign Language II Visual/Gestural Seminar I Visual/Gestural Seminar II Introduction to Deaf Studies Deaf Culture Composition I: College Writing

3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This certificate program is a good choice for Deaf Studies students wishing to explore their program of study and career options while they complete developmental work. • Students are encouraged to be active in our ASL/Deaf Studies club and are required to be active in the Deaf community. • Students will spend an additional hour per week engaged in language lab activities with each ASL course taken. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: (Fall) AMS 01, AMS 81, DST 10, DST 11, ENG 11 Semester 2: (Spring) AMS 02, AMS 82

Deaf Studies Professional
The certificate provides professional development and/or specialization in Deaf Studies for professionals already working with Deaf people. Fundamental to this program are both American Sign Language competency and appreciation of the Deaf community as a cultural/linguistic minority.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Deaf Studies Professional

Credits required: 28 Program director: Sandy Lygren, Assistant Professor of Deaf Studies

Program Courses _____ AMS 11 _____ AMS 12 _____ AMS 21 _____ AMS 22 _____ AMS 83 _____ AMS 84 _____ DST 10 _____ DST 11 _____ DST 13 _____ DST 51 or 52

Intermediate American Sign Language I Intermediate American Sign Language II Advanced American Sign Language I Advanced American Sign Language II and Structure American Sign Language Seminar ASL Seminar II Introduction to Deaf Studies Deaf Culture The Deaf Community in Society Deaf History or Deaf Literature and ASL Folklore

3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 4 credits 1 credit 1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Prerequisite for admission: minimum of associate in arts or science and demonstrated ASL ability at the advanced beginner level. • Students with 30 or more college credits in liberal arts/general education including ENG 11 or equivalent, demonstrated ASL ability, and proof of related employment may meet with the program director to determine admission. • Students without the required language skills should choose the Deaf Studies Prep Certificate program or one of the Deaf Studies degree options.

140
Human Services Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Early Childhood Education
Credits required: 28 Program director: Ravitha Amarasingham, Department Chair of Early Childhood Education

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Early Childhood Education
The Early Childhood Education certificate prepares students for OCCS certification to work with young children from birth to preschool in non-public school settings.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This certificate is designed to prepare students for Office of Child Care Services Teacher Certification as well as Lead Teacher Certification with additional work experience. The certificate also leads into the Early Childhood Education degree. • Graduates qualify for certification by the Office of Child Services as Lead Teachers at age 21, enabling them to work at that level in Massachusetts licensed day care centers. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, PSY 51, ECE 11, ECE 13 Semester 2: ENG 12, PSY 52, ECE 34, ECE 22, ECE 51

Program Courses _____ ECE 11 _____ ECE 13 _____ ECE 22 _____ ECE 34 _____ ECE 51 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12 _____ PSY 51 _____ PSY 52

Introduction to Early Childhood Education Safe and Healthy Early Childhood Learning Environments Special Needs in Early Childhood Preschool Curriculum Planning Teaching Practicum I and Seminar I Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature General Psychology Child Development

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Health Requirements
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must have a tuberculosis test each year.

Criminal Record Check

Hints for Success
Students should take PSY 51 and PSY 52 early in their certificate program.

Students may be required to submit to a C.O.R.I (Criminal Offender Record Investigation) check to identify any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I check may prevent student assignment to a fieldwork agency that requires such a check.

After BCC

• Students may pursue a career in a related field such as Human Services, Special Needs, or Elementary Education.

Academic Expectations
All Early Childhood students must achieve grades of “C-” or better in all subject courses with an ECE designator.

Physical Requirements
Early Childhood students are physically very active during this program, which requires a practicum experience. They may be required to hold and/or restrain children, provide diapering of an infant or the cleanup of an activities area. Students must be able to move quickly and have sufficient visual and hearing acuity to accurately monitor children in their charge.

2007-2008

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

141
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Fire Investigation Specialist
Credits required: 27 Program director: Fire Chief Stephen J. Rivard

Fire Investigation Specialist
This certificate program trains fire and police officials in fire investigation. It prepares firefighters and insurance representatives to investigate the causes of fire incidents and to assist in the criminal prosecutions that may evolve.

Program Courses _____ CRJ 21 _____ CRJ 56 _____ ENG 11 _____ FIR 50 _____ FIR 54 _____ FIR 55 _____ FIR 59 _____ PSY 51 _____ SPH 11

Juvenile Offenders Criminal Investigation Composition I: College Writing Fire Investigation Report Writing Related Fire Codes and Ordinances Building Construction General Psychology Fundamentals of Speech

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Graduates have joined fire departments and insurance companies as fire investigators and fire inspectors. • Courses transfer to the Fire Science Technology degree program. • After completing this certificate program, a student is qualified for assignment to the Fire Prevention Bureau. RECOMMENDATIONS • Start by taking FIR 50.

Fire Prevention Specialist
This technical certificate addresses the many new fire hazards in today’s society and provides firefighters with the knowledge to prevent fire incidents.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Fire Prevention Specialist
Credits required: 27 Program director: Fire Chief Stephen J. Rivard

Program Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ FIR 11 _____ FIR 13 _____ FIR 54 _____ FIR 55 _____ FIR 58 _____ FIR 59 _____ FIR 63 _____ SPH 11

Composition I: College Writing Introduction to Fire Protection Fundamentals of Fire Prevention Report Writing Related Fire Codes and Ordinances Plans Review and Building Codes Building Construction Fire Protection Systems and Equipment Fundamentals of Speech

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

142
Human Services Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Funeral Service Preparatory
Credits required: 27 Program director: John C. Tormey, Assistant Professor of Psychology/Thanatology

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Funeral Service Preparatory
This certificate is unique to BCC and prepares the student interested in a career in funeral services for transfer to associate degree programs in funeral services. The courses also prepare the student for a national board examination required for licensure.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students enrolled in other programs often can earn this certificate by taking the courses as electives. • This certificate, along with Certificate in Thanatology, will make the student a strong candidate for funeral service apprenticeship programs. • This program fulfills the general education requirements, which can be transferred to an Associate Degree in Funeral Service at Mortuary Colleges. BCC has an articulation agreement with Mt. Ida College.

Program Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ BIO 33 _____ BIO 34 _____ BUS 51 _____ CIS 10 _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 54 _____ PSY 62 or 64

Principles of Accounting I Human Anatomy and Physiology I Human Anatomy and Physiology II Business Law Basic Computing Skills Composition I: College Writing Small Business Management Introduction to Thanatology or Psychology of Grief

4 credits 4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

CERTIFICATE OF ACCOMPLISHMENT Human Services

Credits required: 21 Program director: Kevin J. Garganta, MSW. Ed.M., Associate Professor of Human Services RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES DST 11 Deaf Culture PSY 52 Child Development PSY 53 Adolescent Psychology PSY 55 Abnormal Psychology PSY 58 Introduction to Behavior Modification PSY 66 Introduction to Grief Counseling SER 12 Special Topics in Mental Health & Retardation Services SOC 54 Alcohol Use & Abuse SOC 57 Social Issues in Loss

Human Services
This program provides the theoretical and skillsbased knowledge to obtain entry-level positions in social and human services or, for those in the field, an upgrade of existing professional knowledge.

Program Courses _____ SER 11 _____ SER 51 _____ SER 91 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ENG 11 _____ PSY 51

Introduction to Social Welfare Principles and Methods of Interviewing Field Experience and Seminar I
See recommended electives

3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

Composition I: College Writing General Psychology

2007-2008

143
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Infant/Toddler
Credits required: 28 Program director: Ravitha Amarasingham, Department Chair of Early Childhood Education

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

Infant/Toddler
The Infant/Toddler certificate prepares students for OCCS certification to work with infants and toddlers in early intervention and daycare programs.

Program Courses _____ ECE 11 _____ ECE 13 _____ ECE 51 _____ ECE 23 _____ ECE 36 _____ ENG 11 _____ PSY 51 _____ PSY 52 _____ SOC 51

Introduction to Early Childhood Education Safe and Healthy Early Childhood Learning Environments Teaching Practicum I and Seminar I Infant-Toddler Development Infant-Toddler Curriculum Planning Composition I: College Writing General Psychology Child Development Marriage and the Family

3 credits 3 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The Infant/Toddler Certificate is awarded upon completion of one year, 9 courses, and 28 credits.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PROGRAM

Health Requirements
Accepted applicants must have a physical examination, hepatitis B immunization, other immunizations as required by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, and must have a tuberculosis test each year.

Criminal Record Check

Hints for Success
Students should take PSY 51 and PSY 52 early in their certificate program.

Students may be required to submit to a Criminal Offender Record Investigation (C.O.R.I.) check to identify any criminal offense history. A positive C.O.R.I. check may prevent student assignment to a fieldwork agency that requires such a check.

Academic Expectations
All Early Childhood students must achieve grades of “C-” or better in all subject courses with an ECE designator.

After BCC

• Courses transfer into the degree program.

Fieldwork
During this program, which requires a practicum experience, Early Childhood students should be aware that young children are physically very active. Students must be able to move quickly and have sufficient visual and hearing acuity to accurately monitor children in their charge. Transportation to fieldwork sites is the responsibility of the student. Students should be prepared to travel up to an hour from campus for these assignments.

144
Human Services Degrees:
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Instructional Paraprofessional
Credits required: 27/28

2007-2008

Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts (Baking & Pastry) • Culinary Arts • Deaf Studies Transfer • Deaf Studies (C-Print, Early Childhood, Human Services) • Deaf Studies Interpreter transfer • Early Childhood Education - Career, Transfer • Elementary Education • Fire Science Technology • Human Services

Instructional Paraprofessional
This certificate provides a first step toward credentials required by the federal “No Child Left Behind” law. It prepares students to serve as assistants to teachers in public school classrooms, libraries, and resource centers.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Graduates can transfer credits into the General Studies or Liberal Arts and Sciences associate degree programs. Ask your advisor for advice on course electives. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should take ENG 11, IAD 13, and PSY 51 first.

Program Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ IAD 13 _____ IAD 14 _____ PHL 53 _____ PSY 51 _____ SPH 11 _____ PSY 52 or 53 Elective Courses _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE

Composition I: College Writing Roles and Responsibilities of the Instructional Paraprofessional Teaching Elementary School Mathematics Philosophy of Education General Psychology Fundamentals of Speech Child Development or Adolescent Psychology
(Choose from HST 13, HST 20, HLT 11, or any foreign language) (Choose from ENG 12, CIS 10 or CSS 15, PSY 55, or SCI 13)

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

Law Enforcement
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Law Enforcement
Credits required: 27 Program director: Barry McKee, Department Chair and Professor of Criminal Justice

Developed in cooperation with the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association, the certificate combines specialized criminal justice and general education coursework to enter Massachusetts

PROGRAM INFORMATION • The program was developed at the request of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police Association and is intended to provide a basic recruit-training curriculum. • Courses also apply to the Quinn Billeligible Criminal Justice degree program. • No academic credit can be awarded for life experience, academy, military, or other training.

municipal law enforcement agencies.

General Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ PSY 51 _____ SOC 11 _____ SPH 11 Program Courses _____ CRJ 11 _____ CRJ 13 _____ CRJ 19 _____ CRJ 51 _____ CRJ 58

Composition I: College Writing General Psychology Principles of Sociology Fundamentals of Speech Introduction to Criminal Justice Criminal Law Police and Community Relations Criminology Criminal Procedure

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

2007-2008

Certificates: Deaf Studies Prep • Deaf Studies Professional • Early Childhood Education • Fire Investigation Specialist • Fire Prevention Specialist • Funeral Service Preparatory • Human Services • Infant/Toddler • Instructional Paraprofessional • Law Enforcement • Thanatology

145
CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Thanatology
Credits required: 24/25 Program director: John C. Tormey, Associate Professor of Psychology and Thanatology

Thanatology
This certificate examines how loss affects physical, psychological, and social well being. This program is unique to BCC and can be taken on its own or as a program to enrich such caregiving and service professions as education, nursing, criminal justice, human services, pastoral ministry, and funeral service.

Core Courses _____ PSY 62 Introduction to Thanatology _____ PSY 64 Psychology of Grief _____ PSY 66 Introduction to Grief Counseling _____ SOC 57 Social Issues in Loss All core courses must be taken at BCC. General Education _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ PSY 51 General Psychology _____ ELECTIVE Choose from BIO, HLT, NUR _____ ELECTIVE Free Elective

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program has articulation agreements with FINE Mortuary College and Mt. Ida College. • Students who complete the certificate in Thanatology can also take the following courses to transfer to FINE Mortuary College for a career in funeral service: ACC 11, MAN 54, BIO 33, BIO 34. • Program courses are offered days and evenings. • Students enrolled in other programs often earn this certificate by taking Thanatology courses as electives. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students should complete PSY 51 and PSY 62 before registering for PSY 64 and PSY 66.

Office Administration
Why choose Office Administration?
The modern office offers career mobility and flexibility. Students focus on developing strong professional skills. General education courses challenge and encourage critical thinking techniques. Students in these programs prepare for a rapidly changing work world. Certificate programs offer a condensed program and allow quick entry into the workforce. All Office Administration and general education credits can transfer to an Office Administration associate degree program in the same option.

DEGREE PROGRAMS
Office Administration Executive Administrative Assistant 148 Legal Administrative Assistant Medical Administrative Assistant 149 150

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Administrative Assistant C-PrintTM Captioning Foundations of C-PrintTM Legal Office Assistant Office Support 151 151 152 152 153

Office Technology Management 153

148
Office Administration Degrees: Office Administration (Executive Administrative Assistant, Legal Administrative Assistant, Medical Administrative Assistant)
CAREER PROGRAM Office Administration option

2007-2008

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Office Administration, Executive Administrative Assistant Concentration Credits required: 65/66 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students can gain work experience by participating in the Cooperative Education program (CED 11), which places students in office positions related to their academic program. • Some courses are offered only in the day. RECOMMENDATIONS • Take any developmental courses needed prior to enrolling in ENG 11. • Any student wishing to receive transfer credit for an OFC course that qualifies must follow the PEL (Prior Experiential Learning) procedures on page 184 of the catalog. The student must initiate the process with the department chair and appropriate faculty member. • OFC 02 or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 wpm based on a three-minute timing administered by the Office Administration Department Chair is a prerequisite to OFC 13 and OFC 17. RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration Certificate, Office Technologies Certificate RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: OFC 13, OFC 17, OFC 20 Semester 2: OFC 14 Semester 3: OFC 15, OFC 50 or CIS 13, OFC 55 Semester 4: OFC 62, OFC 64, OFC 66, OFC 94 or CED 11

Executive Administrative Assistant
Students completing this option are prepared to assist executives of all levels in a wide variety of settings. Students develop skills in computer applications, transcription, and office administration.

General Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ BUS 11 _____ BUS 51 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Principles of Accounting I Business and Financial Mathematics Business Law Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective _____ ELECTIVE Science Elective Computer Keyboarding

4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 1 credit

Program Courses _____ OFC 02 _____ OFC 13 _____ OFC 14 _____ OFC 15 _____ OFC 17 _____ OFC 20 _____ OFC 55 _____ OFC 62 _____ OFC 64 _____ OFC 66 _____ OFC 94 or CED 11 _____ CIS 13 or OFC 50

(May be waived by previous course or passing Office Administration keyboarding test.)

Hints for Success
Students taking three or more courses should limit outside work to less than 25 hours per week to maintain good grades.

After BCC

• Graduates have gone on to become administrative assistants in all types of offices. Graduates often progress into office management positions. • This program is designed for students who plan to enter the workforce immediately. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Introduction to Word Processing Applications 3 credits Advanced Word Processing Applications 3 credits Records Management 3 credits Introduction to Microsoft Office 3 credit Text Editing 3 credits Executive Office Procedures 3 credits Microsoft Office Integrated Projects 3 credits Administrative Transcription 3 credits Administrative Office Management 3 credits Office Administration Colloquium or 3 credits Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits Business Creativity or 3 credits Speech Recognition with Microsoft Office XP 3 credits

2007-2008

149

Certificates: Administrative Assistant • C-Print™ Captioning • Foundations of C-Print™ • Legal Office Assistant • Office Support • Office Technology Management

Legal Administrative Assistant
Students completing this option are prepared to work in law offices, courts, corporate legal departments, law schools, and a wide range of other office settings. Students develop skills in using Microsoft office applications, machine transcription, office administration, legal terminology, and legal document processing.

General Courses _____ ACC 14 _____ BUS 11 _____ BUS 51 _____ CRJ 13 _____ ENG 11 _____ ENG 12

Introduction to QuickBooks Pro Business and Financial Mathematics Business Law Criminal Law Composition I: College Writing Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ GVT 11 U.S. Government _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, for elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Science Elective Computer Keyboarding

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3/4 credits 1 credit

Degree offered: Associate in Science in Office Administration, Legal Administrative Assistant Concentration Credits required: 65/66 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • Students can choose to specialize in areas such as corporate work, real estate, probate, criminal and/or civil litigation, or to generalize in broad areas. The skills developed provide excellent job mobility. • Gain work experience by participating in the Cooperative Education program (CED 11), which places students in office positions related to their academic program. • Some courses are offered only in the day. • OFC 02 or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 wpm based on a three-minute timing administered by the Office Administration Department Chair is a prerequisite to OFC 13 and OFC 17. RECOMMENDATIONS • Take developmental courses needed prior to enrolling in ENG 11. • Any student wishing to receive transfer credit for an OFC course that qualifies must follow the PEL (Prior Experiential Learning) procedures on page 177. The student must initiate the process with the department chair and appropriate faculty member. RELATED PROGRAMS • Legal Office Certificate, Office Administration Certificate, Office Technologies Certificate RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, OFC 13, OFC 17, OFC 20, OFC 80 Semester 2: ENG 12, BUS 11, ACC 14, OFC 15, OFC 81, OFC 82 Semester 3: GVT 11, AMC/HST, Science, CRJ 13, OFC 14 Semester 4: OFC 62, OFC 84, AMC/HST, SPH 11, BUS 51, OFC 94 or CED 11

CAREER PROGRAM Office Administration option

Program Courses _____ OFC 02

Hints for Success
Students taking three or more courses should limit outside work to less than 25 hours per week to maintain good grades.

(May be waived by previous course or passing Office Administration keyboarding test.)

_____ OFC 13 _____ OFC 14 _____ OFC 15 _____ OFC 17 _____ OFC 20 _____ OFC 62 _____ OFC 80 _____ OFC 81 _____ OFC 82 _____ OFC 84 _____ OFC 94 or CED 11

Introduction to Word Processing Applications 3 credits Advanced Word Processing Applications 3 credits Records Management 3 credits Introduction to Microsoft Office 3 credit Text Editing 3 credits Microsoft Office Integrated Projects 3 credits The Court System and Legal Terminology 3 credits Law Office Procedures 3 credits Legal Document Processing 3 credits Legal Transcription 3 credits Office Administration Colloquium or 3 credits Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits

After BCC

• Graduates have gone on to become legal administrative assistants in law offices, court procedures clerks, and administrative assistants to judges, academic deans, and other corporate officers. • Graduates have continued their education to become paralegals and attorneys. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

150
Degree offered: Associate in Science in Office Administration, Medical Administrative Assistant Concentration Credits required: 66 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration PROGRAM INFORMATION • The medical field offers a wide career choice. The skills developed provide excellent job mobility. • Students can gain work experience by participating in the Cooperative Education program (CED 11), which places students in office positions related to their academic program. • Some courses are offered only in the day. • OFC 13 and OFC 17 are the appropriate pre- or co-requisites for MAA 74. • OFC 02 or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 words per minute based on a three-minute timining administered by the Office Administration Department Chair is a prerequisite to OFC 13 and OFC 17. RECOMMENDATIONS • Take developmental courses needed before enrolling in ENG 11. • Any student wishing to receive transfer credit for an OFC course that qualifies must follow the PEL (Prior Experiential Learning) procedures. The student must initiate the process with the department chair and appropriate faculty member. RELATED PROGRAMS • Medical Coding/Billing Certificate, Medical Office Certificate, Medical Transcription Certificate, Office Administration Certificate, Office Technologies Certificate RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, OFC 13, OFC 17, OFC 20, BUS 11, OFC 02 Semester 2: OFC 14, MAA 70, MAA 75, AMC/HST, ENG 12, BIO 15 Semester 3: MAA 72, MAA 74, ACC 11, SPH 11, AMC/HST Semester 4: MAA 73 or OFC 66, OFC 62, OFC 94 or CED 11, BUS 51, Behavioral/ Social Science

2007-2008

CAREER PROGRAM Office Administration option

Office Administration Degrees: Office Administration (Executive Administrative Assistant, Legal Administrative Assistant, Medical Administrative Assistant)

Medical Administrative Assistant
Students completing this option are prepared to work for doctors or dentists, in hospitals, medical schools, health agencies, or in related fields. They develop skills in medical terminology, computer keyboarding, computer applications, and medical office procedures/administration.

General Courses _____ ACC 11 _____ BIO 15

Principles of Accounting I Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology _____ BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics _____ BUS 51 Business Law _____ ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing _____ ENG 12 Composition II: Writing about Literature _____ SPH 11 Fundamentals of Speech Choose one 2-course AMC or HST sequence: _____ AMC 11 American Civilization I and _____ AMC 12 American Civilization II _____ HST 11 West and the World I and _____ HST 12 West and the World II _____ HST 13 US History to 1877 and _____ HST 14 US History from 1877 See Catalog, page 192, or elective choices: _____ ELECTIVE Behavioral/Social Science Elective Computer Keyboarding

4 credits 4 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit

Program Courses _____ OFC 02

Hints for Success
Students taking three or more courses should limit outside work to less than 25 hours per week to maintain good grades.

(May be waived by previous course or passing Office Administration keyboarding test.)

_____ OFC 13 _____ OFC 14 _____ OFC 17 _____ OFC 20 _____ OFC 62 _____ MAA 70 _____ MAA 72 _____ MAA 74 _____ MAA 75 _____ OFC 94 or CED 11 _____ OFC 66 or MAA 73

After BCC

• Graduates have gone on to become medical administrative assistants in small and large medical offices, in hospitals, nursing homes, or other healthcare agencies. Some have started their own home-based medical transcription business. • This program is designed for students to enter the workforce immediately. • If you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, talk with Transfer Affairs (ext. 2227) to maximize credits that transfer.

Introduction to Word Processing Applications 3 credits Advanced Word Processing Applications 3 credits Introduction to Microsoft Office 3 credit Text Editing 3 credits Microsoft Office Integrated Projects 3 credits Medical Terminology 3 credits Medical Transcription 3 credits Medical Insurance Forms Preparation 3 credits Medical Office Procedures 3 credits Office Administration Colloquium or 3 credits Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits Administrative Office Management or 3 credits Advanced Medical Transcription 3 credits

2007-2008

151

Certificates: Administrative Assistant • C-Print™ Captioning • Foundations of C-Print™ • Legal Office Assistant • Office Support • Office Technology Management

Administrative Assistant
This advanced level certificate helps upgrade skills to improve job opportunity. Students examine the latest office technologies and procedures, learn the advanced functions of word processing and speech recognition software, and develop data base and transcription skills. If you have no working experience of Microsoft Office software, choose the Office Support certificate progam.

Credits required: 27 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Administrative Assistant

Program Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ OFC 14 _____ OFC 15 _____ OFC 55 _____ OFC 62 _____ OFC 64 _____ OFC 66 _____ OFC 94 or CED 11 _____ CIS 13 or OFC 50

Composition I: College Writing 3 credits Advanced Word Processing Applications 3 credits Records Management 3 credits Executive Office Procedures 3 credits Microsoft Office Integrated Projects 3 credits Administrative Transcription 3 credits Administrative Office Management 3 credits Office Administration Colloquium or Cooperative Work Experience I 3 credits Business Creativity or Speech Recognition with Microsoft Office XP 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This advance level certificate provides the most up-to-date training that addresses the fast-changing computer needs of today’s offices. The advanced level of skills developed provide excellent job mobility. • Credits from the Office Support certificate program transfer into the Administrative Assistant certificate program. • All credits transfer into the Executive Administrative Assistant degree program. • Program Prerequisite: Earned Office Support Certificate or OFC 13, 17, and 20. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students must type 30 wpm and have working knowledge of Microsoft Office software. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, OFC 14, OFC 15, OFC 50 or CIS 13, OFC 55 Semester 2: OFC 62, OFC 64, OFC 66, CED 11 or OFC 94 RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration degree programs

C-Print Captioning
TM
This certificate prepares graduates to work with Deaf or hard-of-hearing students and students with other disabilities in mainstream classrooms and/or work environments. Students in this program learn to keyboard effectively, to use laptop computers in conjunction with C-Print™ software, to perform real-time captioning in classrooms or other settings, to edit and prepare notes, and to work within the Deaf culture and with disability services.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT C-Print Captioning
Credits required: 26 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration

Program Courses _____ CIS 03 _____ DST 11 _____ ENG 11 _____ OFC 20 _____ OFC 35 _____ OFC 40 _____ OFC 93 _____ BUS 13 or MAN 54

Working with Laptops Deaf Culture Composition I: College Writing Text Editing C-Print Basics C-Print Captioning Skill Development and Practicum Office Administration Seminar Introduction to Business Functions and Practices or Small Business Management

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 6 credits 6 credits 1 credit 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This is a new and growing career field. • C-Print™ is a support service that combines the characteristics of both interpreters and notetakers. • Graduates may also work within business environments as freelancers. RECOMMENDATIONS • Students must possess an aptitude for phonetics and English grammar. • Students must type 40 words per minute or take OFC 02, OFC 04, OFC 13. • Take these courses in sequence: ENG 11, OFC 35, and DST 11 in the Fall; OFC 20, OFC 40, CIS 03, and BUS 13 or MAN 54, OFC 93 in the Spring.

152
Office Administration Degrees: Office Administration (Executive Administrative Assistant, Legal Administrative Assistant, Medical Administrative Assistant)
CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION Foundations of C-Print
Credits required: 13 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration

2007-2008

Foundations of C-Print
C-Print™ technology provides captioning services for the Deaf and hard-of-hearing in classrooms or work environments. The certificate provides basic training in C-Print™ principles. All credits transfer to the C-Print™Captioning certificate.

TM

PROGRAM INFORMATION • A minimum keyboarding speed of 40 wpm based on a 5-minute timing administered by the Office Administration Department is required for admission to the program. • Courses in this certificate transfer into the C-Print Captioning Certificate of Achievement.

Program Courses _____ CIS 03 _____ OFC 35 _____ OFC 40

Working with Laptops C-Print Basics C-Print™ Captioning Skill Development and Practicum

1 credit 6 credits 6 credits

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Legal Office Assistant
Credits required: 25/27 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration

Legal Office Assistant
This certificate offers a concentrated and shortterm way to acquire office skills for employment in law offices and law-related offices. Legal terminology, court procedures, and computer applications are emphasized.

PROGRAM INFORMATION • Graduates can specialize in a particular legal field (probate, real estate, litigation) or in a general practice. The skills developed provide excellent job mobility. • OFC 02 or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 words per minute based on a three-minute timing administered by the Office Administration Department Chair is a prerequisite to OFC 13 and OFC 17. • Take developmental courses needed prior to enrolling in ENG 11. RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration Degree- Legal Administrative Assistant option RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, OFC 13, OFC 17, OFC 80 Semester 2: OFC 15, OFC 20, OFC 81, OFC 82, OFC 93 or CED 11

Program Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ OFC 13 _____ OFC 15 _____ OFC 17 _____ OFC 20 _____ OFC 80 _____ OFC 81 _____ OFC 82 _____ OFC 93 or CED11

Composition I: College Writing Introduction to Word Processing Applications (program information) Records Management Introduction to Microsoft Office Text Editing The Court System and Legal Terminology Law Office Procedures Legal Document Processing Office Administration Seminar or Cooperative Work Experience I

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits

2007-2008

153

Certificates: Administrative Assistant • C-Print™ Captioning • Foundations of C-Print™ • Legal Office Assistant • Office Support • Office Technology Management

Office Support
This certificate prepares students for basic office responsibilities. Credit can be transferred into the Executive Administrative Assistant degree program, or students could continue skill development in the Office Administration certificate.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Office Support
Credits required: 25/27 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration

Program Courses _____ ENG 11 _____ OFC 13 _____ OFC 14 _____ OFC 15 _____ OFC 17 _____ OFC 20 _____ OFC 55 _____ OFC 93 or CED 11 _____ ELECTIVE

Composition I: College Writing Introduction to Word Processing Applications Advanced Word Processing Applications Records Management Introduction to Microsoft Office Text Editing Executive Office Procedures Office Administration Seminar or Coopeerative Work Experience

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credit 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit 3 credits

PROGRAM INFORMATION • This program is designed for those who need to enter the job market as soon as possible but who may not have clear career goals. • Students may pursue an office specialty such as Legal or Medical by choice of elective. • Prior to enrollment students must place into ENG 11 before admission to this program. • OFC 02 or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 wpm based on a three-minute timing administered by the Office Administration Department Chair is a prerequisite to OFC 13 and OFC 17. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, OFC 13, OFC 17, OFC 20 Semester 2: OFC 14, OFC 55, OFC 15, OFC 93 or CED 11, elective

Choose from OFC 50, 62, 64, 66, 70, 80, CIS 13, CIT 30, BUS 11, 13, 55, MAR 11, MAN 11 3 credits

Office Technology Management
This certificate combines traditional office administration skills with the business and computer skills needed to manage an office. Students gain basic office skills and build upon that knowledge with additional computer and management courses.

CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT Office Technology Management
Credits required: 29 Program director: Carol Martin, Department Chair and Professor of Office Administration

Program Courses _____ ACC 14 _____ BUS 11 _____ CIS 13 _____ CIS 27 _____ ENG 11 _____ MAN 11 _____ OFC 02 _____ OFC 13 _____ OFC 17 _____ ELECTIVE _____ ELECTIVE

Introduction to QuickBooks Pro Business and Financial Mathematics Business Creativity Desktop Publishing Composition I: College Writing Principles of Management Computer Keyboarding Introduction to Word Processing Applications Introduction to Microsoft Office

1 credit 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 1 credit

PROGRAM INFORMATION • All OFC courses transfer into the Office Administration degree program. Students can continue to improve their skills by taking the Office Administration certificate. RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCE Semester 1: ENG 11, OFC 13, OFC 17, BUS 11, Elective Semester 2: MAN 11, ACC 14, CIS 13, CIS 27, MAR 11, Elective RELATED PROGRAMS • Office Administration certificate • Office Administration degree programs

(May be waived by previous course or passing Office Administration keyboarding test.)

Choose from OFC 20, 15, 50, 55, 81, CIS 22, 28, 44, MAR 11, MAN 52

3 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3 credits

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2007-2008

College Information
Admissions
Academic Calendar Who is admitted to BCC? When should I apply? How do I apply? Can I visit the campus?

155
155 156 156 156 157

Financial Aid
Is there a deadline for applying for financial aid? Student rights and responsibilities Financial aid programs available at BCC BCC Foundation Scholarship and Loan programs

164 Academic Information
164 165 165 167 Degrees and Certificates Grading Policies Academic Standing Graduation Planning and managing course load Planning an academic program Prior experiential learning Student rights and responsibilities Accreditation, student information and legal statements

175 Administration, faculty and staff 270 175
176 178 179 180 180 184 185 186

Mission Statements
Public Higher Education System Community College Mission Statement Bristol Community College

287
287 287 288

Transferring
Where do BCC students transfer? Scholarships for BCC graduates Transfer agreements Joint Admissions Program Tuition Advantage Program Transfer Compact Elementary and Early Childhood Education Transfer Compacts

158
158 158 159 159 159 160 160

Earning credit outside the classroom 183

Student Services
Who goes to BCC? Starting your journey Once you are on your way Tutoring and Academic Support Center Student Life Advisement and Counseling Center Charting your next step after BCC Career services Job Placement Services Transfer counseling Special services Health Services Dental Hygiene Clinic Student health insurance Campus safety and traffic control Fitness Center Recreation

171
171 172 172 172 172 173 173 173 173 173 173 174 174 174 174 174

Vision Statement

289 290 291 292 295

Distance Learning Pre-College Programs
MCAS Academy Tech Prep The Transition Program Upward Bound

188 190
190 190 190 190

Strategic Planning Goals 289 Core Values BCC Foundation Index Application for Admission

Tuition and Fees
Estimated costs for BCC education Refund policy for credit courses Tuition exemptions Hope Scholarship

161
162 163 163 163

Course Descriptions
General Education requirements Course descriptions

192
192 193

Workforce Development 268
Center for Business and Industry Center for Adult Basic Education & Workplace Literacy Programs for youth 268 269 269

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR
No matter what your situation or your previous educational experience, if you are willing to work hard and take advantage of College resources, you’ll see why Bristol Community College really is where students come first. Still not sure? Read on.
Fall 2007 Wednesday, August 29 Orientation Tuesday, September 4 First day of classes Monday, September 17 Late-start classes begin Monday, October 8 Columbus Day-no classes Monday, November 12 Veterans Day-no classes Wednesday, November 14 Last day for student-generated withdrawal Wednesday, November 21 No classes (satellites only) Thursday & Friday, November 22-23 Thanksgiving Holiday-no classes Saturday-Friday, December 15-21 Final Examinations Intersession 2008 Wednesday, January 2 Classes begin Friday, January 18 Final examinations Spring 2008 Wednesday, January 16 Orientation Tuesday, January 22 First day of classes Monday, February 4 Late-start classes begin Monday, February 18 Presidents Day-no classes Monday-Friday, February 18-22 Winter Vacation-no classes (satellites only) Monday-Saturday, March 17-22 Spring recess-no classes (satellites excluded) Sunday, March 23 Easter-no classes Wednesday, March 26 Professional Day-no classes (satellites excluded) Wednesday, April 9 Last day for student-generated withdrawal Monday, April 21 Patriots Day-no classes Monday-Friday, April 21-25 Spring Vacation-no classes (satellites only) Friday-Friday, May 9-16 Final Examinations Saturday, May 31 Commencement

Admissions

Choosing Bristol Community College
Here are some concerns you might have and some solutions:
Why go to a community college when I can go right to a four-year college? The better question is why pay their high costs for your first two years? Check the chapter on Transferring to see how much you can save on your college costs by starting at BCC. Plus, with the statewide Joint Admissions program, you can be sure you can transfer into a comparable program at a Massachusetts state college or the University of Massachusetts. You can also qualify for a tuition discount with Tuition Advantage. See Transferring for more. I don’t know what I want to study. That’s no reason to put off starting college! Begin in General Studies or a Liberal Arts and Sciences program. You can earn general education requirements that can transfer into any degree program, and perhaps discover a new career direction. I can’t afford to go to college. BCC is an affordable solution to the high cost of a college education. Our low cost per credit makes us the region’s best educational value. We offer financial aid for eligible students, and because you live nearby, you can commute and save a lot of money. Most of our students find it very convenient to schedule full- or part-time work around their college classes. And, since a college degree makes you so much more marketable and prepares you for better jobs, can you afford not to go? I was never a good student. The passage of time can make an amazing difference. We offer courses that can improve basic academic skills, and a full-service Tutoring and Academic Support Center for individual tutoring. You will also find our faculty is particularly interested in helping you succeed.

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Admissions FOR MORE INFORMATION
Contact the Admissions Office at [email protected] or call (508-678-2811, ext. 2179) to receive more information about BCC and its programs.

I don’t have time to enroll in a full-time program. Then enroll part time! As much as possible, BCC allows you to fit school into your schedule, not ours. There is no rule that says you have to complete your Associate degree in two years. Do it at your own pace. And with classes offered days, evenings, and weekends, your course schedule can be very flexible. Do you have any questions or concerns? Contact the Admissions Office at [email protected] or 508-678-2811, ext. 2179 and let us work with you to come up with solutions. Who can apply for admission to BCC? Everyone! As your community college, we offer the educational services you need, whether you want to take just one course or a full course load. Who is admitted to BCC? Our open admissions policy means that there is a program just right for you. Applicants for an associate’s degree program must have a high school diploma or equivalency certificate or college degree. This requirement may be waived for adults who pass an approved examination administered by BCC which indicates they have the ability to succeed at college work. Some candidates are admitted to the Center for Developmental Education to strengthen their background in specific areas before attempting work in another program. Admission to some programs is competitive because of the limited number of openings and/or the prerequisites required, such as Clinical Laboratory Science, Complementary Healthcare, Culinary Arts, Dental Hygiene, Healthcare Information, Histology, Medical Assisting, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Pre-Radiology Technology, Therapeutic Massage, and Phlebotomy.

When should I apply? Applications are processed as they come in. There are no deadlines for application, but submitting your application well in advance of the semester in which you wish to enroll will give you the best selection of courses. If you are applying for Clinical Laboratory Science, Complementary Healthcare, Culinary Arts, Dental Hygiene, Healthcare Information, Histology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Phlebotomy, Pre-Radiology Technology, and Therapeutic Massage, please submit your completed application by January 15 to receive priority consideration for admission to the following September. After that date, applications will continue to be accepted on a space-available basis. Note the special application requirements for these programs, found in each program description. How do I apply? 1. Fill out an application found at the back of this catalog. Extra copies are available by calling the Admissions Office at 508-678-2811, ext. 2516, or on the Web at www.bristol.mass.edu at “Admissions.”

NEW! APPLY ONLINE!
Go to www.BristolCommunityCollege. edu/apply

2. Mail the completed application form to the Admissions Office,
Bristol Community College, 777 Elsbree Street, Fall River, MA, 02720. Include a check or money order payable to Bristol Community College for the appropriate application fee. $10 For Massachusetts residents and qualified New England Regional Student Program applicants or $35 For all others. This fee may be waived if it causes unusual financial hardship. Contact the Admissions Office at [email protected] or 508-678-2811, ext. 2179 for details. You may apply to up to three Massachusetts community colleges with one application fee. Send your check to Bristol Community College and ask us to notify the others of your payment. 3. Ask your high school and all post-secondary schools you attended to send an official transcript of your grades to the Admissions Office at BCC. 4. If you have received your G.E.D., have an official copy of your G.E.D. test scores sent to the BCC Admissions Office. 5. If you would like to talk with an Admissions counselor, please call the office at 508-678-2811, ext. 2947, for an appointment. 6. Immunization: All full-time students and all full- and part-time health sciences students must provide proof of immunization against measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus and hepatitis B. There may be other immunizations required for some health science programs. Serologic proof of immunity will be acceptable.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to Access BCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

Admission requirements to specific programs may change in accordance with policies established by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education and the BCC Board of Trustees. As a state-assisted institution, Bristol Community College gives first priority to legal residents of Massachusetts, and second priority to students who apply under the New England Regional Student program. All others are admitted as space is available. BCC is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.

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Admissions Can I visit the campus? Contact the Admissions Office at [email protected] or call (508) 678-2811, ext. 2947 to arrange a campus tour for individuals or groups. Visit www.bristol.mass.edu at Admissions for a list of upcoming dates for information sessions and campus tours. For a tour of the New Bedford Campus, call ext. 4000, or for Attleboro, call 508-2262484. Special circumstances International students, students who are neither U.S. citizens nor permanent residents of the U.S., who wish to attend Bristol Community College on an F-1 student visa must have completed their secondary school education and must demonstrate their proficiency in English (if English is not their first or best language). Students attending Bristol Community College on an F-1 student visa must be enrolled in a degree program as a full-time student (12 credits or more per semester). International applicants currently outside of the U.S. must submit completed admission applications by July 15 for the next September semester, or by November 15 for the next January semester. International applicants currently within the U.S. must submit completed admission applications by August 1 for the next September semester, or by January 1 for the next January semester. International students must submit the following documents for admission to Bristol community College: • Application for admission for international students (with a non-refundable fee of $35) • Secondary school or high school or college/university official transcripts (translated into English by an official translator) • Valid passport, visa and I-94 card • Transfer students must bring a copy of the previous school’s I-20 and verification of attendance (this must include the International Student Transfer Report form provided by Bristol Community College) • Proof of financial support (Verification of Funds form provided by Bristol Community College) Funds must exceed $15,000 (U.S. dollars). • Proof of the following vaccinations: measles, Mumps, Rubella, Tetanus within 10 years, Hepatitis B series. Once the Admissions office at Bristol Community College receives all required documentation, international students will be issued an I-20 for (Certificate of Eligibility for Student Visa). After students are admitted and respond with a $50 non-refundable registration deposit, they can apply for a student visa. International students will be subject to out-of-state tuition rates while attending Bristol Community College with an I-20 form. Financial Aid is not available to international students. Please contact the Admissions office at [email protected] 508-678-2811 ext. 2947 for more information. Transfer students from another regionally accredited college or university usually receive credit for courses appropriate to their program in which they received a ‘C-’ or better. Up to 30 credits may be transferred for associate degree programs. For students admitted to certificate programs, half the required credits must be earned at BCC. Part-time students take fewer than 12 credits of course work and receive all the services available to a full-time student. Veterans may use G.I. benefits at Bristol Community College. The College’s certifying official will assist you in applying for your benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and accessing college services. A representative in BCC’s Advisement and Counseling Services office can assist you. January and summer admissions: Students may begin an academic program in January or the summer by taking general and elective courses required for the program. Not all program-specific courses are offered every semester. SACHEM cross-registration: BCC is a member of the Southeastern Association for Cooperation in Higher Education (SACHEM), a consortium of nine institutions of higher education. Students of the participating institutions may cross-register for selected courses on a tuition-exchange, space available basis. For more information contact the Registrar. Tech Prep students from one of the area member high schools within the Bristol Community College Tech Prep Consortium should complete the section on the Application for Admission designated for students enrolled in their high school Tech Prep program. New England Regional Student Program allows out-of-state students from New England to enroll in BCC programs at in-state tuition if the public colleges and universities in the student’s home state do not offer the program. The Admissions office and the NERSP website at www.nebhe.org have additional information. Students enrolling in evening and weekend classes have no residency requirement and are charged the same cost per credit as in-state students.
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
Read the section to the left if you’d like further information about the following circumstances: International students Transfer students Part-time students Veterans January and summer admissions SACHEM cross-registration Tech-Prep students New England Regional Student Program

NEW! APPLY ONLINE!
Go to www.BristolCommunityCollege. edu/apply

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TRANSFERRING
Some of the colleges where BCC students have transferred include: American International College Amherst College Atlantic Union College Bentley College Boston College Bridgewater State College Brigham Young University Brown University Bryant University California State Central Connecticut State University Curry College Eastern Connecticut State University Emerson College Fairleigh Dickinson University Fitchburg State College Framingham State College Georgia State University Goddard College Gordon College Hofstra University Johnson and Wales University Johnson State College LaBoure College Lesley College Manhattan College Massachusetts College of Art Massachusetts College of Pharmacy Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts Massachusetts Maritime Academy Merrimack College continued next page Bristol Community College’s affordable, high-quality educational opportunities can help you beat the high price of a four-year degree.

Transferring

The Community College Advantage in action

By enrolling in a transfer program, you can earn the first two years of your four-year degree at BCC and take advantage of the affordable tuition and fees while getting a great education. Some career programs can transfer as well. Our Transfer office, ext. 2227, helps you get credit where credit is due, so you can transfer the maximum number of your BCC credits into the college of your choice. Students planning to transfer, and those unsure of their plans, should contact the Transfer office as early in their BCC career as possible. Transfer counselors will help you plan a program of study for transfer. Most senior institutions expect a 2.5 grade point average for transfer students. Students with less than 2.5 may transfer, but they may have difficulty getting into the college of their choice. Most colleges do not accept “D” grades except in the Transfer Compact as outlined below.

WHERE DO BRISTOL STUDENTS TRANSFER?

Bristol Community College students find that their time at BCC makes them very desirable transfer students at four-year colleges. Often, senior institutions design special scholarship and financial aid programs especially for community college transfer students. More and more students are finding that starting at BCC makes great sense. Special scholarships for BCC graduates Scholarships are available for BCC graduates who transfer to some four-year colleges and universities. To qualify, students must graduate from BCC, apply, and be accepted to the four-year institution. Most scholarships require at least a G.P.A. of 3.0. These colleges, universities and organizations offer transfer scholarships: Information is available in the Transfer office. Art Institute of Boston Bridgewater State College Bryant University Johnson & Wales University Massachusetts College of Roger Williams University Liberal Arts New England Transfer Association Phi Theta Kappa UMass Boston UMass Amherst UMass Dartmouth UMass Lowell

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Go to www.bristol.mass.edu, choose Resources for Students After BCC and then Transferring

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Transferring
TRANSFERRING continued

The Transfer office also coordinates transfer scholarships. Check their website for details.
Transfer agreements BCC’s Transfer Affairs office has negotiated agreements with a variety of four-year colleges for transfer students who have completed their associate degree. Some of these agreements guarantee admission and ensure full junior standing to the BCC degree holders who achieve a certain G.P.A. and meet specific requirements. Most of these agreements indicate course equivalents and prerequisites so that students know well in advance the courses that will transfer to the four-year college. Some agreements cover specific programs, others are more generic. However, even if you choose to transfer to a college not listed, BCC credits are likely accepted at the college of your choice. Contact the Transfer Affairs office for more information. BCC has transfer agreements with the following colleges and universities: Art Institute of Boston Bridgewater State College Capella University Framingham State College Lesley University Massachusetts Maritime Academy Newbury College Paul Smith College Roger Williams University Salve Regina University UMass Boston UMass Lowell University of Phoenix Westfield State College Worcester State College Becker College Bryant University Fitchburg State College Johnson and Wales University Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts Regis College Salem State College UMass Amherst UMass Dartmouth Unity College University of Rhode Island Worcester Polytechnic Institute

To qualify, students must complete an associate degree in an approved joint admission program with a G.P.A. of 2.5 or better, and plan to transfer to specified programs at the University or state college. For more information contact the Admissions Office or the Transfer Affairs office. Tuition Advantage Program (TAP) Through the Commonwealth’s Tuition Advantage Program, students receive a 33 percent tuition reduction on in-state tuition at a state college or the University of Massachusetts. To be eligible, students must graduate from BCC in a Joint Admissions Program (see above for details) with a 3.0 GPA and maintain a 3.0 G.P.A. at the state college or university. The student is entitled to Tuition Advantage for the two years of matriculation immediately following their BCC graduation. Students may attend the state colleges and the University part time or full time, but only qualify for Tuition Advantage for two years following their BCC graduation. In 2004-05, Tuition Advantage saved full-time students $300 a year at the state colleges, and $467 a year at the university. TAP does not apply for evening and summer programs. Roger Williams University Joint Admissions program Take advantage of a private college education at a public college price. BCC has a Joint Admissions program with Roger Williams University. It's our first Joint Admissions agreement with a private institution. Guaranteed admission and transfer of credit, a smooth transition between BCC and Roger Williams, and generous scholarships make this an attractive program. Visit the Transfer Affairs Web site for a list of eligible RWU Joint Admissions programs.

Joint Admissions Program Joint Admission guarantees admission to specific programs at the University of Massachusetts and state colleges including Bridgewater State College, Fitchburg State College, Framingham State College, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, Salem State College, Westfield State College and Worcester State College.

Some of the colleges where BCC students have transferred include: Montserrat School of Visual Art Mount Ida College New York University Northeastern University Providence College Purdue University Rhode Island College Rochester Institute of Technology Roger Williams University Rutgers State University Salem State College Salve Regina University Southeastern Technical Institute Smith College Springfield College Stonehill College Suffolk University Syracuse University Unity College University of Colorado University of Maine UMass Amherst UMass Boston UMass Dartmouth UMass Lowell University of Nevada University of Rhode Island Ventura College West Virginia State College Western New England College Westfield State College Wheelock College Worcester Polytechnic Institute

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Transferring FOR MORE INFORMATION
Go to www.bristol.mass.edu, choose Resources for Students After BCC and then Transferring

Transfer Compact Students planning to transfer to the University of Massachusetts or state colleges are eligible for the Transfer Compact. Students who qualify are granted transfer credit for all college-level credits taken to earn the associate’s degree. The student must meet the following conditions: a. complete an associate’s degree with a minimum of 60 credit hours exclusive of developmental course work b. achieve a cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.0 (in a 4.0 system) at the community college awarding the degree c. complete the following minimum general education core, exclusive of developmental course work. English Composition/Writing 6 credit hours Behavioral and Social Science 9 credit hours Humanities and Fine Arts 9 credit hours Natural or Physical Science 8 credit hours Mathematics 3 credit hours Students interested in consideration as Compact candidates should consult a Transfer counselor to plan appropriate programs.

Elementary Education and Early Childhood Education Transfer Compacts Students enrolled in the Elementary Education program or the Early Childhood Education program who are interested in transferring to the University of Massachusetts or state colleges are eligible for the Elementary and Early Childhood Transfer Compacts. Students who meet the requirements are guaranteed admission and are granted transfer credit for all college-level credits taken to earn the associate’s degree. Students interested in meeting the requirements for the Elementary Education and Early Childhood Transfer Compacts should consult with a Transfer Counselor or Program Director to plan an appropriate program. Please review program description for more details on pages 130, 132, and 134.

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Bristol Community College receives some of its funding from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is subsidized by state tax revenues. This means that students pay only a portion of the total cost of a BCC education.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you have any questions about tuition and fees, you may contact the Student Accounts Office at ext. 2160.

Tuition and Fees

Tuition and College Fees per credit hour Massachusetts and nearby Rhode Island residents Tuition $ 24/credit College Fee $ 99/credit Total $123/credit Many nearby eastern Rhode Island residents pay in-state tuition and fee rates under the New England Regional Student Program. See Admissions for details. The New England Regional Student Program allows out-of-state students from New England to enroll in BCC programs at in-state tuition if the public colleges and universities in the student’s home state do not offer the program. In addition, the College accepts students for day classes from nearby eastern Rhode Island (Adamsville, Barrington, Bristol, East Providence, Little Compton, Middletown, Newport, Portsmouth, Tiverton, and Warren, RI) at in-state tuition rates. The Admissions office and the NERSP website at www.nebhe.org have additional information. Students enrolling in evening and weekend classes have no residency requirement and are charged the same cost per credit as in-state students. All other students Tuition $230/credit College Fee $ 99/credit Total $329/credit Tuition is set by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education. The College Fee portion of the per credit charge is collected from all students and used to pay for general College operations not funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. These include, but are not limited to, instructional computer equipment, educational supplies, audiovisual aids, library books, and laboratory supplies.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Tuition and Fees FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you have any questions about tuition and fees, contact the Student Accounts Office at ext. 2160.

Other required fees Student Support Fee Registration deposit Registration deposit for Nursing and Dental Hygiene Program Student Health Insurance

applied to the total semester charge) (non-refundable and applied to the total semester charge)

$ 30/semester (non-refundable) $ 50/year (non-refundable and

$100/year for students admitted

$833/year (non-refundable) (may be waived)

Occupational Therapy Assistant $800 Therapeutic Massage $500 Tuition may be modified by action of the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education after publication of this catalog. Fees may be modified by the College Board of Trustees. Because of changing costs and/or state and legislative actions, adjustments may be required after publication of this catalog. Bristol Community College reserves the right to make these adjustments, and tuition and fees are subject to change without notice. Estimated costs for a BCC education The table below gives you an idea of the actual cost of a BCC education for a Massachusetts resident taking 30 undergraduate credit hours over two semesters. Full operating costs per student $7,500 Less State Operating Subsidy $5,069 Tuition and Mandatory Fees $3,885 Less Direct Student Aid (avg.)* $3,510 Average Net Charge to Student $2,806 Average Federal Tax Credit (Hope) $1,000 Net Student Cost $1,806
* includes tuition and fee waivers and directly-applied institution, state and federal financial aid.

Insurance cost for the Spring semester is $558. Family coverage is available at additional cost. Contact the Student Accounts Office at ext. 2160 for details. Mass PIRG (non-returnable) $ 9/semester
(may be waived)

Application fee (non-refundable) Massachusetts and nearby Rhode Island residents Out-of-state residents Late registration Additional fees as required Instructional Support Fee

$10/one time $35/one time $20

This fee is charged for courses with high personnel, technology, or materials costs. Courses that carry this fee are identified in the course description with the sentence "Instructional Support Fee applies." Instructional Support Fee only for those courses that carry it is: 1 credit 2 credits 3 credits 4 credits 5 credits 6 credits 7 credits 8 credits 9 credits $9 $18 $27 $36 $45 $54 $63 $72 $81

Policies Once a student registers, he/she is responsible for payment in full of all tuition and fee charges. Students must fulfill all financial obligations to the College. Overdue student accounts will be sufficient cause for administrative withdrawal from the College, and/or other administrative penalties by the College. Unpaid accounts will be referred for collection, and the student will bear all costs and charges incurred in the collection, and/or litigation. The Massachusetts Health Insurance Law requires that all students enrolled in nine or more credits are required to have basic health insurance. By law, Bristol Community College automatically charges all students who are registered for nine or more credits with this health insurance fee. The annual fee may be waived if you complete and return to the Student Accounts Office the white student health insurance waiver card before school begins (usually when you register), documenting comparable health insurance coverage. You may also complete the waiver online at www.UniversityHealthPlans.com; click on Massachusetts Community Colleges; click on Bristol Community College; click on Student Accident and Sickness Insurance Plan. The waiver

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

Additional program costs (approximate) Clinical Laboratory Science $600 Culinary Arts $1,250 Dental Hygiene $800 Healthcare Information $500 Medical Assisting $400 Nursing $850 Phlebotomy $600

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Tuition and Fees form is listed on the left. A waiver must be complete in order for this charge to be removed from the student’s account. Part-time students may also purchase this coverage, which must be renewed annually, by directly contacting University Health Plans, Inc. at 1-800-437-6448. Students purchase their own textbooks, materials, and supplies, all available at the College Bookstore. Students should estimate transportation and food costs in calculating their expenses for the year. A financial statement of the College is available in the Administration office. Refund policy for students withdrawing from all credit courses Students must follow College withdrawal procedures to receive a refund. See "Withdrawal Policy" section on page 179 of the College Catalog. Tuition refunds for all credit courses are as follows: • If a student withdraws from the College prior to the beginning of classes or during the first two weeks of classes, the student will receive a 100 percent refund less a $30 processing fee. • If a student withdraws from the College during the third week of classes, the student will receive a 50 percent refund of all charges less a $30 processing fee. • If a student withdraws after the third week of classes, there will be no tuition or college fee refunds. Refund policy for students not completely withdrawing from all credit courses If a student withdraws from a course(s) prior to the beginning of classes or during the first two weeks of classes, the student will receive a 100 percent refund for the credits from which s/he withdraws. If a student withdraws from a course(s) during the third week of classes, the student will receive a 50 percent refund for the credits from which s/he withdraws. If the student withdraws from a course(s) after the first three weeks of classes there will be no refund. Tuition exemptions Completed waiver applications must be submitted by the bill due date. Senior Citizens tuition waiver – Massachusetts residents sixty years and older may attend Bristol Community College on a space available basis at no tuition charge. National Guard – Members of the National Guard are eligible for a full tuition and fee waiver. This waiver applies to all qualified students, full- and part-time, and for all credit and certificate courses up to a maximum of 130 semester credit hours per student. Eligible students must present a valid (bearing a raised seal) Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Military Division of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts that specifies the number of remaining credits for which he/she is eligible during a specific academic year. State Employee waiver – At the time of registration a student must present a completed Tuition Remission Authorization form with appropriate signatures. Any additional charges must be paid at registration. Billing is unavailable. Veteran Waiver – Veterans who are Massachusetts residents may be eligible for a tuition waiver. Students must submit form DD-214 for approval at the time of registration. Students must pay all other fees and charges prior to the start of the semester. FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you have any questions about tuition and fees, contact the Student Accounts Office at ext. 2160.

Hope Scholarship (Tax Credit) Students enrolled in six credits or more in the first two years of an undergraduate program day or evening are eligible for the Hope Scholarship, a federal tax credit. Students pay for their tuition and fees, and then can claim a tax credit against their tax liability. Students may take a credit of 100 percent of the first $1,000, and 50 percent of the next $1,000, for a maximum in any tax year of $1,500. Students are eligible for the credit for two years. The Financial Aid Office and Student Accounts Office (formerly the Bursar’s office) have more information on this tax credit, but for specific information consult a tax advisor.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

164
FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you have any questions about financial aid, contact the Financial Aid office, ext. 2513. Bristol Community College offers a full range of financial aid programs to help qualified students who cannot meet the full cost of a college education.

Financial Aid

Paying your way

APPLY ON THE WEB
To get a fast response regarding your financial aid eligibility, go to www.BristolCommunityCollege. edu/financial_aid/

Financial aid packages may include grants, loans and work programs. We use the standards and procedures of the U.S. Department of Education to estimate a fair student contribution and determine financial need. Using Federal Needs Analysis Methodology, an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is calculated. The EFC is subtracted from the cost of attending BCC to determine your individual financial need. All those forms confuse me. Where can I get help in filing the right ones?

The Financial Aid office staff provides students and, if appropriate, their families, with general information and assistance in completing the forms. Regular workshops give information on procedures, programs, and other “how-to” information. Make appointments at either the Fall River Campus, the campus in downtown New Bedford, or the Attleboro Center. Additional information can be found at www.BristolCommunityCollege.edu/financial_aid/ The financial aid process can take a while. What can I do to speed up the process? Filing electronically through the World Wide Web gets the fastest response. File an electronic Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and expect your Student Aid Report in about two weeks from the time of application. Contact the Financial Aid office to learn more about filing electronically. File at www.BristolCommunityCollege. edu/financial_aid/apply1.html If you mail your FAFSA to the Department of Education, you will receive a Student Aid Report in approximately four weeks. Is there a deadline for applying for financial aid? You may apply for aid anytime, but we give priority to students who complete their financial aid file by May 1. Some Rhode Island grant deadlines are March 1. Some Massachusetts grants have a May 1 deadline.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Financial Aid
FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS

Once I have received financial aid, is it guaranteed for my whole college career? You must apply for financial aid every year you need it, but every time you demonstrate financial need, we will work with you and your family to help meet your education-related expenses. Are there any special requirements? Assistance is available to a student who demonstrates financial need, is a citizen, national, or permanent resident of the USA, meets Selective Service requirements, maintains satisfactory progress towards an eligible degree or certificate program, does not owe a refund to a federal or state grant program, or is not in default on a federal or state education loan, and meets criteria in specific programs. Students in the USA on F1, F2, J1 or J2 student visas are not eligible for assistance. Further information on eligibility criteria, deadlines, and applications are available from the Financial Aid office. Student rights and responsibilities The College and the Financial Aid office reserve the right to determine the type, amount, and/or revision of financial aid. Awards are contingent on the availability of funding, student’s course load, and regulations governing those funds. Financial aid may be denied or cancelled if a student does not continue to meet eligibility requirements at any time during the academic year. If a student fails to meet satisfactory progress standards or is in default on Title IV or state grant, or loan funds, financial aid will be denied or cancelled.
FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS AVAILABLE AT BCC

To determine if you’re eligible financially, the U.S. Department of Education uses a standard formula, established by Congress, to evaluate the information you report when you apply. The formula produces an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) number. How much you get will depend not only on your EFC, but also on whether you are a part- or full-time student and whether you attend for a full academic year. In 2006-07 academic year, awards ranged from $400 to $4,050. This grant is not repaid. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) This college-administered program provides grants to students who are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant and demonstrate the greatest financial need. The amount can range from $200 to $4,000 per year. These grants are awarded based on an applicant’s need and funds available. This grant is not repaid. MASSGrant are awarded by the MA office of Student Financial Aid or Massachusetts residents. In 2006-07, full-time students were awarded funds ranging from $300 to $900 per year. Awards are renewable for up to four semesters of community college study. This award is not repaid. Massachusetts Tuition Waiver Program is authorized by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education and administered by the College to help students reduce their tuition obligation to college. Full- and part-time Massachusetts residents who demonstrate need are eligible. This award is not repaid. Massachusetts Cash Grants are state funds administered by the College and are awarded to Massachusetts residents. Full- and parttime students who demonstrate financial need will receive consideration for awards up to the amount of their tuition and fee charges based on available funds. This award is not repaid. Mass Part Time Grant is authorized by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education and administered by the College to assist eligible part time students who are Massachusetts residents. Awards range from $200 to $400 per year. This award is not repaid. RI State Scholarships are awarded by the RI Higher Education Assistance Authority. The scholarship is available to full and part time RI residents who have demonstrated financial need. Special grant programs. The College often receives funds to distribute under special programs. The criteria and procedures for application vary. Contact the Financial Aid office for details.

Grant programs Federal Pell Grant Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant MASSGrant Massachusetts Tuition Waiver Massachusetts Cash Grants Mass Part Time Grant Rhode Island State Scholarship Other special grant programs

The information below was accurate at catalog press time. However, changes in financial aid may take place after publication of this catalog. Check with the Financial Aid office. Grant programs Federal Pell Grant: Pell grants are awarded to undergraduate students who have not yet earned a bachelor’s or professional degree. (A professional degree would include a degree in a field such as pharmacy or dentistry.) For many students, Pell grants provide a foundation of financial aid to which other aid may be added.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Financial Aid FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you have any questions about financial aid, contact the Financial Aid office, ext. 2513.

Loan programs Federal Perkins Loan: This college-administered program allows students with financial need to receive long-term, low-interest loans. The repayment period and the accumulation of 5 percent interest do not begin until nine months after the student discontinues studies. A Federal Perkins loan is awarded as part of the financial aid package. Students sign a promissory note upon receipt. Loans for college-related expenses are available for up to $4,000, and $8,000 for the first two years of an undergraduate program. Students begin paying back these loans after they discontinue studies or at the end of any period of service with the Peace Corps or VISTA. They have up to ten years to pay, and no interest is charged for deferment periods. Alternative Loans: Private loans, also called alternative loans, are available to students and parents to help cover educational costs not covered by grants, scholarships, or educational loans. Interest rates and repayment terms vary. For more information, contact the Financial Aid Office. Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) includes Federal Stafford and Federal Plus Loan Programs. Students and/or parents may borrow funds at a low variable interest rate to help meet the cost of attendance.

Work programs Federal Work Study is a College-administered program in which job opportunities are available to eligible students. It assists students who need to earn money at a part-time job to meet college expenses. Students participating in the program normally work 8 - 10 hours per week while attending classes. The work schedule is designed to meet the needs of the student and supervisor. Off - campus community services jobs are also available. Student Employment Program is a College-funded work-study program offering on-campus jobs and, in some cases, academic credit. This program works with BCC’s CO-OP education program. BCC Foundation Scholarships and loan programs on next page.

Loan programs Perkins Loan Alternative Loans Federal Family Education Loan Work programs Federal Work Study Student Employment Program

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Financial Aid

BCC FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP AND LOAN PROGRAMS
Scholarships funded through the BCC Foundation and Alumni Association range in value from $200 to $2,200. During the 2006-07 academic year, the Foundation awarded $153,000 in scholarship funds. Scholarship application forms are available in mid-March online at www.BristolCommunityCollege. edu/foundation - select scholarships - and at locations throughout the campus, including the Development office, Financial Aid office and the library. One form entitles students to be considered for most of the scholarships listed. Applications are due the first week in May and students are notified of award decisions during the summer. Listed below are the endowed funds and eligibility guidelines. In addition to the endowed scholarships listed, the Foundation awards annually funded scholarships. Eligibility Student who is a resident of Fall River, Swansea, Westport, or Freetown Massachusetts, and demonstrates financial need Altrusa Club/Camilla C. Pickering Student who is a resident of Bristol County, Memorial Scholarship with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and demonstrates volunteer community service Alumni Association Scholarship General requirements Argy Scholarship Full-time student majoring in engineering, science or health science who demonstrates financial need, scholastic merit, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 Leonard and Ruth Baker Scholarship Full-time student enrolled in Business Administration, who has completed 24 credit hours, with a minimum GPA of 3.0, and financial need BFI Waste Systems Scholarship BFI employee, spouse, child or grandchild of employee; if no BFI applicant by 5/1, open to Fall River, Somerset, Swansea or Westport resident, environmental technology, GPA 3.0, financial need Michael K. Bosi Memorial Scholarship Student matriculating in journalism or communictions who demonstrates scholastic merit. Preference will be given to BMC Durfee alumnus. Special application requires submission of work samples H. M. Booth Theatre Scholarship Theatre student Borden-Remington Scholarship Student in top 30% of class who demonstrates financial need. Preference is given to child of Borden-Remington employee Zelma Braga Scholarship General requirements, full or part-time student Gerald M. Brown Scholarship Greater Fall River resident, financial need, GPA 3.0 Ruth P. Brown Scholarship Full or part-time student in the Business Program. Preference given to female student Prof. C. John Capone P.E. Memorial Student matriculating into the engineering or Scholarship environmental technology program, minimum six credits per semester, financial need and scholastic merit Chef John J. Caressimo Scholarship Second year student matriculating in culinary arts Endowed Fund Edward Adaskin Family Scholarship

John A. and Eileen F. Carr Scholarship Nursing or elementary education student with financial need Donna Castro RN Nursing Scholarship Nursing student with preference given to a student with prior experience working in the health care field Judith B. Chace Memorial Scholarship Chace employee, spouse, child or grandchild; if no successful applicant by 5/1, open to Tiverton resident or graduate of Tiverton High school with financial need Citizens-Union Savings Bank Student enrolled in a business-related proScholarship gram from the Fall River area, demonstrated financial need, minimum GPA of 3.0; for entering freshmen, a high school grade average of “C” or better Francis J. Colaneri Scholarship Student with financial need enrolled in the engineering program with preference given to students residing in Bristol County, MA or Rhode Island Pamela Colaneri Dental Hygiene Second year Dental Hygiene student who Scholarship demonstrates academic merit and financial need Christopher M. Cordeiro Memorial Student taking credit or non-credit courses Scholarship who demonstrates financial need, with minimum GPA of 3.0 Dr. and Mrs. Paul P . Dunn Scholarship Student matriculating in a health science program, financial need, minimum GPA of 3.0 Johanna Duponte Occupational Student matriculating in OTA program, having Therapy Assistant Scholarship completed first year with minimum GPA of 2.75 who demonstrates professionalism, collegiality and commitment to OTA profession Fall River Country Club Scholarship Employee of Fall River Country Club; if no applicant, a culinary arts student Fall River Opportunity Fund Fall River resident who demonstrates financial need J.B. Fernandes Memorial Trust I Portuguese-American student who demonstrates Scholarship financial need Paul Fletcher Scholarship Student matriculating into the arts/humanities field, taking a minimum of 6 credits per semester, financial need, scholastic merit, GPA 3.0 John G. Fonseca Memorial Non-traditional student, minimum GPA of Scholarship 3.5, financial need Kevin J. Garganta Human Services Student matriculating in Human Services, Scholarship minimum of 30 credits who demonstrates financial need and has a minimum GPA of 2.5 Officer Thomas J. Giunta Memorial Child/grandchild of active or retired Fall River Scholarship police officer, financial need; if no successful applicant, open to criminal justice student continued on next page

Financial Aid Greater Fall River resident, financial need and/or scholastic merit Max and Edith Gold Scholarship Fall River resident, GPA 3.0, financial need Harry Gottlieb Scholarship Accounting/business major, greater Fall River resident, financial need and scholastic merit Nick Grossi Culinary Arts Memorial Student entering the 2nd year of the culinary Scholarship arts program Bruce O. and Virginia I. Hawes General Requirements Scholarship Lincoln T. Hawes Scholarship General Requirements Hebrew Ladies Helping Hands Society Full-time student who demonstrates academic Scholarship promise and financial need with preference given to a Jewish student with second preference to a resident of greater Fall River Anne P. Hindle Scholarship Student matriculating in one of the BCC allied health programs. Based on scholastic merit and financial need Dr. Rachel V. Holland Memorial Student enrolled at BCC from a financially or Scholarship educationally disadvantaged background. Student should exhibit a dedication to utilizing his/her education in helping others in the community Jack P. Hudnall Memorial Scholarship Second year student, financial need and/or scholastic merit Ernest Israel Scholarship Full-time student who graduated within last five years from Durfee High School, letter of recommendation from teacher or friend required Joseph and Jeanette Koppelman Financial need, top 30% of class Scholarship Virginia and Harold Lash Scholarship Full-time student, financial need, scholastic merit William List Scholarship Student who is a resident of Fall River, Somerset, Swansea, Westport, or Freetown Massachusetts who demonstrates financial need Marie B. Maalouf Scholarship Nursing student, financial need, scholastic merit Senator William and Marjorie MacLean Full-time student who is a resident of Acushnet, Scholarship Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Freetown, Marion, Mattapoisett, New Bedford or Rochester with financial need, academic achievement and interest in public service and/or leadership Alfred J. and Marie B. Macomber Music Student with an interest in music with Scholarship financial need and/or scholastic merit George and Doris Magnan Memorial Student matriculating in the Fire Science TechScholarship nology Program who has completed at least 12 general education credits and at least 12 Fire Science credits at BCC with a minimum GPA of 3.0 Globe Manufacturing Scholarship Basil and Theresa Maravelas Scholarship Student in the natural sciences who has scholastic ability, academic potential and financial need J. Robert Mello Scholarship Student demonstrating outstanding ability and talent in the art program

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Loree Moglia Mullen Memorial Dental First year BCC Dental Hygiene student Hygiene Scholarship
who is studying predominately at the Attleboro Center. Evelyn Pacheco Nursing Scholarship Second year student enrolled in the nursing program who demonstrates scholastic merit and financial need Luis Rodrigues Pavao Scholarship Full-time student with demonstrated financial need and/or scholastic merit Pierce Foundation Scholarship Nursing student with minimum GPA of 3.0, with financial need Richard and Doris Quirk Nursing Second year nursing student with financial Scholarship need, minimum GPA of 3.5, and a resident of Dartmouth, New Bedford, or Fairhaven, MA Rappaccini’s Retort Scholarship Student in liberal arts: language, literature or philosophy. Based on scholastic merit/potential and financial need Rhode Island Society of Governmental Student enrolled in business administration Accountants & Auditors Scholarship with accounting option who demonstrates financial need and scholastic merit. Priority to Rhode Island residents and additional preference if child or grandchild of SOGAA member Ella A. Rodgers Memorial Scholarship Student from Greater Fall River who demonstrates financial need and/or scholastic merit Lucy Rose Memorial Nursing Student entering the second year of the nursScholarship ing program; demonstrated scholastic and clinical competence and has financial need. Preference to a student from Fall River, MA or Tiverton, RI Dr. August I. Ryer Memorial Nursing Second year nursing student who demonScholarship strates academic promise and financial need Mary Lou Hallal Sabra Memorial Student who is a G.E.D. recipient enrolled in Scholarship either credit or non-credit courses leading to further certification or degree Philip and Evelyn Sacknoff Student demonstrating financial need and Scholarship academic promise, preferably in the health sciences or computer science programs Edward Terral Smith Memorial Graduating, transferring student, GPA 3.5, Scholarship with 75% of credits completed at BCC continued on next page

NationsHeritage Federal Credit Union Student enrolled at Bristol Community College
Scholarship

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Financial Aid Student enrolled in the liberal arts and humanities program who demonstrates financial need and/or scholastic merit Robert F. Stoico/FIRSTFED Accounting/business/business transfer student Foundation Scholarship GPA 3.0, financial need Sally Sweeney Memorial Scholarship Full or part-time student enrolled at BCC demonstrating financial need Truesdale Hospital Nurses Alumnae Student entering the second year of the Association Scholarship nursing program who has demonstrated scholastic and clinical competence and has financial need Union Hospital School of Nursing Student entering the second year of the nursAlumnae Scholarship ing program; who demonstrates outstanding clinical skills and has financial need Elizabeth A. and Sumner James Full-time student at BCC who demonstrates Waring, Jr. Scholarship financial need and/or scholastic merit Watuppa Masonic Foundation Student who is a resident of greater Fall River Scholarship and demonstrates scholastic merit and financial need Betty M. Welch Scholarship Business administration/accounting major, with minimum GPA of 3.0 Rev. Dr. Lex King Souter Memorial Scholarship BCC FOUNDATION LOANS

Foundation loans are for emergency purposes. They are interest free and must be paid back within four months. Loan amounts generally are limited to a maximum of $200. Applications are reviewed on a case by case basis. Applications are available in the development office, D100 and in financial aid.
Bogle Book Loan Delta Dental Loan Fund Revolving loan fund for BCC students for the purchase of books Students in emergency situations who would be forced to leave school without this loan; the money is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. Student must be enrolled in the Dental Hygiene Program. For students in emergency situations who would be forced to leave school without this loan; the loan is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. Student must be enrolled in a Computer Information Systems program. Students in emergency situations who would be forced to leave school without this loan; the money is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. Students in emergency situations who would be forced to leave school without this loan; the money is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. Students in emergency situations who would be forced to leave school without this loan; the money is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. For students residing in New Bedford, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Marion, Mattapoisett, or Rochester, MA. Students in the health sciences fields to assist them with extraordinary expenses incurred in the program. Students in emergency situations who would be forced to leave school without this loan; the money is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. For students in emergency situations who need assistance with purchase of books; the loan is generally repaid interest-free at the end of the semester. Student must be enrolled in classes at the New Bedford Campus.

Fletcher-Grocer CIS Loan Fund

Elizabeth A. Milham Fund

Georgina Moniz Memorial Fund

New Bedford Area Student Loan Fund

Albert G. Pierce Revolving Loan Fund Reitzas Loan Fund

Aura Romanovitch Memorial Book Loan Fund

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WHO GOES TO BCC?
There is more to college than just lectures, papers, and classes. The best education is one where you are challenged to grow in all areas – physically, socially and intellectually. And sometimes you just need someone to lend some support in that process – someone who cares about you and wants to help you become successful. Students come from every segment of the community, including: • older students who interrupted their education and are returning to start again • recent high school graduates who take advantage of the affordable costs and quality found at BCC first generation college attendees: over 80 percent of BCC students are in the first generation of their families to attend college

Student Services

Helping you make your way
That’s the idea behind Bristol Community College. To reap the maximum benefit from your college education, you need opportunities to exercise your abilities in ways not always found in the classroom. And, you need some personalized attention to fulfill your educational and career goals. We offer a whole range of extracurricular activities that can enhance your college experience, and the services that will support your educational progress and develop your potential for growth. The Enrollment Services staff and related support services are committed to helping you map out your educational road, make the transition into college, complete your goals successfully, and find employment or the right place to complete your education. The key word here is personal – we want to work with you to make sure that your education is everything you want and need.



Other interesting facts: • nearly 80 percent of BCC students work while attending school • almost 60 percent receive financial aid • approximately 11 percent of BCC students represent racial minority groups

WHO GOES TO BRISTOL COMMUNITY COLLEGE?
Students at BCC come from every circumstance, representing every segment of the community at large. Our students tend to be older than the traditional college age, because many interrupted their education and are returning to start again. But there are many recent high school graduates, too, who take advantage of the affordable costs they find at Bristol Community College. More than 80 percent of our students are in the first generation of their family to attend college. Approximately 11 percent of our students represent racial minority groups. Nearly eighty percent of our students work while attending school, and almost 60 percent receive financial aid. Because of the many responsibilities our students have in addition to school, BCC specializes in helping you fit educational goals into your busy life. Don’t think you need to have your life planned before you come to BCC. Enrollment Services and Advisement staff can help you to determine your interests and strengths, either before or after you begin your education.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Student Services
NEW!

STARTING YOUR JOURNEY
Right from the beginning, BCC is there to help you adjust to life as a BCC student. You can find all these services in the new Enrollment Center in the Commonwealth College Center, Fall River Campus. The Enrollment Center provides registration and enrollment-related services for credit and non-credit enrollment. The Enrollment Center processes all registrations, course change forms, program changes, enrollment verifications, transcript requests, college withdrawals and tuition waiver requests. Applications for admission to the College and Financial Aid may also be obtained through the Enrollment Center. Enrollment Services are also available at the New Bedford Campus Main Office, 188 Union Street; and the Attleboro Center Main Office. Admissions: You start with Admissions, where you can get help in selecting an appropriate program. Our advisors work with you to evaluate your interests and educational experience. If you need preliminary courses before enrolling in a program, we will make recommendations for taking them. (Contact Admissions for detailed information.) Financial Aid: The Financial Aid office provides assistance for all students in covering the cost of college. Staff members will help you file appropriate forms and direct you to alternative funding sources, including scholarships and loans. (You will find more details in the Financial Aid section.) Placement Tests: All students entering a degree or certificate program are required by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education to take assessment tests in order to ensure appropriate placement in classes. The tests assess students’ skill levels in reading, writing and mathematics. The results of the assessment, in conjunction with academic background information, are used by college advisors to help students choose courses prior to registration. Should developmental work be necessary, you’ll receive help to select the courses you need. Orientation: Orientation, offered before the semester begins, gives new students an opportunity to learn about their rights and responsibilities, as well as the services offered to them by BCC. New students also come to campus prior to the start of classes to select courses and register with the help of an academic advisor. Academic Advising: Before you start your first semester, you will meet with an advisor to plan your first semester’s schedule. The advisor will ask questions about your future plans, interpret your placement test scores (English, reading, arithmetic, and algebra) or credits transferred from another accredited college to create your class schedule. If you are in a degree program and taking at least one course scheduled before 4 p.m., you will be assigned an advisor to advise you before registration each semester. Students are assigned advisors based on

Do it all at the Enrollment Center, Commonwealth College Center, Fall River Campus, ext. 2590.
NEW! APPLY ONLINE!
Go to www.BristolCommunityCollege. edu/apply

academic program and the advisor’s specialty. In some instances, students are assigned to a staff member in the Advisement Center. At most times of the year, walk-in advisement is available. For more information, contact ext. 2777. Advisors assist students with short term academic planning (course selection) as well as long term plans most often related to a student’s career and/or transfer goal. Additionally, advisors assist students in learning about the numerous student services on campus such as academic tutoring, co-op experiences, career planning, transfer advising, and job placement.

SUPPORT SERVICES

Tutoring & Academic Support Center (Engineering Building ext. 2295) offers tutoring in BCC courses. Student Life Office (Commonwealth College Center, ext. 2222) provides a variety of programs, services and other opportunities that enhance students’ educational experiences. Advisement Center (Commonwealth College Center, ext. 2777) helps you achieve your goals through academic advising and personal counseling. Headstart to College (see page 174) Disability Services (see page 55) TRiO Quest for Success (see page 54)

ONCE YOU ARE ON YOUR WAY
Throughout your time at BCC, you can receive assistance and support for your educational and career goals as you need it. Here is a sample of what we offer. Tutoring and Academic Support Center The Tutoring and Academic Support Center (TASC), ext. 2295, B110, offers tutoring in most BCC courses with a special emphasis on “learning how to learn.” Special group tutoring called Supplemental Instruction is also available at TASC. Peer tutors staff this comprehensive tutoring center. Tutoring is also offered at the New Bedford Campus and Attleboro Center. All services are free to BCC students. (See page 55.) The Connections Services The Connections Center supports students experiencing problems in a specific course. Referrals are made by faculty or staff or students may make an appointment in the Center. Connections Center advisors work with each student to help him or her get the services needed to become more successful at school. This Center literally “connects” the student to a variety of services on campus including tutoring, personal, career or academic counseling, daycare referrals, and other services to help get the student back on track. Call ext. 2761 for more information or stop by room G208 to learn more. Student Life At Bristol Community College, education extends beyond the classroom. You can develop new skills by participating in extracurricular activities. No matter what your interests, you can find a group of like-minded students who get together at BCC. Many of the degree programs sponsor clubs where you can gather with your fellow future professionals to learn more about the field. If you are a writer or photographer, you can utilize your talents on the student newspaper, The BCC Observer. If acting or

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Student Services production interest you, join the College drama association, BCC Club Theatre. We also have clubs that focus on the celebration of the many cultures represented on campus. If you have a yen for politics, you can represent the interests of fellow students on BCC’s Student Senate. The Senate offers a great opportunity for the development of leadership, interpersonal and public relations skills. You may also represent students by participating on a College-wide committee. Along with faculty, staff and administrators, you can make recommendations on such issues as academic standards, the College budget, bookstore and cafeteria concerns, and Orientation Day. In addition to the opportunity to develop valuable skills that employers will find attractive, the Student Life office works to provide opportunities to meet others and have fun. During the year, the Student Life office sponsors many events such as lectures, picnics, comedy shows, bands and off-campus trips to museums, sporting events, and movies. Whether you’re looking for fun, social connections or an opportunity to develop your skills and enhance your resume, Student Life offers you the opportunities you need. Contact the Student Life Office in the Commonwealth College Center, G102, ext. 2222, or the office at the New Bedford Campus at ext. 4000. Advisement and Counseling Services The Advisement Center can help you sort through all the issues involved in staying on the track you’ve chosen. Our advisors serve as your advocates in achieving your goals. Personal counseling by our staff of professional counselors can help you with any issue that may affect your academic progress. Call ext. 2234 to schedule an appointment. For an appointment in New Bedford, call ext. 4000. Campus Ministry provides opportunities for personal growth through prayer, Scripture reading, counseling, and fellowship. The Campus Ministry office sponsors retreats, lectures, social justice projects, and a variety of other activities for spiritual growth and development. The Campus Ministry office is located in G227 and can be reached at ext. 2447. A Protestant minister is also available. Career services Career Services can help you explore careers, define your career interests, research your major, and plan your career path. Career counselors can also help you with every aspect of your job search including resume writing, interviewing, and job search strategies. Call ext. 2245, or in New Bedford, ext. 4000. Job Placement Services Counselors are available to discuss resumes, cover letters, job search strategies and information on specific organizations. Once a student has registered with the Job Placement Office, we are able to make referrals for appropriate positions. Call ext. 2245. Transfer counseling Should you decide to transfer, our Transfer Counselors can help you plan a program that meets the requirements of the four-year institution of your choice. The office (ext. 2227) collects recent college catalogs and applications from all over the country for your use, and can help you choose the right college for continuing your education. Get extra help at a transfer workshop, or talk to more than 50 admissions representatives at the annual Transfer College Day. Refer to the catalog section called Transferring for information about services and articulation agreements with other colleges. Call ext. 4000 to schedule an appointment in New Bedford.

SPECIAL SERVICES
Students with documented disabilities can get extra support in achieving their educational goals. Support services and accommodations such as interpreter services, taped textbooks, classroom assistance, and other special services are coordinated by the Director of Disability Services (ext. 2955). Refer to the catalog section Center for Development Education. All buildings are wheelchair accessible. To schedule an appointment with ODS in New Bedford, call ext. 4000. VA Educational Benefits Eligible veterans and eligible dependents may access a whole range of services at Bristol Community College. The College is approved to provide all services under the V.A. Rehab, VEAP, Dependent Educational Assistance, the Reserve G.I. Bill, and Montgomery G.I. Bill. The College’s certifying official can assist you with processing your application for benefits to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. For more information, contact Advisement and Counseling services.

CHARTING YOUR NEXT STEP AFTER BCC
Before you become the proud holder of a degree or certificate, we can help you figure out what you want to do with it. Whether you enter the work place immediately, or transfer to a four-year college first, we provide the tools and services that assist you in making practical use of your education.

ACADEMIC CALENDAR
Fall 2007 Wednesday, August 29 Orientation Tuesday, September 4 First day of classes Monday, September 17 Late-start classes begin Monday, October 8 Columbus Day-no classes Monday, November 12 Veterans Day-no classes Wednesday, November 14 Last day for student-generated withdrawal Wednesday, November 21 No classes (satellites only) Thursday & Friday, November 22-23 Thanksgiving Holiday-no classes Saturday-Friday, December 15-21 Final Examinations Intersession 2008 Wednesday, January 2 Classes begin Friday, January 18 Final examinations Spring 2008 Wednesday, January 16 Orientation Tuesday, January 22 First day of classes Monday, February 4 Late-start classes begin Monday, February 18 Presidents Day-no classes Monday-Friday, February 18-22 Winter Vacation-no classes (satellites only) Monday-Saturday, March 17-22 Spring recess-no classes (satellites excluded) Sunday, March 23 Easter-no classes Wednesday, March 26 Professional Day-no classes (satellites excluded) Wednesday, April 9 Last day for student-generated withdrawal Monday, April 21 Patriots Day-no classes Monday-Friday, April 21-25 Spring Vacation-no classes (satellites only) Friday-Friday, May 9-16 Final Examinations Saturday, May 31 Commencement

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Student Services Headstart to College is a special learning opportunity at the New Bedford Campus at the Star Store in downtown New Bedford. Students receive tutoring, career planning, and academic assistance. Geared specifically for students who have been away from school awhile, it provides extra support to help returning students succeed in college courses. For more information, call ext. 4000.

CAMPUS SAFETY AND TRAFFIC CONTROL
The College’s Campus Police office, ext. 2218, maintains a 24-hoursa-day, seven-days-a-week security operation. The staff is committed to the safety and security of the campus community and all visitors. Campus police officers and security personnel provide an on-campus transport service upon request. Located at key spots on campus are emergency telephones, enclosed in yellow boxes and marked with blue lights. They provide instant connection to the Campus Security office. For emergency calls, call ext. 3911. Parking is free and available on a first-come, first-served basis. The College has twelve parking lots with more than 1,800 spaces on the Elsbree Street Campus. All traffic and parking laws are strictly enforced and infractions are subject to monetary fines, especially those involving handicapped spaces, fire lanes, and parking outside white lines. At the New Bedford Campus, students are offered discounted parking at downtown garages.

HEALTH SERVICES
The Health Center for BCC students is located on the second floor of the Commonwealth College Center and is accessible by elevator. The Center is staffed during the day by a registered nurse. A physician sees students on campus by appointment one day a week. The Health Center provides first aid and a private area to rest if you do not feel well, and students who need further medical attention can be referred to community medical resources. All services provided by the Health Center location are free of charge and confidential. The staff offers health fairs, lectures and workshops on healthy lifestyle topics such as nutrition, how to stop smoking, avoiding colds and flu, and more. To further promote a healthful learning environment, the College prohibits smoking inside all College buildings and within 20 feet of building entrances or air vents. Dental Hygiene Clinic Students and their families may take advantage of the dental hygiene clinic. Services offered include scaling and polishing (prophylaxis), plaque control education, x-rays, and fluoride treatment. The clinic is located in the Siegel Health Technologies building. Student health insurance The Massachusetts Health Insurance Law requires that every student registered for nine or more credits participate in the student health insurance program. This may be waived only if comparable health insurance coverage can be demonstrated and a student health insurance waiver form is on file in the Student Accounts Office before school begins. Any student matriculated in a program but carrying less than nine credits may elect to purchase student health insurance. Students may also purchase dependent coverage through the student health insurance program. All students enrolled in any health science or early childhood education must carry health insurance. Brochures and ID cards may be obtained in the Student Accounts Office, Health Services (G208), or by accessing http://www.universityhealthplans.com/intro/BCC.html

FITNESS CENTER
The Campus has a fully-equipped, staffed fitness center located in the Commonwealth College Center. The center offers Cybex weight training equipment, StairMasters, Lifecycles, treadmills, rowers, dumbbells ranging from 5 to 75 pounds, and a Universal pulley station. It also has locker rooms. Trained fitness instructors are on staff to design a program to suit individual needs, and exercise, aerobics, pilates, karate, and other classes are offered during the school year. Special clinics, such as blood pressure testing and body composition analysis, are offered regularly. Students at the New Bedford Campus have access to free YMCA passes. The YMCA is located two blocks from the New Bedford Campus.

RECREATION
Outdoor facilities include five tennis courts, a basketball court, and the Pierce half-mile walking path. Basketballs can be borrowed for use on campus.

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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
This section lists academic policies and procedures for BCC students. Note the index at right for specific information. Each left page also lists policies found on that two-page spread. Degrees & Certificates Grading Policies Academic Standing Graduation 175 176 178 179

Academic Information

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES
Associate in Arts degrees Transfer programs listed in this catalog generally lead to the Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree and prepare students for transfer to a four-year college or university. These programs are designed to meet most senior institution requirements. However, students are responsible to make sure that their program will transfer to the institution of their choice. The BCC Transfer Office works with students by appointment to design programs for transfer. Refer to the catalog section “Transferring” for more information. Associate in Science degrees Courses of study leading to an Associate in Science (A.S.) degree are generally described in this catalog as career programs. Successfully completing one of these programs prepares students for technical or professional entry-level positions. Many A.S. programs also allow students to transfer to four-year institutions. Associate in Applied Science degree Courses of study leading to the Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree are designed to lead directly to employment in a specific occupational area. The career courses in these programs are linked to current practices in the work world. Certificate programs The College also offers a number of certificate programs that can be completed in one year if the prerequisites are met. Three levels of certificates are offered: Certificate of Achievement 24-29 credits Certificate of Accomplishment 15-23 credits Certificate of Recognition less than 15 credits Graduates earning the Certificate of Achievement will be recognized at Commencement.

Planning and Managing Course Load Planning an Academic Program Earning credit outside the classroom Prior Experiential Learning Student Academic Rights and Responsibilities Special Student Policies Accreditation, student information, and legal statements

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181

183

184

185 185

186

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Academic Information
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General education requirements GRADING POLICIES Satisfactory Progress Index Calculating your GPA and SPI Dean’s List Minimum satisfactory completion rate for financial aid Special grade requirements Center for Developmental Education grading policy

General education requirements Entering a degree or certificate program at Bristol Community College means that you are committed both to expanding your general education and pursuing a career. At BCC, General Education is a core of courses that helps students strengthen their skills in reading, writing and mathematics, while increasing their awareness and appreciation of historical thinking, important social issues, and the role of languages, literature, science and the arts in our society.
The core courses for degree programs include:

Prior to the 1999-00, academic year differential point values (as shown above) were not assigned to plus (+) or minus (-) grades. Point values assigned to grades prior to Fall 1999 were: Grade A+, A, ASuperior 4.0 B+, B, BAbove Average 3.0 C+, C, CAverage 2.0 D+, D, DBelow Average 1.0 F Failure 0.0 N Course Continuing -The grade L (given for auditing a course) and S and U (given by the Center for Developmental Education) carry no points and are not figured into the grade point average. Refer to the section on the following page, “Center for Developmental Education grading policy,” for more details on the S and U. Refer to “Dropping a course” for the W grade, and to “Auditing a course” for the L grade under “Planning and Managing Course Load.” Mid-semester progress reports Faculty report mid-semester grades for students in day courses doing “D,” “F,” or “U” work at that time. Those students are notified by mail and are advised to see a counselor. Incomplete course work The mark of Incomplete (I) is given to a student if work in a class is unfinished because of illness, accident, or other unavoidable absence. To receive credit for the course, the student must complete and turn in the missing work by the last day of the semester that follows the semester in which the “I” was earned, regardless of whether the student is then enrolled at BCC. The student must arrange with the instructor or divisional assistant dean in the instructor’s absence to make up the deficiency. The arrangements must be made during the first three weeks of the semester following receipt of the Incomplete. Grade Point Average Letter grades are assigned the point values discussed in the section above, “Grades.” The Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated as follows: • The grade points earned for each course are calculated by multiplying the point value of the grade (from the table at left) by the

English 11, 12 History Arts and Humanities Behavioral and Social Sciences Mathematics Science

6 credits 6 credits 3 credits 3 credits 3-4 credits 3-4 credits

See page 190 or a list of specific courses that fulfill BCC’s general education requirement.

GRADING POLICIES
Grades Letter grades (A, B, C, D, F, L, N, S, U, W) are typically assigned. Pluses (+) and minuses (-) may be given at the discretion of the instructor. The grades shown below are assigned point values for the purpose of calculating the Grade Point Average (GPA) and the Satisfactory Progress Index (SPI). The section on Grade Point Average explains how to use SPI.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

Grade A B C D F

Plus (+) 4 3.3 2.3 1.3 --

4 3 2 1 0

Minus (-) 3.7 2.7 1.7 0.7 --

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Academic Information number of credits for the course. For example, a “B+” (point value = 3.3) earned in a 4-credit course in Fall ’99 or later earns 13.2 grade points (3.3 points x 4 credits). • The semester’s Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated by adding the grade points earned in all courses that semester, and then dividing by the total credits involved in those courses. See example below. • The cumulative GPA is found by adding grade points so far earned in courses taken for the student’s program and dividing by the total credits. Courses with grades of “I,” “L,” “S,” “U,” and “W” are not considered. Satisfactory Progress Index The Satisfactory Progress Index (SPI) is a measure of a student’s academic progress toward a degree. The SPI is calculated in the same manner as the Grade Point Average, except that courses with grades of “I,” “U” and “W” are included. No grade points are earned for these courses, but they are counted in total credits attempted. The semester’s SPI, therefore, is calculated by adding the grade points earned in all courses that semester and then dividing by the total credits attempted in those courses, including courses for which the student received grades of “I,” “U,” and “W.” The cumulative SPI is calculated based on courses taken since the Fall 1994 semester. Calculating your GPA and SPI: A student who receives these grades in 3 courses would calculate GPA and SPI as follows: Credits Grade Point Value Grade Points 1st Course 4 B 3 12 2nd Course 3 C 2 6 3rd Course 3 W 0 0 To calculate the GPA for the example given, add grade points earned (12 + 6) and divide by credits for the courses in which they were earned (4 +3). GPA = grade points earned in all courses = 18 = 2.57 GPA total credits in those courses 7 To calculate the SPI for the example given, add grade points earned as above (12 + 6) but divide by credits for all classes taken (4 + 3 + 3). SPI = grade points earned in all courses = 18 = 1.80 SPI total credits in those courses 10 Note: Grades such as “W,” “I,” and “U” carry no point value but will cause the SPI to be lower than the GPA. Dean’s List The Dean’s List recognizes students who achieve a semester GPA (grade point average) of 3.2 or better with a load of 12 credits or more and no grade below “C.” Minimum satisfactory completion rate for financial aid: Students receiving Federal financial assistance (Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work Study, Perkins Loan, Federal Family Education Loan Program, and other financial aid programs offered by the College) must maintain satisfactory academic progress toward the completion of their degree or certificate program. Refer to financial aid regulations in the Student Handbook for more information. Special grade requirements Students in Occupational Therapy Assistant, Nursing, Medical Assisting, Dental Hygiene, Early Childhood Education, Phlebotomy, Healthcare Information, Clinical Laboratory Science, Complementary Healthcare, Therapeutic Massage, Histology, and Office Administration career programs must meet the special grade requirements of their programs as described in the respective program description. Students failing to meet these requirements in subject area courses are reviewed at the end of the semester by the program director and faculty teaching the courses. The program director will make recommendations to those students regarding their future course of study and give those recommendations to the Dean of Academic Affairs, the chair of the Academic Standing Committee and the Dean of Enrollment Services. Center for Developmental Education grading policy To successfully complete a course in the individualized learning lab (self-paced mode), students must earn a grade of “C-” or better for the three-credit course. These grades are equivalent to the values discussed in the “Grades” section. Those who do not complete the learning lab in one semester and who maintain satisfactory progress receive an “S” grade for the non-degree credit developmental course. The “S” grade does not apply toward a degree, and the student must re-enroll in the developmental course. Students who do not complete a learning lab course in one academic year (two semesters) receive a “U” for the course and do not receive credit. For more information on the Center for Developmental Education, refer to that section in the Quest for Success program listing.

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Official grades ACADEMIC STANDING Satisfactory academic progress Academic Probation Dismissal Appeals process Reinstatement Dismissed non-degree students Withdrawal Policy Continuous Enrollment Policy Readmittance to the College Fresh Start Program GRADUATION

Some courses offered by CDE have additional exit requirements, including demonstration of competency on college tests. Refer to course descriptions for RDG 09, 10; ESL 22, 23, 24, 25. Official grades Official grades are kept by the Registrar. No grade can be changed without the written approval of the course instructor.

ACADEMIC STANDING
Satisfactory academic progress All matriculated students attending the College are expected to make satisfactory academic progress toward a degree. Students who do not maintain an acceptable cumulative Satisfactory Progress Index (SPI), as specified in the table below, will either be placed on academic probation or be academically dismissed. Students who do not maintain satisfactory progress cannot hold elected or appointed positions in any college activity. Academic Probation The academic probation policy is designed to help identify students in academic difficulty as early as possible. Then, if needed, the College can provide the appropriate services to help students make satisfactory progress toward their degrees. Students on academic probation may take no more than thirteen (13) credits per semester, and may be required to repeat courses in which they have received grades of “D” and “F.” Dismissal Students whose SPIs fall below the probation level, or whose GPAs fall below the levels shown in the table below, will be subject to dismissal from the College and withdrawn from any courses for which they preregistered. Dismissals are made at the end of the Fall and Spring semesters. Total No. of Credit Hours Attempted* 15 or less 16-30 31-45 46 and above Satisfactory Progress SPI at or above 1.2 1.5 1.8 2.0 Academic Probation SPI From -To 0.0-1.19 1.0-1.49 1.2-1.79 1.2-1.99 Dismissal** SPI GPA below below 1.0 1.40 1.2 1.70 1.2 1.80

Please note the following: 1. Students are ineligible to receive financial aid if their Satisfactory Progress Index falls below the dismissal level or if the minimum satisfactory completion rate is below the level mandated by federal guidelines. The Student Handbook explains the Financial Aid policy. 2. Full-time students will have a maximum of four years to complete their degree requirements. The time frame for part-time students will be prorated. 3. Students will be required to attain a minimum GPA of 2.0 for graduation. Appeals process Dismissed students may appeal to the Dean of Academic Affairs within one (1) week of the date of their dismissal letter for a hearing to request reinstatement. Students who appeal must come before the Academic Standing Committee with a written statement explaining the reasons why they should be reinstated. Appeals are heard in January and June. The Committee will review each student’s entire academic record and any documented special circumstances the student provides. The Committee will make its recommendations to the Dean of Academic Affairs. If the Dean does not receive a request for a hearing within one week of the date of the letter of dismissal, s/he will conclude that the student has accepted dismissal. Reinstatement Students who, based on their appeals, are reinstated, will be placed on probation and their classes will be restricted by the conditions imposed by the Committee and the Dean of Academic Affairs. They will be monitored by the Connections Center, will register for classes based on the recommendations of the Academic Standing Committee, and will continue to receive developmental advising. Students reinstated on academic probation may be required to take developmental courses, to repeat courses with grades of “C-”, “D”, “F”, “U”, “I“ and “W,” and/or to restrict the number of credits they take. Dismissed non-degree students Students who do not attend an appeal hearing or whose appeal is denied by the Academic Standing Committee may take classes only as non-degree students. Non-degree students are not eligible for Financial Aid. These students may be readmitted to a degree program after attaining a GPA and SPI above the dismissal level indicated in the accompanying table, by applying for re-admission to a College program after two semesters from the date of dismissal, or by appealing to the Academic Standing Committee through the Dean of Academic Affairs. Students wishing to apply for re-admission to the College must do so through the Admissions office.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

*credits for which the student is registered at the completion of the add/drop period. **No student will be dismissed as a result of poor first-semester academic progress.

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Academic Information Withdrawal Policy Students withdrawing from any course must complete a course withdrawal form and forward it to the Enrollment Center. Students may also obtain forms in Advisement and Counseling Services. Students who plan to withdraw from all courses should arrange for an exit interview with a counselor. Those who want to withdraw from Clinical Laboratory Science, Complementary Health Care, Culinary Arts, Dental Hygiene, General Studies Prep/QUEST, Healthcare Information, Histology, Medical Assisting, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Phlebotomy, Pre-Radiology Technology or Therapeutic Massage should talk with the program’s director. Failure to follow the withdrawal policy may result in students receiving failing grades, being placed on academic probation, or academic dismissal. Students who must withdraw for personal, medical, or financial reasons should meet with a counselor to complete the withdrawal process. Continuous Enrollment Policy Except for competitive admissions programs, matriculated and registered students in good standing will be allowed to retain their program of study throughout three consecutive semesters (including Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters) with no registration activity. After the third non-registration semester, students will be dropped from their program of study and will be required to reapply through the Admissions Office to regain active matriculation in an academic degree or certificate program. Students in competitive admissions programs (Complementary Healthcare, Dental Hygiene, Clinical Laboratory Science, Culinary Arts, Healthcare Information, Histology, Medical Assisting, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Phlebotomy, Pre-Radiology Technology and Therapeutic Massage) must reapply after a break in Fall or Spring semester attendance. Readmission to these programs will be subject to space availability and the specific readmission policies of individual programs. International students are cautioned that INS policies regarding nonenrollment supercede College policies. For information about this policy, contact the Registrar. Readmittance to the College A student who has withdrawn and desires to reenter the College must reapply to the Admissions Office. Readmittance to a program is not guaranteed. Fresh Start Program Students returning to the College after an absence of at least three years may request to participate in the Fresh Start Program. If the requirements for participation are met, grades for courses taken before the three-year absence are still listed on the transcript but are excluded from the calculation of the student’s cumulative grade point average (GPA) and satisfactory progress index (SPI). To be eligible, students must: 1. Be accepted into a degree or certificate program in the Fall 2001 semester or later. 2. Have been absent with no recorded grades at Bristol for a minimum of three years. 3. Successfully complete 12 credits of course work with a GPA of 2.0 or better. Students must apply for the Fresh Start Program in the first month of the Fall or Spring semester following completion of the 12th credit. Courses taken before the three-year absence will count toward the degree or certificate if applicable in the student’s program and if the grade earned was C- or better. These credits are subject to the 30-credit maximum for transfer credits. Courses taken before the three-year absence for which a student received a grade lower than C- will not count toward the degree or certificate. More information about this program and applications are available through the Academic Dean’s Office, Admissions Office, Advisement Office, Records Office, the Enrollment Center, at the New Bedford Campus, and Attleboro Center.

GRADUATION
To be eligible for the Associate in Arts degree (A.A.), the Associate in Science degree (A.S.), or Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.), students are recommended by the faculty if they: 1. Complete at least 60 credits (excluding developmental courses) of passing work. 2. Fulfill course requirements established in the selected program of study. 3. Earn a GPA of at least 2.0 in work taken at the College applicable to their program. 4. Complete at least 30 semester hours at the College. 5. File an application for graduation. Intent to graduate forms are available in the Enrollment Center.

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Graduation honors Academic Achievement Awards Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society PLANNING AND MANAGING COURSE LOAD Placements tests Writing Reading Mathematics English as a Second Language Attendance Course load Final examinations Registering for courses Dropping a course Auditing a course Repeating a course PLANNING AN ACADEMIC PROGRAM Length of program

Graduation honors Associate degree students who maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.2 to 3.49 will graduate “Cum Laude,” a GPA of 3.5 to 3.79 “Magna Cum Laude,” and a GPA of 3.8 or higher “Summa Cum Laude.” Honors designations at graduation are based on academic performance through the Fall semester prior to the June graduation ceremony. Final honors designations include all coursework and are printed on the student’s official College transcript. Academic Achievement Awards Students who maintain a cumulative GPA of 4.0 will receive an Academic Achievement Award when all program requirements are met. Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society Phi Theta Kappa is the national honor society of American community and junior colleges. BCC’s chapter is known as Beta Eta Phi. The purpose of this society is to recognize and encourage scholarship among community college students. Candidates are selected in the fall and spring of each academic year. They must be currently enrolled in a degree program at the college and have accumulated 24 or more BCC credits with a 3.5 or better cumulative average. Membership qualifies students to apply for special scholarships at many four-year institutions. These area colleges and universities offer PTK scholarships to transfer students: Boston University Bryant University Clark University Endicott College Harvard University Extention School Johnson & Wales University Lasell College Lesley College Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts Mount Holyoke College Mount Ida College Northeastern University Regis College Roger Williams University Smith College Suffolk University Western New England College Wellesley College

of the assessment, in conjunction with academic background information, are used by college advisors to help students choose courses prior to registration. Should developmental work be necessary, you’ll receive help to select the courses you need. Writing Satisfactory performance on the English Placement test or in ENG 10, Basic Writing Skills, is necessary to enroll in ENG 11, College Writing. Those students whose scores indicate that they need additional work in writing will be placed in ENG 10. Reading Students who perform below the required level on the reading skills test must successfully complete RDG 09, Fundamentals of Reading Development, and/or RDG 10, College Reading and Learning Strategies, before the end of their second semester. Mathematics Students who perform below the required level on the arithmetic test must successfully complete MTH 01, Arithmetic. Students who score below the required level on the elementary algebra test must successfully complete MTH 1N, MTH 4N, or MTH 07, depending on their math background and academic program. English as a Second Language Students who enter the College through the English-as-a-Second-Language program must complete appropriate placement tests administered by the Director of Student Testing and Assessment upon completion of the ESL program. Those who perform below the required level on the assessment tests will be required to complete ENG 10 and/or RDG 10 as appropriate. Attendance Attending every class meeting is important to your success in college. Guidelines for attendance are established by the faculty within a department or program, with the approval of the divisional assistant dean. Instructors provide students with that attendance policy in writing by the end of the first week of classes, including how excused and unexcused absences will affect grades. Faculty members take attendance for each class session. It is the student’s responsibility to know the attendance policy in each class and laboratory. Unless an announcement is made to the contrary, a class is considered dismissed if the instructor does not appear within fifteen minutes of the beginning of a class period. Students who expect to be absent for an extended period due to illness, accident, or other unavoidable problem should notify the Dean of Enrollment Services.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

PLANNING AND MANAGING COURSE LOAD
Placement Tests All students entering a degree or certificate program are required by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education to take assessment tests in order to ensure appropriate placement in classes. The tests assess students’ skill levels in reading, writing and mathematics. The results

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Academic Information Students who attend a field trip should make arrangements with their other course instructors to make up any assignments missed on that day. Those who cannot attend classes, take an exam, study, or fulfill class assignments on a particular day because of their religious beliefs will be given an opportunity to make up their work at the convenience of the instructor. Students cannot be penalized for taking advantage of this right. Course load A full-time course load is 12 credit hours or more a semester. Students on academic probation can register for no more than 13 credits. A load of five courses (15 to 17 credit hours) is considered to be the normal load, although in some programs more credits may be required in some semesters to complete the program within two years. Honor students (3.2 or higher average) may register for six courses (18-20 credit hours). Requests for exceptions may be made in writing to the Academic Standing Committee. Plan for at least two to three hours of study for each class hour. A student carrying 15 credits, for example, should schedule 30 to 45 hours for study each week. Final examinations Final examination, including projects and other evaluation activities, are given during the week following the end of classes each semester. Final examinations can be made up only for compelling reasons, such as accidents or sickness, and with the permission of the instructor. A physician’s certificate may be required if the reason is medical. A student who misses a final examination is responsible for contacting the instructor and arranging to take the exam during the scheduled make-up and conflict period or at another time. If the instructor is not available the student should contact the appropriate divisional assistant dean. Registering for courses Students may register for classes at any time during the registration period. All students are to be registered in courses by the end of the first week of classes. No course changes will be permitted after that time, except with written approval of the faculty member concerned. Course change forms may be obtained in the Advisement Center or the Enrollment Center. Dropping a course Students who need to adjust their schedules due to a change in program or other reason may do so during the registration period and through the first week of classes. After the first week of classes student cannot add a class without instructor authorization. Students may drop any course through the second week of classes without penalty. After the second week of classes any student who drops a class will receive a grade of “W” (see “Withdrawal Policy”). To receive a “W,” students must consult a counselor and the instructor by or before the tenth week of classes. The counselor and instructor sign a withdrawal form signifying that the consultations have occurred. Withdrawal forms also are available in the Advisement/Counseling Center. A grade of either “W” or “F” may be assigned at the discretion of the instructor to any student who withdraws from a course or from the College after the tenth week of classes. Forms must be forwarded to the Enrollment Center. Auditing a course A student may audit a single course for no credit with the consent of the instructor. A student may register for audit one week prior to the start of class through the Drop/Add period. No grade is given, but the notation of “L” is made on the permanent record. A student may repeat a course for credit the next semester after auditing a course. Repeating a course Students receiving a “C-” or “D” or “F” for a course may repeat the course once. The grade received on the second attempt becomes official. Courses in which the student receives a “C” or higher cannot be repeated for credit. Students who wish to repeat clinical courses must apply for readmission to the program.

PLANNING AN ACADEMIC PROGRAM
Length of program Full-time students with appropriate high school credits can complete the requirements for an associate’s degree in two years. However, some students may need to make up deficiencies in certain areas. Others change their concentration or major or withdraw from one or more courses. Students who work may take fewer courses per semester. Any of these reasons may make it necessary for a student to spend more than four semesters at BCC. Courses may be taken in the summer for students who wish to shorten their time at BCC.

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Changes of Program Transferring from a certificate program Transferring credits into BCC programs Earning a second degree from BCC Center for Developmental Education Service-Learning Honors Program Graduation requirements for Honors Scholars EARNING CREDIT OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM Cooperative Education Contract Learning Directed Study

Changes of program Students may change their program or areas of concentration only with the approval of their advisor or a counselor. If a student is enrolled in a career program, then the appropriate divisional assistant dean must also approve the change. Change of program forms are available in the Enrollment Center and the Advisement and Counseling Center. Upon acceptance into a new program, students submit a copy of their transcript to the receiving chairperson to determine which courses apply. Grades already received in courses not applicable to the new program are omitted in computing the student’s GPA but remain on the permanent record. However, all grades already received in courses required in the new program are included in the GPA. Transfer into certain programs, such as Culinary Arts, Clinical Laboratory Science, Complementary Healthcare, Dental Hygiene, Medical Assisting, Healthcare Information, Histology, Nursing, Occupational Therapy Assistant, Phlebotomy, Pre-Radiology Technology, and Therapeutic Massage may be limited by space available as well as by the competitive nature of these programs. Please refer to the description of the program of interest for additional information on admission requirements and the academic background of competitive applicants. Students currently enrolled in a BCC degree or certificate program must fill out an internal transfer request and submit it to the Admission Office by January 15 for priority admissions consideration. All programs will be filled on space-available basis. Transferring from a certificate program Students who complete a certificate program and who wish to enroll in a degree program must complete an application at the Admissions Office.

ation requirements in the selected curriculum. Exceptions may be granted by petition. For certificate programs, half the required credits must be earned at BCC. To receive credit for courses taken at any other institution while enrolled at BCC, students must obtain approval in advance. Forms are available in the Enrollment Center. Completed forms should be accompanied by the catalog from the other institution. The student must arrange to have transcripts of approved courses sent to the Registrar’s Office within six weeks of completing the course(s). Earning a second degree from BCC To qualify for a second associate’s degree, a student must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours beyond the first degree and meet all specific degree requirements of the second program. Center for Developmental Education Refer to the program description of the Center for Developmental Education, starting on page 49 for the General Studies Prep and TRiO/QUEST for Success programs. Service-Learning The Service-Learning program at BCC offers students a unique opportunity to combine classroom theory in any discipline with community practice in a non-profit agency and, at the same time, to develop a sense of social responsibility. While some community colleges require a minimum of 20 hours per service-learning experience over a semester, BCC requires a minimum of 10 hours. Along with performing the service itself, students complete one or more reflective exercises chosen by their instructor to enhance understanding of course content, appreciation of the discipline, and sense of civic engagement. Some BCC faculty incorporate service-learning into their syllabi as a requirement; others offer it as an option. If a student has a particular service-learning experience in mind but cannot find a course for it, s/he may be able to do it via Contract Learning (see Contract Learning on the next page). Many four-year colleges and universities require or strongly encourage service-learning, and prospective employers also look favorably on service-learning and other experiential learning activities. Students who successfully complete service-learning will receive recognition of the activity on their academic transcripts by the notation “Service-Learning Component Course” following the course title and grade.

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accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

Transferring credits into BCC programs Students who transfer into BCC from another regionally accredited college or university usually receive credit for courses that apply to their program with a grade of “C-” or better. Students may meet up to 30 credits of degree program requirements with credits transferred from another accredited college or university and/or credits earned through Prior Experiential Learning. (See page 184.) To qualify for a BCC degree, a transfer student must complete at least 30 of the last 36 credits required at the College and fulfill gradu-

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Academic Information Honors Program The Honors Program at BCC offers intellectually challenging experiences to highly motivated and gifted students in every discipline. It allows students to customize their experience in the Honors Program to their own individual needs and desires. The honors student works one-on-one with dedicated faculty members crafting intellectually stimulating experiences appropriate for the individual student. This independent work and the experience of one-on-one work with a faculty member will better prepare the honors student to continue his or her education at a four-year institution. The Honors Program also engages students in activities that will encourage them to become independent thinkers and lifelong learners. Graduation requirements for Honors Scholars To graduate with an associate’s degree as an Honors Scholar, a student must meet all the following criteria: a. Meet all requirements for an associate degree in major/program. b. Earn a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA while at BCC. c. Earn a minimum of 30 credits completed at BCC. d. Participate in a minimum of 3 honors experiences (9 honors credits), with a grade of at least B. These honors experiences could either be honors courses or honors component courses. At least 2 of these honors experiences (6 honors credits) must be taken at BCC. In the honors credits, a student must take: – At least one interdisciplinary honors course (3 credits), for honors-level students only. – A minimum of one writing intensive honors experience (3 credits). – A minimum of one math, science, engineering, technologybased honors experience, or an honors experience appropriate for the student’s major field of study and academic area of interest. (3 credits) One honors experience could satisfy more than one of the above requirements. Lists of appropriate honors experiences to satisfy the above requirements are developed by the Honors Committee in consultation with individual departments. e. Complete an honors project (or possibly a thesis), directed by a faculty member, involving independent research. This onecredit culminating experience could grow from one of the three honors experiences, but it does not have to follow that path. Students may be required to present their projects as part of an honors day seminar.

EARNING CREDIT OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
Cooperative Education Cooperative Education combines classroom learning and work-based learning related to the student’s field of study. Students enroll in classes, work at their Co-op jobs at least 15 hours per week, and earn 3 credits for their work. Students may also participate in Co-op in the summer. To enroll in Co-op, students must be at the sophomore level and participate in a weekly Co-op seminar. The Cooperative Education office will help students find appropriate positions. Those currently working in a job related to their program of study may apply to convert that job to a Co-op work experience. Each Co-op student and his/her faculty advisor and employer will develop a learning agreement with specific objectives to assess the student’s performance on Co-op. This agreement will relate classroom theory and personal career goals to the Co-op experience. Contract Learning For students who want to investigate personal academic interests or pursue more experimental methods of learning, the College offers a flexible credit format where students can create part of their own study program. Advisors work with the student to determine plans, identify appropriate resource people, and write a learning contract. The contract includes the student’s goals, how and when s/he intends to accomplish them, and how that work will be evaluated. The credits earned are determined by the work proposed and may not total more than one-eighth of total credit hours required for graduation. Students register for CTL 99 with the Enrollment Center. Tuition is based on the number of credits determined through the learning contract. Proposals must be signed by the student, the advisor, the appropriate divisional assistant dean, and the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Credit will be awarded only if approval is granted before the student starts the project. Directed study A directed study is an independent study course, under the sponsorship of a faculty member, that meets the objectives of a regular course offering. Directed study permits a matriculated student to enroll in a required course needed to graduate provided neither the regular course nor its equivalent is available. A directed study course requires the approval of the instructor, the appropriate divisional assistant dean, and the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Credit for a directed study course is equivalent to credit for a regular course offering. Approval forms are available in the Enrollment Center. Students with approved directed study forms must register through the Enrollment Center. Tuition based on the number of credits approved will be charged at that time.

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Academic Information
ON THESE TWO PAGES
PRIOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING Credit by Examination College Level Examination Program and Advanced Placement Program Credit by department/program examination Credit by Evaluation National Guides Credit by Credential Programs Approved by BCC Credit by Experience STUDENT ACADEMIC RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Appealing academic regulations Academic negligence Classroom Conduct Disciplinary action SPECIAL STUDENT POLICIES Underage Student Policy

PRIOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING
Students may meet up to 30 credits of degree program requirements with credits earned through Prior Experiential Learning and/or credits transferred from another accredited college or university. For more information on the Prior Experiential Learning (PEL) process, contact the PEL administrator at ext. 3043 or the department chair, program coordinator, or divisional assistant dean for the discipline in which you seek PEL credit. Each of these individuals, or a faculty or professional staff member, may serve as a PEL advisor. There are three PEL Options: Credit by Examination, Credit by Credential, and Credit by Experience. Credit by Examination College Level Examination Program and Advanced Placement Program The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Advanced Placement (AP) Program offer students an opportunity to receive college credit for subject matter learned through means other than formal college work. The CLEP Subject Matter, CLEP General, and AP Examinations are applicable for credit. Students may obtain information regarding CLEP and AP examinations through the Dean of Academic Affairs. Bridgewater State College is a CLEP examination center. Credit by department/program examination A student may receive credit for some BCC courses by passing a comprehensive examination prepared by the department or program in which the course is being offered. Any student who has been formally accepted into a degree program at Bristol Community College and has completed the course prerequisites or received permission from the program director/department chairperson may take the examinations. Students must request these exams if they want to take them. Credit granted for comprehensive examinations will not have a letter grade assigned. The credit earned cannot by used to raise grades or remove failures in courses already taken. Students must meet department criteria in the taking of these exams. They are responsible to discuss these criteria with the department chair or program director. Arrangements and registration for credit by examination must be made through the appropriate PEL advisor, department chair, program coordinator or divisional assistant dean. Additional information concerning the complete credit-by-examination policy and fees can be obtained by contacting the Enrollment Services office or the PEL Administrator at ext. 3043.

Credit by Evaluation Students may earn equivalent course credit for prior experiences, including instruction sponsored by the military, business and industry, public and private agencies, associations and educational institutions, and licensure preparation by regulatory agencies and associations. National Guides Credit for non-collegiate courses and educational experiences in the armed services may be awarded according to the recommendations in the National Guide to Credit Recommendations for Non-collegiate Courses, the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services, the Directory of the National Program of Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI), and the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs of the American Council on Education. A student who submits official documentation attesting to the completion of a course(s) listed in one of these publications will be awarded appropriate elective credit by the Director of Admissions or the Registrar. If the credit award involves course equivalent credit, approval of the appropriate divisional assistant dean and department chairperson is required. Credit by Credential Programs Approved by BCC Students may earn course credit for programs listed in the PEL Manual, available in the Enrollment Center, all division offices, and in the main office at the New Bedford campus and the Attleboro Center. Equivalent course credit(s) may be granted for Credit by Credential programs in fields such as computer technology and programming, manufacturing methods and processes, electronics, public speaking, income tax preparation, health care, management, fire fighting, and environmental technology. Contact the Prior Experiential Learning Administrator for information. The Police Career Incentive Pay Program (PCIPP), an Amendment to section 18L of chapter 41 of the Massachusetts General Laws, delegated to the Board of Higher Education (BHE) the authority to establish guidelines for programs pursued for police career incentive pay increases. The BHE has subsequently adopted new standards which DO NOT allow for: • Academic credit to be granted for life experience or military, police academy, or other training; • Academic credit for knowledge-based testing (CLEP, DANTES, etc.) to exceed 6 credit hours or; • Tech-prep

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Academic Information Credit by Experience In order to obtain an award of Credit by Experience, students present a written portfolio documenting college-level competencies acquired through educational, vocational, or personal experiences. The Prior Experiential Learning Coordinator initially evaluates the portfolio to determine comparability to required or elective courses in the student’s program of study. All credit is evaluated on a course-by-course basis and must be approved by the department chair/program director in consultation with the assistant dean of the appropriate division and the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Contact the Prior Experiential Learning Administrator or the appropriate department chair, program coordinator, or divisional assistant dean for information. Classroom Conduct Disruptive or distracting classroom behavior is a violation of the college’s student Code of Conduct. A faculty member has the right to remove a disruptive student from class, pending a review of the situation by the Dean of Enrollment Services. Any faculty member may, at any time, refer a student to the Dean of Enrollment Services if the student is in violation of the Code of Conduct. The Dean of Enrollment Services may impose disciplinary sanctions against the offending student consistent with the rules and regulations of the Code of Conduct. Please refer to the Code of Conduct section in the Student Handbook for additional information. Disciplinary action The College may take disciplinary action ranging from a warning to suspension or expulsion from the College if a student is determined to have violated College rules and regulations. Refer to the “Disciplinary Sanctions” section of the Student Handbook.

STUDENT ACADEMIC RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
All BCC students are expected to conduct themselves as mature college students seriously interested in obtaining the best possible education. This includes observing the College’s academic rules and regulations, respecting the rights of others, and practicing academic integrity. In return, the College seeks to provide an environment where the freedom to learn and interact can be nurtured and encouraged. To do that, the College respects and defends the rights of free speech and assembly and will protect such rights for all its members. Appealing academic regulations Matriculated students (those enrolled in a degree or certificate program) have the right to petition for exceptions to the academic regulations of the College. This right, however, does not mean automatic approval of the exception. When appropriate, faculty members may petition on behalf of the student. To appeal a regulation, a petition with appropriate documentation, including a student’s transcript, signed by the student’s advisor, the appropriate department chairperson, and the program director, should be submitted to the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. Replies can be expected within approximately 45 days. Petitions should be submitted by April 1 to guarantee action by the end of the academic year. Petition forms may be obtained from the Advisement/Counseling Center. Academic negligence Academic negligence is demonstrated by failure to do assigned work, by excessive absences, or by academic dishonesty. Any faculty member may, at any time, recommend in writing to the Dean of Academic Affairs that a student guilty of academic negligence be dropped from a course with a grade of “W” or “F.”

SPECIAL STUDENT POLICIES
Underage Student Policy Students below the traditional age-level for college are welcome at Bristol Community College, but they need to comply with the following policies and procedures in order to attend. High school seniors may register as non-degree students. High school juniors must obtain a letter of approval from their principal, guidance counselor, or Tech Prep coordinator before registering as non-degree students. All students enrolled in high school who will be attending classes during the day must obtain a letter of approval from their principal or guidance counselor. Home schooled students need to provide documentation of a home school plan approved by the school district in which they reside. Underage students (i.e., those who have not yet reached the age of 16) or those students who are home schooled will be considered on a case-by-case basis. A parent or the student should obtain the Under-Age Request to Enroll form from Enrollment Services and make the request in writing. This application must be approved by the instructor and/or department chair, the Divisional Assistant Dean, and the Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs. The College reserves the right to limit or deny enrollment of a student under the age of sixteen (16) in a course or program based on its case-bycase consideration of a variety of factors, including but not limited to: the student’s maturity, life experience, placement test scores, prior education, course content, instructional methodology, and risks or requirements associated with a particular course or program.

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Academic Information
ON THESE TWO PAGES
Home Schooling Policy ACCREDITATION, STUDENT INFORMATION, AND LEGAL STATEMENTS Notice of College Regulations College accreditation Release of student information Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act Student rights Criminal Offender Record Information and Sex Offender Registry Information Checks

All students under the age of 18 who require accommodations for a disability must contact the Office of Disability Services at least three weeks prior to registration. Reasonable accommodations will be mutually determined by both the College and the sending school. The student’s sending school must agree to reimburse the College for the cost of any required accommodations. Note: Enrollment in a particular course at BCC is not the same as matriculation. To be eligible for financial aid at BCC, a student must be matriculated into a program. For more information, students should contact the Office of Admissions, by accessing the College’s website (www.bristol.mass.edu), sending an e-mail to [email protected], or calling 508-678-2811 ext. 2516. Home Schooling Policy All home-schooled students without a high school diploma or GED are eligible to apply for admission to a degree or certificate program provided they have successfully completed an approved home school program in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws or the laws of their home state. If a home-schooled student has not completed an approved home school program, then the student will not be eligible to enroll in a degree or certificate program until he/she has taken and passed a federally approved Ability-to-Benefit Test. As high school students may self-certify their completion of a public or private high school program, home-schooled students may selfcertify their completion of an approved home school program. So that the College may determine whether a student has participated in an approved home school program, the student shall submit, with the application for admission, evidence that the home school program was approved by the student’s school district’s superintendent or school committee. Additionally, if the home-schooled student is under the age of compulsory attendance, which is sixteen (16) years old in Massachusetts, a letter from the student’s school district’s superintendent or school committee is required stating that the student is not considered truant and would not be required to attend further schooling or continue to be home schooled if the student has completed his/her home school program before the age of sixteen (16). The College reserves the right to limit or deny enrollment of a student under the age of sixteen (16) in a course or program based on its case-by-case consideration of a variety of factors, including but not limited to: the student’s maturity, life experience, placement test scores, prior education, course content, instructional methodology, and risks associated with a particular course or program.

ACCREDITATION, STUDENT INFORMATION, AND LEGAL STATEMENTS
Notice of College regulations The regulations and policies listed throughout this catalog and in other official statements of the College are binding on all students. The College reserves the right to withdraw, modify, or add to the courses offered or to change the order or content of courses in any curriculum. Any changes made shall be applicable to all students in the College, including former students who reenroll. Proper notification will be made of any changes through official channels and/or notices posted on the bulletin boards. College accreditation Bristol Community College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc., a non-governmental, nationally recognized organization whose affiliated institutions include elementary schools through collegiate institutions offering postgraduate instruction. Accreditation of an institution by the New England Association indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a peer group review process. An accredited school or college is one which has available the necessary resources to achieve its stated purposes through appropriate educational programs, is substantially doing so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will continue to do so in the foreseeable future. Institutional integrity is also addressed through accreditation. Accreditation by the New England Association is not partial but applies to the institution as a whole. As such, it is not a guarantee of every course or program offered, or the competence of individual graduates. Rather, it provides reasonable assurance about the quality of opportunities available to students who attend the institution. Inquiries regarding the status of an institution’s accreditation by the New England Association should be directed to the administrative staff of the school or college. Individuals may also contact the Association: Commission of Higher Education; New England Association of Schools and Colleges; 209 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730, (781)271-0022. Release of student information Bristol Community College designates the following categories of student information as public or “Directory Information.” Such information may be disclosed by the institution for any purpose, at its discretion.

Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass. edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

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Academic Information Category I Name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, class Category II Previous institutions attended, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred (including dates). Category III Past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight of athletes), date and place of birth. Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended. To withhold disclosure, students must submit written notification to the Registrar’s Office prior to the tenth day in a given semester. Forms requesting the withholding of “Directory Information” are available in the Enrollment Center. Bristol Community College assumes that failure on the part of any student to specifically request the withholding of categories on “Directory Information” indicates individual approval for disclosure. The Department of Defense identifies the following information as student recruiting information: student names, addresses, and telephone listings; and if known, students’ ages, levels of education, majors. If a student chooses not to exercise his/her right to refuse to permit the College to disclose the student’s record information, the College will release upon request to the Department of Defense, or an agency thereof, that student information which the Department of Defense has designated as student recruiting information. When student information is released pursuant to a Department of Defense request, notice of the request and the release of student information will be posted in a conspicuous location in the Registrar’s Office for the period of one academic year. Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act Information and statistics regarding incidence of crime on campus are updated regularly in accordance with the law. Information is available upon request in the Campus Security Office, and published each year in the Safety, Security, and Crime Prevention Handbook. Student rights Refer to the Student Rights, Responsibilities, Conduct, Disciplinary Due Process, and Related Policies and Procedures section of the Student Handbook. Criminal Offender Record Information and Sex Offender Registry Information Checks Students interested in participating in an academic program that involves working with children, the disabled, or the elderly, or includes a clinical affiliation with a private or public health care provider, may be required to undergo a Criminal Offender Record Information (CORI) check and/or a Sex Offender Registry Information (SORI) check. Depending on the contents of a student’s CORI or SORI reports, participation in an academic program, or clinical affiliation related thereto, may be denied. CORI checks may be performed pursuant to Mass. General Laws, Chapter 6, Sections 167-178B, and consistent with guidelines promulgated by the Executive Office for Health and Human Services, and/or the Commonwealth’s Department of Public Health. SORI checks may be performed pursuant to Mass. General Laws, Chapter 6, Section 178C. For more information, please contact the Director of Human Resources.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION
For more information about distance learning courses, contact the Office of Distance Learning at (508) 678-2811, ext. 2850. You can also find information about distance learning courses on the Distance Learning web site at http//dl.mass.edu

Distance Learning
Distance learning courses can be fun, exciting, challenging, convenient, and enriching. They can provide a way for you to customize your learning experience to match your educational goals, learning style, and scheduling constraints. Bristol Community College offers five types of distance learning courses: Web courses, Hybrid (or Blended) courses, Interactive Television courses, Student Option Enrollment courses and Mass Colleges Online courses.

Distance Learning
Information online
accessBCC Students may register for courses and check their schedules, bills, and grades at www.bristol.mass.edu Link from home page to accessBCC Other information You can also find catalog descriptions, an application to download and print, and more.

Distance learning courses offer students opportunities to learn in new ways and make learning available to many who cannot attend a traditional class. In general, the successful distance learning student is self-motivated and self-disciplined, is able to communicate effectively through writing, and understands that distance learning courses are just as academically rigorous as traditional courses. Distance learning students understand that high quality learning can take place without going to a traditional classroom. If you are not certain whether distance learning is right for you, visit our Web site at http://dl.mass.edu and take our self-assessment. Web courses allow students to take courses by computer at home, work, or in our computer labs. Most web courses do not physically meet on campus at any time during the semester. Instruction and interaction occur through the online course environment and may include communication via email, chat, discussion board posts or blogging. Hybrid (or Blended) courses are a combination of online and face-to-face instruction. Students have regular face-to-face interaction with an instructor and their classmates throughout the semester. They also interact virtually in the online classroom through the use of email, discussion board postings, assignments and online quizzes and tests. Interactive Television courses allow students to take courses near home or work through state-of-the-art video technology. Each course is offered in multiple locations and students can attend class at the location that is most convenient for them. Each site is linked by special interactive technology that allows both groups to participate in real-time classroom activity.

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Distance Learning

Student Option Enrollment courses allow students to create a learning environment that is best for them. Students take courses in one of three ways. Option 1: Students complete the course as a traditional lecture course where attendance at each class meeting is required. Option 2: Students can complete the course completely online. Option 3: Students can create a hybrid course by combining traditional lecture sessions with web based instruction. Mass Colleges Online (MCO) courses are offered in collaboration with other community colleges. The course offerings compliment BCC distance learning offerings to make it easier for students to complete their program of study. Students register for MCO classes just like they register for any other class at the college and can obtain their textbook at the BCC bookstore. However, MCO courses are offered though a partner institution so students do not access their course materials via Bristol Community College’s WebCT learning management system. Instead, students enrolling in MCO courses will be contacted directly by their instructor via their accessBCC email address with information on how to access the course site. Please contact (508) 678-2811 x2387 or visit http://dl.mass.edu for more information.

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Pre-College Programs

MCAS Academy
At BCC, MCAS means My Choice for Academic Success. The MCAS Academy provides intensive one-to-one and small group instruction in mathematics and English Language Arts for individuals who haven’t yet passed the MCAS exams. In addition, the MCAS Academy offers free credit courses in college success strategies and career exploration. Instruction is offered at the Fall River campus in a convenient evening schedule during the academic year and in the morning during the summer. Students who complete the program are eligible to take the Ability to Benefit test and receive a voucher for a free college course. Many MCAS Academy graduates are now attending BCC. For more information, contact Kristin Kadlec at (508) 678-2811, ext. 2779.

Pre-College Programs

Tech Prep
The Bristol Tech Prep program coordinates the last two years of high school study with career and technical programs at BCC. High school students in Tech Prep may participate in various Career Days as well as competitions in Web Design and Computer Programming at BCC. Tech Prep students are eligible to participate in project-based learning at high-tech companies throughout the area. Students may take selected courses at BCC on a space-available basis at no cost, and earn guaranteed acceptance to approved BCC programs. Certain high school classes entitle Tech Prep students to be awarded college credits upon enrollment at BCC. Participating in the Tech Prep program in high school also better prepares students for study at other colleges. For more information, call Ted Boudria at 508 678-2811, extension 2339.

The Transition Program
The Transition Program provides support services and credit course work to students making the transition from GED and Adult Learning Center programs to college work at BCC. Students become part of a learning community and attend orientation, workshops, and classes as a group. The program includes supplemental instruction and a high level of support. For more information, contact Diane Desmarais at (508) 678-2811, ext. 2360.

Upward Bound
The Upward Bound Program is a national TRiO program annually serving 66 public high school students from Attleboro, Fall River, and Taunton. Year-round intensive academic services are provided to help eligible first-generation, low-income youth prepare for successful college entrance and persistence. The program includes a six-week summer residential academy, monthly Saturday classes at BCC, and weekly tutorials that include academic instruction, one-on-one tutoring, study skills, MCAS, SAT, and other college entrance test preparation workshops. Students also participate in field trips to museums, theatre and cultural events, college tours, leadership training, and volunteer service activities. More than 90 percent of Upward Bound participants have gone on to higher education. For further information, call Sarah Morrell at (508) 678-2811, ext. 2324.

Information online
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GENERAL INFORMATION
Academic credits The number of academic credits listed for each course is the number of credits earned in one semester with successful completion of that course. When courses are offered Descriptions state whether a course is customarily offered in the fall, the spring, or all three semesters. Check each semester’s course listings for additional offerings. Listings are available on the Web or from Enrollment Services (Commonwealth College Center). Descriptions may indicate that a course is offered “Day only” (beginning before 4 p.m. Mon-Fri) or “Evening/Weekend only.” Prerequisites “Prerequisite” means that the listed course(s) must be successfully completed with the indicated grade. A “corequisite” may be taken in the same semester.

Course descriptions
The following is a list of categories and courses which fulfill the College’s General Education requirements. Refer to Academic Information for a description of General Education. Course descriptions begin on the next page.

Course descriptions

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE PROGRAMS

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English: (6 credits) ENG 11 & ENG 12 History: (6 credits) Choose from one of the following sequences: • HST 11 & 12 (World and the West) • HST 13 & 14 (U.S. History) • HST 20 or 21 & HST 22 or 23 • AMC 11 & 12 (American CivilizationRevised SSC 11 & 12) Humanities and Arts: (3 credits) Choose from: • ART 11, 12 or 13 (Art) • ENG 17 or 30 (English) • FRN 01, 02, 11, or 12 (French) • HUM 51, 57, 58, 60, or 72 (Humanities) • MUS 11, 12 or 13 (Music) • PHL 51 or 52 (Philosophy) • POR 01, 02, 11, or 12 (Portuguese) • SCI 17 (Science) • SPA 01, 02, 11, 12 or 51 (Spanish) • SPH 11, 13 or 60 (Speech) • THE 11, 17, 18 or 19 (Theater) Behavioral & Social Sciences: (3 credits) Choose from: • ANT 11 (Anthropology) • ECN 11 or 12 (Economics) • GVT 11 or 51 (Government) • PSY 51 (Psychology) • SOC 11, 12, 51 or 52 (Sociology) • SSC 14 or 17 (Social Science)

Mathematics: (3 credits) Choose from: MTH 10, 19 or 25 (for Liberal Arts)
Notes: Existing MTH requirements will remain the same for all other programs. MTH 01, 1N, 4N, 07 and 08 may not be used to satisfy General Education requirements.

Science: For 3-credit science, choose from: • BIO 10, 16, 17, (Biology) • ENV 11 (Environmental Management) • SCI 17 (Science) For 4-credit lab science, choose from: • AST 11 (Astronomy) • BIO 11, 15 (fulfills general education science for Office Administration Medical option only), 21, 29, 33 or 54 (Biology) • CHM 11, 13, 15 or 16 (Chemistry) • GLG 16 (Geology) • PHY 01 or 11 (Physics) • SCI 11, 12, 13, 15, 18 or 19 (Science)

2007-2008

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Course descriptions with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ACC 55 Federal Taxation I This course provides a study of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals. Topics include income, including inclusions and exclusions; capital gains and losses; deductions and losses; itemized deductions; bad debts; employee expenses and deferred compensation; and preparation of returns for individuals, including sole proprietors. The course emphasizes decision making and tax planning. Prerequisite: ACC 12 with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ACC 56 Federal Taxation II This course completes the study of federal income tax laws as they apply to individuals, then moves on to corporations. Topics include depreciation, amortization and depletion, accounting periods and methods, property transactions, special tax computation methods, tax research, corporations, partnerships and S corporations, and investment planning. The course emphasizes decision making and tax planning. Prerequisite: ACC 55 with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ACC 57 Managerial Accounting This course examines the accountant’s role in the business organization. It covers cost-volumeprofit relationships with emphasis on break-even computations, profit planning, relevant costs and the contribution approach to short-term decisions, cost-behavior patterns, operational budgeting, financial budgeting, and capital budgeting. Students create management reports using Excel spreadsheet techniques. Prerequisite: ACC 12 with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Recommended: MAN 11 and MAR 11. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ACC 50 Small Business Financial Software This is an introductory course, which is recommended for any individual who would like to learn the basics of the most widely used financial software applications in small business today. It is designed for both business and nonbusiness students. Students are introduced to the latest version of QuickBooks Pro and the business applications of Excel Spreadsheet Analysis, including basic production of charts and macros. In addition, students explore several modern techniques and software used to interpret and present the results. Knowledge of accounting procedures is not necessary. This course emphasizes a hands-on approach to learning. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ACC 51 Intermediate Accounting I A study of accounting using comprehensive problems that expand the treatment of cash, receivables, investments, inventories, plant assets, current and long-term liabilities, and financial statements. The course involves Excel spreadsheets, financial analysis, and use of the Internet. Prerequisite: ACC 12 with a “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ACC 52 Intermediate Accounting II This course studies stockholders’ equity, contributed capital, treasury stock, retained earnings, dilutive shares and earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions and post-retirement benefits, statement of cash flows, full disclosure in financial reporting, and basic financial statement analysis. Prerequisite: ACC 51with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring ACC 53 Cost Accounting This course studies basic concepts and cost procedures as applied to any project-oriented enterprise. It examines job order and process cost systems and explores the relationship of cost accounting to control and decision-making functions of management. Prerequisite: ACC 12

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites.

ACCOUNTING
ACC 11 Principles of Accounting I The course focuses on the basic structure of financial record keeping. Attention is directed to journalizing, posting, preparation of the trial balance, adjusting, closing, and reversing entries, deferrals and accruals, use of special journals, receivables and payables, and payroll accounting. This course includes a computerized tutorial program. Pre- or Co-requisite: Passing grade on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01. Three class hours and one computer laboratory hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ACC 12 Principles of Accounting II This course is designed to complete the study of financial accounting. The course covers inventory systems; long-term assets, including plant and equipment; natural resources; intangibles; partnerships; limited liability companies; and corporations, including formation, issuance of stock and dividends, bonds payable, cash flow statements, and the techniques of financial analysis. Additionally, the course examines the consequences of business decisions. Hands-on computer applications are integrated into the course in a computerized classroom setting. Prerequisite: ACC 11 with “C” or better or permission of the department chair. Three class hours and one computer laboratory hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ACC 14 Introduction to QuickBooks Pro This is an introductory course to familiarize the student with the most widely used financial software in small business. It is recommended for any individual who would like to learn, hands on, how to record accounting data in a computerized environment. Topics presented include the basic procedural steps to process sales, purchases, banking transactions, reports, payroll, and budgets. Prior knowledge of accounting procedures is not necessary. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring

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Course descriptions ACC 58 Auditing This study of the audit function as performed by the outside public accounting firm covers all stages—planning the audit, gathering evidence, review of internal control provisions, development of working papers, analysis of accounts, and preparation of statements and audit reports. The ethics of the accounting profession are stressed throughout the course. Prerequisite: ACC 12 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring ACC 59 Analysis of Financial Statements This course examines accounting as a device for evaluating past and current business activity. It emphasizes common analytical measures such as vertical analysis, common-size statements, ratio analysis, working capital flows and cash flows. Other topics include proforma statements, operational and cash budgets, capital budgeting, and stock market fundamentals. Throughout the semester, students apply the fundamentals of each lesson to the financial statements of a real-life company of their individual choice. Prerequisite: ACC 12 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of department chair. Recommended: MAN 11 and MAR 11. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring AMC 12 American Civilization II Utilizing the interdisciplinary approach used in AMC 11, this course works toward an understanding of the United States in the historic context of the world since World War II. Themes of U.S. foreign policy that have emerged during this period are emphasized. A major focus of the course is the American experience with the Third World, particularly areas such as Vietnam, Central America and the Middle East, and the effect of that experience on the U.S. and its place in the world. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

2007-2008

class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day, Spring; Evening/Weekend Intermediate American Sign Language I This course focuses on further developing and refining basic receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, and visual-spatial orientation acquired in AMS 01 and AMS 02. More complex vocabulary and grammar are presented in context and figurative language introduced. Expressive skills will be stressed. To further develop receptive and expressive competence, students are expected to attend community events and/or perform community service in an American Sign Language environment. Prerequisite: AMS 02 with a grade of “C” or better. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day Fall; Evening/Weekend Intermediate American Sign Language II This course is a continuation of AMS 11. This course further develops and refines the receptive and expressive American Sign Language skill, visualspatial orientation, vocabulary, figurative language, and complex syntax acquired in AMS 01, AMS 02 and AMS 11. The course stresses expressive skills. Students are expected to attend community events and/or perform community service in an American Sign Language environment to further develop receptive and expressive competence. Prerequisite: AMS 11 with a grade of “C” or better. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day, Spring; Evening/Weekend AMS 21 Advanced American Sign Language I This course further develops and refines the American Sign Language receptive and expressive skills and visual-gestural skills acquired in AMS 01 - AMS 12 to ensure discourse competency. This course builds the student’s lexical base to include sign variations found across regions, ethnicities and generations. The course introduces formal and informal narrative styles. Students engage in a more intense study of the non-manual, linguistic AMS 12 AMS 11

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE
AMS 01 Elementary American Sign Language This beginning course introduces students to American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by the American Deaf community and parts of Anglophone Canada. Students focus on developing visual-spatial orientation, using their face and body expressively, and learning basic vocabulary and grammar necessary to converse in ASL. Lessons will be presented in a meaningful/ functional context. Receptive (what you understand) skills will be emphasized, however, expressive (what/how you sign) skills will be practiced as well. Cultural aspects of the Deaf community will be explored through literature and community events. Three class hours and one language lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day Fall, Spring; Evening/ Weekend Elementary American Sign Language II A continuation of AMS 01, this course continues student development of visualspatial orientation, face and body expression, vocabulary and grammar. Lessons are presented in a meaningful/functional context. Analysis of expressive (what/ how you sign) skills is explored, however, receptive (what you understand) skills are emphasized. Cultural aspects of the Deaf community are explored through literature and community events. Prerequisite: AMS 01. Three

AMERICAN CIVILIZATION
AMC 11 American Civilization I This course provides the student with a better understanding of American values as they relate to selected issues in contemporary American civilization. Using ideas and methods from history, economics, sociology and political science, the interdisciplinary approach provides a foundation to critically examine the issues raised. In general, emphasis is placed on critical thinking about current American trends and issues, especially their historical context. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

AMS 02

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Course descriptions understanding of complete aquaculture operations. Prerequisites: SCI 30, SCI 31, and MTH 08. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year community. Students analyze and discuss, collectively and independently, their (second) language development, communication skills, cultural awareness, and common ASL student experiences. In addition, students develop and implement an independent learning project. Prerequisite: AMS 02, AMS 82; Co-requisite: AMS 11. One class hour. Some additional hours for community-based learning and independent study may be required. 1 credit Fall AMS 84 American Sign Language Seminar II This is the capstone course for all Deaf Studies degree options. By course’s end, students will demonstrate they have met program outcomes by completing the Deaf Studies/ASL portfolio. Students are also expected to develop and reflect on their individual culminating project (based on their chosen career path and plans). Prerequisites: AMS 11 and AMS 83; Co-requisite: AMS 12. One class hour and one lab hour per week. 1 credit Spring

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. features found in ASL as well as more sophisticated communication and narration, in general. This course is conducted entirely in ASL. Students are required to engage in ASL or Deaf cultural events as part of this course. Prerequisite: AMS 12 with a “C” or better. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. 4 credits Fall Advanced American Sign Language II and Structure This course is a continuation of AMS 21. The course builds on the skills examined and practiced in AMS 21 and provides an intense study and application of advanced American Sign Language competencies. This course also provides a survey of the linguistic structure of ASL particularly its phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. This course is conducted entirely in ASL. Expressive and receptive abilities are enhanced and practiced in native/immersion environments. Prerequisite: AMS 21 with a “C” or better. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. 4 credits Spring AMS 81 Visual/Gestural Seminar I This seminar provides students with a foundation in the visual/gestural skills necessary for acquiring American Sign Language. Students engage in activities that promote visual-spatial awareness, gestural awareness and visual processing skills. Co-requisite: AMS 01. One class hour and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall AMS 82 Visual/Gestural Seminar II This seminar continues the visual/gestural/spatial foundation necessary for acquiring American Sign Language. Students engage in activities that promote visual-spatial awareness, gestural awareness and visual processing skills. Prerequisites: AMS 81, AMS 01. Co-requisite: AMS 02. One class hour and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring AMS 83 American Sign Language Seminar I This course functions as an ASL student discourse AMS 22

ART
ART 09 Visual Art Colloquium This course will consist of career seminars, visiting artist talks and workshops to help students explore career possibilities in art and design. This course will provide an overview of art and design careers, including fine arts, textile design, fashion design, industrial design, graphic design, web and multimedia design. Students will gain skills in analyzing works of art and design in addition to exploring career options. They will be introduced to concepts central to design and art pedagogy, including the structure and sequencing for art and design education, the creative process, the design process and oral and written critiques. Two class hours a week., or a total of 32 hours during the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall ART 10 History of Art: Renaissance to Modern A survey of the history of painting, sculpture and architecture in Western culture from the fourteenth century through the late nineteenth century. The course will focus on the lives and work of great artists, from Michelangelo to Monet, in the context of the social, political and economic conditions of the period in which the art was made. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall History of Art: Ancient, Medieval & World Art This course will explore the relationship between art and its social, political, cultural and economic contexts throughout ancient and medieval times. The development of world civilization will be chronicled in a fashion that emphasizes the interconnectedness between different world cultures. Students will need to think and write critically on how art both reflected and influenced political, social, religious and economic states of ART 11

ANTHROPOLOGY
ANT 11 Social and Cultural Anthropology A study of basic anthropological thought with emphasis on the characteristics and development of early cultures, contemporary primitive societies, comparative studies of institutions, culture change, and the influence of culture on individual behavior. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Evening/Weekend only

APPLIED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
Aquaculture Production and Systems Technology This course will introduce students to the basic technical principles that are applicable to commercial aquaculture systems. Topics include water quality, site selection, open and closed systems, pumps, fluid flow control and measurement, ecological and biological factors. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to read system schematics and have a good ATK 11

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Course descriptions affair. Through lectures, readings, slides and films, students will learn about history and art from the great kingdoms of Egypt and ancient China to the small isolated bands of colorful individuals who lived in what is still popularly thought of as the “dark ages.” Students will also learn how visual art traditions help define our understanding of world culture. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ART 12 Survey of Modern Art This course will follow developments of Modern Art from the late Nineteenth century to post World War II. The line of great individual artists from Gauguin and Cezanne, Matisse and Picasso to De Kooning and the Abstract Expressionists will be studied through lectures, readings, slides and films. Students will learn to think and write critically about the changing relationships of art to the modern world’s urban culture, its significance and its outcomes. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring ART 13 Drawing I Through studio experiences, students will learn the basic elements of drawing, including observational skills and building eye/hand coordination. This course will also introduce the psychological and emotional elements of drawing. Individual and inventive expression is encouraged. A variety of media such as pencil, charcoal, pastel, and brush and gouache will be explored. Two hours critique and four hours studio a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 14 Drawing II A continuation of ART 13. This course emphasizes observing and drawing the human form. A live model will be studied to express gesture, structure and movement in space, with objective accuracy and increased ability to visualize a concept as important goals. The techniques and media explored in Art 13 will be applied to the figure, including pencil, charcoal, conte, ink, wash and pastels. Prerequisite: ART 13 or permission of the instructor. Two hours critique and four hours studio a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 16 Art for the Child This course is intended primarily for those people planning to work with children. Emphasis is on the nature of artistic expression and how to provide an atmosphere that encourages growth, creativity and imagination. Practical studio experiences using art materials to make crayon resists, collages, puppets, papier mache, print making techniques and other projects will be taught. Students will examine the developmental patterns of children at various age levels through short readings and films. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ART 17 Two Dimensional Design A design course introducing the fundamental principles of organizing visual elements on a two dimensional surface. Problems explore the dynamics of line, form and color on the spatial life of the picture plane. Students work in black and white and color. Materials include ink, gouache and cut paper. Three hours critique/lecture and three hours studio a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 18 Three Dimensional Design This course investigates the construction of three dimensional forms using a wide variety of materials including cardboard, clay, plaster, wood and found objects. Emphasis is on the translation of an idea into tangible form. Inventive and personal solutions to problems are encouraged. Three hours critique and three hours studio a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 19 Painting I This course explores the fundamental techniques of oil painting. Basic problems are designed for beginners as well as students with some previous experience. Realism and Impressionism are studied through still life and landscape projects, while the basics of theory and composition are stressed. This course will help students to understand form and space as a foundation for more advanced painting techniques. Prerequisite: ART 13 or permission of instructor. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall

2007-2008

ART 20 Painting II This course continues the painting process in oils while students are also introduced to other painting mediums. Increased emphasis on modern painting techniques and styles replaces more traditional methods. While still life and landscape studies continue to be explored, the figure will also be included as will some conceptual problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their own style throughout the process. Recommended: ART 19 first. Two critique/lecture hours and four hours studio per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 22 Printmaking I This course introduces the print image as a distinct art form. Students learn to obtain this image by exploring various relief, surface, and intaglio printing processes in the studio workshop using selection of such printing media as linoleum and wood block carving, monoprinting, collagraphs, embossments, and engraving. Students learn to use an etching press, how to “proof ” their work, and how to display it. Methods used in each printing process and materials for production are introduced by the instructor in demonstrations. Recommended: ART 13 first. Two hours of critique and four studio hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 23 Printmaking II This course further explores printmaking concepts introduced in Printmaking I, emphasizing the student’s individual stylistic development with the instructor’s guidance. A variety of multicolor registration techniques for relief printing are introduced including reduction printing and multiple block registration. Students work with intaglio methods that are introduced singly, but eventually used in combination proofs. These include engraving, line etching, aquatint, dry point, soft ground, and sugar lift. Two hours critique and four studio hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring

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Course descriptions developing negatives and using the enlarger, it covers the use of different films and filters for various effects, printing papers, lighting issues, and the presentation of prints for portfolio. Lectures and demonstrations cover various technical issues as well as the basics of photo history and aesthetic guidelines for photographing, developing, and critiquing work. Students are required to supply their own 35mm camera with adjustable controls. Two lecture/critique hours and four laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ART 33 Photography II This course is a continuation of ART 32 and allows students to further develop their technical skills related to photography and to explore photography as a medium of self-expression. Through the interplay of darkroom work and digital work, students gain a firm technical and aesthetic foundation in both black and white and color photography. Lectures, demonstrations, and exercises introduce digital imaging techniques, including Photoshop software basics as related to the field of contemporary photography practice. In addition to acquiring digital images directly through the use of a digital camera, students take shots using their manual 35mm camera, develop them in the darkroom, and scan them and manipulate them in Photoshop. Assignments and group critiques provide opportunity for students to experiment, to connect their emerging technical skills with their personal vision, and to understand the context of their work in terms of both the history of photography and contemporary trends. Prerequisite: ART 32 or permission of instructor. Two lecture/critique hours and four laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 34 Art Exploration This course, developed for non-art majors, allows students to explore the basic elements of drawing, painting and design, through a series of studio projects. Class projects include a study of line, value, texture, composition, perspective, and color, through which hand skills, eye coordination, and of commercial illustration. The course exposes students to a variety of media including pencil, charcoal, scratchboard, colored pencil, watercolor and/or gouache, pastel, and computer graphics. The course requires students to keep a notebook of sketches, project files, and a portfolio of all assignments. Prerequisite: ART 13 or permission of instructor; ART 14 is recommended as a prerequisite. Two hours of critique and four studio hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Not offered every year ART 30 Three Dimensional Design II The purpose of this course is to investigate various processes of achieving three dimensional form making. Materials and methods will include a selection of clay modeling, wood and/or stone carving, moldmaking, geometrics, linear forms, plastics, and soft forms. Recommended: ART 18 first. Three hours critique and three studio hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 31 Sculpture In this course, emphasis is placed on investigation and experimentation. Students will discuss ideas and the many media available for expressing or illustrating them in physical form. We will review some technical aspects of building along with a hands-on survey of materials. Students will keep notes and drawings in sketchbooks and also will take photographs as idea devices. Field trips to local museums will be part of the class. We will go on several walking excursions (near the College) to talk about issues and ideas and find them in our surroundings. Prerequisite: ART 30 or permission of instructor. Two critique and four studio hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 32 Photography I This is a basic introductory course in black and white photography as an art form. It emphasizes developing darkroom skills as well as learning how to operate a 35mm camera. In addition to darkroom printing procedures, including

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. ART 24 Working from the Landscape Taking impressionism and romanticism as precedents, this course is for those who want to explore their own responses to the landscape. Working outdoors with a variety of media (watercolor, oil, pastel, charcoal, etc.), we will explore issues that have challenged the great landscape painters of all time. Issues such as space, color, light, and composition will be addressed in depth. Subjective responses to the landscape will also be explored such as content, metaphor, personal iconography, and mood. Ultimately, the deeper ramifications of the role of humankind to nature will be addressed through readings and discussions. One 3 hour class meeting per week 3 credits Summer only ART 26 Two Dimensional Design II This design course is a continuation of the problems involved in Two Dimensional Design I (see ART 17). This half will follow the introduction line, form, and color principles on the Two Dimensional surface. Materials will include: gouache, ink papers, and boards. Recommended: ART 17 first. Three hours critique/lecture time and three hours studio a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 27 Graphic Design I This course introduces basic graphic design concepts, tools, and images. The intent is to strengthen visual and conceptual aspects of image making while exposing students to the graphic design field. The focus of this course is on developing a range of styles, media, and techniques for graphics creation. Prerequisite: ART 13 or permission of instructor. Pre- or Corequisite: ART 39 or permission of instructor. Two critique and four studio hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 28 Introduction to Illustration This course introduces students to a variety of commercial situations in illustration such as magazine illustration, books, CD covers and/or poster design, to acquaint them with the scope

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Course descriptions new visual perceptions help students develop their own unique expressive skills. Media used in the course include pencil, charcoal, brush and ink, and water-based paints. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ART 35 Web Design I This course introduces students to the process of creating a Web site, with an overview of organizational issues, marketing concerns, navigation, typography on the Web, and other design considerations. It uses industry-standard imaging software and graphical interface-based Web design software such as Adobe Photoshop and Dreamweaver. The course uses lectures, software demonstrations, exploration and analysis of existing Web sites, hands-on exercises, and projects to enable students to acquire the basic skills and knowledge to create Web pages for the World Wide Web. Pre- or Co-requisite: ART 39 recommended, or previous Photoshop experience. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. As a distance learning course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 36 Electronic Imaging This course focuses on creative and technical issues related to the production of digital images for print as well as for multimedia and the Web. It emphasizes concept development and application of design principles and color theory to imaging. Technical issues include scanning, output, image creation, and photo manipulation using industry-standard imaging software such as Adobe Photoshop. Students acquire the knowledge and skills required to create compelling images using the digital medium through lectures, examples of professional work, and hands-on projects. Prerequisite: ART 39 or permission of instructor. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. As a distance learning course, three inclass hours and three hours via the Web. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 37 Graphic Design II This course is a continuation of ART 27. It further develops the design process through projects that explore graphic/textural relationships using the written word and visual imagery. The course focuses primarily on the development of visual language as a means of conveying information through effective methods of design. It implements contemporary and traditional skills and methods. It also covers the investigation of printing, production, and service bureaus. Prerequisite: ART 27 and ART 38 are recommended. Six class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 38 Typography Design This course introduces typography, the art of organizing letters in space and time. The course covers all aspects of typography through lectures, demonstration and studio work. It explores the history of the alphabet, written and drawn from primitive times, through the invention of printing from moveable type to the present. Students immerse themselves in the culture of typography and begin to understand the social and aesthetic importance of the visual word. The course further sensitizes students to the continuing evolution of letterforms, to problem-solving, and to the aesthetic use of display and text type through a series of exercises and projects. Pre- or Co-requisite: ART 13 or permission of instructor; ART 39 recommended. Two class hours and four lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 39 Computer Graphics This course provides an overview of page layout, scanning, illustration, and image manipulation on the computer. Industry-standard graphics programs on the Mac will be used such as Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Streamline, Quark Xpress, and Photoshop. Through lectures, software demonstrations and hands-on exercises and projects, students acquire the basic skills and knowledge to use the computer as a design tool. Class meets for two lecture hours and four lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

2007-2008

ART 40 Careers in the Visual Arts This course will consist of career seminars, visiting artist talks and critiques, field trips, professional artist demonstrations and workshops to help students further explore career choices in art and design. Activities will include research, critical thinking, oral and written presentations and evaluations. Workshops and demonstrations will assist students in developing slide portfolios and/ or digital portfolios for transfer applications or for job applications, including selection of work, sequencing, and format. In addition, students will participate in a field experience or service learning project such as helping to organize, publicize or create signage for student exhibitions at BCC’s Grimshaw-Gudewicz Gallery or similar activity. Recommended: students should take this course in their last year. Four class hours a week., or a total of sixty-four hours during the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall ART 42 Publication Design Students learn the fundamentals of designing publications, focusing on typographic systems and the hierarchy of information and using a grid for multi-page documents. The course introduces electronic page-layout using industry-standard page-software such as QuarkXpress and InDesign. Students acquire the basic skills and knowledge to design multi-page documents through lectures and hands-on exercises and projects. Pre- or Corequisite: ART 39 recommended. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. As a distance learning course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 43 Multimedia Design This course teaches students the basic conceptual, design, and technical components of creating digital multimedia projects. Good design is a key to effective interactive multimedia development. The course focuses on the creative design process, including interface design, information design, and design that occurs over time and space and incorporates images, typography, audio, video, and animation components. Lectures, demonstrations,

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Course descriptions photographers, and production staff. Students learn and apply practical skills related to design studio work, including meeting clients, creating design briefs, creating budgets, projecting costs, and developing projects from initial research through brainstorming, thumbnails, comps, and final production (pre-press for print projects, publishing for Web projects). Students work in typical design studio teams to integrate their application of these issues with their design and production work to create client-driven projects. Pre- or co-requisites: ART 37 or ART 42 or COM 12 or CIS 27. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. As a Distance Learning hybrid course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ART 49 Character Animation This course examines concepts, characters and storyboards for character animation design and production. It emphasizes creating movement and expression using electronically-generated image sequences. Character animation design practice focuses on a range of screen-based applications, including animation in information design and narrative animation, as well as experimental animation. Students study the basic principles of classical animation and produce a character cameo. They learn the basics of motion perception and the principles of character animation as well as the basics of vector animation, 3-D animation, and combining animation and interactivity in graphical user interfaces. Prerequisite: ART 14 and ART 39 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. As a Distance Learning Hybrid course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 50 Introduction to Visual Communication This hands-on course provides an overview of graphic design for those considering a career in a related field. Through lectures, readings, demonstrations, class discussions, critiques, ART 46 Advanced Web Design Studio This course provides students with a hands-on opportunity to apply their web design skills to develop functional and effective Web sites that meet specific real-world objectives. It focuses on communication design issues related to the creation of complex Web sites, including development of content and communication strategies, information architecture, prototypes and testing site usability, and workflow management. Students integrate their application of these issues with their facility with color, image-creation, typography and composition to create a culminating portfolio-quality project. Prerequisites: ART 35. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. As a Distance Learning hybrid course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 47 Web Animation Animation is becoming an essential component of multimedia and web design. This course requires a strong foundation in drawing and design. It builds on this foundation and introduce animation design concepts such as character development, timing, sequencing, nuancing, and style. Students apply computer animation techniques, using industry-standard animation programs such as Macromedia Flash to create two-dimensional animation sequences. Completed projects demonstrate the use of typography and illustration to convey a specific concept. Prerequisites: ART 39; ART 13 or drawing experience recommended. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. As a Distance Learning hybrid course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 48 Design Studio This course provides students with handson opportunities to apply the design and production skills they’ve gained to real-world web and print projects. The class functions as a design studio, with a creative director, art directors, designers, copywriters, illustrators,

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. and hands-on projects using industry-standard software such as Director and Premiere enable students to create a portfolio-quality multimedia project for the Web or CD-ROM. Prerequisite: ART 39 recommended. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. As a distance learning course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 44 Drawing III Through further studies of the human form, students will explore form, structure, mass and proportion. The figure in relation to its immediate environment will be emphasized. In addition, students will explore the expressive range the human figure brings to art. Live models will be used the majority of the time. This course will strengthen students’ ability to draw the human form in expressive positions as required for many forms of art, including fine art, illustration, graphic design and animation. Prerequisite: ART 13 and ART 14. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. As a distance learning course, three inclass hours and three hours via the Web. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ART 45 Web Design II This course introduces the fundamentals of interactive design theories and their applications to web design. Students will integrate design principles, image creation, text, video, sound and simple animations to create dynamic web sites. The course will emphasize use of multimedia to achieve specific communication goals for a client. Scripting and storyboarding will be introduced as part of the design process. Students will produce an interactive multimedia web site that demonstrates their use of the basic concepts and principles of interactive design. Prerequisites: ART 35. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. As a Distance Learning hybrid course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall

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Course descriptions exercises, and creative projects, students learn the basics of visual-language and creativethinking techniques in order to create effective visual communication. They work through the design process and learn how to incorporate communication and basic marketing principles into their problem-solving activities. Students explore color, layout, typography, and imagery as they create graphics, brochures, and newsletters. In this project-based course, the students incorporate the concepts taught and demonstrated into their own work. Students sketch possible design solutions by hand and finalize their work on the computer using Photoshop and a page-layout program. Three class hours plus one studio/lab hour per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ART 51 Motion Graphics From TV ads and Flash-based narratives on the Web to the opening credits of movies and TV shows, motion graphics have become an integral part of our day-to-day visual experience. Students in this course explore ways of animating static images and text, as well as compositing digitized elements. They create motion graphics projects using a combination of Adobe After Effects with other video, image, and audio manipulation software. Prerequisite: ART 39 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator. Recommended: ART 43 or ART 47. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. As a Distance Learning Hybrid course, three in-class hours and three hours via the Web per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ART 52 Digital Photography Students in this course learn the fundamentals of the art and craft of making digital images. This hands-on course allows students to explore the basics of photography, including composition and lighting, while developing skills in pixelbased photographic design and processing. It introduces students to the use of the digital camera, scanner, and Adobe Photoshop to create and manipulate images. Students learn how to evaluate images for effectiveness in terms of aesthetics and communication goals: i.e., what makes a good photo? The course also aids students in understanding the role digital photography can play in areas such as illustration, documentation, graphic design, Web design, and fine arts. One lecture hour and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer

2007-2008

BANKING
BNK 10 Principles of Banking The course provides a broad perspective of the banking industry touching on nearly every aspect of bank functions. Topics include the language and documents of banking, check processing, teller functions, deposit function, trust services, bank bookkeeping, bank loans, and the banks’ role in the community. 3 credits Fall, Spring BNK 11 Installment Credit This course provides an understanding of the consumer credit function by examining the role of installment credit in overall banking operations. Recommend BUS 11 first. 3 credits Fall, Spring BNK 12 Real Estate Lending This course introduces legal issues in real estate lending, property appraisal, sources of mortgage credit, federal role in the mortgage market, financing of single family condominiums, cooperative apartments, rental units, business-use properties, and real estate investment analysis. Recommend BUS 11 and BUS 51 first. 3 credits Fall, Spring BNK 13 Commercial Credit Analysis This course examines the tools and techniques necessary for the financial evaluation of a business enterprise. Recommend ACC 12 first. 3 credits Fall, Spring BNK 14 Introduction to Commercial Banking This course reviews the social and monetary aspects of commercial bank operations by investigating the principles and techniques utilized in their functional performance. Recommend MAN 11 first. 3 credits Evenings/Weekends BNK 16 Bank Investments This course examines the fundamentals of bank investments, the types of investment instruments available to commercial banks, the nature and scope of securities markets, and investment account management. Recommend ACC 12 first. 3 credits Fall, Spring

ASTRONOMY
AST 11 Introduction to Astronomy A descriptive, visual introduction to astronomy as a scientific discipline. A brief survey of the history of astronomy, the nature of the solar system, stars, galaxies, and other components of the universe is included. Other important aspects of the course include scheduled observing sessions, discussions of recent discoveries in astronomy, and laboratory exercises that reinforce concepts covered. The planetarium and other visual aides are used extensively. Three class hours and one laboratory hour per week. A few meetings will be scheduled at night for observing with the College’s telescope. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer AST 12 Introduction to Astronomy II A descriptive, visual introduction to astronomy as a scientific discipline that is designed to follow up on material presented in AST 11. The course has more of a mathematical character than AST 11. A brief review of the solar system and its place in the universe will be followed by detailed discussions of the Sun, the nature of stars, the life cycle of stars, galaxies and other structural features of the universe. Current views on cosmology will be covered as well. Other important aspects of the course include scheduled observing session, discussion of recent discoveries in astronomy, and laboratory exercises that reinforce concepts covered. The planetarium and other visual aids are used extensively. Prerequisites: AST 11 and MTH 1N (or High School Algebra I) with a grade of “C” or better. Three class hours and two laboratory hours weekly in a combined lecture/laboratory setting. A few meetings will be scheduled at night for observing with the College’s telescope. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

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Course descriptions patterns of inheritance. Prerequisite: One year of high school biology or chemistry with a grade of “C” or better or CHM 10. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer Fundamentals of Biological Science II A consideration of evolutionary theory including population genetics and a survey of major taxonomic groups of organisms with emphasis on their adaptations and ecology. Prerequisite: BIO 21 or BIO 11. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring BIO 26 Introduction to Biotechnology The course covers the tools of the biotechnician: gene manipulation, biotechnological applications in medicine, forensics, and industry, bioethics, and biological risk assessment. Prerequisite: high school chemistry and biology. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 3 credits Spring BIO 29 Field Biology This is an introduction to natural history with special emphasis on identification of Massachusetts terrestrial plants and animals in the outdoors. A wide range of topics will be presented including animal behavior, map reading, geology, basic principles of natural history, biogeography, taxonomy, and collecting. Combined lecture/ laboratory two meetings a week. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall BIO 30 The Biology and Behavior of Birds This is an introduction to the biology of birds and their behavior. Special emphasis will be given to species of the United States and Massachusetts. A wide range of topics will be presented including: field identification; bird diversity and taxonomy; courtship and nesting; feather structure, flight, and migration; physiology, including respiration, circulation and feeding strategies; and visual and BIO 22 permission of instructor. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. This course does not substitute for BIO 12, 22, or 33/34. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring BIO 16 Physical Anthropology An introduction to human evolution and human ecology. Emphasis is on the factors affecting human physical structure, both in the past and at present. Attempts are made to explain human behavior and social structure as functions of humans’ primate heritage and evolution. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring BIO 17 Physiology of Wellness An introduction to the concept of wellness, basics of nutrition, exercise habits, weight control, and cardiovascular disease prevention. Topics include wellness concepts, exercise, diet and nutrition, set point theories, and environmental influences. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall BIO 20 Introduction to Nutrition This course focuses on human dietary needs. The course emphasizes the health-related roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and vitamins. The course also covers minerals, energy metabolism, food-product labeling, and nutritional requirements of the pregnant woman and fetus. Issues of consumer concern are considered throughout this course. Prerequisite: BIO 11 or BIO 21 or BIO 33 with a grade of “C” or better; CHM 11 or higher with a grade of “C” or better. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring BIO 21 Fundamentals of Biological Science I Designed for science majors or prospective health science students. An examination of three areas of contemporary biological science, including selected topics in chemistry necessary as background for cell biology, the structure and function of cells with emphasis on reproduction, membrane functions and cell energetics, and the molecular mechanisms of genetic control and

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites.

BIOLOGY
BIO 10 Biology of Human Reproduction A one semester, combined lecture-discussion course on various aspects of human reproduction. Topics include: human anatomy and physiology, childbirth, fertility, fertility control, fertility impairment, birth control, V.D., sexually transmissible diseases, and pregnancy termination. Extensive use will be made of films and other A.V. materials as they relate to the above topic. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring BIO 11 General Biology I Designed for non-science majors. Science and health science majors should take BIO 21. An introductory survey of biological principles and topics representing a range of levels of organization including general background chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution and ecology. Prerequisite: One year of laboratory science in high school or one semester of college laboratory science. Not available for credit to students with a “C” or better in BIO 21. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BIO 12 General Biology II A comparative study of life functions (gas exchange, excretion, reproduction, circulation, etc.) of various organisms with emphasis on the human. Laboratory includes dissections and study of physiological processes. Prerequisite: BIO 11 or BIO 21. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring BIO 15 Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology A one-semester survey of organs and systems of the human body with regard to basic structure and function. Cells, tissues, chemistry and abnormalities will be considered. Laboratory activities reinforce information discussed in class. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or biology or

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Course descriptions vocal communication. Students will be required to attend two field trips on either a Saturday or Sunday (weather permitting); one in February and one in May. Classes meet twice weekly in a combined lecture/laboratory setting. Three class hours and two laboratory hours weekly. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring BIO 32 Marine Biology This is a one-semester course designed to provide an introduction to the biology of the marine environment. It incorporates the study of the physical and biological components of the oceans, including the formations of the seas and land masses, physical nature of the oceans, and chemistry of seawater with emphasis on types of marine organisms, the ecology of the marine environment, and man’s impact on the ocean and its inhabitants. Field trips may be required as part of the lab component of the course, including one all-day trip on a whale watch boat. Prerequisite: high school chemistry and biology with a grade of “C” or better or BIO 11 or BIO 21 or SCI 12 or SCI 19 or any CHM course. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring, Summer BIO 33 Human Anatomy and Physiology I This course studies the structure and function of human tissues, organs and organ systems. Topics include tissues; integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems; and the nervous system. The laboratory component includes occasional dissections. The course is intended primarily for students in the health sciences. Prerequisites: high school biology and chemistry, preferably within the last five years. Three class hours and two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BIO 34 Human Anatomy and Physiology II This course is a continuation of BIO 33. The course covers endocrine, reproductive, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary systems. This course is intended for students in health sciences. The laboratory component includes occasional dissections. Prerequisites: a grade of “C” or better in BIO 33 or equivalent biology laboratory science. Three class hours and two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BIO 39 Elements of Microbiology This course considers the general and medical aspects of microorganisms. This course discusses methods of identification, sources and modes of infection, inhibition and control of growth, and principles of sanitation. This course includes a study of bacterial physiology and genetic engineering. The laboratory component studies basic techniques. Prerequisites: BIO 34, or BIO 54, or BIO 21. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BIO 40 Cell Biology This course considers the molecular structure of cells, cell energetics, the role of nucleic acids, cell division, and fertilization. The laboratory covers microscopic studies of cells and methods for studying macromolecules and cells. Prerequisites: BIO 11 or BIO 21 and CHM 16. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring BIO 41 Pathophysiology An introduction to the processes of infection, injury, and other pathogenic influences, their effects on the body, and the basic responses of cells, tissues, and organ systems to these disorders. General phenomena such as inflammation, immune response, carcinogenesis, heart disease and diabetes will be considered. Prerequisite: BIO 34. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall. Spring BIO 54 Human Physiology This course acquaints the student with the biological, chemical and physical functions of the human body. The focus of the course is on the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system, the endocrine system,

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and the excretory system. Laboratory activities will include tests on blood, urine, the heart, and occasional dissections. Prerequisite: High school biology and permission of the instructor. Not available for credit to students with a “C” or better in BIO 33, BIO 34. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall BIO 55 Topics in Biology A one-semester course on a specific topic in biology. Topic to be announced each semester. Prerequisite: “B” or better in one college lab science. One to three class hour per week. 1– 3 credits Fall, Spring

BUSINESS
BUS 11 Business and Financial Mathematics This course provides a presentation of mathematical calculations related to business analysis. It includes solving for unknowns such as present and future values. Selected accounting topics, retailing and consumer mathematics, payroll records, bank statement reconciliations, information concerning corporate stocks and bonds, as well as mutual funds, and business statistics used to make decisions are covered. This course emphasizes critical thinking. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BUS 12 Personal Financial Planning This course will provide students with the basic knowledge to manage their personal finances including basics of saving, debt management, and investing for retirement via 401k, IRAs, and annuities. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring BUS 13 Introduction to Business Functions and Practices This course gives a general survey of the functions and practices of a business and the institutions that facilitate the operation of business units. The course introduces students to the various

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Course descriptions Sales and Customer Service for Tourism and Hospitality This course will deal with the broad scope of marketing and sales activities that take place within the tourism, convention, hospitality, and casino industries. Emphasis will be placed on analysis, structure, and strategy of the marketing department within the tourism, convention, hospitality, and casino businesses. Students will learn about departmental budgets, allocation of resources, market research, media selection, and the effectiveness of a marketing plan. There will be case studies and assigned readings of current marketing trends. 3 credits Spring Hotel and Motel Management & Operations Students will gain an understanding of the operational aspects of various departments within a hotel or motel, and the relationship of each department to the hotel as a whole. They will explore the functions of each separate area within the hotel, its operational procedures, staffing, customer service, and changing trends. Also covered will be the different employment opportunities and career paths available within the industry. 3 credits Fall BUS 51 Business Law An introductory course in laws applicable to business transactions. Covers a basic study of the federal and state court systems as well as criminal, tort, and contract law. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission of department chair. Recommend: MAN 11 and MAR 11 first. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BUS 52 Honors E-Commerce An interdisciplinary course that presents the rudiments of e-commerce from a business and technological perspective. Students will learn the principles of marketing and selling on the Internet as well as a conceptual and practical knowledge of the necessary technology. Recommend: MAR 11 and CIS 07 first. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall BUS 26 BUS 24 with skills needed to operate a group tour movement, negotiate with suppliers, understand contractual responsibilities, handle reservations and documentation, and provide them with a working knowledge of the legal responsibilities and ramifications of group tour management. Also covered will be the role and responsibility of the tour escort before, during, and after the tour. 3 credits Fall Introduction to Travel, Tourism & Hospitality This course will be taught in three different modules to expose students to the concentration areas of travel, tourism and hospitality. The focus of this course will be introductory in nature. It will provide students with an understanding of how people use their free time, what reasons prompt them to travel and the value they expect from their travel dollar. Each module will provide students with an overview of the specific area of study with an emphasis on industry trends and future developments, terminology and an understanding of interrelationships of the three areas. 3 credits Fall BUS 22 Tour Destination Planning This course acquaints the student with a framework to do detailed planning for visits to important tourist destinations in the United States and other nations. The course discusses the cultural, recreational, social, and economic significance of travel. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall Meeting Planning and Convention Sales and Service This course will teach students the basic elements of meeting, convention, and group sales and services. Students will learn how to generate business and to provide the services necessary to create repeat business. Discussions will focus on the operation of a group and convention business. Recommend MAR 11 first. 3 credits Spring BUS 23 BUS 21

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. functional activities of business organizations. It provides an overview of careers in accounting, marketing, general management, human resource management, finance, and production and operations management. Students learn how to develop a job search strategy. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring BUS 15 Fundamentals of an Enterprise This course is designed for students in majors other than Business Administration such as Information Technology, Health Sciences, and Engineering, who will likely be working within a profit or not-for profit enterprise. Topics such as global operating environments, economic systems, organizational structure, and management systems will be discussed. This course is not open to students majoring in Business Administration. One class per week for 15 weeks. 1 credit Fall, Spring BUS 17 Principles of Insurance I An introductory course covering the history and development of insurance, types and organizations of companies, insurance contracts, underwriting, sales, claim adjustment, risk management, and rate making. Recommend MAN 11 or MAR 11 first. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall; Evening/Weekends only BUS 18 Principles of Insurance II A continuation of the introductory course covering life, property, and casualty insurance. Topical coverage includes life, fire, workman’s compensation, and general business lines. Prerequisite: BUS 17 with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring; Evening/Weekends only BUS 20 Group Tour Planning This course is designed to introduce students to the process and methodologies of planning, operating and evaluating a group tour package. It will discuss the various methods of selling, packaging, operating and promoting a group tour to select markets and also to the general public. This course is intended to provide students

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Course descriptions BUS 53 Corporation Finance A study of the forms and sources of financing available to large and small business. Emphasis is placed on financial analysis, financial planning, working capital management and source of short- and long-term financing. Basic concepts of investment analysis are introduced. Prerequisite: ACC 12 or ACC 11 with “C” or better and permission of instructor. Recommend MAN 11 first. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring BUS 55 Business Ethics An examination of the moral, legal, and social dimensions of decision making in businessrelated situations. Actual business cases are analyzed in terms of morality, legality and social considerations. The course will provide students with multifaceted views allowing them in their analysis to come to business decisions that incorporate ethical standards. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer BUS 60 International Business This course develops initial concepts in international business principles. It presents the inter-relationships of the economics and politics of international trade and investment. The course examines the strategies and structures of international business. Prerequisite: MAN 11 and MAR 11 3 credits Fall, Spring Chemistry 10 may not be used to meet the General Education Science requirement nor does it carry degree credits. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA. CHM 11 General College Chemistry I This course in fundamentals of modern chemistry is for students not planning to major in science. Topics include the metric system, exponential notation, atomic structure and the periodic table, the writing and use of chemical equations, stoichiometry of compounds and chemical reactions, the mole, chemical reactivity, properties of chemical bonds, solutions, and acids and bases. Prerequisites: Algebra II, “C” in secondary school science, or CHM 10. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall CHM 12 General College Chemistry II Topics include chemical equilibrium, use of equilibrium constants and LeChatelier’s Principle, reaction kinetics, thermodynamics (enthalpy, entropy and free energy, bond energies), radioactivity and nuclear reactions, oxidationreduction reactions, kinetic molecular theory of gases and gas laws. Prerequisite: CHM 11 or equivalent. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring (even year) CHM 13 Fundamentals of Chemistry I Designed for students majoring in science and engineering, this course covers measurements and dimensional analysis, the structure of matter, nomenclature, formulas, chemical equations, moles and stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the gas laws, and the quantum model of the atom. The laboratory component provides applications of concepts covered in lecture. Prerequisite: “C” or better in high school chemistry, “C” or better in Algebra I and II, and satisfactory performance on a placement exam. Three class hours, one recitation hour and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall

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CHM 14 Fundamentals of Chemistry II Topics include periodicity of atomic properties, theories of chemical bonding, intermolecular forces in solids and liquids, solutions and colligative properties, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. The laboratory includes semimicroqualitative analysis along with traditional experimental procedures. Prerequisite: CHM 13. Three class hours, one recitation hour and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CHM 15 Inorganic Chemistry and Introduction to Organic Chemistry This course is designed to give an introduction to the metric system, atomic structure and its relationship to chemical bonding, acids, bases and equilibrium and their relationship to buffers and neutralization, radiochemistry and radioisotopes, stoichiometry, solutions, concentrations and colligative properties, basic hydrocarbon series, various functional groups and some basic organic reactions. Prerequisite: One year of high school biology and one year of high school chemistry. Not open to students who have credit in CHM 12 or 13. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall CHM 16 Organic and Biochemistry This course deals with basic organic reactions and their application to the formation of biologically important compounds. The chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids and enzymes, their structure, function and activity are covered. The metabolic pathways of fermentation, glycolysis, citric acid cycle and the utilization of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids by these metabolic pathways are discussed. Some instrumental analysis (chromatography and electrophoresis) is considered. Prerequisite: CHM 15 or permission of department chair. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

CHEMISTRY
CHM 10 Introduction to Chemistry A course for students who have not studied chemistry. Topics included under the description of CHM 11 are considered, but in somewhat less depth to permit introduction of necessary background material in greater detail. Prerequisite: MTH 01 or pass arithmetic placement test and a “C” or better in Algebra I or MTH 1N. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

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Course descriptions MED 30 Hematology This course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. The theory and practice of routine hematology will be studied. Topics include the collection and handling of clinical specimens, the origin, development, and function of human blood cells in health and disease, hemostasis and coagulation, automation, computerization, and quality control. Routine hematology and coagulation testing will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CLS students and BIO 54 or its equivalent. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the fall semester, and 120 hours of clinical laboratory experience at an affiliate hospital laboratory during the second half of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 5 credits Fall MED 32 Medical Microbiology I The course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. This is a comprehensive study of both theory and practical aspects of clinical microbiology. Emphasis will be placed on the collection and handling of clinical specimens as well as the primary isolation and identification of the most frequently encountered bacteria pathogenic to humans. Other topics discussed include antimicrobial chemotherapy and host resistance. Prerequisite: CLS students and BIO 39. This course includes 35 hours of lecture and 42 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the semester. The Clinical laboratory experience consists of 120 hours to be completed at an affiliate hospital laboratory and 6 hours of clinical seminar during the second half of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall MED 34 Immunology-Serology The course introduces theoretical principles of immunology which involve the structure, function and interactions of the immune system. The serological techniques useful in the diagnosis of many diseases will be reviewed and performed at and principles and methods of research are developed. Research need not be original. Prerequisite: Approval of department chair. Two one-hour meetings a week with the instructor and appropriate laboratory and research time 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. CHM 20 Environmental Chemistry A one semester course designed primarily for students in an environmental studies program. Topics covered will include areas of inorganic, organic and biochemistry as they pertain to environmental issues and pollution. The formation of toxic substances in the air, water and soil will be discussed including the methods of their formation and how to remedy the problems created by them. Current topics will be included such as acid precipitation, heavy metal deposition, pesticides, polymers (PCB, PVC, etc.) and thermal pollution. Prerequisite: “C” or better in CHM 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CHM 25 Biochemistry This course covers the chemistry of biologically important molecules: amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Bioenergetics, biosynthesis, genes, chromosomes, and DNA metabolism round out the course. The lab introduces analytical and synthesis techniques for the biologically significant compounds. Prerequisites: BIO 21, CHM 15, and CHM 16. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CHM 26 Chemistry of Nucleic Acids This course covers the nature of genes and cell division, the chemical and physical characteristics of DNA and RNA, the synthesis of DNA/RNA and proteins, and replication strategies for viruses. In the lab, students isolate, analyze, and manipulate DNA/RNA. Prerequisites: BIO 21 or BIO 39, CHM 15, and CHM 16. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CHM 55 Directed Studies in Chemistry Literature or laboratory research in chemistry in which the student undertakes a semesterlong project under the guidance of a member of the faculty. Exchange of ideas is emphasized

CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

Please refer to the program description for specific prerequisite courses and grade requirements. MED 10 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science This course explores the nature and scope of clinical laboratory work. The primary focus will be on the role of the laboratory in the delivery of health care in various settings, emphasizing historical background, types of health care facilities, regulatory agencies affecting laboratory operations, responsibilities, duties and professional conduct expected of clinical laboratory technicians, universal precautions, safety in the laboratory, laboratory mathematics and quality control, and medical terminology and procurement of blood specimens. A phlebotomy workshop will develop the fundamental skills required to procure and prepare blood specimens for testing. A field trip will be scheduled to a clinic hospital laboratory. Prerequisite: CLS and Phlebotomy students only. Permission of instructor may be granted to students considering a laboratory career. Three hours of lecture/lab a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall MED 21 Urinalysis This course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. The principles and procedures of the routine urinalysis will be studied as well as the normal and abnormal physiological functions of the renal system. Prerequisite: BIO 54 or equivalent. CLS students only. Three hours of lecture/lab a week. At the end of the semester, students will spend one week (30 hours) in an affiliated laboratory. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring

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Course descriptions the College. Prerequisite: CLS students and BIO 39. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory at the College. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall MED 41 Clinical Biochemistry The course consists of integrated instruction between the College and affiliate hospital laboratory. The primary focus of the course is the biochemical analysis of blood and body fluids in health and disease. Topics include routine manual and automated testing methods, electrophoreses, safety practices and quality control. Prerequisite: CLS students and CHM 15 and CHM 16. The course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the semester, and 120 hours of clinical laboratory experience at an affiliate hospital laboratory during the second half of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Spring MED 43 Immunohematology The course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on the genetic basis and immunological interaction of the major blood group antigens and antibodies. Topics will include compatibility testing, antibody screen and identification techniques, blood donations and transfusion therapy, record keeping and quality control techniques. Prerequisite: CLS students and MED 34. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the spring semester and 120 hours of clinical laboratory experience at an affiliate hospital laboratory during the second half of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 5 credits Spring MED 49 Medical Microbiology II This course is a continuation of MED 32. The microorganisms studied are those which require specialized techniques in both collection and identification. These pathogens include those organisms belonging to the following groups: anaerobic bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi and parasites. Many of the diseases caused by these organisms produce the chronic infections that have plagued man. Prerequisite: CLS students and MED 32. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 45 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed during the first half of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring MED 60 Selected Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science This course offers students an opportunity to study a specific topic in Clinical Laboratory Science. Course topics are announced each semester. Prerequisite: to be determined by the course offered. One to three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1-3 credits Not offered each year MED 61 Introduction to Histotechnology The course is designed to provide an understanding of the histological techniques used in the study of human tissue. It includes an overview of basic pathology and malignant disease and the application of histological techniques used in a modern laboratory. Topics also include the structure and functions of cells and organ systems; study of human cells using light and electron microscopy; processing and handling of surgical and autopsy specimens; gross evaluation of tissues; embedding and sectioning of tissues by microtomy; preparation of frozen sections; instrumentation; slide preparation; routine and special staining; safety procedures; quality assurance procedures; and immunohistochemistry applications. The course provides the fundamental background necessary for clinical practice in a modern histology laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 54 or equivalent, or current work experience in histology, or instructor approval; Co-requisite: MED 63. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Not offered each year

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MED 63 Histology Techniques I This is a 45-hour laboratory course taught on campus. The course allows students an opportunity to practice histology procedures and techniques prior to assignment to clinical fieldwork placement. The student performs routine laboratory procedures that simulate the procedures performed in a modern clinical histology laboratory. Prerequisite/Co-requisite: MED 61. Forty-five laboratory hours. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Not offered every year MED 65 Histology Practicum I The Histology Practicum I course is comprised of 420 hours of clinical fieldwork experience during a 14-week period at one of the affiliating histology laboratories. The student performs routine and special procedures under the direction of a clinical supervisor. Prerequisite: MED 61 and MED 63. Four-hundred and twenty (420) clinical fieldwork hours. Instructional Support Fee applies 7 credits Not offered every year College Success Seminar: The Meaning of Work This course facilitates the new student’s transition to college through exploration of a timely, relevant topic such as diversity, the meaning of work, voter education, or the value and purpose of higher education. The course views learning as an active process based on class discussion, readings, projects and lectures. It emphasizes reading skills, writing skills, problem solving, learning styles, critical thinking, basic computer literacy skills, and time management. As students investigate personal value systems, they recognize the skills required for success in higher education. As a result, students begin to understand how college expands their views and, thus, prepare for that change. The course introduces students to fundamental computer skills for web/net search, library research, word processing, and email. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring CSS 11

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Course descriptions COM 20 Introduction to Communication This is the foundation course for Communication majors. Students explore the fundamentals of human communication, especially the process of exchanging meaning. The course examines communication theory, historical developments, communicating with self and others, nonverbal communication, communicating through the mass media and in organizations, and the impact of emerging technologies on how people communicate in the early part of the 21st century. The course also examines numerous careers in the broad field of communication. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall COM 40 Organizational Communication This course provides a theoretical and historical overview of the role of communication in organizations and a practical look at contemporary roles, responsibilities, and career opportunities in the broad field of organizational communication. Communication plays a significant role in the success of organizations today, whether those organizations be community service agencies, charitable organizations, major media outlets, research institutions, online enterprises, or multinational corporations. All organizations need the knowledge, expertise and skills to communicate effectively, both internally and externally. Functions for study and discussion include public relations, employee communication, event planning, print and online publications, crisis communication, marketing communication, web site management, strategic planning, executive counseling, and ethical challenges faced by communicators working in organizations today. Prerequisite: COM 20 or permission of program coordinator. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring COM 41 Public Relations This course introduces students to the principles and practices of public relations. Students review historical aspects of the discipline and the theoretical foundation that informs the practice. The course helps students identify the skills and movies, television, radio, and the web. The course examines the development and power of the mass media and their role in contemporary society, and explores the potential impact of media consolidation, demassification, and technology on editorial direction and mass audiences. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring COM 12 News Writing and Reporting Students learn principles and practices of news writing and reporting for contemporary media. The course examines the fundamentals of “good journalism,” the role of reporters and editors in the news organization, and decision-making in the newsroom. Students analyze the qualities of good news writing and develop their skills in writing leads and organizing stories. The course explores differences in reporting for print, broadcast, and web-based media, and examines how reporters cover the news on beats and specialty areas such as general assignment, police and fire, city hall, sports, health, and politics. Students consider issues related to ethics and fairness and the impact of media consolidation and rolling deadlines on news content. Prerequisite: ENG 11. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring COM 18 Communication Skills Students develop and apply skills that are necessary to communicate effectively in interpersonal, small group and public communication situations, including those related to technical settings. Through projectbased learning, discussion, selected reading and lectures, students develop written, oral, and critical thinking skills and identify technologies that serve as effective channels for communicating in contemporary settings. Students research, organize, write and present information in small groups and participate in teambuilding and team membership. The course examines issues related to ethics, culture, and technology, and explores career options in selected fields that require effective communication skills. This course does not satisfy a Communication program requirement. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites.

COLLEGE SUCCESS STRATEGIES
Career Exploration and Development Seminar This course encourages the student to learn career decision-making skills through a process of self awareness, individual, and group exercises. The student will explore various career options with the intent on narrowing down specific academic and career goals. Emphasis is placed on gaining knowledge of information resources used in career planning and gaining knowledge of the major themes of career development and choice. One or two class hours a week. 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer CSS 14 Job Preparation: Your Credentials A course in resume and cover letter design. Also includes instruction in job search strategies and interviewing techniques. Students are involved in mock interviewing, learning to dress for success, and appropriate work-world communication skills — everything you need to land the right job. 1 credit Fall, Spring CSS 15 Technology Tools for College Success This course is designed to foster success in college by increasing students’ information technology skills. Topics include basic computer operation, trouble-shooting simple problems, survey of application types, writing papers with word processors, introduction to uses of spreadsheets, email, chat, and threaded discussion as communication tools, online etiquette, searching/ navigating the Internet, assessing the credibility of Internet resources, and using college reference databases. This course is not intended for CIS, OFC, or Business Administration majors. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CSS 13

COMMUNICATION
COM 11 Mass Communication This course focuses on the mass communication process and a survey of primary mass media such as books, newspapers, magazines, recordings,

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Course descriptions expertise that public relations professionals develop in order to be effective for their agency, nonprofit organization, or corporation. The course examines how institutions relate to their various publics and explores traditional public relations functions such as media relations, publications, crisis communication, special events, community relations, and other areas. Course discussion addresses ethical dilemmas, “24/7” deadlines, growing global demands, and the significant effects of new technologies on the profession. This course gives students a foundation for entering careers in public relations. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring COM 42 Writing for Organizations This course explores several forms of print and online writing that are used by contemporary institutions to communicate with key stakeholders. Nonprofit agencies and international corporations produce volumes of written material every year. Students develop critical thinking and writing skills through assignments that challenge them to analyze the purpose, format, style, design, and strategic considerations of email practices, memos, reports, newsletters, media releases, proposals, and planning instruments. The course addresses ethical and global issues and reviews careers in writing for organizations. Prerequisite: ENG 11 or permission of program coordinator. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring COM 51 Field Experience This course provides communication students with a field experience in an area related to the mass media or organizational communication. Students develop skills and explore a career interest in a communication-related field through an internship or field-related project that complements their academic preparation. Students spend 10 to 15 hours a week for approximately 10 to 12 weeks working at their field placement or project, depending upon the requirements of the assignment. Students also attend a one-hour weekly seminar to discuss issues related to the field experience and explore related topics. Prerequisite: admission to communication program; COM 12 and permission of the instructor or program director. 3 credits Fall, Spring COM 57 Television Production This course addresses the fundamental principles of television production. It covers studio and control room operating procedures, basic lighting, script writing, and videotape editing. Students produce videotapes using both studio and portable equipment. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall and Spring COM 59 Video Field Production and Editing Students learn basic concepts of electronic field production and editing and gain handson experience through assignments that take them from initial planning of a project through location shooting and final editing. The course addresses preproduction planning, shot composition, lighting and audio on location, and linear and digital editing concepts and techniques. Emphasis is on pre- and postproduction planning and editing, and project completion. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring COM 60 Special Topics in Communication This course examines a contemporary issue or theme related to journalism/mass media or organizational communication. Students explore and discuss, in depth, a topic selected on the basis of timeliness, impact on society, student interest, and faculty expertise. Topics may include Ethics and Current Practices in International Media Relations, Implications of New Media on the Right to Privacy, Media Consolidation: What it Means for Consumers, Communicating with Employees of Global Corporations: Two Perspectives, Challenges of “Round the Clock” Deadlines on Journalistic Integrity. Prerequisite: ENG 11 or permission of instructor. One class hour per week. 1 credit Not offered every year

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provides practice in the use of freehand sketching and Computer Aided Drafting (AutoCAD) topics, including engineering geometry, orthographic projection, auxiliary and section views, fasteners and isometric pictorials. The course also covers the use of Standards, Specification and Geometric Tolerancing. Students in this course are expected to be computer literate. Pre- or Co-requisite: MTH 4N or high school geometry. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CAD 18 Computer Aided Design This course is a continuation of Computer Aided Drafting (CAD 15). This course develops fundamental concepts of engineering design for the creative solution of a problem to be used in the production of a useful device. Application of Computer Aided Design (AutoCAD) topics including libraries, three dimensional wireframe, surface and solid modeling, and shading and rendering of 3D surfaces will be used to convey the design idea from conception to production. Prerequisite: CAD 15. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Summer CAD 19 Advanced Computer Aided Design This course utilizes the latest PC-based associative, parametric solid modeling software (SolidWorks) to produce three-dimensional models of mechanical objects and assemblies. Topics include sketching a part feature, providing dimensions and constraints to tie the features together, converting a sketch into a solid object, and creating and editing full assemblies. Working drawings are created from the part design, including a variety of views and dimension styles. The course continually emphasizes mechanical design principles using the CAD system. In addition, students learn the integration of Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) with CAD to enhance the understanding of the design to manufacturing process. Prerequisite: CAD 15, CAD 18 is recommended. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring

COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN ANDDRAFTING
CAD 15 Computer Aided Drafting This course develops fundamental skills in forming, presenting, and interpreting ideas and concepts using a graphic language. The course

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Course descriptions CIS 03 Working with Laptops This one-credit course is for the non-technical laptop computer user. Features of the laptop computer are presented and students learn basic terminology and trouble-shooting techniques for typical software/hardware problems. Students learn to solve minor problems that arise and to discuss more complicated problems with technical support personnel. Students learn to deal with specified features of the operating system software as a means of optimizing the computer and preventing problems. Methods of connecting laptops to other devices are covered. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring CIS 06 Internet User This course introduces students to the use of the World Wide Web. Some basic browser features are covered and students are introduced to a few of the numerous search engines available on the Internet. Advanced search features are covered in detail. Students also learn the basics of using email, including the use of file attachments. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring CIS 09 Hospitality Management Information Systems This course will give the student basic computer skills in operating systems, word processors and spreadsheets. In addition, the student will learn to use the Internet as a tool for searching and for e-mail. The student will be introduced to the wide variety of support software that is available to automate many functions that must be performed. The student will learn to evaluate the functions and processing in hospitality software packages and to make knowledgeable decisions about these packages. The student will work hands-on with software packages to better understand their functions and capabilities. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credit Spring 15. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring 3D Architecture, Building, and Landscape Design This course provides students with an understanding of all phases of architectural and construction design using parametric CAD software (AutoDesk Revit). Topics include building components and structures, interior designing, site features, landscaping, rendering, and walkthroughs. Scheduling and cost estimation are also introduced. Prerequisite: CAD 15 with a grade of “C” or better. Two lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CAD 58 Civil Drafting and Design This course deals with the concepts of plan scales, bearings, latitudes and departures, property descriptions, contour lines, profiles, highway layout, earthwork cut-and-fill, and runoff analysis. This course includes a laboratory/field component and students are required to complete a CAD based site design project. Prerequisite: CAD 15. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CAD 55

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. Advanced Computer Aided Design II This course is a continuation of CAD19. It uses the latest PC-based associative, parametric solid modeling software to produce advanced 3-D models of mechanical objects and assemblies. Topics include advanced sketching, assemblies, and dimensioning. Several Solid Works modules are used to analyze and demonstrate part and assembly design. This course continually emphasizes mechanical design principles using the CAD system. Prerequisite: CAD 19 or permission of instructor. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CAD 22 Computer Aided Manufacturing This course is a hands-on computer-aided manufacturing course. Students will utilize the latest PC-based industrial “CAM” software to produce Computer Numerical Control machine tool programs for a CNC mill and CNC lathe. The students will learn to use the CAM software to select tools, enter part geometry, and convert screen graphics into a CNC program. Topics include creating programs for milling and turning operations (ID and OD turning, threading, grooving, and back turning), communication between program and machine, and editing models to improve software utilization. In addition, the student will learn the integration of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) with CAM to enhance the understanding of the design to manufacturing process. Prerequisite: ETK 42 and Co-requisite: CAD 19. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CAD 53 Construction Drawing This CAD-based course presents the fundamentals of current building practices. The course introduces students to floor plans, elevations, sections and architectural standards. Reinforced concrete, wood, steel and masonry, as well as frame trusses, methods of joints and connecting fabrication will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CAD CAD 20

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
CIS 01 Introduction to Applications This course will teach the application packages and introduce the operating systems currently being taught in CIS 11. This course is designed for students who have mastered the material covered in CIS 11 but have learned different application packages. Upon completion of this course, the student may petition for credit for CIS 11 or in the case of TechPrep students where an agreement has been articulated with their high school, credit for CIS 11 will be given upon the successful completion of this course. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Summer

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Course descriptions CIS 10 Basic Computing Skills Students are introduced to computers and to business applications with emphasis on spreadsheet, database, presentation, and word processing applications. Students learn to use applications individually and to use multiple applications to develop a project. Projects have a practical business basis to help students develop the ability to use computers effectively in their personal and professional lives. Students learn to use email effectively and to do research on the Internet using multiple browsers and their advanced features. This course is designed for students with no prior computing experience and is not part of any CIS options. It is not open to students who have successfully completed CIS 11. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CIS 11 Introduction to Business Information Systems This course deals with fundamental computer concepts applicable to business and management, including software, problem solving, case studies, business models, and computer systems analysis and design, as well as basic computer applications. Students learn to work with a spreadsheet, a database management system, word processing and presentation software and to apply these skills to the functional areas of organizations. Case studies will be drawn from accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, operation management, and other areas of business. Students learn how to use the Web successfully to research information. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CIS 13 Business Creativity Business Creativity introduces students to basic graphic design and typographic principles in a computerized business environment. The course will give students the background necessary to identify and later apply these principles to create effective and aesthetically pleasing forms of computerized visual business communications. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CIS 14 Spreadsheets Fundamentals This course will introduce students to spreadsheets and their use. Many of the objectives of the Microsoft Office User Specialist will be covered and the student will learn to use a spreadsheet as a problem-solving tool. This course is not available to students who have taken a 3-credit introductory computer course such as CIS 10, CIS 11, OFC 17 or ETK 13. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall CIS 15 Database Fundamentals This course will introduce students to databases and their use. The students will learn some of the design concepts needed to develop a multiple table database. Many of the objectives of the Microsoft Office User Specialist will be covered and the student will learn to use a database as a problemsolving tool. This course is not available to students who have CIS 10 or CIS 11. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall Presentation and Desktop Management Fundamentals This course will introduce students to presentation and desktop management software using PowerPoint and Outlook. Many of the objectives of the Microsoft Office User Specialist will be covered and the student will learn to use these applications as problem solving tools. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall CIS 16 CIS 17

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Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation This course teaches the fundamentals of programming logic, design and implementation. Students learn to think logically and design programs. Examples are implemented in several languages giving students an understanding of how languages work to implement the programmer’s logic and design. Students with no programming background are strongly encouraged to take this course before pursuing other languages. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 19 Laptop/PC Operations This course will explore PC and laptop computer technology. Students will compare and contrast features, learn to maintain a laptop/PC computer, and learn to troubleshoot common hardware and software problems. DOS, Windows 9x, and Windows NT will be introduced. The installation and upgrade of hardware components, operating system software, and application software will also be introduced. Methods for connecting I/O devices (printers and monitors) to a laptop/PC will be covered. This course will not prepare the student for the A+ Certification exam, but it will cover the subjects on the exam at the introductory level. Students that have taken CIS24 or CIS53 will not be allowed credit for this course. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 22 Microcomputer Applications This course will include an in-depth study of a spreadsheet package including its database and graphic capabilities, and its logical functions and macro capabilities. A study of a leading word processing package, including its graphic/desktoppublishing features will also be included. Students will work with an integrated office package and learn how to convert, link, and embed data between the word processor and spreadsheet programs. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with Word and Excel recommended; students without this knowledge should consider taking CIS 11 as a prerequisite. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

Introduction to Programming (COBOL) This course introduces students to programming concepts and to the widely used business language, COBOL. The student will learn to analyze a simple problem, develop a programming solution, write structured COBOL programs and execute them on a computer. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall

CIS 12

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Course descriptions implementing Novell’s Distributed Print Services. The Novell Networking labs require hands-on exercises by students. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIS 53 or permission of the instructor. Meets three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 32 NetWare Systems Manager II This course addresses advanced system administration issues, which include file server installation of the Novell NetWare operating system. It also covers Server Configuration Files, DHCP, NAT, Enterprise Web Server, NNS, NetWare Directory Services management utilities, system backup, memory management, and network performance. The Novell Networking labs require hands-on exercises by students. Prerequisite: CIS 31 with a “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 33 Networking Technologies This course introduces students to data communications and networking concepts as they relate to both local and wide area networks. The framework for the lectures is the OSI reference model. It presents data translation, transmission media, and data transmission as well as network structures, topologies, physical layouts, and communication protocols. The courses discusses the popular protocol stacks, firewalls, name resolution, and proxy servers. It discusses in detail the Internet and IP addressing. It also covers the material in the current CompTIA Network+ Exam. Prerequisites: CIS 53 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring Network Installation and Configuration Seminar This is a “hands on” capstone course. It includes installation and upgrade procedures for the latest versions of NetWare, Microsoft’s Network operating system and Unix/Linux. It also includes installation and upgrade procedures for network CIS 34 presentation software including Power Point, and advanced use of Adobe Illustrator and other drawing software. The class will include a module devoted to applications on the World Wide Web. The student will learn to combine graphics and text imported from a variety of files and applications. The emphasis will be on designing and developing professionally finished products. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIS 13 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring Introduction to Multimedia Development Multimedia allows the development of dynamic presentations involving sound, motion and interactivity. In this course, the student will learn to prepare business presentations using specialized programs including Macromedia Director, Flash, Freehand, Dreamweaver, and Fireworks. The emphasis will be on learning the technical skills to utilize the multimedia software effectively to create business presentations and demonstrations. Prerequisite: CIS 28 or co-registration in CIS28 or permission of instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Introduction to Local Area Networks This course will provide the student with a knowledge of generic local area networks, as well as the Novell NetWare environment. Basic networking terms and concepts will be defined. The fundamental differences between the standalone/DOS and NetWare environments will be discussed. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 31 NetWare Systems Manager I This course introduces students to the Novell NetWare network operating system. It covers creating users, designing and establishing directory structures, implementing file systems and NetWare Directory Services security, management utilities, creating login scripts, managing workstations using ZenWorks, and CIS 30 CIS 29

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. Advanced Microcomputer Applications This course will cover the microcomputer as a business tool. The student will work with typical business and application software packages and learn to evaluate the type of packages appropriate for a given business situation. The emphasis of the course will be on developing applications and using software tools to solve business problems. Prerequisite: CIS 22 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 24 The Microcomputer Environment This course will concentrate on the function, structure, and operation of DOS, Win 3.x, and Win95 operating systems for file and memory management using the diagnostic and troubleshooting tools available in those operating systems. Installation, configuration, and upgrading of the three operating systems will also be presented. This course covers the material in DOS/Windows module of the examination for A+ Certification. Prerequisite: CIS 53 or co-enrolled in CIS 53 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIS 27 Desktop Publishing Desktop Publishing covers the most common application packages used in business communications and commercial publishing including PageMaker, Quark XPress, scanning software, Illustrator, and Photoshop. The student will learn to combine text and graphics to create effective advertisement, brochures, newsletters, newspaper pages, and other printed material. An understanding of the printing process will be developed so the student knows what is needed for professionally printed documents. Prerequisite: CIS 13 or co-registration in CIS 13 or permission of instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIS 28 Electronic Publishing Electronic Publishing provides an introduction to electronic imaging, manipulating graphics, CIS 23

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Course descriptions adapter configurations, network cabling, disk expansion, and troubleshooting techniques for common network problems. An internetwork will be planned, designed, implemented, managed and documented. The network will include print, file and web hosting services and will internet work to both the IP and IPX networks. Prerequisite: CIS 32, 33, 64 and 66 or permission of the instructor. Students could also be currently enrolled in one of the following: CIS 32, CIS 64 or CIS 66. Four class meetings per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CIS 36 Advanced FlashMX This course focuses on the use of FlashMX to create Rich Internet Applications (RIA) and covers Object Oriented Programming and ActionScript as well as other advanced multimedia techniques. Students learn to use the advanced features in Flash to develop applications and web sites as well as programs for other devices. The course includes coverage of the built-in objects, including arrays, data objects, movie clips, interaction objects, and color objects. Prerequisite: CIS 29, CIS 85, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIS 39 Database Design This course covers database design theory and practice. Students learn to analyze a situation and use solid database design principles to develop a database solution. The course covers concepts of the relational database model, entity-relationship diagrams, data structure, and data integrity. It also introduces students to current topics in database design and development. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 40 Introduction to Lotus Notes This course introduces students to the power and versatility available for using Lotus Notes. The course will include navigating Groupware, communication among users, data base design, automation and replication. In addition, the course will give students a firm foundation in building Lotus Notes applications. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 44 Internet Developer The course emphasizes the technical design, development, and implementation of effective Web sites, and students learn what makes a Web site work effectively. The course teaches XHTML, HTML, and CSS and introduces JavaScript. It also introduces software to develop and maintain web sites. Students develop and maintain their own web sites using these development techniques. In addition, students learn to work effectively with Internet navigation, access tools, and analyze the techniques to attract viewers to their web sites. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Introduction to Java for Internet Developers This course will introduce students to the Java programming language. Java will be used to write stand-alone programs called applications and programs called applets that are used for web page development. Students will learn to write, edit, compile and debug the source code using a Java development kit that can be used on a variety of different hardware platforms and operating systems. Students will write and implement Java applets in the development of web sites. Prerequisite: CIS 44 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 46 Applications for Web Development This course provides students with advanced web theory and graphics. Students learn how to analyze the needs and desires of the client or company as related to its Web presence and translate these objectives and goals into appropriate web architecture. Students also explore e-commerce issues relevant to this design. Students work with software packages for graphics and Web page creation and learn to implement the graphic CIS 45

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and interactive needs into the web architecture. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIS 44 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 47 Interactive Web Sites This course covers the creation of interactive Web sites. Students learn about CGI (Common Gateway Interface) and CGI scripts. The course teaches Perl and the unique features it offers to make effective CGI applications. Students learn about the protocols that govern Web communication. It also teaches other languages used in server processing such as ASP.NET. The course introduces students to XML (Extensible Markup language). Students also learn to develop server-side Internet databases that can be accessed from a Web site. Prerequisite: CIS 44, a programming language (CIT 32, CIT 43, CIS 45, CIS 56, CIS 60, or CIS 73); Pre- or Co-requisite: CIS 50 or CIT 32 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 48 Internet Server Administration In this course, students learn to establish, maintain and troubleshoot a Web server. This includes providing support for the web site and e-mail, monitoring usage and managing traffic, handling FTP and CGI parameters, establishing and maintaining security, handling backup as well as troubleshooting problems, and handling disaster recovery. Prerequisites: CIS 53, CIS 47, and CIS63, or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 49 Internet Seminar This is the capstone course in the Webmaster option. Students combine and integrate all they have learned about creating, maintaining, and managing a Web site and a Web host. They design a professional Web site, including graphics and interactive components, install it on the Web server host, and maintain the Web site. Prerequisite: CIT 32, CIS 46, CIS 63; Pre- or Corequisite: CIT 72, or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring

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Course descriptions CIS 60 Introduction to C++ Programming C++ is one of the newest programming languages. The new Java language syntax was derived from C++ and looks very much like C++. Based on the C programming language, C++ is an improved version of C that takes the C language to the next evolution of programming languages. The course will use Microsoft’s Visual C++ integrated development environment for program editing, compiling, linking and execution. Proper program design using structured programming techniques are emphasized, as well as the C++ syntax. The course will cover data basics, C++ operators, loops, branching, function, arrays, pointers, structures, and file processing. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIS 61 Database Programming and Management with Access This course teaches students the concepts of a relational database system. Students learn to work with a variety of Access components including Structured Query Language and Data Access Objects. Students analyze, design, develop, manage, and execute projects in this powerful database environment. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall an administrative standpoint. The course covers batch files, hard disk management, and system configuration techniques, including organization, performance, and fine tuning. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer CIS 54 Systems Analysis and Design Seminar Analyzing and designing effective business systems is the focus of this course. Emphasis is placed on today’s tools for analyzing business problems, designing solutions and documenting the results. The student will learn the effective use of systems tools, the use and integration of microcomputer applications, the development of an effective database, and they will develop an understanding of the analysis and design processes. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: CIS 50 or CIS 61 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 56 Visual Basic This course will cover object-oriented Visual Basic. The student is taught to analyze a programming problem, design a logical solution, and write and execute the program using Visual Basic. The course will emphasize the strengths of Visual Basic and its wide variety of uses as well as covering a wide range of programming applications. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 57 RPG Programming This course gives students a working knowledge of RPG. Students think through, design, write, and execute programs of medium complexity using RPG. Students learn to work with the RPG fixed logic and use it effectively. The exposure to RPG should help students develop a deeper understanding of how programming languages work. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. CIS 50 Oracle and SQL This course is an introduction to the Oracle data base. Students will learn to work with Oracle and the structured query language SQL as they design, manipulate and access the data base. In addition, the concepts and design of relational databases will be analyzed and implemented. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 51 Advanced COBOL Programming This course will give the student an in-depth understanding of the COBOL language. The student will work with tables, various problems in file processing, and on-line processing. By the end of the semester, the student will have learned to apply advanced programming concepts and to use the COBOL language effectively to accomplish programming goals. Prerequisite: CIS 12 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 52 Program Development Seminar Student learn to analyze difficult programming problems and develop solutions for them. The course deals with sophisticated concepts of logic, program development, and data structures. It also covers the systems life-cycle and the concepts applicable to development of systems programs. Students develop and implement an individual programming project in their language of choice. Pre- or Co-requisite: two of the following: CIS 51, CIS 67, and either CIS 62 or CIS 74 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 53 Operating Systems This course gives students an in-depth understanding of computer operating systems. The Operating Systems covered include DOS, Windows 98, Windows XP, and Red Hat Linux. The course leads students through basic and advanced file management tasks from a command line interface as well as from a graphical interface. Topics are covered from both an end-user and

CIS 62 C++ Object Oriented Programming C++ is a widely used programming language for application development. In this course, the students learn a language that has many practical uses in the real world. The course introduces C++ syntax and functions not found in the traditional C. The fundamental concepts of the object oriented paradigm are introduced and object oriented programming is stressed in place of traditional structured programming. Object arrays, pointers to objects, and linked lists of objects are the focus of the class. Prerequisite: CIS 60 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring

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Course descriptions Introduction to UNIX/Linux and Shell Programming This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the UNIX/Linux operating system and shell programming. It provides an overview of the history of UNIX/Linux and an explanation of operating systems. The course covers in detail basic commands, the vi editor, the file structure, the shell environment, and shell scripts. Prerequisite or Corequisite: CIS 53 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIS 64 UNIX/Linux System Administration This course covers the installation, administration and maintenance of a UNIX/Linux file server. The required hardware, system and network configurations will be discussed. Both LAN and WAN connections to the server will be covered before the installation procedure is presented in detail. Starting, controlling and shutting down the server will be covered, and each student will have hands on experience with their own server. User administration, as well as the UNIX/Linux file system organization and security features, are introduced after the student servers are functioning on the network. Process, mail management and performance tuning issues are also discussed near the end of the course. The course will use a computer lab where each student will have individual access to a UNIX/Linux server. Prerequisite: CIS 63 with a “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 65 Windows Server Administration I In this course students will learn to administer a Windows network from a Windows Server. The class will focus on managing user accounts, group accounts, folders, files, and object security. They will learn to secure network resources with shared folder permissions and NTFS permissions. Students will also implement user profiles, user logon scripts and setup and administer network printing. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform post-installation and day-to-day administration tasks in a Windows Client-Server-based network. Prerequisite: CIS CIS 63 53 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 66 Windows Server Administration II In this course the student will install and configure a Windows server. Topics will include Network Protocols, Active Directory and Dynamic Host Configuration Services. Students will learn how to install and configure network services on the server, manage partitions, and to create and administer system policies. Other topics covered include auditing system resources and events, using Windows Diagnostics and monitoring system performance. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure and maintain a Windows server in a Windows based network. Prerequisite: CIS 65 with a “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 67 Advanced Visual Basic In the second semester of Visual Basic, the student will learn to program with the advanced features available in Visual Basic and will focus on the logic involved in developing professional programs. The features covered will include user interfaces, controls including ActiveX controls, databases, object-oriented programming, VBScript and the Internet. Prerequisite: CIS56 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 68 Oracle with Forms and Reports This course builds on students’ knowledge of SQL and PL/SQL as they learn to develop and customize forms and reports. Students work with Oracle Forms Developer and Report Developer to construct database forms and reports. They work extensively with PL/SQL to increase their knowledge of the language in support of their development activities. Prerequisite: CIS 50. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 69

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Seminar in Desktop Publishing, Imaging and Multimedia Design By working in design teams on multifaceted projects, this course will allow students to apply their skills in creative design, desktop publishing, electronic imaging, and multimedia applications by developing projects needed by businesses, industries, and the community. Students will master at least one suite of design and/or multimedia products, and will produce professional quality work which then may be printed, distributed electronically, and/or accessed via the internet, CD or kiosk. Prerequisites: CIS13, 27, 28, or permission of instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 70 Oracle Database Administration This course is an introduction to Oracle database administration. Students learn how to perform database administration tasks including creating databases; managing tablespaces, rollback segments, datafiles, and users; partitioning tables; protecting database resources; backup and recovery techniques; and database tuning. Prerequisite: CIS 50. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 71 Windows 2000 Administration I In this course students will create and administer user and group accounts in a Windows 2000 environment. In addition students will learn to monitor manage and troubleshoot access to files and folders, as well as configuring and supporting user profiles and implementing and monitoring security. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform postinstallation and day-to-day administration tasks on a Windows 2000 system. Prerequisite: CIS 53 or concurrent enrollment. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIS 72 Windows 2000 Administration II This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure Microsoft Windows 2000. In addition students will implement, manage and troubleshoot

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Course descriptions CIS 78 Computer Organization and Design Laws of computer organization and design for RISC architectures. Interfaces between hardware and software are studied. Influence of instruction set on performance is presented. Design of a processor with pipelining is analyzed. Computer arithmetic is studied. Memory hierarchy and their influence on performance are documented. Elements of interfacing and I/O organization are included. The course has design, implementation, and analytical components. Prerequisite: CIS 77 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CIS 79 J2EE - Enterprise Java Beans (EJB) This course covers the components in the business tier of an enterprise application known as Enterprise Java Beans (EJB). It focuses on the three types of beans--Session, Entity, and Message driven beans, issues pertaining to transactions, persistence, and security, and the role of EJBs in the enterprise application framework of J2EE. The course provides hands-on experience in designing, developing, and deploying enterprise java beans on an application server. Prerequisite: CIS 75 or permission of the instructor. Four class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CIS 80 Advanced CIS Applications This course covers an advanced topic in Computer Information Systems. The topic will be announced prior to the semester in which the course is offered. This course is intended for students who are interested in pursuing a sophisticated topic in Computer Information Systems area with an instructor. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring; not offered every semester CIS 81 Advanced Topics in CIS This is a course on a specific topic in computer information systems. Topics will be announced each semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Not offered every year CIS 75 Software Specification and Design This course covers object-oriented analysis and design, methodologies and tools. It focuses on methodologies of specification and design of software systems. It addresses the issues of user interface design and software prototyping. The course also presents the state of the art in the tool and environments supporting the front end of the software development cycle. Prerequisite: CIS 74 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring Introduction to Procedural Programming Procedural Programming (C/C++) under Unix. Data types, variable declarations, arithmetic expressions, conditional statements, macros, function prototypes, standard libraries, file processing, pointers, structures, unions and dynamic memory management are discussed. Unix file system, shell scripts, input/output redirection, piping, programming with standard I/O and Unix system calls will be covered. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CIS 77 Introduction to Computer Systems This course is an introduction to major components of computer systems. The course introduces fundamental concepts of computing systems such as binary arithmetic and data representation, the Von Neumann model for processing computer programs, the operation of memory, instruction set, and machine and assembly language programming. It systematically presents the levels of transformations from machine language to assembly language to highlevel language. The course studies the role of such systems software components as assemblers, compilers, linkers, loaders, and operating systems. The course has a strong project component. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIS 76 or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite: MTH 43. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall CIS 76

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. hardware devices and drivers, network protocols and services in a Windows 2000 environment. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to optimize performance of a Windows 2000 system. Prerequisite: CIS 71. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIS 73 Object-Oriented JAVA Programming I The course covers basic concepts in programming and an introduction to the object paradigm. It introduces the concepts of the object paradigm and teaches students how to design and implement simple programs in an object-oriented language. The course also covers the basics of using computers and basic software tools to develop programs. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 73 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

Object-Oriented JAVA Programming II The course addresses software development using advanced object-oriented concepts and JAVA. It covers concurrency and synchronization issues and advanced topics of the object paradigm such as inheritance and polymorphism. It introduces the programming of graphics using JAVA Swing classes and examines File Streams and I/O Processing in detail. It compares the procedural paradigm with the object paradigm. It also addresses issues of programming with multiple processes and programming of systems with exception-handling capabilities. These concepts are introduced in the context of developing software using software tools, including libraries of components. Prerequisite: CIS 73. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Approximately 3-5 hours per week of computer time will be required to complete the programming assignments. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

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Course descriptions CIS 82 Adobe Photoshop This course will provide in-depth, hands-on training in Adobe Photoshop, the industry-standard imaging software. Topics covered include the work environment, tools and palettes, working with selections, layers, masks, channels, retouching, effects, color management, and creating images for print or the Web. One hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall CIS 83 Adobe Illustrator This course will provide in-depth, hands-on training in Adobe Illustrator, the vector-based drawing software. Topics covered include creating basic shapes, transforming objects, working with type, creating airbrush effects, combining Illustrator graphics and Photoshop images, and preparing graphics for Web publication. One hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall CIS 84 Adobe PageMaker This course will provide in-depth, hands-on training in Adobe PageMaker, a popular pagelayout software program. Topics include importing text and images, producing publications, managing color, integrating with Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator, merging text and images from database and spreadsheet programs, creating PDFs, and exporting to web pages and other electronic media. One hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall CIS 85 Macromedia Flash This course provides an in-depth, hands-on training in Macromedia Flash, a powerful animation tool. Topics include: the Flash interface, basic drawing in Flash; using text, working with layers and importing artwork, symbols, the Flash library, the movie explorer, animation, using sound, adding interactivity, publishing and exporting Flash movies, printing Flash, introduction to objectoriented programming, Flash structure, mapping, movie clips with sound, and publishing, evaluating, and assessing Flash animations. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring CIS 86 Macromedia Director This course provides an in-depth, hands-on training in Macromedia Director, a popular software package used to create interactive CDs and other multimedia presentations. Topics include: assembling casts, building a score, animating sprites, playing and refining movies, drawing vector shapes, adding digital video, text and sound, creating a projector, making movies for the web, using Xtras and behaviors, and scripting Lingo. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring CIS 87 Macromedia Dreamweaver This course provides an in-depth, hands-on training in Macromedia Dreamweaver. Topics include: tools, palettes, site management properties as well as automating and customizing Dreamweaver. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring CIS 88 Adobe InDesign™ This course provides in-depth, hands-on training in Adobe InDesign™, a popular page-layout software program. Topics include importing and creating text and images, producing publications, managing color, integrating with other products, working with tables and frames, publishing with SML, and color management. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer CIS 91 Selected Topics in CIS A Distance Learning course that offers students the opportunity to take selected courses via the Web. The list of courses available for a particular semester will be published prior to each semester when the course is being offered. Students select the curriculum they will complete from the published list of options. The student will then follow the Web based learning criteria for the selected course and receive credit for that course. There will be one orientation meeting at the beginning of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Not offered every year

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CIS 92 Selected One-Credit Topics in CIS This distance learning course offers students the opportunity to take selected one-credit courses via the Web. The list of courses available for a particular semester are published prior to each semester in which the course is being offered. Students select the curriculum they will complete from the published list of options. Students follow the Web-based learning criteria for the selected course and receive credit for that course. There is one orientation meeting at the beginning of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer CIS 93 Selected Four-Credit Topics in CIS This Distance Learning course offers students the opportunity to take selected four-credit courses via the Web. The list of courses available for a particular semester is published prior to each semester in which the course is being offered. Students select the curriculum they will complete from the published list of options. Students follow the Web-based learning criteria for the selected course and receive credit for that course. There is one optional orientation meeting at the beginning of the semester. An optional two-hour lab each week provides additional instructional support. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
CIT 11 Information Technology Fluency I This course introduces students to the technical and application concepts of information technology. The students develop a basic understanding of computing, operating systems, application packages in word processing and Excel and the basics of developing a web site. Students continue to acquire the intellectual knowledge as well as the concepts, skills, and the capabilities essential to a deep understanding of information technology. This course is the first of three courses needed to fulfill this objective. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; may not be offered every semester

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Course descriptions desk to support internal operations and external operations via phone or email. Troubleshooting concepts are also introduced. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 22 Troubleshooting Applications This course focuses on the technology, techniques, and software tools involved in troubleshooting. Specific popular applications help to building students skills for future use in a broader range of applications. Effective troubleshooting procedures for software applications are taught. Online resources for support are explored. Prerequisite: CIS 15, CIT 21, CIS 53, or permission of the instructor. Pre- or co-requisite CIS 23 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 23 Applied Help Desk Support This course allows students to apply the skills learned in computer information systems courses by working as a volunteer lab assistant. Students gain experience in troubleshooting software and hardware problems, dealing with people in a help desk/lab setting, and sharing knowledge gained in computer courses. Prerequisite: CIS 15, CIT 21, CIS 53, or permission of the instructor. Pre- or Corequisite: CIS 23, CIS 24, CIT 22, or permission of the instructor. One class meeting per week and six hours a week assisting in a computer lab. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 25 Network Security This course introduces the principles and practices of security in computer networks. It covers the foundations of securing computer networks, including cryptography models, authentication, communications security, infrastructure security, operational and organizational security. Students learn the risks, threats, hazards, and concerns of computer networks and enhance their abilities to perform security research. Prerequisite: CIS 33 and CIS 63 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 15 Technology for Teachers Seminar II This course integrates the technology training obtained in CIT 14 with the material covered in fluency courses. In addition to gaining the skills to use technology to meet a variety of learning styles, the students gain knowledge of equity, ethical, legal and human issues of technology as they relate to education and society. Prerequisite: CIT 14. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 13, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring, Summer Information Technology Foundation Concepts This project-based survey course covers some of the major aspects of the Information Technology (IT) industry. Students are introduced to the core aspects of Information Technology, including network and infrastructure systems, information support and services, interactive media, and programming and software development. The focus of this course is a basic understanding of technology and how each IT area relates to and interacts with others. The course gives students a basic understanding of the impact of technology on society and organizations of all types and the knowledge to make informed choices about IT, including how IT will impact a variety of careers. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 20 Hardware Fundamentals This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of computer hardware that lay a foundation for their other courses in computers. Students develop an understanding of the fundamentals involved in buying, building and maintaining a computer. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring CIT 21 Help Desk Methods This course covers the basic knowledge and skills needed to effectively work in the software service support field, including the integrated concepts of a successful help desk and the use of the help CIT 16

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. CIT 12 Information Technology Fluency II This course introduces students to logic and problem solving in the computing environment. Students develop a basic idea of programming, communicating with data, debugging, and solving computing problems. Students continue to acquire the intellectual knowledge as well as the concepts, skills, and capabilities essential to a deep understanding of information technology. This course is the second of three courses needed to fulfill this objective. Prerequisite: CIT 11 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; may not be offered every semester CIT 13 Information Technology Fluency III This course introduces students to the basic concepts of systems analysis and design as applicable to developing computer systems. Students also work to develop the concepts and skills to use application packages for web page and presentation development. Students then apply their skills to the development of a major project involving their field of study. Students continue to acquire the intellectual knowledge as well as the concepts, skills, and capabilities essential to a deep understanding of information technology. This course is the capstone of three courses needed to fulfill this objective. Prerequisite: CIT 12 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; may not be offered every semester CIT 14 Technology for Teachers Seminar I This course provides an overview of the certificate program, introduces students to both PC and Mac platforms, ensures that all students have basic computer skills, and enables students to evaluate and select educational software. Students assess their knowledge and use of instructional technology and develop a plan to integrate technology into their classrooms. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Summer

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Course descriptions CIT 26 Firewall Security This course explores the role of firewalls in building a secure Local Area Network. Students learn how firewalls fit into network security, the role they play, and how they can be effectively combined with other security components to enhance network security. Topics include planning, installation, building, and maintenance of a firewall as well as decision making and trouble-shooting firewall issues. Prerequisite: CIT 25 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 27 Operating Systems Security This course covers operating system security, including Internet and email security, border security, and wireless security. It also covers a variety of operating systems to assure that the student’s knowledge extends to multiple platforms. Prerequisite: CIT 25 or permission of the instructor, CIS 65 is recommended. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Information Security and Disaster Recovery This course emphasizes the creation and maintenance of a secure information system. Students learn how to integrate security during the development of an information system and how to preserve the security during the complete IS life cycle. Students also learn how to create, implement, and test a disaster recovery plan and the related procedures. Prerequisite: CIT 25 or permission of the instructor; CIS 50, CIS 61, CIS 39, or CIT 32 recommended. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 30 Open Source Applications This course covers the use of open source software to handle basic application needs including word processing, spreadsheets, and presentations. Students learn to use all of these applications effectively and understand the ideas and implications of using open source application software. Pre- or co-requisite CIT 28 CIT 31 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 31 Open Source Operating System This course covers the use of open source operating system to handle basic OS needs, including command line and GUI desktop environments. Students learn about the major commands and features of the operating system including navigation and manipulation of the file system. Students also learn about the X Windows environment, GNOME, KDE and the use of text. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 32 Open Source Database Students in this course learn to work with an open source database. They learn the concepts of creating a relational open source database using standard query techniques including SQL and maintaining the database. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 35 eXtensible Markup Language (XML) This course introduces the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and teaches the use of XML within documents and datafiles. In addition to learning XML, students work with DTD, CSS, XSLT, Schemas, and the document object model. Prerequisite: CIS 44 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 39 Security Seminar This hands-on capstone course provides students with the opportunity to plan, design, implement, manage, and document an intranetwork such that access to internal services, both to the LAN and the Internet, can be allowed or denied in a secure manner. It includes the implementation, configuration, and maintenance of a firewall. Students design, implement, and test a disaster recovery plan, a public key server for access to data

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and email encryption, and a plan for performing system updates and virus and spyware protection. Prerequisites: CIS 64, CIS 66, CIT 26, CIT 27, and CIT 28, or permission of the instructor. Three lecture and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring CIT 40 Electronic Game Development I This course is an overview of electronic game development that takes students from the conception of electronic games in the 1970s up through the next generation console and PC games of today. Students study the game design process, the research and development of the game, and prepare a game proposal. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 41 Visual Concepts for Game Designers This course is an introduction to visual concepts and the software that supports their development. Students will learn what game developers need to create the realistic visuals seen in many popular games titles. Emphasis is placed on concepts needed to create actual assets for use in actual games. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 40. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 42 Computer Game Level Building This course provides an introduction to planning and building game levels with a level editor. Students learn the importance of good level building and puzzle creation. Students are exposed to more than one level editor, and their strengths and weakness will be discussed. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 40 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIT 43 Programming and Game Developers I This course introduces programming for game developers. Students learn the basics of game programming using a popular game programming

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Course descriptions a computer game program. Prerequisite: CIT 43. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 45 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 56 Modding II Students collaborate on a complete game level mod in this course, developing it from start to finish. The course emphasizes using an existing mod and adding and modifying elements with a focus on gameplay. Students also develop supporting materials that can be used to promote their mod. Prerequisites: CIT 50, CIT 52, and CIT 53 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Introduction to Digital Audio Recording This course introduces students to the fundamentals of computer technologies to create audio productions for business, multimedia, and other applications. Students explore popular software applications, hardware and software compatibility, and understand their uses for MIDI programming and digital recording. By creating soundtracks, optimized voice-over recordings, and other projects, students develop an understanding of sound recording technology. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Fundamentals of Game Engine Design This course covers various components of game engine design. A well-designed game engine handles processing and reduces the unique coding requirements, making the game more efficient and effective. Students learn how to put together a game engine that can be used by multiple games. The course addresses such aspects of game engines as graphics, sound, input, and tools. Prerequisite: CIT 45 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 59 CIT 58 CIT 47 Production for Game Developers This course covers the commercial development life cycle involved in game production. Student examine case studies of the release of successful games, ethical issues, strategies and trends, and team building in game production. Students examine related concepts such as developing a full complement of toys, hint books, magazines, and movies. Students develop a production plan for their games. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 44, CIT 45, CIT 46, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 50 Modding I A mod can be anything from a simple game modification to new levels or even to a new game. This course examines the mod community online. The goal is to understand what it takes to make a top-notch mod. Aspiring game developers can choose from hundreds of semiformal mod groups to study. Students seek out existing mods and reviews them with a critical eye. Prerequisites: CIT 40, CIT 41, and CIT 42 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 53 Game Design on Paper In this course, students create games on paper only. Understanding the history of paper games is a key to understanding game design. The course includes analysis of games ranging from Tic-TacToe to Dungeons and Dragons. No computers are used in the course. Prerequisites: CIT 40 and ENG 11, or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall CIT 55 Topics in Game Programming This course covers a variety of issues that are important in game development. Topics include artificial intelligence, game world dynamics, human interfaces, and supporting tools. The course incorporates new developments in the programming area as they emerge. Students use their foundation in C++ to apply each topic to

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. language and start out creating simple text games and move on to windows programming with an introduction to DirectX. The student leaves this course with a basic understanding of programming and the basic programming skills to start programming games. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 40 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIT 44 Electronic Game Development II This course is a continuation of CIT 40 and focuses on more advanced concepts of game development and production. Students work on scripting and developing characters, as well as exploring and understanding the concepts of game shells and game engines. Prerequisite: CIT 40, CIT 41, CIT 42, and CIT 43, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Programming for Game Developers II This course expands the knowledge base in programming that was begun in CIT 43. Students further their knowledge of programming and DirectX and focus on more complex gaming techniques. Topics include advanced use of graphics, sound, and input, and an understanding of new and emerging software technologies as they relate to game development. Prerequisite: CIT 43 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring CIT 46 Game and Sound Production This is a project-oriented course. Students work together to create an end product. Students gain an understanding of sound and how to effectively incorporate it into games. At the end of the course, students will develop and disseminate a simple game. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 44, CIT 45, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 45

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Course descriptions CIT 60 Advanced Game Analysis In this course, students examine current computer and console games with a critical eye. This process solidifies their experience in mod development and game design. Students increase the depth of their understanding by continual review of a variety of games. The course also focuses on developing student awareness of the differing quality levels of games. Prerequisite: CIT 52. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 56 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 65 Computer Game Pre-Production In this project-oriented course, students work together to design and plan the development cycle of one or more games that they will cooperatively develop in CIT 66. Students learn to write a game proposal and to schedule development resources. Pre- or co-requisites: CIT 45 and CIT 55. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall CIT 66 Game Production This project-oriented course brings together all components of the game development program to create a unique game. Each group uses the design it created in CIT 65. At the end of the course, students each have a game that they can show to prospective employers. Prerequisite: CIT 65 or permission of the instructor. Two class hours and four lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring Data Structures in the Game Environment This is the third of a sequence of programming courses, following CIT 43 and CIT 45. This course focuses on data structures and algorithms commonly used in computer games. Topics include tables, lists, trees, queues, and stacks, as well as algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: CIT 45 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 70 CIT 72 Advanced Interactive Programming In this course, students write advanced programs and scripts for server-side Web development, building on the framework laid in CIS 47. They increase their abilities in languages learned and build their skills in languages currently used for Web site development. The Web sites they build support databases, data collection and passing, selection, and advanced Web concepts. Students also familiarize themselves with the concepts involved in programming for interactive devices other than the Web. Prerequisite: CIS 47. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CIT 73 Object-Oriented Concepts This course is an introduction to the use of objectoriented concepts for software development. It prepares students for the CIS 73 Object-Oriented Java Programming course. The course concentrates on objects and discusses very little Java syntax. It discusses the object-oriented paradigm in detail with particular emphasis on classes, objects, and the use of objects in user applications and applets. The course introduces encapsulation, inheritance, arrays of objects, and polymorphism. Students learn how to design classes and display the interaction of objects in visual form using the Unified Modeling Language. The course introduces several concepts from procedural programming such as primitive data types, assignment, conditionals, and repetitive loops. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall J2EE - Java Server Pages (JSP) and Servlets This course introduces students to server-side programming using Servlets and Java Server Pages (JSPs). It provides an introduction to Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE), multi-tier architecture, J2EE APIs, and J2EE component architecture from a web perspective. Students learn JSPs, Servlets, the associated APIs, and the interaction of these components with HTML from the client tier and Java Beans from the business tier. The course provides hands-on experience in developing CIT 80

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JSPs and Servlets and deploying code on a server. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, or CIS 45 and CIS 47, or CIS 73 and CIS 47, or CIS 74; CIS 47 may be taken as a co-requisite. Four class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
BASED LEARNING)

(SEE WORK-

CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJ 11 Introduction to Criminal Justice This is a survey course designed to provide students with an overview of the criminal justice system. The principles and practices of police, courts, and corrections are examined. The constitutional basis of our system of justice is explored and emphasized. CRJ 11 provides the foundation needed for more advanced coursework. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall CRJ 13 Criminal Law Primary focus is on the substantive law. General legal principles applicable throughout the majority of the states are covered as well as the substantive law of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The nature and development of criminal law and legal systems, jurisdiction, the criminal act, the criminal state of mind and matters affecting responsibility are studied. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall CRJ 15 Report Writing and Information Systems This course enables students to determine report content through collection, interpretation, and evaluation of data. Emphasis is placed upon interpersonal communication and its application in role-playing experiences in interviews and interrogations. Students complete many reportwriting assignments, including operational and administrative reports. Implications of the individual report for an agency’s total information capability are studied along with examination of several contemporary information systems,

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Course descriptions an introduction to penology. Prerequisite: SOC 11 or permission of program director. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall CRJ 56 Criminal Investigation Emphasis is placed on the special techniques most appropriate for particular kinds of investigations, i.e., arson, burglary, homicide, robbery, etc. Constitutional aspects of investigative procedures are discussed along with procedures for interviewing and recording statements of witnesses and suspects. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring CRJ 58 Criminal Procedure An intensive study and analysis of the United States Constitution and an examination of judicial interpretations of it. Particular attention is placed on the Supreme Court’s decisions and impact on criminal justice processes and procedures with respect to arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confessions, assistance of counsel and freedom of speech. Prerequisite: CRJ 11 and 13. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall CRJ 59 Introduction to Criminalistics An introductory course in forensic science with emphasis on the recognition, collection, and analysis of physical evidence. Students participate in practical exercises utilizing appropriate lab equipment and field kits and investigate simulated crimes and introduce physical evidence at mock trials. Prerequisite: CRJ 13, CRJ 15, and CRJ 58. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring CRJ 60 Topics in Criminal Justice A one-semester course on a specific topic or current issue affecting the criminal justice system. Topic to be announced each semester. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year Probation, Parole, and Community Corrections An in-depth study of the policies and practices of probation and parole. It will view such concepts as risk and ethics, and how these are applied on an everyday basis in the field. Various alternatives to incarceration will also be explored, in addition to a thorough examination of the discretionary powers of the probation and parole officer. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year CRJ 24 Contemporary Corrections A survey of the evolution of corrections, developed historically, with particular emphasis on United States and Massachusetts practices, including contemporary correctional practices and alternatives to incarceration. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year CRJ 26 Corrections Administration Correctional administration and the evolution of management theory are examined. The corrections environment, the organizational process as well as ethics and social influences are explored. CRJ 26 provides the student with an overall understanding of the correctional management process. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year Offender Counseling and Rehabilitation Offender Counseling and Rehabilitation explores the dual demands of the correctional system: Assisting offenders in establishing lifestyles which conform to the rules of society and, protecting the community from harmful activities of offenders under the supervision of the department of Corrections. The concept of Treatment vs. Punishment and various treatment modalities are examined. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year CRJ 51 Criminology The study of the nature of crime, the criminal, and society’s approach to the crime problem; the causes of crime; research methods in criminology; the criminal justice system in theory and reality; CRJ 28 CRJ 23

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. including the processes used for report review and control. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring CRJ 18 Law Enforcement Management and Planning Police organization and management practices are examined. Principal topics include: planning and research, principles of organization, direction and leadership, police supervision, budgeting systems, personnel management, labor-management practices and collective bargaining, and patrol administration. Selected contemporary issues are also discussed. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring

CRJ 19 Police and Community Relations Emphasizing the concept that each human being is unique, this course is an in-depth study of the police role in the community. Police-initiated programs directed toward improving intergroup relations are examined and discussed along with selected issues confronting the police and the public they serve. Maximizing the degree of police/ community cooperation and interaction is the primary objective. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall CRJ 21 Juvenile Offenders This course provides for a holistic approach to the study of the many factors that relate to juvenile delinquency. The scope and nature of delinquency, methods of prevention, environmental influences, the juvenile justice system, and juvenile corrections will be among topics examined and discussed. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring CRJ 22 Introduction to Corrections This is a survey course designed to provide students with a clear overview of each of the categories that make up our Correctional System. Jails, prisons, and community corrections programs are explored. The legal process and rights of inmates are examined. CRJ 22 provides a foundation for more advanced studies in corrections. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year

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Course descriptions

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CULINARY ARTS
CUL 10 Art Skills for the Culinarian This course develops skills that allow students to present food in an artistically pleasing manner, digitally record it, and enhance the food service area. The course emphasizes the following skill areas: art skills, which include the creation of three-dimensional plates and platters utilizing the principles of form, function, and color; photography skills, which include the use of a digital camera and image editing software to record images and correct them for improved professional appearance; and ice-carving skills, which include the art of preparing centerpieces, show pieces, and socles to enhance the appearance of food presentation. Three class hours a week. for 10 weeks; two class hours and three lab hours a week for five weeks. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only CUL 11 Essentials of Culinary Arts I This course covers the procedures and techniques of cooking. It develops basic skills including applicable kitchen safety and sanitation. It introduces students to the practical use of commercial kitchen equipment and hand tools as well as essential cooking principles. The course includes stocks, sauces and soups, meat, fish, and poultry preparations, vegetables and starch products, and cold pantry and breakfast preparation. This course requires participation in evening functions. Students begin to develop their culinary portfolios in this course. Two class hours and eight lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only CUL 12 Essentials of Culinary Arts II This course is a continuation of CUL 11 and builds on the essentials mastered in CUL 11. The course is a practicum in the application of the procedures and techniques of cooking. This course focuses on the individual and group preparation and presentation of meals and their components as well as on the skills to assess and critique them. It culminates in a final practical assessment. The course requires participation in evening functions and continuation of the student’s culinary portfolio. Prerequisite: CUL 11 or permission of program director. Two

class hours and eight lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring; Day only CUL 13 Dining Room Functions I This course introduces students to the proper dining room procedures and the relationship of the dining room to the kitchen. It covers a variety of service styles including American, Buffet, Banquet and Family Style. The course also covers beverage service relative to these types of service. The course requires participation in evening functions. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall; Day only CUL 14 Mixology and Bar Management A major focus of this course includes: “Training for Intervention Procedures by Servers of Alcohol” (TIPS), centered around a nationally recognized course, culminating in a standardized exam and certificate. Also covered are proper procedures for a bar setup, the art of drink preparation and service, and an introduction to the history, service and storage of wine. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only CUL 15 Sanitation for Culinarians This course focuses on the safe and sanitary operation of a restaurant and pastry shop and, using the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point System (HACCP), focuses on the safe and sanitary purchasing, receiving, storing, cooling, and reheating of meats, produce, seafood, and baking ingredients (flours, fruits, dairy products, thickeners) to prevent food borne illness. The course centers on a nationally certified course sponsored by the National Restaurant Association and culminates in a standardized exam and certificate. It also meets the mandatory requirement for certification in the American Culinary Federation (ACF). Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall; Day only CUL 16 Nutrition for Culinarians This course helps students develop an

appreciation for and ability to understand basic nutrition when incorporating proteins, fruits, starches, and vegetables into entrees and desserts. The course focuses on a la carte preparations, specialty menus such as hospitals and nursing homes, and buffet presentations in a variety of menu styles. It employs Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) principles in achieving the desired dietary goals. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall; Day only CUL 19 Baking Skills for Cooks This course focuses on the baking skills cooks or chefs working in smaller establishments should possess, including breads and rolls, quick breads, pies, cookies and simple pastries, and basic cake decorating. This course also covers basic decorative skills, including cornucopia, breadbaskets, and seasonal items. One class hour and four lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only CUL 23 Advanced Table Service This course introduces the student to French and Russian service focusing on table side menu preparations. This course culminates in a required public evening function featuring an advanced service style. Prerequisite: CUL 13 or permission of the program director. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only The Capstone Experience for Culinarians This course is the capstone course for Culinary Arts majors and culminates in the presentation of the Senior Recognition Dinner. Students develop a menu within a given budget, determine the nutritional analysis for the menu, and plan and execute the plate presentations and beverage services. They complete their Culinary Arts Personal Portfolio by the conclusion of this course. Prerequisite: CUL 10, 14, 15, 16, 23, 31, 33, and 36; or permission of the program director. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day only CUL 24

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Course descriptions skills, which include the art of preparing dessert buffet centerpieces, show pieces, and socles for ice creams and sorbets. Three class hours a week. for ten weeks; two class hours and three lab hours per week for five weeks. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only CUL 51 Baking Technology This course focuses on and examines the principles and functions of ingredients (flours, fats, sweeteners, dairy) used in baking and pastry production. It explores the variables of bakery ingredients and the physical behavior of the product from ingredients through formulation and production. The course uses oral and written reports to emphasize the analysis of the final products. Two class hours and three lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only CUL 52 Essentials of Baking I This course introduces the student to basic cooking methods such as sautéing, baking, poaching and broiling, and their relationship to the baking process. It also covers basic kitchen equipment used in bakery and pastry production; fundamental knife skills and cuts, which are implemented in chopping, slicing, and garnishing; and the principles of professional baking, including sanitation, safety regulations, and personal hygiene. It also covers the use and care of the bakeshop utensils and equipment. The course begins to examine the chemistry of baking through the preparation of quick breads, yeast dough, and Artisan breads. It emphasizes yeast fermentation, ingredient functions, flavors, and bread baking. The course requires two seasonal projects. One class hour and four lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall; Day only CUL 62 Essentials of Baking II This course is a continuation of CUL 52 and focuses on laminated dough and pâté a choux as an introduction to classical pastries. The course introduces the preparation and use of custards, prepare food for sale in the Grady Dining Room for lunch one day a week. The course covers Asia, the Mediterranean/Europe, and the African continent. It requires participation in evening functions and continued development of the student’s culinary portfolio. Prerequisite: CUL 31 or permission of the program director. Three class hours and twelve lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Spring; Day only CUL 33 Dining Room Functions II This course focuses solely on the practical aspect of operating an a la carte dining room. Students develop their front-of-the-house skills by greeting customers, taking and delivering orders, and collecting cash. This course requires evening function participation. Prerequisite: CUL 13 or permission of the program director. One class hour and four lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only CUL 36 Purchasing for Culinarians This course focuses on proper purchasing techniques and their application in a well-run restaurant or bakery operation. It covers the skills necessary to correctly identify, purchase, receive, and store a variety of perishable and nonperishable products and equipment pertinent to a restaurant or bakery operation. Two class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only CUL 50 Art Skills for the Baker This course prepares students to present breads, cakes, pastries and other bakery-related items for both a la carte and buffet service in an artistically pleasing manner, digitally record the presentations, and enhance the bakeshop/dessert area. The course emphasizes art skills, which include the creation of three-dimensional dessert plates and platters and centerpieces using form, function, and color; photography skills, which include the use of a digital camera and imageediting software to record images and correct them for improving the professional appearance of dessert plates and platters; and ice-carving

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. Foodservice Operations and Career Development This course focuses on the organization and operation of a small restaurant or pastry shop, including financial, legal, and tax matters. Students develop sound career goals in conjunction with their Culinary Arts/Baking and Pastry Arts Personal Portfolio and a professional working resume. Pre- or Co-requisite: CUL 24 or CUL 67 or permission of the program director. Two class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only CUL 31 Advanced Culinary Techniques I This course encompasses a wide variety of highlevel practical preparation skills in the areas of Garde Manger, Classical French Cuisine, and Cuisine of the Americas. The section on Garde Manger builds on the basic essential skills and applies them at an advanced level to the art of presenting food in a decorative manner. The course also includes various components of the garde manger’s skills, including cheese and sausage making, appetizers and canapé preparation, decorative vegetable carving and food smoking, pâtés, galantines, and cold food presentation. The class lessons in the Classical French Cuisine segment reflect the very foundations of formal cuisine, studying and preparing the recipes of Escoffier, Carême, and other early masters. The Cuisine of the Americas’ section covers the cooking of North and South America, focusing on the important culinary regions in each area. The course requires evening function participation and continued development of the student’s culinary portfolio. Prerequisite: CUL 12 or permission of the program director. Three class hours and twelve lab hours per week. Instruction Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall; Day only CUL 32 Advanced Culinary Techniques II This course applies the skills acquired in CUL 11 and CUL 12. The course applies a variety of International Cuisines studied through classroom lecture and practical work in the kitchen. In addition to the classroom participation in the evaluation of the products prepared, students also CUL 25

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Course descriptions crème anglaise, dessert sauces, and mousse, and emphasizes the mixing methods, shaping, and portioning, filling, baking and finishing of cookies, petit fours, pies, and cakes. The course further emphasizes slicing, filling, and decorating layer cakes with a variety of techniques, including icings and pipings, and their correct plate presentation. Prerequisite: CUL 52 or permission of the program director. Two class hours and eight lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring; Day only Introduction to Showpiece and Displays This course explores the design and techniques of contrasting amenities, showpieces, and displays of various sizes, shapes, and themes, using a variety of media such as chocolate, ice, and floral arrangements. Students plan, execute, and maintain the Culinary Arts public display area. Prerequisite: CUL 50 and CUL 51 or permission of program director. Two class hours and three lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day only CUL 64 Advanced Pastry Arts I This course studies the history and background of Classical cakes and tortes from various American and international regions. Students learn to deviate from the classics and create unique desserts, sauces, and garnishes with a variety of flavors, textures, and ingredients. The course emphasizes the plating of desserts created in class. It also covers frozen cakes, ice cream, and sorbet desserts. The course emphasizes scaling for individual and volume production and a la carte and dessert buffet presentation. Prerequisite: CUL 52 and CUL 62 or permission of the program director. Two class hours and eight lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only CUL 65 The Art of the Cake This course focuses on the history of decorated cakes such as tiered wedding cakes and theme cakes. Students learn a variety of decorating and finishing techniques using media such as rolled CUL 63 fondant and gum paste. The course also covers the pricing, selling, decorating, and displaying of these cakes. It requires the preparation of a multi-tiered wedding cake and a theme cake. Prerequisite: CUL 62 or permission of the program director. Two class hours and three lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only CUL 66 Advanced Pastry Arts II This course focuses on decorative work and display pieces. It requires projects in marzipan, chocolate, and pastillage and focuses on the use of pastillage, sugar, and chocolate in showpieces. It also explores candy making, poured, pulled, and blown sugar. Prerequisite: CUL 64 or permission of the program director. Three class hours and twelve lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Spring; Day only CUL 67 The Capstone Experience for the Baker This course is the capstone course for Baking/Pastry Arts. It culminates in the presentation of the bakery products and dessert buffet presentation for the Senior Recognition Dinner. The students will, within a given budget, develop the bread products, sorbet, chocolates, centerpieces, and Grand Dessert Buffet and determine the nutritional analysis for the products. Students complete the Baking/Pastry Arts Personal Portfolio by the conclusion of the course. Prerequisite: CUL 15, 16, 36, 50, 64, and 65; or permission of the program director. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day only

2007-2008

DAN 12 Modern Dance Technique II This class is a continuation of DAN 11. The class further explores dance technique beyond the introductory level. Basic warm-ups and across the floor combinations will become more complex. Emphasis will be place on the acquisition of rhythmic, dynamic and kinesthetic awareness. The student will be expected to demonstrate a knowledge of basic dance theory relating to space, time, and energy qualities. A studio performance will be given at the end of the semester. Prerequisite: DAN 11 or permission of instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring

DEAF STUDIES
DST 10 Introduction to Deaf Studies This is the foundation course for Deaf Studies majors. Students survey the socio-linguistic discourse communities of Deaf Studies, the diversity of membership in the Deaf community, technology supported in the Deaf world, and careers/professions involving ASL and Deaf people. Students develop their professional goals, their perspective on Deaf people as both consumer and expert, and their personal role in the Deaf community as member or ally. The course consists of lectures, projects, professional observations, and community service and/or attendance at Deaf events. Students also develop the critical thinking, reading, and writing skills of a Deaf Studies major. Open to Deaf Studies degree and certificate majors, or by permission of program director for non-majors. Three class hours per week as well as outside hours. 3 credits Fall DST 11 Deaf Culture This course explores the culture of the American Deaf community, focusing on enculturation; values, attitudes and norms, social, political and athletic organizations; the visual and performing arts; folklore and humor; and diversity of membership. The late 19th and 20th century of Deaf experience will be studied with specific reference to cultural implications of technology, Deaf education and (hearing) societal perspectives.

DANCE
DAN 11 Modern Dance Technique I A course designed to develop insight into modern dance, both as a medium and as an art form. Extending movement control, body and environmental awareness, and sensitivity to space qualities are covered in the course. Theatre elective. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall

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Course descriptions the tradition of storytelling and storytellers in ASL, folklore, which includes original ASL works such as improvisations, success stories, poetry, handshape poetry, ASL films, humor/jokes and drum songs. Students broaden their understanding of ‘literature’ through examination of the Deaf cultures’ “oral tradition”, which transmitted, developed and expanded the literature at residential schools, Deaf Clubs, “literary nights” and festivals. All works are considered in a cultural, historical and political context to develop an understanding of Deaf people as an American co-culture. Prerequisite: AMS 01, DST 11, Co-requisite: AMS 02 3 credits Every other spring DST 60 Topics in Deaf Studies This is a one semester course on a specific topic in Deaf Studies. A topic will be announced yearly. 3 credits Spring interpreters. Prerequisites: AMS 11 with B- or better, and DST 13. Co-requisite: AMS 12 and DST 22. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring DST 22 Fundamental Pre-Interpreter Skills This course provides the foundation of preinterpreter skills and experiences. Students practice the cognitive skills used in the process of interpreting, such as visualization, prediction, listening/concentrating, dual tasking, memory, abstracting, and closure. Through numerous observations (non-interpreted), they develop and increase their awareness of and appreciation for the vocabulary, environment, and ethical considerations presented in a variety of interpreter settings such as education, human services, medicine, mental health, performance, religion, and substance abuse. Prerequisite: AMS 11 with a B- or better, and DST 13. Co-requisite: AMS 12 and DST 21. Two class hours and one lab hour per week; 20 hours of observation per semester Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring DST 51 Deaf History This course examines the social, political, and cultural forces that brought together Deaf people as a cohesive, American co-culture. The course emphasizes the 19th and 20th century experiences, events, and institutions that have shaped the Deaf Community as we know it today. Deaf people are also studied as unique contributors to the heritage of the United States. Prerequisite: DST 11 Three class hours per week. 3 credits Every other spring DST 52 Deaf Literature and ASL Folklore This course surveys the signed and written works of Deaf authors, storytellers, and Artists; this course includes both written works (originals and English translations) and American Sign Language works that have been preserved on film or video--often these works defy standard genre classification. Students study and analyze fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama, memoirs, anecdotes, and tales. Special attention is given to

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. Readings, lectures, discussions and videos emphasize the Deaf as a cultural and linguistic minority group. 3 credits Fall DST 13 The Deaf Community in Society This course provides an in-depth study of the nature and needs of the culturally Deaf, nonculturally Deaf, hard-of-hearing, and late-deafened population in the United States. It focuses on the various and diverse levels of needs found in this community which may include: communication, education, daily living, support, accommodations, and assistive technology. The course also addresses social and audiological differences as well as past and present educational, advocative, rehabilitative, and political philosophies/policies that affect this group. This course gives special attention to examining societal perspectives for the “deaf/ hard-of-hearing”, and their impact on (and merit to) this diverse community while taking into consideration each cohort’s distinctive perception of self and level of need. Prerequisites: DST 10, DST 11, AMS 01, AMS 02, co-requisite AMS 11. Two class hours a week., 8-10 hours of community observations (will be expected to travel beyond greater Fall River) and 3 seminar dates to be announced. 3 credits Fall Introduction to the ASL/English Interpreting Profession This course presents an overview of the American Sign Language/English interpreting profession for students interested in becoming interpreters as well as students who will go on to a related field in the Deaf community. Students develop an understanding of and appreciation for the profession, as course content focuses on the role, responsibilities, and aptitudes of interpreters; the fundamentals of their vocation, including but not limited to ethical behavior, professional standards, business practices, setting, audience, resources, and organizations; and the history of the profession. The course examines various models of the interpreting process. Students begin to analyze and apply models to functional sight translation as well as beginning interpreting exercises. The course also requires students to observe professional DST 21

DENTAL HYGIENE

Please refer to the program description for specific prerequisite courses and grade requirements. DHG 11 Dental Anatomy and Oral Histology The structure, anatomy and functions of human teeth and adjoining structures, including an introduction to the embryological processes and the microscopic anatomy of the oral cavity. The classification of normal occlusion and malocclusion and its related problems will also be addressed. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only DHG 13 Orientation to Clinical Dental Hygiene Both the theoretical and practical aspects of all the major areas of clinical dental hygiene, including diagnostic data collection techniques, instrumentation, philosophy of prevention and patient education. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Two class hours and six clinical hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only

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Course descriptions DHG 15 Medical-Dental Emergencies Emergency procedures to be instituted in case of accident, injury or illness that might occur in the dental office or other facilities where dental hygienists may practice. The course emphasizes the team approach. CPR certification will be required. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall; Day only DHG 19 Head and Neck Anatomy A study of the structures of the human head and neck. The normal anatomy and physiology of the various systems which are present in the head and neck are described in order to enable the students to better recognize abnormal conditions. The study of the head and neck anatomy as it relates to dentistry is stressed. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall; Day only DHG 20 Dental Hygiene Theory 2 A continuation of DHG 13 with emphasis on infection control/exposure control, preventive dental hygiene techniques, patient management techniques, advanced instrumentation techniques, fluoridation and fluoride therapy, instrument sharpening and ergonomics in dental hygiene. Prerequisite: DHG 13. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only DHG 22 Clinical Dental Hygiene 2 Clinical sessions incorporate principles of instrumentation required for complete oral prophylaxis treatment and apply techniques or procedures learned in DHG 13 directly on clinical patients. Emphasis is placed on rationale and techniques of diagnostic data collection, instrumentation procedures, infection/exposure control and patient plaque control. Prerequisite: DHG 13. Nine hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only DHG 24 Oral Radiography A comprehensive study of the theoretical aspects of dental radiography and concentrated clinical practice of radiographic techniques and associated tasks. Prerequisite: DHG 13. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only DHG 26 Periodontology for Dental Hygienists A study of the pathology of periodontal disease and the philosophy of the various surgical and nonsurgical periodontal treatments, with detailed periodontal therapy procedures. The role of the dental hygienist in the treatment of periodontal disease is stressed. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day only DHG 28 Pharmacology for Dental Hygienists A study of drugs to familiarize the student with their origin, physical and chemical properties, dosage and therapeutic effects. Special consideration is given to those drugs affecting dental or dental hygiene procedures. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring; Day only DHG 30 Pain Control in Dental Hygiene The theory of dental local anesthetic agents, anesthetic administration and patient management is studied. Topics will include a review of head and neck anatomy; neurophysiology, anesthetic pharmacology; management of anesthetic complications; needlestick protocol and sharps management; and pre-anesthetic patient evaluation. Prerequisite: DHG 19, DHG 28 and sophomore standing. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall; Day only DHG 31 Dental Hygiene Theory 3 This course is a continuation of the theoretical aspects of DHG 13 and DHG 20. Students develop more sophisticated skills of dental hygiene practice related to patient assessment, dental hygiene treatment plan, and implementation and

2007-2008

evaluation of treatment. Lectures also focus on the legally delegable duties for dental hygienists such as adjunctive periodontal therapies, periodontal dressings, and suture removal. Other topics include the gerondontic and edentulous patient, the orthodontic patient, and the patient with dental implants. Prerequisite: DHG 20 and sophomore standing. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall; Day only DHG 33 Clinical Dental Hygiene 3 Clinical sessions with an increased number of patient exposures give additional experience in the performance of increased dental hygiene skills incorporating procedures from DHG 13 and DHG 20. On a rotation sequence, each student has field training experience at extramural sites such as a nursing home and Brockton V.A. Medical Center. Emphasis is placed upon treatment of patients requiring special care. Prerequisite: DHG 22 and sophomore standing. Twelve to fourteen hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only DHG 35 General and Oral Pathology A study of the diseases of the human body, especially those of concern to the dentist and dental hygienist. Pathological conditions of the oral cavity are examined in detail, emphasizing the comparison of normal and abnormal conditions. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall DHG 37 Dental Materials A study of the composition and properties of materials used in dentistry, including practice in their manipulation. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Two class hours and one laboratory hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Fall; Day only DHG 40 Dental Hygiene Theory 4 A continuation of the principles of dental hygiene practice. Consideration is given to legal and ethical

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Course descriptions on building trust and respect for each child and his/her family’s cultural background. Prerequisites: ECE 11 and ECE 12 Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ECE 22 Special Needs in Early Childhood This course focuses on student understanding diverse abilities of children from birth through eight years of age with problems in any of the following areas: physical, social, emotional and intellectual development. Students learn the role of today’s teacher in an all-inclusive classroom. The objectives of this course meet Office for Child Care Services (OCCS) guidelines for certification as lead teacher. Pre- or co-requisite PSY 52. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ECE 23 Infant-Toddler Development After a quick review of prenatal development, the course addresses the developmental stages of infants and toddlers (birth through three years) within the context of their family. It explores different areas of development--including emotional, physical, cognitive, social, language, literacy, and behavioral--in the context of relationships. The course discusses infant-toddler care-giving principles and the day-to-day practices as reflected in different families of similar and diverse cultural backgrounds. It emphasizes the characteristics of responsive care giving and high-quality early care and education and the significant relationship between emotional development and thinking. Students learn Greenspan’s theory of emotional development and Floortime. Prerequisites: ECE 12 and PSY 52. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall ECE 32 Language Arts Across Preschool Understanding the theoretical foundations and central roll of language arts during the preschool years forms the core of instruction. Language arts include listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking. Communication of ideas and information through the language arts adheres to rules that govern the English language, such as phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Students learn strategies to address the diverse ECE 12 Observing, Recording, and Analyzing Early Childhood Settings Fieldwork and classroom presentations/ discussions provide students the opportunity to learn, know, and apply a variety of recording techniques, such as narratives (e.g., anecdotal, running record, and journal), time sampling, event sampling, and checklists. Discussions focus on the classroom as a learning community, including the teacher as a learner and leader through reflective practice. Analysis of observations takes into account observer assumptions and theories of child and adult development. Assessment is determined by the quality of in-progress records, discussions, and a final assignment. Co-requisite: ENG 11. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. aspects of dental hygiene practice, the special needs patient, child abuse, preparing the student for employment in the attainment of professional goals. Prerequisite: DHG 31 and 2nd semester sophomore standing. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring; Day only DHG 42 Clinical Dental Hygiene 4 Clinical sessions provide further refinement of clinical skills in preparation for licensure. The focus is on the development of advanced clinical dental hygiene skills to ensure the delivery of optimal patient care. Prerequisite: DHG 33 and second semester sophomore standing. Twelve to fourteen hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring; Day only DHG 44 Community Dental Health A study of the methods by which the dental hygienist may evaluate and conduct programs to promote dental health in the community. Emphasis is placed on surveying need and providing community dental health education that produces long-range effectiveness. Preventive measures are stressed. Projects include field work in which students bring dental health education to segments of the community. Prerequisite: Open to DHG students only. Two class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only

ECE 13

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
Introduction to Early Childhood Education This course will introduce the student to the field of early care and education from a philosophical, historical, socioeconomic, and multicultural point of view. Major theories and models of significant early childhood programs will be examined. The role of the early care teacher, professionalism, and managing successfully in the workplace will be explored. The course will include field observations of different childcare programs. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ECE 11

Safe and Healthy Early Childhood Learning Environments The course promotes an understanding of health and safety factors in both the physical and social-emotional areas. Topics such as sanitation, infectious disease control, food preparation, classroom safety, and the safety of the facility itself form part of the physical aspect. Topics related to the emotional wellbeing and protection of children from abuse, neglect, isolation, and biases make up the socialemotional area. Students have the opportunity to observe, record, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of a learning environment in relation to how it meets the needs of the children and families served by that particular community. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

ECE 21 Guiding Young Children Practical approaches to guiding young children’s behavior are based on a philosophy of problem solving that emphasizes children’s abilities and needs. Techniques such as active listening, negotiation, I-messages, and similar limit-setting methods help children to accept responsibility and build their communication capacity. Solutions to conflicts in early childhood settings take a child-centered anti-bias approach based

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Course descriptions needs of young language learners in inclusive settings, to work with parents and families, and to collaborate with professionals in other fields. Prerequisites: ECE 13 and ECE 34. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ECE 34 Preschool Curriculum Planning Through a balanced and integrated approach based on multicultural education, students plan activities related to three- and four-year olds’ need to selfdiscover the world around them. Activity plans include adaptations for inclusion of special-needs children with special attention to individualized education plans (IEPs), strategies for assessment of children’s learning, and evaluation of planned activities. Prerequisites: ECE 11, ECE 12, and ECE 22 Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ECE 36 Infant-Toddler Curriculum Planning In this experiential course, students have the opportunity to explore and create activities that allow the infant-toddler to engage actively and discover the world around her/him. Students apply knowledge of infant-toddler development in developing and assessing a curriculum that supports all-around individual development of the infanttoddler. The course encourages the acquisition of skills to document appropriately, display, and describe children’s work, and involve parents. Prerequisites: ECE 12 and ECE 23. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring Parent-Teacher Communications and Partnerships Students develop knowledge and skills in understanding and building partnerships with parents based on the recognition that families have diverse styles of parenting. Building increased awareness and sensitivity to ethnic, racial, class, abilities, and linguistic issues is key to the affirmation of differences. Students study contemporary models and practices that support the involvement of parents in their child’s education. Students learn to use appropriate oral and written communications, discover parents’ priorities, and design activities and structures for ongoing ECE 44 collaborations with parents. Prerequisite: ECE 11. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ECE 51 Teaching Practicum I and Seminar I Students work with preschool children in inclusive settings that have been approved by OCCS and are staffed by a Lead Teacher. During this period, the students demonstrate their ability to work as a team member; develop, implement, and evaluate developmentally-appropriate activities for small groups of preschool children; and set up the learning environment. Other qualities and skills of importance include the ability to initiate and build conversations with children and interact in ways that help develop mutuality and trust. The weekly seminar provides a forum for students to share their reflections, raise questions, and extend their understanding of the teacher’s responsibility. This studentinternship is supervised by College faculty. Prerequisites: ECE 11 or ECE 12; ECE 22. Corequisite: ECE 34. 150 hours of field experience per semester and one-hour seminar a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring, Fall ECE 52 Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II - Preschool Setting Students continue to build upon, consolidate, and expand professional competencies acquired in ECE 51. As they take on a leading role, student-teachers participate in staff meetings; share responsibility for the education of children with special needs; and develop, prepare, and organize activities around a theme. Studentteachers are expected to demonstrate their ability to provide positive guidance to children, to take on responsibility for the physical set up of the classroom, and to implement successfully a developmentally-appropriate integrated curriculum. The 150-hour field experience is complemented by an on-going seminar that focuses on drawing the connections between child developmental theory and teaching practice. The sites selected are OCCS-approved facilities, and the supervising teacher-practitioner is leadteacher certified. Students are encouraged and supported to develop an initial understanding/

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knowledge of their evolving professional self/role through reflective practice. Evaluation is based on meeting the attendance requirements, the quality of teaching practice, and seminar participation. Final assessment is determined by using multiple sources to inform determination of semester grade, including faculty site-observations, journals, conferences, papers, seminar participation, and a teaching portfolio. Prerequisite: ECE 51. Corequisite: ECE 32 or ECE 44. 150 hours of field experience and one hour of seminar a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring, Fall Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II - Infant-Toddler Setting Students continue to build upon, consolidate, and expand professional competencies acquired in ECE 51. As they take on a leading role, student-teachers participate in staff meetings; share responsibility for the education of children with special needs; and develop, prepare, and organize activities around a theme. Studentteachers are expected to demonstrate their ability to provide positive guidance to children, to take on responsibility for the physical set up of the classroom, and to implement successfully a developmentally-appropriate integrated curriculum. The 150-hour field experience is complemented by an on-going seminar that focuses on drawing the connections between child developmental theory and teaching practice. The sites selected are OCCS-approved facilities, and the supervising teacher-practitioner is leadteacher certified. Students are encouraged and supported to develop an initial understanding/ knowledge of their evolving professional self/role through reflective practice. Evaluation is based on meeting the attendance requirements, the quality of teaching practice, and seminar participation. Final assessment is determined by using multiple sources to inform determination of semester grade, including faculty site-observations, journals, conferences, papers, seminar participation, and a teaching portfolio. Prerequisite: ECE 12, ECE 22, and ECE 51. 150 hours of field experience and one hour of seminar a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring ECE 53

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Course descriptions ECN 12 Principles of Economics — Micro Principles underlying the organization and function of the market economy, including supply and demand, the theory of the firm, resource allocation under conditions of perfect competition, monopolistic competition and oligopoly, the relationship of government and business, pricing and employment of resources; wages, rents, interests, and profits. In addition, contemporary economic issues are presented to reinforce theoretical concepts. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ECN 15 Consumer Economics Designed to make the student a more intelligent consumer, the course considers basic economic concepts as they relate to the consumer decisionmaking process. Topics included are consumerism, the dual role of the consumer in our economy, consumer problems, consumer demand, advertising, the budget, credit savings, investing, insurance, housing, fraud and deception in the marketplace, consumer protection and the future role of the consumer. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ECN 51 Money and Banking Examination and analysis of money, structure and operation of the financial system, monetary theory, central banking, and monetary policy. Prerequisite: ECN 11 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring Restricted to ECE Direct Transfer option students. ECE 91 Day Care Administration This course is designed to promote an understanding of administrative organization and regulatory issues staffing patterns related to childcare centers. The course investigates the role of the administrator as facilitator, mediator, and resource person in promoting a safe and positive preschool environment. The objectives of this course meet Offices of Child Care Services (OCCS) guidelines. Prerequisite: ECE 26 or permission of program director. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring Supervision and Personnel Management in Early Childhood This course focuses on basic supervision and leadership styles. Child care supervisors learn how to enrich and mentor staff. It emphasizes techniques in staff analysis and the enhancement of interpersonal communications, organization, and supervisory styles as well as working with parents and the community. This course meets OCCS standards for Director Certification in Early Childhood programs. Prerequisite: ECE 35 or permission of program director Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall ECE 92

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. ECE 55 Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II: School-Age Child Care Setting This course combines the on-site learning experiences in school-age child care seetings with a weekly two-hour on-campus seminar. The student must complete a minimum of 150 practicum hours and participate in seminar meetings. The teaching practicum experience requires students to record and interpret observations, maintain journals, plan activities, write reflective papers, and demonstrate an increasing ability to link classroom theory to working with children. Pre- or Corequisite: ECE 25 and ECE 38. 150 hours of field experience and one two-hour seminar per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring

Play, Thinking, and Development in the Young Child This course enables students to understand the critical developmental role of play in emotional and conceptual thinking of the young child. Topics, discussions, and assignments focus on how children use play to understand and acquire knowledge of the world around them and the interrelationships between cognitive development and other developmental domains. Prerequisite: ECE 11, ECE 12, and sophomore standing. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall ECE 61 Teaching Pre-Practicum Students explore the role, responsibilities, reward, and challenges in becoming a teacher of young children (pre-Kindergarten through Grade 2). The teaching pre-practicum occurs off campus at an educational setting that affirms diversity and is open to children with special needs. Students are required to complete a minimum of 95 on-site hours and to engage actively in an on-campus seminar. The pre-practicum experience involves observing, documenting, and analyzing classroom dynamics; assisting the teacher; engaging actively with small groups of children; and charting professional progression. Prerequisite: ECE 11, ECE 12, and ECE 32. 95 hours of field experience and one hour of seminar a week.

ECE 60

ECONOMICS
ECN 11 Principles of Economics — Macro Principles underlying the organization and functioning of the economic system are presented in a broad social context embracing issues that affect business, government, and the community. Particular attention is given to the theory of the determination of the general levels of income, employment, and prices. In addition, contemporary economic issues are presented to reinforce theoretical concepts. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

EDUCATION
EDU 20 Foundations of Education with Teaching Pre-Practicum This course provides students the opportunity to examine elementary education (grades 1-6). It requires a two-hour seminar and 45 hours of field experience. The seminar includes information on the history of education and its impact on current school systems, structures, and practices, as well as information on curriculum frameworks. The field-based experience integrates topics and issues, including child growth and development, learning theories, diversity, developmentally-appropriate

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Course descriptions practices, teaching models and approaches, professional teaching standards, and critical issues related to teaching. Prerequisite: completion of 27 credits in the Elementary Education program with a GPA of 2.50 or better. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring Topics include Windows, email communication, Web-based research, word processing, computer graphics, spreadsheets, and presentation software. Students develop the computer skills necessary for successful academic and professional careers, including the creation of effective technical messages, reports and presentations using charts, equations, graphs, scanned information, and transferred data, as well as problem solving using integrated flowchart analysis concepts. Three class hours a week in the CAD lab. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ETK 14 Engineering Applications of MATLAB This course will continue the study of MATLAB and discuss the built-in commands and functions. Emphasis will be on discussing the mathematical capabilities of MATLAB to solve engineering problems which students will encounter in their first two years of college. The students will also learn programming techniques which will allow them to develop their own MATLAB application programs containing interactive prompts as well as user-defined graphic outputs. Prerequisite: MTH 14. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring ETK 19 Electrical Circuits I This course is an introduction to electrical circuits. It examines physics and laws of voltage, current, and power; series and parallel circuit analysis, including equivalent circuit concepts, magnetic circuits; and electromagnetic induction. This course also introduces students to principles of capacitive and inductive reactance, phase shift and analysis of capacitor and inductor defects. Pre- or Co-requisite: MTH 07 or “C” or better in high school algebra II or passing score on algebra placement test. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring (evenings only) ETK 20 Electrical Circuits II Students study advanced AC and DC circuit analysis methods, network theorems, and the analysis and principles associated with capacitors

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and inductors. Phasors, filters, three-phase systems, transformers, motors, the power triangle, and power factor correction are also covered in this course. Pre or Co-requisite: MTH 17 or MTH 10 and 13. Prerequisite: ETK 19. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring (evenings only) ETK 29 Electrical Engineering I Basic electrical theory and techniques of electrical circuit analysis for engineering transfer students. Topics include resistive circuits, independent and dependent sources, analysis methods, network theories, energy-storage elements, RC and RL circuits, second order circuits, sinusoidal excitation and phasers. Prerequisite: MTH 15 with a “C” or better and co-enrollment in ETK 31. Recommendation: Completion of ETK 19, 20. Three class hours and one recitation hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ETK 30 Electrical Engineering II This course continues Electrical Engineering I (ETK 29). Topics include AC steady state power, three-phase circuits, complex frequency, network functions, frequency response, transformers, Fourier series, Laplace transforms, and Laplace transform application. Prerequisite: ETK 29 with a “C” or better and co-enrollment in ETK 32. Three class hours and one recitation hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ETK 31 Electrical Engineering I Laboratory This course provides experience in experimental techniques, laboratory report preparation, familiarization and use of instrumentation, passive circuit investigations, and computer modeling experiments. Prerequisites: Co-enrollment in ETK 29. Three laboratory hours 1 credit Fall ETK 32 Electrical Engineering II Laboratory Students gain hands-on experience with experimentation in passive circuit investigations, steady-state and transient analysis, electrical instruments, magnetic and logic circuit

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
ETK 11 Basic MATLAB Tutorial This tutorial will augment CIS 11 and will introduce the student to MATLAB and its builtin commands and functions. Emphasis will be on familiarizing the student with the MATLAB application program and demonstrating its mathematical capability by solving simple algebraic problems. MATLAB’s powerful graphics capability will also be introduced by setting up simple matrices for the polynomial, parabola, straight line and other basic algebraic functions. Co-requisite: MTH 08 or high school Algebra II. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring Introduction to Engineering and Technology The course introduces students to each of the engineering disciplines within BCC’s Engineering and Technology department. Students gain an appreciation of what each of the engineering fields is about, including specific practices associated with each field. Through team projects that emphasize camaraderie, logical thinking, and simple engineering design, students are exposed early to engineering methodologies. The course instills students with the concepts of ethics and professionalism, the need for involvement in professional organizations, and career planning critical to their growth on the way to becoming future engineers. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring ETK 13 Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians This course is an introduction to the personal computer and its application to engineering and technical communication and problem solving. ETK 12

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Course descriptions and static equilibrium to solve engineering design problems for common engineering structures. They use these techniques to solve problems associated with friction, torsion, centroids, centers of gravity, moments of inertia, shear and moment diagrams, and Moh’r Circle. Prerequisite: MTH 15; Pre- or Co-requisite: ETK 54 and PHY 12. Two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall ETK 56 Surveying The study of the theory and practice of plane surveying with specific applications to civil engineering. Topics will include measurement theory and errors, distance measurement, leveling, bearings, azimuths, traverses, area determinations, stadia, topographic surveys, horizontal and vertical curves, and other related topics. Prerequisite: MTH 10/13 or MTH 17. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall ETK 57 Soils and Foundations This course covers engineering soil properties and classification, site exploration methods, earth pressure and structural foundation types. Foundation and retaining wall bearing capacity, settlement and stability analyses are included, as well as the introduction to the design of shallow foundations. Prerequisite: MTH 17 or MTH 10 and MTH 13. Three lecture hours a week. 3 credits Spring ETK 58 Surveying II This course is a continuation of ETK 56 Surveying. It includes topics such as horizontal and vertical curves, control surveys, state plane coordinate systems, boundary and public lands surveys, global positioning systems, volumes, and construction stakeout. This course includes the use of total stations, data collectors, surveying software, and AutoCAD. Prerequisite: ETK 56. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring and highways. Students learn the proper use, selection, specifications, strength and limitations, fire resistance, and code conformity of basic construction materials and fabrication processes. The laboratory will include fieldwork and basic laboratory testing procedures. Pre- or Co-requisite: MTH 17 or MTH 10 and 13. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. 4 credits Fall ETK 52 Construction Estimating This course covers estimating construction quantities with particular attention to material, labor and equipment costs, overhead and profit estimates, and work scheduling. Pre- or Corequisite: MTH 17 or MTH 10 and 13. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ETK 53 Elements of Structural Design This course introduces students to the design of structural members made of wood, steel and reinforced concrete. The course also covers wood and steel trusses, testing of selected members and sections. Prerequisite: MTH 17 or (MTH 10 and MTH 13) and PHY 01. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. 4 credits Spring ETK 54 Statics This course considers the effects of forces on rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Students apply engineering concepts of force vectors, moments, and static equilibrium to solve engineering design problems. The course investigates techniques for structural analysis of beams, columns, mechanisms, trusses and shafts. Topics include friction, torsion, centroids, center of gravity, moment of inertia, and shear and moment diagrams. Prerequisites: PHY 01 or PHY 11, and MTH 17 or MTH 10 and 13. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall ETK 55 Advanced Statics This course is to be taken concurrently with ETK 54 and covers advanced rigid body analysis techniques utilizing calculus. Students apply the engineering concepts of force vectors, moments

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. investigations, and computer modeling experiments. Prerequisite: Co-enrollment in ETK 30. Three laboratory hours 1 credit Spring ETK 41 Materials Processing I This course covers the fundamentals of manual machine tool utilization. Topics include milling, turning, knurling, threading, surfacing grinding, tooling, feeds and speeds, blueprint reading, layout, proper tolerancing, metrology, and manufacturing processes. Prerequisite: high school algebra I and geometry recommended. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ETK 42 Materials Processing II This course is a continuation of ETK 41 and covers modern, advanced machining processes using Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) for both milling and turning. It also discusses best practices for safety, tooling, setup and process sheets. Students use industrial software simulations and feeds and speeds databases. Prerequisite: ETK 41 and CAD 15, or permission of instructor. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Computer Communications Fundamentals This course studies the requirements of voice, data, and video transmission over wide area networks. It provides students with the basic knowledge required to install and configure wired, wireless, and fiber communications equipment using PC compatible computers. Students are required to install, set up, and configure basic home (peer to peer) networks. Prerequisite: ETK 13. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall Construction Methods and Materials This course studies the methods, materials, and equipment currently used in the construction of residential and commercial buildings, roads, ETK 51 ETK 49

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Course descriptions ETK 59 Strength of Materials A study of the stresses and strains caused by tensile, compression and shearing forces. The course includes stress strain curves and the mechanical properties of engineering materials and investigates shear and bending moment diagrams and stresses due to beam loading. Students also study the strength of bolted and welded joints, torsion and column action. The laboratory includes the study of the general material testing techniques used to analyze the mechanical properties of materials. Prerequisite: ETK 54. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall ETK 62 Electrical Machinery This course studies the principles of AC and DC circuits including electromagnetic induction and power factor, AC motor principles including inductive and synchronous type machines and DC series, shunt, and compound wound devices. Motor starting and speed control are also covered from an operational point of view. Prerequisite: MTH 08 or high school Algebra II. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ETK 63 Industrial Automation This course will provide students with the knowledge of digital systems and the skills required to install, program, operate and troubleshoot automated industrial equipment. It will concentrate on the use of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), robotics and the associated proximity sensors and actuators (hydraulic and pneumatic). Additionally, this course will introduce a variety of automation methods and equipment including microprocessors, vision systems and motor controls. Prerequisite: ETK 20 or ETK 62. Two class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall ETK 64 Hydraulics-Pneumatics This course investigates work and energy related to hydraulic and pneumatic powered devices, including pumps, motors, compressors, cylinders, actuators, air and hydraulic valves, piping standards and components used in automating machinery for production. Emphasis is placed on understanding JIC circuitry. Co- or Prerequisite: PHY 01 or PHY 11. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall ETK 65 Fiber Optics This course investigates the principles of fiber optics. Transmitters, receivers, optical sources, fiber optics sensor, couplers, splitters, and modulation techniques are covered. This course also covers various aspects of telecommunications for telephone, data and Internet transmission. Laboratory exercises illustrate the principles learned in the classroom. Prerequisite: MTH 17, or MTH 10 and MTH 13, and PHY 01. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring ETK 67 Digital Computer Fundamentals I The course examines number systems with particular emphasis on binary, octal and hexadecimal counting methods. The course stresses Boolean algebra with function minimization including logic design and logic circuits for all computer elements, including the arithmetic, control, memory, and I/O system sections. Particular emphasis is given to bus-structured microprocessor-based systems. Prerequisite: ETK 19. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring (evenings only) ETK 68 Digital Computer Fundamentals II A study of microcomputer systems using the 6800 type microprocessor. The course includes machine language programming, system design and expansion, as well as troubleshooting and repair. Prerequisite: ETK 67. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall

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ETK 69 Computer Configuration & Repair This hands-on course covers PC components and PC configuration. Students use system diagnostics to analyze and repair PC system faults. The course emphasizes troubleshooting and replacing individual system components such as memory, hard drives, floppy drives, video cards, and modems. This hardware approach provides real-world computer repair and maintenance experience. Prerequisite: CIS 24 or ETK 13 and enrollment in Engineering Technology or Pre- or Co-requisite: CIS 32, CIS 64, or CIS 66. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall ETK 70 Thermodynamics An introductory course in the fundamentals of classical thermodynamics covering such topics as: the First Law of Thermodynamics, Heat Engines, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, the Internal Combustion Engine, Gas Turbines, Steam Power Generation, the Rankin Cycle, and Heat Transfer. Prerequisite: PHY 02 or 12, MTH 15, or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ETK 75 Electronic Theory I Studies in the theory of semiconductor diodes, bipolar and field effect transistors, including biasing, classes of amplified operation, methods of analysis and design to include Miller’s theorem, hybrid parameters and frequency effects. Prerequisite: ETK 20. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall ETK 76 Electronic Theory II This course deals with the theory and use of integrated circuits involving both negative and positive feedback. Operational amplifier applications such as voltage controlled oscillators, active filters, mixing modulation, comparators and special amplifiers are discussed. Prerequisite: ETK 75. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

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Course descriptions English 10. Passing score on the College’s reading placement test or concurrent enrollment in/prior completion of RDG 10. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer Composition II: Writing about Literature Students read and respond to diverse literary texts while continuing to build on the critical thinking and writing skills developed in ENG 11. This course provides a foundation for the study of literary genres, including poetry, drama, the novel, and the short story. Students apply literary terminology and theory and use evidence to support their responses through a variety of writing assignments. In so doing, they make connections between their lives and the world. Prerequisite: ENG 11. Three class hours a week. Instructional support fee applies. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ENG 14 Critical Writing and Academic Research This course builds on the expository writing and research foundation of ENG 11 with an increased emphasis on critical evaluation of sources in the media, in print, and on the World Wide Web. The course serves to strengthen academic writing through assignments that include essay development, argumentation strategies, and research writing. The culminating project will be a formal, argumentative, 5-8 page research paper that incorporates five or more sources and follows MLA guidelines. Prerequisite: ENG 11. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ENG 15 Technical Writing This course emphasizes the style of writing used in business and industry. Students will examine and then prepare the kinds of documents called for in these fields, including letters and other correspondence, reports, and proposals, with special attention focused on audience analysis, format and editing. Prerequisite: ENG 11. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ENG 12 solution. Students use a variety of design, evaluation and manufacturing tools to complete this process. Design projects cross disciplines and cover a variety of engineering subject areas, including Civil, Electrical, Environmental, Manufacturing, and Mechanical. Prerequisite: 30+ credits completed in major or prior approval by the instructor. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. 3 credits Spring

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. ETK 79 Engineering Material Science A study of the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of engineering materials. The course places particular emphasis on the interdependency of atomic structure, microstructure, material phase relationships, and solid state reactions to each other and to the modification of these properties. It investigates the use of metals, plastics and advanced materials in economic and reliable design. The laboratory includes metallographic examination using light microscopy and the study of material science principles and treatments of metals. Prerequisite: one year of laboratory science in high school, or one semester of college laboratory engineering or science, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring ETK 82 Machine Design Design principles of machine elements are considered and calculations made for determination of sizes and shapes. The factors governing the selection of materials and machine elements are studied. Typical machine elements are clutches, brakes, belts, chains, fasteners, bearings, shafts, lubrications, power screws and gears. Prerequisite: ETK 54. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ETK 90 Technical Projects This course guides the student in the design and development of a useful technical project. The student develops a functioning design solution and generates all necessary support drawings and documentation. Prerequisite: Prior approval of the instructor. 3 credits Spring ETK 99 Engineering Projects This capstone course allows students to use the engineering skills they have developed to solve an actual engineering design project. Students work onsite with a company’s engineering department, participating in all aspects of the design process, from initial identification of the design problem through the implementation of the design

ENGLISH
ENG 10 Basic Writing Skills This course is for students who need to improve their ability to express themselves in writing and to accomplish common writing tasks. Basic principles of spelling, punctuation, usage, sentence structure, paragraph and essay development are stressed. Small group instruction supplements classroom activity. Students must take this course before ENG 11 unless exempted by the writing skills test. Prerequisite: passing score on the College’s reading placement test or concurrent enrollment in/prior completion of RDG 09 or RDG 10. ESL students may substitute ESL 23 for RDG 09. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer ENG 10 may not be used to meet the General Education English requirement, nor do the credits apply toward a degree. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s GPA and SPI. ENG 11 Composition I: College Writing This college-level composition course provides students an opportunity to develop their writing through various stages of composing, revising, and editing. In addition, students learn how to formulate and support a thesis using a number of rhetorical strategies, to conduct research, and to integrate a variety of sources according to the Modern Language Association guidelines. Students write in Standard English with consideration given to audience, purpose, and context. Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on the writing skills test or “C” or better in

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Course descriptions ENG 17 Contemporary American Writers This course surveys modern American writers from diverse backgrounds: Asian American, Black American, Hispanic American, Native American, Jewish American, and White American. Texts include the essay, memoir, interview, novel, short story, drama, and poetry. Discussions will range across historical, mythical, regional, religious, cultural and contemporary issues. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ENG 30 Film In this introductory course, students apply the language of film, photography, mis en scene, movement, montage, sound, to theories of meaning-making, and aesthetics in movies. Students analyze the dynamics between viewer and image by applying a variety of critical thinking approaches to selected films from within and outside of the Hollywood tradition. Moreover, students explore the ways a film may reflect and influence a society and culture. Topics for reading, writing, and discussion may include masculinity/ femininity, sexuality, race, class, ethics, and genre. Four class hours per week. to accommodate screenings. 3 credits Fall, Spring ENG 33 Beginning Poetry Writing An introduction to the craft of poetry via intense practice in writing original poetry and in analyzing poetic techniques employed by notable contemporary poets. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring ENG 50 Puerto Rican Literature The focus of this course will be on poetry, drama, short fiction, essays, and memoirs produced in the past thirty years by Puerto Ricans on the island and in the continental United States. We will review the cultural, historical, and political contexts for this body of writing. Issues of identity, language, family, community, nationalism, migration, and activism will be explored. We will examine where these writers fit into the American literary tradition and how they are transforming America’s consciousness, literature, and language(s). Comfort in reading and speaking English required. No knowledge of Spanish necessary, as Spanish texts will be available in translation. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Offered alternate Fall semesters ENG 51 World Literature This is an introductory survey of selected masterpieces of world literature from ancient times to the Renaissance. The emphasis will be on epic poetry, tragedy, comedy, romances, essays, and satire by writers such as Sophocles, Homer, Euripides, Aristophanes, Lucretius, Virgil, Rabelais, Montaigne, and Cervantes, stressing their influence on contemporary works. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ENG 52 World Literature This is an introductory survey of masterpieces of world literature from the Renaissance to the present. Representative works of neoclassicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, and the 20th century by writers such as Moliere, Voltaire, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Strinberg, Pirandello, Kafka, Brecht, Sartre, Camus, and Ellison will be included. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring ENG 53 English Literature A survey of the seminal authors who wrote in English from the medieval period to the mideighteenth century such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Congreve and Swift. Besides the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Enlightenment are studied for their generic developments (in comedy, lyric and satire) and their cultural history. Some emphasis on reading aloud. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. 3 credits Fall ENG 54 English Literature Concentrating on Romantic poetry and the novel, this second semester deals with English writers from Wordsworth to D.H. Lawrence.

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Topics include women and society, individualism versus industrialism, and the novel from Jane Austen through V.S. Naipaul. Periods include the Romantic, the Victorian and the Twentieth Century. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring ENG 55 American Literature This course studies the significant writers and trends in American literature from the pre-colonial period through the mid-nineteenth century and also explores the literature’s historical and cultural contexts and its development. Included are writers such as Dekanawidah, Anne Bradstreet, Benjamin Franklin, Phillis Wheatley, Samson Occom, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, and Walt Whitman. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ENG 56 American Literature II This course studies the significant writers and trends in American literature from the Civil War through the end of the twentieth century and also explores the literature’s historical and cultural contexts and its development. Included are writers such as Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, Robert Frost, Langston Hughes, H. D. (Hilda Doolittle), Edith Wharton, Countee Cullen, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, Elizabeth Bishop, Arthur Miller, Allen Ginsberg, Ralph Ellison, Flannery O’Connor, Louise Erdrich, Tennessee Williams, and N. Scott Momaday. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring ENG 57 Contemporary African-American Women’s Writing Students will read short stories, novels, autobiographies, speeches, essays, poems, memoirs, and plays by some of the most celebrated writers in the world today. In reading literature written in the past two decades by and about African American women, students will examine the historical, cultural, and social dimensions of African American women’s experiences. These writers— winners of National Book Awards, Pulitzer Prizes, and Nobel Prizes for Literature—raise fundamental

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Course descriptions ENG 83 Creative Writing Seminar Intense practice in writing prose or fiction. This seminar may focus on any of the following according to the instructor’s expertise: short stories; longer fiction (novels/novellas); screen writing; biography (including memoir or autobiography) and other writing forms (experimental fiction, graphic novels, hypertext, etc.). A background in writing fundamentals related to the seminar’s focus will be included. Readings may be assigned to provide theory and models of the form being written. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of the instructor. 3 class hours per week. 3 credits Not offered every year ESL courses prepare students to do college work in English. They are open only to students whose first language is not English. Students registered in ESL courses must have the written approval of the Assistant Dean for Developmental Education or his/her designee before registering in other BCC courses. Students are placed into the intermediate or advanced level based on placement testing. ESL 12 Intermediate English Grammar This course is designed to prepare students for ESL 22 through an introduction to the basic structures of the English language in both written and spoken forms. ESL 12 does not count toward a degree. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ESL 13 Intermediate English Vocabulary and Reading Skills This course is designed to prepare students for ESL 23 by developing reading vocabulary and reading comprehension skills. ESL 13 does not count toward a degree. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring Tutoring in a Writing Center: A Practicum and Honors Course This course provides both a theoretical perspective and hands-on experience in the tutoring of writing in a writing center setting. Topics of discussion will cover the full tutoring process, from helping tentative writers generate ideas to providing strategies for working with teacher’s comments-as well as reflection on the meaning of “peer tutoring” and the role of writing centers. A considerable amount of time will be spent reading samples of student writing (representing a range of writers’ ability and subjects) and responding to them, as well as engaging in role playing scenarios. Students will be expected to apply what they learn to actual tutoring sessions in the college’s writing center. Prerequisites: ENG 12. Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of the instructor. Participants will include, but not necessarily be limited to, students currently working in the Writing lab. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Remembering the Holocaust in Literature and History: An Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar The Holocaust, or as it has come to be known, the Shoah, is one of the most horrific events in all of world history. Even more than 50 years after the fact, the world continues to struggle with the enormity of this human catastrophe. Nevertheless, a body of writing--both historical and literary--exists that enables us to confront this key moment in world history. This course serves as an introduction to this work. Students gain an understanding of the historical facts, including circumstances leading up to the Holocaust itself and the event’s critical aftermath. In addition, students reflect on the role of literature, principally through accounts of that time written by survivors and the children of survivors, in the struggle to represent an event that many have described as beyond the limits of language to capture. Prerequisite: ENG 11 and ENG 12. Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of instructor. 3 credits Fall ENG 64 ENG 62

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. issues relevant to men and women of all races and ethnicities. The writings of Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Rita Dove, Audre Lorde, Terry McMillan, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Ntozake Shange, Alice Walker, and others will be explored. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Offered alternate Spring semesters ENG 58 Shakespeare Students immerse themselves in one great author. Plays are broadly selected such as two comedies, a history, a “problem play,” three tragedies and a romance. Class critiques of film and videotape interpretations, and attendance at one live production. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. 3 credits Spring ENG 59 Native American Novels Students will read wildly different novels by awardwinning writers who touch on common themes and concerns of Native American experience, while simultaneously suggesting the diversity of that experience. These Blackfeet, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chickasaw, Chippewa, Creek, Gros Ventre, Kiowa, Modoc, and Pueblo writers take control of their own image-making as they explore Native American experiences from before the European invasion to the present. Writers include Michael Dorris, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gerald Vizenor, James Welch, and others. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Offered alternate Fall semesters ENG 60 Topics in English This is a one semester course on a specific topic in English. Topics will be announced each semester. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year ENG 61 Topics in English This is a one semester course on a specific topic in English, which has been given a cultural diversity designation by the College. Topics will be announced each semester. Prerequisite: ENG 12 or permission of instructor . Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

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Course descriptions ESL 14 Intermediate English Writing Skills This course is designed to introduce students to the basic patterns of English sentences and to begin paragraph writing in preparation for ESL 24. As part of the final evaluation students must demonstrate their readiness for ESL 24 by an inclass writing sample. A student who completes ESL 14 must complete ESL 24 before registering for English 10 or 11 or achieve the required score on the college’s writing placement test. ESL 14 does not count toward a degree. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ESL 15 Intermediate English Conversation Skills This course is designed to develop students’ oral/ aural skills in preparation for ESL 25 and to review the basic sound system of English. ESL 15 does not count toward a degree. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ESL 24 Advanced English Written Expression This course is designed to prepare students for English 10 or English 11. As part of the final evaluation, students demonstrate their proficiency through a writing sample. Prerequisite: ESL 14 with a “C-” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ESL 25 Advanced English Conversation This course is designed to develop students’ oral/ aural skills through the use of group discussion, presentations and pair practice. As part of the final evaluation, students demonstrate proficiency in a ten minute oral interview. Prerequisite: ESL 15 with a “C-” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ENV 20

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Solid Waste Management and Recycling This course is designed to examine the impact of human activities on the natural world. It is viewed from the context of our emerging awareness of the scope of environmental problems and against the background of our understanding of normal ecosystems. The focus will be on topics concerning population, agriculture, energy, air pollution, water resources and waste management. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only Introduction to Geographic Information Systems This course introduces students to the concepts required to run Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include a basic understanding of what GIS is; elements of cartography, including scale, projection, coordinate systems, digitizing, geography, and spatial and statistical analysis; GIS capabilities; and case studies. The course introduces students to the ArcGIS software package. Pre- or Co-requisite: ETK 13. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall Applications of Geographic Information Systems Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are powerful tools that allow the user to study the relationship among data that can be presented spatially, such as on a map. GIS allows the user to create dynamic electronic maps that can be modified at the user’s will to present desired data. Students use the concepts learned in ENV 30 and apply them to projects that will help them gain hands-on experience in the use of ArcGIS software. Students also choose a project where they demonstrate their ability to use GIS to analyze data, create a map, add features to a map, and create a high-quality layout for the presentation of a class project. Prerequisite: ENV 30. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring ENV 31 ENV 30

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
ENV 11 Introduction to Environment This course is designed to examine the impact of human activities on the natural world in the context of our emerging awareness of the scope of environmental problems and against the background of our understanding of normal ecosystems. The focus will be on topics concerning population, agriculture, energy, air pollution, water resources and waste management. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ENV 15 Hazardous Waste/Waste Management This course examines the various components of the hazardous waste and solid waste management field. Emphasis will be placed on the examination, evaluation, and cleanup of hazardous waste sites as well as on providing an introduction to solid waste management and disposal. Prerequisite: CHM 11 or CHM 13. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall

ESL 22 Advanced English Grammar Review This course is designed to review the basic structures of the English language and to foster mastery of those structures in both written and spoken form. As part of the final evaluation of this course, students will demonstrate proficiency on the ESL Grammar Test. Prerequisite: ESL 12 with a “C-” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring ESL 23 Advanced English Vocabulary and Reading Skills This course is designed to develop students’ English vocabulary and reading comprehension skills to prepare the student for college-level work. As part of the final evaluation of this course, students will demonstrate their proficiency on a reading comprehension test. Prerequisite: Completion of ESL 13 with a “C-” or better or permission of the

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Course descriptions 11 or ENV 90 and ENV 94. Two class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only ENV 53 Wastewater Technology I A survey course which introduces the student to the physical and chemical processes associated with water quality, pollution and treatment of liquid wastes. Topics covered will include: basic environmental concerns, hydrology, water quality and pollution, wastewater flow characteristics, collection systems, water monitoring and sampling procedures. The program will also prepare the student for the State Operator’s Certification Examination. Prerequisite: CHM 11. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall ENV 55 Wastewater Technology II A continuation of Wastewater Technology I (ENV 53) to prepare the student in the design, operation and maintenance of advanced wastewater treatment facilities. Topics covered will include: environmental concerns, chronic and acute toxicity of wastestreams, instrumentation of specialized treatment procedures, biological and chemical observations with “hands-on” treatment observations. The student will also be expected to attend tours of local facilities (domestic/ industrial). The program will also prepare the student for the State Operator’s Certification Examination - Intermediate Levels. Prerequisite: ENV 53. Three class hours a week. and two laboratory hours a week. 4 credits Spring ENV 95 Site Evaluation and GIS The environmental principles learned in Earth Science will be applied to the evaluation of a site. A series of sites will be chosen and a building project or hazardous material spill proposed on the site. Working in groups, students will survey the site, evaluate groundwater flow patterns, weather patterns, vegetative cover, soils and topography. All of the information will be mapped into a GIS system. Students will then evaluate the impact of the project or spill on the site evaluating areas of critical environmental concern such as wetlands, wildlife, water supply, flood control, storm damage prevention and many others. Offered evenings only. Prerequisite: ENV

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. OSHA 40 Hr. Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Preparation This course provides educational background and skills required by personnel involved in hazardous waste operations. It includes the required components of the 40 hour off site training requirement for hazardous waste site workers as defined in the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120. This level of training is required, by law, for all employees working at a hazardous waste site who will be exposed to hazardous substances, health hazards, or safety hazards. Personnel who will benefit from this course include: equipment operators, general laborers, and others, as well as on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations. Topics covered will include: hazardous waste regulations, chemical, physical, and biological hazards, toxicology, medical surveillance and first aid requirements, selection, use and care of personal protective equipment, proper handling of wastes stored in drums, confined space entry, and other safety procedures. A field “mock up” exercise will also be conducted. Students completing this course and successfully passing the certification exam given at the end of the course will receive the official OSHA certification of their completion of this course. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Not offered every year ENV 51 Water Supply and Hydrology This course will expose the student to the engineering design considerations in the water supply field. A detailed review of hydrologic analysis techniques is included. The student will develop an understanding of the principles and design considerations associated with the development of public and private water supply systems. Groundwater and surface water supplies will be reviewed as will hydrologic evaluation methods. Prerequisite: CHM 20. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring ENV 40

FIRE SCIENCE
FIR 11 Introduction to Fire Protection The objective of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the fundamental methods of fire protection, prevention and suppression. Among the basic topics covered are fire behavior, fire hazards of buildings and materials, protection systems and equipment, fire prevention, and fire fighting forces and operations. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 13 Fundamentals of Fire Prevention This course is designed to introduce the student to the principles and practices of fire prevention and to develop a better understanding of the new role that fire prevention should occupy in the fire prevention field. The course will show the relationship between the private sector and the fire service. Course content will emphasize fire inspecting procedures, related codes and ordinances, in-service fire inspection, reports and public fire education. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only Hazardous Materials: Incident Management This course will discuss the legal responsibilities placed on the fire service by the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). Topics will focus on the role of the fire service at hazardous material incidents which outline the need for site management and control, hazard and risk analysis, information management and resource control, methods of product control, confinement, and containment. Fire fighter safety principles in regards to training, personal protective clothing and equipment, decontamination procedures and written standard operating procedures will also be discussed. Prerequisite: SCI 16. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 16

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Course descriptions FIR 50 Fire Investigation This course will cover the fire/arson problem, responsibility for investigation, laws, motives, insurance, chemistry, cause determination, evidence, interview, reports, court presentation, and fire/arson prevention. Profiles of fire setters will also be studied, including the juvenile fire setter. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 53 Firefighting Tactics and Strategy Techniques and procedures of firefighting with emphasis on the fire officer’s role at the fire scene. Emphasis is placed on today’s incident command system for successful control of firefighting personnel and equipment. Topics of discussion will include: methods of extinguishing fires in different types of buildings, life safety procedures, rekindling prevention, and overall fire ground objectives under the control of the incident commander. Prerequisite: FIR 11, FIR 13, FIR 59. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 54 Report Writing Reporting procedures will be presented with emphasis on the use of microcomputers. Word processing will be utilized in the preparation of reports such as NFIRS, investigative and narratives. In addition, business letter and memo writing will be covered. Prerequisite: ENG 11. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 55 Related Fire Codes and Ordinances Inspection practices as they pertain to fire prevention, storage of explosive flammables, codes and fire ordinances, examination of heating systems, fire investigation, collection and presentation of arson evidence, arson laws, interrogation of witnesses and applications of photographs are examined. Students prepare reports and study adjustment of insured losses. Prerequisite: FIR 13. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only Organization and Management of Fire Departments The course is designed to provide fire officers, and those who aspire to such positions, with a better understanding of supervisory, leadership, and effective management skills specific to the modern fire service. Topics include principles of management, management by objectives, decision making, as well as management of fireground operations. Prerequisite: FIR 11, FIR 13. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 57 Leadership and Command This course assists fire company officers and potential fire company officers and firefighters for supervisory functions of command, planning, organizing, staffing, directing and fire ground control leadership and command procedures. This course is intended to give the student an insight into being an effective fire company officer with emphasis on leadership qualifications and effective command procedures. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 58 Plans Review and Building Codes This course will enable firefighters to read blueprints and to apply provisions of the Building Code to the drawings. It will also assist firefighters in recognizing code applications related to fire protection on building plans for new construction and reconstruction of commercial, industrial and residential buildings. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 59 Building Construction This course is designed to inform and instruct the student about the characteristics of building design in relation to the structural integrity of buildings and how that integrity is compromised during fires. It also will attempt to show how different natural and human-made forces work together to weaken a building, especially one that has been or is being remodeled. A discussion of the need and purpose of strong building codes and their corresponding enforcement will also be included. By use of case studies of major high rise fires, conclusions will be FIR 56

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drawn that buildings designed and depicted as fire resistive are by their very nature not fire safe. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 61 Fire Hydraulics Hydraulic theory and principles in a classroom setting using formula calculations with reference to fireground rule of thumb application. Topics covered include: principles of water at rest; the theory of water in motion and under pressure; water distribution systems; pump testing and pump capacity; formulas to determine friction loss; and back pressure and forward pressure of water with relevance. Prerequisite: MTH 17 or MTH 11. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only Fire Protection Systems and Equipment This course presents a study of all types of fire protection systems, including various types and uses of extinguishing systems, fire detection systems and fire alarm systems. Also included are discussions on codes and ordinances related to these systems. It provides the student with a working understanding of a complete fire protection concept and enables the student to make comparisons and decisions for the future. Prerequisite: FIR 11, FIR 55, FIR 61. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 70 Emergency Care I This is the first part of a two-course sequence that enables the student to take the state of Massachusetts Emergency Medical Technicians Exam. Topics covered under this section include introduction to emergency care, medical/legal issues, basic life support CPR, infection control, anatomy and physiology, lifting and moving patients, airway management, and patient assessments. The class meets twice each week for 4 hours for half the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only FIR 63

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Course descriptions literature, newspaper articles, Internet sources and video. Students with concerns about placement should consult the Language department. Prerequisite: FRN 02 or three years of High School French with a C average. Three class hours and one language lab per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day Fall, Spring; Evening/ Weekend FRN 12 Intermediate French (continued) A continuation of FRN 11. Further grammar review based on readings and compositions. Intensive practice of spoken language. More advanced readings from Francophone literature and culture. Frequent compositions and written exercises. Students with concerns about placement should consult the Language department. Prerequisite: FRN 11 or four consecutive years of High School French with a C average. Three class hours and one language lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day Fall, Spring; Evening/ Weekend

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. FIR 71 Emergency Care II This is a continuation of FIR 70 covering the following topics: cardiac and respiratory emergencies, diabetic conditions, poisoning/ overdoses/environmental emergencies, behavioral emergencies, allergies/anaphylactic shock, obstetrics, bleeding and shock issues, head and spine injuries, trauma skills, pediatric emergencies, and ambulance operations. The class meets twice each week for 4 hours for half the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only

GOVERNMENT
GVT 11 U.S. Government A study of the constitutional, ideological and cultural factors that influence the political and governmental institutions of the United States. Major topics include the origin, principles, and provisions of the U.S. and Massachusetts Constitutions; the mass media and public opinion; voting and elections; the institutions of national government; and the Constitutional liberties and rights of citizens. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer GVT 12 Comparative Government A comparative analysis of the political culture, governmental structure and political systems, and public policies of selected Western and nonWestern nations. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring GVT 51 Urban Government and Politics An inquiry into the modern urban community and the political problems of city people in the United States. Central themes include the image of the city in U.S. culture, political ideology, the heritage of machine and reform politics, economic development, governmental organization at state, regional and local levels, and a review of selected governmental services. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring

FRENCH
FRN 01 Elementary French Beginning training in the four skills: reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension. An introduction to Francophone culture is included. One hour of laboratory practice is required. Only for students with no language background or one to two years of High School French with a C average. Students with an A or B average are encouraged to enroll in the 02 level. Students with concerns about placement should consult the Language Department. Three class hours and one language laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend FRN 02 Elementary French (continued) A continuation of training in the four basic skills: reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension. Cultural and daily living topics are included. Students with concerns about placement should consult the Language department. Prerequisite: FRN 01 or two years of High School French with an A or B average. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day Fall, Spring; Evening/ Weekend FRN 11 Intermediate French A review and continuation of French grammar plus additional training in the four skills: reading, writing, speaking and understanding. Readings and discussions based on cultural topics, contemporary

GEOLOGY
GLG 16 Introduction to Physical Geology An introduction to the study of the Earth as a dynamic, changing planet. The course considers the structure of the Earth, properties of the materials that compose it, the nature of the landscape and processes that have contributed to its development. Also covered are the concept of geologic time, the interpretation of Earth’s history, and current problems and recent advances in geology (including the theory of plate tectonics). Students must be able to visualize sequences of events as they occur in space and time. Prerequisite: One year of lab science in high school or one semester of college lab science. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

HEALTH
HLT 11 Personal and Community Health This course helps the student develop standards and principles of good health for the adult based on scientific research. It provides for study in attitudes and practices as they influence effective living, common adult health problems, significant diseases and public health responsibilities, community health and services, and special problems of concern in the area of community health to a democratic society. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Summer

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Course descriptions HLT 13 Medical Language Module I A one-semester, one-credit course to introduce students to the language used in the medical and allied health professions. Word building using medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes is the primary emphasis of the course. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic tests and treatment procedures are taught. The terms relate to the function and anatomy of the overall body structure and the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Pronunciation is emphasized to facilitate the learner’s communication with other members of the healthcare delivery team. Prerequisite: High school biology or permission of instructor. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall HLT 15 Medical Language Module II A one-semester, one-credit course to introduce students to the language used in the medical and allied health professions. Word building using medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes is the primary emphasis of the course. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic tests and treatment procedures are taught. The terms relate to the function and anatomy of the integumentary, respiratory and cardiovascular/lymphatic systems. Pronunciation is emphasized to facilitate the learner’s communication with other members of the healthcare delivery system. Prerequisite: High school biology or permission of instructor. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring Basic Lab Procedures for the Health Sciences This course explores the overall medical laboratory experience. It introduces students to basic laboratory tasks, tests and procedures performed in medical office laboratories. The primary focus will be on laboratory safety, quality assurance and quality control, laboratory equipment and supplies, first aid, CPR, procurement of specimens, record keeping and communication with patients and staff. Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO 15 or BIO 33/34. Two class hours and three lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall HLT 21 HLT 22 Intermediate Lab Procedures for the Health Sciences The course emphasize the most common collection and testing procedures/techniques used in the modern medical office and physician office lab (POL). It is a continuation of the HLT 21 course in the medical assisting program and is also appropriate for phlebotomists and clinical associates who are currently working in a healthcare setting. The primary focus will be the “waived” laboratory testing procedures performed in urinalysis, hematology, chemistry, microbiology, and immunology/ serology. Prerequisite - BIO 15 or BIO 33/34 and HLT 21; or MED 10 or permission of instructor. Two class hours and three lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; Day only HLT 24 Basic Pharmacology for Health Sciences This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic medications administered and prescribed in the modern medical office. In class sessions students will learn basic pharmacology, math and dosage calculations for administering routine medications. Lab practice will focus on math calculations and administration techniques. Topics will include terminology, definitions, abbreviations, drug classification, prescription and drug forms. Common drugs used, actions, side effects and adverse drug reactions, immunizations and injections will also be included. Pre- or Corequisite: BIO 15 or BIO 33/34 and HLT 21. Two class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Not offered every year HLT 31 Muscle Structure & Function This course introduces the student to normal human body movement as related to skeletal and muscular systems, while emphasizing the relationship between biomechanical principles of anatomy (structure) and movement (function). The student will learn the anatomy, function, and relationship of human skeletal muscles. Prerequisite: BIO 15, BIO 54 or BIO 33; or Pre or Co-requisite: BIO 34. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Not offered every year

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HLT 51 Community Health Problems A comprehensive study of the scope and magnitude of the problems of maintaining health in a particular segment of the population. Current mental and physical health problems such as tuberculosis, venereal diseases and other diseases that pose a threat to community resources as well as prevention identification, treatment, and rehabilitation are examined. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year HLT 62 Selected Topics in Health Sciences A one-semester course on a specific topic or a health/medical specialty in the Health Sciences. Course topics will be announced each semester. Prerequisite: to be determined by the course specialty offered. Three to six hours of lecture, and/or two to four hours of lab as speciality requires. Instructional Support Fee applies 3-6 credits Fall, Spring

HEALTHCARE INFORMATION (MEDICAL RECORDS)

Please refer to the program description for specific prerequisite courses and grade requirements. Introduction to Healthcare Information This course is the first in a series designed to instruct students in theory and principles of medical records technology. The course will include the history of medicine and hospitals, the organization and functions of the medical record department, the organization, content and format of medical record forms, and numbering and filing systems used. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall HCI 13 Medical Language An introduction to the language used in the medical and allied health professions. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic and treatment procedures are introduced and correlated to the function and anatomy of the various body systems. HCI 11

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Course descriptions successor coding system. Students will learn how to use alphabetic and tabular indexes to locate exact codes to identify the procedures and services performed by healthcare providers in all types of care settings. They will also learn how codes are processed and communicated to payers for provider reimbursement. Prerequisite: HCI 13. Pre- or Corequisite: HCI 37 and BIO 15 or 34; consult with the program coordinator to choose correct BIO course. There will be two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory exercises per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Information Systems Regulation and Management This course explores the various roles of the medical record professional through the study of quality assurance and utilization review; the tumor registry; and medical staff committee support functions. Forms design and the Problem Oriented Medical Record are examined as are medical records in long-term care, ambulatory care and mental health facilities. Prerequisite: HCI 33. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Medical Coding/Billing Externship and Seminar This course provides students the opportunity to apply coding principles in a health care facility. Externship sites may include a hospital health information department, physician’s practice, freestanding clinic, long-term care facility, or homehealth agency. The 18-hour externship is arranged between the student and worksite supervisor. Students are required to keep a reflective journal of their externship activities and complete a course project. The eight-hour seminar includes discussion of classroom theory as applied to the externship experience. Pre- or Co-requisite: MAA 74, HCI 37, HCI 39, HCI 42, OFC 93, or permission of the instructor. Eighteen externship hours and eight seminar hours per semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring HCI 45 HCI 44 HCI 35 Directed Clinical Practice I This course provides students with the supervised practice of entry level acute and long term care inpatient and outpatient procedures within the Health Information Management profession. The students will spend seventy-five percent of the semester learning and practicing these functions, on site, in the HCI Laboratory and twenty-five percent of the semester applying these skills in the healthcare organizations affiliated with the HCI program at Bristol Community College. Prerequisite: HCI 22. One class hour and nine hours of clinical placement a week (two days). Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall Human Disease Processes and Procedures This course presents commonly-encountered diseases, disorders and conditions affecting human body systems. Students study etiology, physiology, tests and procedures used to diagnose the conditions studied. Methods of treating the diseases and disorders are also studied. Prerequisite: BIO 15 or BIO 33/34 or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring HCI 39 International Classification of Disease Coding This course introduces the characteristics and conventions of the latest version of the International Classification of Disease as used in the United States. Students will learn how to use alphabetic and tabular indexes to locate precise diagnosis codes to identify diseases, disorders, and conditions for patients in all care settings. They will also learn how to provide procedure codes for hospital inpatients. Prerequisite: HCI 13. Pre- or Co-requisite: HCI 37 and BIO 15 or 34; consult with the program coordinator to choose correct BIO course. There will be two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory exercises per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall Coding of Procedures and Healthcare Reimbursement The primary emphasis of this course will be on HCPCS coding, especially the CPT or its HCI 42 HCI 37

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. Pronunciation is emphasized. Students learn word building, commonly used abbreviations, and the use of medical dictionaries and other reference materials. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall HCI 22 Medical Ethics and Jurisprudence This course focuses on the legal aspects of the medical record. It introduces legal terminology and procedures, the court system, policies and procedures for the control and release of medical information, health care legislation and regulations relating to the maintenance of confidentiality and the appropriate use of medical records, ethical standards for medical record practice, and development of informed consent. Prerequisite: HCI 11. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Survey of Medical Coding and Billing A one semester, one credit course to introduce students to the methods used to provide International Classification of Disease, (ICD-9CM) codes to identify diagnoses and inpatient procedures and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT-4) codes for physician services and outpatient procedures. The course also covers use of coded information to identify why individuals receive medical services, to define the services that are provided, and use for reimbursement of medical providers. Prerequisites: HCI 13 or HLT 13, and BIO 15. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Spring Retrieving and Reporting Medical Data This course focuses on the statistical reports created by health information professionals; maintenance requirements of various indexes and registries; data abstracting; entry and retrieval techniques; and exploration of recent reimbursement schemes and their effect on the health information profession. Prerequisite: HCI 22. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall HCI 33 HCI 24

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Course descriptions HCI 46 Directed Clinical Practice II This course provides students with the supervised practice of advanced acute care inpatient and outpatient procedures within the Health Information Management profession. The students will spend seventy-five percent of their time learning and mastering these functions in the HCI Laboratory, on site, and twentyfive percent of their time applying these skills in the healthcare organizations affiliated with the Healthcare Information Program at Bristol Community College. Prerequisites HCI 33, HCI 39, co-requisite HCI 42. Twelve hours of clinical placement a week (three days). Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring HST 14 United States History from 1877 A survey of the American experience from 1877 to the present. The course will focus on the forces, personalities, events and institutions that have shaped modern America since Reconstruction. Major topics and themes covered will be continued evolution and implementation of the Federal and State constitutions industrialization, immigration, urbanization, westward expansion and America’s global role in the twentieth century. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer HST 20 Roots of Human Societies This course is an introduction to the origins and development of human culture from prehistory to the decline of the dominant European and Asian empires in the 4th century. Students learn the spiritual, political, philosophical, technological, and economic systems that laid the foundations for many contemporary global patterns. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer HST 21 The Peoples of the Middle Ages This course examines civilization in Europe and the Middle East, emphasizing the spiritual, intellectual, political, social, and economic forces that shaped these societies. The course begins with the decline and breakup of the Roman Empire in the 4th and 5th centuries and continues to the time of the Renaissance in the 13th and 14th centuries at the beginning of the early modern period. The course uses brief biographical sketches of the peoples of the Middle Ages across the broad social, political, intellectual, and economic spectrum of the period from 476 to 1500 to illustrate this fascinating, challenging, and transitional time in the West and the world. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer HST 22 The Age of Revolutions This course examines the dramatic changes that occurred in the economic, political, intellectual, and social lives of people from the end of the Middle Ages to the era of the French Revolution. The rise of capitalism, the fall of absolute monarchies, the diversification and evolution of

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religious beliefs, and the movement of peoples, ideas, and commodities around the world make this time period key in understanding the development of the modern world. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer HST 23 From the Industrial Age to the Information Age This course is a one-semester study of the last three centuries of the evolution of western society and its interactions with the rest of the world. The course begins with and focuses on the development and ongoing impact of the industrial revolution. The rapid change from a rural, agricultural economy and society to an urban, industrial economy and society provide the framework for studying the various developments that have produced the modern world. The course examines the growth of big business and modern market capitalism, the rapid expansion of the middle class and the growth of Parliamentary democracy, the rise and evolution of the modern nation-state system, the rise of nationalism and other globally organizing ideologies, such as Marxism, Fascism, and mass democracy, within the context of a rapidly evolving foundation of science, technology, and economic development. The course concludes with an examination of the growing militarization of world politics as manifested in two world wars in the first half of the 20th century and the intense ideological competition and conflict since 1945 as reflected in the Cold War and the post-Cold War tensions. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

HISTORY
HST 11 The West and the World I This course is a comparative study of societies and cultures from prehistory through the Renaissance. It emphasizes the interaction between the West and the world in order to understand the current world. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer HST 12 The West and the World II This course is a comparative study of societies and cultures from the Renaissance to the present. It emphasizes the interaction between the West and the world in order to understand the current world. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer HST 13 United States History to 1877 A survey of the American past from the age of exploration to the end of Reconstruction. The course will examine the major forces, personalities, events, and institutions which shaped the American experience through 1877. Topics and themes covered will include the development of colonial society, the American Revolution, the Constitution (Federal and Commonwealth of Massachusetts), the growth of the new nation, westward expansion, 19th century reform movements, the rise of sectionalism, and the Civil War. The course concludes with an overview of the Reconstruction period. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

HST 51

The Social History of American Women A survey of women’s lives in America from the beginning of English settlement to the present. The course considers marriage, family, childbearing and childrearing, work, religion and politics. Readings, lectures, and discussions emphasize the diversity of women’s lives according to age, race, ethnicity, social class, and place of residence. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall

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Course descriptions Immigration and Ethnicity in American History An examination of the cultural, economic, and political significance of immigration and ethnicity in American life. The course will explore those historical forces which led millions of people to migrate to, and settle in, the United States. It will include study of all major ethnic and racial groups which have contributed to the creation of a multiethnic, multicultural, and multiracial society in the United States. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring HST 65 HST 59 History of North American Indian Peoples This course will examine the history of the indigenous people of North America from archaic times to the present. Students will study the unique culture and civilizations of Amerindian peoples north of the Rio Grande River before and after contact with European culture and society. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. HST 52 African American History A study of African civilizations before slavery, the slave trade, slavery in the United States, and the various stages in the development of AfricanAmerican history in the United States. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring HST 54 Twentieth Century Russian and Soviet History A survey of Russian, Soviet and post-Soviet political, social, economic and intellectual history from 1890 to the present. Emphasis is placed on the legacy and traditions of the Czarist Empire, on the development of Russian Marxism, on the origins, course and affect of the Bolshevik (communist) Revolution and on the major changes within the former Soviet Union since 1991. Prerequisite: HST 22 or 23 or by permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall

HST 60 Topics in History A one-semester course on a specified topic or period of history. Topic to be announced each semester. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year HST 61 Topics in History A one-semester course on a specified topic or period of history, which has been given a cultural diversity designation by the College. Topic to be announced each semester. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year HST 62 Reading in History A seminar course in which students discuss a topic or topics based on selected readings. Prerequisite: Three credits in HST or AMC. One class hour a week. 1 credit Not offered every year The History of Southern New England This course will offer a general overview of the history of Southern New England from precontact to the present. This course will concentrate on Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut with an emphasis on public history (history which is visible to people in their daily lives). Major topics will include a consideration of the indigenous peoples of the area (the Narragansett, the Wampanoag, the Pequot, the Massachusetts, the Nipmuck, and other tribal peoples of the area), the colonial development of Southern New England, the industrial revolution in New England, the ethnicity of the region, and the importance of the Southern New England area to the social, cultural, political, and economic development of the United States. 1 credit Fall, Spring HST 64

HONORS
HON 60 Culminating Honors Project An honors experience open only to students in the BCC Honors Program. A student develops project activities and objectives with a faculty mentor who oversees the project. A contract describing the project must be submitted to the Honors Program for approval. Students are encouraged to present honors projects at appropriate conferences. Each culminating honors project will be unique, focusing on an area of particular interest to the individual student. The number of class meetings per week will vary by contract. Prerequisite: current enrollment in the Honors Program. 1 credit Fall, Spring HON 90 Honors Seminar in Business and Information Management This course allows Honors program students from the Business Administration, Computer Information Systems, and Office Administration and other departments to develop projects needed by businesses, industries, and the community. By working in teams on multifaceted projects, students bring their expertise to evaluate a concept and propose a solution involving experts from the college and the community as needed. In this writing-intensive course, the students plan, implement, and/or assess the project. Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

HST 56 History of World War II A one semester study of the origins, causes, events, and consequences of World War Two (1939-1945). The course will consider the war from a variety of perspectives and will examine the political, diplomatic, military, economic, technological, and intellectual developments related to the war. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring History of Modern East Asia (China and Japan) A survey of nineteenth and twentieth century Asian history with a special emphasis on China and Japan. Concentration will be placed on the political, social, economic and cultural development of China since the Ch’ing dynasty with an emphasis on the development of modern Chinese nationalism and on the theory and practice of Maoism; and the background and significance of the Meiji Restoration and Japanese modernization, the fall of the Japanese empire and the emergence of Japan as an “economic superpower.” Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring HST 57

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HUMAN SERVICES
SER 11 Introduction to Social Welfare This course provides an overview of social welfare in the United States from two perspectives — the development of major policies and practices from the Colonial period to the present and the network of systems and services that constitute social welfare today. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall Principles and Methods of Interviewing An introduction to the fundamental principles and basic techniques of the interviewing process. The course is conducted in small groups and in the activity-oriented atmosphere of the workshop. Prerequisite: SER 11 and PSY 51 or concurrent enrollment in PSY 51. Students not in Human Services program must have permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring SER 91 Field Experience and Seminar I The fieldwork experience is an opportunity for the student to gain direct on-the-job experience in the human services field. Theories relevant to social services are tested in the reality of actual practice, and discussed in a seminar on campus. All fieldwork placements are arranged by the program director. Prerequisite: SER 11 and SER 51. A minimum of 16 contact hours a week in a fieldwork agency each semester and up to 3 hours of seminar on campus each week are required. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall, Spring SER 92 Field Experience & Seminar II The fieldwork experience is an opportunity for the student to gain direct on-the-job experience in the human services field. Theories relevant to social services are tested in the reality of actual practice, and discussed in a seminar on campus. All fieldwork placements are arranged by the program director. Prerequisite: SER11 and SER 51 A minimum of 16 contact hours a week in a SER 51

fieldwork agency each semester and up to 3 hours of seminar on campus each week are required. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall, Spring

HUMANITIES
HUM 51 Topics in the Humanities and the Arts A one-semester course on a specified topic or period in the arts, literature, philosophy, or the humanities. Topics or major themes are announced each semester. Prerequisite: ENG 12. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring HUM 52 Honors Study of Ethnic Cultures in Massachusetts Using cross-disciplinary modes of inquiry to approach case studies, this course offers students a range of methods and tools for exploring and researching the ethnic and regional history of the Commonwealth and the histories of specific ethnic groups within it. Students examine the following topics: (im)migration; identity, acculturation and assimilation; technology and work; religious identity and practice. This course pays special attention to the experiences of African Americans, Cambodians, Cape Verdeans, French Canadians, Irish, Mi’kmaq, Portuguese, Puerto Ricans, and Wampanoag in southeastern New England. Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring HUM 54 Civil Rights and Women’s Rights Movements: Made in Massachusetts This course recognizes Massachusetts’ significance historically and currently for the movements of African Americans and women for accessibility, equality, opportunity, and social change. We will study the development of and division within these “communities,” as well as their evolving and divergent concepts of identity and membership, concerns and goals, rhetoric, strategies for organizing and effecting change, leadership and grassroots activism, and institutionalization. We will also consider the cultural, social, educational,

and legal ramifications of these movements, within and for Massachusetts, and with Massachusetts as model or motivator for the nation. Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring HUM 57 Old Testament An introductory study of the major books, ideas, and historical context of the Old Testament. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall HUM 58 New Testament An introductory study of the major books, ideas, and historical context of the New Testament. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring HUM 60 The Criminal in Literature and the Arts An interdisciplinary approach to the study of crime, criminality, and society’s reaction to it. Particular attention is directed at the manner in which the criminal is portrayed in literature, the fine arts, and other media. This course presents an opportunity to examine this social problem through the works of such varied writers and artists as Dostoyevsky, Camus, Capote, and others. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring HUM 72 Coping with Life & Death A literary approach to the way humans cope with life and death through writings and the arts, including such writers and artists as Kubler-Ross, Emily Dickinson, Tolstoy, and Woody Allen. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall HUM 75 Myth in the Human Experience This interdisciplinary course studies the basic myths that have been part of the human race from time immemorial and their relationship to cultural values, religious beliefs, and great literary works. It examines the role these myths have played in the rites of passage of the human race. The course looks upon myth as an “image language, expressive

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Course descriptions with applications to the uniqueness of the sport and leisure industry: event marketing, sponsorship, licensing, sport information, sales and public relations. Prerequisites: LSM 11 and MAR 11, or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall LSM 41 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport This course provides an analysis of the legal and ethical aspects of the sport environment. Topics discussed include negligence; liability; control of amateur, professional, and school sport; violence/ crowd control; product liability; risk management; and selected current issues. Prerequisites: LSM 11 and LSM 31, or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring LSM 43 Budgeting and Financing Sport This course analyzes financial concepts and theories and their application in the professional, intercollegiate, recreational, and commercial sport environments. Topics include revenues and expenses of professional, intercollegiate and private sport industries; issues impacting these revenues and expenses; budgeting methods; economic impact; fundraising at the intercollegiate level; ownership in sport, and public and private funding for non-profit sport programs. Prerequisites: LSM 11 and LSM 31, or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring provides a rationale and a strategy for teaching elementary school mathematics. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Not offered every year

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. of metaphysical, psychological, and sociological truth.’’ Prerequisite: PSY 51 and HST 20 or 21. 3 credits Not offered every year

INSTRUCTIONAL AIDE
Introduction to Instructional Aide I An introduction to the roles and responsibilities of the instructional aide in early education, with special emphasis on teacher-aide relations, techniques for observation, instructional skills, materials preparation, and classroom problem solving. 1 credit No credit will be given until both semesters have been satisfactorily completed. Introduction to Instructional Aide II An introduction to the roles and responsibilities of the instructional aide in early education, with special emphasis on teacher-aide relations, techniques for observation, instructional skills, materials preparation, and classroom problem solving. 1 credit No credit will be given until both semesters have been satisfactorily completed. Roles and Responsibilities of the Instructional Paraprofessional This course provides an overview of the diverse roles of the instructional paraprofessional as a member of the educational team. Students learn strategies and develop skills to increase their competency in the areas of student support, curriculum implementation, effective instruction, classroom management, and professionalism. Classroom lecture is supplemented with guest speakers. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring Teaching Elementary School Mathematics This course introduces students to a wide variety of effective teaching procedures and instructional materials, acquaints them with the basic concepts underlying elementary school mathematics, and IAD 14 IAD 13 IAD 12 IAD 11

LEISURE SERVICES MANAGEMENT
Introduction to Sport Management This course explores and analyzes sport and recreation from philosophical, historical, and organizational perspectives. It also introduces the student to the field of sport management, examining professional opportunities available, resume writing, and professional networking in the field. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall LSM 23 Sport as Popular Culture This course covers a broad range of topics that explore sport as a significant part of popular culture. These topics include the analysis of the production and consumption of sport and leisure as an aspect of contemporary popular culture; the relationship between sport and leisure and the economy, the media, and politics; and the impact of class, race, gender, ethnicity, and nationality. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring Facility Design and Event Management This course examines the processes for managing sport and event enterprises. It gives specific attention to the design and management of a sport facility as well as the skills and processes associated with administration of a sport event, whether it be participant-centered or spectator-centered. Prerequisite: LSM 11 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall LSM 33 Sport Marketing and Sales This course provides an in-depth analysis of the various techniques and strategies of marketing and sales in the sport environment. It examines basic marketing and sales concepts LSM 31 LSM 11

MANAGEMENT
MAN 11 Principles of Management This course emphasizes the global perspective in management principles. The overall objective is to introduce the student to the world of the modern first-line and middle-level manager. The course focuses on the behavioral and functional nature of management and presents contemporary management challenges related to cultural diversity and the global business environment. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

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Course descriptions MAN 51 Human Resources Management A study of the philosophy and policy considerations that are basic in sound personnel practices. Emphasis is placed on the components of a full human resource management program including recruitment, selection, training, evaluation, compensation and labor relations. Behavioral science contributions to the personnel function are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: MAN 11, with “C” or better or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring MAN 52 Purchasing A survey of procurement functions, the course deals with definition of function, responsibilities, and relationship to the organization, considering relevant purchasing personnel and assisting them in handling responsibilities. Recommended MAN 11 and BUS 11. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall; Evening/Weekend only MAN 54 Small Business Management This course is designed to supply prospective and current small business managers with the essential concepts of starting and operating small businesses. The course includes problems in initiating the business, financial and administrative control, marketing programs and policies, economic, legal, and social relationships. The course discusses case studies involving actual business situations. Recommended MAN 11 and MAR 11 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MAN 55 Basic Quality Control This basic control course will cover the jobs of the quality control function: control of purchased materials, quality during manufacture, outgoing quality, and organization for quality improvement. Prerequisite: Pass algebra placement or “C” or better in MTH 1N. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring; Evening/Weekend only MAN 56 Inventory/Production Control This course will cover organizing, forecasting, inventory fundamentals, inventory replenishment, aggregate inventory management, planning/ controlling capacity, and scheduling and control of input and output. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MAN 11; Pass Algebra placement; “C” or better MTH 1N or instructor permission. Recommended MAR 11. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall; Evening/Weekend only MAN 90 Managing an Enterprise A course designed to provide the essential concepts of managing a wide range of for-profit and nonprofit enterprises. Includes three dimensions of the successful practice of management: managing an existing enterprise, preparing for the future, and managing oneself. Case studies involving actual organizational situations will be discussed. Recommended: ACC 12, MAN 11, and MAR 11. Three class meeting per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

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planning. Principles of management as they relate to the sales organization are reviewed and sales management activities involved in maintaining an effective sales force are detailed. Prerequisite: “C” or better in MAR 11, and MAN 11 or permission of department chair. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring MAR 55 Advertising Principles An introduction to advertising, including types of advertising, planning and preparation of advertising, and evaluation and selection of media. Recommend MAR 11 first. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MAR 56 Credit Management Credit and collection policies and procedures are detailed as a departmental responsibility and as they relate to the entire business organization. Types of credit, originating credit, installment accounts and credit sales promotion are emphasized. Prerequisite: “C” or better in ACC 12 or permission of department chair. Recommend Mar 11 first. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring

MAT (SEE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE) MARKETING
MAR 11 Principles of Marketing This course emphasizes the global perspective in marketing principles. The course presents basic marketing concepts, marketing functions, institutions, policies, and marketing systems as they relate to the challenges of diverse cultures and the global business environment. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MAR 14 Sales Principles This course focuses on the changing, dynamic nature of professional selling and the people who choose a career in it. The course emphasizes the salesperson, the company and sales techniques. Recommend MAR 11 first. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring MAR 53 Sales Management The course is designed to provide students with the background that will enable them to be more effective managers at all levels in a firm. Emphasis is placed on the planning function of management involving methods used in sales analysis and

MATHEMATICS
MTH 01 Arithmetic Review This course is a review of arithmetic. Topics include the arithmetic of whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents and square roots. For students who do not achieve a passing score on the arithmetic placement test, MTH 01 is a pre- or corequisite for all MTH courses and BUS 11. Fifteen class hours a semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 01 may not be used to meet the General Education Mathematics requirement, nor does it carry degree credit. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. MTH 1N Introduction to Algebra This course is designed for students who have not previously passed an algebra course. The topics

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Course descriptions physics, chemistry and fire science courses. This course or MTH 17 is required of Fire Science students. Topics included are operations with whole numbers, fractions & decimals, percents, ratio & proportion, graphing, powers & roots, basic algebra, basic geometry and measurement, including metrics. Examples of mathematics applied to fire science are given. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and high school algebra I, or MTH 1N. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend only MTH 13 Trigonometry This course is a study of the trigonometric functions. Topics covered include definitions of the trigonometric functions, graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, the inverse trigonometric functions and right triangle trigonometry. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C” or better in high school geometry and in high school algebra II, or a grade of “C” or better in MTH 08. Two class hours a week. 2 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 14 Calculus I This course is an introduction to calculus and provides students with initial exposure to limits, continuity, the derivative, and differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. MTH 10 and MTH 13, or equivalent high school courses and a passing score on the elementary algebra placement test. Four class hours and one computer laboratory hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring MTH 15 Calculus II This course is a continuation of MTH 14. Topics covered are differentiation and integration of logarithmic, exponential, and inverse trigonometric functions, applications of the definite integral, Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 07 may not be used to meet the General Education Mathematics requirement, nor does it carry degree credit. Grade points earned will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. Note: Any student needing algebra II must take both MTH 07 and MTH 08. MTH 08 Intermediate Algebra Part II The skills acquired in MTH 07 are used to complete the study of intermediate algebra. Topics studied are operations with rational expressions, radicals, exponents, quadratics, exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite, MTH 07. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 08 may not be used to meet the General Education Mathematics requirement, nor does it carry degree credit. Grade points earned will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. Note: Any student needing algebra II must take both MTH 07 and MTH 08. MTH 10 Elementary Functions This course is designed to present those topics necessary for the later study of calculus. Topics include the real number system, relations and functions, and analytic geometry. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C” or better in high school geometry and in high school algebra II, or a grade of “C” or better in MTH 08. If a student has all the prerequisites except high school geometry, the student must complete MTH 4N before registering for MTH 10 or concurrent with MTH 10. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 11 Technical Mathematics for Fire Science This course provides the necessary mathematical tools for solving problems encountered in

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. included are: operations with signed numbers, evaluating algebraic expressions and formulas, polynomials, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, word problems, factoring, algebraic fractions and graphs of linear equations in two variables. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 1N may not be used to meet the General Education Mathematics requirement, nor does it carry degree credit. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. MTH 4N Algebra and Essential Geometry The skills acquired in MTH 1N are used to complete the study of elementary algebra topics and introduce essential plane geometry. Topics included are: polynomials, linear equations and inequalities in one variable, variation, factoring, algebraic fractions, graphing linear equations, exponents and radicals, angles, triangles, parallel lines, polygons, circles, perimeter, area, volume and deductive reasoning. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A grade of “C” or better in MTH 1N or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 4N may not be used to meet the General Education Mathematics requirement, nor does it carry degree credit. Grade points earned in this course will be included permanently in the student’s cumulative GPA and SPI. MTH 07 Intermediate Algebra Part I A second course in algebra. Topics studied are operations with real numbers, first degree equations and inequalities, graphs, functions, problem solving, and systems of equations and inequalities. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. As a first (exclusive of MTH 01) MTH course at BCC: a grade of “C” or better in high school algebra I and in high school geometry. As other than the first (exclusive of MTH 01) MTH course at BCC: a grade of “C” or better in MTH 4N.

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Course descriptions techniques of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, and infinite series. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A grade of “C” or better in MTH 14. Four class hours and one computer laboratory hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall, Spring MTH 17 Technical Mathematics I This course provides engineering technicians with the necessary mathematical tools to solve engineering problems. Topics covered are: scientific notation, units of measurement, review of algebra, functions, the trigonometric functions, right angle trigonometry, and vectors and oblique triangles. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or corequisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C” or better in high school geometry and in high school algebra II, or a grade of “C” or better in MTH 08. If a student has all the prerequisites except high school geometry, the student must complete MTH 4N before registering for MTH 17 or concurrent with MTH 17. Four class hours a week. 4 credits Fall MTH 18 Technical Mathematics II A continuation of MTH 17. Topics included are: graphs of the trigonometric functions, radicals, the j-operator, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, analytic geometry and additional topics in Trigonometry. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a co-requisite. MTH 17. Four class hours a week. 4 credits Spring MTH 19 Fundamental Statistics This course provides a survey of statistical methods, with examples taken from sociology, psychology, education and related fields. A minimum background in mathematics is assumed. Topics include descriptive statistics, measure of central tendency and variability, probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation, correlation and regression. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C-” or better in high school algebra I, or a grade of “C-” or better in MTH 1N, or a passing grade in MTH 07. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 21 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I This course provides prospective elementary school teachers with a background in mathematics so they can teach elementary school mathematics confidently and knowledgeably. Topics include critical thinking, sets and whole numbers, numeration and computation, number theory, integers, fractions and rational numbers, decimals and real numbers. Prerequisite: A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of C- or better in high school algebra I and in high school geometry, or a grade of C- or better in MTH 4N or a passing grade in MTH 07. Pre- or Co-requisite: a passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MTH 22 Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II This course is a continuation of MTH 21. Topics include algebraic reasoning and representation, statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement. Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in MTH 21 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Spring MTH 25 Modern College Mathematics This course gives the student a better appreciation and understanding of mathematics with a minimum of algebraic manipulation. Topics may be selected from the following: sets, logic, congruencies, elementary number theory and number systems. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C-” or better in high school algebra I, or a grade of “C-” or better in MTH 1N, or a passing grade in MTH 07. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

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MTH 31 Elements of College Mathematics Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions, break-even analysis, matrix algebra, simplex method of linear programming and mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a preor co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C” or better in high school geometry and in high school algebra II, or a grade of “C” or better in MTH 08. If a student has all the prerequisites except high school geometry, the student must complete MTH 4N before registering for MTH 31 or concurrent with MTH 31. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Summer MTH 32 Calculus with Applications A continuation of MTH 31. Topics include: limits, continuity, differential calculus, applications of differential calculus, integral calculus, and applications of integral calculus. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. MTH 31 or equivalent. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring, Summer MTH 41 Problem Solving Using a TI82 or TI83 Graphics Calculator This course is designed to reinforce fundamental concepts in mathematics by teaching the student to use a graphics calculator effectively in problem solving. Order of operations, evaluating expressions, functions, graphing, and solving systems of equations are some of the topics to be covered. Writing programs for the calculator and mathematical laboratory investigations will be included in the course. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C-” or better in high school geometry and in high school algebra II, or a grade of “C-” or better in MTH 08. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Not offered every year

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Course descriptions MAA 71 Administrative Medical Assisting Procedures This is a comprehensive course to prepare Medical Assisting students to perform administrative procedures in the medical office. Students develop skills in using computer software, scheduling and managing appointments, telephone techniques, records and office management, screening and processing mail, managing practice finances, professionalism, medical law, and ethics. Prerequisite: High school keyboarding and computer applications course with a “C” or better or OFC 13 or admission to the Medical Assisting program. Two lecture hours and three lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall MTH 53 Calculus III This course is a continuation of MTH 15. Topics include conic sections, polar coordinates, parametric equations, two and three dimensional vectors, differential calculus of several variables, multiple integration, and applications. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a co-requisite. MTH 15. Four class hours and one computer lab hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall MTH 54 Ordinary Differential Equations This course covers the methods of solving ordinary differential equations and applications in engineering and the sciences. Topics include equations of the first order, higher order equations, power series solutions and applications. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A grade of “C” or better in MTH 15. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. MTH 43 Discrete Structures I This course will provide the topics from discrete mathematics and logic needed in the study of computer science. Included in this course are set theory, propositional logic, methods of proof, counting, relations, digraphs and functions. Prerequisites: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre-/co-requisite; a grade of “C” or better in MTH 10, or a grade of “C” or better in an equivalent course and a passing score on the elementary algebra test. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall MTH 44 Discrete Structures II This course is a continuation of MTH 43. Topics include order relations and structures, lattices, Boolean algebra, trees, graph theory, groups and semigroups, languages, finite state machines and coding. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite; a grade of “C” or better in MTH 43. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring MTH 51 Fundamental Business Statistics This course, an introduction to statistics, includes methods of collecting, tabulating and graphically representing data, averages, measures of dispersion skewness and kurtosis, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling distribution and problems of estimation. Prerequisite: A passing score on the arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a pre- or co-requisite. A passing score on the elementary algebra placement test and a grade of “C” or better in high school geometry and in high school algebra II, or a grade of “C” or better in MTH 08. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Summer MTH 52 Statistics for Decision Making This course brings statistical methods to bear on decision-making situations. Topics included are estimation, test of hypothesis, sampling, linear regression, correlation, contingency tables, and statistical quality control. Prerequisite: Passing score on arithmetic placement test or MTH 01 as a preor co-requisite. MTH 51. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring, Summer

MED (SEE CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE) MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT
MAA 70 Medical Terminology This course teaches the basic design of medical terminology as used in academic, business, and health institutions. Applying a unique instructional system of memory technology, the student learns to interpret and understand thousands of complex medical terms using root words, prefixes, and suffixes. Comprehensive presentations of various body systems and anatomical structures provide a powerful foundation for technical language used in medical practices. No previous knowledge of biology, anatomy, or physiology is needed. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

MAA 72 Medical Transcription This course includes a unique combination of authentic physician dictation, coordinated readings and exercises by medical specialty, and supplementary information vital to every medical transcriptionist. Dictated reports including chart notes, consultations, history and physical examinations, emergency room reports, and procedure notes will be transcribed using word processing software and state-of-the-art transcription equipment. Pre- or Co-requisite: OFC 14 (with a keyboarding speed of 40 wpm) and a grade of “C” or better, MAA 70 and OFC 20 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring MAA 73 Advanced Medical Transcription Advanced Medical Transcription will prepare the student for entry-level employment using Instant Text software to strengthen and expand medical transcription skills, reinforce the techniques of transcribing, and build transcription speed and accuracy. Prerequisite: MAA 72 and a keyboarding speed of 50 wpm. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring

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Course descriptions Medical Insurance Forms Preparation This course provides students with an understanding of medical insurance. It also covers collecting patient information, coding procedures, audit trails, insurance claims, and preparing insurance forms. It provides training on a billing/ accounting software program. Pre- or Co-requisite: CIT 11 or OFC 13 and OFC 17. Two lecture and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring MAA 75 Medical Office Procedures This course emphasizes the administrative duties of the medical administrative assistant. Broad coverage encompasses oral and written communication, classroom group activities, financial records “pegboard” simulation, filing and indexing, a “job shadow” experience, appointment scheduling, and research on the Internet. Prerequisite: OFC 14 with a grade of “C” or better or concurrent enrollment. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring Medical Office Portfolio Development This course prepares medical office students for employment. Students identify their short- and long-term goals and work on developing their strengths and minimizing weaknesses. Students attend workshops for career research and “dressing” for success. Students create a resume, cover letter, and reference list, and practice job interviewing techniques. A comprehensive portfolio is created to include the above topics as well as sample work from various courses taken in their program, activities in critical thinking, communication skills, and current events in job placement. Pre- or Corequisite: MAA 74 or MAA 75 or permission of the instructor. One class hour per week. 1 credit Spring MAA 79 MAA 74 MAS 11 Medical Assisting I An introduction to procedures that are basic to assisting physicians in the examination and treatment of patients in the medical office. Students develop knowledge and skills in standard precautions, aseptic techniques, measurement of vital signs, recording medical history, assisting physician with general and specialized exams, vision testing, respiratory testing, basic principles of radiology, basic principles of applied psychology, displaying a professional image, and medical law and ethics. Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO 15 or BIO 34. Co-requisite: HLT 21. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only MAS 12 Medical Assisting II This course further develops the student’s clinical skills and prepares them to perform a variety of procedures in the medical office or clinic. Students develop knowledge and skills in communication, assessment and triaging, pharmacology, administration of medications, basic principles of nutrition, and basic principles of psychology. Preor Co-requisite: BIO 15 or BIO 33/34, MAS 11 or permission of the instructor. Thirty (30) lecture hours and 45 laboratory hours per semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day only MAS 22 Medical Assisting Clinical Practicum and Theory Students are assigned supervised clinical experiences to practice medical assisting duties and responsibilities learned in class and college laboratories. Various sites are utilized, including medical offices, outpatient clinics, laboratories, and surgical centers. The course includes a weekly seminar to correlate practice and theory and to develop workplace readiness practices. This class includes 160 clinical hours at a clinical affiliate site and 21 seminar hours. Prerequisite: HLT 22, MAS 12, MAA 71, HLT 15, HCI 24. Twenty-one (21) seminar hours and 160 clinical externship hours; offered in the second half of the semester. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring

2007-2008

MUSIC
MUS 11 History of Music I Major forms and styles from the Middle Ages to the present as seen against sociological and cultural backgrounds are studied. The course includes lectures, recordings, live music in the classroom and attendance at concerts. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MUS 12 History of Music II A continuation of the study of major forms and styles from a variety of ethnic cultures, including jazz and popular music throughout the world as seen against sociological and cultural backgrounds. The course includes lectures, recordings, live music in the classroom and attendance at concerts. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer MUS 13 Introduction to Music Theory This course is a practical introduction to the fundamentals of music. Class work emphasizes ear training, including rhythmic and melodic dictation, and the acquisition of keyboard skills with an emphasis on chords and harmonizing melodies. Some improvisation techniques will also be included. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring MUS 16 Music for the Child A practical approach to presenting music to children, including nursery and folk songs, musical games, rhythm bands, simple folk dances and the staging of puppet shows learned through student group performance in class. The student will compile musical materials which can be used in future employment. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring MUS 17 Sound Design for Multimedia This hands-on course shows students how sound can be employed to underscore, to provide spatial dimension, to contextualize, to provide emotional dimension, and to provide subtext in media. Students produce soundtracks to visual media. Students are also introduced to outstanding examples of soundtracks and sound designs from

MEDICAL ASSISTING

Please refer to the program description for specific prerequisite courses and grade requirements.

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Course descriptions consequences of the rhythms, and the treatment of the basic arrhythmias. Fundamental waveforms and measurements will be presented in the analysis of single lead rhythm strips. Prerequisite: BIO 15 or BIO 54, or BIO 33 and 34. One class hour per week. 1 credit Spring; not offered every year the areas of food, fluid, and oxygen balance, sexuality, and emotional equilibrium. Evening hours may be used for clinical teaching. Prerequisite: BIO 33, 34, NUR 11 and 12 with a “C” or better, PSY 51, 52. Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 55, BIO 39. Four class hours and fifteen practice hours a week in hospitals and health agencies. Instructional Support Fee applies 9 credits Fall; Day only NUR 52 Nursing Care of the Adult II This course continues to address the nursing care of adults with common health problems as initiated in NUR 51. The focus is on nursing care of adults with homeostatic deviances related to metabolic balance, activity, sensation, neurologic integrity, and emotional equilibrium. The course provides a variety of communitybased learning experiences. Evening hours may be used for clinical teaching. Prerequisite: NUR 51 with a “C” or better; BIO 39; PSY 55. Preor co- requisite: NUR 53. Four class hours and fifteen practice hours a week in hospitals and health agencies. Instructional Support Fee applies 9 credits Spring; Day only NUR 53 Trends in Nursing This course provides opportunities for students to explore a variety of factors and issues which influence contemporary nursing practice. These include an historical perspective of nursing, contemporary models of nursing education and practice, health care delivery systems, legal and ethical issues, leadership and management concepts, role transition, and continued development into the nurse role. Students must receive a “C” or better in NUR 52 and NUR 53 to continue in the program. Co-requisite: NUR 52. One class hour a week. 1 credit Spring; Day only Basic Cardiac Arrhythmia Identification The basic cardiac arrhythmia course is designed for health care students or professionals. This course will allow students to identify basic arrhythmias, describe the physiological NUR 54

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. the world of cinema, as well as other media. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring

NURSING

Please refer to the program description for specific prerequisite courses and grade requirements. NUR 11 Fundamentals of Nursing This course focuses on basic human needs. It emphasizes the care of persons threatened by simple homeostatic deviances that interfere with basic human needs. Students are introduced to the nursing process as they develop basic nursing skills in the college and clinical laboratories. Evening hours may be used for clinical teaching. Students must receive a “C” or better to continue in the program. Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 51, BIO 33. Four class hours and twelve practice hours a week in hospitals and health agencies. Instructional Support Fee applies 8 credits Fall; Day only NUR 12 Parent-Child Health Nursing This course focuses on the developmental needs of the growing family during the child bearing and child rearing phases. It emphasizes assisting the members of the growing family to maintain the ability to meet their developmental needs and/or to regain this ability when threatened by homeostatic deviances. Students continue to use the nursing process and to develop basic nursing skills in the college and clinical laboratories. Day and evening hours are used for clinical teaching. Prerequisite: NUR 11 with a “C” or better, BIO 33, PSY 51. Pre- or Co-requisite: PSY 52, BIO 34. Four class hours and twelve practice hours a week in hospitals and health agencies. Instructional Support Fee applies 8 credits Spring; Day only NUR 51 Nursing Care of the Adult I This course focuses on the nursing care of adults with common health problems. Students apply the nursing process by identifying client problems, selecting interventions and administering care to adults experiencing homeostatic deviances in

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT
OTA 11 Introduction to Occupational Therapy This course provides the foundation of occupational therapy principles which emphasize the use of purposeful activity and occupation to enhance role function. It explores the foundation, history and philosophical base of the profession and its personnel. Emphasis is on the collaborative role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant and the Registered Occupational Therapist within the larger health care delivery system. The course explores professional advancement and career options. It presents therapeutic use of self, dyadic, and group interaction skills. The course discusses the effect of age, gender, race, culture and environment, and provide students opportunities to clarify their values and learn the core values and attitudes of the occupational therapy profession. The emphasis on professional roles and behaviors serves to firmly establish the underlying principles of collaboration and lifelong learning. Prerequisite: admission to the OTA program or prior approval of program director. Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO 33. Two class hours and three lab or fieldwork hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall; Day only OTA 17 Psychosocial Performance This course explores the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant in various service delivery models in the psychosocial performance area. Students will learn selected frames of reference, concepts of mental health and mental illness across the life span and the effects on performance. Patient interaction concepts and skills, and occupational therapy process and methods will

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Course descriptions be studied in depth. Lab sessions incorporate the theoretical principles presented in lecture. Students will learn therapeutic use of self as the means of achieving therapeutic goals with individuals and groups. The ability to analyze tasks relative to performance areas, components and contexts and adaptation of tools, materials, environments and occupations are major foci. The therapeutic media component of the lab provides opportunities to understand the meaning and dynamics of occupation and purposeful activity. Pre or corequisites: PSY 51, ENG. 11, OTA 11. Three lecture hours and 2 lab hours. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only Cognitive and Sensorimotor Performance This course will demonstrate how physical and cognitive dysfunction can interfere with functional performance. The collaborative role of the COTA and OTR in the occupational therapy process will be explored with emphasis on therapeutic intervention related to ADLs, work activities and play/leisure. Family/caretaker training, environmental adjustments, splinting, adaptive equipment and technology will be presented in the lab. Prerequisite: OTA 11 and OTA 17. Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO 34. Three class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring; Day only OTA 25 Movement in Human Performance Students will incorporate their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to study muscle groups and their function relative to performing various activities. Clinical application of kinesiology and biomechanics to purposeful activity will be explored. Students will learn therapeutic applications of activity across the occupational performance areas of work, play/leisure, and activities of daily living. Prevention, health maintenance and safety programs will be integrated into the course. Prerequisite: OTA 11 and OTA 17. Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO 34. Two class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring; Day only OTA 21 OTA 27 Psychosocial Therapeutic Modalities Students will apply their knowledge of psychosocial performance and activity analysis to focus on therapeutic modalities used in mental health and geriatric services. The use of purposeful activity and the collaborative OTR/COTA relationship in the OT process will be emphasized. Community programming will be studied via site visits and fieldwork. Students will participate in a group laboratory to study group process. Prerequisites: OTA 11 and OTA 17. 2 class hours, 2 lab hours, and 3 fieldwork hours. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring; Day only Common Conditions of Physical Dysfunction This course is presented in the third semester when students have a foundation in movement in human performance and psychosocial, cognitive, and sensorimotor performance. Students learn to apply this knowledge to problem solving about treatment techniques for specific, commonly referred conditions affecting people of all ages. The COTA role in the occupational therapy process is emphasized. Prerequisites: OTA 21, 25 and 27. Three class hours, two lab hours. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only OTA 35 Professional Practice Skills This course focuses on the COTA role in the management of occupational therapy services. It covers departmental operations, supervisory requirements, personnel training and supervision, data collection for quality assurance, documentation of OT services, compliance with regulations, reimbursement requirements, and national and state credentialing requirements. The course explores and integrates values, attitudes, and behaviors congruent with the profession of occupational therapy and discusses ethical and legal concerns. The lab component provides experience in clinical reasoning, treatment planning documentation, discharge planning and family/care provider training. The course explores analysis and comparison of appropriate treatment modalities, as related to patients’ disability and functional outcomes. Prerequisite: OTA 21, 25 OTA 33

2007-2008

and 27 or prior approval of the program director. Two class hours, two lab hours and three fieldwork hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only Developmental / Pediatric OT Practice Human development throughout the life span and the occupational therapy process in the treatment of developmental concerns are foundational concepts of this course. Normal development of the infant and child will be explored within the context of environmental, community, and social/cultural influences and will be compared with delayed development. Students will learn pediatric practice skills to address sensorimotor, cognitive, and psychosocial performance. Health promotion, disability prevention, and safety will also be presented. Lab sessions incorporate theoretical principles and provide opportunities to develop evaluation, assessment, treatment planning/implementation and documentation skills. Students will demonstrate adaptation of the environment, tools, materials and occupations to meet the needs of the pediatric population. Prerequisites: PSY 51, BIO 33 & 34, HLT 13 and all 1st and 2nd semester OTA 21, OTA 25,and OTA 27. 3 lecture and 2 lab hours. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall; Day only Level II Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice – A The student will be assigned to a psychiatric, long term care or alternate agency under the supervision of a Registered Occupational Therapist or Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant. The student will be given the opportunity to apply his/her knowledge and skills to occupational therapy practice in sensorimotor, cognitive and/or psychosocial performance areas. Students will actively participate in a collaborative and supervisory relationship and experience being a part of the rehabilitation team. Pre-requisites: OTA 33, OTA 35, and OTA 37. 8 week, full-time placement. Instructional Support Fee applies 5 credits Spring; Day only OTA 41 OTA 37

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Course descriptions theory and practice of Speedwriting Shorthand is introduced. Skill development will cover reading, writing, and mailable transcription of textcorrelated material. Dictation speeds will range from 50 to 70 wpm. Prerequisite: OFC 13 or concurrent enrollment for Office Administration majors; OFC 02 or knowledge of the keyboard for non-majors. Three class hours and two unscheduled lab hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening only Speedwriting Dictation/ Transcription A review of the basic principles of Speedwriting with intensive dictation practice to develop speed and accuracy Speed requirements are 60 to 90 words a minute. Proficiency in producing mailable letters and transcription skills integrating the language arts will be developed on IBMcompatible computers. Prerequisite: OFC 11 and OFC 13 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent. Three class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening only Introduction to Word Processing Applications This course focuses on using Microsoft Word to develop core-level competencies and preparing the student to take the Microsoft Office Specialist Word Certification exam. Students create business documents such as memos, letters, simple reports, tables, and newsletters. The course includes intensive speed development drills to increase speed and accuracy. A minimum speed of 30 wpm is required to receive a grade for the course. Prerequisite: OFC 02 with a grade of “C” or better or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 words per minute. Three class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer Advanced Word Processing Applications This course focuses on using Microsoft Word to develop expert-level competencies and preparing the student to take the Microsoft Office Word OFC 14 OFC 13 OFC 12 OFC 04 Computer Keyboard Skillbuilding This course uses specialized computer software to increase speed and accuracy on the computer keyboard. The course objective is to increase current keyboarding speed by 10+ words per minute while maintaining a 95 percent level of accuracy. Prerequisite: Minimum keyboarding speed of 15 words per minutes, based on a three-minute timing with no more than three errors, or OFC 02. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring OFC 06 Introduction to Microsoft® Word In this course, students learn to use Microsoft Word to produce letters, reports, research papers, resumes, and other documents for personal or professional use. This course is not open to Office Administration students. Prerequisite: Minimum keyboarding speed of 20 words per minute, based on a three-minute timing with no more than three errors, or OFC 02 with a grade of “C” or better. One class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring OFC 07 Introduction to Speech Recognition Learn to use your voice and continuous speech recognition software to create documents and handle application functions without using a computer keyboard. Increase your personal productivity with faster input than that allowed by touch typing; improve writing, reading, and speaking skills by learning to enunciate correctly and speak clearly; and prevent repetitive stress injuries caused by overuse of the computer keyboard. It is recommended that students taking this course and wishing to use the software outside of the course have access to a computer outside the College. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring OFC 11 Elementary Speedwriting This course is for anyone seeking to acquire an abbreviated writing skill for personal or professional use within one semester. The

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. Level II Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice - B The student will be assigned to a second clinical agency under the supervision of a Registered Occupational Therapist or Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant. The student will be given the opportunity to apply his/her knowledge and skills to occupational therapy practice in sensorimotor, cognitive and/or psychosocial performance areas. Students will actively participate in a collaborative and supervisory relationship and experience being a part of the rehabilitation team. Pre-requisites: OTA 33, OTA 35, and OTA 37. 8 week, full-time placement. Instructional Support Fee applies 5 credits Spring; Day only OTA 44 Seminar in Occupational Therapy The seminar component addresses practice-related experiences and question. The course provides opportunities to reflect and clarify ongoing fieldwork experiences. The application of didactic knowledge and laboratory experience along with an opportunity for clarification during the seminar component provides integration of the entire four semesters. Pre- or co-requisites: OTA 33, OTA 35, and OTA 37 or prior approval of the program director. Two class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 2 credits Spring; Day only OTA 43

OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
OFC 02 Computer Keyboarding Efficient keyboard and computer operation is a necessary skill for almost all occupations. This course develops keyboarding skill through the touch method. Computer keyboarding software is used for speed and accuracy skill building. A minimum speed of 20 words per minute based on a three-minute timing with no more than three errors is required to receive a grade for this course. A proctored final exam is required. One class hour a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 1 credit Fall, Spring, Summer

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Course descriptions Expert Certification exam. Students advance to the expert level in creating business correspondence, mail merges, tables, reports, and newsletters; create macros, forms, and custom toolbars; create and apply styles and use workgroup collaboration tools. Using graphics and design enhancement functions, students produce professional and appealing documents and business communications. A minimum speed of 40 wpm is required to receive a grade for the course. Prerequisite: OFC 13 with a grade of “C” or better and OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better or concurrent enrollment, or permission of the instructor. Three class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer OFC 15 Records Management This course is a comprehensive introduction to the complex field of records management with emphasis on the management of paper and nonpaper business records including automated, microimage, and electronic records. It includes the study of filing systems, storage and retrieval procedures, records analysis, and records classification from creation through disposition. Microsoft Access is used to develop core-level competencies and to prepare the student to take the Microsoft Office Specialist Access Certification exam. Prerequisites: OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring OFC 17 Introduction to Microsoft Office Students learn to use a personal computer for personal or professional productivity. Using both lecture and hands-on applications, this course presents computer hardware and software at an introductory level. Students learn to use the Microsoft Windows operating system and become familiar with Microsoft Office suite applications (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, Outlook). Use of the Internet and e-mail is also presented. Prerequisite: OFC 02 or a demonstrated keyboarding speed of 20 words per minute. Three class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer OFC 20 Text Editing Editing and proofreading documents involve more than using the spell check on your computer. This course will review sentence structure, grammar usage, punctuation, capitalization, and number style. Frequently misspelled words and confusing words will also be covered. Students’ skills will be enhanced through proofreading and editing business documents. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring OFC 35 C-Print Basics This is an introductory course for the person seeking to use computer technology and C-Print® principles to assist deaf or hard-of-hearing students and students with other disabilities in classrooms or other settings. It covers computer basics of file management, word processing, and e-mail. The course is supported by NTID (National Technical Institute for the Deaf ) online training and covers an introduction to C-Print® training, the abbreviation system, and condensing/summarizing strategies. Speed-building activities promote the development of captioning skill. Prerequisite: a demonstrated keyboarding speed of at least 40 words per minute based on a three-minute timing with three or fewer errors using the touch method (without looking at the keyboard). Six class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall, Spring, Summer C-Print Captioning Skill Development and Practicum This course develops captioning skill using classroom simulated lecture materials. Students learn condensing strategies and develop summarizing skills. The course emphasizes glossary creation and management along with editing and formatting of keyed notes. Students spend 15-20 hours captioning in actual classrooms on campus. Prerequisite: OFC 30 with a grade of “C” or better. Six class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall, Spring OFC 40 OFC 50

2007-2008

Speech Recognition with Microsoft Office XP This course introduces students to speech recognition and emphasizes its usefulness in improving personal productivity. Students learn to transform verbal communications directly into a typewritten format, thereby eliminating the need for data input via the keyboard. Speech recognition techniques improve students’ efficiency in performing daily tasks in the workplace. Three lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

OFC 55 Executive Office Procedures Students become familiar with the various duties and responsibilities of an administrative assistant. Emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking skills in an office setting. Students are given an overview of the duties within an office, including scheduling appointments, handling mail and financial tasks, telephone etiquette, corresponding with e-mail, responding to requests made by both internal and external groups, making travel arrangements using the Internet, and office organizational skills. Prerequisite: OFC 13 and OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring Microsoft Office Integrated Projects Students use an integrated-project approach in a local area network environment in this Office Administration core capstone course. Students create a simulated business and use the Office applications (Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint, and Publisher) to develop materials associated with their business. Publishing concepts are presented and students develop critical thinking skills in selecting the appropriate software for the required task. The Internet and e-mail are also used. Prerequisite: OFC 14 and OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring, Summer OFC 62

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Course descriptions portfolio development. Students will use technology where applicable and will produce a comprehensive portfolio reflective of their work at BCC. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed 12 credits in the Office Administration department prior to enrollment. One class hour per week. 1 credit Spring OFC 94 Office Administration Colloquium This seminar course prepares Office Administration students for employment and also enhances their communication skills. It covers researching a career; writing a resume, cover letter, and reference listing; practicing job interviewing techniques; working in teams to solve problems; assessing on-the-job situations; and enhancing professional communication skills. Students create a portfolio in the course. Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed 18 credits in the Office Administration department prior to enrollment. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Fall, Spring and are responsible for creating and maintaining office records and client files in a simulated office environment. Microsoft Outlook, Access, Excel, and Word are used in completing all office assignments. This course explores professional associations and certifications. (PLS®--the advanced certification for legal professionals; ALS®--the basic certification for legal professionals; and CPS--Certified Professional Secretary). Prerequisites: OFC 13 and OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring OFC 82 Legal Document Processing This course presents the fundamentals of legal document preparation. Students develop the formatting and editing skills needed for processing a variety of both court and non-court legal documents commonly used in law offices. The course develops further keyboarding speed and accuracy. The course requires a minimum keyboarding speed of 40 wpm to pass the course. Prerequisites: OFC 13 and OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall; Spring OFC 84 Legal Transcription This course develops skills in legal transcription, where documents are converted from the spoken word to printed form. Students apply communication skills, problem-solving skills, and technical skills as they learn to transcribe legal documents, correspondence, and instruments using correct formatting, punctuation, and spelling. Prerequisite: OFC 14, OFC 20, and OFC 82 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring OFC 93 Office Administration Seminar This seminar prepares the Office Administration student for employment. Topics cover job search techniques, resume preparation, the application process, employment testing, interviewing, employee benefits, employee appraisal, and

Refer to “General Information” on page 192 for explanations of credits, when courses are offered, and prerequisites. OFC 64 Administrative Transcription Students develop machine transcription skills and integrate language arts principles to produce mailable business documents from dictated material. Specialized dictation focuses on various industries, i.e. hotel, marketing, insurance, media and entertainment, banking, real estate, etc. Students use word processing software and state of the art transcription equipment. Prerequisite: OFC 14, OFC 17, and OFC 20 with a grade of “C” or better and a minimum keyboarding speed of 40 words per minute. Three class hours and two lab hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring OFC 66 Administrative Office Management This course provides a comprehensive introduction to office management and focuses on what office managers actually do on the job. Topics include the office environment; selecting, developing, supervising, motivating, and evaluating employees; systems analysis; and functions of the office. Microsoft Excel is used to develop core-level competencies and prepare the student to take the Microsoft Office Specialist Excel Certification exam. Prerequisite: OFC 17 with a grade of “C” or better or permission of the instructor. Three class hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 3 credits Spring, Summer The Court System and Legal Terminology This course presents the Massachusetts and Federal Court structures and the history of the United States Judicial system. Students learn legal terminology and procedures by reviewing and analyzing general legal documents and documents specifically related to personal injury litigation, family matters, probate, evictions, and criminal litigation. Students visit local courts and experience introductory legal research in this communityenriched course. Three class hours per week. 3 credits Fall OFC 81 Law Office Procedures This course is designed for students interested in working as a legal secretary/assistant. Students assume the role of legal administrative assistant OFC 80

PHILOSOPHY
PHL 11 Introduction to Logic This course is designed to assist the student in learning the fundamental principles for distinguishing sound arguments from fallacious ones. Arguments are studied as abstract patterns of reasoning and as a particular use of ordinary language. The course is intended not only for the serious philosophy student, but also for students who wish to develop the critical thinking skill needed to formulate sound arguments of their own and to evaluate the arguments of others. 3 credits Fall, Spring PHL 51 Introduction to Philosophy An introductory study of some of the most important problems of philosophy, including knowledge and reality, ethics, religious belief, freedom and determinism. Some consideration is given to the development of the Western philosophical tradition from Plato to twentieth century existentialism. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

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Course descriptions Ethics: Making Ethical Decisions in a Modern World This course presents the various systems which philosophers in the Western World have devised for making ethical decisions. The course examines modern ethical problems, e.g. abortion, divorce, euthanasia, extramarital sex, war, and capital punishment in the light of these systems. It encourages the student to form reasoned solutions to the ethical problems of our day. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Fall, Spring PHL 53 Philosophy of Education An introductory study of American education. The character and abilities which make a good professional teacher are discussed; educational theorists of Western Civilization are studied. Emphasis is placed on traditionalist and experimental approaches to modern education. 3 credits Fall PHL 52

2007-2008

PHYSICS
PHY 01 Technical Physics I This is a noncalculus-based introduction to the principles of physics and their applications. Emphasis is placed on understanding through problem solving. This course is not transferable to most four-year engineering degrees. Topics include vectors, Newton’s law of motion, work, energy and machines. Prerequisite: Concurrent registration in MTH 10 and 13 or MTH 17. High school geometry, trigonometry, and second year algebra proficiency are highly desirable. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Fall PHY 02 Technical Physics II This is a continuation of PHY 01. Topics include circular motion, hydrodynamics, thermodynamics, optics, electrostatics. Prerequisite: “C” or better in PHY 01 and concurrent registration in MTH 18 or permission of instructor. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring PHY 11 General Physics I This course and Physics 12 are a one-year calculus-based introduction to the principles of physics and their applications. Emphasis is placed on understanding through problem solving. This course is transferable to four-year engineering degrees. Topics include vectors, Newton’s law of motion, work, energy, rotational motion, and simple harmonic motion. Prerequisite: MTH 14 or concurrent registration in it or permission of instructor. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credits Spring PHY 12 General Physics II This is the second semester continuation of PHY 11. Topics include the laws of gravity and satellite motion, optics, electromagnetism. Prerequisite: “C” or better in PHY 11 and MTH

15 or concurrent registration in it, or permission of instructor. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Instructional Support Fee applies 4 credi