2008-11-21

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The student vOice since 1904
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2008 The University Daily Kansan
Mostly sunny
index weather
— weather.com
today
Sunny
saturday
Partly cloudy
sunday
StateS diSagree on how to
Spend tobacco Suit money
While some have started to fund projects such as museums, other
states have used to money for tax breaks. newS 2A
Classifieds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8A
Crossword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Horoscopes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5A
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10A
Sudoku. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
40 26 52 31 58 31
JayhawkS prepare for tough
competition in cbe claSSic
Men’s basketball team to play Washington Monday night. SportS | 10a
film
25 years after ‘the day after’
BY RYAN McGEENEY
[email protected]
Twenty-five years to the day after its
initial television broadcast, Armageddon
returned to Lawrence.
About 135 people attended the anniver-
sary screening of “The Day After,” a two-
hour made-for-television drama depicting
the aftermath of a mas-
sive nuclear exchange
between America and
Russia. The film, shot
primarily in Lawrence,
features many of the
city’s most recognizable
landmarks, as well as a
number of local actors
who lived in the area at
that time.
Bob Swan, Lawrence
resident, said he still
remembered watch-
ing Jason Robards, the
actor who portrayed a KU Medical Center
surgeon who survived the initial blasts,
stagger down Ninth Street as film crews
shot a scene that took place only hours after
the nuclear strikes.
“I watched it with friends and my eight-
year-old daughter,” said Swan, who brought
a collection of news clippings from the era
related to the film’s release. “My daughter
asked if we were going to have a war in
Lawrence.”
Swan said that the film moved him so
much that he decided to become involved
with organizations dedicated to improving
relations with Russia, the country that char-
acters in “The Day After” believe engages
the United States in the nuclear exchange.
The showing was organized by Kyle
Harvey, a doctoral student in modern his-
tory studying at Macquarie University in
Sydney, Australia. Harvey said that his
interest in the film stemmed from dual fas-
cination with politics and movies, and how
they are historically intertwined.
“The most interesting movies, to me, are
the controversial ones,” said Harvey, who
began organizing the showing in August.
“And ‘The Day After’ was one of the biggest
controversies, even before it was shown.”
Harvey is currently constructing an
oral history of the film’s production and
said he has 15 to 20 interviews lined up
in the area.
“I’m trying to piece together the story of
how the town remembers the film,” Harvey
said. “It was a giant movie, seen by 100 mil-
lion people, shot in a small town.”
Michele Johnson, Lawrence resident,
whose late mother, Pat Schurer, was an
extra in the film, said she had attended the
showing in order to gain some perspective
on her mother’s stories
about the shooting.
“She said she had
had a great time, just
standing in line to get
the scars and the blood
applied,” Johnson said.
Johnson, who was
a student at Kansas
State University when
the film was originally
released, and now has
two children attend-
ing the University, said
that while some details
have changed, the film
reminded her that the danger discussed in
the movie is still present.
“It still makes you think about what
could happen very easily,” Johnson said.
“It’s still very real. It’s not like they’ve made
nuclear weapons disappear, they just have
different controls on them.”
Allison Watkins, Branson, Mo., senior,
said she remembered watching the original
broadcast as a child with her mother.
“It scared the crap out of me, as it
would anyone, especially when you’re five,”
Watkins said.
Several individuals directly involved
with the creation of the film attended the
screening, and climbed up on stage after
the film’s conclusion to answer questions
from the audience.
Nicholas Meyer, the director, said it was
important to understand how the subject
matter transcended the commercial con-
sideration of television at that time.
Meyer said the initial version of the film,
originally conceived as a three-hour movie
to be shown on two consecutive evenings
in order to cost 60 minutes worth of adver-
tising, contained about an hour’s worth of
padding.
“I told the producers, ‘I don’t see anybody
tuning in for night two of Armageddon, so
why don’t you just let me shoot it the best
way I know how?’” Meyer shared with the
audience. He said, ultimately, it was a moot
point — most of the project’s commercial
sponsors had dropped out once word of the
film’s subject matter got out.
Robert Papazian, the movie’s producer,
recalled an event toward the end of the
editing process.
“While we were in post-production, we
got a message from ABC to send a copy of
the movie to the White House,” Papazian
said.
He told the audience that he later learned
that President Ronald Reagan, after viewing
it, sent the copy to Mikhail Gorbachev, then
the leader of the Soviet Union. Whether
the movie had a direct effect on either
man couldn’t really be known, Papazian
said, but noted that the two did sign the
Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty
in 1987.
When an audience member asked Meyer
if he had considered re-releasing the DVD
version of the movie to include extra foot-
age, commentary or other special features,
Meyer was direct in his refusal.
“The short answer is no,” Meyer said.
“The longer answer is, I’d prefer not. And
the reason is that catastrophe is so horrible,
most people would rather do anything
than think about it. So I’m not inclined to
include more material that would just be a
diversion from the real subject matter.”
— Edited by Brieun Scott
BY HALEY JONES
[email protected]
Who knew a weather balloon could
cause so much controversy?
Members of the Experimental Balloon
Society, a student group
that launches large
weather balloons to
take scientific measure-
ments, received $2,500
from Student Senate to
fund its project despite
concerns that the cost of
the project outweighed
its potential benefit to
students. The funding
request passed after
45 minutes of debate
Wednesday night.
Alex Porte, Great Falls, Va., senior and
Student Senate treasurer, said the Senate
gave at least 25 percent of unallocated
funds to engineering groups. The group’s
funding request raised controversy among
the Senate because $30,000 would be all
that remained for other student groups for
the rest of this academic year.
Brian Hardouin, Broomfield, Colo., law
senator, said although the group was edu-
cational for students, engineering projects
tended to be expensive. He said he was
concerned Senate would not have enough
money to fund student groups next
semester.
“To tell students
they should com-
mit more than the
engineering student
council seems exces-
sive when a total of
$30,000 remains for
the next five months,”
he said.
The balloon proj-
ect cost about $6,000
and the Engineering
Student Council and
the Department of Aerospace Engineering
each allocated about $2,000 for the project.
The School of Engineering also allowed
the group to use a building on West
Campus for its balloon project.
Andy Haverkamp, Hoyt sophomore
and engineering senator, said if Senate had
not approved the group’s funding request,
the program wouldn’t exist.
The group is working on a project in
which a rocket attached to a weather bal-
loon could potentially reach the legal limit
of outer space after being launched from
the balloon.
The group plans to continue launch-
ing the “Rockoon” until May, or until the
rockoon reaches a height of 100 kilome-
ters, or about 62 miles.
Daniel Zehr, president of the group,
said the rocket could eventually fly higher
than 62 miles, which is the legal boundary
of space, after being released from the bal-
loon. Zehr said the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, University of Colorado and
Cambridge University were working on
similar projects.
“We think we have a pretty good chance
at beating them to the punch,” Zehr said.
“At that point, the University would have
an actual space program.”
Though some senators expressed
concerns that the Experimental Balloon
Society was made up of mostly engineer-
ing students, Zehr said the 20 active mem-
bers included two physics majors, two
geology majors, an education graduate
student and a creative writing major.
“It really is multidisciplinary,” he said.
“We’re trying to branch out from engi-
neering.”
Senate approved the request 39-18, with
one senator abstaining from voting.
— Edited by Brieun Scott
“He said he was concerned
Senate would not have enough
money to fund student groups
next semester.”
Brian hardouin
Law senator
Group funding raises questions among Student Senators
parking lotS to be Separated by
teamS for border Showdown
Ofcials hope trafc to Arrowhead Stadium will be better this year with the changes. SportS | 10a
CAmPUS
contributed photo
members of the experimental balloon Society set up a weather balloon, which is used to for scientifc mea-
surements. The group received $2,500 fromthe Student Senate onWednesday for an experiment to launch a rocket
into outer space, about 62 miles above Earth, froma weather balloon.
Friday, november 21, 2008 www.kansan.com volume 120 issue 67
photo courteSy of Spencer reSearch library
lawrence residents peer over the tent city erected along the banks of the Kansas River during the 1982 flming of
“The Day After,”which portrays the aftermath of a nuclear strike in the American Midwest. The flmwas the second-
highest television programof all time, behind the MASH series fnale.
“I watched it with my friends
and my eight-year-old daugh-
ter. My daughter asked if we
were going to have a war in
Lawrence.”
BoB swan
Lawrence resident
ryan mcgeeney/kanSan
bob Swan, left, and his grandson trey, 10, look
over some news clippings from1983, when“The Day
After”originally aired on ABC. The flm, shot primarily in
Lawrence, had a 25th anniversary screeningThursday
night at Liberty Hall. The Swans were among about 135
people at the showing.
ODD NEWS
New York couple helps
butterfy on its trip south
LAKE LUZERNE, N.Y. — A
monarch butterfy has a chance
at completing its species’ famed
migration to central Mexico
thanks to some tiny cardboard
splints, a bit of contact cement
and a trucker from Alabama.
The insect’s broken wing was
painstakingly splinted by an
upstate New York couple who
then helped it hitch a ride south
after the weather in the southern
Adirondacks turned cold.
About three weeks ago,
Jeannette Brandt was out for a
bike ride in rural Hadley when
she spied the injured butterfy
and took it home in her emptied
water bottle.
She and her partner, Mike Par-
wana, fed it rotting pears and wa-
ter mixed with honey from bees
they keep. The butterfy fattened
but the question remained: What
about the broken wing?
A search of the Internet turned
up a nine-minute video dem-
onstration posted by the Live
Monarch Foundation, a nonproft
group from Boca Raton, Fla., on
how to fx a broken butterfy
wing. A little contact cement on
the wing, some tiny cardboard
splints, and the bruised butterfy
was back in business.
“It was still weak. It was an-
other week or so before it would
fy,” Parwana told the Post-Star
newspaper of Glens Falls.
On Sunday, the couple took
the healed monarch in a shoebox
to Scotty’s, a popular and busy
truck stop about 35 miles north
of Albany. Anybody looking for
company on the trip south?
“And all these truckers looked
down at their shoes,” Parwana
told the newspaper. “If you ever
want to feel strange, walk into
Scotty’s and just put it out there
that you want them to take a box
south.”
Eventually, a trucker from
Alabama, on his way to Florida,
raised his hand.
On Tuesday, the trucker called:
The butterfy was loose in Florida
with its mended wing.
A high-speed food fght
results in assault charges
PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — A
Florida man is accused of tossing
a sandwich at his girlfriend as
they cruised down an interstate,
knocking of her glasses and
nearly causing her to lose control
of the car.
Police say 19-year-old Em-
manuelle Rodriguez is charged
with domestic battery for Friday’s
sandwich-tossing incident.
According to police, Rodriguez
became angry during an argu-
ment as she drove and threw
the sandwich at her because he
didn’t want to hit her.
A police report didn’t specify
the type of sandwich involved.
Police also say Rodriguez
ripped of the rearview mirror
and used it to break the wind-
shield.
Rodriguez was released Satur-
day on $7,500 bail. Court records
show Rodriguez did not have an
attorney as of Thursday.
— Associated Press
NEWS 2A Friday, November 21, 2008
quote of the day
most e-mailed
et cetera
on campus
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fact of the day
The University Daily Kansan
is the student newspaper of
the University of Kansas. The
first copy is paid through the
student activity fee. Additional
copies of The Kansan are 25
cents. Subscriptions can be
purchased at the Kansan busi-
ness office, 119 Stauffer-Flint
Hall, 1435 Jayhawk Blvd.,
Lawrence, KS 66045.
The University Daily Kansan
(ISSN 0746-4967) is published
daily during the school year
except Saturday, Sunday,
fall break, spring break and
exams. Weekly during the
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fee. Postmaster: Send address
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Kansan, 119 Stauffer-Flint Hall,
1435 Jayhawk Blvd., Lawrence,
KS 66045
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dio. Each day there is news, music,
sports, talk shows
and other content
made for students,
by students. Wheth-
er it’s rock ‘n’ roll or
reggae, sports or
special events, KJHK
90.7 is for you.
For
more
news,
turn to
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Sunflower Broadband Channel 31
in Lawrence. The student-produced
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9:30 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. every
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Tell us your news
Contact Matt Erickson, Mark
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or [email protected]
Kansan newsroom
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(785) 864-4810
“A truly great book should
be read in youth, again in
maturity and once more in old
age, as a fne building should
be seen by morning light, at
noon and by moonlight.”
—Robertson Davies
If you are right handed, you
will tend to chew your food on
your right side. If you are left
handed, you will tend to chew
your food on your left side.
— www.hemmy.com
Here’s a list of the fve most
e-mailed stories from Kansan.
com:
1. Montemayor: Athletic
event sponsorships steady
2. Pill poppin’ perils
3. McConnell: How corn in-
fltrated the entire food chain
4. Thornbrugh: How to tell
someone you have an STI
5. Morning Brew: Royals
buck nights and Plaza Christ-
mas lights
The student group event
“Ceramics Club: Holiday Craft
Sale” will begin at 8:30 a.m. on
the fourth foor in the Kansas
Union.
The seminar “’Orientally
Splendid and Weirdly Romantic
Spectacular Pilgrimage to Mec-
ca’: Orientalism and American
Popular Culture” will begin at
1:30 p.m. in the Seminar Room
in Hall Center.
The lecture “Binary recur-
sive partioning methods and
psychology applications” will
begin at 2 p.m. in 547 Fraser.
The workshop “Poster Pre-
sentations for Beginners” will
begin at 3 p.m. in the Gridiron
Room in the Burge Union.
The seminar “Diagnostic
Insufciency: The Case for
Strengthening Laboratory
Medicine in Africa” will begin at
3:30 p.m. in the Seminar Room
in Hall Center.
The lecture “Springs and
Things: Nature’s Design Ap-
proach for Robustness in
Biological Function” will begin
at 3:30 p.m. in 2010 Malott.
The social event “TGIF”
will begin at 4 p.m. in Adams
Alumni Center.
The University Dance Com-
pany Concert will begin at 7:30
p.m. in the Lied Center.
The “SUA Feature Film: The
Dark Knight” will begin at 8
p.m. in Woodruf Auditorium in
the Kansas Union.
The student group event
“St. Lawrence Catholic Campus
Center: Theme PART-y” will
begin at 8 p.m. in the St. Law-
rence Catholic Campus Center.
The entertainment event
“FREE Cosmic Bowling” will
begin at 10 p.m. in Jaybowl in
the Kansas Union.
Sure, we know that Dr.
James Naismith invented
basketball. But did you know
he is also credited by many for
having invented the football
helmet?
daily KU info
Bungled ballots
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Barb Cox, a Plymouth city hall worker, holds a rejected ballot that was challenged by the Franken CampaignThursday in Plymouth, Minn. Disputed ballots in Minnesota’s U.S. Senate race are
growing at a pace likely to dwarf the 215-vote margin before the recount. And that makes it tough to tell whether Coleman or Franken is gaining an edge as the recount progresses.
POLITICS
Debate about use of funds drags on
States divided on how to spend money received from tobacco settlement
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In 2006, Alaska desperately
needed cash to complete a muse-
um featuring a mummified bison
and other natural wonders of the
frozen north. So the state dipped
into its share of the landmark 1998
tobacco settlement.
The billions that began flow-
ing from cigarette makers to the
states a decade ago also helped
outfit the Niagara County, N.Y.,
golf course with new carts and
sprinklers. And the money has
gone toward college scholar-
ships in Michigan, tax breaks in
Illinois and Ohio, a dog catcher
in Lincoln, Neb., and jails and
schools elsewhere around the
country.
Despite the promises of politi-
cians and policymakers, states and
counties have spent the lion’s share
of the settlement money on things
that have nothing to do with public
health or smoking, even as once-
falling teen smoking rates have
stagnated.
Of the $61.5 billion divided
among 46 states between 2000 and
2006, only 30 percent was spent on
health care, according to federal
Government Accountability Office
data analyzed by The Associated
Press. Less than 4 percent went to
anti-smoking efforts.
“A lot of people on both sides
thought we were going to enter a
new Eden, and we haven’t,” said
Thomas Glynn, director of cancer
science and trends at the American
Cancer Society.
States defend the myriad ways
they have spent their tobacco
money, which is still being paid
out in annual installments and is
expected to total $294 billion over
25 years in today’s dollars. They
note that no strings were attached
to the settlement reached on Nov.
23, 1998, and that anti-smoking
campaigns do not cost billions.
“Our view was, that was money
that we had to spend as a result
of tobacco-related illnesses. This
was paying us back for that,” said
Scott Pattison, executive director
of the National Association of State
Budget Officers.
States had sued the industry
to recover the crushing costs of
treating smoking-related illness-
es in people enrolled in public
health programs such as Medicare
and Medicaid. Big Tobacco also
agreed to eliminate advertising
aimed at teenagers. In return,
it won protection from future
lawsuits.
At the time, many states intend-
ed to spend settlement money on
health care and anti-smoking cam-
paigns.
“We should use this money to
fund cancer research, offer health
insurance to the poor, keep kids
from smoking and arrest those
who sell tobacco products to our
children,” said then-Pennsylvania
Attorney General Mike Fisher.
But even then, lawmakers and
others were eyeing the money for
other needs.
Gregory Connolly, director of
Massachusetts’ Tobacco Control
Program from 1993 to 2003, said
the failure to funnel more of the
money into anti-smoking cam-
paigns was a retreat from implicit
promises made at the time of the
settlement.
“Every state court case had that
built into it, that we’re here for the
kids,” said Connolly, now a profes-
sor at the Harvard School of Public
Health. “But the legislatures said,
‘This is our money. Thanks for
suing, but we’re going to decide
how to spend the money.’”
Over the years, about two
dozen states have sold off por-
tions of their annual tobacco-
settlement payments for upfront
money, sometimes for pennies on
the dollar. And now, with the
economy in crisis, more states
are proposing to dip into their
tobacco money to solve some of
their problems.
NATIONAl
California has second
train wreck in 2 months
RIALTO, Calif. — A commut-
er train collided with a freight
train Thursday in California,
producing no serious injuries
but bringing back memories of
a deadly commuter-train wreck
in the region two months ago.
A Metrolink train heading
east from Los Angeles toward
San Bernardino collided with
a BNSF train about a half-mile
from the Metrolink station in Ri-
alto around 11:30 a.m., spokes-
woman Joanna Capelle said.
The trains sideswiped each
other and both remained
upright on the tracks, Rialto
police Lt. Joe Cirilo said. Police
said fve people were taken to
area hospitals.
— Associated Press
ASSOCIATED PRESS
State administrators in Alaska recently used funds received fromthe 1998 tobacco
settlement to complete the University of Alaska Museumof the North in Fairbanks, Alaska.
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Just ‘cross the bridge
You’re not around for
55 years unless you have
something amazing to offer.
401 N.2nd St.
842-0377
news 3A friday, november 21, 2008
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Walk-ins welcome!
sunshine fresh air cool water mangos
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Student groups ofer something for everyone
Campus
BY JESSE TRIMBLE
[email protected]
Have an interest in ducks,
prison ball or breathing? There’s
a campus group for you. There
are 536 groups registered with the
University and countless other
unofficial groups that students can
join. Ducks Unlimited, Prison Ball
Club and the Art of Living Club are
just a few this campus has to offer.
DuCks unlimiteD
membership: 8
Year FounDeD: 1995
Ducks Unlimited at the
University is part of a national
organization. Taylor Erickson,
Herington junior and Ducks
Unlimited president said the
group wasn’t about just waterfowl;
it is interested in preserving all
wildlife.
“You have to have something to
hunt and you have to raise money
to produce habitats for the animals
you hunt,” he said.
Erickson said getting the word
out about Ducks Unlimited was
difficult.
“Trying to market our group
and get people more interested is
the biggest challenge,” Erickson
said. “Most are confused because
they ask how we can be hunters
and are about conserving wild-
life.”
Erickson said the group had
raised $2,500 by auctioning Ducks
Unlimited merchandise to raise
money, which was donated to
Ducks Unlimited to save wildlife
and conserve land.
“Being able to meet with people
at KU that have similar interests
is one thing,” Erickson said. “But
if it’s going towards a good cause,
that’s great, too.”
Erickson said Ducks Unlimited
wasn’t yet a University-sponsored
organization because groups must
have support from a faculty mem-
ber. He said the group hadn’t made
that step yet.
Stephani e McCaul l ey,
Victorville, Calif., senior, is the
only female member of Ducks
Unlimited.
Both McCaulley and Erickson
have hunting backgrounds and
said they had grown up with the
sport. McCaulley’s family hunts
both duck and large game. She said
it was something she enjoyed, too.
McCaulley said after hunt-
ing expeditions her family would
always use every part of the animal.
She said her mother made jewelry
out of the feathers of ducks.
Erickson said the group
planned to take hunting expedi-
tions together.
He said the group would go
out during the months of October
through December for duck sea-
son and possibly February for
goose season.
McCaulley said that for her,
Ducks Unlimited was about con-
servation.
“It’s really a club that’s about the
outdoors and nature — you don’t
have to hunt,” she said. “It’s just
about doing your part to conserve
these wetlands so they can live on
for many years.”
For more information, visit
the “Ducks Unlimited at KU”
Facebook group.
prison ball Club
membership: 41
Year FounDeD: 2008
Brian Bracciano, Lawrence
junior and co-president of Prison
Ball Club, said that the new group
to campus wasn’t just about having
fun and playing ball, but that it had
also been a tradition since middle
school.
Prison Ball, Bracciano said, is
a dodgeball-like sport that allows
many people to join in the activ-
ity. He said the group had recruit-
ed more than 120 people to play
before.
“It’s definitely a lot more stra-
tegic than dodgeball,” Bracciano
said.
The game is played with the
same types of balls and has two
jails at opposing ends of the gym.
When one person from a team is
struck with a ball, they must go
to the opposing team’s jail and
a member from their team has
to throw balls into the jail to get
them out. When one member from
a team throws the ball through
the basketball goal, then the entire
team is released from jail in a jail-
break.
Bracciano said he began a group
at Free State High School and from
there it had grown to forming a
group on campus. He said Prison
Ball Club was waiting to hear from
Student Senate about funding for
the group.
Alex Gordzica, Lawrence junior
and co-president of the group, said
Prison Ball Club was entertaining
and fulfilling.
“It allows people to do some-
thing that they wouldn’t normally
do,” he said. “Plus, I think kids our
age have a lot of aggression and it
helps get that out.”
Bracciano said the group can’t
charge members an admission
fee because it wouldn’t get fund-
ing from Student Senate and the
Ambler Student Recreation Center
charges $15 an hour to use its gym
courts.
Bracciano said the group had
high hopes and would hear from
Student Senate about the funding
decision on Dec. 3.
“We’re still using the same balls
we bought back in high school,”
he said.
For more information, go to
www.ku.edu/organizations or visit
the “Prisonble: A KU Chapter”
Facebook group.
the art oF living Club
membership: 20
Year FounDeD: 2007
The Art of Living Club focuses
on breathing and mind exercises.
Manas Bhatnagar, Bhobal, India,
sophomore and president, said cer-
tain sessions are targeted for differ-
ent things.
“The Body, Breath and Mind
session is one that is meant to relax
you,” Bhatnagar said. “It reaches
the body and the mind.”
He said the ultimate goal for the
group is just to have fun.
The group offers three dif-
ferent sessions and meets every
Wednesday at Hashinger Hall.
Bhatnagar said he thought of
the group as a way for individu-
als to handle their own share
of stress and to uplift society.
Certified breathing instructors
teach the course and the group
also brings in yoga instructors on
occasion.
The club gets its name from the
Art of Living Foundation, which
is a national organization with
courses in stress relief. According
to the group’s description, there
are no religious components to the
sessions and are primarily simple
techniques of meditation, yoga and
breathing.
“The instructors for the course
all have full-time jobs,” Bhatnagar
said. “This is just volunteer work
for them.”
For more information, go to
www.ku.edu/organizations.
— Edited by Becka Cremer
BY BRANDY ENTSMINGER
[email protected]
The old Pachamama’s building
at the corner of 23rd and Kasold
streets looks common at first
glance, but it will soon house what
will be the only Shakespearean the-
ater in Kansas.
The building’s Shakespearean
atmosphere — a double roof and
woods with a creek and a foot-
bridge in back — drew Victoria
Hartman in.
Hartman, a playwright who
recently moved to Lawrence, first
noticed the building’s potential
while sitting on a bench outside
it, finishing rewrites for her play,
“Monsoon Christmas.” Hartman
has since developed a plan to use
the building as the home of the
Shakespeare Repertory Theater
Company. The theater will offer
students the opportunity to watch
Shakespearean plays and to partici-
pate in the productions.
Jackie Koester, Hoisington
sophomore, played the “Lady of the
Night” in the University Theatre’s
production of Shakespeare’s
“Twelfth Night” last semester.
Koester said a Shakespearean
theater in Lawrence would give
students the opportunity to explore
themes such as love, hatred and
passion and the history behind
Shakespeare’s works.
“Shakespeare’s themes still have
significant meanings and rele-
vance, even in today’s generation,”
Koester said.
The company plans to pres-
ent five performances each sea-
son and feature professional and
local actors. It will also offer about
30 independent study opportuni-
ties and internships for college
students, programs for students
in secondary school and training
for people interested in careers in
Shakespeare.
Hartman is working to build
partnerships with the department
of theatre and film; the department
of music and dance and the schools
of fine arts, business and educa-
tion at the University. She said she
hoped to work with schools and
universities in Lawrence, Topeka,
Ottawa, Manhattan and Kansas
City.
Paul Laird, professor of music
and dance, spoke with Hartman
about the project. He said the the-
ater would give musicology stu-
dents who generally worked with
papers and presentations a chance
to design, perform or arrange
music for a production.
Hartman said she plans to cre-
ate a managing producer position
to help handle the budget, ticket
sales and daily business of the
company.
Joe Haugh, Leawood senior, is a
marketing major with a concentra-
tion in entrepreneurship. He said
an internship such as the one at
the theater would be beneficial for
business students.
“You actually get to put some of
what you’ve learned out in the real
world,” Haugh said.
Professionals from Shakespeare
and Company in Lenox, Mass., will
teach some classes for a month-
long intensive professional actor
training program. Hartman said
the company inspired her to start
her own theater in Lawrence.
Hartman said she was excited
about the design for the theater,
which will include a T-shaped stage
to allow for more interaction with
the audience. The building will
also include set and costume shops
and three acoustically designed
practice rooms for art forms such
as stage fighting, clowning and
Elizabethan dance.
In the spring, the theater will
sponsor a number of fundraisers
to pay for expenses, including
an “Amazing Shakespeare Race”
based on the CBS program “The
Amazing Race.” Hartman will ask
businesses to donate money for
the event, which will feature con-
testants racing to four Kansas cit-
ies in three days, performing tasks
related to Shakespearean works.
The winning team will receive
$10,000.
Hartman said the goal for the
theater was to be self-sustaining in
three to five years. She said the pro-
jected yearly revenue was $150,000
from class tuition and $300,000
from ticket sales.
Along with playwriting,
Hartman is also a director and
producer. Her play “Monsoon
Christmas” was well received
around the country, winning
awards such as Critics Choice in
the L.A. Times for seven months
and four NCAAP Image Awards.
The play will premiere in New
York this spring.
The Shakespeare Repertory
Theater Company is scheduled to
open for the 2009 spring/summer
season.
— Edited by Becka Cremer
New theater to ofer jobs, opportunities
arts
Ryan Waggoner/KANSAN
The building that was formerly Pachamama’s Restaurant will soon be turned into a
ShakespeareanTheater and will employ KU students through independent study classes and
internships. Students in the departments of English, theater and music and dance will have the
opportunity to work at the theater, which is planned to open by next summer.
NATIoNAL
Agency found Joe the
Plumber info illegally
TOLEDO, Ohio — An agency
director improperly used state
computers to fnd personal in-
formation on “Joe the Plumber,”
a government watchdog said in
a report released Thursday.
There was no legitimate
business purpose for the head
of Ohio’s Department of Job and
Family Services to order staf to
look up the records, Inspector
General Tom Charles said.
Investigators weren’t able to
determine whether the searches
were politically motivated, the
report said.
“All these searches were
done in the midst of a national
political campaign,” the report
said. “But we did not fnd any
evidence that shows the data
was accessed or information
released in response to media
requests in an efort to support
any political activity or agenda.”
Gov. Ted Strickland sus-
pended the agency director,
Helen Jones-Kelley, for a month
without pay after reviewing the
fndings.
— Associated Press
Ryan McGeeney/KANSAN
Alex Gordzica and Brian Bracciano, Lawrence juniors, are co-presidents of Prison Ball Club. Prison Ball Club has 41 ofcial members, but has
recruited many more on occasion to play the dodgeball-like sport.
Ducks Unlimited, Prison Ball Club and The Art of Living Club
are among the more than 500 clubs available on campus.
entertainment 4a friday, november 21, 2008
10 is the easiest day, 0 the
most challenging.
MAX RINKEL
The advenTures of Jesus and Joe dimaggio
horoscopes
Red Lyon
Tavern
944 Mass.
832-8228
aries (march21-april 19)
Today is an8
If you’re not already working for
yourself, you probably should
be. You’re knocking yourself out
for low pay, and that’s the way
most entrepreneurs start out.
Give it some thought.
Taurus (april 20-may 20)
Today is an8
The sun’s going into Sagittarius
for the next four weeks. This is
the area that brings emphasis to
your fnancial holdings. You have
natural talent, but guard against
surprises. Stay in charge.
gemini (may 21-June 21)
Today is a 6
Stick with your family’s tradi-
tions. If you don’t have any,
make up some. You’ll fnd that
doing the same old thing is very
comforting now.
cancer(June 22-July 22)
Today is a 7
Practice makes perfect but, as
you may have noticed, it can
take a while. Keep at it; you’re
losing your inhibitions and your
terror of making mistakes.
Leo(July 23-aug. 22)
Today is an8
There’s way too much for one
person to do, so get as much
help as you need. This job pays
well enough that you’ll come
out ahead. If this is totally not
happening in your life, move
over to where it is.
virgo(aug. 23-sept. 22)
Today is a 6
Continue to let your loved ones
build up your confdence. They
think you can do anything, even
when you wonder. Trust them.
LiBra(sept. 23-oct. 22)
Today is a 5
A behind-the-scenes negotia-
tion works out well for you. This
could be a trade or you get it
free for hauling it away. You
don’t have to tell anybody how
much you paid, unless you want
to brag.
scorpio(oct. 23-nov. 21)
Today is a 7
Hurry and start whatever it is
that you want to have grow
and be abundant. Pray for what
you want to learn easily in the
coming year.
sagiTTarius (nov. 22-dec. 21)
Today is an8
You can advance your career
now, and make a lot more
money. This might involve
making a change, but it’s not
impossible. Think about the pros
and cons.
capricorn(dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
Friends can make a connection
better than you can yourself.
Luckily, you’ve been getting bet-
ter at delegating responsibilities.
That hasn’t happened yet?
aQuarius (Jan. 20-feb. 18)
Today is a 5
Conditions are changing in
your favor. The next few weeks
should be fun. Keep sorting
through your expenses to see if
there are any you can cut.
pisces (feb. 19-march20)
Today is a 7
By now you should have your plan
just about fgured out. That’s good,
because you’re about to take on
more responsibility. You can do
this, especially if you’re prepared.
So, prepare.
ceLeBriTy
UK judge to grant divorce
ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON — A judge will likely
grant Madonna and Guy Ritchie
an initial divorce decree on Friday,
according to the schedule for
London’s High Court.
The court lists “Ciccone M L v
Ritchie G S” as one of 17 cases for
“matrimonial and civil partner-
ship causes for pronouncement of
decree.” That means a judge is
to grant the couple a preliminary
divorce decree, or decree nisi.
After six weeks and a day, the
couple will probably be granted
a decree absolute and the divorce
will become final.
It is unusual for the couple to
attend court in such cases.
British media reported Thursday
that the celebrity pair had reached
a settlement which would see the
pop superstar keep the majority of
her estimated 300 million pound
($445 million) fortune and share
custody of two of her children with
her film-director husband.
A report in the Evening Standard
newspaper said Ritchie had refused
to take any of Madonna’s assets,
while the Times of London said
Madonna would hold on to the
bulk of her fortune.
The papers said the couple had
also reached a deal regarding their
two children: Rocco, 8, and David
Banda, 3, who was adopted from
Malawi in 2006.
The two boys would split their
time between Britain and the
United States, the papers said, while
Lourdes — Madonna’s 12-year-old
daughter from a previous relation-
ship with personal trainer Carlos
Leon — will live with her mother
in the United States.
Neither paper cited a named
source for their reports and
requests for comment from repre-
sentatives for the couple were not
immediately returned.
An agreement between the two
would avoid an ugly, public and
expensive courtroom battle like the
one between former Beatle Paul
McCartney and model Heather
Mills. Mills has said the media cov-
erage of the rancorous divorce had
pushed her to the brink of suicide;
McCartney compared the process
to going through hell.
Madonna and Ritchie, director
of “Snatch” and “Lock, Stock and
Two Smoking Barrels,” married in
December 2000 at Skibo Castle in
the Scottish Highlands.
In recent years, however, the
relationship was dogged by rumors
that the pair had fallen out over
Madonna’s plans to adopt a second
child from Malawi. Media reports
over the summer — denied by
Madonna — linked the singer to
the breakup of New York Yankee
Alex Rodriguez’s marriage to his
ex-wife Cynthia.
Madonna and Ritchie
announced last month they were
divorcing after almost eight years
of marriage. They own homes in
London, Los Angeles and New
York, and a 1,200-acre retreat in
Wiltshire, England.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Musician Madonna poses for photos before the Sept. 1 premiere of “Rock n Rolla,”directed by
her husband, Guy Ritchie. A judge is likely to grant the couple an initial divorce decree today in
London High Court.
PhIlAnThROPy
Afeck to raise awareness
of Congolese refugees
GOMA, Congo — Ben Afeck
is talking to children and aid of-
cials in refugee camps in war-torn
eastern Congo in an efort to raise
awareness of the confict that has
displaced at least 250,000 people.
The actor has visited the
Central African country four times
since 2007 and also has made a
documentary about its problems.
“I’m not an expert in interna-
tional afairs or diplomacy, but it
doesn’t take that to see the tre-
mendous sufering here,” he told
the Associated Press on Thursday
in Goma, the regional capital. “It’s
not something that we as human
beings can, in good conscience,
ignore.”
Years of sporadic violence
in eastern Congo intensifed in
August, when fghting heated up
between the army and fght-
ers loyal to rebel leader Laurent
Nkunda.
Some fear the current
crisis could once again draw in
neighboring countries. Congo’s
devastating 1998-2002 war split
the vast nation into rival fefdoms
and involved half a dozen African
armies.
“I’m really glad that more
people are paying more attention
to (Congo) now but I’m really sad-
dened that it’s taken this uptick
in violence to make that happen,”
Afeck said.
“The primary reason I am here
is to urge people to give money
to the NGOs and charities doing
hard work in eastern Congo on
meager funds,” he said. “And if
people out there have an existing
relationship with a charity, to
urge that charity to get involved
in eastern Congo. To let people
know, ‘Don’t just read the horror
stories in the newspapers and
turn of.’”
Afeck said he frst became
interested in Congo a few years
ago, when Hollywood’s attentions
began to focus another African
crisis, Darfur. After doing more re-
search on Africa, he was shocked
to learn about Congo’s four-year
war, during which an estimated 5
million people died.
— Associated Press
There are few things lamer than
(Blank) Movie, the series of increas-
ingly moronic spoof “films” made
by untalented Hollywood directors
and writers Jason Friedberg and
Aaron Seltzer. One of those few
things is the inevitable riff after a
new one is cranked out:
“What's next?! 'Animated
Movie?' 'Space Movie?' How about
'Spoof Movie,' where they spoof
spoofs! Wouldn't that be crazy?”
Every single moviegoer in the
world has cracked up his friends
with the possibilities that come
from Friedberg and Seltzer's mov-
ie-by-numbers method of creating
anti-cinema. Although ostensibly
pointing out their laziness, peo-
ple who partake in this particular
line of thought anymore are just as
lazy and just as wrong in thinking
they're being original or funny.
This hypocrisy used to be merely
annoying. But it has become some-
thing much worse: The inevitable
conclusion of that riff, Spoof Movie,
is becoming reality.
Last week, The Hollywood
Reporter Hollywood reported that
Chevy Chase and Burt Reynolds
will be “spoofing the nonstop flood
of spoof films” in “Not Another Not
Another Movie.”
The movie's synopsis is like a
verbal M.C. Escher drawing: When
Chase's character leaves his posi-
tion as the boss of a failing film
studio, his replacement gives a pro-
duction assistant the task of direct-
ing a spoof movie that spoofs spoof
movies. Within the spoof spoof,
Reynolds plays an actor playing the
director of the spoof ... spoof.
No intelligent person thinks this
recent rash of spoof flicks is any-
thing less than garbage. But this
is simply not the way to go about
sticking it to Friedberg and Seltzer
and the cruel suits who repeatedly
give them the green light.
This isn't fighting fire with fire.
This is fighting illiteracy by blowing
up a library.
Nothing is accomplished with
this film except for bringing more
attention to the spoof genre just
as it appears to be losing its profit-
ability. “Disaster Movie,” the most
recent incarnation of the series,
premiered at No. 7 in the box office,
making under $7 million during
Labor Day weekend.
But as the beast begins to die,
Chevy Chase decides to swoop in
and revive it.
Why won't you use your powers
for good, Chevy Chase?
As Oscar Wilde once said, “The
only thing worse than being talked
about is not being talked about.”
Instead of doing the right thing
by just ignoring the movies, True
Fiction Filmz (the company pro-
ducing this movie, and yes, it’s
spelled with a “z”) is legitimizing
its existence by immortalizing its
influence on culture.
This movie is providing free
publicity to the franchise that it is
spoofing. Even the slightest bit of
success on its part will not only
motivate Friedberg and Seltzer to
spoof back, but would also encour-
age moviegoers to see their new
film out of morbid curiosity. It's a
shameful exercise in competitive
spoofery that will end in carnage.
If Wilde were alive today, he'd be
dead from a self-inflicted gunshot
wound after seeing what passes for
entertainment these days.
Of course, in writing this col-
umn, I'm a part of the problem. I'm
reminding the smart folks who read
this paper that these movies exist.
But the people who are immune
to their inexplicable allure must
band together and brace themselves
for the oncoming Spoof-pocalypse.
We must not be blindsided because
if we let down our guard, one day
we will suddenly find ourselves at
a screening of the Wayans Brothers'
upcoming spoof “Dance Flick”
wondering what the hell happened.
And that would truly be the lam-
est thing of all.
Nichols is an Overland Park
sophomore in creative
writing.
OpiniOn
5A
Friday, November 21, 2008
To contribute to Free for
All, visit Kansan.com or
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n Want more? Check out
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Matt erickson, editor
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864-4810 or [email protected]
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THe ediTOriAL BOArd
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Alex
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contAct us
how to submit A LEttER to thE EDitoR
FrOM THe drAWinG BOArd
tyler dOehring
There’s no better music to
have sex to than the Game
Guy commercial.
n n n
42.
n n n
Twilight. Twilight. Twilight.
Twilight. Midnight showing of
Twilight!
n n n
My professor should quit
asking if we’re wearing green
underwear, so we’ll rush to
her ofce to speak to her
on a one-to-one basis. No,
I don’t think so. She’s not
trustworthy.
n n n
I need a hot girlfriend.
n n n
I have a crush on the 10th
foor Ellsworth RA.
n n n
Who writes “pleaseeee”?
Did you sound that out to
yourself? Then you know you
probably should have put
“pleeeeeease”.
n n n
Good luck fnding your wallet,
fellow Minnesotan.
n n n
I wish nap time 101 was
a class. Anyone feel like
seconding that one?
n n n
What do you think this is?
Some kind of brownie social?
n n n
If you’re male and your name
begins with an Q, X, or Y
please reply. All other letters
need not reply.
n n n
Shackers, make sure you’re
out by 10 a.m. I’m going to
wake you up at 9:30 just to
be sure. Remember Jayhawks
always keeps it real.
n n n
I’m Facebook friends with
Bangin’ Bruce. Nuf said.
n n n
There are 27,000 people
on campus. Can’t you
fnd somebody else to be
obsessed with?
n n n
Don’t be surprised if you
see two reindeer prancing
around.
n n n
I could rant about my lack of
boy, or I could just sleep it of.
Guess which one I choose.
n n n
Am I stupid for thinking the
color “russet” was white?
n n n
Is anyone else bored out of
their minds, or is it just me?
n n n
I’m a lumberjack and I’m OK.
I sleep all night, and I work all
day. I cut down trees. I eat my
lunch. I go to the lavatory. On
Wednesdays I go shopping
and have buttered scones for
tea.
n n n
What would happen if
other advocates gave up
Protests are held to show-
case injustices placed on those
who don't have the rights
they deserve. The passing of
Proposition 8 is a big step back
for not only the gay commu-
nity, but for the freedoms this
country is supposed to aford its
entire people. The people have
indeed spoken, but both sides
realize this fght is not over.
Where would fghts such as
those for women's rights, inter-
racial marriage and the black
vote be if the nation did not
evolve in thinking and grant the
minority and less powerful the
rights they deserve as Ameri-
cans? What if the trailblazers of
their day shrugged it of as a
good try and just went home?
Such scenarios seem ridicu-
lous today, but I'm sure that in
their early stages, many people
would have preferred these
advocates step down in such
fashion. The gay community is
not going away, and its allies
will only grow in number and
strength.
Proposition 22 passed in
California in 2000 with nearly 62
percent in favor. Proposition 8
mirrored much of its message
this year, but the number in
support dropped to 52 percent.
I wonder what would happen
with another four years of solid
campaigning by the gay com-
munity to bring this issue back
for another vote.
This is not a matter of
religion or creed. This is about
equality. A law advocating mar-
riage for both gay and straight
couples does not diminish any
other couple’s union although
many religious leaders and
churches would like their con-
gregations to think otherwise.
Why people think lawful gay
marriage is a problem is amus-
ing to me. The only people this
vote truly afects are those who
want so badly to share in a life
that straight couples take for
granted.
—Brian Walters is a senior fromCatherine.
With spoof movies,
the joke’s on all of us
MariaM Saifan
ALEX nichoLs
UNDER
OBSERVATION
editorials around the nation
Where is the strict
bailout oversight?
When Congress established
the $700 billion bailout fund,
it promised strict oversight. A
month later, with $290 billion
already committed, we have
our answer as to what that
means: There isn't any.
Congress has yet to name
the members of a special
oversight panel. The deadline
under the law for the frst
oversight report
by that panel
has passed and
the panel may
not be able to
make the Jan.
20 deadline for a
much more detailed report.
The bailout law also creat-
ed an entity called the Finan-
cial Stability Oversight Board,
whose fve members include
Treasury Secretary Henry
Paulson and Federal Reserve
Chairman Ben Bernanke, who
would efectively be doing
oversight over themselves.
The board has no staf.
Congress promised the
hallmarks of the federal gov-
ernment's massive interven-
tion in the markets would be
oversight and transparency.
A top priority of its lame duck
session must be to make good
on that promise.
— Rocky Mountain News
Nov. 15 editorial
Paulson
Why haven’t you joined
the prop 8 protests?
Why is Proposition 8 being
protested? As a queer student
here at KU, I've got a few pretty
good reasons, and none of
them go against democracy.
If anything, the reasons for
protesting the Proposition 8
decision are upholding pillars of
democracy. In a previous letter
to the editor, the author of the
letter compared the presiden-
tial election to the passing of
Proposition 8 in California. He
compared numbers. About 52
percent of the votes went for
Obama, and in California 52
percent of the votes said yes to
Proposition 8.
But the last time I checked,
my civil rights and the civil
rights of all people were not
numbers and percentages.
This is not merely a matter
of who won and by how much.
This is a direct declaration, loud
and clear, that second-class citi-
zenship and blatant discrimina-
tion are still alive and kicking in
this country.
It is proof that although
we've come a very long way in
the fght for equal rights for all,
we still have a very long way
to go.
The question of why the
LGBT community and our allies
are protesting the decision
made on Proposition 8 should
be obvious. Very obvious.
You shouldn't have to ask
why. You shouldn't have to
wonder why we fnd it neces-
sary to have rights that you
already have.
It’s simple. We are fghting
for visibility, tolerance, under-
standing, compassion and our
very livelihood. We are fghting
for something that goes so far
beyond marriage it isn't even
funny. We are fghting to walk
down the street at night and
not worry about what might
happen because of who we are.
We are fghting to be able to
visit our loved ones in hospitals
during family/spouse visiting
hours.
We are fghting to be able
to raise families and live hap-
pily with those families. We are
fghting for our right to not be
discriminated against, to not
be emotionally and physically
abused by those in this society
who still don't accept us.
We are fghting for the right
to fght until we get what every
one should get: a frst-class citi-
zenship and the recognition we
for so long have deserved.
We are your friends, your
neighbors, your classmates,
your teachers and your family.
If you are still wondering why
we are fghting, perhaps you
should ask yourself why you
aren't at our sides, as an ally,
fghting with us.
— Erica Goddard is a junior fromLawrence.
LeTTers TO THe ediTOr
aSSOCiated preSS
n Join the conversation.
Read and post comments online at kansan.com/opinion or
submit a letter to the editor by following the steps below.
@
sports 6A Friday, November 21, 2008
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ANSAN
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* Not valid with any other specials or discount programs. Not valid on Holiday Feast.
SAVE 20%
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Breakfast is just the beginning.
Coupon Expires: December 31, 2008.
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Take the hassle out of the holidays.
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Breakfast is just the beginning.
Border showdown
Kansas to the west, Missouri to the east
BY B.J. RAINS
[email protected]
Cody Daniels was so excit-
ed for last
year’s Border
S h o wd o w n
against the
M i s s o u r i
Tigers that he
and his friends
jumped in their
RV and headed
to Arrowhead
Stadium more
than six hours
before kickoff.
But Daniels,
Shawnee freshman, and his
friends couldn’t get into the sta-
dium’s parking lot for more than
two hours as they sat in standstill
traffic on Interstate 435.
“It was very frustrating,” Daniels
said. “It was a big mess. We were
real surprised, because we figured
we were going
to beat the
crowd. It was
a pain in the
butt, because
we had to
park way in
the back and it
took probably
10 or 15 min-
utes to walk
from where we
were parked to
get to the sta-
dium.”
To help fix the problem,
Arrowhead Stadium has formed
a new parking procedure for this
year’s game that they hope will alle-
viate last year’s parking lot mess.
They have assigned all parking lots
on the west side of Arrowhead
Stadium for Kansas fans and park-
ing lots to the east of the stadium to
Missouri fans.
The new plan should help fans
avoid the lines on both I-435 and
I-70 that stretched as long as five
miles and forced fans from both
teams to wait as long as three hours
to get into the parking lot last year.
“Arrowhead has worked with
the schools to formulate a park-
ing plan that should help Kansas
fans and Missouri fans get into
the parking lot quicker,” Jim
Marchiony, associate athletics
director, said. “It should also help
get them into the stadium quicker
and easier once they get there as
well.”
Parking lots will open five hours
prior to kickoff, meaning that those
attending the 11:30 a.m. game can
start tailgating at 6:30 a.m. Either
way, the new lots should allow fans
of each team to tailgate together
and have a better time leading up
to kickoff.
“It will probably help,” Daniels
said. “But people from the opposite
team will go and venture into the
other parking lot and they are just
going to get manhandled.”
Arrowhead officials recommend
carpooling to the Nov. 29 game and
arriving early to avoid missing any
of the game, because police will
pat down each person entering the
stadium.
— Edited by Becka Cremer
MAP COURTESY OF KU ATHLETICS
For the Nov. 29 Border Showdown game, Kansas fans will be directed to parking lots to the west of Arrowhead stadium(shown above in blue). Missouri fans will park to the east of the
stadium(shown in yellow). Arrowhead ofcials expect this change to help fans get into the parking lots more efciently than they did last year.
New parking procedure should shorten wait to tailgate at Arrowhead Nov. 29
“It was a big mess. We fgured
we were going to beat the
crowd. It was a pain in the butt,
because we had to park way in
the back.”
Cody daniels
shawnee freshman
lpgA
Hall of Famer must be in
top 16 Friday to continue
WesT PalM BeaCH, Fla. —
annika sorenstam arrived at the
frst tee Thursday morning, shook
a few hands and got a kiss on
the cheek from donald Trump.
Then she turned to the gallery
and waved. on Friday, unless she
moves a bit up the leaderboard,
she’ll be waving goodbye.
sorenstam shot a 2-over par
74 in Thursday’s opening round
of the adT Championship, good
for a tie for 23rd in the 32-woman
event, her fnal lPGa Tour ap-
pearance before “stepping away”
from competitive golf. The feld
gets trimmed to 16 after Friday’s
play, meaning sorenstam has
some work remaining just to
reach the weekend.
otherwise, her lPGa Tour
career will come to an unceremo-
nious end.
“i was a little nervous. i feel
like i’m playing good. i’m excited
about the week,” sorenstam said.
“But i’m telling you, nothing went
my way today.”
indeed, it was not a dominant
round for the woman who once
controlled her sport. she went
barefoot into the water on the
par-3 seventh to salvage a bogey
and was 4 over through 10 holes,
putting her into what seemed
like a precarious spot.
But as she’s done so many
times throughout her 72-win
career, the Hall of Famer rallied.
sorenstam put together
consecutive birdies on the par-4
14th and par-5 15th to stop the
bogey bleeding and fnished six
shots behind Katherine Hull (68).
“i think she wants to win a few
more,” Hull said. “But i guess time
will tell.”
sorenstam is a four-time adT
winner and a giant fan of the
Trump international course, but
in this double-cut, erase-the-
scores format, she’s never even
reached the weekend.
The scores are erased after Fri-
day’s play, then get wiped clear
again after saturday’s round,
after which only the top eight get
invited back sunday to play for
the $1 million winner’s prize.
— Associated Press
sports 7A Friday, November 21, 2008
BY JOSH BOWE
[email protected]
It’s officially gut check time for
Kansas.
The volleyball team has only
three matches remaining this sea-
son. Each against a team with a
winning record. Each critical to
the team’s slim chance of making it
into the NCAA Tournament.
The final stand starts Saturday,
on the road in Austin, to face the
No. 4 Texas Longhorns.
“They’ll (Texas) put a lot of
pressure on you with their serve
and their attack and their block,”
coach Ray Bechard said. “We’ve
seen it before, but it’s how we man-
age it on our side of the net.”
At least the Jayhawks’ last match
was against Nebraska, one of the
premier teams in the Big 12.
Although Nebraska and Texas
are different teams, Bechard thinks
that the Jayhawks can transfer
some of the strengths from last
week’s match to Saturday night’s
match.
“You see some of the same phys-
icality,” Bechard said. “The speed
of the game is similar, I think those
opponents back-to-back do help
you.”
Although it isn’t as sound
in fundamentals as a team like
Nebraska, Texas offers some of
the best athletes in the confer-
ence. Texas just flexed its muscles
against that same Nebraska team
on Wednesday night.
The Longhorns punished the
Cornhuskers in four sets. They
accumulated 25 total blocks and
junior All-American Destinee
Hooker stole the show from
Nebraska’s All-American Jordan
Larson with 24 kills.
Kansas has to catch Texas
sleeping after a huge victory, but
sophomore outside hitter Karina
Garlington doesn’t want to take
that chance. She said the Jayhawks
have to focus on their team, not
the Longhorns.
“We have to focus on what we
did really well,” Garlington said of
the Nebraska match. “We worked
on digging, and trying to convert
aggressive swings off of that.”
A bye week certainly helps. The
players received their first day off
on Monday and were able to for-
get about volleyball, albeit just for
one day.
“We finally get to see what other
students get to do.” Garlington said
with a laugh.
Garlington also mentioned the
bond between her teammates.
Even though the team had the
entire day off, she said the team
members were still together, hang-
ing out and enjoying their break.
But the task at hand is beat-
ing Texas. Freshman setter Nicole
Tate understands the importance
of the match and knows what
the Jayhawks have to do starting
against Texas.
“We just have to stay after them/
It’s a must-win match,” Tate said.
“We’re ready to play them. They’re
big, but they can go down.”
The players seemed cool and
collected when talking about
what’s in store for them to end the
season.
But Garlington shared a sense
of urgency with her teammates
about the match against Texas.
“We know this is a doable deal
if we just can create that kind of
high level,” Garlington said. “We
know that they’re going to make
plays, but we can make plays too.”
— Edited by Jennifer Torline
volleyball notes
Keys to the game
Saw ‘em of: Usually that phrase
is reserved for the students at
Texas a&m, but Kansas needs
to hold that level of confdence
to beat the Texas Longhorns.
The season isn’t over, and while
it can be intimidating to play in
austin, this could be a defning
moment for the Jayhawks if
they squeak out with a win.
Sleeping giant: it’s natural for a
team like Texas, especially after
beating Nebraska, to over-
look this Kansas team. if the
Longhorns come out sloppy in
the opening sets, the Jay-
hawks have to take advantage.
bechard said this team cannot
fall down by fve or six points
on the road, especially against
the No. 4 team in the country.
Players to watch
Kansas: Karina Garlington
The sophomore outside hitter
had a poor match against
Nebraska, hitting for only nine
kills with a sub .200 hitting per-
centage. it will be interesting to
see how Garlington rebounds
against another elite team. if
Garlington gets her groove
back, look for the Jayhawks to
be competitive.
Texas: Destinee Hooker
This one is a no-brainer. Hooker
might be the most physically
imposing player in the entire
country. She stands six-foot-
four-inches with an impressive
wingspan. Her stature also
translates into dominating the
big 12 Conference. Hooker’s
4.28 kills per set tops the con-
ference and she also boasts the
sixth best hitting percentage in
the big 12 with .347. if Kansas
can somehow control this
phenom, then consider that a
victory in itself.
Team prepares to face Longhorns
VolleyBall
McCabe said of Kansas’ ability to
cope with setbacks. “Getting beat
6-0 by Missouri was kind of heart-
breaking. To come back and beat
Texas A&M 4-2 just showed we
could come back from adversity.”
But more than that, doubling
the program’s all-time victory total
against the Aggies and making the
NCAA Tournament helped give the
program the momentum it lacked
after three consecutive seasons
without any tournament experi-
ence. It gave Kansas something
to build on. Predictably, Francis’
message to his team following the
loss to Stanford was straight to the
point.
Just making the tournament is
no longer a goal at Kansas. It’s an
expectation.
“Just seeing your name pop up
on the screen in a bracket was a
something different that none of us
had experienced,” Dolinsky said. “A
lot of us want that feeling again.”
— Edited by Ramsey Cox
SOCCER
(conTinued from 10A)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
soccer season at a glance
Graphic by Peter Soto
Kansas won fve straight games to begin the
season before a stretch of road games and the
beginning of Big 12 Conference play cooled its
hot start. The Jayhawks wouldn’t win or lose
more than two game in a rowfor the rest of
the season, but still collected enough quality
wins to play in the NCAATournament.
PGA
Honest golfer ineligible
after illegal ball use
The moment J.P. Hayes saw
the golf ball on the foor in his
hotel room, he knew he could
keep his mouth shut and his
chances of playing full-time
on the PGA Tour next season
alive or pick up the phone and
disqualify himself.
The only thing that seems
remarkable to Hayes about that
decision is the stir it created.
“It’s blown me away,” Hayes
said Thursday. “I certainly
don’t want to be made out as
a hero. I’m just a player that
did the right thing.”
Hayes was on the tee at
the par-3 12th hole in the
frst round of the PGA Tour’s
qualifying tournament when
his caddie fipped him the ball.
He missed the green, chipped
on, marked his ball and then
realized it wasn’t the one he’d
started the day with. Hayes
called over an ofcial and took
a two-shot penalty, then went
back to playing his original
ball on the next tee.
Like a lot of golfers, Hayes
goes through his golf bag ev-
ery night. The night after the
second round, he realized the
ball that had already cost him
two strokes was a prototype
that hadn’t been approved
for tournament play. After he
called a PGA tour ofcial, he
recalled, “I pretty much knew
at that point I was done.”
— Associated Press
MLB
Yankees pitcher leaves
baseball without regrets
NEW YORK — Mike Mussina
took a secret to the ballpark
every day this season. Maybe
that’s why he was so successful
on the mound, so jovial in the
clubhouse.
From day one of spring train-
ing, he knew this was his fnal
year — even if it meant giving
up bids for 300 wins, a World
Series ring and a better shot at
the Hall of Fame.
The New York Yankees pitcher
walked away from baseball
Thursday after his only 20-win
season.
“I don’t have any regrets with
what I decided. This is the right
time,” Mussina said on a confer-
ence call.
“I don’t think there was ever a
point where I looked around and
said, ‘You know what, I’m going
to change my mind,’” he said.
“It was like the last year of high
school. You know it’s going to
end and you enjoy the ride.”
Mussina fnished 270-153
with a 3.68 ERA in 18 seasons
with Baltimore and New York.
A thinking man’s pitcher who
relied on sharp control and did
more than overpower hitters, he
ranks 32nd on the career wins
list and 19th in strikeouts with
2,813.
— Associated Press
Central Florida — Coming off the loss to
Loyola Chicago, the Jayhawks rebounded with a
3-2 victory against then-No. 18 Central Florida.
It was Kansas’ first road victory against a ranked
opponent since 2004.
Texas A&M — Facing a must-win situation to even garner post-
season consideration, Kansas knocked off No. 8 Texas A&M 4-2 in
the first round of the Big 12 Championship. It was the second time
the Jayhawks defeated the Aggies during the season, and was also
enough to secure Kansas a spot in the NCAA Tournament.
Loyola Chicago —
Maybe Kansas overlooked
Loyola Chicago. Perhaps
it was just an off-day.
Whatever the case, the
Jayhawks’ 2-1 loss to the
Ramblers was Kansas’ first
loss of the season.
Missouri — Still desperately looking to
clinch a spot in the NCAA Tournament, the
Jayhawks suffered a major setback with a 6-0
loss at Missouri. The game marked Kansas’
worst defeat since 1999.
Denver — Simply put, Kansas won its first
NCAA Tournament game since 2004 with a 2-1
victory against Denver in the first round.
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Winners
Revealed
Find out who the
students voted Top of the Hill!
December 1
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Tired of dorms or rundown rentals? 4BR
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sports 8A Friday, November 21, 2008
Look to these players
for a quick roster rival
Fantasy Football
Here are the players that could
be last-minute saviors on your fan-
tasy roster this weekend.
Pierre thomas, rb,
new orleans saints
Thomas had 144 total yards
against the Chiefs last week. This
weekend looks a little rougher with
a matchup against Green Bay, but
expect Thomas to have another
solid game. A possible suspension
is hanging over Deuce McAllister’s
head and Reggie Bush is still bat-
tling injury problems, so Thomas is
the most reliable running back for
the Saints.
Kerry Collins, Qb,
tennessee titans
Collins is starting to hit his stride
after being a designated backup for
so long. Collins has topped the
200-yard passing mark the past two
games and threw three touchdowns
on Sunday. All this bodes well for
fantasy owners who need an option
at quarterback this week. Collins
could have his biggest day of the
season and the Titans should con-
tinue to roll, considering the Jets
defense has been unable to slow
down any offense it has faced.
hanK basKett, wr,
PhiladelPhia eagles
Baskett is becoming quarterback
Donovan McNabb’s favorite tar-
get, especially when they near the
end zone. Philadelphia’s receiving
corps has been troubled by injury
problems this year, but Baskett and
rookie DeSean Jackson have ben-
efited. Baskett is the second leading
receiver on the team in yardage
and is also tied for the team lead
in touchdown receptions. So if you
need a wide receiver, Baskett is
your guy.
denVer bronCos
deFense
It’s time for the live-dangerously
moment. If you decide to start the
best free agent defense, Denver is
your best bet this weekend. The
Broncos play the offensively inept
Raiders whose passing offense
ranks last in the NFL. Denver fans
probably couldn’t be happier that
JaMarcus Russell is winning back
his job. Russell actually had one of
his best games of the year against
Denver with 180 passing yards and
two touchdowns, so the Broncos
could be looking for revenge. The
Raiders don’t really do much, so
expect a dominating performance
from Denver’s defense.
— Edited by Andy Greenhaw
Pierre Thomas breaks a tackle against the
Chiefs in Sunday’s 30-20 victory. The Saints
face a tougher foe in Green Bay this week.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
By Kelly BrecKunitch
[email protected]
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — There has never
been a rain-shortened game in the
postseason, and now there never
will be.
Baseball commissioner Bud Selig
announced the sport will enact a
rules change stating that postseason
games cannot be shortened because
of bad weather.
“All postseason games, All-Star
games and that, will be full-length
affairs, and the rule will be so writ-
ten,” Selig said Thursday following
an owners’ meeting.
Selig said the change also will
apply to tiebreaker games that
decide division titles and wild-card
berths.
“Any game that has significance
for the postseason,” he said. “It will
be very clear now. Everybody will
know exactly.”
Under baseball’s rules, games are
official as soon as the trailing team
has made 15 outs.
During World Series Game
5 between Tampa Bay and
Philadelphia last month, Selig
decided that it wouldn’t be cut short
because of pouring rain. Just after
the Rays tied it in the top of the
sixth, umpires halted play and the
game was suspended for 46 hours.
Selig said that if the Phillies still
led 2-1 when play was stopped, the
game would have gone into a rain
delay until it could resume — even
if that took several days.
“We’ll stay here if we have to cel-
ebrate Thanksgiving here,” he said.
Management lawyers will dis-
cuss the contemplated change with
the players’ association.
“I expect that will be having dis-
cussions with the commissioner’s
office about that rule in the weeks
to come,” union general coun-
sel Michael Weiner said. “I don’t
want to prejudge it one way or the
other.”
“All right boys, this is going to
be the roughest, toughest season a
University of Kansas team has ever
faced. And to you, captain Dean
Kelly, you’re the only returning regu-
lar and you and the rest of these
boys have to carry a terrific load.
Do you think you can do it? I think
you can do it. What do you think?”
— Dr. F.C. “Phog” Allen
The year was 1953 and the
Jayhawks returned to Lawrence to
raise a third National Championship
banner. Coach Phog Allen had the
daunting task of replacing four
starters on a team that not only
won a title but had seven players
take home the Olympic gold in
basketball the year before.
Dean Kelly, a 5-foot-11 guard,
was the lone starter from the previ-
ous season. Kelley had averaged 6.5
points per game and was named to
the NCAA All-Tournament team.
That season the Jayhawks were
picked to place fourth in the Big
Seven Conference and started out
as the AP No. 20-ranked team.
That year the Jayhawks went on
to surprise everyone. B.H. Born,
a 6-foot-9 center became a team
leader and averaged 18.9 points
and 11.2 rebounds per game. In
1952, Born averaged just 1.2 points
per game as a backup. The team
went on to win the Big Seven title
and advance to the Final Four
against No. 2 Washington.
Washington came unprepared
for the game. Born and legendary
North Carolina coach Dean Smith,
then a player for Kansas, recalled
the game in the book “Mac’s Boys,”
a book about the 1953 Indiana
Hoosiers.
“I don’t think Washington
bothered to scout us because they
thought we’d lost everybody from
the year before and weren’t that
tough,” Born said.
“The first 10 minutes (against
Washington) were unbelievable.
They had a hard time getting a
shot,” Smith said.
The result: Kansas 79,
Washington 53. The Jayhawks were
headed to defend the national title
against Indiana.
Kansas put up a valiant effort
against heavily favored No. 1
Indiana in Kansas City’s Municipal
Auditorium but lost on the final
shot of the game 69-68.
Fifty-five years later, the 2008-
2009 edition of Kansas basketball
will go to Kansas City’s Sprint
Center Monday and Tuesday for
the CBE Classic Tournament to
face Washington and then Florida
or Syracuse.
Will history repeat
itself this season? After
two games, it’s far too
early in the season to
tell. On paper though,
there are several simi-
larities between the
1953 team and these
Jayhawks.
Kansas started the
season ranked No. 23
and was ranked third
in the preseason Big
12 poll.
This year’s team
features a 5-foot-
11 guard, Sherron
Collins, who was an
integral part of last
year’s title, and former backup cen-
ter Cole Aldrich.
Only time will tell if this team
has the magic that Phog Allen’s
boys had in 1953. Should this
team struggle early, it wouldn’t be
any different than the 1953 team,
which lost to the Rice Owls in just
their second game.
— Edited by Jennifer Torline
sports 9a Friday, november 21, 2008
Oklahoma at Texas Tech
Penn State at Michigan State
Brigham Young at Utah
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati
Florida State at Maryland
Iowa State at Kansas State
Oregon State at Arizona
Illinois at Northwestern
West Virginia at Louisville
Washington at Washington State
Oklahoma
Penn State
Utah
Cincinnati
Florida State
Kansas State
Oregon State
Northwestern
West Virginia
Washington State
Case Keefer
Basketball
(75-36)
Oklahoma
Penn State
Utah
Cincinnati
Florida State
Kansas State
Oregon State
Northwestern
West Virginia
Washington State
Andrew Wiebe
AssociateSportsEditor
(75-35)
Oklahoma
Penn State
Utah
Cincinnati
Florida State
Kansas State
Oregon State
Northwestern
West Virginia
Washington State
Drew Bergman
DesignEditor
(74-36)
Texas Tech
Penn State
Utah
Cincinnati
Florida State
Kansas State
Arizona
Northwestern
West Virginia
Washington
Mark Dent
ManagingEditor
(73-37)
Oklahoma
Penn State
Utah
Pittsburgh
Maryland
Iowa State
Arizona
Northwestern
Louisville
Washington
Matt Erickson
Editor
(74-36)
Texas Tech
Penn State
Utah
Cincinnati
Florida State
Iowa State
Arizona
Northwestern
Louisville
Washington
Rustin Dodd
SportsEditor
(70-40)
Oklahoma
Penn State
Utah
Pittsburgh
Florida State
Kansas State
Arizona
Northwestern
Louisville
Washington
Kelsey Hayes
ManagingEditor
(70-40)
Think you can pick
better? Join next
week’s competition
and prove yourself.
KICK THE KANSAN: WEEK 10
quote of the day
trivia of the day
fact of the day
Greg Ostertag played with
the Jazz, Raef LaFrentz with the
Nuggets, Scot Pollard with Kings,
Jacque Vaughn with Hawks,
Manning with Mavericks, and
Pierce with the Celtics in 2001
NBA season.
—funtrivia.com
Q: What kind of ball did
James Naismith use in his frst
basketball goal
A: A soccer ball
BY BRYAn WhEElER
[email protected]
Basketball team resembles Allen’s 1953 squad
MLB
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — George
Steinbrenner’s 35-year reign as
boss of the New York Yankees
ended Thursday when he passed
control of baseball’s most famous
team to his youngest son, Hal.
The elder Steinbrenner has
gradually withdrawn from the
Yankees’ day-to-day operations in
recent years, and brothers Hal and
Hank were appointed co-chairmen
in April.
“I realize it’s a great responsibil-
ity,” said Hal Steinbrenner. “My
dad is, needless to say, a tough act
to follow.”
George Steinbrenner, now 78,
headed a group that bought the
club in January 1973 for an $8.7
million net price and became one
of the most high-profile owners
in all of sports. He dominated the
back pages of New York’s tabloids,
earning the nickname “The Boss”
as he spent lavishly on players and
changed managers 20 times during
his first 23 years as owner, feuding
with Billy Martin, Yogi Berra and
Dave Winfield.
The Yankees regained their
former glory, winning six World
Series titles and 10 American
League pennants from 1976-2003.
They also have transformed them-
selves into a billion-dollar business
that owns a cable television net-
work and food concession com-
pany and is preparing to move into
a $1.3 billion new Yankee Stadium
next year.
Steinbrenner is baseball’s lon-
gest-serving current owner, but
has been in declining health fol-
lowing fainting spells that required
hospitalization in December 2003
and October 2006.
His speech in public has been
halting and weak since the second
fall, and he has needed assistance
when walking. He delivered the
balls for the ceremonial first pitch-
es from a golf cart at July’s All-Star
game, then stayed home in Florida
to watch the park’s final game on
television in September.
Steinbrenner passes control of Yankees of to son
‘The Boss’ officially steps away from the duties with the team he bought in 1973
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NewYork Yankees owner George Steinbrenner, right, slaps hands with his son, Hal,
before a ceremony renaming Legends Field to George M. Steinbrenner Field inTampa, Fla.
“The biggest issue for us is
that we were able to have a
corner last year that we could
put on an island and therefore
help the other corner, which
solidifed our pass defense. “
—Kansas coach Mark Mangino on former
All-American Talib
MLB
Weather won’t ever stop the playofs
nFl
League narrows search
for players’ union head
The search committee seek-
ing a replacement for the late
Gene Upshaw to run the NFL
Players Association has nar-
rowed the feld to a little more
than a dozen candidates, some
with no previous ties to the
union or the NFL, a person with
knowledge of the search told
the Associated Press.
The committee met this week
with the search frm seeking
candidates to replace Upshaw,
who died in August. The union
hopes to have a list of fnalists
set by early next year and select
its new executive director in
March.
— Associated Press
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[email protected]
Kansas’ first two opponents, UMKC and
Florida Gulf Coast, had never reached the
NCAA Tournament.
Washington, who the Jayhawks play
Monday at the Sprint Center in Kansas
City, has participated in three of the last
five NCAA Tournaments. Kansas will then
face off Tuesday against either Florida or
Syracuse, teams that have combined to
win three of the last six NCAA champion-
ships.
The Jayhawks’ level of competition in
the CBE Classic isn’t just increasing, it’s
rapidly intensifying. They say they’re ready
for it.
“I think it’s time,” Kansas coach Bill Self
said. “We’ll have a better idea of where
we’re at.”
Self stressed, however, that it’s going to
take a handful of quality practices to pre-
pare his young team for its upcoming chal-
lenges. All three teams in the CBE Classic
present unique ones.
Senior forward Jon Brockman leads
Washington by averaging nearly 27 points
and 14 rebounds through his first two
games. Syracuse presents a backcourt duo
with junior Eric Devendorf and sopho-
more Jonny Flynn, who are known for their
ability to both shoot and drive. Florida
relies heavily on sophomore forward
Nick Calathes, last year’s Southeastern
Conference Freshman of the Year.
After Tuesday’s 85-45 victory against
Florida Gulf Coast, Self said he hadn’t
watched Washington play yet. Florida and
Syracuse, however, already impressed him.
“I’ve seen Florida and Syracuse play
on television so far,” Self said. “And we’re
going to have to play better than we have
thus far to have a successful trip if success
is equated to us winning games.”
Self knows enough about Brockman to
fear the Huskies as well. If Kansas has dis-
played one troubling trait in its first two
games, it’s the big men’s propensity to get
into foul trouble. Sophomore center Cole
Aldrich has recorded two fouls within the
first four minutes of both games. Although
freshmen Marcus and Markieff Morris
have only combined for seven fouls in the
first two games, Self knows they are still
prone to foul trouble. And he knows that
could become an issue against Brockman.
“If our big guys foul guys when they
throw it to the post now, how are they going
to play when they jam it into Brockman
every possession?” Self said. “We’ve got a
lot of things to work on, a lot of things to
improve on.”
The two tests in two days should help
Kansas prepare for a daunting upcoming
schedule. The Jayhawks play seven teams
in their nonconference schedule this sea-
son that made the NCAA Tournament last
season and the runner-up of the National
Invitational Tournament, Massachusetts.
Some of the toughest matchups will be
in December and January when Kansas
plays Arizona, Tennessee and Michigan
State.
Self even said the nonconference sched-
ule was a little harder than he’d like. But
the players aren’t deterred. They know the
opposing teams aren’t only strong, but also
are particularly looking forward to playing
Kansas.
“We’re still the defending national cham-
pions from last year so we’ve got a bull’s eye
on our back,” junior guard Sherron Collins
said. “We’re going to get everybody’s best
shot.”
Sophomore center Cole Aldrich feels
the same way. For Aldrich, Monday’s
matchup against another skilled big man in
Brockman serves as his first significant
test.
But he’s excited for it. He says it will be
fun for Kansas.
“The competition is really going to be
tough,” Aldrich said. “We’re going to have
to bring it in practice the next few days.”
— Edited by Brieun Scott
BY ANDREW WIEBE
[email protected]

Kansas’ six seniors finally made it to the
promised land.
Down to their final opportunity, Missy
Geha, Jessica Bush, Jenny Murtaugh,
Kristin Graves, Sara Rogers and Stephanie
Baugh did what seemed close to impossi-
ble. They did what three consecutive senior
classes before them had failed to do. They
led the Jayhawks (13-8-2) to the NCAA
Tournament for the first time since 2004.
“They have been like my big sisters ever
since I got here,” junior midfielder Monica
Dolinksy said. “They put it in so much time
and effort. They work so hard, and it was
great to see that happen for them.”
After beating Denver in the first round,
Kansas fell to No. 3 Stanford 5-0 last Sunday
to bring a close to the careers of six seniors
who finally made it. Bush said she still had
trouble wrapping her mind around the fact
that her career in crimson in blue has come
to a close.
“At different times it has hit me,” Bush
said. “It’s sad. It’s like a part of me is done.”
Until that loss, she never gave up hope.
Down and out more than once, Kansas
and its six departing seniors never gave
up. Not when Loyola Chicago spoiled a
5-0 start with a 2-1 victory at the Jayhawk
Soccer Complex. Not when Nebraska and
Oklahoma State snatched important road
victories from Kansas’ grasp in overtime.
Not even when arch rival Missouri won 6-0
on the final day of the season.
Through it all the Jayhawks never
wavered. The NCAA Tournament was the
goal, and anything less would be unaccept-
able. Two late season victories against Texas
A&M, both following devastating weekend
results, showed just how short Kansas’
memory had become.
“I thought we bounced back from loss-
es pretty well,” junior forward Shannon
SportS
The universiTy daily kansan www.kansan.com Friday, november 21, 2008 page 10a
Take a look back aT The
Jayhawk soccer season
Follow the highs and lows of the schedule, which ended in the second round of
the NCAA Tournament. soccer7A
Volleyball Team
needs big win
A victory against Texas could push the Jayhawks
into the NCAA Tournament. Volleyball 7A
Men’s BAsketBAll
cbe classic just got a bit more intense
soccer
Raising the bar for next season
WoMen’s BAsketBAll
weston white/kansan
Freshman forward emily cressy (back left) and senior midfelder Jessica bush (back right) hug junior
midfelder Monica Dolinsky after she scored Kansas’ frst goal of the season. The team’s seniors are fnding it hard to
believe that their season is over and are proud of making it to the tournament.
BY DANNY NoRDStRom
[email protected]
It was evident that coach Bonnie
Henrickson was excited after Kansas’
76-55 victory against Iowa on Tuesday.
After the game, an animated Henrickson
said that she felt this was the Jayhawks’
best victory in her four years at Kansas.
After a disappointing 17-16 finish last
season, it seems that the winds are finally
changing for the Jayhawks (2-0). The team
is off to a tremendous start with dominant
victories against the Sacred Heart Pioneers
and the Iowa Hawkeyes, the defending Big
10 Conference champions.
“I think we’ve got them (Kansas) brain-
washed finally,” Henrickson said. “I think
they understand how good they can be
with that kind of work. It’s something
players have to buy into and commit to
the work it takes to be that good defen-
sively, and these kids have.”
This season, Kansas’ recipe for victory
has been an aggressive defense and a con-
fident offensive attack. In previous seasons
the Jayhawks’ hesitation to knock down
shots hurt them greatly. After two decisive
victories, it seems that the poise to put
points on the board is finally there.
Led by junior guard Danielle McCray,
Kansas has averaged 91 points in its first
two games. McCray scored a career-high 29
points against Sacred Heart and 15 points
with nine rebounds against Iowa. Her abil-
ity to score has ignited Kansas’ offense and
gotten multiple players involved.
Defensively, Kansas has been impres-
sive as well, scoring 24 points off 23 turn-
overs against Iowa. Henrickson cites hard
work in practice and solid technique as the
reason for the Jayhawks’ strong defense.
“I am more excited how we’re play-
ing and winning than we’re winning,”
she said. “It’s how we’re winning that I’m
excited about.”
The Jayhawks hope to capture another
victory this weekend, as they travel to play
Saint Louis University. Henrickson said she
was optimistic about this season’s team.
“The best part is we are going to get
better,” she said.
—Edited by Jennifer Torline
graphic by nick gerik/kansan
Fromleft: Florida guard nick calathes, syracuse guard eric devendorf and washington forward Jon brockman. These players could cause tough matchups for the young Kansas teamat the CBE Classic next week.
team statistics
Preseason record 2-0
Regular season record 2-0
Last season record 17-16
opponents:
Sacred Heart 106-64,
Iowa 76-55
Next game: Sunday against St.
Louis University
Leading scorer: Danielle McCray
is averaging 22 points per game
Leading rebounder: Porscha
Weddington is averaging 7.5
rebounds per game.
Kansas has won by an average of
26.5 points per game.
Kansas has averaged 7.5 three-
pointers per game.
As a team, Kansas is 73.8% from
the free throw line.
Kansas has averaged 11 steals per
game.
Kansas has scored 54 points of 48
turnovers in two games.
Kansas has averaged 27 points of
turnovers per game.
Kansas returns 88% of its scoring
from last season.
Kansas returns 11 letterwinners
and four starters from last season.
Team sets high
expectations for a
return to the
NCAA Tournament
see Soccer on page 7a
Team begins season
with perfect record

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