2011 Closing the Gaps Report

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AGENDA ITEM IV

CLOSING THE GAPS PROGRESS REPORT 2011

June 2011

Division of Planning and Accountability

Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Fred W. Heldenfels IV, CHAIR Harold W. Hahn, VICE CHAIR Joe B. Hinton, SECRETARY OF THE BOARD Amir H. Barzin, STUDENT MEMBER OF THE BOARD Durga D. Agrawal Dennis D. Golden Lyn Bracewell Phillips A. W. “Whit” Riter III Raymund A. Paredes, COMMISSIONER OF HIGHER EDUCATION Mission of the Coordinating Board The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s mission is to work with the Legislature, Governor, governing boards, higher education institutions and other entities to help Texas meet the goals of the state’s higher education plan, Closing the Gaps by 2015, and thereby provide the people of Texas the widest access to higher education of the highest quality in the most efficient manner. Philosophy of the Coordinating Board The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board will promote access to quality higher education across the state with the conviction that access without quality is mediocrity and that quality without access is unacceptable. The Board will be open, ethical, responsive, and committed to public service. The Board will approach its work with a sense of purpose and responsibility to the people of Texas and is committed to the best use of public monies. The Coordinating Board will engage in actions that add value to Texas and to higher education. The agency will avoid efforts that do not add value or that are duplicated by other entities. Austin El Paso Crawford Dallas Houston Carthage Bastrop Tyler

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, religion, age or disability in employment or the provision of services.

Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 1 Executive Summary .............................................................................................................. 3 Closing the Gaps 2011 Progress Summary.............................................................................. 4 Summary of Findings............................................................................................................ 6 Closing the Gaps in Participation ........................................................................................... 9 Closing the Gaps in Success .................................................................................................. 18 Closing the Gaps in Excellence .............................................................................................. 30 Closing the Gaps in Research ................................................................................................ 35 Appendix A: Participation Data .............................................................................................. A-1 Appendix B: Success Data..................................................................................................... B-1 Appendix C: Research Data ................................................................................................... C-1 Enrollment Growth at Public and Independent Higher Education Institutions Since Fall 2000 ........................................................................................................................ Enrollment and Percent of Statewide Total by Type of Institution ............................................. Enrollment and Percent of Statewide Total by Gender within Race/Ethnicity .............................. Number and Percent of Students Enrolled Part-Time at Public Community Colleges, by Race/Ethnicity ........................................................................................................... Hispanic Enrollment Growth at Public and Independent Institutions Since Fall 2000 ................... African American Enrollment Growth at Public and Independent Institutions Since Fall 2000 ........................................................................................................................ White Enrollment Growth at Public and Independent Institutions Since Fall 2000....................... Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions ............................................................................................................... Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions ........................................ Associate’s Degrees Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions ....................................... African American Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions ..................................................................................... African American BACs Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions, by Sector ................... Hispanic Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions ............................................................................................ Hispanic BACs Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions, by Sector................................ Doctoral Degrees Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions ........................................... Technology Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Public Institutions ............................................................................................................... Technology BACs Awarded by Public Institutions, by Field ....................................................... Allied Health & Nursing Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Public Institutions ...................................................................................................... Teacher Education Initial Certificates All Routes ...................................................................... Teacher Education Initial Certificates by Program Route .......................................................... Teacher Education Initial Certificates in Math and Science, All Routes ....................................... Federal Science and Engineering R&D Obligations and Share of U.S. Total for Top Seven States ...................................................................................................................... Expenditures for R&D at Public Universities and Health-Related Institutions ..............................

Table of Contents

Appendices

List of Charts

10 10 11 12 13 15 17 19 21 21 23 23 24 24 25 26 26 27 28 28 29 36 37

Introduction
In October 2000, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board adopted Closing the Gaps by 2015: the Texas Higher Education Plan (CTG). The goal of the plan is to close educational gaps within Texas and between Texas and other leading states by focusing on the critical areas of participation, success, excellence, and research. When introduced, CTG was greeted by strong support from educational, business, and political communities. The plan has maintained a high level of visibility and support from these and other entities because of its potential to strengthen Texas’ economic base, attract businesses and faculty, generate research funding, improve quality of life, and enhance the overall stature of the state. At the plan’s inception, a primary goal and a number of supporting objectives were adopted for each CTG goal. Goals for 2015 were set relative to 2000 benchmarks. To assess progress toward meeting the goals, intermediate targets for 2005 and 2010 were identified. Some targets were modified in 2005 in response to new population projections and accelerated progress toward some of the goals. Adjustments were also made to incorporate the contributions of independent higher education institutions toward CTG. Every summer, the Coordinating Board issues an update on the progress made toward achieving the goals of CTG. This 2011 Progress Report presents a summary of findings and data on meeting the major goals and supporting targets. Texas higher education completed two-thirds of the 15-year time frame for CTG in 2010. Institutions met or exceeded a number of 2010 intermediate targets, such as statewide enrollment, undergraduate awards, and research expenditures. However, in several areas, such as teacher certifications and technology awards, performance continued to be far below targets. The Coordinating Board implemented an accelerated action plan in 2010 to address four areas that were, and continue to be, below expectations: African American male and Hispanic participation; Hispanic and African American degrees and awards; technology (STEM field) degrees and awards; and teacher initial certifications. That plan was described in the 2010 Progress Report. The Coordinating Board received an $11.8 million College Access Challenge Grant from the U.S. Department of Education for FY 2011. The goal of the grant is to build statewide support for a college-going culture and ultimately increase the number of degrees and other awards earned by underrepresented students – areas of slow progress in reaching CTG goals and targets. It includes funding for the Generation Texas (GenTX) movement, which strives to create a culture of college and career education in Texas. Generation Texas was launched in Fort Worth and San Antonio in fall 2010, and it includes a social media website where students can gather inspiration and information about becoming college and career ready during high school. It is being expanded to major metropolitan areas of Texas in 2011.

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Executive Summary
Texas higher education enrolled over 84,000 more students in fall 2010 than in the previous fall, the second largest gain since Closing the Gaps by 2015: the Texas Higher Education Plan (CTG) began in 2000. The state added a record 122,000 students in fall 2009. With a very large two-year boost, Texas is well ahead of the pace to meet the 2015 CTG participation goal of 1.65 million students. The state needs to add an average of just 29,000 students over the next five falls to reach the participation goal. That is much better than two years ago, when annual increases of over 50,000 students were needed. For the second year in a row, African Americans had the highest participation rate – enrollment divided by their statewide population – of the three major racial/ethnic groups in Texas: 6.6 percent in fall 2010, up from 6.2 percent in 2009. But the disparity between females and males grew, as 8.1 percent of African American females participated, compared with just 5.0 percent of African American males. Statewide, the gender gap also increased, with females participating at a 6.8 percent rate versus 5.1 percent for males. White participation dropped one-tenth of a percentage point to 5.7 percent, as about 3,000 fewer white students enrolled in fall 2010. That put white enrollment below the trend line for reaching CTG targets for only the second time since 2000. Hispanic enrollment increased by almost 33,000 in fall 2010, but the cumulative increase was still well below the target trend line. Texas institutions awarded almost 12,000 more undergraduate degrees and certificates in FY 2010 than in FY 2009, the largest increase since CTG began, putting the state somewhat above the target trend line. The associate’s degree component was especially strong, as it increased by more than twice any previous increase since 2000. Hispanic students had their biggest increase in the number of undergraduate awards since CTG began, but they and African American students continued to be somewhat below the target trend line. One reason that gains in participation of underrepresented groups, especially impressive for African Americans, have not let to parallel gains in success is that graduation and persistence rates lag those of white and Asian students. The Coordinating Board implemented an accelerated action plan in 2010 (described in the 2010 CTG Progress Report) that addressed Hispanic and African American success, as well as STEM awards and teacher certification, but results may not be seen for several years. Further efforts to improve the success of underrepresented students are being aided by an $11.8 million College Access Challenge Grant awarded to the Coordinating Board by the U.S. Department of Education for FY 2011, which includes funding for the new Generation Texas (GenTX) movement. Undergraduate awards in allied health and nursing fields continued to stay somewhat above the target trend line in 2010. Doctoral degrees rebounded following a slight decrease in FY 2009; the numbers have been well above the target trend line since FY 2006. Texas public institutions had another good year for research and development expenditures in FY 2010, with the largest percentage increase (based on inflation-adjusted dollars) since FY 2002. Although STEM awards increased for the third straight year, and math and science teacher certifications increased by 11.5 percent in FY 2010, these may have been cases of “too little too late.” These measures need to increase by over 80 percent in the next five years to reach 2015 goals. Teacher certifications dropped for the second year in a row, leaving them nearly 30 percent below the target trend line. While the recent economic downturn has resulted in teacher layoffs and reduced employment opportunities for newly certified teachers, long-term projections indicate that in the future, teachers will be heavily in demand throughout the state. 3

Closing the Gaps 2011 Progress Summary
There are currently 18 targets in this report associated with the Texas higher education plan, Closing the Gaps by 2015. Progress toward most of the targets is measured relative to a target trend line that is linear for the periods 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2010-2015, as follows:
Progress Well Above Target Somewhat Above Target On Target Somewhat Below Target Well Below Target Definition of Progress Relative to Target Trend Line 10 or more percent above 2 to 9 percent above Within +1 percent 2 to 9 percent below 10 or more percent below Progress Relative to Target Trend Line

CTG Measure
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June 2010 Report

June 2011 Report Well Above Target Well Above Target Well Below Target Somewhat Below Target Somewhat Above Target Somewhat Above Target Well Above Target Well Above Target Somewhat Below Target Somewhat Below Target Well Below Target Somewhat Above Target Well Below Target Well Below Target Well Below Target On Target Somewhat Below Target Well Above Target

Participation Statewide participation Well Above Target African American participation Well Above Target Hispanic participation Well Below Target White participation Well Above Target 1 Success BACs: bachelor’s and associate’s degrees, and certificates Statewide BACs Bachelor’s degrees Associate’s degrees Doctoral degrees African American BACs Hispanic BACs Technology BACs Allied health and nursing BACs Teachers initially certified Math and science teachers initially certified Excellence2 National rankings Program recognition Research Federal science & engineering R&D obligations3 Public institutions’ research expenditures 4
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On Target Somewhat Above Target Somewhat Above Target Well Above Target Somewhat Below Target Somewhat Below Target Well Below Target Somewhat Above Target Well Below Target Well Below Target Well Below Target On Target Somewhat Below Target Well Above Target

For participation and success, the most recent progress was compared to the 2010 value on a target trend line, which assumed linear growth from 2000-2005, 2005-2010, and 2010-2015 to reach 2010 and 2015 goals. 2 Progress in excellence was assessed by methods other than a target trend line. Program recognition, as defined for the target, cannot be better than “on target.” 3 For research and development obligations, the most recent assessment was done relative to the 2007 value (the year of the most recently available data) on the target trend line. 4 For research expenditures, the most recent progress was assessed relative to the 2010 value on a linear target trend line from 1999 to 2015.

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Summary of Findings
Statewide Goal for Participation: By 2015, increase enrollment at public and independent institutions by 630,000 students. The 630,000 more students would bring Texas public and independent higher education enrollment to 1,650,000 students in 2015.  Texas added over 84,000 students to higher education in fall 2010. This was the second best performance since CTG began in 2000 and followed 2009’s record-setting increase of nearly 122,000 students. After such impressive gains, the state had nearly 486,000 more students in 2010 than in 2000. Another 145,000 students (23 percent of the 630,000student gap) need to enroll in 2015 to meet that year’s goal. The state is in much better shape than in fall 2008 when there were seven years to close 56 percent of the gap. Hispanic enrollment grew by almost 33,000 students in fall 2010. This put Hispanics a little closer to the target trend line for reaching the 2015 target, but still well below it. Enrollment needs to grow another 52 percent by 2015. Hispanic females participated in higher education at a rate of 5.4 percent of their population, compared with just 3.7 percent for Hispanic males. African Americans added about 16,000 students in 2010, bringing their 10-year increase to 85,000, which already exceeded the 2015 goal of about a 64,000 increase. African Americans continued to have the highest participation rate of the three major racial/ethnic groups at 6.6 percent, up 0.4 percentage points from 2009. African American male participation trailed females 5.0 to 8.1 percent. White participation fell by 3,000 students in fall 2010. It increased by almost 86,000 students since 2000, but that was not enough to keep progress above the target trend line. Because the white population is expected to grow very slowly through 2015, and CTG targets are based on participation rates, white enrollment only needs to increase another 2.3 percent to reach the 2015 target. Females in Texas surpassed males, 6.8 percent to 5.1 percent, in their fall 2010 participation rate. The female-male gap has grown steadily since 2000 when it was just 1 percentage point (5.4 percent versus 4.4 percent).









Statewide Goal for Success: By 2015, increase the number of bachelor’s and associate’s degrees and certificates (BACs) to 210,000 at public and independent institutions. By 2010, increase the number of BACs to 171,000. The 2015 target requires awarding 93,765 more BACs than in 2000.     Texas institutions awarded 176,604 BACs in FY 2010, up 60,369 or 51.9 percent since FY 2000 and up 11,889 awards since 2009. The one-year increase was the most since CTG began in 2000. Hispanic students had their greatest annual growth in BACs since 2000 in FY 2010, and African American students earned 7.4 percent more awards in 2010, but both groups continued to be somewhat below the level of the target trend line for reaching 2015 targets. After increasing for three straight years, undergraduate awards in computer science, engineering, math, and physical science (STEM fields) still need to increase by over 90 percent in the next five years to reach the 2015 target. Certifications of new math and science teachers increased 11.5 percent in FY 2010. Total initial teacher certifications dropped 2.7 percent, the second straight decline. Both measures were well below targeted levels. 6



The annual increase of 6,522 associate’s degrees in FY 2010 was more than twice any other increase since 2000, pushing the level well above the target trend line. Doctoral degrees remained well above the line after rebounding from a small decrease in 2009, and bachelor’s degrees continued their steady upward climb, posting a 2.4 percent gain to remain somewhat above the line.

Statewide Goal for Excellence: By 2015, substantially increase the number of nationally recognized programs or services at colleges and universities.  In the 2011 U.S. News & World Report (U.S. News) rankings, The University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) tied for 13th place and Texas A&M University (TAMU) was in 22nd place among national public universities. Although UT-Austin moved up two places, neither ranking was a significant improvement, and U.S. News has never ranked either institution in the top 10 public universities since 2000. The University of Texas at Dallas was the next highest ranked Texas public university in U.S. News, tied for 72nd place. Examination of the components of U.S. News’ rankings shows that UT-Austin could have moved up to the 11th-ranked University of California at Irvine by improving in areas such as faculty resources (class size, faculty salaries, and so forth), percent of freshmen in the top 10 percent of their high school class, and spending per student. Based on data in the 2010 report from The Center for Measuring University Performance (CMUP), UT-Austin and TAMU tied for 14th and 17th place, respectively, among a group of 41 top public research universities. The CMUP does not compute rank numbers, but their data can be used for this purpose. Both institutions did better, tied for 13th place, on the basis of the 2009 report’s data. The University of Houston was in a tie for number 15 in the CMUP’s next lower group of 34 top public research universities, based on data from the 2010 report. Data from the 2010 CMUP report indicate that, among the 41 top public research universities mentioned in the previous paragraph, the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center were at numbers 23 and 31, respectively, one position better than the previous year. The Wall Street Journal ranked TAMU and Texas Tech University number 2 and 18, respectively, among public and independent colleges and universities in a first-time 2010 survey of recruiters for the nation’s largest companies, nonprofit organizations, and federal agencies. The survey focused on how well institutions prepared bachelor’s degree graduates to land a job and succeed in their careers.

 







Statewide Goal for Research: By 2015, increase the Texas share of federal obligations for science and engineering research and development (R&D) to 6.5 percent of the national total at public and independent institutions. By 2010, increase the share to 6.2 percent.  Texas’ federal obligations for science and engineering R&D were 5.5 or 5.6 percent of the U.S. total from FY 2004 through FY 2007 (the most recent year of available data), following a 6.1 percent share in FY 2003. The 5.6 percent share in FY 2007 was somewhat below the target trend line value. Texas public universities and health-related institutions had already exceeded the 2015 CTG target for research and development expenditures ($3 billion) in FY 2008. Expenditures totaled $3.55 billion in FY 2010, well above the target trend line. 7



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Closing the Gaps in Participation
Goal: By 2015, close the gaps in participation rates across Texas to add 630,000 more students.
Following a record annual increase of nearly 122,000 students in fall 2009, statewide enrollment grew by over 84,000 students in fall 2010, the second largest increase since CTG was adopted in 2000. The total increase from 2000 to 2010 was nearly 486,000 students, 20 percent higher than the 2010 CTG target and well above the pace needed to reach the 2015 target. African Americans continued to make remarkable progress as their participation rate – enrollment divided by total population – grew to 6.6 percent, exceeding the rates for whites and Hispanics. They had already surpassed their 2010 and 2015 enrollment targets in 2009, and added another 16,000 students in 2010. However, the disparity between African American females and males grew in 2010, as 8.1 percent of females participated in higher education versus 5.0 percent of males, the largest gap for the three major racial/ethnic groups. White enrollment dropped in fall 2010 by 3,000 students and the participation rate dropped from 5.8 to 5.7 percent. Ninety percent of the drop was for males, whose participation dropped 0.1 percentage point to 5.1 percent while white female participation was steady at 6.3 percent. Hispanic enrollment grew by nearly 33,000 students, but the change since 2000 was still well below what was needed to stay on track to meet the 2015 target. Things will only get more challenging for Hispanics in the next five years, as the CTG target trend line for enrollment growth gets steeper. Hispanic male participation grew by just 0.2 percentage points in fall 2010 and continued to trail the five other major racial/ethnic and gender groups at 3.7 percent.

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CLOSING THE GAPS IN PARTICIPATION GOAL: Increase the overall

Texas higher education participation rate from 5 percent* in 2000 to 5.6 percent by 2010 and to 5.7 percent by 2015.
*Based on projected population when CTG goals were set; revised to 4.9 percent based on the 2000 Census.

Status: Well Above Target In fall 2010, enrollment in Texas public and independent higher education was 5.9 percent of the state’s population, already exceeding the 2015 participation rate target. The state must enroll almost another 145,000 students by 2015 to meet that year’s target.

Participation enrollment growth charts show enrollment changes since fall 2000. Data for charts may be found in the Appendices.

Enrollment Growth at Public and Independent Higher Education Institutions Since Fall 2000
700,000 600,000

Target

Actual

630,483

Observations 500,000  Fall enrollment increased 84,456 485,932 between 2009 and 2010, the second 400,000 403,483 largest gain since CTG began in 300,000 2000. On average, only about 200,000 29,000 students need to be added each year through 2015 to meet the 100,000 state goal. 0  Public two-year institutions 2000 2005 2010 2015 contributed the most, 295,254 or 60.8 percent, to the 2000-2010 increase in enrollment of 485,932.  State-level participation and goals are sums of data for African American, Hispanic, white, and “other” groups. While the African American enrollment increase since 2000 was well above its 2010 target trend line value, the white increase was somewhat below and the Hispanic increase was well below.  Enrollment of females was 6.8 percent of the Texas female population in fall 2010, 1.7 percentage points higher than for males. That gap has steadily increased since 2000, when it was 1 percentage point. Males from all three of the major Enrollment and Percent of Statewide Total racial/ethnic groups have trailed by Type of Institution females by at least 0.9 percentage 800,000 49.4% points since 2000. Fall 2009 Fall 2010 48.8% 700,000  Enrollment at public two-year 38.4% 600,000 38.8% institutions increased by 50,407, or 500,000 7.3 percent, from 2009 to 2010. 400,000 This was 59.7 percent of the 300,000 statewide increase. Their share of 200,000 statewide enrollment grew to 49.4 8.6% 8.3% 100,000 3.8% 3.9% percent. 0  Public four-year institutions r r r nt ea ea ree de 2-y 4-y contributed 26,923 students to the en Ca lic lic ep b b Ind Pu Pu 2009-2010 increase, 31.9 percent of 10















the statewide gain. Career schools and for-profit institutions added 4,261 students in fall 2010, a 7.8 percent increase. They had a much larger annual increase in fall 2009 (19,785 students), when more of these institutions began reporting data to the Coordinating Board, yielding more accurate data for this sector of higher education. African Americans had the greatest rate of increase in enrollment, 9.2 percent, from 2009 to 2010, among the three major racial/ethnic groups. African American male enrollment grew by 9.2 percent, but that was much less than that group’s 18.8 percent increase from 2008 to 2009. Data indicate that fall 2010’s relatively high rate of increase in African American enrollment was due more to better recruitment of new students than to improved retention: persistence rates of African Americans were far below those of Hispanics and whites; and in fall 2010, a higher percentage of African American students at public and independent colleges and universities were first-time undergraduates than were white students, 18.3 percent to 14.3 percent. White male enrollment decreased by 0.9 percent in 2010, the worst performance among the six major racial/ethnic and gender groups, lowering that component’s share of the statewide total from 20.6 percent to 19.3 percent. This was the only major racial/ethnic and gender group whose participation rate decreased (from 5.2 to 5.1 percent of the population). Hispanic males increased their enrollment by 8.2 percent in fall 2010 (increasing their share of the statewide total to 12.4 percent), a little better than Hispanic females who increased their enrollment by 7.7 percent (increasing their share to 17.2 percent). However, Hispanic enrollment was still well below the target trend line in 2010. The enrollment of “other” groups (excluding African Americans, Hispanics, and whites) increased by 22.5 percent in fall 2010, far above their 14.1 percent increase from 2008 to 2009. Some of the 2010 increase may be explained by the adoption of new federallyrequired ethnicity and race categories for fall 2010 data, including the option to report more than one race for a student. Dual credit enrollment, a Enrollment and Percent of Statewide Total by component of higher education Gender Within Race/Ethnicity enrollment, decreased from 91,303 to 90,364 between fall 400,000 25.8% 24.3% Fall 2009 Fall 2010 2009 and fall 2010. That drop is 350,000 surprising because dual credit 20.6% 19.3% 300,000 17.2% enrollment rose steadily by an 16.9% 250,000 average of over 8,000 students a 12.4% 200,000 12.1% year between fall 2000 and fall 150,000 7.9% 8.1% 2009, including about a 12,000 100,000 4.6% 4.8% student increase in fall 2009. 50,000 One way to boost enrollments to 0 meet participation targets is to ale ale ale ale ale ale rm fem fem fem em ic m hit er me an increase persistence rates, ite nic p A W pa Am Wh His Afr His Afr particularly after the first and second years of enrollment. o The one-year persistence rate of first-time, full-time students at public universities rose from 86.5 percent for the fall 2000 cohort to 87.9 percent for the fall 2009 cohort. However, the rate at public community colleges dropped from 66.1 percent to 65.7 percent in the same time period.

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The two-year persistence rate increased from 80.7 percent to 82.0 percent between fall 2000 and fall 2008 cohorts at public universities. But the rate declined slightly for public community college cohorts over the same time span, from 54.5 percent to 54.3 percent. Focusing on the unique needs of part-time students (undergraduates taking less than 12 semester credit hours) may encourage more participation of older as well as traditional college-age segments of the population. Part-time students made up 69.0 percent of all credential-seeking students at public community colleges in fall Number and Percent of Students Enrolled Part-Time 2010. Some 70.5 percent of at Public Community Colleges, by Race/Ethnicity credential-seeking African 250,000 American students were enrolled Fall 2000 Fall 2009 Fall 2010 part-time at public community 200,000 68.8% 67.4% 69.0% colleges in fall 2010, a little 68.8% 150,000 higher than Hispanics (69.0 61.3% percent) and whites (68.8 100,000 61.9% percent). While part-time 69.5% 70.5% 50,000 students are far less prevalent at 64.8% universities, 4.6 percent of first0 time degree-seeking n ite nic ca pa Wh eri undergraduate students at public His Am n ica universities enrolled part-time in Afr fall 2010. o

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Hispanic Participation Target: Increase the higher education participation rate for the Hispanic population of Texas from 3.7 percent* in 2000 to 4.8 percent by 2010 and to 5.7 percent by 2015.
*Based on projected population when CTG goals were set; revised to 3.6 percent based on the 2000 Census.

Status: Well Below Target Hispanic enrollment increased by 207,789 or 87.5 percent between fall 2000 and fall 2010, the fastest growth of the three major racial/ethnic groups. Some 32,541 or 7.9 percent more students enrolled in fall 2010 than in fall 2009. The enrollment increase through 2010 drew a little closer to the target trend line, but it was still 12.2 percent below it. The line is steeper from 2010 to 2015, so enrollment growth will need to accelerate even more to meet the 2015 target. Another 230,917 Hispanic students must enroll in 2015 to meet that year’s target, a 51.9 percent increase over fall 2010’s enrollment of 445,183. Observations  The Hispanic population is projected to grow by 19.8 percent between 2010 and 2015 (from 9.8 million to 11.8 million).  Hispanics are projected to become the largest racial/ethnic group in Texas in 2015.  Hispanic males had the lowest higher education participation rate of the major racial/ethnic and gender groups in fall 2010: 3.7 percent of the Hispanic male population. That was 1.8 percentage points below the Hispanic female participation rate. If males had participated at the same rate as females, almost 91,000 additional Hispanic students would have been enrolled, pushing the increase since 2000 well above the target trend line. Increasing the Hispanic male participation rate is especially rewarding because, unlike African Americans and whites, there are more males in the Hispanic population than Hispanic Enrollment Growth at Public and females: 335,000 more in 2010. Independent Institutions Since Fall 2000  The number of Hispanics who 438,706 graduated from Texas public high 450,000 schools increased from 74,466 in Target Actual 400,000 FY 2002 to 119,365 in FY 2010. 350,000 At the same time, the college300,000 going rate increased from 42.6 250,000 236,606 percent to 52.2 percent. That 207,789 200,000 increased rate meant that about 150,000 11,500 more Hispanic high school 100,000 graduates went to college than if 50,000 the rate had been stagnant. Yet 0 the college-going rate still trailed 2000 2005 2010 2015 white public high school graduates’ 58.3 percent rate.  FY 2010 Hispanic female high school graduates went directly to Texas public and independent higher education in the fall at a higher rate than Hispanic males, 56.1 percent to 48.3 percent.  Increasing the persistence rates of Hispanic students is a critical component of meeting Hispanic participation targets. o At public universities, the one-year persistence rate for first-time, full-time Hispanic students increased from 83.4 percent to 85.6 percent between the fall 2000 and fall 13

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2009 cohorts, but the 2009 rate was nearly 5 percentage points below that of white students. About 850 more Hispanic students in the cohort would have stayed in higher education if their rate had matched the white students’ rate. The one-year persistence rate also increased for Hispanics at public community colleges over the same time span, from 65.2 to 66.6 percent; the latter was virtually the same as the white rate of 66.7 percent. The two-year persistence rate for Hispanics at public universities rose nearly 3 percentage points, to 80.3 percent, for cohorts starting in fall 2008 versus fall 2000. At public community colleges the increase was from 53.2 to 55.3 percent. The latter figure was half a percentage point below that of white students but nearly 12 percentage points above African American students’ rate.

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African American Participation Target: Increase the higher education participation rate for the African American population of Texas from 4.6 percent* in 2000 to 5.6 percent by 2010 and to 5.7 percent by 2015.
*Based on projected population when CTG goals were set; revised to 4.5 percent based on the 2000 Census.

Status: Well Above Target African American enrollment increased by 85,271, or 78.6 percent, from fall 2000 to fall 2010. Some 16,275 or 9.2 percent more students enrolled in fall 2010 than the previous fall. The increase through 2010 exceeded the 2010 and 2015 targets by 71.1 and 32.7 percent, respectively. Observations  African American participation was 6.6 percent of the African American population in fall 2010, about 1 percentage point above the white rate and about 2 percentage points above the Hispanic rate.  African American females African American Enrollment Growth at Public participated in higher education and Independent Institutions Since Fall 2000 at the highest rate among the Target Actual 100,000 major racial/ethnic and gender groups in fall 2010, 8.1 percent. 85,271 80,000 This was up half a percentage 64,237 point from 2009 and just over 3 60,000 percentage points better than African American males. Almost 49,837 40,000 44,000 more African American males would have been enrolled 20,000 in fall 2010 if they had participated at the same rate as 0 African American females. 2000 2005 2010 2015  The population of African American Texans is expected to grow by 9.1 percent from 2010 to 2015, when it is projected to be 3.2 million.  The number of African American public high school graduates increased from 30,030 in FY 2002 to 36,988 in FY 2010, while the percentage going directly into public and independent higher education increased from 43.7 percent to 51.2 percent. However, the rate for FY 2010 high school graduates was below the college-going rates of Hispanic and white public high school graduates, 52.2 percent and 58.3 percent, respectively. About another 2,600 African Americans from the 2010 high school graduating class would have enrolled in higher education if their college-going rate had matched the white graduates’ rate.  African American females who graduated from Texas public high schools in FY 2010 went directly into public and independent higher education at a much higher rate than their male counterparts, 55.5 percent to 46.8 percent. If the male students had gone into higher education at the same rate as the females, almost 1,600 more males would have been enrolled in fall 2010.  African American persistence rates must be improved so that increased participation rates translate into more graduates. 15

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At public universities, the one-year persistence rate for first-time, full-time African American students improved to 81.8 percent for the fall 2009 cohort, compared with 80.3 percent for the fall 2000 cohort. But the 2009 cohort’s performance was well below the 90.3 percent rate for the white cohort. The one-year persistence rate for African American students at public community colleges dropped over 4 percentage points during the same time span to 55.2 percent, which was over 11 percentage points below Hispanic and white students’ rates. The two-year persistence rate rose nearly 1 percentage point to 71.8 percent for the fall 2008 cohort of African Americans at public universities, versus the fall 2000 cohort’s results, but that was far below the 2008 cohorts’ rates for Hispanics (80.3 percent) and whites (85.0 percent). Two-year persistence rates dropped from 45.1 percent to 43.5 percent for African American cohorts at public community colleges during the comparable time. The latter rate was about 12 percentage points worse than Hispanic and white rates for 2008 cohorts.

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largest percentage of any racial/ethnic group,. the higher education participation rate White Participation Target: Increase

for the white population of Texas from 5.1 percent in 2000 to 5.7 percent by 2010 and remain at 5.7 percent through 2015.

Status: Somewhat Below Target White enrollment growth fell below the target trend line as enrollment dropped by 3,000 students or 0.5 percent from fall 2009 to fall 2010. The 2010 participation met the target of 5.7 percent of the white population in 2010, but that did not translate into satisfying the enrollment growth target because population projections have changed since the enrollment goals were set. Observations White Enrollment Growth at Public and  Some 655,907 white students Independent Institutions Since Fall 2000 enrolled in fall 2010, 15.1 percent 101,248 more than in fall 2000. 100,000 Target Actual 90,448  The white population is expected to grow just 1.0 percent from 85,855 80,000 2010 to 2015, when it is projected to reach 11.6 million, about 60,000 237,000 below the Hispanic population. 40,000  Some 108,577 white students 20,000 graduated from Texas public high schools in FY 2010, the lowest 0 since FY 1999. 2000 2005 2010 2015  The white population in Texas ages 18 to 24 (traditional college ages) peaked in 2007 at 1.06 million, and it is projected to decline 7.5 percent from there to about 979,000 by 2015. Therefore, to maintain or increase total white enrollment, more white Texans must enroll from other age groups or in greater proportion from the traditional pool.  Strategies for increasing male participation in higher education should include both minority and white males. Enrollment of white males was just 5.1 percent of the white male population in Texas in fall 2010, compared with a participation rate of 6.3 percent for white females. By increasing their participation to the female rate, another 67,000 white males would have been enrolled in fall 2010.

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Closing the Gaps in Success
Goal: By 2015, award 210,000 undergraduate degrees, certificates, and other identifiable student successes from highquality programs.
Overall, the state is on track to reach the CTG success goal of increasing undergraduate awards: bachelor’s and associate’s degrees and certificates. The associate’s degrees component of undergraduate awards increased in FY 2010 by more than twice any previous annual increase since the start of CTG. The allied health and nursing component did not increase as quickly, but it was enough to stay somewhat above the target trend line. Doctoral awards stayed well above the target trend line for the fifth consecutive year in FY 2010. Hispanic and African American students’ undergraduate awards remained somewhat below needed levels, but they did post good increases in FY 2010. Initial teacher certifications, which were last above the target trend line in FY 2004, continued to move farther below the line. That trend is of somewhat less concern short-term in light of recent layoffs of teachers and fewer job opportunities due to the downturn in the economy. However, in the long run it is not good news because the Texas Workforce Commission projects that, when the economy returns to long-term growth patterns, K-12 teachers will again be in heavy demand. Science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) undergraduate awards and math and science teacher certifications had decent gains in FY 2010, but they were still far short of progress needed to reach 2015 goals.

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CLOSING THE GAPS IN SUCCESS GOAL: Increase the overall number of


students completing bachelor’s degrees and associate’s degrees and certificates (BACs) to 171,000 by 2010 and to 210,000 by 2015.

Status: Somewhat Above Target Success progress charts show the Texas public and independent institutions number of awards in a fiscal year, in awarded 176,604 bachelor’s and associate’s contrast to participation enrollment degrees and certificates (BACs) in FY 2010, up growth charts that show changes. 11,889 or 7.2 percent from FY 2009. This was since fall 2000. the largest increase since CTG began. The state was somewhat above the target trend line to reach the 2015 goal; about 33,000 more awards are needed by Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates then. Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions
210,000 Observations 200,000  Bachelor’s and associate’s degrees 176,604 and certificates increased by 171,000 150,000 60,369 or 51.9 percent at public and independent institutions 100,000 between FY 2000 and FY 2010.  The six-year graduation rate of 50,000 first-time, full-time cohorts of Target Actual students starting at public 0 universities increased from 49.6 2000 2005 2010 2015 percent for those graduating by FY 2000 to 57.4 percent for students graduating by FY 2010. There were about 4,350 more awards by FY 2010 for the fall 2004 cohort than there would have been if this cohort’s graduation rate had been the same as the earlier cohort’s rate (49.6 percent).  Many baccalaureate graduates attend two-year institutions at some time. Some 76.1 percent of FY 2010 university baccalaureate graduates earned one or more hours at a twoyear institution, up from 71.2 percent for FY 2000 graduates. Some of these hours may be attributable to dual credit earned while in high school. Nearly 35 percent of the FY 2010 baccalaureate graduates completed 30 or more semester credit hours at a two-year institution.  At public community, technical, and state colleges, 29.3 percent of first-time, full-time students entering in fall 2004 earned a BAC by FY 2010.  The rise in graduation rates of full-time students is encouraging, but attention is also needed on part-time students, since their enrollment has grown much more quickly than for full-time students since fall 2000.  If success goals are to be met, strategies for improving success are especially needed for African American and Hispanic students, since they persist and graduate at lower rates than whites and Asians at public institutions. For example, six-year graduation and persistence rates for first-time full-time public university students through FY 2010 were 52.3 percent – African American; 64.8 percent – Hispanic; 76.6 percent – white; and 84.0 percent – Asian.

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 

For first-time full-time public community, technical, and state college students through FY 2010, the six-year graduation and persistence rates were 30.6 percent – African American; 40.2 percent – Hispanic; 45.8 percent – white; and 53.9 percent – Asian. Student preparation for college-level coursework is also important for boosting success rates. Efforts should focus on improving the skills of incoming students and supporting effective and scalable developmental education programs for students who arrive in higher education underprepared. o For the fall 2006 cohort of first-time students at public universities, 12.2 percent did not meet the Texas Success Initiative (TSI) standard in math. Just 34.4 percent of these students successfully completed a college-level math course within three years. Firsttime students who were underprepared in reading or writing did better in successfully completing a college-level course in a related area within three years: 55.7 percent for reading and 52.2 percent for writing. o Underprepared students are more likely to attend community colleges. Of first-time students entering public community colleges in fall 2006, 41.7 percent did not meet the TSI standard in math, 27.8 percent were underprepared in reading, and 19.6 percent were underprepared in writing. As with universities, the students who were underprepared in math were least successful in completing a college-level course in that area within three years: completion rates for the fall 2006 cohort were just 14.0 percent, compared with 36.1 percent in reading and 28.9 percent in writing.

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Success targets for Bachelor’s and Associate’s degrees:  Increase the number of students completing bachelor’s degrees to 100,000 by 2010 and to 112,500 by 2015.  Increase the number of students completing associate’s degrees to 43,400 by 2010 and to 55,500 by 2015.
Bachelor’s Degrees Status: Somewhat Above Target Public and independent institutions awarded 101,879 bachelor’s degrees in FY 2010, 2,416 or 2.4 percent more than in FY 2009 and 1.9 percent above the target Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded by Public and trend value of 100,000. Independent Institutions Observations 112,500 120,000 101,879  Bachelor’s awards increased 26,973 (36.0 percent) from FY 100,000 90,000 2000 to FY 2010.  Institutions must award 10,621 60,000 (10.4 percent) more bachelor’s Target Actual degrees in 2015 to reach the 30,000 target of 112,500.  White students were awarded about 700 fewer bachelor’s 0 degrees by public institutions in 2000 2005 2010 2015 FY 2010 than in FY 2009. The last decrease was in FY 2001. One contributing factor to the decrease in 2010 may be the steady decline in white enrollment at public universities from fall 2003 to fall 2007, a total drop of 4,275 white students. White enrollment at public universities did not climb above the fall 2003 level until fall 2009. The loss in bachelor’s degrees for white students was more than offset by Hispanic and African American students, who together earned over 1,500 more bachelor’s degrees in FY 2010 than the previous year, helping the state Associate’s Degrees Awarded by Public and stay on track to meet CTG Independent Institutions targets. Associate’s Degrees Status: Well Above Target Some 48,851 associate’s degrees were awarded in FY 2010, 6,522 more than in FY 2009. The increase was more than twice any previous yearly increase since 2000, placing the number of awards more than 12 percent above the level of the target trend line.
60,000 Target 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0 Actual

55,500

48,851 43,400

2000

2005

2010

2015

Observations  Associate’s degrees increased 23,346 or 91.5 percent from FY 2000 to FY 2010. 21

  



Another 6,649 awards are needed in 2015 to meet that year’s target. Hispanic students earned about 2,500 more associate’s degrees from public institutions in FY 2010 than in the previous year, an 18.4 percent increase. Associate’s degrees from public institutions increased by over 500 for African Americans during that time. The initial increase in associate’s degrees several years ago was due, in part, to some institutions performing degree audits and determining that many of their students had sufficient credits for a degree, but had not been awarded one. Many institutions are now conducting degree audits for this purpose on a regular basis. Reverse transfers are another reason for the robust increases in associate’s degrees. In a reverse transfer, credits earned at a university are transferred to a two-year institution previously attended in order to award a student an associate’s degree for work already completed.

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African American Success Target: Increase the number of African American students completing bachelor’s degrees, associate’s degrees, and certificates to 19,800 by 2010 and to 24,300 by 2015.
Status: Somewhat Below Target Public and independent institutions awarded 18,560 BACs to African American students in FY 2010, 1,273 or 7.4 percent more than in FY 2009. This fell 6.3 percent short of the 19,800 awards on the target trend line for 2010.
African American Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Observations Certificates Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions  Bachelor’s and associate’s degrees and certificates to African American 24,300 25,000 Target Actual students increased by 7,345 or 65.5 19,800 percent since FY 2000. 20,000 18,560  Another 5,740 (30.9 percent) BACs 15,000 are needed to meet the 2015 target.  Public four-year institutions 10,000 conferred 7,998 undergraduate awards (43.1 percent of the total) 5,000 on African American students and 0 public two-year institutions awarded 2000 2005 2010 2015 8,706 (46.9 percent of the total). The remaining 1,856 BACs were conferred by independent four-year and two-year institutions.  More needs to be done to retain and African American BACs Awarded by Public and graduate African American students. Independent Institutions, by Sector While fall 2010 African American 2015 Target: 24,300 enrollment already exceeded the 24,000 Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents 2015 CTG goal, the number of BACs 20,000 awarded to African Americans has 18,560 17,287 1,856 been below the target trend line 1,831 15,460 15,568 16,000 14,66714,600 14,695 1,713 1,765 since 2007. 13,373 2,009 1,784 1,777 12,625 7,998 12,000 11,21511,756 1,807 1,809 7,579  African Americans have very low 6,616 6,821 1,700 1,750 5,576 5,723 6,213 graduation and persistence rates. A 4,805 5,136 8,000 4,323 4,559 first-time full-time cohort of African 8,706 4,000 American students who enrolled in 7,082 7,093 6,705 7,131 6,982 7,877 5,192 5,447 6,013 6,428 fall 2004 at Texas public universities 0 had a six-year graduation and 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 persistence rate of just 52.3 percent, well below the rate for Hispanic students (64.8 percent) and white students (76.6 percent). If the African American cohort had succeeded at the Hispanic or white students’ rates, about 1,000 or 1,900 more students, respectively, would have graduated or persisted in six years. A fall 2004 cohort of African American students at public community, technical, and state colleges graduated and persisted over six years at a 30.6 percent rate, compared with Hispanic students’ 40.2 percent and white students’ 45.8 percent.

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Hispanic Success Target: Increase the number of Hispanic students completing bachelor’s degrees, associate’s degrees, and certificates to 50,000 by 2010 and to 67,000 by 2015.
Status: Somewhat Below Target Public and independent institutions awarded 47,750 BACs to Hispanic students in FY 2010, 4,592 (10.6 percent) more than in FY 2009. This was the largest increase in the number of awards since CTG began, but the level remained somewhat below the target trend line. Observations  Hispanic BAC awards more than Hispanic Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates doubled since FY 2000, climbing by Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions 24,382 from a starting level of 67,000 23,368. Target Actual 60,000  Hispanic students must earn 19,250 50,000 or 40.3 percent more BACs in 2015 to 47,750 reach the success target. 40,000  Some 20,605 BACs were awarded to Hispanics by public four-year 20,000 institutions in FY 2010, 43.2 percent of the total. Public two-year 0 institutions awarded 24,024 BACs, 2000 2005 2010 2015 17.5 percent more than in 2009, raising these institutions’ share to 50.3 percent of the total BACs awarded to Hispanic students. The other 3,121 awards were conferred by independent institutions.  Historically, Hispanic students have had lower graduation and persistence rates than white and Asian groups. A first-time fulltime cohort of Hispanic students who Hispanic BACs Awarded by Public and Independent Institutions, by Sector enrolled in fall 2004 at Texas public universities had a six-year graduation 2015 Target: 67,000 and persistence rate of 64.8 percent, Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents 60,000 compared with 84.0 percent for 50,000 47,750 Asians and 76.6 percent for whites. If 43,158 3,121 3,201 40,000 the cohort had graduated and 37,70439,267 2,970 35,385 33,723 2,493 2,726 20,605 31,334 2,495 persisted at the white rate, nearly 28,832 2,583 19,511 30,000 26,251 17,055 17,971 24,036 2,444 2,595 1,600 additional Hispanic students 23,368 14,504 15,478 2,282 2,363 13,263 12,502 20,000 would have succeeded. At public 11,974 10,879 11,135 24,024 community, technical, and state 20,446 10,000 15,488 16,724 17,414 17,923 18,326 10,207 10,538 11,833 13,735 colleges, the fall 2004 cohort’s six0 year success rates were 40.2 percent 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 for Hispanics, 53.9 percent for Asians, and 45.8 percent for whites.

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Doctoral Success Target: Increase the number of students completing doctoral degrees to 3,350 by 2010 and to 3,900 by 2015.
Status: Well Above Target Doctoral awards rebounded in FY 2010 following a slight decrease in FY 2009. The new level was 3,813 degrees, up 121 (3.0 percent) from 2009 and 1.3 percent from 2008. Doctorates have increased by 1,184 or 45.0 percent since FY 2000. Observations Doctoral Degrees Awarded by Public and  Doctoral awards at independent Independent Institutions institutions decreased from 609 to 564 3,900 between 2009 and 2010, but this was 3,813 4,000 more than offset by a 166 degree (5.4 3,350 percent) increase at public institutions. 3,000  Institutions only need to award another 2,000 87 doctorates in 2015 to reach the CTG Target Actual target. 1,000  Public institutions conferred 3,249 doctoral degrees in FY 2010, 41.4 0 percent more than in FY 2000. 2000 2005 2010 2015  Hispanic students earned 103 more doctorates from public institutions in FY 2010 than in FY 2000, and African American students earned 62 more, but their shares of the total doctoral awards in FY 2010 were only 7.4 and 4.7 percent, respectively. “Other” students (excluding Hispanic, African American, and white students) earned 42.9 percent of the doctorates in FY 2010.  Nationwide, females earn more doctorates than males. In Texas, however, males continued to earn more doctorates than females in FY 2010, 2,004 to 1,809.  The National Research University Fund Act, established in HB 51, 81st Texas Legislature, is intended to assist emerging research universities with achieving national prominence as major research universities. One criterion for determining if an emerging research institution is eligible for these funds is whether it has awarded at least 200 Ph.D. degrees in the prior two academic years. This provision may spur competing institutions to push Ph.D. degree completion.

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Science-Technology-Engineering-Mathematics (STEM) Field Success Target: Increase the number of students completing engineering, computer science, math, and physical science (STEM) bachelor’s and associate’s degrees, and certificates from 12,000 in 2000 to 24,000 by 2010 and 29,000 by 2015.
Status: Well Below Target Public institutions awarded 15,225 technology (STEM fields) BACs in FY 2010, 1,226 more than in FY 2009. This was the third straight year of increases following four years of decline. However, the level still needs to increase by 13,775 awards in the next five years to reach the 2015 target. Observations Technology Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and  After 10 years, the number of awards Certificates Awarded by Public Institutions was just 27.1 percent higher than the 29,000 Target Actual 30,000 FY 2000 level of 11,979. Awards in FY 2010 needed to be more than twice 24,000 25,000 the FY 2000 level to keep up with the 20,000 CTG targets. 15,225 15,000  Computer science awards increased by 627 or 19.6 percent between 2009 10,000 and 2010, the most of any STEM field. 5,000 However, this was the only STEM field 0 that had fewer awards in 2010 than in 2000 2005 2010 2015 2000.  Bachelor’s and associate’s degrees and certificates in engineering had the biggest gains from 2000 to 2010 and increased by 547 (6.4 percent) from Technology BACs Awarded by Public 2009 to 2010. Physical science BACs Institutions, by Field went up by 77 (6.9 percent) in FY 15,225 14,578 14,336 15,000 13,999 1,185 2010, but math BACs went down by 808 13,677 829 12,720 817 821 12,97812,666 12,877 1,108 1,048 938 957 11,97912,122 1,192 25 (-2.3 percent) from FY 2009. 949 966 1,041 1,073 12,000 1,028 1,062 959 1,153 1,094 766 3,833 700  It took seven years to move above 744 5,507 5,110 3,206 4,198 3,455 3,102 2,867 9,000 the previous peak in awards, 14,578, 4,759 4,002 4,352 achieved in FY 2003. During that time, 6,000 awards earned by females dropped 8,612 9,159 7,446 7,459 7,709 7,538 7,536 8,010 17.9 percent, lowering their share of 3,000 6,080 5,976 6,003 total awards from 26.3 to 20.7 percent. 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010  From 2003 to 2010, STEM awards for Engineering Computer Science Math Physical Science white students dropped 5.1 percent, reducing their share of total STEM awards to 50.0 percent. African American STEM awards dropped by 8.5 percent, but STEM awards to Hispanics surged by 43.4 percent, increasing their share of total STEM awards from 19.0 to 26.0 percent. 26

Allied Health and Nursing Success Target: Increase the number of students completing allied health and nursing bachelor’s and associate’s degrees, and certificates to 20,300 by 2010 and to 26,100 by 2015.
Status: Somewhat Above Target Public institutions awarded 21,225 allied health and nursing BACs in FY 2010, 1,313 (6.6 percent) more than in FY 2009 and 8,018 (60.7 percent) more than in FY 2000. Awards leveled off from 2006 through 2008, but increases the last two years have kept up with the target trend line. Observations Allied Health & Nursing Bachelor’s and Associate’s Degrees and Certificates Awarded by Public Institutions  Students earned 12,845 nursing BACs from public institutions in FY 30,000 26,100 2010, 5,242 or 68.9 percent more Target Actual 25,000 than in FY 2000. Allied health BACs 21,225 20,000 totaled 8,380 in FY 2010, 2,776 or 20,300 49.5 percent above FY 2000’s level. 15,000  Some 70.4 percent of the allied 10,000 health and nursing BACs were 5,000 earned at two-year institutions in FY 2010. 0  Allied health and nursing awards 2000 2005 2010 2015 must total an additional 4,875 (23.0 percent) in FY 2015 to achieve the CTG target.  The number of allied health and nursing BACs was lower in FY 2002 than in FY 2000, continuing a trend that began in the middle of the previous decade, but award counts began to rebound in FY 2003. In 2005, the original targets were revised upward to reflect the need for more practitioners, coupled with increased legislative attention.  The 82nd Texas Legislature again funded the Professional Nursing Shortage Reduction Program, which provides incentive funding for increased numbers of nursing graduates.

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Teachers Success Targets: Increase the number of teachers initially certified through all teacher certification routes to 34,600 by 2010 and 44,700 by 2015.
Status: Well Below Target Initial teacher certifications through all routes totaled 25,079 in FY 2010, down 2.7 percent from FY 2009 and 27.5 percent below the target trend line. Certifications dropped below the line in FY 2005 and the gap has steadily increased since then. Observations Teacher Education Initial Certificates All Routes  In FY 2000, alternative certification programs produced about one in five Target Actual 50,000 44,700 newly certified teachers. By FY 2010, they accounted for over half: 51.9 40,000 34,600 percent. 30,000  In 2015, 19,621 more new certifications 25,079* will be needed to hit the CTG target, 20,000 78.2 percent above the FY 2010 level. 10,000  The current economic situation means that current teachers are being laid off 0 and newly certified teachers are finding 2000 2005 2010 2015 few employment opportunities. *FY 2010 data may be incomplete. However, many teachers are expected to retire so that a focus on teacher certifications is still needed.  From a long-term perspective, preparing more teachers is a priority throughout Texas. The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) projects that K-12 teachers will be among the top five occupations (for which postsecondary education is preferred) in every region of the state, in terms of adding new jobs between 2006 and 2016. Those projections were derived before the recent recession, but Teacher Education Initial Certificates by Program Route 2015 Target: 44,700 the TWC projections assume that the 30,000 Alt Cert Post-Bacc Traditional Other* economy will return to long-term 26,360 25,777 25,079* 24,68625,229 23,160 growth patterns by the end of the 22,885 21,453 10,326 10,434 projection period, with labor supply and 20,000 10,279 10,250 10,200 17,708* 9,799 9,370 demand in equilibrium. Under those 9,831 14,383* 2,284 1,950 1,766 2,835 assumptions, the top two occupations 3,323 9,290 11,807* 3,680 4,122 10,000 statewide (for which a bachelor’s 9,118 4,386 8,163 13,750 13,393 13,024 3,408 degree is preferred) for job growth 11,113 12,194 8,964 10,110 1,471 7,236 940 between 2006 and 2016 are projected 4,684 2,509 3,533 0 to be teachers, at the kindergarten/ 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010** elementary and middle/secondary * Small amounts by “Other” routes **2010 data may be incomplete levels. Nearly 130,000 new jobs are expected for those occupations.

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Math and Science Teacher Success Targets: Increase the number of math and science teachers certified through all teacher certification routes to 6,500 by 2015.
Status: Well Below Target Math and science certifications through all routes rose by 368 or 11.5 percent from FY 2009 to FY 2010, but this measure of teacher success was still 33.7 percent below the target trend line. The number of subject area certifications, such as in math and science, can exceed the number of certified individuals. A person who is qualified and tests in more than one subject area can receive multiple certificates and is counted more than once in these figures. Observations Teacher Education Initial Certificates  Preliminary FY 2010 data show in Math and Science, All Routes that the number of math and science teacher certifications 7,000 6,500 increased by 1,422 (66 percent) 6,000 since FY 2000. 5,400 5,000  Math and science certifications must increase by 81.7 percent in 4,000 3,578* 2015 to reach the CTG target. 3,000  Adding qualified math and 2,000 science teachers is a more 1,000 significant priority for the state now that additional math and 0 science requirements are 2000 2005 2010 2015 *FY 2010 data may be incomplete. included in the recommended high school curriculum. Certified teachers for instruction in math and science programs are critical for enhancing student learning and increasing student interest in and readiness for STEM fields.  Texas Success Initiative results suggest that better math instruction is needed in high school. For example, in a statewide cohort of 100,715 first-time students at public community colleges in fall 2006, over 42,000 students, or 41.7 percent, were underprepared in math.

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Closing the Gaps in Excellence
Goal: to substantially increase the number of nationally recognized programs/services.
The quality of an institution’s educational units and services contributes to its reputation and fosters national recognition. When CTG was first implemented, institutions were asked to demonstrate efforts toward achieving excellence by providing a program or service that they wanted to develop to garner national recognition. Many institutions have identified not one, but several, programs for this assignment, and most institutions report that at least one program has received some type of national recognition. Consideration of the excellence goal has been increasingly geared toward the need for both individual program excellence and overall institutional quality. While little progress toward reaching the excellence goals tied to national rankings has been made, discussions about the nature of excellence and how to best achieve it have refocused attention on this goal. Funding allotments in HB 51, 81st Texas Legislature, will provide opportunities to reward universities that achieve program excellence and, as a consequence, to make progress toward the excellence goals in CTG. In January 2011, Texas A&M University– Kingsville’s Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute became the first program recognized by the Coordinating Board for meeting the stringent guidelines of the Excellence in Specific Programs and Fields Incentive Award. In recent years, excellence issues have arisen during national conversations about the value of higher education. These conversations have led to renewed attention on the topic of general education and those educational outcomes that should be expected for any student who completes a college degree. Research with employers and educators suggests the need for additional emphasis in higher education on broad-based skills such as critical thinking, effective communication, and teamwork, in addition to content knowledge. In FY 2010, Coordinating Board staff and peer accountability groups from Texas public institutions discussed excellence-related topics spawned by the national conversations including: assessing general education/core curriculum learning outcomes, especially in the areas of writing and critical thinking, and determining the meaning of value-added in higher education. Each public institution was required to highlight one or two excellent programs in the Texas Higher Education Accountability System’s December 2010 edition.

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Excellence Targets: Increase the number of research institutions ranked in the top 10 among all research institutions from zero to one, and two additional research universities ranked in the top 30 by 2010; increase the number of public research universities ranked in the top 10 among all public research universities from zero to two, and four ranked among the top 30 by 2015. Increase the number of public liberal arts universities ranked in the top 30 among all public liberal arts institutions from zero to two by 2010, and four by 2015. Increase the number of health science centers ranked among the top 10 medical institutions from zero to one by 2010, and two by 2015.

Status: Well Below Target: Regarding top-ranked research institutions, public liberal arts universities, and health science centers, Texas has made no appreciable progress, according to two of the major ranking organizations, since the start of CTG. However, a new survey conducted by the Wall Street Journal did rank Texas A&M University 2nd among public and independent colleges and universities for the job readiness of its bachelor’s degree graduates. Observations  The U.S. News & World Report (U.S. News) 2011 edition of “America’s Best Colleges” ranked The University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) in a tie for 13th place among national public universities, improving two positions from 2010. It has been tied for 13th place three other times since 2000, but no better. Texas A&M University (TAMU) was in 22nd place, unchanged from the previous year. That institution has done no better than 15th place since 2000, and has been ranked 21st or worse nine of 12 years.  The University of Texas at Dallas and Texas Tech University were the only other Texas public universities in U.S. News’ “first tier” of 112 public universities, tied for 72nd and 85th place, respectively. Their inclusion in U.S. News’ “first tier” of public universities came about because the publication decided to display the ranks of the top 75 percent of national universities, up from 50 percent previously. It does not necessarily mean that they are considered so-called “Tier One” schools.  Among research medical schools, U.S. News’ highest ranked institution in Texas for 2011 was The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (UT Southwestern), tied for number 22 with respect to public and independent institutions and tied for number 8 with respect to public institutions.  No public institution in Texas was among the 189 “Best National Liberal Arts Colleges” ranked by U.S. News for 2011. One reason is that few public institutions in Texas, or anywhere else in the U.S., meet U.S. News’ definition of a liberal arts college: emphasis on undergraduate education and awarding of at least half of all degrees in the arts and sciences. Midwestern State University is the only officially designated public liberal arts university in Texas. 31









The University of Texas at Austin and TAMU were tied for 14th and 17th place, respectively, among 41 U.S. public research universities, based on data in the Center for Measuring University Performance’s (CMUP) 2010 report of “Top American Research Universities.” The Center does not provide rank numbers, but ranks can be derived using their data. Both institutions scored higher in 2009: they were tied for number 13, according to CMUP data. Since 2006, the best either institution has done is UT-Austin’s tie for 8th place in the 2007 report. The University of Houston was the only public Texas institution listed in the next lower group of 34 top American universities, where their data placed them in a tie for number 15. The CMUP data indicate that UT Southwestern placed 23rd in the 2010 list of public research universities, one place better than in 2009. About half of these research institutions are universities with medical schools. If the list just included universities with medical schools, UT Southwestern would have been number 15. The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center (UT M.D. Anderson) was number 31 on the list of public research universities (18 if compared only to universities with medical schools), also one place better than previously. For the first time since its inaugural 2000 report, the CMUP provided additional tables for top “medical research universities,” which did not include universities with medical schools. There, UT M.D. Anderson was 2nd among public and independent institutions and UT Southwestern was 4th. Four Texas medical research universities were among the top 10 public institutions. While those results reflect the excellence of these institutions, a “top 10” ranking meant little because there were only nine institutions in the public and independent list and 11 in the public list. The Wall Street Journal ranked TAMU and Texas Tech number 2 and 18, respectively, among public and independent colleges and universities, based on its 2010 survey of recruiters for the nation’s largest companies, nonprofit organizations, and federal agencies. This was the first time the Journal conducted this survey. The recruiters were asked to identify schools on the Journal’s list of 100 “top colleges and universities” whose bachelor’s degree graduates were the “best-trained and educated, and best able to succeed once hired.” Recruiters also wrote in 31 schools not on the list. The final list from which recruiters ranked schools included all but eight of the 62 public and independent institutions ranked higher than TAMU by U.S. News, so TAMU’s high ranking was not due to a lack of competition on the Journal’s list. While this survey was not as comprehensive as the U.S. News and CMUP evaluations, it did focus on identifying schools “that are most likely to help students land a job in key careers and professions.” Rankings among National Public Universities by U.S. News

Institution UT-Austin TAMU
*Tie.

2000 13* 18*

2001 16 17

2002 15* 15*

2003 14* 24*

2004 17* 27*

2005 14* 22*

2006 17 21*

2007 13* 21*

2008 13* 23

2009 15* 24*

2010 15* 22*

2011 13* 22

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Rankings among American Research Universities Based on Data from the Center for Measuring University Performance
Texas Public Institution UT-Austin TAMU UT Southwestern UT M.D. Anderson Rank Among Public and Independent Universities** Rank Among Public Universities** 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 28* 25* 19* 18 15 12* 8* 14* 13* 14* 32 31* 30* 28* 29* 20 14* 14* 13* 17* 43 18* 23 25 24 23 51 52 47* 49* 38* 32* 32* 28 32 31

*Tie. **The Center does not actually assign rank numbers to institutions as U.S. News does, but rank numbers can be assigned using the Center’s listing.





Examination of the components that go into rankings can provide insight into areas where an institution is doing well relative to its peers and where it needs improvement. For example, U.S. News ranked UT-Austin just below the University of California at Irvine, which was tied for 11th among public universities. While UT-Austin had a somewhat better undergraduate academic reputation, SAT scores, and alumni giving rate, it trailed UC-Irvine in areas including faculty resources (class size, faculty salaries, and so forth), percent of freshmen in the top 10 percent of their high school class, and spending per student. Lagging areas such as these could be targeted to improve UT-Austin’s stature (as measured by U.S. News) relative to UC-Irvine and the five other UC campuses that were ranked higher than UT-Austin. Data in the CMUP report show that UT-Austin was one of the top 10 public research universities in endowment assets, annual giving, National Academy members, and doctorates granted. It could have improved (as measured by the CMUP) to a tie for 8th place among public research universities by being slightly more selective with respect to SAT scores of its undergraduates or by adding about 150 postdoctoral appointees.

33

Excellence Targets: Each college and university will have identified by 2002 at least one program to achieve nationally recognized excellence. Community and technical colleges and universities will have at least one program or service nationally recognized: 75 percent of the institutions by 2010 and 100 percent by 2015.
Status: On Target Past CTG progress reports noted that all Texas public higher education institutions had identified at least one program to develop for national recognition, and that all received national recognition of some type in one or more programs. Therefore, the state’s colleges and universities are “on target” for these excellence goals. No institution can do better than “on target” because of the way the target is defined. Observations  In spring 2008, institutions informed the Coordinating Board of their progress towards achieving excellence in their programs identified for excellence.  Each public institution was required to highlight one or two excellent programs in the Texas Higher Education Accountability System’s December 2010 edition.  In January 2011, Texas A&M University–Kingsville’s Caesar Kleberg Wildlife Research Institute became the first program recognized by the Coordinating Board for meeting the stringent guidelines of the Excellence in Specific Programs and Fields Incentive Award.  The process of identifying programs for excellence and then reporting on achievements focuses attention on the quality of specific programs and services and on the totality of institutional performance.

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Closing the Gaps in Research
Goal: Increase the level of federal science and engineering research and development obligations to Texas institutions to 6.5 percent of obligations to higher education institutions across the nation.
Capturing a significant portion of the federal science and engineering research and development obligations is, and must remain, a primary focus of the Texas higher education agenda. The CTG research goal serves to keep attention on the need for Texas to compete with other states for national research dollars and projects. The state seemed to be competing well between FY 2001 and FY 2003, when its share of national obligations ranged from 5.8 to 6.1 percent. However, from FY 2004 through FY 2007 (the most recent year of available data), its share has held at around 5.6 percent. Texas tends to rank higher when the portion of total federal funding for health-related research and development is lowest. Texas public universities have done much better with respect to their expenditures for research and development. Steady growth since 2000 enabled them to reach the $3 billion level (the 2015 target) seven years early, in FY 2008. At $3.55 billion in FY 2010, research and development (R&D) expenditures were 41.0 percent above that year’s target.

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CLOSING THE GAPS IN RESEARCH GOAL: By 2015, increase the level of
federal science and engineering research and development obligations to Texas institutions to 6.5 percent of obligations to higher education institutions across the nation, from 5.5 percent in FY 2000. Increase to 6.2 percent by 2010.

Status: Somewhat Below Target Texas public and independent institutions had a 5.6 percent share of federal obligations for science and engineering R&D in FY 2007 (the most recent data available), up 0.1 percentage point from FY 2006 and FY 2000. The state’s share reached 6.1 percent in FY 2003, but dropped the next year and was at 5.6 percent three times between 2004 and 2007. Observations Federal Science and Engineering R&D Obligations  Federal science and engineering and Share of U.S. Total for Top Seven States Millions In constant (base FY 1998) dollars obligations for R&D received by $3,000 13.8% FY 1998 FY 2007 Texas’ public and independent higher $2,500 education institutions totaled $1.42 14.9% $2,000 billion in FY 2007, up 1.2 percent 7.9% $1,500 from FY 2006. On a constant dollar 6.3% 6.2% 8.3% 5.9% 5.6% basis (FY 1998 base), Texas $1,000 6.4% 6.2% 4.2% 6.0% 5.3% 3.7% obligations were $1.13 billion in FY $500 2007, compared with $0.73 billion in $0 FY 1998. s a d ia tts ina ork xa rni an an se rol Te ryl lifo wY ylv  In 2003, when Texas had 6.1 percent hu Ca ns Ma Ca Ne ac n rth ss Pe No Ma of national obligations, the state seemed to be on course to meet or exceed the CTG target. However, from FY 2003 to FY 2007, obligations to Texas institutions grew by only 2.4 percent ($32.9 million), while total national obligations grew by 11.1 percent ($2.53 billion).  House Bill 51, 81st Texas Legislature responded to the call for more nationally prominent research universities in Texas. Among its provisions are: o Creation of the Texas Research Incentive Program, which awards matching funds for leveraging private gifts to enhance research activities at the state’s emerging research universities. o Creation of the National Research University Fund, which provides funds to emerging research universities that meet benchmarks in areas such as research expenditures, number of Ph.D.’s awarded, high-achieving entering students, high-quality faculty, and high-quality graduate programs. o Creation of the Research University Development Fund, intended to help research and emerging research universities attract high-quality faculty and enhance research productivity. Appropriated funds would be distributed based on an institution’s total research expenditures for the most recent three years. o The Governing Board of each research and emerging research university was required to submit to the Coordinating Board a detailed, long-term strategic plan addressing how it would achieve or enhance its recognition as a national research university. Revised strategic plans are to be submitted to the Coordinating Board every four years.

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Research Target: Increase research expenditures by Texas public universities and health-related institutions from $1.45 billion in FY 1999 to $3 billion by 2015 (approximate 5 percent increase per year). Increase expenditures to $2.2 billion in constant (FY 1999 base) dollars by 2007.
Status: Well Above Target Public universities and health-related institutions reported $3.55 billion in R&D expenditures from federal, state, institutional, and private sources in FY 2010, 7.1 percent above expenditures in FY 2009 and 41.0 percent above the target trend line. In constant (FY 1999 base) dollars, expenditures increased from $2.48 billion to $2.69 billion between FY 2009 and FY 2010, an 8.5 percent increase. Observations Expenditures for R&D at Public Universities and Health Expenditures grew at a Related Institutions faster rate at public In constant (base FY 1999) dollars universities (8.8 percent) Annual Change 2010 8.5% than at public health1.7% 2009 related institutions (5.2 7.9% 2008 percent) from 2009 to 3.9% 2007 2010. 2.2% 2006 6.9% 2005  In constant dollars, the 1.3% 2004 annual increase in FY 4.8% 2003 2010 (8.5 percent) was 2002 12.5% the largest since FY 2002, 2001 6.7% 2000 when expenditures 7.6% 1999 increased by 12.5 percent.  The federal government 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 ($ Million) was the largest provider Public Universities Public Health-Related Institutions of funds for public R&D Annual Increase Shown as Percentage expenditures in FY 2010, with a 52.6 percent share, up from 51.8 percent in FY 2009. State government provided the next largest share (20.0 percent) in appropriations, contracts, and grants, followed by private sources (16.6 percent), and institutional funding (10.8 percent).  Research expenditures in FY 2010 were 144.3 percent more than in FY 1999. The increase was 85.1 percent in constant dollars.

37

38

Appendix A: Participation Data

Appendix Table A-1: Actual Public and Independent Higher Education Enrollment Fall 2000-2010 and CTG Targets
Change to Reach 2015 Target 20102015 9.6% 16.7% 7.9% -13.8% -10.9% -10.6% -5.4% -25.7% 51.9% 65.9% 43.7% -12.2% 2.3% -0.1% 4.2% 5.7%

Race/Ethnicity and Type of Institution Total Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independent* African American Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independent* Hispanic Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independent* White Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independent* *Includes career colleges.

Actual Fall Enrollment 2000 447,998 427,233 144,286 108,463 49,414 41,371 17,678 237,394 129,308 82,815 25,271 570,052 236,429 249,816 83,807 2001 478,313 443,870 147,655 114,950 52,730 44,193 18,027 252,824 138,718 87,923 26,183 586,942 248,620 253,906 84,416 2002 515,771 469,514 151,991 125,985 57,465 49,005 19,515 273,945 152,149 94,981 26,815 614,412 264,350 262,805 87,257 2003 536,005 487,061 151,621 132,334 60,277 51,833 20,224 292,071 162,994 101,612 27,465 627,086 271,190 268,216 87,680 2004 557,373 497,213 153,295 138,400 63,446 54,566 20,388 309,457 174,844 107,004 27,609 631,767 275,863 268,319 87,585 2005 566,071 500,535 152,539 139,773 64,665 55,438 19,670 319,495 180,323 111,181 27,991 628,429 275,146 267,113 86,170 2006 575,712 507,243 153,213 142,622 65,971 56,851 19,800 333,964 189,474 115,952 28,538 624,671 272,612 266,016 86,043 2007 587,244 513,930 153,809 145,387 67,554 57,993 19,840 345,284 195,890 120,148 29,246 621,603 272,977 264,214 84,412 2008 617,507 526,820 154,731 152,877 72,720 60,331 19,826 366,878 210,476 126,416 29,986 628,605 279,396 265,256 83,953 2009 692,845 550,872 177,276 177,459 86,241 65,060 26,158 412,642 238,281 136,381 37,980 658,876 306,376 270,966 81,534 2010 743,252 577,795 184,402 193,734 98,112 68,491 27,131 445,183 259,110 148,094 37,979 655,907 305,605 268,195 82,107

CTG Goal/ Target 2015 867,670 623,329 159,001 172,700 87,714 64,822 20,164 676,100 429,947 212,813 33,340 671,300 305,156 279,331 86,813

Actual Change 2000-2010 Number Percent 485,932 295,254 150,562 40,116 85,271 48,698 27,120 9,453 207,789 129,802 65,279 12,708 85,855 69,176 18,379 -1,700 47.7% 65.9% 35.2% 27.8% 78.6% 98.6% 65.6% 53.5% 87.5% 100.4% 78.8% 50.3% 15.1% 29.3% 7.4% -2.0%

1,019,517 1,069,838 1,137,276 1,174,687 1,207,881 1,219,145 1,236,168 1,254,983 1,299,058 1,420,993 1,505,449 1,650,000

Appendix Table A-2: Trend Line Data Points for Change in Participation from Fall 2000 to Meet CTG Targets At Public and Independent Higher Education Institutions
Race/Ethnicity Total African American Hispanic White 2001 29,897 4,707 20,521 4,190 2002 59,793 9,415 41,042 8,379 2003 89,690 14,122 61,564 12,569 2004 119,586 18,830 82,085 16,758 2005 149,483 23,537 102,606 20,948 2006 200,283 28,797 129,406 34,848 2007 251,083 34,057 156,206 48,748 2008 301,883 39,317 183,006 62,648 2009 352,683 44,577 209,806 76,548 2010 403,483 49,837 236,606 90,448 2011 448,883 52,717 277,026 92,608 2012 494,283 55,597 317,446 94,768 2013 539,683 58,477 357,866 96,928 2014 585,083 61,357 398,286 99,088 2015 630,483 64,237 438,706 101,248

A-1

Appendix Table A-3: Fall Enrollment in Public and Independent Institutions as a Percentage of the Population by Race/Ethnicity and Gender
Point Change 20002010 1.0% 1.4% 0.7% 0.7% 2.1% 2.7% 1.6% 1.1% 1.0% 1.3% 0.7% 0.6% 0.6% 0.7% 0.4% 0.3%

Race/Ethnicity & Gender Total Female Male Point Difference African American Female Male Point Difference Hispanic Female Male Point Difference White Female Male Point Difference

2000 4.9% 5.4% 4.4% 1.0% 4.5% 5.4% 3.5% 2.0% 3.6% 4.1% 3.0% 1.1% 5.1% 5.6% 4.7% 0.9%

2001 5.0% 5.6% 4.5% 1.1% 4.7% 5.7% 3.6% 2.1% 3.6% 4.3% 3.0% 1.2% 5.3% 5.7% 4.8% 0.9%

2002 5.3% 5.9% 4.6% 1.2% 5.0% 6.1% 3.8% 2.3% 3.8% 4.5% 3.1% 1.4% 5.5% 6.0% 5.0% 1.0%

2003 5.3% 6.0% 4.6% 1.4% 5.2% 6.3% 3.9% 2.4% 3.9% 4.7% 3.1% 1.5% 5.6% 6.1% 5.0% 1.1%

2004 5.4% 6.1% 4.6% 1.4% 5.3% 6.5% 4.0% 2.5% 4.0% 4.8% 3.2% 1.6% 5.6% 6.2% 5.0% 1.2%

2005 5.3% 6.0% 4.6% 1.5% 5.2% 6.5% 3.9% 2.5% 3.9% 4.7% 3.2% 1.6% 5.6% 6.1% 5.0% 1.2%

2006 5.3% 6.0% 4.5% 1.5% 5.2% 6.5% 3.9% 2.5% 4.0% 4.8% 3.2% 1.6% 5.5% 6.1% 4.9% 1.1%

2007 5.3% 6.0% 4.5% 1.4% 5.3% 6.4% 4.0% 2.4% 3.9% 4.7% 3.2% 1.6% 5.5% 6.0% 4.9% 1.1%

2008 5.3% 6.1% 4.6% 1.5% 5.4% 6.6% 4.1% 2.5% 4.0% 4.9% 3.2% 1.6% 5.5% 6.1% 5.0% 1.1%

2009 5.7% 6.5% 4.9% 1.6% 6.2% 7.6% 4.7% 2.9% 4.4% 5.2% 3.5% 1.7% 5.8% 6.3% 5.2% 1.1%

2010 5.9% 6.8% 5.1% 1.7% 6.6% 8.1% 5.0% 3.1% 4.5% 5.4% 3.7% 1.8% 5.7% 6.3% 5.1% 1.2%

Note: Differences and changes are expressed as percentage points.

Appendix Table A-4: Freshmen as a Percentage of All Students at Public Higher Education Institutions by Race/Ethnicity
Type of Institution Fall 2000 Total Two-Year Four-Year Fall 2010 Total Two-Year Four-Year African American 47.0% 61.9% 29.2% 47.0% 62.9% 24.2%

White 41.1% 64.4% 19.1% 41.3% 63.9% 15.6%

Hispanic 46.9% 61.7% 23.8% 48.8% 64.3% 21.8%

Asian 33.6% 53.1% 20.1% 32.8% 52.2% 16.5%

Other 27.0% 57.2% 10.5% 39.2% 69.3% 12.6%

Total 42.1% 62.7% 20.5% 43.7% 63.7% 18.0%

A-2

Appendix Table A-5: Public Higher Education Enrollment by Region and Type of Institution and Race/Ethnicity
Fall 2000 Region or Type of Institution Region of Institution High Plains Northwest Metroplex Upper East Southeast Gulf Coast Central Texas South Texas West Texas Upper Rio Grande Type of Institution University Community College Technical & State College Health-Related Total 242,024 227,361 9,068 7,792 486,245 40,763 46,871 2,543 608 90,785 81,180 125,222 4,086 1,635 212,123 23,626 17,362 283 1,693 42,964 27,033 15,118 84 879 43,114 414,626 431,934 16,064 12,607 875,231 258,383 296,185 9,420 9,812 573,800 67,092 94,432 3,680 1,399 166,603 145,121 251,981 7,129 2,973 407,204 35,690 32,138 425 3,146 71,399 51,264 47,226 636 2,915 102,041 557,550 721,962 21,290 20,245 1,321,047 38,873 10,436 117,576 24,786 22,754 88,636 122,484 42,245 13,363 5,092 1,688 1,178 23,386 5,014 5,473 36,771 10,141 5,287 982 865 7,010 1,742 20,142 1,328 1,742 33,752 23,129 91,413 5,602 26,263 1,095 243 12,168 226 633 15,095 10,370 2,578 222 334 1,794 533 12,336 386 591 10,652 11,399 2,722 274 2,427 50,460 14,132 185,608 31,740 31,193 184,906 177,523 144,245 20,443 34,981 41,570 12,507 153,314 34,242 23,464 100,800 136,682 51,752 14,147 5,322 3,191 1,716 51,012 8,472 9,755 59,772 19,433 10,307 1,558 1,387 13,733 3,495 59,408 4,851 4,076 73,848 45,627 151,445 9,880 40,841 1,765 357 23,221 583 939 23,982 14,785 4,848 382 537 7,241 1,185 26,765 2,789 2,734 22,037 18,001 16,745 1,196 3,348 67,500 19,260 313,720 50,937 40,968 280,439 234,528 235,097 27,163 51,435 African American African American Fall 2010

White

Hispanic

Asian

Other

Total

White

Hispanic

Asian

Other

Total

A-3

Appendix B: Success Data

Appendix Table B-1: Actual Awards FY 2000-2010 and CTG Success Targets
CTG Goal/ Target 2008 2009 2010 2015

Degrees and Certificates Awarded Type of Award Bachelor's, Associate's, & Certificates (BAC) Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents Bachelor's Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents Associate's Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents Doctorates Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents African American BAC Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents Hispanic BAC Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Independents Technology BAC Public Two-Year Public Four-Year Computer Science Math Physical Science Engineering Allied Health & Nursing BAC Public Two-Year Public Four-Year BSN ADN Other Nursing Allied Health All Teachers Initially Certified, All Routes Math & Science Teachers 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

116,235 116,754 124,626 132,478 139,626 144,338 147,705 152,058 155,542 164,715 176,604 210,000 40,553 58,818 16,864 74,906 0 58,574 16,332 25,505 24,810 163 532 2,629 0 2,297 332 11,215 5,192 4,323 1,700 23,368 10,207 10,879 2,282 11,979 5,084 6,895 4,002 744 1,153 6,080 13,207 9,388 3,819 2,004 2,752 2,847 5,604 11,807 2,156 40,444 59,337 16,973 75,286 0 58,988 16,298 25,363 24,549 139 675 2,671 0 2,318 353 11,756 5,447 4,559 1,750 24,036 10,538 11,135 2,363 12,122 5,140 6,982 4,352 700 1,094 5,976 12,878 9,026 3,852 1,961 2,695 2,601 5,621 14,383 2,473 44,697 61,995 17,934 78,919 0 61,611 17,308 27,512 26,765 121 626 2,539 0 2,238 301 12,625 6,013 4,805 1,807 26,251 11,833 11,974 2,444 12,720 5,428 7,292 4,759 766 1,192 6,003 12,960 9,224 3,736 2,056 2,708 2,812 5,384 17,708 2,972 49,988 63,777 18,713 81,141 0 63,356 17,785 30,482 29,599 144 739 2,637 0 2,203 434 13,373 6,428 5,136 1,809 28,832 13,735 12,502 2,595 14,578 7,267 7,311 5,507 817 808 7,446 13,535 9,861 3,674 2,125 3,220 2,933 5,257 21,453 3,061 53,851 67,099 18,676 84,595 0 66,742 17,853 33,608 32,688 177 743 2,807 0 2,356 451 14,667 7,082 5,576 2,009 31,334 15,488 13,263 2,583 14,336 6,966 7,370 5,110 938 829 7,459 15,019 11,117 3,902 2,345 3,496 3,058 6,120 22,885 2,498 56,858 69,852 17,628 86,473 0 69,505 16,968 35,796 35,070 166 560 3,041 0 2,560 481 14,600 7,093 5,723 1,784 33,723 16,724 14,504 2,495 13,677 6,169 7,508 4,198 949 821 7,709 16,113 11,962 4,151 2,430 3,595 3,457 6,631 23,160 2,737 57,020 73,182 17,503 89,780 0 72,837 16,943 37,196 36,559 177 460 3,220 0 2,780 440 14,695 6,705 6,213 1,777 35,385 17,414 15,478 2,493 12,978 5,277 7,701 3,455 1,028 957 7,538 17,289 12,838 4,451 2,607 3,984 3,494 7,204 24,686 2,991 58,202 75,951 17,905 93,032 30 75,577 17,425 37,869 37,309 168 392 3,623 0 3,123 500 15,460 7,131 6,616 1,713 37,704 17,923 17,055 2,726 12,666 5,251 7,415 3,102 1,062 966 7,536 17,924 13,041 4,883 2,944 4,141 3,620 7,219 25,229 3,044 58,940 78,384 18,218 95,778 46 77,989 17,743 39,486 38,903 185 398 3,763 0 3,216 547 15,568 6,982 6,821 1,765 39,267 18,326 17,971 2,970 12,877 5,360 7,517 2,867 959 1,041 8,010 18,184 12,901 5,283 3,266 4,566 3,203 7,149 26,360 3,373 64,475 81,425 18,815 112 81,014 18,337 42,329 41,732 242 355 3,692 0 3,083 609 17,287 7,877 7,579 1,831 43,158 20,446 19,511 3,201 13,999 6,157 7,842 3,206 1,073 1,108 8,612 19,912 14,254 5,658 3,476 4,819 3,675 7,942 25,777 3,210 73,963 83,329 19,312 131 82,881 18,867 48,851 48,253 242 356 3,813 0 3,249 564 18,560 24,300 8,706 7,998 1,856 47,750 67,000 24,024 20,605 3,121 15,225 7,159 8,066 3,833 1,048 1,185 9,159 21,225 14,946 6,279 4,044 5,240 3,561 8,380 25,079 3,578 44,700 6,500 26,100 29,000 3,900 55,500

99,463 101,879 112,500

B-1

Appendix Table B-2: Success Trend Line Data Points Since FY 2001 to Meet CTG Targets
Type of Award Bachelor's, Associate's, & Certificates (BAC) Bachelor's Associate's Doctorates African American BAC Hispanic BAC Technology BAC Allied Health & Nursing BAC All Teachers Initial Certifications Math & Science Teacher Certifications 2001 119,788 77,425 26,004 2,663 11,572 24,894 13,383 13,266 15,160 2,585 2002 123,341 79,944 26,503 2,697 11,929 26,421 14,787 13,324 17,320 3,014 2003 126,894 82,462 27,002 2,732 12,286 27,947 16,192 13,383 19,480 3,442 2004 130,447 84,981 27,501 2,766 12,643 29,474 17,596 13,441 21,640 3,871 2005 134,000 87,500 28,000 2,800 13,000 31,000 19,000 13,500 23,800 4,300 2006 141,400 90,000 31,080 2,910 14,360 34,800 20,000 14,860 25,960 4,520 2007 148,800 92,500 34,160 3,020 15,720 38,600 21,000 16,220 28,120 4,740 2008 156,200 95,000 37,240 3,130 17,080 42,400 22,000 17,580 30,280 4,960 2009 163,600 97,500 40,320 3,240 18,440 46,200 23,000 18,940 32,440 5,180 2010 171,000 100,000 43,400 3,350 19,800 50,000 24,000 20,300 34,600 5,400 2011 178,800 102,500 45,820 3,460 20,700 53,400 25,000 21,460 36,620 5,620 2012 186,600 105,000 48,240 3,570 21,600 56,800 26,000 22,620 38,640 5,840 2013 194,400 107,500 50,660 3,680 22,500 60,200 27,000 23,780 40,660 6,060 2014 202,200 110,000 53,080 3,790 23,400 63,600 28,000 24,940 42,680 6,280 2015 210,000 112,500 55,500 3,900 24,300 67,000 29,000 26,100 44,700 6,500

B-2

Appendix C: Research Data

Appendix Table C-1: Federal Science and Engineering Obligations for Research and Development (Current $ Thousands), U.S. and Top Seven States, FY 1999-2007
State U.S. Total California % of U.S. Total New York % of U.S. Total Pennsylvania % of U.S. Total Maryland % of U.S. Total Massachusetts % of U.S. Total Texas % of U.S. Total North Carolina % of U.S. Total 1999 $15,569,103 $2,247,783 14.4% $1,269,773 8.2% $990,736 6.4% $1,004,165 6.4% $937,584 6.0% $834,577 5.4% $573,092 3.7% 2000 $17,289,808 $2,517,086 14.6% $1,410,518 8.2% $1,082,830 6.3% $1,051,387 6.1% $998,935 5.8% $958,185 5.5% $636,881 3.7% 2001 $19,390,153 $2,697,229 13.9% $1,580,912 8.2% $1,239,294 6.4% $1,122,508 5.8% $1,072,841 5.5% $1,147,752 5.9% $766,285 4.0% 2002 $21,154,640 $2,951,472 14.0% $1,682,187 8.0% $1,378,756 6.5% $1,296,852 6.1% $1,147,934 5.4% $1,222,324 5.8% $841,951 4.0% 2003 $22,804,253 $3,193,421 14.0% $1,857,646 8.1% $1,417,348 6.2% $1,294,617 5.7% $1,220,700 5.4% $1,385,229 6.1% $938,818 4.1% 2004 $23,810,968 $3,458,540 14.5% $1,948,714 8.2% $1,489,570 6.3% $1,382,909 5.8% $1,342,039 5.6% $1,342,911 5.6% $948,086 4.0% 2005 $25,025,362 $3,562,040 14.2% $2,048,855 8.2% $1,491,231 6.0% $1,461,924 5.8% $1,377,471 5.5% $1,396,643 5.6% $1,020,230 4.1% 2006 $25,361,561 $3,458,085 13.6% $2,010,960 7.9% $1,536,857 6.1% $1,652,290 6.5% $1,483,191 5.8% $1,401,353 5.5% $1,079,329 4.3% 2007 $25,335,978 $3,487,825 13.8% $1,991,832 7.9% $1,591,859 6.3% $1,569,606 6.2% $1,491,859 5.9% $1,418,120 5.6% $1,076,694 4.2%

Source: National Science Foundation, Survey of Federal S&E Support to Universities, Colleges, and Nonprofit Institutions: Federal Obligations for Research and Development. Available online at: https://webcaspar.nsf.gov/index.jsp?subHeader=WebCASPARHome

Appendix Table C-2: Trend Line Data Points for Percent of U.S. Total Research and Development Obligations to Meet CTG Targets, FY 2000-2015
Type of Data % of U.S. Total 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

5.50% 5.57% 5.64% 5.71% 5.78% 5.85% 5.92% 5.99% 6.06% 6.13% 6.20% 6.26% 6.32% 6.38% 6.44% 6.50%

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Appendix Table C-3: Expenditures for Research and Development (Current $ Thousands) by Source of Funds at Texas Public Four-Year Institutions, FY 1999-2010
Type of Institution and Source Public Universities Federal State Appropriated State Grants and Contracts Institutional Private-Profit Private-Non-Profit Total $429,469 $113,107 $80,162 $88,518 $29,205 $88,733 $829,194 $466,342 $146,241 $70,326 $80,512 $53,546 $64,305 $881,271 $501,649 $154,227 $80,609 $77,158 $63,347 $71,233 $564,550 $181,170 $96,572 $92,735 $64,765 $76,996 $581,314 $192,545 $98,792 $102,690 $61,670 $81,401 $598,223 $164,060 $89,478 $109,589 $62,315 $85,935 $687,231 $178,457 $99,235 $129,826 $71,011 $76,930 $715,512 $188,607 $98,129 $139,173 $79,413 $77,920 $762,459 $194,793 $112,385 $144,064 $86,185 $84,960 $828,254 $239,248 $112,838 $178,282 $115,434 $84,659 $860,044 $261,504 $126,235 $208,213 $128,414 $104,711 $945,238 $262,752 $125,293 $249,544 $144,419 $110,745 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010

$948,223 $1,076,789 $1,118,412 $1,109,602 $1,242,691 $1,298,753 $1,384,846 $1,558,716 $1,689,121 $1,837,990

Public Health-Related Institutions Federal State Appropriated State Grants and Contracts Institutional Private-Profit Private-Non-Profit Total Federal State Appropriated State Grants and Contracts Institutional Private-Profit Private-Non-Profit Total $367,176 $83,801 $4,114 $11,367 $60,196 $95,875 $622,528 $796,645 $196,908 $84,275 $99,885 $89,400 $184,609 $421,090 $90,655 $8,082 $27,624 $57,762 $116,072 $721,284 $887,432 $236,896 $78,408 $108,135 $111,308 $180,376 $479,224 $94,141 $13,790 $38,793 $63,032 $132,457 $821,437 $577,718 $119,859 $16,843 $38,501 $78,841 $141,687 $639,417 $133,768 $10,414 $38,962 $79,164 $154,054 $709,811 $149,561 $11,525 $43,951 $67,522 $160,926 $752,991 $164,507 $11,621 $51,283 $78,454 $167,100 $787,661 $205,871 $18,810 $70,291 $82,281 $178,450 $796,944 $210,984 $24,294 $82,275 $93,615 $207,523 $836,908 $251,078 $21,305 $110,797 $112,523 $212,997 $857,479 $261,218 $30,767 $134,385 $109,732 $229,945 $919,226 $284,766 $38,211 $134,303 $110,162 $221,801

$973,451 $1,055,780 $1,143,296 $1,225,956 $1,343,363 $1,415,636 $1,545,608 $1,623,526 $1,708,469

Public Universities and Health-Related Institutions $980,873 $1,142,269 $1,220,731 $1,308,035 $1,440,222 $1,503,173 $1,559,403 $1,665,163 $1,717,523 $1,864,464 $248,368 $94,400 $115,951 $126,379 $203,690 $301,029 $113,415 $131,237 $143,606 $218,683 $326,314 $109,206 $141,652 $140,835 $235,455 $313,621 $101,004 $153,540 $129,837 $246,861 $342,964 $110,856 $181,109 $149,465 $244,030 $394,478 $116,939 $209,463 $161,694 $256,369 $405,778 $136,679 $226,339 $179,800 $292,482 $490,325 $134,143 $289,079 $227,957 $297,657 $522,722 $157,002 $342,598 $238,146 $334,656 $547,518 $163,504 $383,846 $254,581 $332,545

$1,451,722 $1,602,555 $1,769,660 $2,050,240 $2,174,192 $2,252,898 $2,468,647 $2,642,116 $2,800,482 $3,104,324 $3,312,647 $3,546,459

Appendix Table C-4: Trend Line Data Points for Research and Development Expenditures ($ Billion) to Meet CTG Targets
Type of Data Total Expenditures 1999 1.452 2000 1.549 2001 1.646 2002 1.742 2003 1.839 2004 1.936 2005 2.033 2006 2.129 2007 2.226 2008 2.323 2009 2.420 2010 2.516 2011 2.613 2012 2.710 2013 2.807 2014 2.903 2015 3.000

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This document is available on the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Website: http://www.thecb.state.tx.us

For more information contact: Janet Beinke, Director of Planning Planning and Accountability Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board P.O. Box 12788 Austin, TX 78711 (512) 427-6354 FAX (512) 427-6147 [email protected]

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