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School of Education, University of St. Thomas
(Syllabus updated March 5, 2015, subject to change)

Spring 2015, Online Class, 3 credits
March 14 – April 30, 2015

CIED 551

Instructor: Chientzu Candace Chou
E-Mail: [email protected]

Use of Technology for
Instruction
Course Description
This course examines learning theories, philosophies and their
implications on the use of technology, as well as the history
and development of learning technologies. Additionally,
students will examine current trends and future challenges in
education technology. Students will learn a variety of learning
technologies and advocate sound integration of technology
into curriculum. Issues on the design, development, and
implementation of technology will be discussed. Students will
integrate learning technologies into their curriculum planning
in the specific content areas that meet with the technology and
content standards.
Goals
By the end of the course, participants will be able to






Gain factual knowledge and examples in effective
technology integration (NETS*1)
o To do this, you will develop a project-based
learning plan
Learn to apply course materials to develop
instructional activities for learning (NETS*II)
o To do this, you will develop several
Technology Integration projects
Develop specific skills and competences in creating a
standard-based electronic portfolio (NETS III)
o To do this, you will develop an eFolio.

Use of Technology for Instruction

IRT Help Line: 651-962-6230

Textbooks & Materials



A compilation of texts to be
downloaded from Blackboard
Recommended Readings
(optional)
o Marcowitz, D. (2012). Digital
Connections in the Classroom.
ISTE
o Tucker, C. (2012). Blended
learning in grades 4-12:
Leveraging the Power of
Technology to Create studentcentered classrooms. Corwin.
o ISTE 2013 Videos:
http://goo.gl/h0OX4C

Milestones
April 5-April 26, 2015

Technology curriculum upgrades
April 26, 2015

Project-based learning
May 3, 2015

eFolio

1

Course Module Topics and Dates (subject to change, see detailed module descriptions on Blackboard)
Block 1 Technology Foundation and Framework
Module 1 Getting Started: Orientation to the course (3/14-22)
Module 2 Community of practice via social networks (3/14-22)
Module 3 Theory into practice (3/14-22)
Module 4 Google Drive for collaboration (3/23-29)
Module 5 ISTE NETS: Technology standards and curriculum planning (3/23-29)
Module 6 Portfolio for life-long learning (3/30-4/5)
Module 7 Project-based learning (3/30-4/5)
Block 2: Curriculum Applications and Upgrade
Module 8 Concept mapping as Mind Tools (4/6-12)
Module 9 Flipped Classroom and Instructional webcast (4/6-12)
Module 10 One-to-one learning with mobile devices (4/13-19)
Block 3: Implication and Future Trends
Module 11 Game-based learning (4/13-19)
Module 12 Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines (4/20-26)
*Blue highlights denote modules with main class assignments. Green highlights denote modules with
curriculum upgrades.
Course Assessment and due dates
All introductory activities are due at the end of the module. All curriculum upgrade activities are due one week after
the module.






Online Participation and Peer Comments (weekly)
20%
Electronic Portfolio (May 3)
20%
Project-based learning plan (April 26)
20%
Technology Integration: Module activities (various due dates) 40%

Projects and Assessment Criteria
1. Class Participation 20%: Participation in peer project comments and timely submission of
assignments are vital to the success of your online learning. You can contribute to the class
activities through active discussion, comments on projects, completion of module activities,
and sharing of tips in technology-based learning solutions. The learning tips can be a tool,
Use of Technology for Instruction

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app, website, or other resources that are relevant to the course and could be of interest to
your fellow educators. Unexcused late assignment submission will receive a reduction of ½
letter grade of the project. Here is a breakdown of the class participation activities:
-Post your two main assignments (project-based learning and portfolio) and two curriculum
upgrade assignments on time: 4 points
-Provide at least two or three comments for your peers’ main assignments and curriculum
upgrade projects: 12 points (The comment should be at least three to five sentences and
meaningful.)
-Provide additional comments or tips on technology: 4 points
2. Electronic Portfolio: 20% Use the eFolio Minnesota system, Google Site or a tool of your
choice (e.g., Weebly, Tumblr, wiki, etc) to create a professional portfolio. Include at least
introduction, CV/resume, teaching philosophy, and Technology integration sections. See
Portfolio module for the checklist. Post the URL to Edmodo for peer-feedback.
4. Project-based Learning: 20% Work with a partner or by yourself to develop a project-based
learning plan using the template from Blackboard. Include all additional handouts, rubrics, or
resources that come with this PBL. Integrate at least two technological tools from this course. Post
the final project URL on Edmodo for peer-feedback.
5. Technology Integration Curriculum Upgrade Projects: 40% All learning modules have
introductory activities that help the participants to develop a basic understanding of the topics. The
completion of the introductory activities is mandatory. Some modules mostly under Block Two
have additional curriculum upgrade components. You need to complete at least two curriculum
upgrade projects. If you are already familiar with the topics or if you would like to use the
opportunity to pursue a topic further, you can choose your own topics with instructor’s prior
approval. Here is a breakdown on how to earn points for this assignments:
-Completion of all introductory activities at the end of each module, 20 points
-Completion of two quality curriculum upgrade projects, 20 points (rubrics for the individual
projects can be found in the Blackboard modules)
-Curriculum upgrades are due one week after the completion of a module. For example, if a
module ends on Oct. 1, the curriculum upgrade project for tis module is due Oct. 7.
Grading
A 93 - 100
A- 90-92
B+ 87-89
B 83-86
C+ 77-79
C 73-76
D or below is unacceptable for graduate level work.
F is given for failing or incomplete work

B- 80-82
C- 70-72

Course Outcomes
Participants will develop a good understanding of using technology for instruction in K-16 and life-long
learning settings. Project-based learning is the underpinning theoretical framework for project design.
Central themes on connecting learners with the 21st century learning skills and technology will be
emphasized through course discussion and project implementation. Participants will demonstrate effective
Use of Technology for Instruction

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technology integration for instructional activities. Electronic portfolio will be developed as the end product
that reflects standards-based technology integration and your progress in using technology for instruction.
Course Format
The principles of the entire program are based on discovery learning, authentic tasks, and social discourse.
The instructor will serve as a facilitator, guide and resource provider. Participants will be agents of change
in their own learning. The spirit of collaboration and cooperation will underpin all class interaction. This
class is entirely online and has no scheduled meetings. Optional Lync or Adobe Connect videoconferencing might be scheduled at a time that’s convenient for most participants. Two learning systems
are integrated into this course: Blackboard for learning modules and Edmodo for learning interaction.
Please check both sites regularly.
Special Note
Projects: If you are an expert in any topic proposed in this course and if you are interested in advancing
your skills in another area, you can propose a different project with the instructor’s consent. If you wish to
substitute more appropriate class assignments or propose an alternative project, please inform the
instructor.
Incomplete Policy
The mark of I is used if the student has not completed the work of the course, has good reason for delay,
and has made arrangements with the instructor before the date grades for the course are due to be
submitted. Ordinarily, good reason will involve matters not wholly within control of the student, such as
illness. The mark may not be used to allow a student to improve a grade by additional work over and
above that ordinarily expected for the course or by repetition of work already submitted to the
instructor. The mark of I should not be used without prior arrangement between instructor and student.
Holistic Rubric
Each assignment has a rubric listed in the modules in Blackboard. Assignments that do not have a rubric
or check list are evaluated holistically using the following criteria:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Relevance to meeting the needs of learners.
Accuracy of information, clarity and organization.
Application of literature base, Internet, text, and course content.
Evidence of critical and creative thought.
Usability.

Course Requirements and Workload
Participating in class activities and dialogues is required. Rigorous and active engagement is necessary for
all learners throughout their course of study. Assignments are given to support the learning within the
course and should be completed on time. As learners of integrative technology you are required to use
technology via the web as well as build a learning community network with your collaborative partners in
this course. This is an intensive online course. You are expected to spend 8 to 10 hours a week in reading,
searching, online discussion, and project completion. Check your UST email every day.
Use of Technology for Instruction

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Computer System Requirements
You should have access to computers that meet the following specifications. A microphone headset is required for
projects and optional synchronous webinar.
Hardware \
Platform

Apple Macintosh

Microsoft Windows

Recommended

Recommended

Operating System

OS 10.5 and higher

Windows XP/2000/Vista/7

Processor
Speed/Type

1 GHz PowerPC G4 processor, or
better

1 GHz Intel Pentium III processor, or
equivalent/better

CPU Memory

1 GB of RAM

1 GB of RAM

Monitor
Resolution

1024 x 768

1024 x 768

Internet
Connection

Any high-speed connection (e.g. Cable
Broadband or DSL)

Any high-speed connection (e.g. Cable
Broadband or DSL)

Hard Disk Space

500 MB or greater

500 MB or greater

Software requirements
All software programs required for this course are available in the UST Minneapolis campus computer lab.
If you choose not to complete your work at school, you need to have access to the following software
programs:
1. PowerPoint: part of the Microsoft Office program for both Mac and PC. Mac users can use
Keynote or Google Presentation as an alternative. Files need to be saved in .PPT format.
2. Internet Explorer or Firefox for PC. Mozilla Firefox or Safari for Mac users. Firefox can be
downloaded from http://www.mozilla.org/
3. QuickTime Player: Free download from http://apple.com/quicktime/
4. Acrobat Reader: Free download from, http://get.adobe.com/reader/
5. Flash video player, http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/
6. Google Account. Create a gmail account via http://mail.google.com.
7. Edmodo account: Create a student account to join the class using the group coded provided in the
syllabus (page one). https://edmodo.com
8. Other optional programs as specified in Blackboard modules
Discussion Board Netiquette
As a good netizen (a.k.a cybercitizen), please follow the etiquette for online discussion. The instructor will
serve as a facilitator for discussion and may not respond to all postings.
1. Treat other people as you would yourself be treated.
2. You are entitled to express your opinion.
3. You are expected to learn and to teach.
Use of Technology for Instruction

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4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

You have a right to disagree and to respond.
It is your privilege to change your mind or remain silent.
Show respect to each other’s postings
Do not use offensive language/images or launch personal attack.
Read what everyone has responded to avoid repeated comments.
Post under the appropriate thread or forum and before due dates.
Cite your reference (do not plagiarize).

ADA accommodations
Classroom accommodations will be provided for qualified students with documented disabilities. Students
are invited to contact the Enhancement Program – Disability Services about accommodations for this
course. Telephone appointments are available to students as needed. Appointments can be made by calling
651-962-6315 or 800-328-6819, extension 6315. You may also make an appointment in person in
O’Shaughnessy Educational Center, room 119. For further information, you can locate the Enhancement
Program on the web at http://www.stthomas.edu/enhancementprog/.
Mission Statement of the School of Education, University of St. Thomas
Inspired by Catholic intellectual tradition, the mission of the School of Education is to educate practitioners to
be morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely and work skillfully to advance the common good.
Incomplete Policy
The mark of I is used if the student has not completed the work of the course, has good reason for delay,
and has made arrangements with the instructor before the date grades for the course are due to be
submitted. Ordinarily, good reason will involve matters not wholly within control of the student, such as
illness. The mark may not be used to allow a student to improve a grade by additional work over and
above that ordinarily expected for the course or by repetition of work already submitted to the
instructor. The mark of I should not be used without prior arrangement between instructor and student.

Use of Technology for Instruction

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Assignment Due Dates
Modules

Completion
Date

Curriculum
Upgrade Due

Block One Technology Foundation and Framework
Module 1 Getting Started: Orientation to the course
(3/14-22)

3/22

N. A.

Module 2 Community of practice via social networks
(3/14-22)
Module 3 Theory into practice (3/14-22)

3/22

N. A.

3/22

N. A.

Module 4 Google Drive for collaboration (3/23-29)

3/29

4/5

Module 5 ISTE NETS: Technology standards and
curriculum planning (3/23-29)
Module 6 Portfolio for life-long learning (3/30-4/5)

3/29

N. A.

4/5 (portfolio
site)

5/3 (complete
portfolio)

Module 7 Project-based learning (3/30-4/5)

4/26

Block Two: Curriculum Applications and Upgrade
Module 8 Concept mapping as Mind Tools (4/6-12)

4/12

4/19

Module 9 Flipped Classroom and Instructional webcast
(4/6-12)
Module 10 One-to-one learning with mobile devices
(4/13-19)

4/12

4/19

4/19

4/26

Block 3: Implication and Future Trends
Module 11 Game-based learning (4/13-19)

4/19

N. A.

Module 12 Copyright and Fair Use Guidelines (4/20-26)

4/26

N. A.

Project Development and Completion.
Complete all peer comments.

5/3

N. A.

Use of Technology for Instruction

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Knowledge Base
The following list of professional literature represents current thinking in the field of technology integration into the
classroom:
A. Tools, Trends, and Development
Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012) Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. ISTE.
Livingston, P. (2009). 1-to-1 learning Laptop Programs That Work (2nd ed.). ISTE.
Marcovitz, D. (2012). Digital connections in the classroom. ISTE.
Richardson, W. (2010). Blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other powerful Web tools for classrooms.
Tucker, C. R. (2012). Blended learning in grades 4-12: Leveraging the power of technology to create studentcentered classrooms. Corwin.
• Schrum, L. & Levin, B. (2009). Leading 21st-Century Schools: Harnessing Technology for Engaging and
Achievement.
B. Educational Technology Theories and Practice








Jonassen, D. H., Howland, J., Moore, J., & Marra, R. M. (2007). Meaningful learning with technology.
Upper Saddle river, NJ: Merrill Prentice Hall.



M Lever-Duffy, J. & McDonald Jean, B.(2008). Chapter 1: Theoretical Foundations. In Teaching and learning
with technology (pp. 2-31). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc.
Roblyer, M. D. (2006). Chapter 2: Foundations of effective technology integration models: Theory and
Practice. In Integrating educational technology into teaching (pp. 33-70). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson
Education, Inc.
Sprague, D., & Dede, C. (1999). Constructivism in the Classroom: If I teach this way, am I doing my job?
Learning and Leading with Technology, 27(1), 6-9, 16-17.
Boss, S., Krauss, J., & Conery, L. (2008). Reinventing Project-Based Learning: Your Field Guide to Real-World Projects in
the Digital Age Eugene, Oregon: International Society for Technology in Education.
Moursund, D. (2003). Project-based learning: Using information technology. Eugene, Oregon: International Society for
Technology in Education.







C. ISTE Technology Standards
• ISTE (2000). National educational technology standards for teachers and students: Connecting curriculum and
technology. International Society for Technology in Education and the U.S. Department of Education.
http://cnets.iste.org/
• Roblyer, M. D. (2003). Getting Our NETS Worth: The role of ISTE's National Educational Technology
Standards. Learning and Leading with Technology, 30(8), 6-13.
• ISTE (2013) ISTE Connected Word: ISTE 2013 Full Length Session Videos. Retrieved from
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6aVN_9hcQEFDH57WbT4sY8xQ6Mpp5kbO
D. Concept Mapping, Mindtools, Presentation, and Spreadsheet Software
Jonassen, D. H. (2000). Chapter 2 Engaging critical thinking: The goal of mindtools. In Computers as
mindtools for school engaging critical thinking (pp. 21-32.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Merrill.
• Ezell, B., Johnson, D., & Rice, M. (2006-2007). Creating interactive excel learning tools. Learning and
Leading with Technology, 34(4), 29-37.
• Owen, A. (2002). Mapping student minds. Learning and Leading with Technology, 29(7), 6-9, 26.
E. Electronic Portfolio






Barrett, H. C. (2001). Electronic portfolio - A chapter in Educational Technology: An encyclopedia to be published by
ABC-CLIO, 2001. Retrieved January 4, 2004, from
http://electronicportfolios.org/portfolios/encyclopediaentry.htm
Dr. Helen Barrett’s Electronic Portfolio, http://electronicportfolios.com/

Use of Technology for Instruction

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F. Copyright and Fair Use


Johnson, D., & Simpson, C. (2005). Are you the copy cop? . Learning and Leading with Technology, 32(7),
14-20.



Langran, E., Langran, R., & Bull, G. (2005). Copyright law and technology. Learning and Leading with
Technology, 32(7), 24-26.



Thompson, K. A. (2005). Copyright 101. Learning and Leading with Technology, 32(7), 10-12.

G. Educational Technology Journals and Magazines



Learning and Leading with Technology, paid subscription, retrievable from UST Library full-text databases,
http://www.iste.org/
Edutopia, free subscription to ideas of technological innovation in education, http://www.edutopia.org

H. Game-based learning











Your Brain On Games (2012) http://www.ted.com/talks/daphne_bavelier_your_brain_on_video_games.html
Infographics on Video Game Industry Statistics : http://infographiclist.com/2013/02/20/video-gameindustry-statistics-infographic-2/
Abbott, A. (2013). Gaming improves multitasking skills. 1 :
http://www.nature.com/polopoly_fs/1.13674%21/menu/main/topColumns/topLeftColumn/pdf/501018
a.pdf
Neurology of Gaming: http://www.onlineuniversities.com/neurology-of-gaming
Steinkuehler, C. & Squire, K. (in press). Videogames and Learning. 19:
https://d396qusza40orc.cloudfront.net/videogameslearning%2Freadings%2Fvideogames-and-learning.pdf
Gaming in the Classroom : http://infographiclist.com/2012/10/28/gaming-in-the-classroom-infographic/
Squire, K. D (2011). Chapter 10, The future of games and learning:
https://d396qusza40orc.cloudfront.net/videogameslearning%2Freadings%2Ffuture-of-games-andlearning.pdf
Do educational video games actually work?:
http://www.socialtimes.com/files/2012/10/eduvideogames.jpeg?red=an

I. Mobile learning and flipped classroom
• Alberta Education. (2012). iPads: What are we learning? Summary report of provincial data gathering day October 3, 2011, from http://education.alberta.ca/admin/technology/research.aspx









Brunsell, E., & Horejsi, M. (2013). A flipped classroom in action. The Science Teacher, 80, 8. Retrieved from
http://go.galegroup.com.ezproxy.stthomas.edu/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CA320439386&v=2.1&u=clic_sttho
mas&it=r&p=ITOF&sw=w&asid=de01bbe0bf57d989629e2b6508e4c06b
Conn, C. (2012). Managing and maximizing a class set of iPads. Learning and Leading with Technology, 39(8), 32-33.
Cooper, K. J. (2012). An ipad education? Diverse Issues in Higher Education, 29(3), 10-11.
Falloon, G. (2013). Young students using iPads: App design and content influences on their learning
pathways. Computers & Education, 68(0), 505-521.
Gliksman, S. (2011). What do Students Think of Using iPads in Class? Pilot Survey Results Retrieved Jan.
18, 2012, from http://ipadeducators.ning.com/profiles/blogs/what-do-students-think-of.
Harmon, J. (2012). Unlock literacy with iPads. Learning and Leading with Technology, 39(8), 30-31.
Hatten, S. H. (2012). iPod implementation in the elementary grades. Learning and Leading with Technology, 39(7), 3031.

Use of Technology for Instruction

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Ifenthaler, D., & Schweinbenz, V. (2013). The acceptance of tablet-PCs in classroom instruction: The
teachers’ perspectives. Computers in Human Behavior, 29(3), 525-534.
doi:http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.stthomas.edu/10.1016/j.chb.2012.11.004
Karsenti, T., &Fiévez, A. (2013). The iPad in education: Uses, benefits and challenges. A survey of 6057
students and 302 teachers in Quebec, Canada. Montreal, QC: CRIFPE.
McQuiggan, S., McQuiggan, J., Sabourin, J., & Kosturko, L. (2015). Mobile learning: A handbook for
developers, educators, and learners. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

Faculty Biography

Chientzu Candace Chou, Ph.D.
Department of Organization Learning and Development
School of Education
College of Applied Professional Studies
University of St. Thomas
[email protected]

C. Candace Chou is an associate professor of Learning Technology at the University of St. Thomas in
Minnesota. She has been designing and implementing online and blended learning for more than a
decade. She is the academic coordinator for the E-Learning Graduate Certificate, K-12 Learning
Technology Certificate, and Master of Arts in Technology for Learning, Development, and Change
programs. She teaches courses on Adult Learning, Instructional Design for E-Learning, Online
Teaching and Evaluation, Introduction to Technology Tools and Effective Learning, Immersive learning
Through Virtual Worlds, and Web-based Curriculum Design. She served on the University Online
Learning Task Force and Technology Advisory Committee to provide policy suggestions on online
learning and technology integration. Her main research interests include design of distance learning
environments, strategies of blended learning, pedagogy of immersive learning and emerging
technologies, and online interactions. She has more than 30 publications in journals, book chapters, and
conference proceedings. She is a regular speaker at local, national and international conferences.
Candace is a native of Taiwan. She received her doctoral degree in Communication and Information
Sciences from the University of Hawaii at Manoa. She is a member of International Society for
Performance Improvement, American Educational Research Association, Association for Educational
Communication and Technology, Digital Learning Forum, Professional Association for Computer
Training, and International Society for Technology in Education.

Use of Technology for Instruction

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