Analysis for Financial Management

Published on May 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 44 | Comments: 0 | Views: 368
of 17
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Course guide for the analysis for financial management.useful book for finance majors.

Comments

Content

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Analysis for financial management (Robert C. Higgins) 
Summary of the used chapters in the lecture (WM0609LR) 
Written by: Joris Van Gestel 

 

Chapter 1 Interpreting financial statements 
Accounting
Information provided by 3 annual reports:
Balance Sheet
Cash-Flow statement
Income statement

 
Figure 1 Cash flow­production cycle 

(Operating) working capital: movement of cash into inventory 
Investment: flow from cash into new fixed assets 
Depreciation: the loss in value of fixed assets ⇒ increase in value of merchandise made + needed for 
growth 
Solvency: ability to have cash to buy fixed assets and inventory (outflow cash) 

Financial statements: Balance sheet

The balance sheet 
Equity= assets - liabilities
current assets

current liabilities
cash

!

inventories

!

acc receivable

!

equipment

!

plant

!

accounts payable !

fixed assets

long-term liabilities
long-term debt

!

total shareholders equity
stock

!

retained earnings !

total assets

x

total liabilities + equity

x

Figure 2 example of a balance sheet 

 

Financial snapshot: 1 moment in time 
Assets against the claims 
 
Liability: obligation to deliver something of value in the future 
Equity: difference between assets and liabilities 
Liquidity: speed at which an item can be turned into cash 
  Accounting: income statement
Assets and liabilities are listed in order of decreasing liquidity 
‐ Current: liquidity < 1 year 
Net sales
‐ of Long­term: liquidity >1 year 
-Costs
sales
Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation, Amortization (EBITDA)
-Depreciation, Amortization
Earnings Before Interest and Taxes (EBIT)
-Interest
Earnings before taxes (EBT)
-Taxes
Net income
-Dividends
Addition to retained earnings



 

Income statement 
 
Difference between 2 important balance sheets 
‐  Change  in  owner’s  equity  in  terms  of  revenues  (sales)  and  expenses  (costs)  ⇒  net  income 
(earnings, profits) 
‐ Commonly divided in operating and non operating segment 
Some different aspects of earnings 
‐ Accrual  accounting:  revenue  is  recognised  as  soon  as  the  effort  required  to  generate  the 
sale is complete + certain of sale ⇒ lag between generation of revenue and receipt of cash 
‐ Depreciation: costs for (ex buildings) are spread over the years ⇒ period defined by useful 
life, salvage value, method of allocation to be employed 
o




Straight line ⇒

cos t total − salvationvalue
 
lifetime

o Accelerated ⇒ more depreciation in the early years an less later on 
Taxes:  sometimes  firms  use  different  income  statements  for  the  tax  and  for  the  public 
shareholders 
o Taxes differ from the provisioned (higher/lower) 
o Can  be  used  to  shift  tax  payments  to  later  years  to  use  the  finances  in  the 
business 
Research and development (R&D) ⇒ difficult to estimate the payoff 
o The cost have to be listed as an operating cost (united states) 

Sources and Uses statements 
 

Is not the same as income statement because ⇒ accruals, lists only cash flow associated with sale of 
goods with in the accounting period 
 
‐ 2 balance sheets of a different date and note all the changes in account 
‐ Segregate the changes into generated and consumed cash 
o Generate: reducing assets, increasing liabilities 
o Consume: increase assets, reduce liabilities 
Cash can also come from loans (long term debt) or the retention of profits earned through the year 
Cash flow statement 
 
Difference between 2 important balance sheets 
Provides a detailed look at changes in the cash balance 
Cash provided or consumed by: rearranges sources and uses into these three categories 
‐ Operating: 
o Non cash charges: amortisation, depreciation 
o Changes in current assets, liabilities 
‐ Investing 
‐ Financing 
 
Cash flow 
‐ Net: net income + Noncash items 
‐ From operating activities: net cash flow +/‐ changes in assts and liabilities 
‐ Free:  total  cash  available  for  distribution  to  owners  and  creditors  after  funding  investing 
activities 
‐ Discounted: sum of money having the same value ⇒ receipt and disbursements 
All this info can be found in the income statement and the balance sheet but ⇒ 
‐ Better understanding for the non‐experienced and the ones against accrual accounting 
‐ More accurate info about taxes and securizations 
‐ Light on the firm’s solvency (generating/consuming) 


 

Financial statement and the value problem 
 

Market value Vs book value 
 
A company is never worth its book value 
‐ An  asset  purchased  in  1950  can  be  worth  less  or  more  on  this  moment  (land  (more), 
technology (less)) 
o Problem: values of things in the present are subjective 
 “Accountants prefer to be precisely wrong rather than vaguely right” 
 Regulators: fair value accounting: some assets and liabilities must appear 
at their market price instead of the historical 
‐ Equity investors buy shares for the future income they hope to receive and not for the value 
of the assets 
o Problem: accountant measure of shareholders equity h  as  little  relation  with 
future income 
 Accountants numbers look back and are cost based 
 Companies  often  have  assets/liabilities  that  do  not  occur  on  the  balance 
sheet  but  affect  the  future  income  nonetheless  (patents,  trademarks,  loyal 
customers,  lawsuits,  bad/good  management,  technology)  ⇒  book  value 
inaccurate 
 More accurate ⇒ value =# shares ⋅ value  
 Goodwill:    buy  a  company  for  more  as  the  book  value  ⇒  book  value  in 
assets, the rest in the asset goodwill 
 
Economic income Vs accounting income 
 
The problem here lies in the distinction between realised and unrealized income 
The accountant only recognises realized gains/losses⇒ assets that increase are gains on paper (it can 
fluctuate) 
 
Imputed costs 
 
Equity  capital  also  has  cost  (investors  expect  a  return)  but  these  do  not  appear  on  the  income 
statement⇒because there is no paper that says how much the company has to pay this cost must be 
estimated (imputed)  
 
The  economist  would  subtract  these  cost  but  an  accountant  does  not,  the  difference  is  important 
because many decisions are based on the numbers in the income statement: wages, bonuses, etc 



 

Chapter 2. Evaluating financial performance 
 

Return on equity 
 

Most  popular  tool  to  evaluate  financial  performance  ⇒  it  is  a  measurement  of  efficiency⇒

 

earnings
 
investedDOLLAR
NETincome
 Is the basic formula but can be redefined as  
shareholdersEQUITY

ROE =
 

NETincome Sales
Assets


Sales
Assets shareholdersEquity

ROE =

 

ROE = PROFITm argin ⋅ ASSETturnover ⋅ FINANCIALleverage
 
Profit margin: earnings out of every dollar of sale 
 
NETincome
‐ Return on assets  ROA =
 
Assets
GROSSprofits
‐ Gross margin: 
⇒  used to find out the fixed and the variable costs 
Sales
 
Asset turnover: sales generated for every dollar of assets employed 
 

Low: assets intensive industry 

cos tgoodssold
 
Inventory ending

Inventory turnover: 

Collection  period:  shows  the  company’s  management  of  accounts  receivable  ⇒  average  time  lag 
between sale and cash  
 
 

 

 

 

 
Days’ sales in cash:    

account recievable
 
creditsale day
cash + sec urities
 
sales day

 
The optimal ratio is different for every company and depends on the necessary liquidity 
Payables Period: 

 

accountspayable
 
purchasescredit day

 
Control ratio for liability ⇒ period to accounts payable 
Fixed­Asset turnover: 

Sales
 with net property = plant, equipment 
netproperty

 
Especially important for companies with capital intensive (= operating leverage) businesses (cars, etc) 
⇒Sensitive to the state of the economy 
 


 
Financial leverage: amount of equity used to finance the assets 




Not necessary max: find a balance between the benefits and costs of debt financing 
Ideal leverage depends on the nature of company’s business and the assets 
⇒ Stable/predictable cash flow⇒high financial leverage 
Inversely  related  with  ROA⇒  safe,  stable,  liquid  investment=low  returns  +big  borrowing 
capacity 

 
Measures of financial leverage:  


Debt  to  assets  ratio:
creditors 



Debt to equity ratio:

liabilitiestotal
⇒percentage  of  the  assets’  book  value  that  comes  from 
assetstotal
liabilitiestotal
⇒percentage by the creditors for every dollar of equity 
equity shareholders

 
Coverage ratios: used to calculate the burden of the debt on the cash flow  
(EBIT=earnings before interest and taxes) 
 


 Time interest:
o



EBIT
 
expenseint erest

⇒Too liberal: assumes the company will roll over all its obligation as they mature 

Time burden covered:
o
o

EBIT
 
int erest + (repayment principal 1− taxrate)

⇒ Too conservative: assumes the company to pay the loans down to zero 
Best high for companies with high financial risks and low when ready access to cash 

 
Market  value  leverage  ratios:  market  value  ratio  are  superior  to  book  value  ratio  because  book 
values are often irrelevant and market values  are  based  on investors expectations about future  cash 
flows. 
⇒Helpful  when  assessing  financial  leverage  of  rapidly  growing  start‐up  businesses,  because  lenders 
will credit companies when they believe that they will be able to service the debts but don’t have a bad 
coverage ratio. 
 


debt marketvalue
debt marketvalue
 and 
 
equity marketvalue
assetsmarketvalue

Risks: ignore roll over risks (pay the debts not by promising future cash) 
 
Liquidity  ratios:  determinant  of  company’s  debt  capacity  is  liquidity  of  its  assets  (⇒maturing 
mismatching= liabilities come due before they generate enough cash), measures of liquidity are 



assetscurrent
 
liabilitiescurrent
assetscurrent − inventory
Acid test:
 
liabilitiescurrent
Current ratio:

⇒Rather crude measures because:  
‐ Rolling over obligation involves no insolvency risk 
‐ Cash  generated  can’t  be  used  to  reduce  liabilities  because  it  must  be  used  to  support 
continued operations 



 

Problems of the ROE 
 
Timing problem: ROE looks at the past and one periodic when for good business it is needed to look 
forward 
⇒Ex high start up cost for a very good product will let the ROE fall 
 
Risk  problem:  the  ROE  doesn’t  say  anything  about  how  much  risk  the  company  needed  to  take  to 
generate the ROE 
 
Return on invested capital (ROIC): 
‐ Used to avoid the distortion of leverage on ROE an ROA 


ROIC =

EBIT ⋅ (1− taxrate)
 
debt int erestbearing + equity

‐ Is the rate of return earned on the total capital invested 
 
Value problem 
‐ The  ROE  is  calculated  on  the  book  value  of  shareholders  equity  ⇒market  value  of  the 
equity is much higher⇒needed: high ROE + unknown to other investors 


earning
incomenet
share  
=
Earnings yield:
shareholdersequity marketvalue earning
share
o

⇒Is  no  good  solution  because  the  stock  price  is  dependent  on  investors 
expectation⇒high expectation=high stock price⇒low earning yield 

price



P/E ratio:
o
o
o

share  
earnings
share

Price  of  one  dollar  of  earnings⇒used  to  normalise  stock  prices  for  different  earnings 
levels 
Rises with improved earnings and lowers with increasing risks 
Gives a good image of what investors believe for the future 

 
Market price problems: stock price as a performance measure 
‐ Difficulty of specifying how operating decision affect stock price 
‐ Managers  now  more  about  the  company  then  external  investors⇒why  should  managers 
consider the assessments of less informed investors 
‐ Stock price is also dependent on factors out of the control of the company (ex. improving 
economy)  

Ratio analysis 
 



Strategies 




If used properly can reveal a lot about the company 
No automatically insight in complex companies⇒they are more a clue 
There is no single correct value for a ratio⇒depends on the perspective of the analyst 
Compare to rules of thumb 
Compare to industry averages (sometimes there are good reasons to differ) 
Look at changes in time (most useful) 



 

Chapter 4 managing growth 
 

Sustainable growth 
 

Growth is not always a good thing because growth needs resources (financial) 
 
Sustainable  growth  rate:  the  max  rate  of  which  a  company  can  increase  sales  without  depleting  the 
financial resources 
 
Typical life cycle of a successful company 
• Losses: research, developing, foothold on the market 
• Rapid growth: growth is so fast external investments are needed 
• Maturity:  decline  in  growth,  no  outside  investment⇒generating  more  cash  then  can  be 
invested 
• Decline: declining sales, marginally profitable 
 
Growth phase 
The growth rate is limited by the growth of owners’ equity (sustainable) 
 

g* =
g* =

equity change
equity bop

[bop = beginning ! of ! period]

R " earnings
[R = retention ! rate]
equity bop

g* = R " ROE bop
g* = R " profit m arg in " asset turnover " assets ! to ! equity ratio  
 
If a company increases sales at a other rate then g* some of the ratios must change 
 
Balanced growth 
g* = R ⋅ (assets − to − equity ratio ) ⋅ ROA ⇒ Growth depends on return on assets 

 

What to do when actual growth exceeds sustainable growth 
 

Check how long this will continue 
• Short: additional loaning for the transition to mature (absorbing⇒generating financing) 
• Long‐term: 
o  Sell new equity: solves everything but equities don’t sell easily (illiquid, minor owner) 
o Increase financial leverage:  
o Reduce dividend: 
o Profitable pruning: no spreading of resources over more markets 
o Outsource: releases assets, increases asset turnover 
o Increase prices: reduces growth 
o Merge: 
 
Product diversification: 
• Less risks but not good for the shareholders who can diversificate by buying different stock 
• Spreading of resources: followers in many markets less as leading in one market 


 

To little growth 
 

Have the problem not knowing what to do with the money⇒inefficient 
Check how long this will continue 
• Short term: accumulate cash for future growth 
• Long term 
o Ignore the problem: this attracts raiders (hostile buyers)⇒will redeploy the resources  
o Return money to the shareholders: repurchasing shares or raising the dividend 
o Buy growth 
 
Growth comes from increasing volume and rising prices  
The inflation⇒rise in assets and accounts receivable ⇒ worsens the growth problems  
• Increases amount of external financing 
• Increase debt to equity ratio 
 

New equity financing 
 
Corporations don’t use equity as a source but just cash 
 
Why don’t US corporations issue more equity? 
• No need ⇒borrowing and retained profits were enough 
• Expensive to issue (5‐10% of the raised amount⇒2 times the cost for debt) 
• Managers are fixated on earnings per share (EPS) ⇒new equity lowers EPS 
• Companies almost always think there undervalued 
• Stock market is a unreliable funding source 



 

Chapter 5 financial Instruments and markets 
 
Financial security:  
• A piece of paper of paper that investors get from the companies with the nature of their claim 
on future cash flow 
• This paper can be traded on financial markets. 
• Must be designed to be attractive to investors + meets the demands of the company 

Financial instruments 
 
Companies are relatively free to design their own securities like they want ⇒ only real regulation is 
that the consumer needs to get all the info relevant to value the security. 

 
Bonds 
 


















Is a fixed income security ⇒ holder receives a specified interest and maturity 
Usually in small amounts ($1000) 
Largest source of external financing (34%) 
Variables 
o Par value: amount of money the holder will receive on the bond’s maturity date 
o Coupon rate: % of the par value the issuer promises to pay as annual interest income 
o Maturity date: company will pay the par value and stop paying interest 
Companies try to make the initial market price of the bonds equal to its par value 
After issue the bond’s market price can differ (different interest and credit risk) 
o Interest rises ⇒ bond prices fall 
Sinkin fund: repayments to creditors to reduce principal 
o Retire bonds or repurchase market securities 
Floating rate: interest is tied to a short term interest rate 
Call provisions 
o Company has the option to retire the bond earlier (mostly with a premium) 
o Delayed call: issuer can’t call before a specified period (5‐10 years) 
o If interest rate falls ⇒ retire and resell a lower interest rate 
o Changing market conditions ⇒ rearrange the capital structure 
Covenants: specified in the indenture agreement ⇒typically sets lower limit for current ratio 
and  upper  limit  for  debt‐to‐equity  ratio  (sometimes  forbids  to  sell/buy  major  assets  without 
approval)⇒company  fails  (default):  bankruptcy  or  liquidation:  sale  of  assets  to  meet  the 
claims 
Rights  of  liquidation:  distribution  of  the  money  (rights  of  absolute  priority)⇒  government 
(due taxes), senior creditors, general creditors, subordinated creditors, stock and shareholders 
Secured  creditor  (mortage,  hypotheek  in  Dutch):  loan  collateralized  with  a  specific  asset 
⇒on liquidation money of sale of this assets go to this creditor 
Bonds are vulnerable to inflation ⇒ interest is the same but value decreases 
Bond  rating:  bonds  are  rated  by  companies  with  a  letter  grade,  these  grades  are  important 
because  with  good  grades  the  companies  need  to  offer  a  smaller  interest  rate.⇒Bad  ratings 
have a high interest but also higher risk 

10 

 
Common stock 
 








 

Residual income security: 
Stockholder has a claim on any income remaining after payment of al the obligations (incl. debt 
interest) 
Highest benefits when the company prospers but also highest loss when things go bad 
Amount of money they receive depends on the dividends (choice of the company) 
Shareholders control: the shareholders own the company (in theory) ⇒ when there is no 
dominant shareholder, management controls the board (particularly in US and UK) 
o Management can’t ignore the shareholders because this would be bad performance 
⇒low stock price⇒maybe hostile take‐overs 
o Security markets ⇒needs to be attractive to raise debt or equity capital 
anualincome = d1 + p1 − p0  With d1 = dividend, p0, p1 are beginning/end of year value of the 
stock 

d1 d1 − d0
+
 
p0
p0



annualreturn =



The difference between bonds is an additional percentage (premium) for the risk bared 

Preferred stock 
 





Is a hybrid security: debt/equity 
o Debt: fixed income: annual dividend ⇒coupon rate 
o Equity: may choose not to pay these dividend, not a deductable expense, no maturity 
Have priority over common stock for dividends 
o Common don’t get dividends before the preferred are fully paid 
o Cumulative: if the dividend is passed ⇒ no dividend until fully paid the preferred stock 
Sometimes more control in big decisions 
Can be seen as cheap equity or debt with a tax disadvantage 

Financial markets 
 
Financial markets: are the channels through which investors provide money to companies 

Private equity financing 

 
Strategic investors: make significant equity investments in start‐ups 
• Gain access to promising new products and technology 
• Outsourcing research and development 
 
Venture capitalists: wealthy individuals or professional venture capital companies (private equity 
firms) 
• Buy a significant fraction of a company and take an active role in the management 
• Liquidate the investment in 5‐6 years 
• Very high risks but also very high profits 
• Unusual organisation: private equity partnership 
o General partner raises a pool of money from investors, pension funds, insurance, etc 
o Invest and manages ⇒ liquidates and returns to the investors 
o Firm charges percentage of the original capital and around 20% of the earnings 
• Addresses several problem of conventional investment 
o Minimise differences between management and owners ⇒create value for the owners 
o Aggressive buy‐fix‐sell attitude ⇒management has to take decisive action 
11 

 
Initial public offerings 

 
Initial public offering (IPO): creating a public market for common stock 
• Creates liquidity for growth and for existing owners 
• Investment banking: 
o Proposals of investment banks (how to sell)⇒winner= managing underwriter 
o Road show: top executives go and market the issue in financial centres 
o Selling syndicate and underwriting syndicate: short joining of investment banks 
 Selling: each member sells predefined amount of securities 
 Underwriting: buy all the securities at a fixed price and try to sell them at a 
higher price 

Seasoned issues 
 
Shelf registration: allow frequent security issuers to avoid cumbersome traditional registration by 
filing a general‐purpose registration 
• Ready for use when needed (no time lag between decision and issue) 
• High likelihood of bidding between investment banks ⇒ issue cost 10‐50% lower as 
traditional 
 
International markets: whenever the currency employed is outside of the control of the issuing 
monetary authority ⇒ ex. Dollar loan to an American company in London 
• Minimal reporting and regulatory requirements, very competitive prices 
o Absence of reserve requirements on international bank deposits 
o Possibility to issue bonds in bearer form= unregistered owners, lower coupon rate but 
same after tax return (illegal in US⇒tax avoidance) 
 
Issue costs: costs the issuer and its shareholder incur on initial sale 
• Privately negotiated transaction ⇒fee charged by the investment banker 
• Public: legal, accounting, printing fees, managing underwriter 
o Underwriter: spread fee per share he sold ⇒split between syndicate and underwriter 
 Offer under the market price ⇒ easier to sell to less informed outsiders 
• Equity is more costly then debt  
o 11% for IPO, 7.1% for public sold, 3.8% bonds 
o Cost rise when issue size decreases 

Efficient markets 
 
Important in raising new capital is timing⇒sell when prices are high⇒predictions future price trends 
in financial markets 
Market  efficiency  is  controversial  because  many  companies  overstate  the  evidence  supporting 
efficiency and misrepresent its implications.⇒ Not black and white but shades of grey 
 
Efficient market: is a market in which the prices adjust rapidly to new info and prices reflect fully the 
available info about the assets traded 
• Weak‐form: current prices reflect all the info about past prices 
• Semistrong‐form: current price fully reflect all the publicly available info 
• Strong‐form: current price reflect all info (public and private) 

12 

 
Implications of efficiency 
 
• Publicly available info is not helpful 
• Absence of private⇒best forecast is the current price (trend) 
• Without private info a company can not improve terms to sell by timing 
• Without private info/accept high risks ⇒no earning above market average return 
Solution is making an information gathering system or get inside info (illegal?), buy a forecast of a firm 

Forward contracts, options and the management of corporate risks 
 
Forwards and options are a class of securities: derivatives: value depends on underlying assets 
• Used to control risks of volatile exchange rates, interests rates and commodity prices 
• Must be very careful ⇒can loose a lot of money to 

Forward markets 
 
Forward market: the price is set today but exchange happens on a future date (ex reserving a room) 
Speculating: ex. Selling euros when the euro has a high value then wait a while and buy them again 
when price is lower 
 
This can results on transactions with euro’s to a US company so they can sell the same amount in 
euro’s for dollars so the effect of a fall is hedged for a future drop of the euro (forward market hedge) 
⇒ is convenient to put in the right number in accounts receivable 
 
Options: a security entitling the holder to either buy or sell the asset at a predefined price/time 
• Put option: right to sell at a predefined price 
• Call option: right to buy at a predefined price 
• Premium: amount you pay for the option 
• Maturity date: date option expires 
• Can be used to hedge the effects of the exchange rate by buying put options 
 
Limitations of hedging 
• Asset creating the risk must trade in financial markets 
• Amount and timing of the foreign cash needs to be known with reasonable certainty 
o This is a problem when it is an operating cash flow 
 Hedge an unknown amount 

13 

 

Chapter 6 the financing decision 
 
Financing decision 
• Decide how much capital is required: estimate sales growth, assets needed, available money 
• Instrument to be sold ⇒ risk, inability to sell, excessive costs if wrong choice was made 
• Focus should be on supporting the business strategy (acquiring/deploying assets) 
• Take into account the effect on the future ability to raise money 

Financial leverage 
 
Financial leverage: device increases owners expected return at the cost of greater risk 
• Increase the debt financing ⇒interest expenses 
• Way to vary the way they finance ⇒debt‐equity ratio 
• Debt reduces variable costs + increases fixed costs⇒after breakeven income will rise more 


ROE = ROIC + ( ROIC − i') ⋅

Debt int eres

Equity bookvalue  With i’ after tax interest rate 

o ROIC is the return a company earns before the financial leverage 
o Improves financial performance when business is going well and vice versa 
Example p203‐210 


 
Bond financing: lower tax bill⇒interest tax shield 
Common stock: higher earnings after tax 
To make a decision a range of earnings need to be made (plot EBIT‐EPS) 

How much to borrow 
 
Purpose should be to increase the shareholders value 
• Increase value the shareholders attach to the operating cash flow (absolute by M&M) 
• Increase the level of cash flow 
 
Irrelevance by Franco Modigliani and Merton Miller (M&M) 
• When cash flow is constant the amount of debt has no effect on the value⇒no concern in 
value‐maximizing 
• Increased risk precisely offsets the increased return 
• Physical assets produce value⇒ no increase in cash flow produced no increased value 
• Concl: financial choice should be the one that maximizes the cash flow 

14 

 
5­factor model to change the cash flow 
• Tax benefits: debt financing increases the tax benefit⇒increases cash flow 
• Distress costs: various costs a company incurs when it has to much debt capital 
o Bankruptcy:  P (banktruptcy ) ⋅ cos ts , bankruptcy doesn’t necessarily mean liquidation 
but the risk is very high and depends on the resale value of some assets 
o Indirect costs: increase as the chance of bankruptcy rises and can reinforce the chance 
of bankruptcy  
 Internal: conserve cash by cutting R&D, marketing (lost profit opportunities) 
 External: costumers are concerned + higher financing cost by worried investors 
+ concurrent would try to kill you by making a price war 
o Conflicts of interest: various parties in the company worry about themselves⇒ owners 
have nothing to loose but creditors do 
• Flexibility: if the debt capacity is reached further financing needs to be done by equity which is 
not always reliable or even possible⇒ remaining under the debt capacity is better to be able to 
handle future extra costs 
• Market signalling: studies have shown that total stock prices decline with 30% of the new 
issued equity and vice versa (permanent) ⇒ market signalling: sail of extra equity signals 
investors that management is concerned for the future⇒firms try first to internally finance to 
avoid unnecessary signalling 
• Management incentives: (aansporing): debt can be a very strong incentive, management 
doesn’t does it’s best they could lose there business (jobs) 
 
The financing decision and growth 
 
Rapid growth 
• Maintain conservative leverage ratio with unused borrowing capacity 
• Modest dividend payouts⇒internal financing of growth 
• Cash, marketable security as buffer liquidity ⇒ investment exceeds internal sources 
• External financing ⇒ debt only until leverage ratio threatens flexibility 
• Sell equity rather then restrict access to financial markets⇒reduce growth only when no 
alternative 
 
Low growth 
 
Easy financial decisions because only problem is how to get rid of the excess cash⇒create value for 
the owners by aggressive debt financing use proceeds to repurchase shares 
• Increased tax shield (reduce taxes) 
• Positive market signal ( 
• High financial leverage increases the management incentive 

Selecting a maturity structure 
 
Minimum‐risk maturity structure occurs when the maturity of liabilities equals that of the 
assets⇒cash generated by operations over the years should be sufficient to repay existing liability 
• Maturity is less then the assets ⇒ risk of refinancing: maturing liabilities have to be paid with 
newly raised capital. 
• Maturity longer then the assets: extra margin of safety + excess cash 
 
Can’t always use the perfect maturity 
• Unacceptable terms 
• Reduce borrowing costs 
Debt has an advantage with inflation⇒only when inflation is unexpected else it is compensated for in 
the interest 
15 

 

Chapter 7 discounted cash flow techniques 
 
Company future depends on the investments of today 
⇒Key aspect is capital budgeting: process of financial evaluation of investment proposals 
 
Discounted cash flow techniques: relevant whenever a company contemplates an action entailing costs 
or benefits that extend beyond the current year 
• Valuing stocks and bonds, divisions, companies 
• Choosing competing product technologies 
• Etc 

Figures of merit 
 
Financial evaluation 
• Estimate of relevant cash flows 
• Figure of merit of the investment: number summarizing an investment economic worth 
• Compare figure of merit to an acceptance criterion: standard of comparison 
 
Figures of merit 
• Payback period: time to recoup the initial investment 
o Problem: insensitive to the period after that 
• Accounting rate of return 
o

average − cash inf low annual
 
cashoutflow total

o Problem: insensitive to timing of cash flow 
 
Time value of money 
A dollar today is worth more then a dollar in a year 
• Inflation: reduces the purchase power of one dollar in the future 
• Uncertainty of receipt rises when receipt date is further in the future 
• Opportunity cost: return one could earn on the next best alternative ⇒ cash received in the 
future could already be used in investments if received today 
 
Because of this no cash flows occurring at different dates can be just added up before adjusted by 
• Compounding: process of determining the future value of a present sum 


Discounting: process of finding the present value of a future sum⇒

• Present cash is equivalent to future cash 
 
Net present value (NPV) 

1$

(1$ + 1$ ⋅ discountrate ) period

NPV = cash inf low present,value − cashoutflow present,value  

 
Important to calculate if an investment will add value to your company in the future 
 
Benefit­cost ratio (BCR): profitability index 

BCR =

cash inf low present,value
⇒Higher then 1 is good 
cashoutflow present,value

 
Internal rate of return (IRR) 
Most popular form of merit and closely related to NPV⇒is the discount rate at which he NPV is 0 
16 

 

 

Determining the relevant cash flows 
  
Relevant cash flow 



 

Cash flow principle: record investment cash flows when the money actually moves not when 
the accountant say they occur 
With‐without principle: image 2 worlds, the one with the investment made and one without all 
cash flows that are different in these worlds are relevant 

17 

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close