Bachelor Thesis Handbook Feb 2013

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Bachelor Thesis Handbook Feb 2013

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Thesis Handbook

Prepared by the thesis handbook committee Version 6 February 20, 2013

Thesis Handbook DEDICATION This handbook is dedicated to all IUBH graduates and the successful completion of their theses.

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Thesis Handbook ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The thesis handbook committee appreciates all the contributions and feedback which were received from the various IUBH departments and which helped improve this handbook considerably.

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Thesis Handbook TABLE OF CONTENTS Dedication .................................................................................................................. ii Acknowledgement .................................................................................................... iii Table of Contents ..................................................................................................... iv 1. Introduction – What is a Thesis ............................................................................. 1 2. Overall Process ...................................................................................................... 2 2.1 Finding a topic for a thesis ............................................................................... 2 2.1.1 Researching available sources for a possible topic .................................... 2 2.1.2 Writing an outline ...................................................................................... 2 2.2 Finding a supervisor ......................................................................................... 2 2.3 Supervision process .......................................................................................... 3 2.4 Data Collection ................................................................................................. 4 3. Registering for the thesis. ...................................................................................... 5 3.1 Who is eligible to register? .............................................................................. 5 3.2 Registration Forms ........................................................................................... 5 4. Formal Requirements ............................................................................................ 6 4.1 Style Rules........................................................................................................ 6 4.1.1 Minimum Number of Pages ....................................................................... 6 4.1.2 Font, Line Spacing, Type of Paper, and Page Numbering ........................ 6 4.1.3 Binding....................................................................................................... 7 4.2 Layout of Thesis ............................................................................................... 7 4.2.1 Introduction (includes the order of thesis) ................................................. 7 4.2.2 Title (Cover) Page ...................................................................................... 8 4.2.3 Acknowledgment (optional) ...................................................................... 8 4.2.4 Abstract ...................................................................................................... 8 4.2.5 Table of Contents ....................................................................................... 8 4.2.6 Lists of Tables/Figures, List of Abbreviations, Glossary .......................... 9 4.2.7 Reference and Citation Style ..................................................................... 9 4.2.8 Main Body of the Thesis ............................................................................ 9 4.2.9 Appendices ............................................................................................... 10 4.2.10 Declaration of Authenticity ................................................................... 10 4.3 Deadlines ........................................................................................................ 10 4.4 Intellectual Property and Circulation of the Thesis ........................................ 11 4.5 Cheating and Plagiarism ................................................................................ 11 iv

Thesis Handbook 5. Grading of Thesis ................................................................................................ 13 6. Colloquium Requirements ................................................................................... 13 6.1 Presentation .................................................................................................... 14 6.2 Critical Discussion ......................................................................................... 14 Works Cited ............................................................................................................. 15 Appendeces: Sample Pages ..................................................................................... 16 Appendix A: Sample Proposal ............................................................................. 16 Appendix B: Sample Title Page ........................................................................... 19

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Thesis Handbook

1. INTRODUCTION – WHAT IS A THESIS The thesis provides students in diploma and bachelor programs with the opportunity “to demonstrate some originality in identifying a topic or a line of argument and to follow up their insight with a more systematic piece of research work” (Dunleavy, 1986, p. 110). This thesis handbook represents the first point of reference for obtaining information on writing final theses at the International University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef  Bonn. A thesis is a piece of academic research that includes both, theory and application. It involves thorough academic investigation of a topic relevant to the respective academic field. Such a substantial piece of work can only be successfully completed if (1) you are really interested in your topic, (2) you are prepared to become an expert on your topic, and (3) you are 100% committed to your research project. The results of your research should contribute to the existing body of knowledge. There are no IUBH restrictions concerning the research philosophy, research approach, research strategy, research design and/or data collection method as these heavily depend on your thesis topic and the way you are addressing your research question.

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Thesis Handbook 2. OVERALL PROCESS This chapter outlines the overall process regarding the identification of an appropriate topic, writing an outline, finding a supervisor, and the supervision process. 2.1 Finding a topic for a thesis You should choose a topic for your thesis you are really interested in. Finding a topic is one of the – if not the – most challenging steps during preparing and writing a thesis. After identifying a topic, you should document your intended approach to the research problem in an outline. 2.1.1 Researching available sources for a possible topic Please have in mind that finding an adequate topic is not a matter of few hours. You have to spend some time on that activity. Therefore, you should start as soon as possible to look for possible topics for your thesis and put aside time for that activity. Interesting ideas and concepts you have encountered in lectures or problems you faced during your internship might be suited for being researched within your thesis. In addition, you can contact any of the lecturers to get ideas for a topic. Furthermore, professors offer specific topics for theses in CARE. Once you have a first idea about a possible topic you should do research by looking for and reviewing current publications (journal articles and books). The library offers both books and databases that contain many academic resources (e.g., EBSCO). Based upon a first literature review you should specify your topic by writing an outline. 2.1.2 Writing an outline An outline should give an overview of your thesis topic. Usually an outline consists of two (2) to three (3) pages. It should contain (1) a working title for your topic, (2) a section outlining the motivation why this topic is relevant and suited for a thesis, (3) the objectives of your thesis, (4) the research methodology you plan to apply (e.g., a questionnaire-based survey1, a case study). An outline not only helps you to clarify and specify your idea. In addition, it facilitates finding a suited supervisor for your thesis. 2.2 Finding a supervisor With the outline you should contact a supervisor. An updated list with all possible supervisors is available in CARE. The professor you are going to contact should have his or her specialization in a field that is related to your topic. For instance, if you have outlined a topic such as “The challenges of brand management for independent hotels” you

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see section 2.4 for details on the available queSTat online suvery tool

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Thesis Handbook should contact a professor specializing in marketing. Another example: if you have outlined a topic “Controllership under International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) – how the adoption of IFRS affects controllers’ tasks,” you should contact a professor of accounting. The professor you have contacted from the list of possible supervisors will decide (1) whether the topic falls within his/her research expertise. If not, he or she will recommend colleagues who might be better suited for supervising your topic. (2) Furthermore, the professor has to decide whether he or she has still capacities left for supervising a thesis. If not, he or she will recommend colleagues you might contact. In case you have contacted at least four (4) professors from the list of possible supervisors and you have not been accepted by any of them, you should contact the study dean. Send her or him an outline and a list with the four (4) or more professors you have contacted and spoken to (including the dates of your meetings). The study dean will help you individually to find a supervisor. Once you have found a topic and a supervisor you must register in accordance with chapter 3. 2.3 Supervision process Before registration the professor has already supervised you in terms of helping you to specify your topic and the elements of the outline. After registration supervising in general consists of (1) giving you feedback on the table of contents and (2) by answering your questions that might arise while writing your thesis. The formal requirements you have to follow are specified in chapter 4. By setting up preliminary tables of contents based upon your research you further specify your thesis. The supervisor will give you feedback on the tables of contents you are handing in. If you have any questions concerning your thesis, set up a meeting with your supervisor. However, you should collect a number of questions before contacting your supervisor. How many times you are going to meet with your supervisor and any further specific terms of the supervision process – except for those stated in this handbook – are to be specified by your supervisor.

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Thesis Handbook 2.4 Data Collection As indicated in the introduction, there are no university limitations on data collection methods applied. For those interested in conducting research online, the tool queSTat offers a convenient way to conduct an online survey – either internally at IUBH or externally. A small co-payment is charged for the use of the tool and implementation support. It is highly recommended that you contact Andreas Kensik ([email protected]) for details on queSTat in case you plan on doing a large scale survey.

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Thesis Handbook 3. REGISTERING FOR THE THESIS. In order to register for a thesis, the student has to find a supervisor. A list of all supervisors available can be found in CARE. Together with the supervisor, the concrete topic of the thesis needs to be decided on. Students may propose topics. On the other hand supervisors also offer different topics for thesis´ on a regular basis via the intranet or CARE. 3.1 Who is eligible to register? Bachelor degree students are allowed to enroll for their thesis if they have completed their internship and if they have passed the exams according to § 29 BachelorPrüfungsordnung in all required modules during semesters 1 - 4. 3.2 Registration Forms Students will find all forms necessary for enrolment in CARE. Form 1 is the official enrolment form. Be sure to use the form for BA-Degree students. With Form 2 students must declare their legal eligibility for writing the thesis. Form 3 states the topic of the thesis and the date, when the paper has to be turned in. This form must be co-signed by the supervisor. Also the examination office has to co-sign this form in order to confirm that the student is eligible for registering for the thesis. All forms must be turned in at the examination office together with a Curriculum Vitae and a recent Transcript of Records.

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Thesis Handbook 4. FORMAL REQUIREMENTS 4.1 Style Rules 4.1.1 Minimum Number of Pages The main body of the text of the thesis must be 40 A4 pages. Students are permitted

to exceed or decrease the page limit by a maximum of 10%. Any thesis which does not adhere to this requirement may not be read beyond the limit by the supervisor and may be marked lower in the evaluation. The first page for counting the page limit is the Introduction page. The Table of Contents, Acknowledgement Page, List of Tables, List of Abbreviations, Abstract, References, and Appendices will not be counted toward the page limit. Please see chapter 4.1.2 for information on how to number such pages. 4.1.2 Font, Line Spacing, Type of Paper, and Page Numbering 3 cm The thesis must be typed using Times New Roman 12 point or a similar serif font on A4 size white paper. A sans serif font (like Arial 11 point) is encouraged for tables, graphs, etc. for the purpose of clarity. The margins must be exactly 3 cm on the left, and 2.5 cm on the right, top, and bottom. Line spacing must be set as 1.5. Left or block align all text. Only titles should be centered. The Introduction page shall be the first page numbered in Arabic numerals, starting with “1.” The preliminary pages (Table of Contents, Acknowledgement Page, List of Tables, List of Abbreviations, and Abstract) shall be numbered in lower case Roman numerals, leaving the title page blank (ii, iii, iv, etc.). The body of the thesis shall be numbered in Arabic numerals (1, 2, 3, etc.). Page numbers continue through the appendix. The preferred location for page numbers is centered at the bottom of the page. However, the student’s supervisor may consent to an alternate location for page numbers. A header and/or footer of a maximum of one line are permitted on the thesis. According to APA style, the header may include the title of the thesis or if the title is too long, a shorter version of the title (American Psychological Association, 2007, p. 288). The header typically does not identify the author. However, the content of the header and footer may be exchanged. On rare occasions the student’s supervisors may choose a different font, line spacing, alignment, or page numbering. In such circumstances the students should follow the supervisor’s specific instructions. 2.5 cm

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Thesis Handbook 4.1.3 Binding All students are required to bind in hardback two (2) copies of the thesis. All two (2) copies will be submitted to the exam office. The exam office will forward the two (2) copies to the first supervisor. In addition, the student must submit to the exam office, the completed thesis on three (3) CD’s as an MS Word and as a .pdf document. One (1) CD will be forwarded to the library; the other two (2) CD’s should be affixed to the two (2) copies of the thesis. In the event a student has been instructed not to share the thesis data, usually by a private organization, the student is still required to submit two (2) hardbound copies of the thesis and three (3) CD’s; however, the CD will not be forwarded to the library for publication. In order for this paragraph to apply the student must submit to the exam office, a letter from the company on company letterhead requesting confidentiality of the data. Once such letter has been received by the exam office the thesis will be flagged as “confidential” and it will not be released for viewing by other students or the general public. The letter has to be handed in together with the thesis at the latest. 4.2 Layout of Thesis 4.2.1 Introduction (includes the order of thesis) In order to retain consistency of thesis submission, the following order of text shall be applied on all theses:             Title (Cover) Page Dedication (optional) Acknowledgment (optional) Abstract Table of Contents List of Tables/ Figures (optional) List of Abbreviations (optional) Main Body of Thesis (refer to section 2.2.8 of this handbook) References Appendices Glossary (optional) Declaration of Authenticity

On rare occasions the student’s supervisors may choose a different order of text. In such circumstances the students should follow the supervisor’s specific instructions.

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Thesis Handbook 4.2.2 Title (Cover) Page The title page is the first written page seen by the reader. Other than the items listed below, nothing else should be on the title page. It must include the following:         Full name of the university (no abbreviations, even if logo is used). Name of degree program (no abbreviations) The title of the thesis Your name Student identification number Your address Name of your first supervisor Date of submission 4.2.3 Acknowledgment (optional) The acknowledgement page is used to thank those who have been of particular assistance to you in the completion of the thesis. You are not required to include an acknowledgment page; however, should you wish to include one please note the following recommendations. Remember that your thesis is a published document that will remain in existence for a very long time. Therefore, chose who you thank carefully. Traditionally, students will thank their parents, their supervisor, data providers such as industry partners or interview sources, and proofreaders. Your thesis is a reflection of your hard work at the university and the acknowledgement page should not become a running list of all of your friends. Except under rare circumstances, the acknowledgment page should not exceed one page (this section may be single spaced). 4.2.4 Abstract The abstract is usually one paragraph which summarizes the main aims, findings, and conclusions of the thesis. It should be approximately 200 words and should not exceed one page. It is recommended, although not required, that keywords be written under the abstract paragraph. Keywords are three to seven words that let the reader know the topic of the thesis. 4.2.5 Table of Contents The Table of Contents section should show each chapter and chapter subheading along with the corresponding page number. It is not necessary to include all subsubheadings. The decision of what to include and how much detail shall be included under the Table of Contents will be taken by the student’s supervisor. In general it is recommended to avoid more than two levels of subheadings for your thesis. For example, 8

See Appendix 2 for a sample title page.

Thesis Handbook too many subchapters such as 2.3.4.5.1. are discouraged. The chapter and subchapter titles shall be numbered accordingly in the text. 4.2.6 Lists of Tables/Figures, List of Abbreviations, Glossary The List of Tables, List of Abbreviations, and Glossary sections are intended to assist the reader in finding pertinent additional information. They are optional. Traditionally, the List of Tables / Figures and List of Abbreviations are listed in the front of the thesis, while the Glossary is listed at the end of the thesis after the Appendices. For page numbering of these sections, please see discussion above under Table of Contents. 4.2.7 Reference and Citation Style It is recommended that students use APA style unless directed to do so differently by the student’s supervisor. 4.2.8 Main Body of the Thesis The following is intended to show the usual content of the main body section of a thesis. Changes to the following order may be accepted upon approval by the student’s supervisor:       Introduction (usually called chapter 1) Literature Review (usually called chapter 2) Research Methods/ Methodology (usually called chapter 3) Research Findings (usually called chapter 4) Conclusion (often called chapter 5) Recommendations / Limitations (may be separate or combined with chapter 5)

The Introduction should include the overall rationale for the topic, a clear outline of the aim and objectives of the thesis as well as an overview of the structure of the thesis. The Literature Review should include a critical reflection of the literature relevant for your topic. Relevant literature should at least include the respective text books and articles out of the relevant academic journals. It is up to the student to decide on the structure of the literature review and on the titles of the respective chapters. It is not required to include a chapter that is explicitly named “Literature Review”. The thesis should contain a chapter that outlines the applied research methods. Please refer to the relevant literature (e.g., Saunders, Lewis, & Thronhill, 2003; Churchill & Brown, 2007) for a detailed description of relevant research methodologies. At least one chapter should be dedicated to a critical reflection of your research results. It is essential to clearly link your research findings to the relevant literature that has been appraised in the literature review (please also refer to the evaluation criteria outlined in the chapter “Grading”).

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Thesis Handbook Finally, you should draw conclusions out of your research and derive recommendations as well as list any limitations such research encountered. 4.2.9 Appendices The Appendix section is used to present information which is too detailed to include in the thesis and/or information that is interesting but not essential to the main thrust of the thesis, such as an original copy of the questionnaire, large tables, and scanned materials. Generally, it is not necessary to transcribe and include all of the interview transcripts or all of the questionnaire responses in case of fully structured interviews/ questionnaires. Often, in case of (unstructured) in-depth interviews it is recommended to include transcripts. It is up to the student’s supervisor to decide if the supervisor desires that the interview responses be transcribed and included in the Appendix. Generally, questionnaires, transcripts or other information in the appendix that originally is in other languages than English can be included in the original language, however, the student’s supervisor may choose to ask the student to transcribe the appendices into English. Each Appendix shall be labeled as an Appendix and given a letter. For example: Appendix A, Appendix B. The Appendix pages shall be numbered but not counted in the 40-page page limit. 4.2.10 Declaration of Authenticity The Declaration of Authenticity, which can be found in CARE, is required to be included as an original signed page in each hardbound copy of the thesis. Any thesis which does not include this form will not be read or graded. 4.3 Deadlines The student will have nine (9) weeks from the date indicated on Form 3 to submit the completed thesis to the examination office. The submission must be done by the close of business on such deadline date. If the day of submission (e.g., July 9th) is a holiday, a weekend day or anything alike the thesis has to be handed in the next working day after the deadline. Exceptions to the deadlines will not be accepted due to the student’s miscalculation. Please refer to section 1.2 of this handbook for registration requirements. In very rare exceptions, the deadline for submission of the thesis may be extended. Generally, an extension of up to four (2) weeks may be granted to the student. In the event of extreme situations, such as a serious illness or injury, the four week extension may be further extended. The time period for this second additional extension will be decided on a case by

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Thesis Handbook case basis by the examination board based on the severity and extent of the student’s injury or situation. Any extension must be requested by the student, in writing, on Form 5 available in CARE before the original thesis submission due date. Such form must be signed by the student’s supervisor and submitted by the student to the chairperson of the examination board. It is up to the chairperson of the examination board to decide whether it will grant any extension of time for the thesis submission. If the extension is not granted the student must adhere to the initial deadline. In case of failure to submit the thesis in time the student will fail the thesis. In the event of any extension of the deadline for submission of the final thesis, the student will remain responsible for the payment of the relevant university fees in accordance with the decision by the examination board. 4.4 Intellectual Property and Circulation of the Thesis All theses are the intellectual property of the International University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef  Bonn. Before publishing your thesis or parts of it you are required to obtain the University’s written approval. If you cooperate with a company or any other experts you may provide them with a copy of your thesis if your supervisor agrees. If your cooperation partner insists on confidentiality of the data provided or of your thesis as a whole you need the written confirmation of the partner to receive a lock flag for your thesis (please refer to section 4.1.3 “Binding”). 4.5 Cheating and Plagiarism Academic dishonesty is a serious offense against the academic community. Therefore, cheating and plagiarism is strictly forbidden in any part of the academic education including the thesis project. Cheating and plagiarism includes:  Submitting the same thesis/paper in more than one study program, course, or institution  Cheating on exams, including colloquium. This includes referring to notes, books, laptop computers, or other programmable electronic devices without prior authorization. The use of mobile phones during colloquium is also forbidden.  Any form of plagiarism, especially failure in the thesis to acknowledge ideas taken from others and the submission of work prepared by another person. This includes total or partial reproduction of a text by an author without indication of the correct reference or unauthorized assistance by others.

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Thesis Handbook Academic dishonesty results in the student failing the thesis. Additionally, the incident will be noted in the student’s file. If the offense is repeated the student will be expelled from University. Though academic dishonesty may escape direct observation at the time, it can be detected by coincidences of language, argumentation or result, either with textbooks, or with other students’ work or results. If academic dishonesty is detected after the mark has been issued, the student will fail the thesis and any credits that he/she has received for the thesis will be revoked.

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Thesis Handbook 5. GRADING OF THESIS A thesis will be graded on a number of criteria. Most commonly, supervisors will consider three main areas in their evaluation. These are a) content, b) style, and c) formal requirements. A brief description of possible evaluation criteria in each area follows: a) The content element of the thesis evaluation will account for approximately 80% of the final grade; supervisors may consider such criteria as  clarity of your research question and the establishing of appropriate research objectives  comprehensive nature of the review of literature  command of concepts and definitions  degree to which a praxis approach (theory-informed practice) was followed  quality of source materials  soundness of applied research methods  degree of independent evaluation and/or original contribution  distinctiveness of applications, conclusions, and recommendations b) The style element of the thesis evaluation will account for approximately 10 % of the final grade; supervisors may consider criteria such as  language (precision, clarity, orthography, grammatical correctness)  soundness of the argument  structure and flow  scientific (objective) writing style  length appropriate to section c) The formal requirements element of the thesis evaluation will account for approximately 10 % of the final grade; supervisors may consider criteria such as  accordance with formatting requirements of this handbook and APA or other agreed-upon referencing and formatting style  alignment of sections/outline with the general requirements  overall presentation (binding, condition of manuscript)  other formal requirements such as page numbering, inclusion of abstract and, etc. 6. COLLOQUIUM REQUIREMENTS The colloquium should be held after both the supervisor and second corrector have concluded their reviews and within a period of 6 (six) weeks from the submission of the thesis. Students must enroll in the colloquium by submitting Form 4 to the examination office at the day of the colloquium before the colloquium takes place. Students will receive an invitation specifying a date and time for colloquium. A student must not participate in a colloquium if not all of the requirements have been met, especially if not all modules have been passed. At the beginning of the colloquium, the student must indicate s/he is in good health and able to commence with the colloquium procedures outlined below.

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Thesis Handbook 6.1 Presentation Colloquium usually starts with a student presentation of the research project and findings. This presentation should illustrate the entire research process from the origin of the research question to final recommendation in rather broad strokes. The time frame for the presentation is 10-15 minutes so that only selected findings may be discussed in greater detail. Supervisors may require a particular presentation format and technology, such as a PowerPoint presentation and/or handouts. As a general rule, the structure and means of the presentation should be appropriate to the topic addressed. There are no universal guidelines regarding the number of slides or the number of pages in a handout. As a rule of thumb, someone not closely familiar with the research project (such as a future employer) should understand the project after the ten-minute presentation. 6.2 Critical Discussion During the following 30 minutes, the supervisor along with the second corrector will ask questions that arose out of the printed version of the research or the colloquium presentation. They may ask for clarification on methods, sources, findings, etc. In addition, questions may be asked with the aim to verify the student’s knowledge of the subject matter or the authenticity of the work.

Good luck with your thesis!

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Thesis Handbook WORKS CITED American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Churchill, G.A., & Brown, T.J. (2007) Basic marketing research (6th ed.). Mason: SouthWestern UP Dunleavy, P. (1986). Studying for a degree in the humanities and social sciences. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan Saunders M., Lewis, P., & Thronhill A. (2003) Research methods for business students. Essex: Pearson Education

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Thesis Handbook APPENDECES: SAMPLE PAGES Appendix A: Sample Proposal

University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef · Bonn

Proposal (MM/YYYY)

Name: N.N.

Supervisor: N.N.

Study Program: Hospitality Management Working title: An analysis of the impact of “traffic light” food labelling on snack food manufacturers

Overall Aim: This study aims at examining the food marketing tool of traffic light labelling, analyse consumer perception of the tool and identify its possible impact on snack food manufacturers.

Objectives: 1) To review relevant literature concerning general concepts in the area of food marketing, consumer perception as well as food labelling.

2) To critically analyse consumer perception concerning food labelling. 3) To analyse German consumers' and snack food manufacturers’ opinion regarding the traffic light labelling system.

4) To develop a set of recommendations for food companies and governments that addresses critical impacts of traffic light food labelling and identifies possible alternatives to traffic light food labelling

Methodology: A quantitative approach will be used by conducting a survey amongst German students who will be the future families. A 16

Thesis Handbook convenience sample being all students of the International University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef  Bonn will be selected. Further one–to–one qualitative interviews will be conducted with a selected group of snack food manufacturers (n=4) to gain a wider understanding of the impacts of traffic light food labelling on industry participants. Structure: …

Indicative Reading List: Ahmed, A., Ahmed, N. and Salman, A. (2005). 'Critical issues in packaged food business.' British Food Journal. Vol. 107, No. 10, pp. 760-780. Baltas, G. (2001), 'Nutrition labelling: issues and policies'. European Journal of Marketing.Vol. 35, No. 5/6, pp. 708-721. Batra, R., Myers, J.G. and Aaker, D.A. (1996). Advertising Management. Prentice Hall: Upper Saddle River. Bhaskaran, S., Polonsky, M. Cary, J. and Fernandez, S. (2006). 'Environmentally sustainable food productiona and marketing. Opportunity or hype?'. British Food Journal. Vol. 108, No. 8, pp. 677-690. Bussel, G. (2005). 'Nutritional profiling vs guideline daily amounts as a means of helping consumers make appropriate food choices.' Nutrition & Food Science. Vol. 35, No. 5, pp. 337-343. Davies, M.A.P. And Wright, L.T. (1994). 'The importance of labelling examined in food marketing'. European Journal of Marketing.Vol. 28, No. 2, pp. 57-67. Humphries, C. (1998). 'A code of practice for food labelling.' Nutrition & Food Science. No. 4, July/August, pp. 193-197. Jamieson, B. (1996). 'Retailing – getting it right'. Nutrition & Food Science. No. 4, July/August, pp. 14-18. Jones, P., Comfort, D. and Hillier, D. (2006). 'Healthy eating and the UK's major food retailers: a case study in corporate social responsibility.' British Food Journal. Vol. 108, No. 10, pp. 838-848. Kotler, P., Wong, V., Saunders, J. and Armstrong, G. (2005). Principles of Marketing. (4th European ed.). Pearson Education: Harlow.

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Thesis Handbook Marshall, S., Bower, J.A. and Schröder, M.J.A. (2007). 'Consumer understanding of UK salt intake advice'. British Food Journal. Vol. 109, No.3, pp. 233-245. Peter, J.P. and Olson, J.C. (2002). Consumer Behavior and Marketing Strategy. (6th ed.). McGraw-Hill: New York. Schiffman, L.G. and Kanuk, L.L. (2004). Consumer Behavior. Pearson Education: Upper Saddle River. Shine, A., O'Reilly, S. and O'Sullivan, K. (1997). 'Consumer use of nutrition labels.' British Food Journal. Vol. 99, No. 8, pp. 290-296. Tenbült, P. , De Vries, N.. Dreezens, E. and Martijn, C. (2007). 'Categorizing genetically modified food products. Effects of labelling on information processing'. British Food Journal.Vol. 109, No. 4, pp. 305-314. Turner, A. (1995). 'Prepackaged food labelling: past, present and future.' British Food Journal. Vol. 97, No. 5, pp. 23-31. Wandel, M. (1997). 'Food labelling from a consumer perspective'. British Food Journal. Vol. 99, No. 6, pp. 212-219.

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Thesis Handbook Appendix B: Sample Title Page

Bachelor Thesis

International University of Applied Sciences Bad Honnef · Bonn International Hospitality and Tourism Management

Networking within the Bad Honnef Community

Michaela Schmidt Student ID: 9051234 Beethovenstraße 50 12345 Bonn

Supervisor: Professor Dr. Krämer Date of submission: June 1, 2008

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