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www.BDCnetwork.com
Chicago Riverwalk
Chicago, Illinois
29 Great
Solutions
BIM Innovations, New Materials,
Hospital Breakthroughs,
Kinetic Road Plates, and More
30
INSPIRING THE BUILDING TEAM
Tall ICF Walls
16
AIA/CES Course:
Historic Masonry
21
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bdc0908cover_ID 2 8/6/2009 11:22:05 AM
BUILD LEARN
INTERACT
AISC and the fabricated structural steel industry introduce SteelDay 2009—a new
opportunity for learning and networking among members of the design, construction,
and structural steel industry nationwide.
Find out more about SteelDay
and sign up for an event near
you at www.SteelDay.org.
There's always a solution in steel.
American Institute of Steel Construction
One East Wacker Drive, Suite 700
Chicago, IL 60601
312.670.2400 www.aisc.org
September 18
NATIONWIDE
September 18
Over 100 free
educational events
scheduled throughout
the United States.
There’s always a solution in steel. Now you’ll know how to find it.

su
stain
able
Input #1 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd C2 7/29/2009 3:29:18 PM
5 I Editorial
America needs more argonauts, not
astronauts.
6 I News
Decline expected as healthcare
slows, but hospital work will remain
steady; first green roof professionals
certified; Jones named director of
GSA’s Design Excellence program.
8 I On the Drawing Board
New Jersey’s high-tech landscaping
facility; Goettsch Partners’ winning
design for Soochow Securities HQ
in China; residence hall design
focused on freshmen.
10 I New Project Portfolio
Restoration gives new life to New
Formalism icon; citizenship building
in Texas targets LEED Silver.
13 I Products At Work
51 I Advertisers’ Index
52 I Thought Leaders
Howard W. Ashcraft, Jr., Fellow of
the American College of Construc-
tion Lawyers, honorary member of
the AIA California Council, and a
member of the Integrated Project
Delivery task force, on BIM, IPD,
and evolving legal issues involving
their use.
29 Great
Solutions 30
FEATURES
DEPARTMENTS
INSPIRING THE BUILDING TEAM
AUGUST 2009 VOLUME 50, NO. 08
42
16
21
COVER: A cyclist cruises along the 1.3-mile-long
Riverwalk on the Chicago River’s south bank. The
$22 million promenade was created by linking
previously unconnected parcels of land, giving the
Windy City a second waterfront that’s lined with
new retail, restaurants, and other attractions.
PHOTO: MARK SEGAL/GETTY IMAGES
COVER STORY
Innovative solutions to some of the
most complex issues facing Building
Teams today.
30 I 29 Great Solutions
Design 30
BIM/IT 34
Collaboration 38
Healthcare 40
Products 42
Technology 44
Business Management 46
Green Building 48
16 I Tall ICF Walls
Experts offer 9 tips on taking insulating
concrete forms to new heights.
AIA CONTINUING EDUCATION
21 I Historic Masonry
Earn 1.0 AIA/CES learning units by
studying this article and completing the
online exam.
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 1
Cause: Providing essential solutions that inspire
Building Teams to design and construct
great places for people.
bdc0908TOC_ID.indd 1 8/6/2009 12:54:55 PM
WELCOME TO THE
STEEL AGE.
And the start of a beautiful new era.
SteelBuilt Curtainwall
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increased glass sizes, smaller frame profiles and significantly larger spans
than traditional aluminum systems, now a whole new universe of ideas
is available. SteelBuilt Curtainwall also helps reduce the dependence
on artificial lighting by leveraging daylight to illuminate a space. With all
this newly found design freedom, SteelBuilt Curtainwall will inspire an
unmatched level of creativity.
For more information visit TGPAmerica.com or call 800.426.0279.
BIM 3D Modeling now available at tgpamerica.com
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Cur tainwall and TGP America are registered trademarks of Technical Glass Product s.
Visit tgpamerica.com to take our AIA registered
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Input #2 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads 2 8/5/2009 11:17:42 AM
AUGUST 2009
e-Contents
BD+C Webcast
Fundamentals of Fenestration: Windows, Doors
and Glazing Materials
The free AIA/CES course from Building Design+Construction is designed
to give Building Teams a comprehensive overview of current approaches
to building fenestration. Glass technology, fenestration performance,
daylighting, and the renovation and replacement of glass façades to
comply with the green building movement are key areas of discussion.
Our panel of experts includes: Rich Walker, president and CEO, Ameri-
can Architectural Manufacturers Association; Fiona Aldous, associate
principal, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates; John Clark, principal, Cordo-
gan, Clark & Associates Architects; and Tim Swindle, national business
development, Trainor Glass Company. Register at:
http://bit.ly/4mJth
BD+C Chief Editor Robert Cassidy to hospital
designers: Cut costs, use BIM and IPD
Robert Cassidy, Editor-in-Chief of Building Design+Construction, warned
170 of the nation’s top healthcare designers that they will be under
severe pressure from the federal government to trim costs in hospi-
tal construction. Speaking at the AIA Summer Leadership Summit in
Chicago on July 25, Cassidy advised architecture firms to use building
information modeling (BIM) tools and integrated project delivery (IPD) to
control costs. Download Cassidy’s presentation at:
www.BDCnetwork.com/article/ca6673453.html
Web exclusive: Performance-based safety codes
could make safer elevators
Building professionals are looking for the added benefits that new eleva-
tor technology can supply. While new technologies are available and in
use globally, building professionals in North America may be unable to
deploy them due to limitations imposed by the Safety Code for Elevators
and Escalators, writes Norman B. Martin, chief elevator inspector for the
State of Ohio, in an exclusive to BD+C.
www.BDCnetwork.com/article/ca6669879.html
Follow BD+C on Twitter
The BD+C editorial staff is now on Twitter. Get the latest news and com-
mentary on the nonresidential building industry at:
www.twitter.com/BuildingTeam360
FIND
ARCHITECTURAL
INDEPENDENCE.
TGPAMERICA.COM
TGPAmerica.com is your
source for innovative
architectural glazing solutions.
©

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Input #3 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
To subscribe online to BD
+
C,
go to: www.getFREEmag.com/bdc
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 3
bdc0908eTOC_ID 3 8/6/2009 1:57:35 PM
Dow Corning is a registered trademark of Dow Corning Corporation. We help you invent the future is a trademark of Dow Corning Corporation.
XIAMETER is a registered trademark of Dow Corning Corporation. ©2009 Dow Corning Corporation. All rights reserved.
Stephanie A. Burns, Ph.D.
Chairman, President and CEO
Dow Corning Corporation
“ Your needs for more options and convenience
led us to develop the XIAMETER
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Through this innovative online model, you still get
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volume alternatives, and the option to order
through your distributor. It’s another way we’re
changing to give you more options and value.”
“ A spirit of innovation and passion for solving
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And it’s this kind of working partnership that
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See how we’re changing to better meet your needs at dowcorning.com/transform
We’re always working
to understand your
business. That’s why
we’re changing ours.
Input #4 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 4 7/29/2009 3:29:46 PM
EDITORIAL
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 5
EDITORIAL STAFF
Robert Cassidy
Editor-in-Chief
[email protected]
630-288-8153
Dave Barista
Managing Editor
[email protected]
630-288-8082
Jay W. Schneider
Senior Editor
[email protected]
630-288-8088
Jeff Yoders
Senior Associate Editor
[email protected]
630-288-8021
Jim Haughey
BD+C Economist
Larry Nigh
Senior Art Director
EDITORIAL ADVISERS
Peter Davoren
CEO, Turner Construction Company
M. Arthur Gensler, Jr., FAIA, FIIDA, RIBA
Chairman, Gensler
Raj Gupta, PE, LEED AP
President, Environmental Systems Design
Laurin McCracken, AIA
Chief Marketing Officer, Carter & Burgess
Thomas R. Samuels, FAIA, AICP
Executive Vice President,
Higgins Development Partners
Philip Tobey, FAIA, FACHA
Senior Vice President, SmithGroup
Alan Traugott, LEED AP
Principal, CJL Engineering
Randolph Tucker, PE
Senior Vice President, RJA Group
BUSINESS STAFF
Dean Horowitz
General Manager, Reed Construction Media
[email protected]
630-288-8180
Daniel Colunio
Director
[email protected]
781-734-8360
Joyce Simon
Production Manager
[email protected]
630-288-8424
Melinda Werner
Advertising Service Manager
[email protected]
630-288-8065
Angela Tanner
Director, Audience Marketing
[email protected]
Mary Nasiri
Director of E-Media
[email protected]
BUSINESS OFFICE
2000 Clearwater Drive
Oak Brook, IL 60523
Subscription inquires:
[email protected]
Reprints: The YGS Group
Mike Shober, (800) 290-5460x129
[email protected]
John Poulin
CEO, RBI US
Jeff DeBalko
President of Business Media, Chief Internet Officer
Dean Horowitz
General Manager, Reed Construction Media
America needs
more argonauts,
not astronauts
I know what you’re thinking: “What’s this guy talking
about? What do argonauts and astronauts have to do with
designing and constructing buildings?” Indulge me for a mo-
ment, Dear Reader, as I do my best to connect the dots.
My argument is this: We need to shift
priorities from manned exploration of
space to human exploration of our own
planet. Instead of seeking the “ultimate
goal” of going to Mars, as astronaut
Eugene Cernan suggested last month
on the 40th anniversary of the Apollo
11 moon landing, we need to concen-
trate our precious research dollars on
our oceans and seas and the air around
us, so that we can preserve the fragile
planet that the Apollo missions so bril-
liantly revealed to us.
A historical perspective: On October
4, 1957, Russia’s launch of Sputnik
threw fear into every American’s heart.
The race for “control” of space was on,
but as our rockets kept exploding on
their launch pads, we were reduced to
playing catch-up. The ultimate embar-
rassment came on April 12, 1961,
when a Russian cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin,
became the first human in space.
Those who are too young to have lived
through this period may find it hard
to appreciate the near-jingoist sense
of national mission that accompanied
President Kennedy’s call, a month later,
to send a man—a red-blooded Ameri-
can, of course!—to the moon before the
end of the decade.
And oh, that magical evening of July
20, 1969! How I remember frantically
fiddling with the antenna of a clunky
black-and-white TV so I wouldn’t miss
Neil Armstrong taking that famous small
step, that giant leap.
Looking back, it is clear that the
space race had more to do with
geopolitics than science. True, the
space program employed thousands
and helped turn Houston into our
fourth-largest city. But NASA didn’t
invent Tang, and the manned space
program’s so-called “technological
spin-offs” were minimal.
So, enough already. We’ve done the
moon. Nor do we need to go to Mars to
supplement our rock collection.
This is not an academic exercise. At
this writing, a committee appointed by
President Obama is reviewing the entire
U.S. human space flight program.
Here’s my recommendation: Take a
few billion from NASA’s $17 billion bud-
get and give it to poor NOAA, the federal
agency that studies our oceans and
atmosphere (annual budget: $4 billion).
Use those scarce dollars to fund lots
more R&D on climate change—ocean
exploration, atmospheric studies—re-
search that might help us solve the most
vexing problem facing humanity—and
the built environment—right here on
good ol’ Mother Earth.
NASA would still have plenty of dough
for valuable unmanned scientific mis-
sions like the Hubble Telescope. So let’s
keep shooting for the stars. Just don’t
put any more Americans up there.
bdc0908edit_ID 5 8/6/2009 4:42:42 PM
The once steady 10% growth rate in
healthcare construction spending has
slowed, but hasn’t entirely stopped.
Spending is currently 1.7% higher
than the same time last year when
construction materials costs were 8%
higher. The 2.5% monthly jobsite
spending decline since last fall is consis-
tent with the decline in materials costs.
A 7% decline is expected in the next six
months, consistent with the year-to-
date drop in the value of healthcare
construction starts, which includes a
66% plunge in June.
The June drop is partly random but
also reflects concern by healthcare
project managers about how the out-
come of the current healthcare debate
in Congress will affect their opera-
tions. Specifically, they are concerned
about reimbursement rates from
federally operated or regulated insur-
ance plans. With no final plan ready
for a vote in early August, expect the
cautious spending to continue through
the summer.
All options being considered in
Washington envision expanded health-
care services
that would re-
quire additional
facility capacity
by 2011—but
financing for
the expanded
services re-
mains fuzzy.
Half the added
cost appears
to be vague
promises of
$40 billion plus
annual fee cuts
by hospitals and
drug companies. Significant growth
in healthcare construction will not
resume until the healthcare financing
arrangements are final and judged to
be realistic.
Hospital construction spending is
currently 14% higher than a year ago,
while spending for other healthcare
facilities, including specialized office
buildings and residential care facili-
ties, is off 25% from last year. The
developers of these buildings react
to a recession much as developers of
commercial buildings do: They pull
back when they see falling rental and
occupancy rates. By this time next
year, expect spending for medical of-
fice buildings and possible residential
care facilities to be expanding again
in a growing economy while spend-
ing for hospitals is expected to still be
stuck at current levels. BD+C
—Jim Haughey, BD+C Economist and
Chief Economist with Reed Construction Data
Decline expected as healthcare slows,
but hospital work will remain steady
NEWS BRIEFS
Design firms say they need more project management
training. Nearly one-third (32%) of design and environmental
firms report that project management training is their biggest
training need, according to a survey in The Zweig HR Letter.
Next in importance: marketing and business development train-
ing (19%) and leadership training (16%).
Carbon prices running out of gas in Northeast cap and
trade market. The price of carbon permits plummeted 8% for
the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), which requires
utilities in the Northeast to purchase carbon permits for each ton
of carbon they emit. Lower demand for electricity as a result of
the recession was the cause of the price plummet. More than 30
million permits (or allowances) had cleared at $3.23 each in a
sale on June 17, 8% lower than the auction price in March.
First green roof professionals certified. Green Roofs for
Healthy Cities announced the first wave of accredited green roof
professionals. These individuals have successfully completed a
multidisciplinary exam encompassing five areas of concentration,
including pre-design, design, contract management, quality as-
surance and support, and maintenance.
Jones named director of GSA’s Design Excellence program.
Casey Jones, a principal at jones|kroloff, has been named the
next director of the General Services Administration’s Design
Excellence program, according to sources at the GSA. Jones will
replace Thomas Grooms, the program’s current head. As director
of Design Excellence, Jones will oversee the architect selection
and design process for the GSA.
For more: www.BDCnetwork.com.
NEWS
6 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Source: U.S. Census Bureau Forecast: Reed Construction Data
Qtr 1
2008
2 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 4 Qtr 1
2009
Qtr 1
2010
Healthcare construction spending
(in millions, at seasonally adjusted annual rate)
4
5
,
2
4
6
4
7
,
1
4
5
4
8
,
6
0
7
4
9
,
3
2
5
4
7
,
3
4
5
4
7
,
8
0
0
4
6
,
4
0
0
4
5
,
1
0
0
4
5
,
6
0
0
4
6
,
6
0
0
4
7
,
8
0
0
4
9
,
4
0
0
Healthcare construction spending is currently 1.7% higher than the same
time last year, led by hospital work, which is 14% higher than a year ago.
bdc0908_news 6 8/5/2009 11:26:31 PM
In the past moment frames were the
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For more information, see our webinar
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To view and request a copy of the
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Change your frame
of reference.
Elementary school Junior high school High school Vocational school
’09 ’08 % chg. ’09 ’08 % chg. ’09 ’08 % chg. ’09 ’08 % chg.
Atlanta 137.30 128.06 7.2 140.06 136.85 2.3 136.31 134.38 1.4 133.38 129.98 2.6
Baltimore 141.60 131.41 7.8 144.45 140.44 2.9 140.58 137.90 1.9 137.55 133.39 3.1
Boston 178.67 165.52 7.9 182.26 176.89 3.0 177.38 173.69 2.1 173.56 168.01 3.3
Chicago 175.81 162.73 8.0 179.34 173.90 3.1 174.53 170.76 2.2 170.78 165.17 3.4
Cleveland 152.42 142.32 7.1 155.48 152.09 2.2 151.32 149.34 1.3 148.06 144.45 2.5
Dallas 131.10 120.93 8.4 133.74 129.23 3.5 130.15 126.90 2.6 127.35 122.74 3.8
Denver 143.51 135.33 6.0 146.39 144.62 1.2 142.47 142.01 0.3 139.40 137.36 1.5
Detroit 159.10 146.93 8.3 162.30 157.02 3.4 157.95 154.18 2.4 154.55 149.14 3.6
Houston 134.60 124.14 8.4 137.31 132.67 3.5 133.63 130.27 2.6 130.75 126.01 3.8
Kansas City, Mo. 157.83 147.77 6.8 161.00 157.92 2.0 156.69 155.06 1.0 153.31 149.99 2.2
Los Angeles 165.62 153.50 7.9 168.95 164.04 3.0 164.43 161.08 2.1 160.89 155.81 3.3
Miami 140.01 128.06 9.3 142.82 136.85 4.4 139.00 134.38 3.4 136.00 129.98 4.6
Minneapolis 170.71 158.39 7.8 174.15 169.27 2.9 169.48 166.21 2.0 165.83 160.77 3.1
New Orleans 135.39 124.84 8.5 138.12 133.41 3.5 134.42 131.00 2.6 131.52 126.72 3.8
New York City 202.06 189.01 6.9 206.12 201.99 2.0 200.60 198.34 1.1 196.28 191.85 2.3
Philadelphia 175.81 163.29 7.7 179.34 174.50 2.8 174.53 171.35 1.9 170.78 165.74 3.0
Phoenix 134.76 126.80 6.3 137.47 135.51 1.4 133.78 133.06 0.5 130.90 128.70 1.7
Pittsburgh 152.58 141.06 8.2 155.65 150.74 3.3 151.47 148.02 2.3 148.21 143.18 3.5
Portland, Ore. 153.85 145.39 5.8 156.94 155.38 1.0 152.74 152.57 0.1 149.45 147.58 1.3
St. Louis 156.55 147.35 6.2 159.70 157.47 1.4 155.42 154.62 0.5 152.08 149.56 1.7
San Diego 160.21 150.01 6.8 163.44 160.31 2.0 159.06 157.41 1.0 155.63 152.26 2.2
San Francisco 189.33 176.01 7.6 193.14 188.09 2.7 187.96 184.70 1.8 183.91 178.65 2.9
Seattle 160.53 147.49 8.8 163.76 157.62 3.9 159.37 154.77 3.0 155.94 149.70 4.2
Washington, D.C. 152.26 142.18 7.1 155.32 151.94 2.2 151.16 149.19 1.3 147.90 144.31 2.5
Winston/Salem, N.C. 118.85 111.84 6.3 121.24 119.52 1.4 117.99 117.36 0.5 115.45 113.52 1.7
RSMeans costs comparisons: K-12 Schools
Costs in dollars per square foot For more data, visit RSMeans at www.rsmeans.com, or call (800) 448-8182.
Input #5 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_news 7 8/5/2009 11:26:34 PM
ON THE DRAWING BOARD
Designed to enhance the use of science
and technology in Bergen County Spe-
cial Services’ landscaping programs, the
new single-story facility at the techni-
cal school’s Paramus campus will have
7,950 sf of classroom space, a 1,000-sf
greenhouse (able to replicate different
environments, such as rainforest, desert,
forest, and tundra), and 5,000 sf of out-
side landscaping and gardening space.
Instructional space includes classrooms,
a computer lab, a biology lab, demon-
stration space for small engine repair
(for blowers and other landscaping
equipment), and a garage for light and
heavy power equipment used as part of
the curriculum. DMR Architects of Has-
brouck Heights, N.J., is the architect.
New Jersey’s high-tech landscaping facility
8 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Chicago-based Goettsch Partners has
been selected to design the Soochow
Securities Headquarters, the new office
and stock exchange building for So-
ochow Securities Co. Ltd. The 21-story,
441,300-sf project includes 344,400
sf of office space, an 86,100-sf stock
exchange, classrooms, and under-
ground parking. The project is sited
along the western edge of Jinji Lake in
Suzhou Industrial Park, a major new
mixed-use district outside the city cen-
ter. The signature feature of the design
is a soaring internal atrium that rises
the full height of the building, allowing
access to daylight and views from all
locations within the facility.
Goettsch Partners wins design
competition for Soochow
Securities HQ in China
The $325 million Atlantic Plaza II
lifestyle center will be built on 8.5
acres in Delray Beach, Fla. Designed by
Vander Ploeg & Associates, Boca Raton,
the complex will include six buildings
ranging from three to five stories and
have 182,000 sf of restaurant and retail
space. An additional 106,000 sf of Class A
office space and a residential component
including 197 apartments, townhouses,
and lofts round out the project.
Florida mixed-use complex
includes retail, residential
Hardin Construction Company’s Austin, Texas, office is serving as GC for the $50
million freshman housing complex at the University of Houston. Designed by HADP
Architecture, Austin, the seven-story, 300,000-sf facility will be located on the
university’s central campus and have 1,172 beds, residential advisor offices, a social
lounge, a computer lab, multipurpose rooms, a fitness center, and a convenience
store. Exterior spaces will be designed to encourage outdoor activities, while site pav-
ing will reinforce a strong pedestrian/bicycle connection with the campus. The proj-
ect, the first phase of two similar residence halls, is expected to open in fall 2010.
Residence hall designed specifically for freshman
bdc0908_dboard 8 8/5/2009 12:48:11 AM
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of business owners are using it to get better terms —
no matter who they do business with. Find out how at
plumcard.com/who or call 1-866-993-PLUM.
“If I can knock off
a point and a half
off my bill, that’s a
huge benefit over
a lot of dollars.”
Chris Zane
Zane’s Cycles
Member Since 2000
Input #6 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 9 7/29/2009 3:29:58 PM
The $30 million upgrade, restoration,
and expansion of the Mark Taper Forum
in Los Angeles was completed by the
team of Rios Clementi Hale Studios
(architect), Harley Ellis Devereaux (ex-
ecutive architect/MEP), KPFF (structural
engineer), and Taisei Construction (GC).
Work on the Welton Becket-designed
1967 complex included an overhaul of
the auditorium, lighting, and acoustics.
Work also focused on expanding the
back-stage area and creating a 1,350-sf
downstairs lounge. The historic building’s
exterior—an iconic example of New For-
malism—which includes a wraparound
sculptural mural, was also restored.
Restoration gives new life to
New Formalism icon
The Department of Homeland Security’s
new U.S. Citizenship and Immigration
Services facility in Irving, Texas, was
designed by 4240 Architecture and
developed by JDL Castle Corporation. The
focal point of the two-story, 56,000-sf
building is the double-height, glass-walled
Ceremony Room where new citizens take
the oath. The facility also has interview
rooms and offices for the Dallas USCIS of-
fice. Deep overhangs, sun shades, locally
sourced materials, and energy-efficient
systems make the building a candidate for
LEED Silver certification.
Citizenship building in Texas
targets LEED Silver
ON THE DRAWING BOARD
10 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
One of Kentucky’s largest performing arts venues should open in 2011—that’s
when construction is expected to wrap up on Eastern Kentucky University’s Busi-
ness & Technology Center for Performing Arts. The 93,000-sf Broadway-caliber
theater will seat 2,000 audience members and have a 60x24-foot stage prosce-
nium and a fly loft. A large lobby and a 250-seat black-box theater are also part
of the package. The theater comprises the second phase of the university’s $32
million Business & Technology Center project, designed by Sherman Carter Barn-
hart with D.W. Wilburn Inc. as GC. Phase I includes a three-classroom, 20,000-sf
addition to an existing academic facility.
Broadway-style theater headed to Kentucky
Input #000 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
LIGHT INDULGENCES
M|nneapo||s 612 339 5958
schu| ershook. com
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W Minneapolis - The Foshay
Input # 7 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_dboard 10 8/5/2009 12:48:28 AM
Talk to the steel joist and deck company
that can improve your process.
Flexible to the Finish
Together, let’s build your business.
www.newmill.com/future
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You’ve read about BIM, so you’ve seen the future. But now is
the time to build the connections that will make your business
better, today.
Let’s talk about a new kind of joist and deck supply. Let’s talk
about new design ideas to achieve an architect’s vision, new
ways to engineer out costs for an owner, and a new kind of
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Input #8 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 11A 7/29/2009 3:30:15 PM
THIS IS 0NE VERY RESPONSIVE FAUCET.
Proximity

Sensing Technology is the next generation
in responsive hands-free functionality that contributes
to water efficiency. This revolutionary technology
transforms the entire faucet into a sensor, automatically
responding when approached. There are no optics or
infrared to maintain. All backed by the industry’s best
5-year limited warranty. Another way that Delta is
more than just a faucet.
deltafaucet.com/commercial/proximity
©

2
0
0
9

M
a
s
c
o

C
o
r
p
o
r
a
t
i
o
n

o
f

I
n
d
i
a
n
a
Input #9 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 12 7/29/2009 3:31:41 PM
PRODUCTS
Products at Work
Using Bluebeam PDF Revu, construction management firm William A. Berry &
Son of Danvers, Mass., the Chicago office of architect Perkins+Will, and their
subcontractors electronically reviewed and redlined 42,000 pages of construc-
tion documents using Bluebeam PDF Revu for the Overlook Center in Waltham,
Mass., home of the New England office of Adobe Systems. By going paperless
the team reduced the $44.7 million, 107,000-sf project’s carbon footprint
by 1,557 lb. of CO
2
. The project is applying for a LEED Innovation & Design
Credit from the U.S. Green Building Council.
Bluebeam
Input No. 207 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
Paperless project produced with PDF Revu
Valor Christian High School is the first
private school in Colorado to earn Gold
certification through the USGBC’s LEED
rating system. Wausau Window and Wall
Systems provided high-performance
windows manufactured with recycled
aluminum for the campus’s academic
building. The $55 million, 35-acre
campus in Highlands Ranch includes a
130,000-sf academic building, an ath-
letic complex, and a football and track
stadium, for a maximum 1,200 stu-
dents. Wausau’s 3250 Series Heritage
windows are part of an advanced light-
ing/daylighting control system specified
by SlaterPaull Architects of Denver, the
design architect. Saunders Construction
of Englewood, Colo., served as GC.
Wausau Window and
Wall Systems
Input No. 201 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
LEED Gold high school
gets high-performance
aluminum windows
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 13
Bradley Corp. has figured out a way to
squeeze a faucet, soap dispenser, and
hand dryer in a single lavatory unit,
reducing or even eliminating the need
for separate hand dryers or paper towel
dispensers. The Advocate saves space
and improves user safety by eliminat-
ing the “drip trip” to the hand dryer
or paper towel dispenser. The unit
features a low-energy hand dryer, a
0.38-gpm faucet, and ndite technol-
ogy, which powers the faucet without
electricity or batteries. The solid-
surface lavatory is made with 25%
preconsumer granules and a bio-based
resin. The material is Greenguard cer-
tified as low emitting, and is available
in eight colors.
Bradley Corp.
Input No. 210 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
New lavatory system hits the trifecta
bdc0908paw 13 8/6/2009 10:08:04 AM
Products at Work
PRODUCTS
Red Robin Gourmet Burgers has replaced 12,000 standard incandescent and
halogen lights in more than 150 of its restaurants with more efficient seven-
watt GE light emitting diode (LED) PAR 20 floodlights and spotlights. Red
Robin is using the LED lights for downlighting applications that require a high
quality of light, measured as lamp-to-lamp white LED color consistency. The
installation is the largest application of GE’s seven-watt LED PAR lamp in a
restaurant setting to date.
GE
Input No. 205 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
The Lancaster, Calif., YMCA wanted its
new building to be comfortable while
maintaining good indoor air quality
and earning LEED points. Mechanical
engineer Levine-Segal of Los Angeles
specified a design that used Reznor
HVAC equipment to heat and cool
each zone in the building according
to its needs. The engineers selected
the Reznor PreevA series because its
hybrid systems included high-effi-
ciency, three-stage DX cooling coupled
with evaporative cooling modules. The
AquaSaver technology in the PreevA
series increases evaporative efficiency
while also reducing water consump-
tion—a key LEED factor. The hybrid
systems sensed both indoor and
outdoor conditions and automatically
switched back and forth from stan-
dard DX cooling to evaporative cooling
mode as needed.
Reznor
Input No. 206 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
Red Robin uses LEDs for energy efficiency
HVAC systems bring energy efficiency
to the YMCA
14 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Towering above the Chicago skyline
at 1,450 feet, Willis Tower (formerly
the Sears Tower) is the tallest building
in North America. Its newest fea-
ture, the “Skydeck Ledge,” features
all-glass viewing booths that provide
a heart-pounding, but safe, view
thanks to DuPont SafetyGlas structural
interlayers. The deck construction,
laminated with DuPont SentryGlas, is
1½ inches thick, offering five times
greater strength and 100 times greater
stiffness than conventional laminating
interlayer materials. It was constructed
to bear five tons.
DuPont
Input No. 208 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
Glass makes view from
the top possible
bdc0908paw 14 8/6/2009 8:30:16 PM
The new 58,000-sf student union at
Northern Kentucky University in Highland
Heights creates a crossroads for student,
faculty, and staff activities. University
administrators sought a “unique and
appealing identity” that would raise the
architectural standard and set a new
direction for excellence on the campus,
according to Michael Jacobs, principal
of design firm Omni Architects, Lexing-
ton, Ky. Three thousand sf of Rheinzink
preweathered blue-gray horizontal reveal
panels and 500 sf of blue-gray perforated
reveal panels were specified. The panels
were fabricated and installed by JC
Industries, Louisville. General contractor:
Messer Construction Co., Cincinnati.
Rheinzink
Input No. 203 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
Panels give a new look to student union in Kentucky
Input #10 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908paw 15 8/6/2009 8:30:21 PM
2
3
1
9 Building Tips from the Experts
Insulating concrete forms have a long history of success in low-rise
buildings, but now Building Teams are specifying ICFs for mid-
and high-rise structures—more than 100 feet. ICF walls can be
used for tall unsupported walls (for, say, movie theaters and big-box
stores) and for multistory, load-bearing walls (for hotels, multifam-
ily residential buildings, and student residence halls).
Our trusted ICF experts offer the following tips for design-
ing and constructing tall ICF walls:
Pre-plan your job by drawing a simple cross section with
the ICF you are using. The cross section will show you how
openings line up with the coursing of the ICF joints and where
embeds will be placed, says Glen Klassen, regional manager
with ICF manufacturer Arxx, Cobourg, Ont. “During the build
process, your crew can follow this cross section to know when
to stop placing forms and start placing embeds.”
Account for the ICF formwork course height. Designers
can greatly reduce the amount of formwork cuts the contrac-
tor will be required to make by considering the course height
of the ICF product when designing the walls, says Kelvin
Doerr, VP of engineering and technical services for Reward Wall
Systems, Omaha, Neb. Doerr says architects should factor in wall
heights, window heights, and floor elevations when possible.
Base concrete slump and aggregate size on ICF
manufacturer recommendations. Both concrete slump and
aggregate size are impacted by the formwork tie configuration
within the formwork cavity, as well as by the amount of open
space available around the ties to allow concrete to effectively
flow within the forms, says Donn C. Thompson, AIA, LEED
AP, CGP, director of Low Rise Buildings with the Portland
Cement Association, Skokie, Ill. “Ties with smaller openings
will require smaller aggregate to insure the concrete flows ef-
fectively through the forms,” he says.
Arxx’s Klassen offers this rule of thumb: If the concrete is
restricted slightly at the top form around the rebar before
flowing into the wall, it’s just right. If the concrete gets re-
By Dave Barista, Managing Editor
P
H
O
T
O
:

A
R
X
X
Want to go high with insulating concrete forms?
Better keep these helpful tips in mind.
CORE & SHELL SOLUTIONS
16 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
TALL ICF
WALLS
bdc0908ICF_ID 16 8/6/2009 12:46:07 PM
4
9
8
7
6
5
Input #11 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
Building outside
the box
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www.amvicsystem.com
+
stricted to the point of not flowing down into the wall, it’s too
low of a slump. If the concrete flows freely into the wall with
no restriction, it is likely too high a slump.
Consider the STC rating needed for the job. Once you
know the sound transmission class, consider what needs to be
added to the ICF wall if an STC rating of 50 or higher is re-
quired, says John Krzic, accounts manager with Amvic Building
System, Toronto. “For example, by adding a resilient channel
to the ICF wall and then installing the drywall, it will increase
the STC rating of the wall assembly,” says Krzic.
Take steps to ensure the concrete completely fills the
form. “One concern with tall ICF walls is that concrete may
not fill all parts of the form since the walls are generally thin,”
says Lionel Lemay, PE, SE, LEED AP, CAE, senior VP of
sustainable development, National Ready Mixed Concrete
Association, Silver Spring, Md. To help avoid holes and gaps in
the concrete pour, Lemay advises the following:
• Place a single layer of reinforcement in the center of the wall
to allow for more space on either side of the reinforcement.
• Allocate greater spacing of reinforcement than is required
in ACI 318 14.5, which requires a maximum spacing of three
times the wall thickness or 18 inches, whichever is smaller.
• Consider using self-consolidating concrete. “Keep in mind that
self-consolidating concrete exerts greater pressure on forms, so ad-
ditional bracing will be required for most ICF systems,” says Lemay.
Specify an ICF that is fully reversible. “These forms have
no top, bottom, left, or right side, and, therefore, are more effi-
ciently stacked, reducing construction costs,” says Reward’s Doerr.
Repeat window patterns when possible. In multistory
load-bearing applications such as multifamily, senior living,
and hotel projects, try to repeat window patterns from floor
to floor so that the openings remain stacked for the full height
of the wall assembly, says PCA’s Thompson. This maximizes
efficiency in design and construction.
Make sure, in noncombustible Type I, II, III, and IV
multistory building projects, that the noncombustible floor
system intersects the foam plastic on the interior of the
building. “The foam plastic must not be continuous from floor
to floor, and special detailing is necessary to meet these require-
ments,” says Doerr. In addition, IBC states that interior walls
must be covered with a 15-minute thermal barrier. Doerr says
half-inch gypsum board will do the trick.
Brace from the inside. The higher the wall, the more difficult
and costly it is to reach the exterior of the wall with bracing, says
Amvic’s Krzic. “Proper bracing will help to ensure that walls will be
straight and level,” he says. “This is important as it can affect other
sub trades, wall finishes, and structural integrity of the building.”
For more on ICFs, visit: www.BDCnetwork.com/article/
ca6627257.html BD+C
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 17
bdc0908ICF_ID 17 8/6/2009 12:46:21 PM
Energy Efficiency The thermal and moisture resistance properties of FOAMULAR
®
XPS insulation is critical to long-term building
envelope performance. FOAMULAR
®
insulation has a very low rate of water absorption, resulting in excellent long-term thermal performance.
Unlike other rigid foam insulation, FOAMULAR
®
XPS insulation – tested under real-time conditions – effectively maintains 90 percent of its
R-value (R-5 per inch) for 20 years
1
.
Above-Grade Applications FOAMULAR
®
insulation is an excellent choice for many above-grade insulation applications in
commercial buildings. In exterior walls and structural wall framing, FOAMULAR
®
insulation offers protection from energy loss due to
thermal bridging through wood or metal framing or steel fasteners. Using FOAMULAR
®
insulation can satisfy energy codes such as ASHRAE 90.1
2
and contributes to achieving LEED
®
credits.
Product Availability Owens Corning’s new LEED
®
certified plant in Gresham, Oregon provides a source of FOAMULAR
®
insulation in the Pacific Northwest and has a new manufacturing process compliant with the Montreal Protocol. This new location helps
streamline delivery and reduces the amount of energy necessary for transport.
1
See actual warranty for details.
2
ASHRAE 90.1; American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, 1791 Tullie Circle, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329.
LEED is a registered trademark of the U.S. Green Building Council.
The color PINK is a registered trademark of Owens Corning. ©2009 Owens Corning.
Not all insulation products are made the same
Building professionals face a significant challenge in light of changing codes and a new understanding
of the energy and environmental impact of building practices. FOAMULAR
®
insulation protects the
performance of your building envelopes by providing superior moisture and thermal performance,
while offering incredible application versatility.
For more information, visit www.owenscorningfoam.com or call 1-800-GET-PINK.

ADV ERT I S EMENT
EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS)
Open cells let water in
EPS can easily come apart, as it is manufactured by
molding together polystyrene beads under heat
and pressure, allowing moisture and air penetration,
resulting in voids and causing reduced R-value.
POLYISOCYANURATE (ISO)
Brittle cells increase water absorption
ISO can be brittle and friable because of a
thermoset manufacturing process that uses
continuous lamination of liquid raw materials
that expand between facing materials. This
process creates an irregular cell structure that
lends itself to high moisture permeability.
EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE (XPS)
Closed cells keep moisture out
XPS is manufactured with materials that produce a
consistent and uniform network of homogenous
closed cells that stay together, while foams made
with other processes may break down. XPS cell
structure withstands moisture penetration and loss
of R-value over time.
A CLEAR WINNER IN PERFORMANCE – XPS INSULATION
The performance of rigid foam insulation is dependent on several factors—whether it’s open or
closed cell, as well as the type of polymer and blowing agent used in its manufacture. The following
showcases the differences in rigid insulation and the clear advantage of using XPS:
bdc0908_ads.indd 18A 8/6/2009 11:34:39 AM
*
ASHRAE 90.1; American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, 1791 Tullie Circle, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329.
* **
Competing types of rigid insulation include Expanded Polystyrene and
Polyisocyanurate.

See actual warranty for details. LEED is a registered trademark of the U.S. Green Building Council. The color PINK is a registered trademark of Owens Corning. ©2009 Owens Corning.
Exceed
green
expectations
with
PINK
specif ications
With energy codes constantly evolving, it’s important to spec materials that do more than just
meet building requirements. With Owens Corning FOAMULAR
®
insulation, your projects can
surpass ASHRAE 90.1
*
standards and achieve the LEED
®
qualifications you strive for. FOAMULAR
®
insulation’s high resistance to water gives it optimal thermal performance in a multitude of applications.
And unlike competing types of rigid insulation,
**
FOAMULAR
®
insulation maintains 90 percent of its
R-value for 20 years

. So when it comes to your specs, think PINK, and your buildings won’t just be
built energy efficient, they’ll stay energy efficient. And now that Owens Corning has a LEED
®
certified plant in Gresham, with a new manufacturing process compliant with the
Montreal Protocol, it’s even easier to get FOAMULAR
®
insulation.
To learn more about how FOAMULAR
®
insulation can make your buildings
more energy efficient, go to owenscorningfoam.com or call 1
-
800
-
GET
-
PINK.

Input #12 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 19A 8/6/2009 11:33:58 AM
Energy Efficiency The thermal and moisture resistance properties of FOAMULAR
®
XPS insulation is critical to long-term building
envelope performance. FOAMULAR
®
insulation has a very low rate of water absorption, resulting in excellent long-term thermal performance.
Unlike other rigid foam insulation, FOAMULAR
®
XPS insulation – tested under real-time conditions – effectively maintains 90 percent of its
R-value (R-5 per inch) for 20 years
1
.
Above-Grade Applications FOAMULAR
®
insulation is an excellent choice for many above-grade insulation applications in
commercial and residential buildings. In exterior walls and structural wall framing, FOAMULAR
®
insulation offers protection from energy
loss due to thermal bridging through wood or metal framing or steel fasteners. Using FOAMULAR
®
insulation can satisfy energy codes such as
ASHRAE 90.1
2
and contributes to achieving LEED
®
credits.
Product Availability Owens Corning has strategically placed manufacturing facilities throughout the country to streamline delivery
and reduce the amount of energy necessary for shipping.
1
See actual warranty for details.
2
ASHRAE 90.1; American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, 1791 Tullie Circle, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329.
LEED is a registered trademark of the U.S. Green Building Council.
The color PINK is a registered trademark of Owens Corning. ©2009 Owens Corning.
Not all insulation products are made the same
Building professionals face a significant challenge in light of changing codes and a new understanding
of the energy and environmental impact of building practices. FOAMULAR
®
insulation protects the
performance of your building envelopes by providing superior moisture and thermal performance,
while offering incredible application versatility.
For more information, visit www.owenscorningfoam.com or call 1-800-GET-PINK.

ADV ERT I S EMENT
EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS)
Open cells let water in
EPS can easily come apart, as it is manufactured by
molding together polystyrene beads under heat
and pressure, allowing moisture and air penetration,
resulting in voids and causing reduced R-value.
POLYISOCYANURATE (ISO)
Brittle cells increase water absorption
ISO can be brittle and friable because of a
thermoset manufacturing process that uses
continuous lamination of liquid raw materials
that expand between facing materials. This
process creates an irregular cell structure that
lends itself to high moisture permeability.
EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE (XPS)
Closed cells keep moisture out
XPS is manufactured with materials that produce a
consistent and uniform network of homogenous
closed cells that stay together, while foams made
with other processes may break down. XPS cell
structure withstands moisture penetration and
loss of R-value over time.
A CLEAR WINNER IN PERFORMANCE – XPS INSULATION
The performance of rigid foam insulation is dependent on several factors—whether it’s open or
closed cell, as well as the type of polymer and blowing agent used in its manufacture. The following
showcases the differences in rigid insulation and the clear advantage of using XPS:
bdc0908_ads.indd 18B 8/6/2009 11:35:02 AM
You wouldn’t design a building with 23% of your walls left open, but if you’re not accounting
for thermal bridging that’s essentially what you’re doing. That’s why it’s impor tant to spec
Owens Corning FOAMULAR
®
insulation for above-grade sheathing. FOAMULAR
®
insulation
not only satisfies ASHRAE 90.1
*
by reducing energy loss caused by thermal bridging, it also
has an incredibly high resistance to water absorption. And unlike competing types of rigid
insulation,
**
FOAMULAR
®
insulation maintains 90 percent of its R-value for 20 years.

So your
walls won’t just be built energy efficient, they’ll stay energy efficient.
To learn more about how FOAMULAR
®
insulation can reduce the effects of
thermal bridging, go to owenscorningfoam.com or call 1
-
800
-
GET
-
PINK.

*ASHRAE 90.1; American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, 1791 Tullie Circle, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30329. **Competing types of rigid insulation
include Expanded Polystyrene and Polyisocyanurate.

See actual warranty for details. The color PINK is a registered trademark of Owens Corning. ©2009 Owens Corning.
Input #13 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 19B 8/6/2009 11:35:19 AM
Timely’sNewBuilt-In Door Seal Helps
PREVENT JOB-SITE CALL-BACKS.
Factory
Prefinished
Steel Kerf
Frame
Factory
Installed
Mitered
Door
Seal
CALL-BACK#1
Improper cleaning of
door surface leads to
poor adhesion and
separation from frame.
CALL-BACK#2
Poor hand alignment
of door seal can cause
inadequate sealing.
Effective door sealing that avoids 'Call Backs' isn't
the only built-in advantage. Installed prefinished
Timely frames cost about 30% below primed hollow
metal frames. Plus these Timely design features:
• Door seals are available in beige, black, white,
bronze and grey
• Prefinished - does away with job-site painting
• 4 stocking, 32 custom colors or any other color match
• 5 casing profiles, or choose your own wood casing
• 90 minute positive pressure fire rating
• Full perimeter anchoring for greater strength
Ask your distributor about Timely's superior quality and
workmanship -- an industry leader for almost 40 years.
© TIMELY 2009
www.timelyframes.com/bdc
Timely Corporate Offices: 10241 Norris Ave., Pacoima, CA 91331-2292 / 818-492-3500 / 800-247-6242 / Fax 818-492-3530
Eastern Distribution Center: 9782 Interocean Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45246 / 513-682-9600 / 800-346-4395 / Fax 513-682-4102
Georgia: 4713 Hammermill Road, Tucker, Georgia 30084 / 770-493-8811 / 800-445-8899 / Fax 770-491-1653
Factory installed
non-adhesive door seal
slips into kerf. Seal
can easily be replaced.
Input #14 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 20 7/29/2009 3:37:23 PM
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
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. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
BRICK + STONE RECONSTRUCTION
By C.C. Sullivan and Barbara Horwitz-Bennett
After reading this article, you should be able to:
Discuss the basic issues affecting the
restoration of historic brick structures.
Describe the characteristics of natural
stone and historic mortars that must be
considered in renovation and restora-
tion projects.
Explain the basic details and installation
techniques for proper application of
manufactured cast stone.
List three ways to prevent moisture-relat-
ed defects in masonry and brick walls.
Explain the benefits of stone and brick
for sustainable building projects.
Learning Objectives
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 21
Restoration and
Renovation
The Gerding Theater at the Armory, in
Portland, Ore., the country’s first LEED
Platinum historic renovation and first
LEED Platinum theater, involved exten-
sive brick restoration work. Originally
constructed in 1889, it now accom-
modates a 599-seat main-stage theater
and a 200-seat black-box.
Historic
Masonry
H
istoric restoration and preservation efforts are accelerating throughout
the U.S., thanks in part to available tax credits, awards programs, and
green building trends. While these projects entail many different build-
ing components and systems, façade restoration—as the public face of these
older structures—is a key focus.
Recognizing this, seasoned architects and consultants often spend much
time analyzing and evaluating an existing structure with the goal of best pre-
serving the original façade design.
According to Andrew Wolfram, AIA, LEED AP, a senior associate in the
San Francisco office of Perkins+Will (www.perkinswill.com), such projects of-
ten start out with a longer pre-design phase than in new construction. “At the
initiation of the project, we conduct a comprehensive due diligence analysis
of the building,” says Wolfram. “We start with an analysis and evaluation of
historic drawings and specifications, all the way through archival research.”
The next step, says Wolfram, who has spent most of his 20-year career on
historic preservation projects, is an overall “binocular survey” of common
bdc0908supp_brick 21 8/6/2009 10:11:28 PM
BRICK + STONE RECONSTRUCTION
22 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Adaptive Reuse Case Study
Architecture firm Perkins+Will is turning
a 1930s San Francisco Public Health Ser-
vice Hospital in the city’s Presidio district
into a 22,000-sf apartment building. Tap-
ping into historic tax credits and tracking
for LEED Gold certification, the program
for this unique adaptive-reuse project
includes restoring historic brick and stone
façades on the Georgian revival structure.
“We are currently working with the
contractor to select appropriate infill
materials at areas where historic masonry
had been removed in prior renovations
of the building,” says Andrew Wolfram,
AIA, LEED AP, a senior associate in
Perkins+Will’s San Francisco office.
Glass-fiber-reinforced polymer panels have
been selected to emulate terra cotta and
limestone in larger decorative areas. The
panels can easily be molded from existing
details. However, for smaller areas at a his-
toric entrance portico, “We have found that
it is less expensive as an infill material to
use Indiana limestone,” says Wolfram.
In order to boost the façade’s energy
efficiency, an interior stud wall with insu-
lation has also been specified behind the
brick wall.
The $71 million project, slated for com-
pletion this fall, will convert the space into
161 residential units, a management office,
a fitness center, a private dining room and
wine bar, and other tenant amenities.
Façade restoration in progress at the his-
toric PHS Hospital. Built in the 1930s, the
hospital is being converted into a 22,000-sf
apartment building.
Rendering of Public Health Service Hospi-
tal’s rehabbed entry portico.
signs of exterior aging. For a masonry buildings—and taking
into account local site conditions—this visual inspection
includes the overall condition of visible stone, mortar, and
grout, as well as such conditions as:
• Delamination.
• Efflorescence.
• Spalling.
• Steel lintel failure.
During this assessment, says Joseph K. Oppermann, FAIA,
a Winston-Salem, N.C.-based historic preservation consul-
tant, “We look for the patterns of deterioration as they point
to weaknesses in the design or the use of materials. We also
look to the patterns of maintenance and repairs, as the loca-
tion and frequency of repairs tell us a lot as to the areas of the
building most susceptible to problems.”
One key to a successful predesign inspection, says Robert
Mack, FAIA, a principal with MacDonald and Mack Ar-
chitects, Minneapolis (www.mmarchltd.com), is taking the
time to do a proper evaluation. “Go slow!” he advises. “The
building probably has been there for many years, and taking
the time to do tests and evaluate the results won’t lead to
significantly more deterioration.”
According to experts like David A. Vottero, AIA, senior
associate and director of architectural design, and Brian E.
Kiggins, AIA, senior associate, SchooleyCaldwell Associ-
ates, Columbus, Ohio, facilities personnel who have known
a building for some time can be extremely helpful to Build-
ing Teams who are investigating an existing structure. For
example, the project leaders can inquire about things like past
A coquina stone façade on a 1797 Spanish Colonial structure in St.
Augustine, Fla., is inspected prior to patching.
bdc0908supp_brick 22 8/6/2009 10:12:31 PM
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Input #15 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 23 7/29/2009 3:37:37 PM
repairs, the history of problems in various portions of the
building, as well as leak locations.
Another important part of the early project evaluation is
materials testing. This may include positively identifying
things like sand gradation and color, as well brick compres-
sive strength and mortar strength. Even so, Mack stresses
the importance of being practical: “For many buildings, for
example, the bricks and mortar can be adequately evaluated
using a simple hardness-classification tool rather than expen-
sive laboratory tests.”
Similarly, Oppermann, past chairman of the American
Institute of Architects Historic Resources Committee and a
founding member of the AIA Preservation Education Task
Group, says, “With most materials and construction tech-
niques, architects can handle much of the identification and
assessment process themselves, using testing laboratories for
some analyses and the manufacturers of the materials for col-
laboration on solutions.”
However, more complex or historically significant projects
do call for experts such as a historic architect or architectural
conservator, whose experience and training in materials and
methods of construction, code compliance, and architectural
history should benefit the project. As for tracking down a
credentialed professional ideal for a given project, referrals
can be procured from state historic preservation offices, the
American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic
Works (http://aic.stanford.edu), the Association for Preserva-
tion Technology (APT, www.apti.org), or local AIA offices,
according to Mack, a professor at the University of Min-
nesota School of Architecture whose career spans more than
four decades devoted to historic preservation.
Another useful resource is the AIA Historic Resources
Committee’s Guide to Historic Preservation (www.aia.org/
aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aias075381.pdf), which
gives a good overview of key players to strengthen the Build-
ing Team as well as the various stages of a typical historical
preservation project.
HISTORIC RESTORATION: BRICK
Once an overall assessment is completed, it’s time to analyze
the extent of observable or reported damage and the poten-
tial causes of its harmful effects. For brick structures, Daniel
Friedman, a Poughkeepsie, N.Y.-based consultant special-
izing in construction, environmental testing, and inspection,
offers a brief diagnostics punch list (also available in more
detail at the online resource InspectAPedia, www.inspect-
ny.com). Highlights for historic brick subjects include:
• Bulging brick walls can be caused by bond-brick or
bond-course failures, which are dangerous and require urgent
attention.
• Cracks and bulges may indicate frost and earth loading,
which can push a below-grade brick foundation wall inwards.
• Cracks and loose bricks are caused by frost, settlement,
and expansion, often found at building corners where roof
spillage is concentrated.
• Loose bricks and missing or lost mortar are common and
have various causes.
• Spalling can occur when water and frost expand behind
the brick’s exterior surface, leading to cracks where a brick
has lost its hard surface or at openings by window and door
penetrations.
• Exfoliating rust damage can occur due to improper caulk-
ing that traps moisture—for example, between the brick and a
steel lintel over a window or door.
• Improper repair mortar has many deleterious effects,
including surface spalling, and occurs when a high-Portland-
content mortar is used on soft brick in a climate subject to
freezing weather conditions.
• Sandblasting bricks often results in a permanently dam-
aged brick surface, and is considered to be poor practice in
building renovation and maintenance.
Once problems are identified, possibilities for replacing
and restoring the brick can be considered. Meredith Strout,
AIA, LEED AP, a senior project manager in the San Fran-
BRICK + STONE RECONSTRUCTION
24 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
A stucco veneer at Charleston’s Market Hall, original constructed in
1841, is being repaired.
The Association for Preservation Technology will hold its
annual conference November 2-6, 2009, in Los Angeles. In
addition to workshops, symposiums, and exhibits, field ses-
sions will feature Frank Lloyd Wright’s Textile Block houses
in Hollywood Hills, Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco Landmarks , and
Mid-century Houses by Rudolf Schindler and Richard Neutra.
More information: www.apti.org.
National Conference on
Preservation Technology
bdc0908supp_brick 24 8/6/2009 10:13:57 PM
Input #16 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads 25 8/4/2009 10:19:47 AM
Sika Sarnafil, A Division of Sika Corporation
Tel. 1-800-451-2504, Fax: 781-828-5365, www.sikacorp.com
Performance that Pays.
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At Sika Sarnafil, it means delivering high-quality, energy-efficient roofing and waterproofing solutions
that not only reduce environmental impact but continue to outperform after decades of service.
Around the world, Sika Sarnafil products are proving their value through significantly lower utility and
maintenance costs, year after year. Unparalleled performance—designed to meet your sustainability
goals of energy efficiency, environmentally preferable products, greenhouse gas reduction and waste
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managers alike. To learn more about how our products can help you achieve your sustainability goals,
visit SustainabilityThatPays.com.
Converting Waste
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Sika Sarnafil has diverted
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bdc0908_ads 26 8/4/2009 10:33:16 AM
Sika Sarnafil is proud to be a participating member of VisibleCity.com,
an online virtual city that demonstrates the next wave in city design,
construction and living. VisibleCity is an interactive space where architects,
engineers, contractors and developers meet to explore forward-thinking
design; consider sustainability issues; and experience innovative building
products that positively impact a built environment’s performance.
Take a virtual tour of the Carver-Hawkeye Arena and learn more about
the future of sustainable practices and Sika Sarnafil’s high-performance
solutions by visiting VisibleCity.com.
PROJECT PROFILE
Carver-Hawkeye Arena
University of Iowa
Iowa City, Iowa
Architect
Benchmark, Inc.
Roofing Contractor
CEI Roofing Texas, LLC
Roofing Systems
Sika Sarnafil mechanically
attached roof system, using
Sarnafil 60 mil S327 EnergySmart
Roof
®
membrane (white)
Project Size
158,000 square feet
A Winning Performance
From a Resilient Player
The University of Iowa’s Carver-Hawkeye Arena
seats 15,500 for basketball and is host to numerous
concerts, commencements and events. The arena’s
original mechanically attached Sarnafil roof had
been performing admirably for 25 years when a
severe storm hit in April 2006, damaging parts of
the roof. The university’s engineer, Jeff Hayes, had
been planning to gradually phase in a new roofing
system, but the storm’s impact changed the game
plan. Hayes suddenly found himself playing against
the clock to replace the roof in time for the fall
basketball season.
Hayes first retained the roofing consultant services
of Benchmark, Inc. of Cedar Rapids. After evaluating
various roofing options, Benchmark recommended
the Sarnafil EnergySmart Roof®. The choice was
based on the positive experience with Sika Sarnafil
roofs, as well as the impressive longevity of the
arena’s original Sarnafil roof system.
Playing Against the Clock
Prior to the start of construction, Sika Sarnafil
came up with a proposal for the old membrane:
recycle it for use in a new Sika Sarnafil product.
Hayes liked the idea. “The University is always
looking for opportunities to recycle materials that
would otherwise end up in the landfill,” he said.
The roofing contractor, CEI Roofing, was also
enthusiastic. As CEI president Byron Warnick
put it, “Sika Sarnafil really are the pioneers in
recycling old roofing membranes and we found
this very exciting.”
Knowing the roof had to be completed before
basketball season, CEI crews worked seven days
a week, except for four days when there were
home football games. They first removed the old
membrane and replaced the insulation around
the outer edges of the roof. Most of the remaining
insulation was determined to be in good shape and
could be reused. Gypsum board was mechanically
fastened over the insulation and the Sarnafil
EnergySmart Roof membrane was then installed.
Recycling Wins Extra Points for All
The discarded membrane was rolled up and sent
to a processor in preparation for recycling back into
roofing membrane products. Even after 25 years
of non-stop performance the aging roof material
proved to be a resilient player. Like a seasoned
athlete, the aging Sika Sarnafil membrane
continues to perform today in its new, recycled
edition, while the new EnergySmart Roof continues
the legacy of performance under pressure. Sika
Sarnafil exceeded expectations and scored big
with everyone involved in the project. Warnick was
especially pleased with the recycling initiative,
calling it “something that owners will want to be a
part of.” Hayes added, “It’s a win/win situation for
the University—and for everyone.”
Input #17 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads 27 8/4/2009 10:33:33 AM
cisco office of HOK (www.hok.com), describes her firm’s
general approach: “Our consultants will advise us, but our
goal is to preserve, not necessarily restore, what is left of the
brick and match the mortar in color, softness, and strength.”
As for specific options, Harry J. Hunderman, FAIA, a
senior principal with Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates (www.
wje.com), Northbrook, Ill., lists removal and reinstallation
of original brick as one restoration strategy. Other options
include using salvaged brick from elsewhere on the building,
reclaiming salvaged brick from other buildings, or find-
ing a matching new brick, which may require custom brick
fabrication.
In the opinion of SchooleyCaldwell’s Kiggins, resorting to
custom brick fabrication should be used only in rare instanc-
es. “Given the plethora of options available to designers, it is
almost always possible to find an existing brick that works for
a given application,” he says.
In purely aesthetic terms, blending the old with the new is
important, yet as Oppermann points out, “The compatibility
of performance characteristics is critical to extending the life
of the building.” In other words, the repairs and renovations
need to be consistent with the original construction technol-
ogy in order to minimize future maintenance.
Addressing both aesthetics and performance, one of the
most common historic preservation approaches is repointing.
Because this technique requires skilled handwork, special ma-
terials, time, and money, the best approach may be to repoint
only where necessary on a wall, rather than repointing an
entire wall elevation, says Mack. However, if repointing is
required for a good percentage of the wall, then repointing
the whole wall often ends up being more cost effective.
Before repointing can begin, the first step is match-
ing the existing mortar, as Jeff L. LaRue, AIA, senior vice
president and director of quality management in the Dallas
office of HKS (www.hksinc.com), explains: “Repointing
with mortar which matches the existing in color, shape,
and texture is mandatory for a successful restoration.”
However, mortar matching can be one of the biggest tech-
nical obstacles facing masonry contractors, says Stephan
Niewiadomski, vice president of National Restoration Sys-
tems, Rolling Meadows, Ill. (www.nrsys.com). Fortunately,
today’s choice of mortar types is more extensive than ever,
making it easier to match colors.
According to Kiggins, “One aspect of mortar that should
not be overlooked is the color and size of the aggregate,”
which can have a big impact on the overall appearance of the
mortar. “Finding a source for a matching aggregate is critical
in many instances because it adds to the overall appearance of
the mortar.”
As described in a technical paper that Mack co-authored
for the National Preservation Society (http://www.nps.
gov/history/hps/TPS/briefs/brief02.htm), the new mortar
must either have greater vapor permeability and be softer (as
measured in compressive strength) than the masonry units,
or the new mortar must be as vapor permeable and as soft or
softer than the historic mortar.
BRICK + STONE RECONSTRUCTION
Editor’s Note
Additional required reading online! To earn 1 AIA/CES continuing
education unit, complete the required reading and take the CEU
exam posted at www.BDCnetwork.com/article/ca6675037.html.
28 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Mortar Types (measured by volume)
ASTM Hydrated lime
Designation Cement or lime putty Sand
Type M
2,500 psi 1 1/4 3 to 3¾
Type S
1,800 psi 1 1/2 4 to 4½
Type N
750 psi 1 1 5 to 6
Type O
350 psi 1 2 8 to 9
Type K
75 psi 1 3 10 to 12
Type “L”
(lime and sand) 0 1 2¼ to 3
SOURCE: National Park Service
http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/TPS/briefs/brief02.htm
The ASTM designates five mortar types, each with recommended mix
proportions, to aid in distinguishing between high-strength mortars and
soft, flexible mortars—and to ensure the right physical properties are
achieved. In decreasing order of strength, they are: Type M, S, N, O, K
and a Type “L,” a straight lime and sand mix.
Suggested Mortar Types for
Different Exposures
Exposure
Masonry Material Sheltered Moderate Severe
Very durable: granite,
hard-cored brick, etc. O N S
Moderately durable: limestone,
durable stone, molded brick K O N
Minimally durable:
soft handmade brick “L” K O
Source: National Park Service Preservation Brief, “Repointing Mortar Joints in
Historic Masonry Buildings” http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/TPS/briefs/brief02.htm
Mortars for historic preservation projects must be selected according to
the type of masonry material and anticipated exposure.
bdc0908supp_brick 28 8/6/2009 10:15:05 PM
www.arcat.com
ARCAT B¡M
Objects, Systems, Materials
B M
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Input #18 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 29 7/29/2009 3:38:17 PM
Design 30
BIM/IT 34
Collaboration 38
Healthcare 40
Products 42
Technology 44
Business Management 46
Green Building 48
29 Great
Solutions
AEC firms are hotbeds of invention and innovation to
meet client needs in today’s highly competitive envi-
ronment. The editors of Building Design+Construction
are pleased to present 29 “Great Solutions” to some
of the most complex problems and issues facing
Building Teams today.
30 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
For the expanded Great Solutions
report, visit www.BDCnetwork.com/
GreatSolutions
bdc0908GreatSol_Design 30 8/6/2009 12:58:11 PM
DESIGN
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www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 31
Canopies offer high style
below bridges
At several points along the riverwalk, the path runs beneath
bridges where passing vehicles can shower pedestrians below
with dirt and debris and where the covered, shadowy space
can instill a sense of trepidation in those walking underneath.
The architects’ solution to these problems was the installation of
canopies that act as barriers between the bridges and the path-
way. Bright lighting is integrated into the canopies, which are
covered with stainless steel shingles that act as mirrors to reflect
the water’s shimmering elegance. One Chicago architecture critic
blogging about the canopies wrote: “instead of under-bridge fear,
you get under-bridge delight.” BD+C
Shielding pedestrians from falling dirt and debris, this canopy under the
Michigan Avenue bridge shimmers as its steel shingles reflect the river.
Chicago has long enjoyed a beautiful waterfront along Lake
Michigan, but the Windy City’s second waterfront along
the Chicago River was often ignored and mostly neglected.
Thanks to a $22 million rehab by local architect Carol Ross
Barney and her associate John Fried, a 1.3-mile stretch of land
morphed into an urban park with a 17-foot-wide promenade
that meanders along the river’s south bank through the heart of
downtown Chicago. Parts of the Riverwalk existed prior to the
overhaul, but the usable spaces existed as self-contained islands
with no relation to one another, forcing pedestrians to climb
steps and cross busy streets to get from one to the other. Con-
necting these previously unconnected spaces and creating an
uninterrupted path (gaps were built atop steel piles and concrete
landfill) that can be used by people strolling, jogging, or biking
along the water was critical. The improvements also brought
cafés, retail, tour boat docks, extensive landscaping and hard-
scaping, and abundant seating. The city’s new Vietnam Veterans
Memorial Fountain is also installed along the Riverwalk.
1. RIVERWALK TRANSFORMS CHICAGO’S
SECOND WATERFRONT
P
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The Riverwalk runs along the south bank of the Chicago River,
giving the Windy City a 1.3-mile-long pedestrian promenade.
By Robert Cassidy, Editor-in-Chief; Jay W. Schneider,
Senior Editor; Dave Barista, Managing Editor; and Jeff
Yoders, Senior Associate Editor
bdc0908GreatSol_Design 31 8/6/2009 9:51:03 PM
32 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
Reconstruction of the High Line turned 1.45 miles of elevated
and abandoned railroad track into a public park that offers
unprecedented views of New York City and the Hudson River
as it winds around buildings and over streets 30 feet above
the West Side (from Gansevoort St. to 34th St., between 10th
& 11th Avenues). The original 13-mile High Line opened
in 1934 as a way to combat numerous accidents by elevat-
ing freight train tracks above street-level traffic (10th Avenue
was dubbed Death Avenue around this time), a public-private
project that cost $150 million, the equivalent of $2 billion
today. The newest High Line project, the first phase of which
opened June 8, cost $152 million and was championed by
Friends of the High Line and planned by the architects Diller
Scofidio & Renfro and landscape architect James Corner Field
Operations. As part of the adaptive reuse project, the High
Line is being fully rehabilitated (concrete repair, repainting,
and drainage improvements) and pathways, lush plantings,
seating (fixed and mobile) and lighting are being added. Ac-
cess points occur every two to three blocks. The High Line,
which took inspiration from the Promenade Plantée in Paris,
is serving as inspiration for urban renewal projects in Chicago,
Jersey City, Rotterdam, Philadelphia, and St. Louis.
2. HIGH LINE ELEVATES THE TYPICAL URBAN PARK
Built on the 75-year-old ruins of New York City’s elevated freight train tracks, the High Line is a 1.45-mile urban park that winds
around buildings and above streets on the city’s West Side. The $152 million rehab is inspiring similar projects throughout the world.
P
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GREAT SOLUTIONS
DESIGN
bdc0908GreatSol_Design 32 8/6/2009 9:51:08 PM
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 33
When Wolcott Architecture|Interiors of Culver City,
Calif., was asked to design BeachBody’s new Santa Monica,
Calif., offices, the fitness and weight loss solutions company
challenged them to create a workspace that reflected its
mission to promote healthy lifestyles. One of the 55,000-sf
office’s standout features is a ¼-mile walking track that runs
around the perimeter of the office’s third floor. Workspaces
were pulled away from outside walls allowing daylight to
filter throughout the space—sustainability aligned with the
company’s wellness goals and the office earned LEED CI
Gold—and by doing so a six-foot-wide walkway was cre-
ated. Architects turned it into a real walking track—down
to the rubber sports flooring—that also functions as a main
circulation path. Employees now have a convenient way to
incorporate walking into their exercise regimen—or a way to
work off a really big lunch.
3. WALKING TRACK FITS FIRM’S WELLNESS FOCUS
The main circulation path in BeachBody’s Santa Monica, Calif., office is also a ¼-mile walking track, complete with rubber flooring.
P
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bdc0908GreatSol_Design 33 8/6/2009 9:51:19 PM
Before 3D walkthroughs for client presentations were
popular, HKS manager of Advanced Technologies Pat
Carmichael and his team were working to marry gaming
engines with 3D building models. “What’s being tasked to
us more and more is not just to show design, but to show
function,” Carmichael said. HKS’s in-house-developed
ARCHengine allows realistic architectural visualization in
an interactive virtual environment. It includes the ability to
show real-time shadows and light, moving figures, opera-
tional mechanical equipment, and animations that run at 30
frames per second. Utilizing the polygonal structure of Epic
Games’ Unreal Engine 3, ARCHengine delivers textured
details and immersive graphic environments that can show
how a building will work to clients and potential buyers.
For the new $1 billion Dallas Cowboys Stadium, ARCH-
engine was able to show different views from different seats
and allow potential season ticket holders to walk, or fly,
through the stadium. Now, other visualization programs are
following Carmichael’s lead and using gaming engines to
show architectural design.
HKS used its ARCHengine virtual environment to allow season ticket holders to see different views and angles of the $1 billion Cowboys stadium project.
34 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
4. ARCHITECTURAL VISUALIZATION THROUGH GAMING TECHNOLOGY
To help its 1,500-plus architects design energy-efficient
buildings toward meeting AIA’s 2030 Challenge, Perkins+Will
in April launched an online energy estimating and evalua-
tion tool for new construction and retrofit projects. The firm
made the tool available to the public for free at http://2030e2.
perkinswill.com.
The 2030 e2 Energy Estimating Tool allows users to set
targets in four key areas—energy efficiency, on-site renew-
able energy, grid-supplied renewable energy, and green power
offsets—and assess a building’s design against the goals of the
2030 Challenge, which calls for an immediate 50% reduction in
carbon emissions of buildings and carbon neutrality by 2030.
Plug in the project name, location, and start date, as well as
key energy-related information such as regional fuel mix and
baseline energy use for the area, and the tool automatically
tracks progress toward 2030.
“The 2030 e2 Energy Estimating Tool allows designers to
explore different percentages of these elements to achieve the
2030 goals,” says Doug Pierce, AIA, LEED, senior associate
in Perkins+Will’s Minneapolis office and developer of the tool.
“Additionally, the tool can be used over and over to confirm
2030 compliance throughout the life of the project.”
5. FREE ONLINE DESIGN TOOL FOR ENERGY ESTIMATING AND EVALUATION
GREAT SOLUTIONS
BIM/ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
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bdc0908GreatSol_IT 34 8/6/2009 1:01:11 PM
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Input #19 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads.indd 35 7/29/2009 3:38:38 PM
GREAT SOLUTIONS
An example of how BIM virtual mockups work: The first figure (left) shows a point on a roof where a radius needed to intersect with a
tangent. However, the meeting point left no room for construction workers to caulk or flash the joint. The virtual mockup in the sec-
ond figure (right) shows how JE Dunn and its architect modeled a solution during the design stage that would permit worker access
to the point of contention, thus saving a costly change order during construction.
BIM/ INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
36 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
This model, seen on the Web in the ICEvision viewer, allows full examina-
tion of the architect’s Revit model. The client used the viewer to “fly” up
to his office window to see what his sightline would be like during a game.
JE Dunn Construction uses building information modeling
extensively on its projects, but the company (ranked #102 with
62 seats of BIM software on BD+C’s Giants BIM adoption list)
is also using 3D models for constructability analysis, includ-
ing field conditions. All information (even 2D CAD) that JE
Dunn receives from their architects on big projects is put into
a 3D model. From there, virtual mockups are created to make
sure construction conditions, such as room for a ladder and a
worker to flash or caulk a joint, are checked out and confirmed
to be buildable (see example below).
7. BIM VIRTUAL MOCKUPS FOUND TO BE LESS EXPENSIVE THAN PHYSICAL MOCKUPS
ICEvision from Salt Lake City-based Ice Edge enables users
to explore Revit or AutoCAD 3D models in a dynamically
rendered 3D viewer on a computer, smartphone, or other
mobile device. The ICEvision viewer is a full exploratory
environment of a 3D model that lets you walk through and
visualize an entire project in detail rendered directly from
AutoCAD or Revit. Publishers can also associate bookmarks
and annotations of their models to give guided tours to end
users. ICEvision is platform neutral. The ICEvision viewer
for Web and e-mail sharing is available as a free download.
ICEvision’s iPhone plug-in helps you check models for ac-
curacy directly from your jobsite.
6. EASY AUTOCAD AND REVIT FILE SHARING
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bdc0908GreatSol_IT 36 8/6/2009 1:01:36 PM
Input #20 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
Gould Evans needed to trim the cost of its tape-only data stor-
age and backup system. IT manager Chet LaBruyere wanted
to improve the accessibility of the system to all 150 Gould
Evans employees in the firm’s five offices—Kansas City, Mo.,
Lawrence, Kan., Phoenix, Tampa, and San Francisco—and
reduce the risk of data loss between them. After testing sev-
eral systems, LaBruyere decided to go with Riverbed WAN
technology and data replication software from Double-Take.
This solution enabled Gould Evans to store all of its backed-
up data on one SRO image server accessible to all offices.
Double-Take’s replication software is hardware agnostic, so it
can back up work from Mac, LINUX, or Windows computers.
The new system reduces backup labor from 36 human-hours
a week to one or two human-hours a week and saves $55,250
a year, plus another $8,400 in annual savings in tape media.
Double-Take’s system has reduced the total amount of data on
Gould Evans’s servers by 52% while more than doubling their
WAN’s bandwidth capacity.
8. BACKUP SOFTWARE SAVES DATA, MONEY AT GOULD EVANS
With Double-Take data
backup, Gould Evans’s
main server is in
constant contact with
an SRO image server.
Double-Take replicates
and compresses the
backup data to take
up less space.
bdc0908GreatSol_IT 37 8/6/2009 9:29:32 PM
Collaboration tools are big at AEC firms. Architecture firm
Perkins Eastman links its 13 offices worldwide through its
award-winning proprietary intranet system, ORCHARD,
which stands for “Online Resource for the Creative Harvest
of Architecturally Relevant Discovery” (catchy, isn’t it?). OR-
CHARD unites the firm’s Practice Area Communities to share
best design practices, insights, and lessons learned.
Over at AEC giant Heery International, “e-communities”
enable partnering between the firm’s offices around the country.
Interior designer Judy Peterson used the e-community to get
feedback on whether a project should use LEED-CI alone, or
LEED-CI with LEED for Core & Shell. The decision: CI only.
Engineering firm Walter P Moore created its “Communi-
ties of Practice” in 2008 to share expertise across its 13 offices.
The “COPs”—in its healthcare, sports, aviation, parking con-
sulting, and tall buildings practices—are staffed on a voluntary
basis. The healthcare COP, with 27 volunteers, formed its own
Medical Equipment Task Group to inventory medical equip-
ment used in hospital projects. “It’s great, because the folks in
Houston and Florida who have seen every MRI known to man
can pass that along to our new offices in California,” says Kurt
Young, PE, LEED AP, leader of WPM’s healthcare COP.
HOK designers from around the globe are able to collaborate and interact in real time in the firm’s new Advanced Collaboration Rooms. The high-tech
videoconferencing spaces allow users to display (in high definition) and mark up multiple project-related documents simultaneously.
38 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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To help foster collaboration among its 2,212 employees while
cutting travel time, expenses, and carbon emissions traveling
between its 24 office locations, HOK is fitting out its major
offices with prototype videoconferencing rooms that are like
no other in the U.S.
HOK’s Advanced Collaboration Rooms (ACR) combine
Cisco’s TelePresence high-resolution, interoperable video-
conferencing technology with PolyVision’s Thunder Virtual
Flipchart System—a sort of digital easel pad that allows HOK
designers to sketch ideas and “virtually” hang them in multiple
ACRs so the entire team can collaborate in real time.
Thunder allows users to display images, video, documents,
and even live views of computer desktops. Using a series of
projectors and flat-screen TVs in each ACR, multiple ideas and
documents can be displayed at one time, and all meeting notes
can be saved, printed, and emailed instantly to participants.
“The ability to bring HOK’s best creative minds together
in these ACRs is a powerful new tool for our virtual design
teams,” says HOK CEO Patrick MacLeamy, who led the
effort to develop the ACR concept. ACRs are currently
installed at seven HOK offices, with six more installations
planned this year.
10. MORE AEC COLLABORATION SOLUTIONS
9. HOK TAKES VIDEOCONFERENCING TO A NEW LEVEL WITH ITS ADVANCED COLLABORATION ROOMS
GREAT SOLUTIONS
COLLABORATION
bdc0908GreatSol_collab 38 8/6/2009 9:53:26 PM
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Input #21 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
bdc0908_ads 39 8/4/2009 10:26:39 AM
The intra-operative MRI system at the United Hospital Nasseff Neuroscience Center in St. Paul, Minn., will allow neurosurgeons
to perform real-time MRI scans during operations to confirm that all cancerous tissue is removed during prodecures.
40 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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A major limitation of traditional brain cancer surgery is the
lack of scanning capability in the operating room. Neurosur-
geons do their best to visually identify and remove the cancer-
ous tissue, but only an MRI scan will confirm if the operation
was a complete success or not. Consequently, patients must be
stitched up and wheeled into the MRI room for further scans.
If cancer is still present, further surgery is often required.
To avoid putting its patients through this painful cycle of
surgeries and scans, the United Hospital Nasseff Neuroscience
Center in St. Paul, Minn., is collaborating with HDR Architec-
ture on an intra-operative MRI system. This “MRI on a track”
will be able to move between two operating rooms and spin in
any direction, allowing neurosurgeons to perform real-time
MRI scans during operations.
“The neurosurgeon can use the intra-operative MRI to con-
firm that the entire tumor was removed before closing, thus
reducing the need for additional operations,” says Douglas S.
Wignall, AIA, RAIC, international healthcare director with
HDR Architecture, Omaha, Neb. In addition, Wignall says
the mobility of the system allows the neurosurgeon to update
images quickly and efficiently so that surgical adjustments and
decisions can be made with pinpoint accuracy.
“This is one example of how architecture can help save
lives,” says Wignall.
11. OPERATING ROOM-INTEGRATED MRI WILL HELP NEUROSURGEONS GET IT RIGHT THE FIRST TIME
GREAT SOLUTIONS
HEALTHCARE
bdc0908GreatSol_HCare 40 8/6/2009 9:37:27 PM
Faced with the unprecedented task of having to replace half
its California hospital beds by 2015, Oakland, Calif.-based
Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest nonprofit HMO,
enlisted SmithGroup and Chong Partners Architecture
(now Stantec Architecture) to collaborate on the design of a
new hospital template—a state-of-the-art, prototypical hos-
pital that could be built on many different sites with only
minimal changes to the basic concept for quick and efficient
construction.
Luckily, the team wasn’t starting from scratch. Over the
years Kaiser had developed best-practices templates for
emergency departments, patient rooms, and other individual
clinical spaces and those pieces were combined into a single
configuration for an entire hospital. The resulting template
consists of common planning concepts, floor plans, equip-
ment and furnishings, and structural and building systems.
Exterior skins and colors vary from site to site. So far Kaiser
has built five hospitals using the template, which shaved 15
to 18 months off its typical new hospital timeline.
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A. Secondary MOB. B. MOB. C. Hospital. D. Nursing units. E. Signature
entry rotunda. F. Future construction, including hospital expansion, ad-
ditional MOB, clinic, and parking. G. Future helipad.
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 41
Modular nursing stations are designed to accommodate virtu-
ally any healthcare environment, whether for centralized or
decentralized spaces, standard or high-tech facilities, or new
or retrofit projects. HDR Architecture collaborated with Nur-
ture by Steelcase on the SYNC line, which was inspired by the
way people fit in cockpits and automobiles. It accommodates
multiple users, heights, and movements.
The centralized solution is offered in three fixed heights—
28½, 36, and 42 inches—to provide seated, service counter,
and standing solutions. Widths are available in one-foot
increments from five to nine feet, and integrated monitor arms
have 160-degree adjustability for sharing information between
caregivers. The product sits elevated off the floor, creating a
light, minimalistic look.
The decentralized products provide height-adjustable (23 to
48 inches), fixed, or combination surfaces in eight shapes. Two-
person configurations allow each work surface to be adjusted
individually.
12. NURSING STATIONS GO MODULAR
The new SYNC modular nursing station line from Nurture by Steelcase is designed to accommodate both centralized and decentralized spaces.
13. TEMPLATE HELPS HOSPITALS OPEN QUICKLY AND EFFICIENTLY
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bdc0908GreatSol_HCare 41 8/6/2009 9:37:33 PM
42 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
16. CONCRETE SLABS PLAYS UP
RUBBER BALL TECHNOLOGY
The BubbleDeck utilized in construction of the $27 million,
104,000-sf academic building at Dalhousie University in Hali-
fax, Nova Scotia, is new to North America, but the concrete
slab technology has been used in Europe since the early 1990s.
BubbleDeck technology involves substituting recycled rubber
balls for concrete that has no carrying effect (nonworking dead
load) in concrete slabs, which reduces the amount of concrete
used by 35%. Steel lattice locks the balls in place and serves
as traditional reinforcing components to create a monolithic
hollow slab with maximum biaxial strength. The site of the
four-story Dalhousie project had height restrictions, so the
flexible BubbleDeck allowed the Building Team to use mul-
tiple grades; slabs can be utilized in various shapes, sizes, and
applications, such as cantilevers and large deck spans. Because
the BubbleDeck slabs have significant span capabilities, they
require fewer support columns, which gives the Dalhousie
building more usable floor space and allows better filtration of
natural light. The university is targeting LEED Gold.
15. TRANSFORM ANY WORK SURFACE
INTO A CHARGING STATION
Imagine being able to charge your laptop, smart phone, or iPod
by simply placing it on your desk. Sounds improbable, but wire-
less charging technology is actually a reality thanks to Com-
merce Township, Mich.-based Powermat Ltd. The company’s
Powermat utilizes the principles of magnetic induction to
transform virtually any surface into an energy hub for charging
portable electronic devices. Simply plug in the mat and place it
anywhere on your work surface. Form-fitting covers embedded
with a wireless receiver allow gadgets to “plug in” and power
up. The company is also exploring partnerships with workplace
furniture manufacturers, such as Teknion, to embed the Power-
mat in tabletops, desktops, and other furniture.
14. MOD POD A NOD TO FLEX BIZ
Designed by the British firm Tate + Hindle, the OfficePOD
is a flexible office space that can be installed, well, just
about anywhere, indoors or out. The self-contained modu-
lar units measure about
seven feet square and
are designed to serve as
dedicated space for em-
ployees who work from
home or other remote
locations. Construction
of the modular pods in-
cludes natural, recycled,
and recyclable materials,
as well as insulation and a
high-efficiency HVAC system. The
pods are plug-in powered; the fully wired units connect
to an existing structure (home, garage, office building,
um…Starbucks?) while IT and phone connectivity is wire-
less, but can also be cabled in. Delivery takes approximately
12 weeks.
GREAT SOLUTIONS
PRODUCTS
bdc0908GreatSol_Prod 42 8/6/2009 9:22:55 PM
WHEN THERE IS NO LOADING DOCK OR
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TO MATCH A TRUCK HEIGHT
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LEVEL LOADING BENEFITS ARE:
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• Faster truck turn around times
• Less energy loss from open dock doors
Input #26 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 43
18. KILLER BEETLES LEAD TO
CONCRETE PLYWOOD
The mountain pine beetle is devastating British Columbia’s
conifer forests, and while some researchers focused on
controlling the destruction, others focused on salvaging the
billions of dead trees. The University of Northern British
Columbia’s professor Ron Thring and graduate student Sorin
Pasca focused on salvaging efforts and discovered that dead
wood from lodgepole pine trees is an excellent ingredient for
cement production. While cement typically repels organic
material, the beetles “enhanced” the wood in such a way that
it sticks to cement and act as a substitute for typical aggregates
like stones and rocks. Researchers say the concrete plywood
hybrid board (left), which they call MPB (for mountain pine
beetle), is water resistant and can be used in place of drywall
and gypsum board or as flooring and countertop surfacing.
Boards can be cut with regular woodworking tools and nailed
without pre-drilling.
17. BROWN RICE FOR
GREENER CONCRETE
While slag from steel mills, fly ash, and
silica fume are being added to concrete
to reduce the material’s greenhouse
gas emissions and make it stronger and
more resistant to corrosion, rice husks
(the small cases around edible rice ker-
nels) have so far proved an unsuitable
additive because when burned, its ash is
too contaminated with carbon. How-
ever, scientists were focused on finding
ways to utilize rice husks because they
are very rich in silicon dioxide, a core
concrete ingredient. A breakthrough
has come from researchers at Plano,
Texas-based ChK Group, who discov-
ered that superheating the husks to al-
most 1500 ºF in an oxygen-free furnace
produces pure, nearly carbon-free silica.
ChK researchers, who are still refining
their production processes, speculate a
single full-size furnace could produce
15,000 tons of rice husk ash annually,
which can be used to replace up to 20%
of cement used in concrete production.
bdc0908GreatSol_Prod 43 8/6/2009 9:22:59 PM
44 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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19. HYBRID GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGY
The team at Stantec saved $800,000 in construction costs
by embedding geothermal piping into the structural piles
at the WestJet office complex in Calgary, Alb., rather than
drilling boreholes adjacent to the building site, which is the
standard approach. Regular geothermal installation would
have required about 200 boreholes, each about four-inches in
diameter and 300-350 feet deep, but incorporating geothermal
piping into 73 of the building’s 105 structural piles before con-
crete was poured required only 20 additional boreholes to be
drilled, each about 350 feet deep. The geothermal system, in
concert with the $100 million project’s many other sustainable
features (rainwater collection, daylighting, recycled materials),
should help the property save $200,000 annually on energy
costs and earn it a LEED Gold rating.
Kinetic road plates installed in a parking lot at the Sainsbury’s store
in Gloucester, England. Kinetic energy captured as vehicles drive
over the plates is channeled back into the store. The plates can pro-
duce up to 30 kWh of electrical power every hour, enough to power
the store’s checkout machines. “Customers can now play a very
active role in making their local shop greener, without extra effort
or cost,” says Alison Austin, Sainsbury’s environment manager. The
system was invented by Peter Hughes, of Highway Energy Systems,
based in Somerset, England.
Only 20 geothermal boreholes were drilled at the WestJet complex because a majority of the piping was embedded in the building’s structural piles.
GREAT SOLUTIONS
TECHNOLOGY
20. KINETIC ROAD PLATES POWER PURCHASES
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bdc0908GreatSol_Tech 44 8/6/2009 9:18:50 PM
MFMA Accredited Installers have
the qualifications and knowledge
needed to successfully install maple
sports floors.
MFMA Accredited Installers have
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Input #22 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 45
21. CUTTING THE COOLING LOAD OF DATA
CENTERS BY 15%
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, At-
lanta, are using a 1,100-sf simulated data center to develop
and evaluate new ways of controlling heat in commercial
data centers, one of the fastest-growing building types in
the country. The researchers, led by Professor Yogendra
Joshi of the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering,
have found ways to cut energy center cooling costs 15% by
rearranging servers and space for optimal airflow patterns.
Their simulated data center uses several different cooling
systems, partitions to change room air volumes, sophisti-
cated thermometers attached directly to a server’s moth-
erboard, and both real and simulated airflow sensors to
measure the output of fans and other systems. The research
is sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and the
Consortium for Energy Efficient Thermal Management.
Graduate student Shawn Shields checks server performance while Dr.
Yogendra Joshi looks on at Georgia Tech’s simulated data center. P
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bdc0908GreatSol_Tech 45 8/6/2009 9:18:59 PM
As a result of the slumping economy, there’s a glut of dis-
tressed, semi-completed properties that started deteriorat-
ing soon after construction halted. Seeing an opportunity in
helping banks or new investor owners salvage, complete, and
reposition these languishing properties, Englewood Con-
struction of Schiller Park, Ill., launched a distressed property
division. The GC is licensed in 48 states, which gives clients a
single firm and single point of contact to navigate the com-
plexities of many different jurisdictional authorities, damage
analysis, and cost estimates endemic to distressed properties.
The new division’s first contract involves completing six Value
Place hotels in four states (Iowa, Louisiana, North Carolina,
and Ohio), each one in a different stage of construction. The
work involved in completing the Value Place hotels, which are
all four-story properties averaging 121 rooms and 42,000 sf,
adds approximately 100 construction jobs per building and,
once open for business, the hotels will start contributing to
their local economies.
Six previously stalled Value Place hotels are being completed by
Englewood Construction’s new distressed property division.
46 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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We’ve all seen the TV commercials for AT&T and Comcast
selling the cost advantages of bundling phone, cable, and
Internet services. Shane Ketterman, network engineer and
administrator with ZGF Architects, applied similar logic when
searching for ways to cut costs and streamline communications
at the 473-employee Portland, Ore., firm.
Ketterman found a partner in PATEC Holding Corp. to
develop a customized solution to bundle and transmit all
voice, video, Internet, and data services using a dedicated radio
frequency line instead of traditional wire distribution. Radio
antennas mounted on the roof of each of the firm’s five offices
transmit and receive voice/data three times faster than before,
and at a fraction of the cost. Ketterman’s solution will save
ZGF $320,000 this year alone.
“Transmitting data via radio waves is much more cost effec-
tive and allows greater flexibility for increased bandwidth and
additional services as the needs of the business change,” says Ket-
terman. His solution is also much more reliable than traditional
delivery methods—the dedicated FCC radio frequency cannot be
interrupted or jammed—and it requires less energy to operate.
Tocci Building Companies is finding success in repositioning
commercial properties for university use, and it expects the
trend to continue. The firm’s Capital Cove project in Provi-
dence, R.I., for instance, was originally designed by Elkus
Manfredi (with design continued by HDS Architects) to be a
mixed-use complex with private, market-rate condominiums.
The economy stalled those plans. The economy is also stalling
university projects, preventing much-needed student hous-
ing from going up. The nation’s colleges and universities have
the capacity to house only about 25% of students, and since
enrollment has a history of rising during a recession, the higher-
ed housing crunch could get much worse. Johnson & Wales
University saw a solution to its housing shortage by leasing the
96-unit Capital Cove complex, locating students in Providence’s
historic Capitol District and in close proximity to public trans-
portation, shopping, and cultural attractions. The university
also sees the upscale property and its urban setting providing a
significant competitive advantage in attracting new students.
The Capitol Cove complex in Providence, R.I. was repositioned, changing
from 96 private condos to Johnson & Wales University student housing.
22. COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES
REPOSITIONED FOR UNIVERSITY USE
23. DISTRESSED PROPERTY DIVISION
TARGETS STALLED PROJECTS
24. BUNDLE COMMUNICATIONS AND DATA SERVICES FOR MAJOR SAVINGS
GREAT SOLUTIONS
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
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bdc0908GreatSol_Biz 46 8/6/2009 10:01:55 PM
For lightness of touch.
DORMA TS93 in Contur Design.
With its unique cam and roller
design, the TS93 System in Contur
Design represents the pinnacle of
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enabling a door to open much easier
than one operated by a rack and
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efficiency with the sleek aesthetics
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Input #23 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 47
Patrick Callahan, AIA, LEED AP, a principal with StudioGC,
Chicago, leads a group of interns from the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign in the firm’s “Revit Boot Camp.” The
month-long workshop provided eight UIUC architecture students
with four hours of unpaid BIM training in the morning, followed
by four hours of paid studio work in the afternoon. “I thought I
knew Revit, but they really showed us how much it could do, how
robust it was,” said Caroline VanAcker, a junior from Palatine, Ill.
Front row, left to right: Kimberly Wiskup, VanAcker, Christiana
Symeonides, Fadi Salem, Daniel Martin. Back row: Maria Niko-
loski (obscured), Jacob Oostema. Not pictured: Kristina Collet.
As part of a companywide commitment to improve relation-
ships with subcontractors, Farmington, Conn.-based KBE
Building Corp. (formerly Konover Construction) developed a
custom online resource center that provides 24-hour, real-time
access to payment status, insurance information, compliance
forms, and project details for subcontractors and KBE staff.
“Subs were frustrated with the length of time to get paid,
and would frequently call for payment status and other infor-
mation,” says John Patterson, information architect with KBE
and developer of the online resource center. He says KBE
staff spent hours on the phone daily answering calls, returning
calls, and fulfilling requests from subs, costing the company
thousands of dollars a month in personnel costs.
After launching the resource center in late 2006, the company
saw an immediate 75% reduction in phone calls, in addition to
fewer faxes and mailings. Patterson estimates a productivity gain
of 25%, saving the company $100,000 annually.
26. KEEP YOUR SUBCONTRACTORS HAPPY
AND SAVE BIG BUCKS
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bdc0908GreatSol_Biz 47 8/6/2009 1:52:25 PM
48 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
New York is not particularly known for its green roofs, but
two recent projects may put the Big Apple on the map.
In spring 2010, the Lincoln Center for the Perform-
ing Arts will debut one of the nation’s first fully walkable
green roofs. Located across from the Juilliard School in
Lincoln Center’s North Plaza, Illumination Lawn will consist
of a glass-walled restaurant topped with a 10,000-sf, sloped
vegetated roof that will double as a campus lawn for students
and the public.
The sloped green roof will add some much-needed softness
to the hardscape that dominates Lincoln Center. “It will be
a dynamic, engaging kind of space that people hopefully will
want to run up on, play Frisbee, or relax,” says Heidi Blau,
AIA, LEED, partner with FXFOWLE Architects, which is
collaborating with Diller Scofidio + Renfro on the Lincoln
Center redevelopment.
To support the weight and handle the wear and tear from
constant foot traffic, the design team specified a beefed-up
version of a typical green roof system. A six-inch-thick com-
posite poured-concrete/metal-deck structural slab rated for
100-pound live loads will support the 14-inch-thick vegetated
roof. The slab will be supported on nine steel columns with
five girders and 45 beams situated to create the saddle-like
“hypar” roof shape.
Four miles downtown, in Manhattan’s Tribeca
neighborhood, a new 950,000-sf mixed-use condo tower
designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill features what
can only be described as a miniature urban forest atop
the building’s five-story podium. SOM teamed with local
27. NEXT-GENERATION GREEN ROOFS SPROUT UP IN NEW YORK
Lincoln Center’s walkable green roof is scheduled to debut next spring. The
roof, in the form of a hyperbolic paraboloid, will reach a full height of 11
feet from the plaza level and 23 feet from the sidewalk level; it will extend
down to the plaza on the south end, providing access for pedestrians. The
cross section below depicts the composition of the green roof system. R
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bdc0908GreatSol_Green 48 8/6/2009 9:45:35 PM
Input #24 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
landscape architect Thomas Balsley Associates to develop
the intensive green roof, which is composed of 101 Austrian
pines—some reaching 35 feet in height—planted in a soil
bed up to 42 inches deep.
The entire green roof system—which includes a 12- to
16-inch-thick concrete slab topped with a 2 mm waterproof
membrane, a root barrier, four inches of rigid insulation,
a three-inch-thick drainage panel, geotextile fabric, plant-
ing soil, and three inches of mulch—extends six feet deep in
certain areas—a depth that has been proven to be sufficient
in urban settings and broad planting areas, says Thomas
Balsley. He estimates that the trees will eventually reach 50
feet in height.
All residents of the 31-story 101 Warren St. condo tower
have access to the rooftop pine forest, and many ultra-lux units
overlook the trees. The building’s developer, Edward Minskoff,
was willing to take on the extra cost of the urban forest because
of the unique selling point it offered to prospective condo buy-
ers. It also gave tenants some much-needed green space.
“The notion of a garden in the sky is very appropriate to
the urban condition in New York, where the ground plane
is precious and, therefore, the opportunities for semi-public
space is explored in the third dimension,” says Mustafa K.
Abadan, FAIA, SOM partner in charge on the project.
www.BDCnetwork.com BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION AUGUST 2009 49
High-end condos at the 101 Warren St. mixed-use development in New
York overlook a rooftop urban forest, complete with 101 pine trees.
28. NEW LEED RETAIL PROGRAMS SPEED UP
CERTIFICATION
The U.S. Green Building Council’s stated goal of reaching
100,000 LEED-certified buildings by 2010 will require thousands
of new commercial buildings certified in the next six months. The
building type that goes up fastest in the largest numbers is retail
commercial buildings. Retail buildings have been LEED regis-
tered as prototypes since 2005, but LEED for Retail Commercial
Interiors and LEED for Retail New Construction, now open for
member ballot, would allow much more flexible certification.
The USGBC is also publishing a LEED for Retail Best Prac-
tices manual, to illustrate the strategies used by companies in the
LEED for Retail pilot. Any green feature that isn’t repeatable for
a large number of stores is meaningless in retail, so best practices
are even more important than in other building types. Some of
the companies participating include Office Depot (LEED Silver
in its Austin, Texas, store with six other similar stores), McDon-
ald’s (several LEED-certified restaurants), and Chipotle (the
world’s first LEED Platinum, in Gurnee, Ill.).
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bdc0908GreatSol_Green 49 8/6/2009 9:45:40 PM
50 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
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One of the biggest complaints among K-12 school facility
managers is the conflict that arises when teachers and students
open the windows during not-so-ideal climate conditions. In-
troducing outside air into a conditioned building can decrease
the mechanical system’s efficiency if the outdoor climate
conditions increase heating or cooling demands already being
made on the mechanical system.
Since most K-12 school districts don’t have the budget for
high-end automated climate controls, communication and
education are often the only tools facility managers have to
prevent occupants from opening the windows during less-
than-optimal weather conditions.
To help some of its K-12 school clients minimize energy
costs, NAC|Architecture has implemented a simple, inex-
pensive notification system made up of red and green lights
located in the corridors. When the green lights are on, the
windows can be opened to help cool the classroom spaces.
When the red lights are on, all windows should remain shut,
as outdoor air will
inhibit the mechan-
ical system’s ability
to properly condi-
tion the building.
“This system
is an economical
approach to the
age-old quandary
regarding operable
windows,” says
Dana L. Harbaugh,
AIA, LEED, prin-
cipal architect with
NAC|Architecture,
who developed the system. “It asks building users to facilitate
environmental stewardship on a daily basis, raising awareness
of their impact on energy usage.”
P
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29. NOTIFICATION SYSTEM GIVES TEACHERS
THE GREEN LIGHT TO OPEN THE WINDOWS
When the green light is on (circled above),
building occupants know it’s okay to open the
windows because outdoor air will moderate the
building’s mechanical system performance.
GREAT SOLUTIONS
GREEN BUILDING
bdc0908GreatSol_Green 50 8/6/2009 9:45:44 PM
DIRECTORY
Page Circle
no. no.
Advance Lifts Inc. 43 26
AISC C2 1
American Express 9 6
Amvic Building System 17 11
Autodesk C4 —
Belden Brick Co. C3 25
Bluebeam Software 37 20
Dorma Architectural Hardware 47 23
Dow Corning 4 4
Kullman Buildings Corp. 39 21
Maple Flooring Manufacturers Assn. 45 22
NanaWall Systems Inc. 35 19
New Millennium Building Systems 11 8
Owens Corning 18-19 12,13
Perfect Polish Inc. 49 24
Schuler Shook 10 7
Simpson Strong-Tie Co. 7 5
Technical Glass Products Inc. 2, 3 2, 3
Timely Industries 20 14
Building with Brick and Masonry Supplement
ARCAT 29 18
Martin Fireproofing 25 16
Mortar Net USA 23 15
Sika Sarnafil 26-27 17
Commercial Products Supplement
Delta Faucet 12 9
Strongwell 15 10
BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION (ISSN 0007-3407, Vol.
50, No. 8, GST#123397457) is published monthly by Reed
Business Information, 8878 S. Barrons Blvd., Highlands Ranch,
CO 80129-2345. Reed Business Information, a division of Reed
Elsevier Inc., is located at 360 Park Avenue South, New York,
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President of Business Media, Chief Internet Officer. BUILDING
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All rights reserved. BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION is a
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bdc00908index_ID 51 8/6/2009 11:00:57 PM
Howard W. Ashcraft, Jr., is a Fellow of the American
College of Construction Lawyers, an honorary member of the AIA California Council, and a mem-
ber of the Integrated Project Delivery task force. He serves on the American Arbitration Associa-
tion panel for Large and Complex Construction Cases for California and Nevada and on the Legal
Counsel Forum of the American Council of Engineering Companies, and has been admitted to the
bar of the U.S. Supreme Court. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Stanford and a JD degree from
Boalt Hall at UC Berkeley.
‘IPD is light years ahead of traditional delivery’
BD+C: Is IPD the answer to aligning incentives with proj-
ect success?
Howard Ashcraft: It’s a quantum improvement over traditional
delivery processes. You want to align people down to the individual
holding the hammer. IPD doesn’t go down to that level, but it’s light
years ahead of the traditional delivery process.
BD+C: You wrote the IPD contracts on Autodesk’s office proj-
ects. What efficiency gains did you see on those projects?
HA: In the San Francisco project, the RFI turnaround averaged well
under an hour because of this discussion. It was in the realm of 20
minutes with instant responses that allowed people to move forward
much more swiftly. In Waltham, Mass., final project management
decisions were made at a low level and that allowed them to move
the project forward in really tough times. There were tight sched-
ules on both projects, but they met them. In both situations the
architects began to understand how the contractors needed their
information to develop costing information. They started to visually
draw for the contractor, which saved time in the erection process.
BD+C: Can the IPD process work without a committed owner?
HA: No. It is designed to have an owner who is intimately involved
with the project. If you go back to Construction Industry Institute
studies, most will indicate that the owner is the biggest factor in
project success. Getting an owner who is active is a major thing, for
IPD but also for delivering a better project overall.
BD+C: Is the U.S. legal system ready for IPD and BIM?
HA: The contracts are still evolving. We need to get the contracts
optimized for use in BIM and IPD, and that will take care of the
legal structure. There are some subsidiary issues having to do with
professional licensing, third-party liability, and insurance that have
not yet been nailed down, but I don’t think those are huge impedi-
ments to adoption of IPD. The bigger impediment is that people
have been used to doing things, in terms of contractual relation-
ships, a given way for a long time. They have to unlearn a lot.
BD+C: Do architects and engineers need to “own” their
risk more often?
HA: The needle has swung too far in the direction of insulating
oneself from liability and separating oneself from the other parties
in the construction process. That really has not been a success-
ful strategy. The needle needs to swing more toward accepting
responsibility for the entire process and making sure that the bad
events—cost overruns, failures, and the like—don’t occur.
BD+C: Are you satisfied with how the AIA and the AGC are
addressing BIM and IPD in their new contract documents?
HA: No. I’m very pleased that they’ve issued the contract docu-
ments, but I don’t think the current documents are 100% there
yet. They’ve validated the concept of IPD, but we need to keep
making the documents better.
BD+C: Is it good for government agencies and states to
require BIM?
HA: Yes. Requiring BIM will get a lot more people involved in some-
thing they ought to be involved in. The difficulty is it’s very hard to
come up with a blanket specification for BIM that’s applicable to
all projects. You run the risk of being too generic and not requir-
ing enough detail, or requiring detail you don’t need. The GSA and
the Army Corps of Engineers have struggled with that. But there’s
no doubt in my mind that few projects of any complexity can’t be
delivered better on a BIM platform.
BD+C: Will all projects eventually be delivered electronically?
HA: All projects of any complexity. There are some people out there
still sketching with a pencil, but not many. Even if you only use BIM
to catch the low-hanging fruit like conflict resolution, it pays for itself.
BD+C: How important is joint decision making?
HA: There are two issues: communication and decision making.
Increasing communication is important to get information directly
flowing in both directions. Decision making takes it to a whole dif-
ferent level, because in IPD we’re asking people to assume certain
risks: scheduling costs, quality, etc. It’s difficult to do that without
giving people control over that risk, and that means joint decision
making. We’ve had subcontractors say, “Since everyone was asking
my opinion, I really wanted to see this project succeed.” BD+C
THOUGHT LEADERS
52 AUGUST 2009 BUILDING DESIGN+CONSTRUCTION www.BDCnetwork.com
bdc0908thought_ID 52 8/6/2009 9:14:13 PM
Input #25 at BDCnetwork.com/quickResponse
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