Choose the Right Tutor

Published on March 2017 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 36 | Comments: 0 | Views: 300
of 15
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content

Choose the Right Tutor

Compiled by:

Table of Contents
Create a Customized Tutoring Program for My Child Interview Your Child's Tutor Monitor My Child's Tutoring Program Real Life Story: When Good Kids Get Bad Grades Real Life Story: Center­based Tutoring Can Improve Kids' Grades Tutoring Programs: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities Tutoring Options: A Summary of Types, Programs, and Costs Tutoring Programs FAQs Should I Be My Child's At­home Tutor? Does My Child Need a Tutor?  

Choose the Right Tutor
Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you suspect that your child needs some extra help either because she’s struggling with her schoolwork or because she needs  www.EduGuide.org 2 greater challenges. ONLINE EDUGUIDE

Does My Child Need a Tutor?  

Choose the Right Tutor
Do I need this EduGuide?
Yes, if you suspect that your child needs some extra help either because she’s struggling with her schoolwork or because she needs  greater challenges.

How does it work?
l l l l

Quizzes help you know where you stand.  Articles give you the background information you need to make a good decision.  Real Life Stories tell the actual experiences of real parents and real kids.  ShortCuts help you take immediate action. Choose one or go through them all. 

What will I learn?
l l l l

Whether my child needs a tutor and if I can do the job myself  How tutoring works and what kinds of tutoring programs are available  What you can expect from a tutor and what a tutor expects from you  How to find the best tutor and the best program for your child 

Quick Solutions
l l

What can I do in fifteen minutes? Take the quiz "Does My Child Need a Tutor?"  What can I do in an hour? Read "Tutoring Programs FAQ's" and discuss the information with your child 

 

Create a Customized Tutoring Program for My Child
One Size Does Not Fit All
Before you choose a tutor or tutoring program, make an appointment to sit down with your child, your child’s teacher or teachers, and  counselor to map out your child’s  specific needs. To create a program with the highest potential of success in tutoring children, be  sure to get answers to the following questions: What kind of tutoring does my child need? Does my child need basic skills review, student homework help, or more intensive  assistance?  2. In what areas do we want to see improvement: better grades in a subject (English, geometry); improved general skills (math,  reading), study skills, goal setting and motivation?  3. What is my child’s learning style? Does he or she learn best by reading, listening, or moving and touching?   www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE 4. Does my child learn better from men or women?  5. Does he or she need lots of nurturing or firm discipline?  1.

3

l

What can I do in an hour? Read "Tutoring Programs FAQ's" and discuss the information with your child 

 

Create a Customized Tutoring Program for My Child
One Size Does Not Fit All
Before you choose a tutor or tutoring program, make an appointment to sit down with your child, your child’s teacher or teachers, and  counselor to map out your child’s  specific needs. To create a program with the highest potential of success in tutoring children, be  sure to get answers to the following questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.   What kind of tutoring does my child need? Does my child need basic skills review, student homework help, or more intensive  assistance?  In what areas do we want to see improvement: better grades in a subject (English, geometry); improved general skills (math,  reading), study skills, goal setting and motivation?  What is my child’s learning style? Does he or she learn best by reading, listening, or moving and touching?   Does my child learn better from men or women?  Does he or she need lots of nurturing or firm discipline?  What motivates and interests him or her?  How much money can we spend on tutoring?  How much time can we devote to tutoring?  When can we expect to notice results?  What kinds of results are reasonable for us to expect? 

Interview Your Child's Tutor
Know What Questions to Ask and How to Judge the Answers EduGuide Staff
Use the following questions and comments to help you evaluate potential tutors for your child. 1.  What is your educational background and experience tutoring children? Look for a tutor who has taught students the same age as your child. The more experience the tutor has had in the specific subject  area (three years minimum) the better. 2.  How will you develop a tutoring plan and methods for my child? Good tutors consult with classroom teachers and use test results to come up with individualized plans and lessons that employ  methods suitable for your child’s learning style. Ask to see the plan and sign off on it before tutoring starts. If appropriate—or if you  have concerns—show the plan to your child’s teacher or teachers if they have not seen it. 
4 3. In what way and how often will you evaluate progress? ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

10.  

What kinds of results are reasonable for us to expect? 

Interview Your Child's Tutor
Know What Questions to Ask and How to Judge the Answers EduGuide Staff
Use the following questions and comments to help you evaluate potential tutors for your child. 1.  What is your educational background and experience tutoring children? Look for a tutor who has taught students the same age as your child. The more experience the tutor has had in the specific subject  area (three years minimum) the better. 2.  How will you develop a tutoring plan and methods for my child? Good tutors consult with classroom teachers and use test results to come up with individualized plans and lessons that employ  methods suitable for your child’s learning style. Ask to see the plan and sign off on it before tutoring starts. If appropriate—or if you  have concerns—show the plan to your child’s teacher or teachers if they have not seen it.  3. In what way and how often will you evaluate progress? The best tutors evaluate formally by testing and informally by observation. They provide feedback to students, parents, and teachers  regularly. Feedback can be after each session, weekly, monthly, or less frequently. It can be oral, written, or both. Make sure you are  comfortable wit the frequency and form of evaluation. 4. When can you meet with my child, where will you meet, and how long will the lessons be? Make sure a potential tutor can meet with your child at a time and place that are convenient for you and your child. Be sure everyone  agrees about the length and frequency of the lessons. Ask for explanations if either the suggested frequency or length don’t seem  right to you. 5. What are your tutoring business policies? You need to know all the details up front: how much the lessons will cost, what forms of payment the tutor accepts, when payment is  expected, and what the cancellation policy is. 6. Can you provide some recent references? You should expect to get three to five references (including references from students, parents, and teachers). Even with positive  references, you may decide that the tutor’s teaching style does not seem to be a good match for your child. Use your intuition. You  know your child better than anyone else does.  

5

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

know your child better than anyone else does.  

Monitor My Child's Tutoring Program
Stay Involved to Ensure the Best Results for Your Child EduGuide Staff
Follow the following suggestions to monitor and enhance your child’s tutoring program. 

Be Patient
l

It may take several months before your child’s grades improve, but that does not mean  the tutoring is ineffective. Most tutoring  relationships last from several months to a year.  Work with your child, his teacher or teachers, and the tutor to establish milestones and set a target end date for the tutoring.  

l

Monitor Progress
l

Talk with the tutor after each session. Find out what your child accomplished and what areas need additional work. Ask for  suggestions on ways you can help your child.  Talk to your child. Does he or she enjoy the tutor’s lessons and believe they are helping? Does your child feel more confident  about the subject and about schoolwork in general?  Talk to your child’s teachers. Find out whether your child’s grades and attitude about school have improved. Are the teachers  satisfied with the progress? Being informed about your child’s progress is an effective way to improve relations with his  teachers. 

l

l

Take Action
l

If you aren’t getting the results you had hoped for, set up a meeting with the tutor, your child, and your child’s teacher or  teachers to discuss your concerns.  Work together as a team to solve the problem or end the relationship. 

l

 

Real Life Story: When Good Kids Get Bad Grades
Lisamarie Sanders
6 www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE Ryan lay in bed Monday morning, complaining of yet another stomachache. A child who once loved school was now avoiding it  whenever possible. He lied about student homework assignments and hid his test papers. Whenever his mother, Carol, asked about 

l

Work together as a team to solve the problem or end the relationship. 

 

Real Life Story: When Good Kids Get Bad Grades
Lisamarie Sanders
Ryan lay in bed Monday morning, complaining of yet another stomachache. A child who once loved school was now avoiding it  whenever possible. He lied about student homework assignments and hid his test papers. Whenever his mother, Carol, asked about  school, Ryan changed the subject or stormed off to his room. At first she thought his behavior signaled a preadolescent phase, but  she realized there was a bigger problem when she saw his report card.

Facing Facts
Carol set up a meeting with Ryan's teacher to find out what was going on. Mr. Edwards told her that Ryan was trying hard in class but  didn't seem to be grasping the material. He suggested finding a tutor to work with Ryan one on one to help get him up to speed. At first Carol resisted the explanation. Ryan was a smart kid who had always done well in school. She assumed the teacher was at fault.  However, she knew Ryan would be in Mr. Edwards' class all year, so she needed to do something to help him succeed. Rebecca Rothman McCoy, an experienced tutor in Anchorage, Alaska, says that many parents have a hard time admitting their  children need extra help. "But tutoring is not a stigma," she says. She adds that all children learn differently, but large class sizes limit  a teacher's ability to personalize lessons for each student. That's where a tutor can help. "Tutoring should be seen as a proactive step  parents can take to help their children," McCoy says. Sandy Fleming, who has been tutoring in Michigan for more than twenty years, says it's best to seek help as soon as you see any sort  of academic difficulty. "It shouldn't depend solely on grades," she says. "If parents are concerned that the child isn't making enough  progress, or if they feel that something just isn't right, they should consider getting a tutor." Identifying and tackling the problem early  can make a world of difference for your child's self­confidence and success levels.

Where to Start Tutoring Children Who Need Help
Carol decided that getting extra help would be good for Ryan, but she didn't know where to find a tutor or what to look for. She called  Mr. Edwards for advice. He explained that tutors can help in many different ways, from basic homework support to intensive  remediation, and that Ryan needed something in the middle. He offered a list of tutors he had worked with in the past and suggested  she try them first. John J. Prelich Jr., a teacher and school psychologist currently at New Jersey­based Corn Associates, says that contacting your child's teacher for referrals is one of the best ways to find a tutor. He says, "If the teacher knows the tutor, they may be more willing to work  together as a team." And the teaming of home and school is the best way to find success.

A Different Kind of Learning That Can Improve Grades
Carol called several tutors on the list and was able to find one she thought would be a good match for Ryan. Then she and Ryan did  an informal interview with the tutor and decided to hire him. However, Carol worried that the after­school tutoring sessions would be  too much "schooling" for Ryan. She was afraid that if he hated school now, the extra learning time would make the situation even  worse. Fleming, however, doesn't worry. She says that tutoring is a different kind of teaching from what a child gets in school. Tutors provide  individualized attention that fits a child's learning style, and many tutors try to make the sessions "fun enough that the students actually want to be there," she explains. The fun and games teach the student that learning can be a positive experience. Positive tutoring can  help a child learn the material, get better grades, and form a better attitude about school.

7

On the Road to Success ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

It took only a few sessions for Carol to know she made the right decision in hiring a tutor for Ryan. He stopped faking illnesses to get 

individualized attention that fits a child's learning style, and many tutors try to make the sessions "fun enough that the students actually want to be there," she explains. The fun and games teach the student that learning can be a positive experience. Positive tutoring can  help a child learn the material, get better grades, and form a better attitude about school.

On the Road to Success
It took only a few sessions for Carol to know she made the right decision in hiring a tutor for Ryan. He stopped faking illnesses to get  out of class. He started doing his homework. He showed his tests to his tutor and suggested things he thought they should work on  together. Although his grades didn't improve instantly, his attitude did. It will take Ryan several months of tutoring to catch up to his peers, but Carol now knows that it will be time well spent.   
Lisamarie Sanders is a former early childhood and elementary school teacher, currently raising two preschoolers. She is a freelance writer specializing in  family and education articles.

 

Real Life Story: Center­based Tutoring Can Improve Kids' Grades
Pamela A. Zinkosky

Elementary Tutoring Helps Struggling Students
Ruth Gingell's eight­year­old son, Nick, has five to ten pages of homework every night, but it's not for school. His homework is for the  reading and math learning center he attends one night a week. A year ago, Nick was in an elementary tutoring program at Winchester Elementary School in Northville, Michigan, for students  struggling with reading. The program, called Reading Boost, was offered during school hours. Still Gingell felt that Nick also needed some extra study time. "It was very rare that he had homework," says Gingell. "I just felt he  needed something extra."

Reading Tutoring Program Makes a Difference
Gingell enrolled her son in a nearby reading tutoring program recommended by a family member. This national program emphasizes  repeated practice of basic concepts through timed worksheets that students complete every day. Gingell was surprised at the results  of her son's tutoring. Nick's teachers noticed a difference in his reading ability almost immediately, and he no longer needed the  Reading Boost program after four months in the after­school program. At the center, students are tested and given work based on what they know—not their age or school grade. They begin with basic  concepts they understand based on the results of the testing. They spend fifteen minutes per subject completing worksheets for their  learning level and then go over the answers with the instructor. Students take home packets of worksheets and complete the  worksheets every day. Once they can consistently solve all of the problems for their learning level in a set length of time, they move on  to the next level. Gingell says the program works for her son because he doesn't mind doing the work. "It's not like a chore for him," she says. She also notes that he concentrates intensely on the worksheets as do the other students at the center. "What amazes me is that you go in  there, and you could hear a pin drop," she says.

For more information about this national center­based program, contact Kumon Learning Centers at 800­ABC­MATH.

8

 

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

family and education articles.

 

Real Life Story: Center­based Tutoring Can Improve Kids' Grades
Pamela A. Zinkosky

Elementary Tutoring Helps Struggling Students
Ruth Gingell's eight­year­old son, Nick, has five to ten pages of homework every night, but it's not for school. His homework is for the  reading and math learning center he attends one night a week. A year ago, Nick was in an elementary tutoring program at Winchester Elementary School in Northville, Michigan, for students  struggling with reading. The program, called Reading Boost, was offered during school hours. Still Gingell felt that Nick also needed some extra study time. "It was very rare that he had homework," says Gingell. "I just felt he  needed something extra."

Reading Tutoring Program Makes a Difference
Gingell enrolled her son in a nearby reading tutoring program recommended by a family member. This national program emphasizes  repeated practice of basic concepts through timed worksheets that students complete every day. Gingell was surprised at the results  of her son's tutoring. Nick's teachers noticed a difference in his reading ability almost immediately, and he no longer needed the  Reading Boost program after four months in the after­school program. At the center, students are tested and given work based on what they know—not their age or school grade. They begin with basic  concepts they understand based on the results of the testing. They spend fifteen minutes per subject completing worksheets for their  learning level and then go over the answers with the instructor. Students take home packets of worksheets and complete the  worksheets every day. Once they can consistently solve all of the problems for their learning level in a set length of time, they move on  to the next level. Gingell says the program works for her son because he doesn't mind doing the work. "It's not like a chore for him," she says. She also notes that he concentrates intensely on the worksheets as do the other students at the center. "What amazes me is that you go in  there, and you could hear a pin drop," she says.

For more information about this national center­based program, contact Kumon Learning Centers at 800­ABC­MATH.

 

Tutoring Programs: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
As with any professional relationship, parents and students have certain rights and responsibilities in their partnership with a learning tutor. Here are some of both to keep in mind before the tutor lessons begin.
9 ONLINE EDUGUIDE www.EduGuide.org

Rights

For more information about this national center­based program, contact Kumon Learning Centers at 800­ABC­MATH.

 

Tutoring Programs: Know Your Rights and Responsibilities
As with any professional relationship, parents and students have certain rights and responsibilities in their partnership with a learning tutor. Here are some of both to keep in mind before the tutor lessons begin.

Rights
You have the right to:
l l l l l l l l l l l l l

Shop for a tutor who best suits the student’s individual needs   Be certain that the student is safe and comfortable with the tutor  Know the tutor's educational background and experience  Ask for and check a tutor's references  Understand the tutor's teaching methods and techniques  Receive an outline of the tutor's lesson plan  Know what is going on during the student’s sessions   Receive student progress reports  Know, understand, and agree to the tutor's payment, cancellation, and withdrawal policies  Know, understand, and agree to the tutor's discipline techniques and policies  Meet with the tutor at mutually convenient times to discuss progress and concerns  Share the tutor's assessments, progress reports, and other information with the student’s teacher(s)   Terminate the tutoring program if it is not meeting your needs 

Responsibilities
You have the responsibility to:
l l l l l l l l l l l

Share pertinent medical and/or educational information about the student with the tutor  Attend sessions as scheduled, except in the case of emergency or illness and/or giving as much notice as possible when the  student cannot attend  Arrive at tutoring sessions on time  Come prepared for the session (with pencils, paper, books, homework, etc.)  Pick up the student on time after the session  Follow the tutor’s recommendations regarding homework   Request progress reports  Discuss any concerns, especially regarding the student's progress and attitude  Follow the tutor’s policies regarding payment, cancellation, and withdrawal   Inform the student’s teacher of the content and progress of the tutoring sessions   Give at least two weeks' notice to end the tutoring arrangement 

 

10

Tutoring Options: A Summary of Types, Programs, and Costs
ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

by EduGuide Staff with contributions from Lisamarie Sanders and Carole McGraw

l

Give at least two weeks' notice to end the tutoring arrangement 

 

Tutoring Options: A Summary of Types, Programs, and Costs
by EduGuide Staff with contributions from Lisamarie Sanders and Carole McGraw
When it comes to finding a learning tutor, it's important to compare your options.

Option 1:  Private Tutor
A private tutor can be a friend, neighbor, family member, student teacher, peer or student, classroom teacher, or professional. Each  will provide one­on­one instruction. Pros
l l l l

Private tutors offer individual attention.  The program is tailored to the student's individual needs.  The student can develop a strong relationship with the tutor or benefit from an already existing relationship.  Lessons can be very affordable, even free. 

Cons
l l l l l

The quality of the tutor’s lessons can vary depending on tutor's expertise and the length of time spent.   Finding a good match can take time.  If tutoring happens during the school day, the student could miss class and fall behind in another subject area.  If the tutor is sick, the student misses a session.  If the tutor is a family member, differences of opinion could strain personal relationships. 

Costs
l l

Peer tutors (often older students), classroom teachers (including student teachers from a nearby college), neighborhood drop­ in tutoring centers, and family members often provide tutoring services free.  Professional tutors charge between $20 and $75 per hour; highly experienced subject specialists in such subjects as math or  chemistry can charge more. 

Tips
l l l

Ask your student’s teacher for suggested tutors.   Ask friends and coworkers for referrals.  Always interview tutors to make sure they fit your student's personality and needs (see EduGuide ShortCut “Interview Your  Child’s Tutor”).  

Option 2: Tutoring Centers
Tutoring centers include national tutoring companies such as Sylvan Learning Centers, Kumon Math and Reading Centers, and  Huntington Learning Centers. Your community may have local tutoring centers too. Kaplan, among others, offers courses to prepare  students for high­stakes standardized tests. Pros Tutoring companies use objective tests to pinpoint students' strengths and weaknesses.  Students move through structured levels of achievement that give concrete benchmarks for a feeling of progress.  www.EduGuide.org ONLINE EDUGUIDE l More than one tutor is available.  l Tutoring companies usually hire trained, certified teachers. 
l l

11

Pros
l l l l

Tutoring companies use objective tests to pinpoint students' strengths and weaknesses.  Students move through structured levels of achievement that give concrete benchmarks for a feeling of progress.  More than one tutor is available.  Tutoring companies usually hire trained, certified teachers. 

Cons
l l l l l

Tutors work with groups of three to five students.  Since these are standardized tutor programs, the teaching methods may not suit your student's learning style (see EduGuide  Quiz: “What is My Child’s Learning Style?”)   The family can't choose a specific tutor.  The tutoring assignments are in addition to the student's regular homework; homework support may not be part of the  curriculum.  The cost is high. 

Costs
l l l

The cost is as much as $150 a week;  payments is expected weekly or monthly.  Most tutoring companies accept credit cards.  Some companies offer financing or scholarship programs. 

Tips
l l

Ask if the tutoring business will communicate with the student's teacher.  Make sure the center's philosophy matches yours. 

Option 3: Online Tutors
Online help includes homework help sites, one­on­one tutoring, and step­by­step software. Pros
l l l l

Tutoring can fit into your schedule without leaving home.  Questions can be posted any time.  This is a great option for quick answers.  Online tutoring can be fun, particularly for students who love technology. 

Cons
l l l

Little or no mentoring relationship is formed.  Online tutoring provides no personal assessment of student needs and progress.  The tutor has no contact with the classroom teacher. 

Costs
l l l

Help is free on homework help sites such as mathnerds.com.  Some sites charge per minute, per month, or per service—for example per essay or assignment.   Expect to pay between $20 and $50 per hour for tutors. 

Tips
l l

Make sure you get as much information as possible from and about the online tutor.  Monitor your student's work. Is he or she learning or just having fun without real thinking? 

Option 4: No Child Left Behind
Under No Child Left Behind legislation, families at certain schools are entitled to free tutoring services. Pros 12 ONLINE EDUGUIDE l The services are free to qualifying families. 

www.EduGuide.org

Option 4: No Child Left Behind
Under No Child Left Behind legislation, families at certain schools are entitled to free tutoring services. Pros
l l l

The services are free to qualifying families.  Tutors are highly qualified.  Tutors will work closely with classroom teachers. 

Cons
l l l

The student's school must be identified as needing improvement.  If supply or funding is limited, only the neediest students qualify.  Schools can use only services and service providers approved by the state. 

Costs
l

Services are free to families in Title I schools that fail to make adequate yearly progress (AYP) for three or more years.  

Tips
l

Ask your school's principal or Title I coordinator whether you qualify. 

 

Tutoring Programs FAQs
EduGuide Staff
If this is your first experience with a tutor, you probably have some questions. Here are four questions parents ask most frequently  about tutoring programs. 1. How long do tutoring programs usually last? The most effective school­based tutoring programs last between five and  eighteen weeks—though this depends both on the student’s needs and the intensity and teaching methods of the tutor. Based on your child's goals, your tutor should suggest the number of sessions the tutor expects your child to need for noticeable  improvement. For basic skills like reading, writing, math, or learning a foreign language, it's fair to expect twenty or more  sessions before improvements translate into better grades.  How many times a week should my child meet with a tutor? Sessions that occur twice or even three times a week typically  produce faster results. Meeting more frequently helps keep students moving ahead.  Which subjects respond best to tutoring? Math skills usually improve more quickly than reading skills. Struggling readers  may need more than a year of tutoring to get up to grade level.  What are the most successful tutoring techniques? Though techniques vary depending on the subject being taught, the  following generally yield the best results: a. Developing a student's independent problem­solving skills b. Timely feedback to confirm good choices and correct mistakes c. Quickly recognizing which techniques work best and structuring the tutoring plan     around those methods 
Sources: Cohen, P.A., Kulik, J.A., Kulik, C.C. (1982) Educational outcomes of tutoring: A meta­analysis of findings. American Educational Research Journal. 19:2.  pp.237­248. Juel, C. (1996) What makes literacy tutoring effective? Reading Research Quarterly. 31:3 pp.268­269. 13 ONLINE EDUGUIDE

2. 3. 4.

www.EduGuide.org

l

Ask your school's principal or Title I coordinator whether you qualify. 

 

Tutoring Programs FAQs
EduGuide Staff
If this is your first experience with a tutor, you probably have some questions. Here are four questions parents ask most frequently  about tutoring programs. 1. How long do tutoring programs usually last? The most effective school­based tutoring programs last between five and  eighteen weeks—though this depends both on the student’s needs and the intensity and teaching methods of the tutor. Based on your child's goals, your tutor should suggest the number of sessions the tutor expects your child to need for noticeable  improvement. For basic skills like reading, writing, math, or learning a foreign language, it's fair to expect twenty or more  sessions before improvements translate into better grades.  How many times a week should my child meet with a tutor? Sessions that occur twice or even three times a week typically  produce faster results. Meeting more frequently helps keep students moving ahead.  Which subjects respond best to tutoring? Math skills usually improve more quickly than reading skills. Struggling readers  may need more than a year of tutoring to get up to grade level.  What are the most successful tutoring techniques? Though techniques vary depending on the subject being taught, the  following generally yield the best results: a. Developing a student's independent problem­solving skills b. Timely feedback to confirm good choices and correct mistakes c. Quickly recognizing which techniques work best and structuring the tutoring plan     around those methods 
Sources: Cohen, P.A., Kulik, J.A., Kulik, C.C. (1982) Educational outcomes of tutoring: A meta­analysis of findings. American Educational Research Journal. 19:2.  pp.237­248. Juel, C. (1996) What makes literacy tutoring effective? Reading Research Quarterly. 31:3 pp.268­269. Merrill, D.C, Reiser, B.J., Merrill, S.K. & Landes, S. (1995) Tutoring: Guided learning by doing. Cognition and Instruction. 13:3. pp.315­372. 

2. 3. 4.

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Should I Be My Child's At­home Tutor?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/24/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

14

Does My Child Need a Tutor? ONLINE EDUGUIDE
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/27/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

www.EduGuide.org

Merrill, D.C, Reiser, B.J., Merrill, S.K. & Landes, S. (1995) Tutoring: Guided learning by doing. Cognition and Instruction. 13:3. pp.315­372. 

 

Due to the dynamic nature of our quizzes, they are only available on the web. Follow the addresses below to take a quiz on our  website.

Should I Be My Child's At­home Tutor?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/24/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

Does My Child Need a Tutor?
http://www.eduguide.org/Parents/TakeQuiz/tabid/114/quizId/27/view/StepTakeQuiz/Default.aspx

15

ONLINE EDUGUIDE

www.EduGuide.org

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close