Closing the Big Data Management and Security Gap

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White
 
 
Paper
 

 

 


  Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 
 
 
and
 Security
 Gap
 


 

 

 

By
 Nik
 Rouda,
 Senior
 Analyst
 

 

 

October
 2014
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This
 ESG
 White
 Paper
 was
 commissioned
 by
 Zettaset
 
 
 
and
 is
 distributed
 under
 license
 from
 ESG.
 

 

 
©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 


 

White
 Paper:
 Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 &
 Security
 Gap
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 2
 

Contents
 
Big
 Data
 Is
 Gaining
 Momentum,
 but
 Increasing
 Concerns,
 Too
 ..................................................................
 3
 
Big
 Data
 Projects
 Still
 Rely
 Heavily
 on
 Professional
 Services
 ...................................................................................
 3
 
Security
 Still
 a
 Top
 Concern
 for
 Big
 Data
 Platforms
 .................................................................................................
 4
 
How
 Organizations
 Should
 Automate
 and
 Secure
 Big
 Data
 Deployments
 .................................................
 5
 
Zettaset
 Delivers
 a
 Safer,
 More
 Automated
 and
 Secure
 Solution
 ..............................................................
 6
 

 

The
 Bigger
 Truth
 .........................................................................................................................................
 7
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
All trademark names are property of their respective companies. Information contained in this publication has been obtained by sources The
Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG) considers to be reliable but is not warranted by ESG. This publication may contain opinions of ESG, which are
subject to change from time to time. This publication is copyrighted by The Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. Any reproduction or redistribution of
this publication, in whole or in part, whether in hard-copy format, electronically, or otherwise to persons not authorized to receive it, without the
express consent of The Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc., is in violation of U.S. copyright law and will be subject to an action for civil damages and,
if applicable, criminal prosecution. Should you have any questions, please contact ESG Client Relations at 508.482.0188.
 

©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 

White
 Paper:
 Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 &
 Security
 Gap
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 3
 

Big
 Data
 Is
 Gaining
 Momentum,
 but
 Increasing
 Concerns,
 Too
 
More
 and
 more
 companies
 are
 exploring
 new
 opportunities
 offered
 by
 big
 data
 and
 advanced
 analytics,
 across
 a
 
broad
 range
 of
 industries
 and
 functional
 lines
 of
 business.
 Data-­‐driven
 decision
 making
 is
 being
 seen
 not
 as
 a
 luxury,
 
a
 management
 fad,
 or
 an
 area
 for
 future
 innovation,
 but
 as
 an
 essential
 need
 in
 order
 to
 compete
 successfully
 in
 
the
 modern
 world.
 In
 parallel
 or
 even
 driving
 this
 interest,
 emerging
 technologies
 like
 Hadoop
 and
 NoSQL
 databases
 
are
 finding
 a
 ready
 market
 and
 are
 increasingly
 being
 chosen
 as
 the
 primary
 platforms
 for
 accommodating
 the
 
intense
 demands
 of
 big
 data.
 The
 appetite
 and
 applications
 are
 virtually
 endless,
 applicable
 to
 nearly
 any
 business
 
process
 or
 activity,
 and
 limited
 more
 often
 by
 managerial
 creativity
 and
 institutional
 resistance
 to
 change
 than
 by
 
technology
 today.
 
IT
 budgets
 are
 suddenly
 reflecting
 this
 fundamental
 shift
 as
 well,
 and
 recent
 ESG
 research
 found
 56%
 of
 companies
 
surveyed
 are
 increasing
 their
 investments
 in
 big
 data
 and
 analytics
 by
 more
 than
 10%
 in
 2014,
 as
 compared
 with
 
the
 previous
 year.1
 This
 rapid
 increase
 further
 indicates
 that
 most
 organizations
 are
 now
 moving
 beyond
 small
 
pilots
 and
 proof-­‐of-­‐concept
 stages
 into
 enterprise-­‐wide
 production
 deployments.
 
 
 
However,
 as
 big
 data
 projects
 migrate
 from
 pilot
 to
 production
 deployment
 and
 extend
 beyond
 the
 exclusive
 realm
 
of
 IT
 and
 into
 the
 business
 unit,
 new
 factors
 come
 into
 play.
 
 How
 will
 the
 enterprise
 efficiently
 scale
 a
 technology
 
that
 is
 still
 relatively
 immature
 and
 overly
 dependent
 on
 manual
 installation
 and
 configuration
 processes?
 
 How
 will
 
the
 enterprise
 lock
 down
 sensitive
 data
 in
 Hadoop
 and
 NoSQL
 environments
 for
 Big
 Data
 technologies
 that
 were
 
never
 conceived
 with
 security
 in
 mind?
 
 

Big
 Data
 Projects
 Still
 Rely
 Heavily
 on
 Professional
 Services
 
Development
 of
 a
 big
 data
 solution
 is
 still
 a
 complex
 undertaking
 that
 is
 very
 interdisciplinary
 in
 nature,
 requiring
 
specialized
 personnel
 to
 provide
 operational
 support.
 
 Hadoop
 is
 rapidly
 evolving,
 but
 has
 not
 yet
 reached
 the
 level
 
of
 maturity
 and
 sophistication
 that
 traditional
 relational
 databases
 offer.
 There
 may
 not
 be
 enough
 in-­‐house
 
expertise
 to
 understand
 all
 the
 requirements
 of
 the
 new
 Big
 Data
 platforms,
 making
 users
 more
 reliant
 on
 the
 
professional
 services.
 
 
Persistent
 skills
 gaps
 in
 various
 IT
 disciplines
 impact
 projects,
 and
 these
 include
 shortages
 in
 security
 (25%
 
surveyed),
 architecture
 planning
 (24%),
 BI
 and
 analytics
 (20%),
 and
 database
 administration
 (17%),
 as
 shown
 in
 
Figure
 1.2
 If
 unaddressed,
 these
 staff
 gaps
 will
 often
 lead
 to
 unforeseen
 delays
 and
 risks
 in
 new
 initiatives.
 
 
Hadoop
 and
 NoSQL
 technology
 is
 rapidly
 evolving,
 but
 has
 not
 yet
 reached
 the
 level
 of
 maturity
 and
 sophistication
 
that
 traditional
 relational
 databases
 offer.
 
 As
 a
 result,
 users
 expecting
 lower
 operational
 costs
 by
 using
 Hadoop
 
software
 and
 infrastructure
 can
 sometimes
 find
 they
 must
 spend
 significant
 sums
 for
 software
 support
 and
 
maintenance
 in
 the
 form
 of
 recurring
 subscription
 fees
 to
 vendors
 of
 branded
 Hadoop
 and
 NoSQL
 distributions.
 
 
 
It
 could
 be
 argued
 that
 since
 professional
 services
 represent
 a
 substantial
 revenue
 source
 for
 some
 distribution
 
vendors,
 they
 have
 less
 incentive
 to
 incorporate
 more
 process
 automation
 into
 their
 respective
 offerings.
 
 While
 
this
 model
 may
 have
 worked
 during
 the
 early
 phases
 of
 Hadoop
 deployment
 in
 pilot
 environments,
 it
 often
 
becomes
 a
 resource
 issue
 for
 organizations
 wishing
 to
 scale
 their
 deployments
 in
 an
 efficient
 and
 cost-­‐effective
 
manner.
 More
 automation
 of
 management
 tasks
 could
 help
 organizations
 to
 avoid
 having
 to
 spend
 inordinate
 sums
 
for
 outside
 support
 and
 maintenance
 of
 a
 technology
 that
 has
 been
 touted
 as
 cost-­‐saving.
 

 

 

 

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1


 Source:
 ESG
 Research
 Report,
 Enterprise
 Data
 Analytics
 Trends,
 May
 2014.
 

 Ibid.
 

2

©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 

White
 Paper:
 Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 &
 Security
 Gap
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 4
 

Figure
 1.
 Top
 Ten
 Skills
 Shortages
 Impacting
 Initiative
 Success
 

In
 which
 of
 the
 following
 areas
 do
 you
 believe
 your
 IT
 organizaGon
 currently
 has
 a
 
problemaGc
 shortage
 of
 exisGng
 skills?
 (Percent
 of
 respondents,
 N=545,
 mulGple
 
responses
 accepted)
 
Informaeon
 security
 

25%
 

IT
 architecture/planning
 

24%
 

Mobile
 applicaeon
 development
 

21%
 

Business
 intelligence/data
 analyecs
 

20%
 

Server
 virtualizaeon/private
 cloud
 infrastructure
 

20%
 
19%
 

Mobile
 device
 management
 
Applicaeon
 development
 

18%
 

Database
 administraeon
 

17%
 

Data
 proteceon
 (i.e.,
 backup
 and
 recovery)
 

17%
 
0%
 

5%
 

10%
 

15%
 

20%
 

25%
 

30%
 

Source:
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 2014.
 


 

Security
 Still
 a
 Top
 Concern
 for
 Big
 Data
 Platforms
 
As
 the
 number
 of
 distinct
 data
 sources
 and
 total
 data
 volumes
 grow
 exponentially,
 correspondingly
 more
 strategic
 
planning
 and
 tactical
 administration
 is
 required,
 and
 this
 basic
 talent
 problem
 is
 magnified
 to
 potentially
 deleterious
 
effect.
 This
 problem
 can
 manifest
 in
 different
 ways,
 but
 when
 asked
 about
 it
 by
 ESG,
 38%
 of
 respondents
 cited
 
security
 requirements
 as
 being
 a
 top
 order
 challenge
 due
 to
 unchecked
 size
 growth
 and
 proliferation
 of
 databases.3
 
So
 not
 only
 is
 there
 more
 data,
 in
 more
 places,
 and
 too
 few
 people
 to
 steer
 projects,
 but
 also
 the
 stakes
 are
 raised
 
for
 protecting
 this
 sensitive
 information
 in
 the
 age
 of
 malicious
 hackers,
 advanced
 persistent
 threats,
 and
 
occasional
 internal
 malfeasance.
 
One
 implication
 is
 that
 these
 new
 big
 data
 projects
 can’t
 be
 led
 solely
 by
 the
 data
 scientists,
 analysts,
 and
 database
 
administrators.
 While
 they
 may
 possess
 the
 know-­‐how
 to
 design
 in
 new
 functionality
 and
 support
 new
 applications,
 
they
 may
 not
 have
 the
 detailed
 understanding
 and
 skill-­‐set
 required
 to
 manage
 the
 security
 nuances.
 A
 copy
 of
 
privileged
 data
 in
 a
 test
 and
 development
 environmental
 is
 still
 a
 copy
 susceptible
 to
 breach,
 and
 more
 worryingly,
 
the
 end
 goal
 of
 consolidating
 as
 much
 information
 as
 possible
 into
 a
 central
 data
 lake
 or
 hub
 can
 further
 compound
 
the
 exposure
 if
 not
 handled
 appropriately.
 
As
 such,
 ESG
 research
 found
 that
 84%
 of
 respondents
 in
 a
 recent
 enterprise
 data
 survey
 say
 it
 is
 important
 or
 crucial
 
that
 security
 teams
 are
 actively
 involved
 in
 development
 of
 new
 big
 data
 and
 analytics
 initiatives.4
 This
 is
 proven
 
out
 in
 customers’
 lists
 of
 technology
 evaluation
 criteria
 for
 selecting
 an
 enterprise
 data
 management
 platform
 in
 
Figure
 2,
 below.
 Security
 is
 tied
 for
 first
 place
 as
 the
 most
 important
 factor
 according
 to
 survey
 respondents
 when
 
defining
 requirements
 for
 new
 initiatives
 in
 big
 data,
 analytics,
 or
 business
 intelligence.5
 With
 these
 various
 
challenges
 in
 mind,
 most
 customers
 are
 looking
 for
 already
 proven
 approaches
 to
 achieving
 better
 security
 in
 the
 
face
 of
 pressure
 to
 deliver
 new
 deployments
 in
 the
 most
 efficient
 and
 cost-­‐effective
 way.
 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3


 Source:
 ESG
 Research
 Report,
 Enterprise
 Database
 Trends
 in
 a
 Big
 Data
 World,
 July
 2014.
 

 Source:
 ESG
 Research
 Report,
 Enterprise
 Data
 Analytics
 Trends,
 May
 2014.
 
5

 Source:
 Ibid.
 
4

©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 

White
 Paper:
 Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 &
 Security
 Gap
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 5
 

Figure
 2.
 Top
 Five
 Most
 Important
 Criteria
 in
 Evaluating
 a
 Big
 Data
 Solution
 

Which
 of
 the
 following
 aUributes
 are
 most
 important
 to
 your
 organizaGon
 when
 
considering
 technology
 soluGons
 in
 the
 area
 of
 business
 intelligence,
 analyGcs,
 and
 big
 
data?
 (Percent
 of
 respondents,
 N=375,
 three
 responses
 accepted)
 
Security
 

26%
 

Cost,
 ROI
 and/or
 TCO
 

26%
 

Reliability
 

22%
 

21%
 

Performance
 

Ease
 of
 integraeon
 with
 other
 applicaeons,
 APIs
 

20%
 
0%
 

5%
 

10%
 

15%
 

20%
 

25%
 

30%
 


 

Source:
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 2014.
 


 
How
 Organizations
 Should
 Automate
 and
 Secure
 Big
 Data
 Deployments
 
The
 good
 news
 is
 that
 as
 adoption
 has
 accelerated
 and
 more
 production
 deployments
 are
 being
 settled
 into
 
enterprise
 environments,
 there
 are
 now
 some
 emerging
 best
 practices
 to
 follow
 to
 automate
 and
 secure
 a
 Hadoop
 
environment.
 The
 bad
 news
 is
 that
 the
 requisite
 functionality
 is
 by
 no
 means
 yet
 a
 standardized
 part
 of
 any
 
particular
 distribution,
 and
 many
 customers
 will
 need
 to
 look
 carefully
 at
 vendors’
 glib
 promises
 to
 determine
 for
 
themselves
 which
 are
 most
 up
 for
 the
 deployment
 and
 security
 challenge.
 A
 typical
 CISO
 will
 be
 interested
 in
 
establishing
 sound
 methodologies
 for
 security
 efficacy,
 operational
 efficiency,
 and
 enabling
 the
 business
 to
 conduct
 
activities
 in
 a
 safe
 manner
 without
 undue
 burden.
 
Both
 IT
 and
 line
 of
 business
 leaders
 should
 take
 an
 interest
 and
 demand
 the
 best-­‐of-­‐breed
 capabilities
 outlined
 in
 
Table
 1
 from
 any
 production
 solution.
 
Table
 1.
 Four
 Primary
 Considerations
 in
 Selecting
 a
 Secure
 Big
 Data
 Platform
 


 

Common
 Enterprise
 Requirements
 

Deployment
 (incl.
 automation
 and
 integration
 of
 
tested
 configurations)
 
Encryption
 (both
 at
 rest
 and
 in
 motion)
 and/or
 
data
 masking
 as
 appropriate
 
Key
 management
 (incl.
 policies,
 HA,
 and
 key
 
management
 interoperability
 protocol
 -­‐
 KMIP)
 
User
 authentication
 and
 access
 control
 by
 role
 for
 
users
 and
 administrators
 

Impact
 /
 Benefit
 
Faster
 time
 to
 production
 and
 reduced
 risk
 of
 security
 gaps
 
Safer
 ETL
 and
 storage
 of
 everything
 in
 data
 lake/hub
 
Simplified
 key
 admin
 and
 more
 reliable
 access
 
Only
 approved
 people
 can
 see
 only
 appropriate
 data
 
Source:
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 2014.
 

©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 

White
 Paper:
 Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 &
 Security
 Gap
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 6
 

While
 set
 up
 and
 configuration
 of
 a
 few
 management
 and
 data
 nodes
 in
 a
 Hadoop
 cluster
 may
 be
 touted
 as
 
relatively
 easy
 to
 do,
 the
 manual
 effort
 introduces
 chances
 of
 errors,
 which
 are
 increased
 for
 each
 additional
 
instance.
 Having
 an
 automated
 system
 for
 deployment
 simplifies
 this
 process,
 making
 for
 both
 a
 more
 scalable
 and
 
more
 reliably
 protected
 environment.
 
Encryption
 may
 seem
 like
 a
 common
 “tick
 box”
 option
 on
 many
 Hadoop
 distributions,
 but
 not
 all
 follow
 the
 same
 
conventions
 or
 coverage
 model.
 Ensure
 that
 all
 data
 on
 disk
 is
 covered
 with
 strong
 encryption,
 and
 take
 steps
 to
 
also
 guard
 against
 network
 attacks
 for
 data
 being
 transferred
 between
 nodes;
 during
 extract,
 transform,
 and
 load
 
activities;
 and
 when
 exporting
 information.
 Data
 masking
 can
 also
 be
 useful
 if
 certain
 fields
 need
 to
 be
 identifiably
 
unique
 for
 analytics
 without
 exposing
 their
 actual
 contents.
 
Though
 encryption
 itself
 may
 seem
 quite
 simple
 to
 turn
 on,
 key
 management
 is
 often
 the
 weak
 point
 of
 solutions,
 
particularly
 in
 larger,
 more
 varied,
 or
 more
 dynamic
 environments.
 Unique
 keys
 should
 be
 generated
 and
 controlled
 
via
 customizable
 policies,
 kept
 and
 provided
 in
 a
 highly
 available
 source,
 and
 compliant
 with
 KMIP
 definitions.
 Key
 
management
 should
 also
 have
 role-­‐based
 administration
 and
 auditing
 capabilities.
 
Even
 if
 the
 whole
 environment
 is
 defended
 from
 external
 attacks
 using
 these
 mechanisms,
 steps
 should
 be
 taken
 to
 
limit
 access
 to
 particular
 data
 sets
 for
 only
 authenticated
 users.
 This
 should
 be
 fine-­‐grained,
 role-­‐based,
 
automatically
 tied
 into
 AD
 and
 LDAP
 protocols,
 and
 carry
 over
 permissions
 as
 specified
 from
 these
 proven
 access
 
control
 systems.
 
From
 a
 broader
 perspective,
 additional
 steps
 should
 be
 explored
 as
 best
 practices,
 including
 establishing
 a
 security
 
zone
 for
 the
 analytics
 servers,
 deploying
 these
 servers
 in
 a
 hardened
 configuration,
 frequent
 scanning
 and
 timely
 
patching,
 and
 traffic
 monitoring.
 These
 approaches
 are
 not
 necessarily
 different
 for
 Hadoop
 environments,
 
however,
 and
 should
 be
 considered
 as
 a
 standard
 part
 of
 a
 larger
 IT
 security
 framework.
 
Although
 a
 non-­‐trivial
 undertaking,
 IT
 technology
 decision
 makers
 should
 build
 these
 into
 their
 “must
 have”
 
evaluation
 criteria,
 and
 select
 products
 that
 have
 functionality
 to
 match.
 

Zettaset
 Delivers
 a
 Safer,
 More
 Automated
 and
 Secure
 Solution
 
While
 many
 companies,
 young
 and
 old,
 are
 rushing
 to
 capitalize
 on
 the
 new
 opportunities
 afforded
 by
 big
 data,
 
many
 vendors
 are
 seeking
 to
 provide
 them
 with
 the
 technology
 to
 do
 so.
 Of
 these,
 some
 focus
 on
 performance,
 
some
 on
 connectivity,
 and
 some
 on
 vertical-­‐specific
 applications.
 Zettaset
 is
 differentiating
 with
 a
 focus
 on
 building
 
rock
 solid
 enterprise-­‐ready
 management
 and
 security
 applications
 that
 augment
 and
 improve
 the
 branded
 open-­‐
source
 distribution
 frameworks.
 In
 doing
 so,
 Zettaset
 enables
 other
 vendors’
 big
 data
 solutions
 to
 also
 better
 meet
 
enterprise
 operational
 requirements.
 As
 already
 noted,
 these
 requirements
 may
 not
 be
 top
 of
 mind
 for
 the
 DBA
 or
 
data
 scientist,
 but
 they
 will
 be
 critical
 steps
 before
 IT
 infrastructure
 and
 operations
 teams
 can
 adopt
 the
 new
 
solutions
 and
 begin
 enterprise-­‐wide
 production
 deployments.
 
Zettaset’s
 Orchestrator
 provides
 a
 more
 mature,
 more
 comprehensive
 approach
 to
 managing
 big
 data
 
environments,
 automating
 and
 standardizing
 common
 activities
 like
 cluster
 configuration,
 node
 deployment,
 set
 up
 
of
 interfaces
 to
 applications,
 general
 administration,
 and
 not
 least,
 securing
 Hadoop
 environments.
 
 
 
With
 the
 recent
 Fast-­‐PATH
 addition,
 Orchestrator
 process
 automation
 reduces
 reliance
 on
 manual
 efforts
 and
 
accelerates
 database
 cluster
 deployment.
 
 In
 the
 company’s
 internal
 benchmark
 testing,
 Zettaset
 found
 Fast-­‐PATH
 
was
 able
 to
 fully
 install
 a
 50-­‐node
 Hadoop
 cluster
 in
 140
 minutes,
 which
 would
 almost
 certainly
 be
 quicker
 and
 less
 
error-­‐prone
 than
 a
 manual
 effort.
 The
 benchmark
 time
 includes
 installation
 of
 the
 Hadoop
 distribution,
 as
 well
 as
 
installation
 of
 Kerberos,
 HBase,
 Hive,
 Encryption,
 Key
 Management,
 and
 Zettaset’s
 patented
 High-­‐Availability
 
framework
 on
 all
 nodes.
 
 Orchestrator
 Fast-­‐PATH
 dramatically
 lowers
 operational
 costs
 and
 reduces
 the
 IT
 resource
 
requirements
 necessary
 to
 implement
 Hadoop,
 as
 well
 as
 reduces
 time
 to
 value
 from
 weeks
 to
 hours.
 
Now
 Zettaset
 is
 going
 a
 step
 further
 and
 modularizing
 key
 components,
 like
 Hadoop
 security
 and
 their
 patented
 
multi-­‐service
 high
 availability
 and
 automated
 failover,
 to
 more
 easily
 complement
 and
 integrate
 with
 popular
 
Hadoop
 distributions
 from
 Cloudera
 and
 Hortonworks.
 This
 enterprise-­‐class
 add-­‐on
 functionality
 enhances
 the
 

©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 

White
 Paper:
 Closing
 the
 Big
 Data
 Management
 &
 Security
 Gap
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 7
 

management
 and
 security
 mechanisms
 of
 most
 branded
 distributions,
 and
 will
 help
 address
 the
 considerations
 
outlined
 in
 Table
 1.
 
Specific
 modularized
 Big
 Data
 management
 and
 security
 capabilities
 include:
 






Data-­‐at-­‐rest
 Encryption
 –
 Zettaset
 offers
 a
 standards-­‐based,
 low-­‐overhead
 approach
 linking
 up
 AES-­‐256
 
bit
 disk
 partition
 encryption
 with
 existing
 frameworks,
 and
 smoothly
 interoperates
 with
 KMIP-­‐
compliant
 key
 management,
 PKCS
 hardware
 security
 modules,
 and
 a
 wide
 range
 of
 leading
 Hadoop
 
distributions
 and
 NoSQL
 databases.
 This
 complements
 open
 source
 encryption
 approaches
 for
 data
 in
 
motion
 in
 Hadoop
 clusters,
 and
 also
 ensures
 the
 Orchestrator
 console
 communications
 are
 safe.
 
Multi-­‐Service
 High
 Availability
 -­‐
 Hadoop
 cluster
 environments
 are
 complex,
 and
 require
 multiple
 
services
 to
 productively
 function.
 Zettaset
 Orchestrator
 uniquely
 delivers
 enterprise
 class
 high
 
availability
 with
 automated
 fail-­‐over
 for
 all
 Hadoop
 services
 running
 in
 a
 cluster,
 eliminating
 single
 
points
 of
 failure
 that
 exist
 in
 open
 source
 Hadoop,
 and
 delivering
 the
 robust
 security
 and
 compliance
 
capabilities
 that
 enterprises
 expect
 and
 need.
 
Fine-­‐Grained,
 Role-­‐based
 Access
 Control
 –
 Because
 Hadoop
 may
 often
 contain
 a
 wide
 range
 of
 
information,
 both
 management
 tools
 and
 data
 itself
 must
 be
 restricted
 to
 those
 who
 “need
 to
 know.”
 
Fine-­‐grained
 controls
 ensure
 that
 roles
 and
 permissions
 can
 be
 easily
 customized,
 and
 that
 only
 
appropriate
 administrators
 and
 users
 can
 make
 changes
 or
 access
 sensitive
 information.
 

Zettaset
 has
 a
 bigger
 vision,
 too,
 including
 smoother
 deployments,
 better
 reliability,
 improved
 performance,
 and
 
easier
 support
 and
 administration
 for
 broader
 big
 data
 environments.
 Centralizing
 and
 certifying
 management
 of
 all
 
required
 functions
 to
 meet
 enterprise
 operational
 standards
 will
 go
 a
 long
 way
 to
 facilitating
 the
 adoption
 of
 
technologies
 that
 are
 still
 evolving
 and
 maturing.
 Modularizing
 the
 Zettaset
 offerings
 opens
 them
 up
 to
 the
 wider
 
community
 with
 a
 flexible
 “a
 la
 carte”
 menu
 to
 suit
 specific
 enterprise
 requirements,
 while
 also
 paving
 the
 way
 for
 
an
 expanded,
 more
 comprehensive,
 and
 fully
 integrated
 solution
 for
 big
 data
 management
 and
 security.
 


 
The
 Bigger
 Truth
 
Big
 data
 is
 rapidly
 entering
 the
 mainstream,
 and
 new
 data
 platforms
 like
 Hadoop
 and
 NoSQL
 databases
 are
 
becoming
 increasingly
 popular
 tools
 to
 capture
 and
 serve
 up
 more
 enterprise
 data
 than
 ever
 before,
 spanning
 
sensitive
 personal
 profile,
 health,
 financial,
 and
 sometimes
 R&D
 information.
 Not
 only
 is
 more
 data
 being
 collected
 
and
 compiled
 into
 a
 single
 repository,
 but
 also
 more
 people
 are
 being
 given
 access
 to
 this
 data
 across
 multiple
 lines
 
of
 business
 for
 application
 development
 and
 for
 analysis
 and
 reporting.
 Yet
 these
 emerging
 technologies
 are
 not
 yet
 
fully
 mature
 in
 their
 security
 capabilities,
 increasing
 the
 risk
 of
 a
 “super
 breach.”
 The
 financial
 repercussions
 and
 
brand
 damage
 of
 an
 incident
 are
 well
 documented,
 as
 are
 the
 limitations
 of
 simple
 perimeter-­‐based
 security
 
products.
 
 
While
 many
 are
 leaping
 into
 the
 big
 data
 opportunity
 with
 enthusiasm,
 the
 need
 to
 build
 a
 robust,
 manageable,
 and
 
safe
 solution
 is
 paramount.
 Many
 vendors
 are
 paying
 lip-­‐service
 to
 these
 issues,
 but
 few
 have
 really
 understood
 the
 
scope
 of
 the
 problem
 or
 yet
 endeavored
 to
 design
 and
 implement
 a
 truly
 protected
 product.
 Zettaset
 has
 focused
 
on
 building
 more
 comprehensive
 security
 and
 management
 functionality,
 and
 offers
 a
 great
 complementary
 
solution
 that
 addresses
 the
 inherent
 risks
 of
 Hadoop
 distribution
 frameworks.
 
 

©
 2014
 by
 The
 Enterprise
 Strategy
 Group,
 Inc.
 All
 Rights
 Reserved.
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
20
 Asylum
 Street
 
 |
 
 Milford,
 MA
 01757
 
 |
 
 Tel:
 508.482.0188
 
 Fax:
 508.482.0218
 
 |
 
 www.esg-­‐global.com
 


 

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