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N O R T H W E S T WIA

I NFORMATION FOR W ORKFORCE I NVESTMENT P L ANNING 2007

Andover Ansonia Ashford Avon Barkhamsted Beacon Falls Berlin Bethany Bethel Bethlehem Bloomfield Bolton Bozrah Branford Bridgeport Bridgewater Bristol Brookfield Brooklyn Burlington Canaan Canterbury Canton Chaplin Cheshire Chester Clinton Colchester Colebrook Columbia Cornwall Coventry Cromwell Danbury Darien Deep River Derby Durham Eastford East Granby East Haddam East Hampton East Hartford East Haven East Lyme Easton East Windsor Ellington Enfield Essex Fairfield Farmington Franklin Glastonbury Goshen Granby Greenwich Griswold Groton Guilford Haddam Hamden Hampton Hartford Hartland Harwinton Hebron Kent Killingly Killingworth Lebanon Ledyard Lisbon Litchfield Lyme Madison Manchester Mansfield Marlborough Meriden Middlebury Middlefield Middletown Milford Monroe Montville Morris Naugatuck New Britain New Canaan New Fairfield New Hartford New Haven Newington New London New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Branford North Canaan North Haven North Stonington Norwalk Norwich Old Lyme Old Saybrook Orange Oxford Plainfield Plainville Plymouth Pomfret Portland Preston Prospect Putnam Redding Ridgefield Rocky Hill Roxbury Salem Salisbury Scotland Seymour Sharon Shelton Sherman Simsbury Somers Southbury Southington South Windsor Sprague Stafford Stamford Sterling Stonington Stratford Suffield Thomaston Thompson Tolland Torrington Trumbull Union Vernon Voluntown Wallingford Warren Washington Waterbury Waterford Watertown Westbrook West Hartford West Haven Weston Westport Wethersfield Willington Wilton Winchester Windham Windsor Windsor Locks Wolcott Woodbridge Woodbury Woodstock

Salisbury

North Canaan Norfolk Canaan

Colebrook

Hartland

Winchester

Barkhamsted

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington

New Hartford

Kent

Warren

Litchfield

Harwinton

Morris Washington Bethlehem New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Watertown Wolcott Thomaston

Nor thwest WIA

Waterbury Middlebury Naugatuck Prospect Cheshire

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

Ridgefield

Redding

Covering 1,345 square miles of land, or nearly 28 percent of the State’s total, the Northwest Workforce Investment Area (WIA) is the largest in Connecticut. It stretches from the Massachusetts border in the north, and westward to the New York border, and includes 41 cities and towns. The Northwest WIA, which shares the rural setting of Litchfield Hills with the metropolitan characteristics of Danbury and Waterbury, also possesses the bedroom towns of upper Fairfield County. Towns and cities in the Northwest WIA can be reached via Interstate Route 84, which runs east and west from Danbury and Waterbury, along with Routes 8 and 44, which traverse the Torrington area. For long distance travel, Bradley International Airport serves the northern and eastward residents, while people from the city of Danbury and southward are within driving distance of JFK, LaGuardia, White Plains and Newark International Airports.

Ashford Bozrah Brooklyn Canterbury Chaplin Colchester Columbia Coventry Eastford East Lyme Franklin Griswold Groton Hampton Killingly Lebanon Ledyard Lisbon Lyme Mansfield Montville New London North Stonington Norwich Old Lyme Plainfield Pomfret Preston Putnam Salem Scotland Sprague Sterling Stonington Thompson Union Voluntown Waterford Willington Windham Woodstock

Andover Avon Berlin Bloomfield Bolton Bristol Burlington Canton East Granby East Hartford East Windsor Ellington Enfield Farmington Glastonbury Granby Hartford Hebron Manchester Marlborough New Britain Newington Plainville Plymouth Rocky Hill Simsbury Somers Southington South Windsor Stafford Suffield Tolland Vernon West Hartford Wethersfield Windsor Windsor Locks

Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

Bethany Branford Chester Clinton Cromwell Deep River Durham East Haddam East Hampton East Haven Essex Guilford Haddam Hamden Killingworth Madison Meriden Middlefield Middletown Milford New Haven North Branford North Haven Old Saybrook Orange Portland Wallingford Westbrook West Haven Woodbridge

Ansonia Beacon Falls Bridgeport Darien Derby Easton Fairfield Greenwich Monroe New Canaan Norwalk Oxford Seymour Shelton Stamford Stratford Trumbull Weston Westport Wilton

PREFACE
The Office of Research is Connecticut’s leading producer of information and statistics on the economy, workforce, occupations, and careers. Our mission is to produce, analyze, and deliver timely and reliable workforce information and statistics to assist in decision-making for those planning economic development initiatives, for education and training providers, and for job seekers and students who are seeking guidance in making career choices. The Workforce Investment Act provides a valuable framework through which to organize and coordinate a broad range of undertakings to support workforce investment activities. State and local Workforce Investment Boards are important customers of the workforce information system. The Office of Research provides much of the core information needed by administrators and service providers to plan, evaluate, and effectively serve the business and individual customers of the workforce system. Our office is pleased to provide the Information for Workforce Investment Planning – 2007. This publication includes data on Connecticut’s population, its labor force, industry employment and wages, employment by town, and on persons with barriers to employment. In this current edition, we’ve added 2006 data on employment by industry clusters and their relative importance statewide and for each workforce investment area; home sales and median home prices, housing inventory and fair market rents; highlights of Connecticut’s regional occupational forecast, 2004 to 2014; along with additional historical data for comparisons and trends. We believe this information will be useful for the Workforce Investment Board planners and policy makers who make critical workforce system decisions. Sources for the data are cited on each table, and include other State agencies, the Connecticut Department of Labor and the United States Census Bureau. We wish to thank these providers for their contribution to this year’s publication. The charts and tables in the Information for Workforce Investment Planning – 2007 are within the public domain, and may be copied and/or quoted. However, we do request that you attribute such material to this publication. We hope that you find this publication helpful and informative.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Cynthia DeLisa, Rachel Meyerhoff, and Mark Stankiewicz of the Office of Research prepared this publication. We would like to thank the following Department of Labor and Office of Research staff who provided data for this publication: John DiSette, Edward Doukas, Jessy George, Nicholas Jolly, Doreen LeBel, Dana Placzek, David Post, and Joseph Slepski. Special thanks go to John Tirinzonie, State Labor Economist and Director of Job Development, and to Brandon T. Hooker for providing the regional and statewide employment forecasts included in this publication. Questions regarding information in this report may be directed to: Connecticut Department of Labor Office of Research 200 Folly Brook Boulevard Wethersfield, CT 06109 (860) 263-6275 E-mail: [email protected] The Information for Workforce Investment Planning – 2007 and other Office of Research publications are available on the Internet at: www.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi.

INFORMATION

FOR

W O R K F O R C E I N V E S T M E N T P L A N N I N G -20 07
TABLE OF CONTENTS

WIA ECONOMIC DATA: PAGE # POPULATION AND POPULATION DENSITY ......................................................................................................... 1 LABOR FORCE ............................................................................................................................................... 2 EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES BY INDUSTRY ......................................................................................................3-4 EMPLOYMENT CONCENTRATION AND INDUSTRY CLUSTERS ...........................................................................5-6 NEW HOUSING PERMITS ................................................................................................................................. 7 HOME SALES AND MEDIAN SALES PRICES ....................................................................................................... 8 WIA DATA ON RESIDENTS IN NEED OF WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SERVICES: FOOD STAMP AND TEMPORARY FAMILY ASSISTANCE RECIPIENTS .................................................................... 9 STATE SUPPLEMENT AND MEDICAID RECIPIENTS ........................................................................................... 10 STATE ADMINISTERED GENERAL ASSISTANCE RECIPIENTS ............................................................................. 11 DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL RETARDATION—ACTIVE CLIENTS........................................................................... 12 ADULT PROBATIONERS ................................................................................................................................. 13 HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND DROPOUT RATES ...................................................................................... 14 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT ........................................................................................................................... 15 BIRTHS TO TEENAGE MOTHERS ................................................................................................................... 16 APPENDIX TABLES WIA ECONOMIC DATA: POPULATION AND POPULATION DENSITY ....................................................................................................... 17 LABOR FORCE ............................................................................................................................................. 18 WORKSITES BY SIZE CLASS .......................................................................................................................... 19 EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES BY INDUSTRY ..................................................................................................20-22 EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES BY TOWN ............................................................................................................ 23 REGIONAL EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK BY OCCUPATION ..................................................................................... 24 NEW HOUSING PERMITS ............................................................................................................................... 25 HOME SALES AND MEDIAN SALES PRICES ..................................................................................................... 26 HOUSING SITUATION ..................................................................................................................................... 27 FAIR MARKET RENTS .................................................................................................................................... 28 WIA DATA ON RESIDENTS IN NEED OF WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SERVICES: FOOD STAMP AND TEMPORARY FAMILY ASSISTANCE RECIPIENTS .................................................................. 29 STATE SUPPLEMENT AND MEDICAID RECIPIENTS ........................................................................................... 30 STATE ADMINISTERED GENERAL ASSISTANCE RECIPIENTS ............................................................................. 31 DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL RETARDATION—ACTIVE CLIENTS........................................................................... 32 DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTION SERVICES—SUBSTANCE ABUSE CLIENTS ......................... 33 ADULT PROBATIONERS ................................................................................................................................. 34 HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT AND DROPOUT RATES ...................................................................................... 35 EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT ........................................................................................................................... 36 BIRTHS TO TEENAGE MOTHERS ................................................................................................................... 37 STATEWIDE DATA: POPULATION CHANGE (MAP) ........................................................................................................................ 38 LABOR FORCE .............................................................................................................................................. 39 UNEMPLOYMENT RATE (MAP) ....................................................................................................................... 40 WORKSITES BY SIZE CLASS ......................................................................................................................... 41 CONNECTICUT EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES BY INDUSTRY ...........................................................................42-44 EMPLOYMENT OUTLOOK BY OCCUPATION ...................................................................................................... 45 HOME SALES AND MEDIAN SALES PRICES (MAP)........................................................................................... 46 POVERTY INCOME GUIDELINES AND LOWER LIVING STANDARD INCOME LEVELS ............................................. 47 PER CAPITA PERSONAL INCOME, MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME, AND MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME ........................ 48 BUSINESS AND EMPLOYMENT CHANGES ANNOUNCED IN THE MEDIA ..........................................................49-55 CHARACTERISTICS OF CTWORKS APPLICANTS .........................................................................................56-59 GLOSSARY OF TERMS ..............................................................................................................................60-62

Northwest WIA P O P U L AT I O N
AND

P O P U L AT I O N D E N S I T Y
Salisbury North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

From 2000 to 2006, Connecticut’s population increased from 3,405,602 to 3,504,809 residents (+2.9%), and was up just 4,108 residents from its revised 2005 level. Over the six-year period, the North Central WIA saw the largest population increase (+26,614 residents), followed by South Central (+21,543), Northwest (+21,250), Eastern (+17,319), and finally the Southwest (+12,481) area. Danbury had highest over-the-period population increase (+4,437) among Connecticut’s 169 towns. Nine towns in the State reported a net decline in population from 2000 to 2006, including Waterbury, which recorded the smallest decline (-20). The Northwest WIA’s population ranked as the fourth largest with 592,886 residents in 2006. From 2000 to 2006, its population grew by 21,250 residents (+3.7%). Danbury trumped the other area towns with the largest over-the-period increase, up 4,437 residents to 79,285 in 2006. Newtown had the WIA’s second highest increase (+1,954 residents), followed by New Milford (+1,573), Southbury (+1,119), and Wolcott (+1,054). In 2006, Waterbury (107,251), Danbury (79,285), Torrington (35,903), and Naugatuck (31,872) were the only Northwest WIA towns to have population counts of over 30,000. Together, these four towns represented 43% of the total Northwest WIA population in 2006. Six of the WIA’s 41 towns had populations below 2,000 in 2006: Bridgewater (1,898), Norfolk (1,677), Colebrook (1,545), Cornwall (1,488), Warren (1,384), and Canaan (1,102). There are more small towns in the Northwest WIA than any other region in the State; among the area’s 41 towns, eighteen have fewer than 5,000 residents, and eight have a population of between 5,000 and 10,000.

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

Population%% Chang Population Change
Negative growth Negative growth 0% to 3% 0% to 3% 3% to 6% 3% to 10% 6% to 6% Over 10% 6% to 10% Over 10%

Ridgefield

Redding

In 2006, the Northwest WIA had the second lowest population density (440 persons per square mile) among the State’s five workforce investment areas. Of the area’s 41 towns, Waterbury was the most densely populated (3,754 persons/29 sq. mi.) in 2006, followed by Naugatuck (1,945 persons/16 sq. mi.), and Danbury (1,883 persons/42 sq. mi.). In contrast, Canaan (33 persons/33 sq. mi.) and Cornwall (32 persons/46 sq. mi.) were the WIA’s least densely populated towns in 2006.
In 2006, the Northwest WIA accounted for 17% of CT's total population
3,520,000 3,500,000 3,480,000 585,000 3,460,000

U.S. Census Bureau - Population Estimates 2000 to 2006

595,000 590,000

SW WIA 22%

NC WIA 28%

3,440,000 3,420,000

580,000 575,000 570,000

EA WIA 12% NW WIA 17% SC WIA 21%

3,400,000 3,380,000 3,360,000 3,340,000 565,000 560,000

2000

2001

2002 Connecticut

2003

2004

2005

2006

Northwest WIA

See Also Appendix Tables on Pages 17 and 38
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

1

Northwest WIA LABOR FORCE
From 2005 to 2006, Connecticut’s labor force increased by 21,300 (+1.2%) to 1,844,200. Over the year, the total number of employed residents increased by 30,700 to 1,765,100 residents, while 9,300 fewer residents were unemployed, bringing their total to 79,200. This is noteworthy considering that from 2004 to 2005 there was a decline of only 400 in the number of unemployed residents. In 2006, Connecticut’s unemployment rate fell to 4.3%, down from 4.9% in both 2004 and 2005. The North Central WIA reported the largest labor force (511,000 residents) and highest unemployment rate (4.6%) among Connecticut’s five workforce investment areas in 2006. With a labor force of 312,000 residents, the Northwest WIA recorded the second lowest unemployment rate (4.1%) among the five WIAs in 2006. All five areas followed the statewide trend of higher employment and lower unemployment in 2006. From 2005 to 2006, the total labor force in the Northwest WIA increased by 2,900 residents (+4,600 employed; -1,700 unemployed). In 2006, nearly half (47%) of the area’s total labor force resided in Waterbury (49,891), Danbury (43,977), Torrington (19,453), Naugatuck (17,106), and New Milford (16,324). These five towns also accounted for 56 percent of the WIA’s unemployed. Twenty-four of the Northwest WIA’s 41 towns had a labor force total of less than 5,000 residents. Canaan had the lowest labor force (611 residents) in 2006.
Salisbury North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

Unemployment Rate Unemployment Rate 2006 2006
3% and under 3% and under 3% to 4% 3% to 5% 4% to 4% 5% 6% 4% to6%5% to Over 5% to 6% Over 6%

Labor Force

15,000

300,000 200,000 100,000 0 NC WIA SW WIA SC WIA NW WIA # Unemployed 2006 UR 4.6% 2004 UR 5.3% 2006 UR 4.0% 2004 UR 4.7% 2006 UR 4.3% 2004 UR 4.9% 2006 UR 4.1% 2004 UR 4.8%

-600 from 2004 10,000

2006 UR 4.3% 5,000 2004 UR 4.7% 0 EA WIA

Total Labor Force

See Also Appendix Tables on Pages 18, 39-40
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

Unemployed

Waterbury (6.8%) had the highest unemployment rate Redding Ridgefield in the WIA. In addition to Waterbury, Torrington (4.9%), Winchester (4.9%), Naugatuck (4.8%), and Thomaston (4.7%) represented the Northwest WIA towns with an WIA Labor Force and Unemployed Residents - 2006 unemployment rate of UR = Unemployment Rate -3,300 over 4.5% in 2006. from 2004 600,000 The town of Colebrook reported the lowest unemployment rate in 500,000 -1,600 -2,300 the Northwest WIA, as from 2004 from 2004 well as in Connecticut, 400,000 -1,900 at 2.2% in 2006. from 2004

25,000

20,000

2

Northwest WIA E M P LO Y M E N T
BY INDUSTRY
Connecticut’s employment grew by 28,198 (+1.7%) to 1,672,161 from 2005 to 2006. Professional & Business Services added 6,474 jobs (+3.2%), and Educational & Health Services was up 5,962 jobs (+2.2%). These industries accounted for 44% of the State’s total over-the-year growth. Leisure & Hospitality, which gained 3,113 jobs (+2.4%), and Other Services, up 1,545 (+2.7%), also saw impressive gains during the same period. The industry sectors losing employment over the year were Manufacturing (-1,526 jobs, -0.8%), Trade, Transportation, & Utilities (-1,177 jobs, -0.4%), and Information (-328 jobs, -0.9%). Educational & Health Services (+25,049 jobs, +10.1%), and Leisure & Hospitality (+12,436 jobs, +10.4%) had the highest employment growth from 2001 to 2006. In contrast, the Manufacturing (-32,821 jobs, -14.5%), and Information (-6,942, -15.5%) sectors had the greatest employment declines over the same period.
From 2001 to 2006, Educational and Health Services had the highest employment gain; and Manufacturing saw the biggest loss in the Northwest WIA
Trade, Transp. & Utilities Educational & Health Svcs Government Manufacturing Prof. & Business Svcs Leisure & Hospitality

From 2005 to 2006, the Northwest WIA experienced an Const., Nat. Res. & Mining overall gain of 3,589 jobs Financial Activities (+1.6%), bringing its 2001 employment total to 223,855 in 2006 Other Services 2006. Among the State’s five workforce investment areas, Information the Northwest WIA accounted for 13 percent of Connecticut’s 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 total employment. The Educ. Annual Average Employment & Health Services (+637 jobs, +1.7%) and Leisure & Hospitality (+609 jobs, +3.6%) industries had the WIA’s largest private sector increase, and accounted for 35 percent of the area’s over-the-year gain. The Northwest WIA was up 2,349 jobs (+1.1%) from 2001 to 2006; and the Educational & Health Services industry recorded the highest employment growth (+3,798 jobs, +11%). During the same period, Manufacturing had the area’s largest employment decline (-6,315 jobs, -17%). In 2006, over half (52%) of all Northwest WIA workers were employed in the Trade, Transportation & Utilities (20%), Educational & Health Services (17%), and Government (14%) sectors.
Annual Average Employment by Industry 2006 Connecticut Northwest WIA Const., Nat. Res. & Mining Manufacturing Trade, Transp. & Utilities Information Financial Activities Prof. & Business Svcs Educational & Health Svcs Leisure & Hospitality Other Services Government 1,672,161 223,855 11,985 31,886 44,910 3,769 9,434 25,156 38,162 17,359 8,625 32,215 2005 1,643,963 220,266 12,079 31,785 44,504 4,026 9,477 24,975 37,525 16,750 8,383 30,701 2004 1,631,848 219,448 12,033 32,621 44,571 4,436 9,419 24,225 36,887 16,686 8,237 30,306 2003 1,625,932 218,711 11,406 33,760 44,104 4,791 9,468 23,783 36,465 16,313 7,967 30,622 2002 1,648,986 220,021 11,554 35,048 43,453 5,146 9,648 24,141 35,700 16,410 7,906 30,977 2001 1,665,699 221,506 11,303 38,201 43,802 5,199 9,672 25,029 34,364 15,684 7,722 30,455

See Also Appendix Tables on Pages 20-22, and 42-44
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

3

Northwest WIA ANNUAL AVERAGE WAGES
BY INDUSTRY
From 2005 to 2006, annual average wages for Connecticut’s workers increased by $1,879, from $52,964 to $54,843 (+3.5%). Workers in the Financial Activities sector saw the largest boost in their paychecks, up $6,603 from 2005 to 2006, and more than three times higher than the overall statewide increase. Manufacturing (+$2,907), Professional & Business Services (+$2,705), and Information (+$2,258) also experienced over-the-year gains greater than the annual average wage increase for all industries. Financial Activities workers in the State earned the highest annual average wages in 2006 ($122,874) among all industries, followed by Professional & Business Services ($66,746), Manufacturing ($65,940), and Information ($65,719). Those employed in Other Services* ($28,302) and in Leisure & Hospitality ($19,005) averaged the lowest annual wages. Connecticut workers experienced a net increase of $7,853 (+16.7%) in annual average wages from 2001 to 2006. During the same period, the Financial Activities sector (+$32,916) again reported the largest net gains among Connecticut’s industries, followed by Manufacturing (+$10,216), Information (+$8,015), and Professional & Business Services (+$7,871). Workers in the Other Services (+$2,533) and Leisure & Hospitality (+$1,748) sectors received the smallest annual average wage increases from 2001. In 2006, the Northwest WIA reported 2001 to 2006 the second lowest annual average $60,000 wages ($45,717) along with the third highest over-the-year increase $50,000 (+$1,544) among the State’s five workforce investment areas. Among the Northwest WIA’s major industry $40,000 sectors, workers in Financial Activities ($67,229) and Manufacturing $30,000 ($65,230) received the highest annual average wages. The over-the-year increase in Manufacturing wages $20,000 (+$4,174) was nearly three times the 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 overall wage increase for the WIA. Those employed in the area’s Connecticut Northwest WIA Professional & Business Services sector received the second highest ‘raise’ (+$2,799) in their paychecks from 2005. Similar to the statewide trend, Northwest WIA workers in the Other Services ($24,259) and Leisure & Hospitality ($18,851) sectors received the lowest earnings in 2006. Wages in the Leisure & Hospitality sector, however, were up by 5.5% (+$985) from 2005.
Northwest WIA - Annual Average Wages 2006 Connecticut Northwest WIA Const., Nat. Res. & Min. Manufacturing Trade, Transp. & Utilities Information Financial Activities Prof. & Business Svcs. Educational & Health Svcs. $54,843 $45,717 $49,335 $65,230 $37,527 $56,002 $67,229 $56,400 $41,324 2005 $52,964 $44,173 $48,368 $61,056 $35,115 $54,892 $66,770 $53,601 $39,877 2004 $51,004 $42,957 $47,014 $58,394 $34,205 $50,848 $64,291 $51,725 $38,490 2003 $48,318 $41,446 $45,326 $55,700 $32,741 $48,050 $62,766 $51,752 $37,020 2002 $46,849 $40,409 $45,059 $53,861 $31,678 $49,734 $59,190 $50,385 $35,963 2001 $46,990 $40,201 $44,913 $54,144 $31,174 $45,843 $57,616 $51,028 $34,675 $15,195 $22,238 $42,220

Connecticut & Northwest WIA Wages

2006

From 2001 to 2006, the $18,851 Leisure & Hospitality $17,867 $16,977 $16,634 $15,898 Manufacturing sector $24,259 Other Services $23,841 $23,694 $23,086 $22,404 reported the Northwest WIA’s largest net $45,807 Government $47,306 $47,791 $44,474 $43,253 increase in annual wages (+$11,086), more than double the overall increase for the area (+5,516). Information (+$10,159) and Financial Activities (+$9,613) workers ranked second and third in wage increases over the period.
*repair and maintenance, personal and laundry services, membership associations, private households See Also Appendix Tables on Pages 20-22, and 42-44
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

4

Northwest WIA E M P LO Y M E N T C O N C E N T R AT I O N
AND INDUSTRY

CLUSTERS

The industry clusters with the greatest employment concentration in Connecticut relative to the U.S. were aerospace (5.22), insurance/financial services (1.29), and metal manufacturing (1.21). The clusters with the smallest were agriculture (0.53), bioscience (0.81), and plastics (0.81). Between 2003 and 2006, the fastest growing industry clusters in Connecticut were maritime (4%), tourism (4%), and healthcare/services (4%). The fastest shrinking were plastics (-8%), bioscience (-6%), and creative industries (-2%). As a percentage of 2006 Northwest WIA employment, the largest industry clusters were healthcare/services (14%), tourism (8%), and metal manufacturing (5%). Aerospace The smallest were medical devices (0.7%), Insurance/Financial Services Northwest WIA plastic (0.6%), and Employment Concentration Tourism maritime. The industry Relative to CT (1.00) Creative Industries clusters with the > 1.0 = Key Industry in WIA greatest employment Agriculture concentration in the Information Technology Northwest WIA relative Healthcare/Services to Connecticut were bioscience (1.79), metal Medical Devices manufacturing (1.49), Plastics and plastics (1.26). The Metal Manufacturing clusters with the smallest concentrations Bioscience were insurance/financial 0.00 0.20 0.40 0.60 0.80 1.00 1.20 1.40 1.60 1.80 2.00 services (0.55), Employment Concentration aerospace (0.45), and maritime. Between 2003 and 2006, the fastest growing industry clusters in the Northwest WIA were bioscience (24%), tourism (7%), and agriculture (4%). The fastest shrinking clusters were information technology (-15%), plastics (-19%), and maritime. The industry cluster that provides more employment in the WIA relative to Connecticut, but provides less employment in the State relative to the U.S. is bioscience.
Northwest WIA - Industry Cluster Employment Concentration - 2006 NW WIA Employment 1855 3,226 2,929 3,998 31,544 5,961 8,655 N 1,479 12,088 1285 18,500 223,789 % of NW WIA Employment 0.8% 1.4% 1.3% 1.8% 14.1% 2.7% 3.9% N 0.7% 5.4% 0.6% 8.3% 100% NW WIA % Change 2003-06 3.5% 3.7% 23.8% -8.0% 3.4% -15.1% 0.4% N -5.5% -6.1% -19.0% 6.5% 2.3% NW WIA Concentration Relative to CT 0.45 0.93 1.79 0.88 1.10 0.94 0.55 N 1.22 1.49 1.26 0.84 NW WIA % of CT Employment 0.1% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 1.9% 0.4% 0.5% N 0.1% 0.7% 0.1% 1.1% 13.4% CT % Change 2003-06 2.4% 2.1% -5.9% -2.3% 3.7% -1.7% 2.5% 4.4% 2.9% -2.1% -8.0% 4.4% CT Concentration Relative to U.S. 5.22 0.53 0.81 1.01 1.11 0.89 1.29 1.17 1.19 1.21 0.81 0.93 -

Industry Cluster
Aerospace Agriculture Bioscience

1

Creative Industries Healthcare/Services Information Technology Insurance/Financial Services Maritime Medical Devices Metal Manufacturing Plastics Tourism WIA Total
1

Industry Clusters are defined by the Department of Economic and Community Development.

N = employment data subject to 'non-disclosure'

See Also Industry Cluster Components listing on Page 6
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

5

CONNECTICUT INDUSTRY CLUSTER COMPONENTS
NAICS Connecticut Industry Cluster Components Code AEROSPACE 3364 Aerospace Product & Parts Manufacturing AGRICULTURE 111 Crop Production 1121 Cattle Ranching & Farming 1122 Hog & Pig Farming 1123 Poultry & Egg Production 1124 Sheep & Goat Farming 1129 Other Animal Production 1151 Support Activities for Crop Production 1152 Support Activities for Animal Production 311 Food Manufacturing 312 Beverage & Tobacco Product Manufacturing 3253 Pesticide, Fertilizer, & Other Agricultural Chemical Manufacturing 4244 Grocery & Related Product Wholesalers 4245 Farm Product Raw Material Merchant Wholesalers 4248 Beer, Wine, & Distilled Alcoholic Beverage Merchant Wholesalers 42491 Farm Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 42493 Flower, Nursery Stock, & Florists' Supplies Merchant Wholesalers 42494 Tobacco & Tobacco Product Merchant Wholesalers 49312 Refrigerated Warehousing & Storage 49313 Farm Product Warehousing & Storage BIOSCIENCE 3254 Pharmaceutical & Medicine Manufacturing 54138 Testing Laboratories 54171 Research & Development in the Physical, Engineering, & Life Sciences 6215 Medical & Diagnostic Laboratories CREATIVE INDUSTRIES 5111 Newspaper, Periodical, Book, & Directory Publishers 51211 Motion Picture & Video Production 51212 Motion Picture & Video Distribution 512131 Motion Picture Theaters (except Drive-In's) 51219 Post-production Services & Other Motion Picture & Video Industries 5122 Sound Recording Industries 515 Broadcasting (except Internet) 516 Internet Publishing & Broadcasting 519 Other Information Services 54131 Architectural Services 54132 Landscape Architectural Services 5414 Specialized Design Services 5418 Advertising & Related Services 7111 Performing Arts Companies 7113 Promoters of Performing Arts, Sports, & Similar Events 7114 Agents & Managers for Artists, Athletes, Entertainers, & Other Public Figures 7115 Independent Artists, Writers, & Performers HEALTHCARE & HEALTHCARE SERVICES 524114 Direct Health & Medical Insurance Carriers 54194 Veterinary Services 6211 Offices of Physicians 6212 Offices of Dentists 6213 Offices of Other Health Practitioners 6214 Outpatient Care Centers 6216 Home Health Care Services 6219 Other Ambulatory Healthcare Services 622 Hospitals 6231 Nursing Care Facilities 6232 Residential Mental Retardation, Mental Health & Substance Abuse Facilities 6233 Community Care Facilities for the Elderly 6239 Other Residential Care Facilities 62412 Services for the Elderly & Persons with Disabilities 6243 Vocational Rehabilitation Services INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 3341 Computer & Peripheral Equipment Manufacturing

3342 3343 3344 334611 334613 42343 42511 44312 454111 454112 5112 517 518 5415 61142 524113 52412 52413 5242 531 521 522 523 525 1125 1141 3366 483 488 334510 334516 334517 3391 42345 42346 331 332 333 3363 337124 33991 42351 325211 3261 32622 339991 481111 481211 4853 4855 487 5321 532292 5615 7112 712 713 72

Communications Equipment Manufacturing Audio & Video Equipment Manufacturing Semiconductor & Other Electronic Component Manufacturing Software Reproducing Magnetic & Optical Recording Media Manufacturing Computer & Computer Peripheral Equipment & Software Merchant Wholesalers Business-to-Business Electronic Markets Computer & Software Stores Electronic Shopping Electronic Auctions Software Publishers Telecommunications Internet Service Providers, Web Search Portals, & Data Processing Services Computer Systems Design & Related Services Computer Training INSURANCE & FINANCIAL SERVICES Direct Life Insurance Carriers Direct Insurance (except Life, Health, & Medical) Carriers Reinsurance Carriers Agencies, Brokerages, & Other Insurance Related Activities Real Estate Monetary Authorities - Central Bank Credit Intermediation & Related Activities Securities, Commodity Contracts, & Other Financial Investments & Related Activities Funds, Trusts, & Other Financial Vehicles MARITIME Animal Aquaculture Fishing Ship & Boat Building Water Transportation Support Activities for Transportation MEDICAL DEVICES Electromedical & Electrotherapeutic Apparatus Manufacturing Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing Irradiation Apparatus Manufacturing Medical Equipment & Supplies Manufacturing Medical, Dental, & Hospital Equipment & Supplies Merchant Wholesalers Ophthalmic Goods Merchant Wholesalers METAL MANUFACTURING Primary Metal Manufacturing Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing Machinery Manufacturing Motor Vehicle Parts Manufacturing Metal Household Furniture Manufacturing Jewelry & Silverware Manufacturing Metal Service Centers & Other Metal Merchant Wholesalers PLASTICS Plastics Material & Resin Manufacturing Plastics Product Manufacturing Rubber & Plastics Hoses & Belting Manufacturing Gasket, Packing, & Sealing Device Manufacturing TOURISM Scheduled Passenger Air Transportation Nonscheduled Chartered Passenger Air Transportation Taxi & Limousine Service Charter Bus Industry Scenic & Sightseeing Transportation Automotive Equipment Rental & Leasing Recreational Goods Rental Travel Arrangement & Reservation Services Spectator Sports Museums, Historical Sites, & Similar Institutions Amusement, Gambling, & Recreation Industries 6 Accommodation & Food Services

Northwest WIA NEW HOUSING PERMITS
From 2005 to 2006, new housing permits in Connecticut decreased from 11,885 to 9,236, which represented the first decline since 2001, the largest over-the-year decrease (-2,649) since 2000, and the lowest number of new housing permits issued in the State since 1996. All five of the State’s workforce investment areas reported over-the-year decreases in new housing permits issued. The Southwest WIA had the largest decrease (-952), followed by the Northwest (-594), South Central (-528), Eastern (-335), and North Central (-240) WIAs. The Northwest WIA reported 1,621 new housing permits issued in 2006, which was the third highest total among the workforce investment areas. Danbury (318), Waterbury (195) and New Milford (84) had the area’s highest number of new housing permits in 2006. In 2006, eleven of the Northwest WIA’s 41 towns showed gains in housing permit activity from 2005, led by Waterbury (+52), Bethel (+33), and Cheshire (+29). Twenty-nine area towns reported an over-theyear decrease in housing permit activity, led by Danbury (-280), Redding (-118), and Newtown (-61). The Northwest WIA experienced the second largest net decrease (-296) in new housing permits issued from 2000 to 2006 (South Central WIA, -486). Twenty-five WIA towns reported an over-the-period decrease, led by Newtown (-67) and Danbury (-63). Fifteen area towns posted an over-the-period net increase, led by Waterbury (+81) and Brookfield (+30).
Salisbury North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

Housing Permits
25 and under 26 to 50

Housing P
25 and 26 to 5 51 to 1 O 1
51 to 100 Over 100

Ridgefield

Redding

Housing Permits in Connecticut - by WIA
3,200 3,000 2,800 2,600 2,400 2,200 2,000 1,800 1,600 1,400 1,200 2000 2001 EA WIA 2002 NC WIA 2003 NW WIA 2004 SC WIA 2005 SW WIA 2006

See Also Appendix Tables on Pages 25-28, and 46
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

7

Northwest WIA HOME SALES
AND

MEDIAN SALES PRICES

In 1996, 56,333 homes were sold throughout Connecticut with a median sales price of $138,000. During 2000, the State had home sales of 56,032, a decrease of 301 units, and a lower median sales price of $135,500. The number of home sales took a big tumble in 2006 when 37,665 homes sold (-18,367), possibly reflecting North an increase in the median sales price to $275,000. Hartland Colebrook Canaan
Salisbury

All five of Connecticut’s workforce investment areas experienced net declines in total home sales from 1996 to 2006. The Southwest WIA reported the most significant decline (-7,294), followed by the South Central (-3,373), North Central (-3,730), Northwest (-3,327), and Eastern (-944) regions. All five areas showed significant increases in median home sales prices during this period, led by the Southwest WIA (+$280,000), and followed by the Northwest (+$187,500), South Central (+$170,250), North Central (+$134,000), and Eastern (+$119,100) regions. From 1996 to 2006, all 169 Connecticut towns saw an increase in median home sales prices, ranging from Union (+$36,550) to Greenwich (+$1,242,500). However, 143 towns (85%) reported a net decline in home sales during the same ten-year period. Only twelve towns reported a net increase of 10 or more homes sold in Connecticut from 1996 to 2006. Among eight towns in the Northwest WIA that reported net increases in total home sales, only Naugatuck (+30) and Goshen (+21) reported a net increase of 10 or more. Ten of the WIA’s 41 towns reported a net decrease in home sales of 100 or more, ranging from Woodbury (-116) to Danbury (-583).

Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

ResidentialSales Residential Sales Residential Sales 2006 2006 2006
50 and under

8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000

$400,000 $300,000 $200,000 $100,000 $0

Home sales in Waterbury (1,103), Danbury (583), Torrington (567), Naugatuck (477), Newtown (372), and New Milford (340) were the highest among the Northwest WIA towns, accounting for over 50% of the area’s total in 2006.

0 NC WIA SW WIA Total Home Sales SC WIA NW WIA Median Sales Price EA WIA

See Also Appendix Tables on Pages 25-28, and 46
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

Median Sales Price

Homes Sold

Redding Ridgefield In 2006, the highest median home sales prices in the Northwest WIA were in Ridgefield ($779,500), Roxbury ($700,000), and Redding ($675,000). The lowest median home sales prices were in Number of Homes Sold and Median Sales Price by WIA 12,000 2006 Waterbury ($159,900), Winchester ($171,750), 10,000 and Torrington ($179,900).

50 -and under 51 100 101 250 51 -- 100 251 - 500 101 - 250 Over 500 251 - 500
$600,000 $500,000

8

Northwest WIA F O O D S TA M P
AND

T E M P O R A R Y F A M I LY A S S I S TA N C E R E C I P I E N T S
Salisbury North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

From 2000 to 2006, Connecticut saw a 35% decline in the total number of Temporary Family Assistance (TFA) recipients (-24,407). Each of the State’s five workforce investment areas experienced a similar trend during this period. Among the five workforce investment areas, the North Central (-8,352), South Central (-7,798), and Southwest (-5,274) showed the largest net decreases in Temporary Family Assistance recipients from 2000 to 2006. In 2006, the total number of Temporary Family Assistance recipients in Connecticut decreased over the year by 3,809 to 44,365, which represented the lowest level over the past ten years. The North Central (-1,417) and South Central (-1,172) areas reported the largest over-the-year decreases among the five WIAs. The Northwest WIA reported 6,230 Temporary Family Assistance recipients in 2006. Waterbury accounted for 70% of the area’s total number of TFA recipients (4,416), Torrington (427) and Danbury (408) had the second and third highest counts. Waterbury (-84), Danbury (-63), and Naugatuck (-55) reported the area’s largest decreases of Temporary Family Assistance recipients from 2005 to 2006.

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Kent

Warren

Litchfield

Harwinton

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury In 2006, the number of Food Stamp recipients in Newtown Bethel Connecticut increased by 5,720 (+3.0%) from 188,591 TFA Recipients TFA Recipients to 194,311, which represented the highest level over the 15 and under 15 and under past eight years, and fifth consecutive year of 16 to 50 Redding 16 to 250 to 50 increases. With the exception of the Southwest, which Ridgefield 51 experienced a slight decrease (-78), each of the State’s 51 to 250 Over 250 workforce investment areas reported increases over the Over 250 year, led by North Central (+1,654), Northwest (+1,436), Eastern (+1,433), and South Central (+1,277). These areas also reported increases in Food Stamp recipients for five consecutive years.

With 28,274 total Food Stamp recipients in 2006, the Northwest WIA recorded the second lowest total among the State’s five workforce investment areas. Within the WIA, Waterbury (+866) and Torrington (+224) reported the area’s largest gains from 2005 to 2006. In total, 31 of the Northwest WIA’s 41 towns showed over-the-year increases in Food Stamp recipients. From 2000 to 2006, Connecticut experienced a net increase of 31,629 Food Stamp recipients. The largest net increases were reported in the North Central (+11,058), Northwest (+8,518), and Eastern (+4,926) workforce investment areas. In all, each of the State’s five workforce investment areas reported net increases during this period. Food Stamp Recipients
2006 Connecticut Northwest WIA Waterbury Danbury Torrington 194,311 28,274 18,647 2,587 2,151 2005 188,591 26,838 17,781 2,539 1,927 2004 180,941 25,210 17,068 2,255 1,750 2003 166,615 23,205 15,941 2,017 1,553 2002 157,028 20,629 14,053 1,879 1,366 2001 151,733 19,050 12,671 1,863 1,301 2000 162,682 19,756 13,058 2,093 1,197 Change 2000-06 # 31,629 8,518 5,589 494 954 % 19.4% 43.1% 42.8% 23.6% 79.7%

See Also Appendix Table on Page 29
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

9

Northwest WIA S TAT E S U P P L E M E N T
AND

MEDICAID RECIPIENTS
North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

Connecticut experienced a 37% decrease in the total number of State Supplement recipients, down by 9,211 from 2000 to 2006. Each of the State’s five workforce investment areas reported net decreases, led by the Southwest (-1,847 recipients, -43%) and the North Central (-3,187 recipients, -38%) areas, whose declines exceeded the statewide percentage drop. From 2005 to 2006, the total number of State Supplement recipients in Connecticut decreased by 893 (-5%) to 15,599, representing a steady decline during the past seven years. With a 2,424 total in 2006, the Northwest WIA experienced a 4.5% overthe-year decline (-115) in the number of State Supplement recipients. In 2006, Waterbury (1,155 recipients), Torrington (244 recipients) and Danbury (206 recipients) accounted for 66% of the area’s total State Supplement population. From 2000 to 2006*, Connecticut saw a 22% rise in the total number of Medicaid recipients (+70,717), with all of the State’s five workforce investment areas following this trend. The Northwest (+17,557 recipients, +38%) and Eastern (+11,661 recipients, +33%) areas experienced percentage increases greater than the statewide total. The South Central (+14,337 recipients, +20%) and Southwest (+11,873 recipients, +19%) areas were on par with the statewide percentage increase, while the North Central WIA (+15,318 recipients, +14%) had the smallest increase over the six-year period.

Salisbury

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Kent

Warren

Litchfield

Harwinton

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

State Supplement State Supplemen
10 and under 10 and under 11 to 25 11 to 25 26 to 100 Over 100 26 to 100

Ridgefield

Redding

The total number of Medicaid recipients in Connecticut increased by 5,614 (+1.4%) from 2004* to 2006 and, Over 100 at 397,641, was at its highest level in the past ten years. The Northwest WIA experienced a 2.8% over-the-period rise (+1,738) in the number of Medicaid recipients, with Waterbury (+922), Torrington (+384) and Danbury (+265) reporting the area’s largest increases. These three towns along with Naugatuck accounted for 74% of the WIA’s total Medicaid population in 2006.

Medicaid Recipients - by WIA
150,000 120,000 90,000 60,000 30,000 0 2000 2001 Eastern WIA South Central WIA 2002 2003 2004 Northwest WIA 2006*

North Central WIA Southwest WIA

*2005 data not available

See Also Appendix Table on Page 30
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

10

Northwest WIA S TAT E A D M I N I S T E R E D G E N E R A L A S S I S TA N C E R E C I P I E N T S
The number of State Administered General Assistance (SAGA) recipients, who received cash assistance in Connecticut, declined by 33 to 4,100 from 2000 to 2006, with an over-the-period high of 4,757 in 2003. The number of SAGA medical assistance recipients had a steady annual increase over the same period, rising 73% from 18,085 in 2000 to 31,307 in 2006. Each year from 2000 to 2006, the Northwest WIA reported the second lowest number of SAGA cash and medical assistance counts among the State’s five workforce investment areas. From 2000 to 2006, the number of SAGA cash assistance recipients in the Northwest WIA rose slightly (+56) to 527, while the number of SAGA medical assistance recipients more than doubled from 2,033 in 2000 to 4,326 in 2006. The Northwest WIA accounted for 13% of Connecticut’s SAGA cash assistance recipients and 14% of the State’s medical assistance recipients, in 2006. SAGA cash and medical assistance recipients in the City of Waterbury continued to account for over half of the WIA total.
In 2006, 80% of the Northwest WIA's total SAGA medical client population resided in these four towns
Salisbury North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

2006 Waterbury Danbury Torrington Naugatuck 2,360 511 402 199

2005 2,169 508 364 162

2004 2,015 458 331 139

2003 1,799 415 313 132

Change 2003-06

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

SAGA Medical Recipients Medical Recipients 2006 2006
25 and under 50 25 and and under

Medical Recipien 2006
unde
51 to 250 26 to 250

561 96
Ridgefield Redding

89 67
Connecticut SAGA Cash and Medical Recipients

251 to 500 250 to 500

26 to 250 500

Over 500 Over 500 to 250

The number of SAGA medical assistance recipients more than doubled from 2000 to 2006 in Waterbury (+1,299), Torrington (+250), and Naugatuck (+117); Danbury had an increase of 175 (+52%) in the number of medical assistance recipients. The City of Waterbury also reported the largest over-theyear increase in SAGA medical assistance recipients, up 191 to 2,360 in 2006.

35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Cash
See Also Appendix Table on Page 31

Medical

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

11

Northwest WIA D E PA R T M E N T
OF

M E N TA L R E TA R D AT I O N -A C T I V E C L I E N T S
North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

The number of active Connecticut Department of Mental Retardation (DMR) clients decreased by 14 from June 2006 to June 2007, going from 15,018 to 15,004. However, this small decline did snap the steady annual increase of the State’s DMR client population over the past five years. The North and South Central areas reported the highest annual counts, the Northwest area ranked third, while the Southwest and Eastern WIAs had the lowest annual DMR client counts. As of June 2007, the Northwest WIA reported 2,977 active DMR clients, and saw the second largest over-the-year increase (+45 clients) of the State’s five workforce investment areas. Four towns, including Southbury (581) and Waterbury (544), reported a client population of over 200, representing 58% of the area’s total number of DMR clients. Twenty-seven of the area’s 41 towns reported fewer than 40 active DMR clients. From June 2002 to June 2007, Southbury (-81), Wolcott (-15), Waterbury (-12), and Norfolk (-10) reported the Northwest WIA’s largest declines; Cheshire (+37), Naugatuck (+27), Torrington (+24), and Prospect (+18) had the greatest increase in the number of active DMR clients. Southbury also reported the Northwest WIA’s largest over-the-year decline (-19), and Waterbury had the greatest increase (+26) in the number of active DMR clients from June 2006 to June 2007.

Salisbury

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Danbury Bethel

Newtown

DMR Clients DMR Clients 2007
June 2007

25 and under 25 and under
Ridgefield Redding

26 to 50

26 to 50 51 to 100

51 to 100

101 to 250
Northwest WIA accounted for 20% of Connecticut's total active DMR client population as of June 2007

101 to Over 250 250

NC WIA 27%

EA WIA 15%

In 2007, 58% of the Northwest WIA's total DMR client population resided in these four towns

June 2007
SW WIA 17%

June 2002 662 556 304 269

Change 2002-07 -81 -12 24 -1

Southbury Waterbury

581 544 328 268

SC WIA 21%

NW WIA 20%

Torrington Danbury

See Also Appendix Table on Page 32
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

12

Northwest WIA A D U LT P R O B AT I O N E R S
The total number of adult probationers in Connecticut increased by 3,694 to 53,125, up 7.5% from June 2004 to June 2007. Nearly one-fourth of the adult probationers (12,505) were provided services by the General Security Services Corp. Among the State’s five workforce investment areas, the Eastern and Northwest areas reported the highest rate increases (+28% and +22% respectively), while the North Central WIA experienced the largest over-the-period gain (+2,155) in the number of adult probationers. The South Central and Southwest areas had the smallest over-the-period increases. The Northwest WIA accounted for 15% of the total number of adult probationers in Connecticut as of June 2007. The area experienced a 1.7% increase from June 2006, up by 135 to a total of 7,872. The largest over-the-year gain was reported in Waterbury, where the number of adult probationers increased by 93 to 3,107.
June 2007 June 2006 June 2005 June 2004
Salisbury North Canaan Norfolk Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Hartland

Sharon

Cornwall

Goshen Torrington New Hartford

Harwinton Kent Warren Litchfield

Morris Washington Bethlehem Watertown New Sherman Milford Roxbury Woodbury Bridgewater New Fairfield Brookfield Southbury Wolcott Thomaston

Waterbury Cheshire

Middlebury Prospect Naugatuck

Connecticut North Central WIA South Central WIA Southwest WIA Northwest WIA Eastern WIA

53,125 15,282 11,901 11,715 7,872 6,254

52,132 14,791 11,827 11,516 7,737 6,049

50,579 14,786 11,420 11,003 7,111 6,259

49,431 13,127 10,857 10,900 6,432 4,880
Ridgefield Redding Danbury Bethel Newtown

Adult Probationer Adult Probationers 2007 2007
50 and under 51 - 100

50 and under

51 101 - 250 100
251 - 500 Over 500

101 - 250 251 500

From June 2004 to June 2007, the Northwest WIA reported an additional 1,440 probationers. Towns with increases of over 100 adult probationers were Waterbury (+591), Danbury (+173), Torrington (+160) and Naugatuck (+114). As of June 2007, these four towns reported the highest number of adult probationers in the region, and their combined total accounted for 69% of the WIA total and 10% of the statewide count.
NW WIA Top 5 Towns with Most Adult Probationers
June 2007 June 2006 June 2005 June 2004 # Change 2004-07

As of June 2007, 15% of Connecticut's total adult probationer population resided in the Northwest WIA

EA WIA 12% NW WIA 15% NC WIA 29%

Connecticut Northwest WIA Waterbury Danbury Torrington Naugatuck New Milford

53,125 7,872 3,107 1,151 738 453 279

52,132 7,737 3,014 1,121 745 433 306

50,579 7,111 2,737 1,042 715 383 284

49,431 6,432 2,516 978 578 339 230

3,694 1,440 591 173 160 114 49

SW WIA 22%

SC WIA 22%

See Also Appendix Table on Page 34
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

13

Northwest WIA HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
AND

D R O P O U T R AT E S

During the school year ending 2006, high school enrollment in Connecticut increased by just 484 to 173,709 students, after having gained nearly 4,600 students during the prior year. The number of high school dropouts rose by 185 to 3,212 from the prior school year ending (SYE) 2005, and the dropout rate in Connecticut rose from 1.7% to 1.8%. Despite the large number of students enrolled in Connecticut’s Technical High School System, at 10,325 in 2006, the dropout rate was below 1.0% for each year from SYE 2004 to 2006. During this period, however, total enrollment declined by over 900, or 8%, in the State’s Technical High School System. From SYE 2004 to 2006, the total roll count of Northwest WIA high schools increased by 1,292 to 30,015 students, and the dropout rate was 1.8% during SYE 2006 and 2005, up slightly from 1.6% reported during SYE 2004.
NW WIA's Highest Dropout Rates for SYE 2006 Total Enrollment Dropouts # %

These seven districts accounted for 52% of the Northwest WIA's total HS enrollment in SYE 2006 Total Enrollment Waterbury Danbury Ridgefield Newtown Cheshire New Milford Naugatuck 4,386 2,986 1,703 1,688 1,655 1,576 1,527 Dropouts # 148 79 7 16 12 17 26 % 3.4% 2.6% 0.4% 0.9% 0.7% 1.1% 1.7%

Torrington Waterbury Thomaston

1,438 4,386 357

94 148 11

6.5% 3.4% 3.1%

The Northwest WIA accounted for 17% of Connecticut's total HS dropout population for SYE 2006

EA WIA 11% NW WIA 17% NC WIA 31%

Waterbury had the largest enrollment (4,386 students) during SYE 2006, and reported the second highest dropout rate among school districts with over 1,000 students, at 3.4%, up from 2.6% in SYE 2005. The largest enrollment increases were reported in Waterbury (+131 from 2005, and +373 from 2004) and in Ridgefield (+108 from 2005, and +183 from 2004).

SC WIA 16%

SW WIA 25%

Among the Northwest WIA’s districts with over 1,000 high school students, Torrington (6.5%) reported the highest dropout rate during SYE 2006, followed by Waterbury (3.4%), Danbury (2.6%), and Naugatuck (1.7%). Bethel was the only district to report zero dropouts each year from SYE 2004 to 2006.
Change SYE 2002-06 2002 158,996 3,891 2.4% 26,216 494 1.9% --# 14,713 -679 --3,799 50 % 9.3% -17.5% --14.5% 10.1% ---

School Year Ending (SYE) 2006 Total Enrollment CT Number of Dropouts Dropout Rate Total Enrollment Northwest WIA Number of Dropouts Dropout Rate 173,709 3,212 1.8% 30,015 544 1.8% 2005 173,225 3,027 1.7% 29,692 520 1.8% 2004 168,628 2,956 1.8% 28,723 467 1.6% 2003 150,694 3,315 2.2% 27,381 505 1.8%

See Also Appendix Table on Page 35
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

14

Northwest WIA E D U C AT I O N A L A T TA I N M E N T
From 2000 to 2005, the number of Connecticut residents (age 25 or older) with a high school diploma or higher increased by 94,131 (+5%) to 2,022,092. Nearly 90% of this increase can be attributed to residents who earned a Bachelor’s degree or higher, up 82,221 (+11%). In 2005, 88% of Connecticut’s population age 25 or older had at least a high school diploma – up from 84% in 2000. The number of residents age 25 or older with a high school diploma increased by 22,401 (+3%) from 2000 to 2005. In 2000, 17% of Connecticut’s population (age 25 or older) with a high school diploma or higher resided in the Northwest WIA – the 2nd lowest percentage among the State’s five workforce investment areas. Of the Northwest WIA’s total population age 25 or older, 84% had at least a high school diploma – 3rd highest among the five areas; and 30% had at least a Bachelor’s degree – 3rd highest among the five areas in 2000.
250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0 HS Diploma Some College Bachelor's or higher Educational Attainment by WIA - 2000

In 2000, 16% of Connecticut's total population (age 25 or older) with a bachelor's degree or higher resided in the Northwest WIA EA WIA 10% NW WIA 16% NC WIA 27%

SC WIA 20%

SW WIA 27%

NC 187,430 159,736 191,484

SW 125,967 109,275 196,217

SC 140,357 115,826 146,505

NW 111,902 96,889 118,187

EA 87,644 71,941 68,601

In 2000, 30% of the Northwest WIA's total population (age 25 or older) had a Bachelor's Degree or higher % of Total Population with HS Diploma or Higher % of Total Population with a Bachelor's or Higher

Total Population
age 25 or older High School Diploma

Educated Population*

Some College**

Bachelor's or higher

Total

CT SW WIA NC WIA SC WIA NW WIA EA WIA

2,295,617 514,823 649,617 473,337 388,743 269,097

653,300 125,967 187,430 140,357 111,902 87,644

553,667 109,275 159,736 115,826 96,889 71,941

720,994 196,217 191,484 146,505 118,187 68,601

1,927,961 431,459 538,650 402,688 326,978 228,186

84.0% 83.8% 82.9% 85.1% 84.1% 84.8%

31.4% 38.1% 29.5% 31.0% 30.4% 25.5%

* Educated Population: age 25 or older - with a HS Diploma, or some college, or Bachelor’s Degree or higher ** Some College: no degree up to associate's degree

See Also Appendix Table on Page 36
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

15

Northwest WIA BIRTHS
TO

TEENAGE MOTHERS

From 2000 to 2005, Connecticut experienced a net decline (-508) in the total number of births to teenage mothers. Each of the State’s five workforce investment areas reported net declines in births to teenage mothers, led by the North Central (-160), South Central (-133), and Southwest (-108) areas. More specifically, the births to teenagers under the age of 18 dropped by 206 (18%), while births to 18 and 19 year olds decreased by 302 (14%). From 2004 to 2005, the total number of births to teenage mothers in Connecticut decreased by 67 (2%) to 2,842, representing the lowest level in over ten years. Births to 18 and 19 year olds dropped by 48, the first decrease since 2002; while births to teenagers under the age of 18 declined by 19, representing the fourth over-the-year decrease in the past five years.
Teenage Mothers - by WIA
1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

North Central

South Central

Southwest

Northwest

Eastern

From 2000 to 2005, the North Central WIA reported the highest cumulative total number of births to teenage mothers (5,905) among the five workforce investment areas. The Northwest WIA reported 2,662 births to teenage mothers, representing the second lowest total during the same period.
350 275 40%

30%

Births to NW WIA Teen Mothers 2000-2005

200 20% 125 50 10%

2000 343 155 31%

2001 307 150 33%

2002 254 164 39%

2003 281 147 34%

2004 295 135 31%

2005 273 158 37%

18 & 19 Years of Age Under 18 Years of Age % of NW WIA Moms Under 18

In 2005, there were 431 births to teenage mothers in the Northwest WIA, accounting for 15% of Connecticut’s total. Waterbury (246), Danbury (50), Torrington (36), and Naugatuck (29) reported the highest number of births to teenage mothers. Collectively, these towns accounted for 84% of the WIA’s total in 2005.
Births to Teenage Mothers 2005 Connecticut NW WIA NW WIA % of CT 2,842 431 15.2% 2004 2,909 430 14.8% 2003 2,881 428 14.9% 2002 2,946 418 14.2% 2001 3,142 457 14.5% 2000 3,350 498 14.9% 1999 3,433 502 14.6% 1998 3,620 469 13.0% 1997 3,578 501 14.0% 1996 3,655 492 13.5% 1995 3,806 552 14.5% # Change 2004-05 -67 1 # Change 1995-05 -964 -121 % Change 1995-05 -25% -22%

See Also Appendix Table on Page 37
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

16

Appendix Tables

Northwest WIA P O P U L AT I O N
AND

P O P U L AT I O N D E N S I T Y
Population Population Density (persons/sq. mile)
% Change 2000-06 Land Area Estimate July 2006 Census 2000 # Change 2000-06 Census 2000* # Change 2000-06

Estimate July 2006

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

3,504,809 592,886 3,705 18,599 3,577 1,898 16,398 1,102 28,833 1,545 1,488 79,285 3,151 2,087 5,595 2,968 8,743 7,132 2,379 31,872 14,221 6,788 28,671 26,985 1,677 3,385 9,264 8,902 23,999 2,342 4,044 3,056 4,138 19,686 7,916 35,903 1,384 3,701 107,251 22,329 10,861 16,269 9,757

3,405,602 571,636 3,494 18,067 3,422 1,824 15,664 1,081 28,543 1,471 1,434 74,848 2,697 2,012 5,283 2,858 8,316 6,451 2,301 30,989 13,953 6,088 27,098 25,031 1,660 3,350 8,707 8,270 23,643 2,137 3,977 2,968 3,827 18,567 7,503 35,202 1,254 3,639 107,271 21,661 10,664 15,215 9,196

99,207 21,250 211 532 155 74 734 21 290 74 54 4,437 454 75 312 110 427 681 78 883 268 700 1,573 1,954 17 35 557 632 356 205 67 88 311 1,119 413 701 130 62 -20 668 197 1,054 561

2.9% 3.7% 6.0% 2.9% 4.5% 4.1% 4.7% 1.9% 1.0% 5.0% 3.8% 5.9% 16.8% 3.7% 5.9% 3.8% 5.1% 10.6% 3.4% 2.8% 1.9% 11.5% 5.8% 7.8% 1.0% 1.0% 6.4% 7.6% 1.5% 9.6% 1.7% 3.0% 8.1% 6.0% 5.5% 2.0% 10.4% 1.7% 0.0% 3.1% 1.8% 6.9% 6.1%

4,844.8 1,345.3 36.2 16.8 19.4 16.2 19.8 33.0 32.9 31.5 46.0 42.1 43.7 33.0 30.8 48.5 56.1 17.8 17.2 16.4 20.5 37.0 61.6 57.8 45.3 19.5 14.3 31.5 34.4 26.2 57.3 58.7 21.8 39.1 12.0 39.8 26.3 38.2 28.6 29.2 32.3 20.4 36.5

723.4 440.7 102.3 1,107.7 184.8 116.9 828.2 33.4 876.1 49.1 32.3 1,882.8 72.2 63.2 182.0 61.2 156.0 401.8 138.4 1,944.6 695.1 183.3 465.5 467.2 37.0 174.0 646.9 282.6 697.0 89.3 70.6 52.1 189.8 504.0 659.1 902.3 52.6 96.9 3,754.0 766.0 336.5 796.3 267.3

702.9 424.9 96.5 1,076.1 176.8 112.4 791.1 32.8 867.3 46.7 31.2 1,777.4 61.8 60.9 171.8 59.0 148.3 363.4 133.9 1,890.7 682.0 164.4 440.0 433.4 36.6 172.2 608.0 262.5 686.7 81.5 69.4 50.6 175.6 475.3 624.7 884.7 47.7 95.3 3,754.7 743.1 330.4 744.7 251.9

20.5 15.8 5.8 31.7 8.0 4.6 37.1 0.6 8.8 2.4 1.2 105.4 10.4 2.3 10.1 2.3 7.6 38.4 4.5 53.9 13.1 18.9 25.5 33.8 0.4 1.8 38.9 20.1 10.3 7.8 1.2 1.5 14.3 28.6 34.4 17.6 4.9 1.6 -0.7 22.9 6.1 51.6 15.4

* Corrected count - 12/22/04 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates - June 28, 2007

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

17

Northwest WIA LABOR FORCE
2006 Annual Average Labor Force Unemployed Employed No. % Labor Force 2005 Annual Average Unemployed Employed No. % Labor Force 2004 Annual Average Unemployed Employed No. %

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

1,844,200 1,765,100 311,981 2,222 10,859 2,035 1,036 8,999 611 14,602 834 836 43,977 1,588 1,194 3,134 1,600 4,401 3,772 1,310 17,106 7,594 3,760 16,324 14,255 961 1,745 5,264 4,548 11,740 1,374 2,014 1,572 2,150 9,031 4,620 19,435 736 1,950 49,891 12,392 6,028 8,975 5,506 299,129 2,131 10,510 1,967 1,008 8,715 588 14,109 816 811 42,478 1,540 1,155 3,020 1,552 4,245 3,654 1,265 16,291 7,353 3,632 15,788 13,827 925 1,679 5,065 4,421 11,413 1,340 1,948 1,533 2,089 8,720 4,404 18,476 711 1,889 46,495 11,878 5,730 8,615 5,343

79,200 12,852 91 349 68 28 284 23 493 18 25 1,499 48 39 114 48 156 118 45 815 241 128 536 428 36 66 199 127 327 34 66 39 61 311 216 959 25 61 3,396 514 298 360 163

4.3 1,822,900 1,734,400 4.1 4.1 3.2 3.3 2.7 3.2 3.8 3.4 2.2 3.0 3.4 3.0 3.3 3.6 3.0 3.5 3.1 3.4 4.8 3.2 3.4 3.3 3.0 3.7 3.8 3.8 2.8 2.8 2.5 3.3 2.5 2.8 3.4 4.7 4.9 3.4 3.1 6.8 4.1 4.9 4.0 3.0 309,071 2,182 10,742 2,003 1,023 8,895 600 14,420 823 820 43,567 1,570 1,173 3,089 1,570 4,344 3,757 1,293 16,996 7,522 3,706 16,167 14,059 942 1,718 5,221 4,470 11,551 1,353 1,984 1,550 2,129 8,904 4,560 19,274 724 1,920 49,817 12,319 5,962 8,911 5,441 294,462 2,092 10,359 1,926 993 8,590 576 13,857 799 795 41,869 1,507 1,134 2,965 1,520 4,157 3,610 1,238 16,094 7,247 3,565 15,561 13,551 905 1,644 5,004 4,333 11,185 1,312 1,907 1,502 2,059 8,546 4,323 18,173 696 1,850 45,931 11,734 5,611 8,510 5,232

88,500 14,609 90 383 77 30 305 24 563 24 25 1,698 63 39 124 50 187 147 55 902 275 141 606 508 37 74 217 137 366 41 77 48 70 358 237 1,101 28 70 3,886 585 351 401 209

4.9 1,803,700 1,714,800 4.7 4.1 3.6 3.8 2.9 3.4 4.0 3.9 2.9 3.0 3.9 4.0 3.3 4.0 3.2 4.3 3.9 4.3 5.3 3.7 3.8 3.7 3.6 3.9 4.3 4.2 3.1 3.2 3.0 3.9 3.1 3.3 4.0 5.2 5.7 3.9 3.6 7.8 4.7 5.9 4.5 3.8 306,910 2,172 10,740 2,008 1,017 8,794 605 14,306 818 817 43,111 1,543 1,166 3,054 1,574 4,317 3,660 1,300 16,920 7,457 3,661 16,031 13,844 954 1,718 5,165 4,449 11,503 1,346 1,989 1,541 2,099 8,783 4,493 19,143 712 1,933 49,665 12,240 6,018 8,829 5,415 292,119 2,059 10,339 1,934 987 8,482 579 13,745 797 793 41,367 1,473 1,120 2,911 1,519 4,134 3,519 1,243 15,961 7,203 3,489 15,421 13,354 911 1,647 4,946 4,304 11,128 1,308 1,915 1,498 2,037 8,426 4,257 17,976 689 1,858 45,861 11,653 5,632 8,420 5,224

88,900 14,791 113 401 74 30 312 26 561 21 24 1,744 70 46 143 55 183 141 57 959 254 172 610 490 43 71 219 145 375 38 74 43 62 357 236 1,167 23 75 3,804 587 386 409 191

4.9 4.8 5.2 3.7 3.7 2.9 3.5 4.3 3.9 2.6 2.9 4.0 4.5 3.9 4.7 3.5 4.2 3.9 4.4 5.7 3.4 4.7 3.8 3.5 4.5 4.1 4.2 3.3 3.3 2.8 3.7 2.8 3.0 4.1 5.3 6.1 3.2 3.9 7.7 4.8 6.4 4.6 3.5

Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

18

Northwest WIA W O R KS I T E S
Size Class Number of Employees

BY

SIZE CLASS
2006 - 4th Qtr
Number of Worksites* Employment*

2005 - 4th Qtr
Number of Worksites* Employment*

2004 - 4th Qtr
Number of Worksites* Employment*

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

0-4 5-9 10 - 19 20 - 49 50 - 99 100 - 249 250 - 499 500 - 999 1000 & over
TOTAL

9,908 2,985 1,871 1,158 418 234 46 8 8 16,636

16,490 19,695 25,028 34,997 28,403 35,446 14,793 5,359 15,476 195,687

9,736 2,985 1,846 1,166 399 229 44 8 8 16,421

16,244 19,705 24,622 34,991 27,300 35,302 14,187 4,994 15,160 192,505

9,593 2,967 1,860 1,149 381 236 47 8 9 16,250

16,084 19,514 24,870 35,028 25,933 35,521 14,921 4,737 15,558 192,166

* Excludes government Size Class is determined by the number of employees at a worksite. NOTE: The sum of the areas is less than the statewide total because some firms only report statewide employment and are not included in the area data. Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research Information by county and labor market area is available online at www.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

19

Northwest WIA E M P LO Y M E N T
NAICS Code Total, All Industries 11 111 112 113 114 115 21 212 213 22 221 23 236 237 238 31-33 311 312 313 314 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 42 423 424 425 44-45 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 448 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting Crop production Animal production Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Agriculture and forestry support activities Mining Mining, except oil and gas Support activities for mining Utilities Utilities Construction Construction of buildings Heavy and civil engineering construction Specialty trade construction Manufacturing Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile mills Textile product mills Apparel manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal product manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment and appliance manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Wholesale trade Merchant wholesalers, durable goods Merchant wholesalers, nondurable goods Electronic markets and agents and brokers Retail trade Motor vehicle and parts dealers Furniture and home furnishings stores Electronics and appliance stores Building material and garden supply stores Food and beverage stores Health and personal care stores Gasoline stations Clothing and clothing accessories stores

AND

WAGES
Industry

B Y I N D U S T R Y -2006
Units 17,326 72 27 19 * * 22 * * * 30 30 2,116 611 72 1,433 1,040 54 * * 13 9 * 40 13 68 * 46 36 22 26 304 106 87 35 33 61 67 1,183 442 186 555 2,246 232 128 114 188 359 163 177 271

ANNUAL AVERAGE
Total Annual Wages $10,233,924,777 $17,946,247 $14,110,514 $1,830,255 * * $1,648,150 * * * $76,904,186 $76,904,186 $573,337,285 $146,619,162 $51,485,358 $375,232,765 $2,079,932,527 $35,378,936 * * $11,366,363 $4,441,147 * $13,420,872 $53,028,177 $52,442,347 * $555,513,001 $55,822,604 $25,263,984 $53,582,653 $356,168,128 $195,982,765 $229,306,326 $117,697,149 $189,448,024 $27,099,054 $89,730,773 $549,371,314 $243,916,170 $221,197,301 $84,257,843 $874,130,572 $167,438,675 $37,042,824 $27,780,421 $101,693,961 $174,958,030 $55,673,142 $22,176,952 $49,466,441 Annual Average Wages $45,717 $27,738 $27,942 $26,525 * * $25,356 * * * $88,497 $88,497 $50,568 $56,653 $65,337 $47,128 $65,230 $43,040 * * $34,236 $54,160 * $43,574 $60,123 $56,329 * $124,527 $48,040 $47,668 $59,603 $47,872 $71,500 $65,070 $56,831 $63,403 $41,121 $51,041 $68,766 $64,188 $67,500 $92,388 $27,539 $46,550 $31,313 $34,255 $34,791 $22,639 $26,298 $22,699 $16,450 Average Weekly Wages $879 $533 $537 $510 * * $488 * * * $1,702 $1,702 $972 $1,089 $1,256 $906 $1,254 $828 * * $658 $1,042 * $838 $1,156 $1,083 * $2,395 $924 $917 $1,146 $921 $1,375 $1,251 $1,093 $1,219 $791 $982 $1,322 $1,234 $1,298 $1,777 $530 $895 $602 $659 $669 $435 $506 $437 $316

Annual Average Employment 223,855 647 505 69 * * 65 * * * 869 869 11,338 2,588 788 7,962 31,886 822 * * 332 82 * 308 882 931 * 4,461 1,162 530 899 7,440 2,741 3,524 2,071 2,988 659 1,758 7,989 3,800 3,277 912 31,742 3,597 1,183 811 2,923 7,728 2,117 977 3,007

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

20

Northwest WIA E M P LO Y M E N T
NAICS Code Total, All Industries 451 452 453 454 48-49 481 484 485 487 488 491 492 493 51 511 512 515 516 517 518 519 52 522 523 524 525 53 531 532 533 54 541 55 551 56 561 562 61 611 62 621 622 623 624 71 711 712 713 72 721 Sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores General merchandise stores Miscellaneous store retailers Nonstore retailers Transportation and warehousing Air transportation Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Scenic and sightseeing transportation Support activities for transportation Postal service Couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Information Publishing industries, except Internet Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting, except Internet Internet publishing and broadcasting Telecommunications ISPs, search portals, and data processing Other information services Finance and insurance Credit intermediation and related activities Securities, commodity contracts, investments Insurance carriers and related activities Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles Real estate and rental and leasing Real estate Rental and leasing services Lessors of nonfinancial intangible assets Professional and technical services Professional and technical services Management of companies and enterprises Management of companies and enterprises Administrative and waste management Administrative and support activities Waste management and remediation services Educational services Educational services Health care and social assistance Ambulatory health care services Hospitals Nursing and residential care facilities Social assistance Arts, entertainment, and recreation Performing arts and spectator sports Museums, historical sites, zoos, and parks Amusement, gambling, and recreation Accommodation and food services Accommodation

AND

WAGES
Industry

B Y I N D U S T R Y -2006
Units 17,326 161 58 272 123 227 5 104 47 * 41 * * 13 256 81 50 * * 59 32 18 866 412 165 285 4 546 438 97 11 1,706 1,706 83 83 1,018 943 75 215 215 1,573 1,039 15 199 320 306 106 24 176 1,153 65

ANNUAL AVERAGE
Total Annual Wages $10,233,924,777 $19,932,996 $93,639,258 $35,337,973 $88,989,899 $184,926,670 $5,250,720 $35,879,840 $34,757,697 * $45,994,941 * * $27,061,146 $211,071,223 $117,516,508 $7,620,613 * * $61,237,369 $17,172,426 $2,796,006 $552,004,432 $381,186,812 $70,819,491 $99,575,496 $422,633 $82,231,442 $61,950,273 $17,670,574 $2,610,595 $739,580,106 $739,580,106 $412,536,701 $412,536,701 $266,685,834 $231,373,286 $35,312,548 $142,667,244 $142,667,244 $1,434,336,633 $593,276,112 $424,267,220 $305,092,787 $111,700,514 $86,588,819 $40,710,742 $5,565,187 $40,312,890 $240,653,112 $42,709,376 Annual Average Wages $45,717 $17,008 $21,731 $19,720 $41,858 $42,906 $58,341 $40,819 $21,999 * $150,803 * * $54,780 $56,002 $57,465 $28,866 * * $68,961 $62,903 $17,259 $75,659 $74,978 $120,646 $61,466 $84,527 $38,462 $40,332 $30,625 $104,424 $73,059 $73,059 $86,613 $86,613 $25,967 $24,437 $44,031 $34,586 $34,586 $42,141 $53,841 $52,580 $31,505 $21,216 $28,691 $72,828 $30,578 $17,704 $16,781 $23,467 Average Weekly Wages $879 $327 $418 $379 $805 $825 $1,122 $785 $423 * $2,900 * * $1,053 $1,077 $1,105 $555 * * $1,326 $1,210 $332 $1,455 $1,442 $2,320 $1,182 $1,626 $740 $776 $589 $2,008 $1,405 $1,405 $1,666 $1,666 $499 $470 $847 $665 $665 $810 $1,035 $1,011 $606 $408 $552 $1,401 $588 $340 $323 $451

Annual Average Employment 223,855 1,172 4,309 1,792 2,126 4,310 90 879 1,580 * 305 * * 494 3,769 2,045 264 * * 888 273 162 7,296 5,084 587 1,620 5 2,138 1,536 577 25 10,123 10,123 4,763 4,763 10,270 9,468 802 4,125 4,125 34,037 11,019 8,069 9,684 5,265 3,018 559 182 2,277 14,341 1,820

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

21

Northwest WIA E M P LO Y M E N T
NAICS Code Total, All Industries 722 81 811 812 813 814

AND

WAGES
Industry

B Y I N D U S T R Y -2006
Units 17,326

ANNUAL AVERAGE
Total Annual Wages $10,233,924,777 Annual Average Wages $45,717 Average Weekly Wages $879

Annual Average Employment 223,855

Food services and drinking places 1,088 12,521 $197,943,736 $15,809 $304 Other services, except public administration 1,963 8,625 $209,236,734 $24,259 $467 Repair and maintenance 454 2,139 $72,683,089 $33,980 $653 Personal and laundry services 505 3,112 $63,940,537 $20,546 $395 Membership associations and organizations 258 2,061 $46,499,730 $22,562 $434 Private households 746 1,313 $26,113,378 $19,888 $382 Total government 690 32,215 $1,475,660,727 $45,807 $881 Federal 100 1,644 $95,334,234 $57,989 $1,115 State 123 8,398 $428,283,625 $50,998 $981 Local 467 22,173 $952,042,868 $42,937 $826 99 Nonclassifiable establishments * * * * * * Disclosure provisions of Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance Law probhibit the release of figures which tend to reveal data reported by individual firms. Note: State Government sector data may not be fully comparable with last year's data due mainly to a new reporting system for State Government that was in use this year. Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research (2006 QCEW Program Data)

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

22

Northwest WIA E M P LO Y M E N T
AND

WAGES

BY

TOWN
Total Annual Wages 2006 2005 2006 Annual Average Wages 2005

# of Worksites 2006 2005

Annual Average Employment 2006 2005

Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

77 578 100 53 682 79 917 23 102 2,525 101 48 118 168 419 236 80 577 249 167 873 744 90 153 231 251 1,002 96 228 165 106 615 242 1,010 48 236 2,355 555 340 323 358

78 588 104 54 672 78 909 25 98 2,501 108 43 115 166 418 236 71 566 236 162 828 741 98 148 228 251 979 97 221 162 103 594 239 1,023 46 234 2,374 545 335 321 353

585 6,787 663 245 7,296 669 15,569 181 465 43,707 381 161 708 1,206 3,478 3,346 427 7,528 1,586 1,335 8,642 7,507 388 2,177 2,106 1,501 9,530 294 2,029 1,214 463 9,545 2,999 16,063 170 1,595 43,320 8,630 3,705 3,155 2,427

612 6,878 640 243 7,226 688 14,876 183 450 43,154 383 143 677 1,265 3,451 3,264 383 7,682 1,570 1,263 8,395 7,590 452 2,179 2,071 1,418 9,201 288 2,041 1,191 475 9,512 2,862 15,931 158 1,505 42,448 8,653 3,611 3,032 2,422

$19,416,680 $356,640,320 $19,148,544 $11,587,305 $302,156,308 $25,457,899 $788,550,720 $5,199,758 $13,523,152 $2,395,391,434 $13,823,029 $5,839,109 $28,773,133 $40,353,022 $122,284,104 $168,341,011 $10,737,684 $280,423,387 $65,909,105 $41,085,151 $351,107,693 $344,553,700 $11,856,829 $86,915,421 $77,099,341 $63,212,142 $669,795,222 $11,362,840 $75,815,956 $56,939,786 $17,723,448 $586,313,420 $126,095,166 $624,627,634 $6,948,031 $63,881,579 $1,667,398,834 $355,396,997 $132,788,490 $113,835,996 $84,249,688

$19,920,454 $336,495,383 $17,126,663 $11,039,983 $286,336,675 $25,838,225 $744,818,069 $4,969,473 $11,975,217 $2,266,230,506 $12,904,054 $5,125,019 $26,188,712 $41,993,719 $117,960,027 $163,780,457 $8,970,430 $274,383,172 $60,172,668 $37,583,219 $335,796,010 $341,151,419 $13,143,108 $83,120,735 $72,745,226 $58,872,182 $599,731,940 $10,043,065 $72,153,016 $55,479,126 $16,823,860 $557,646,966 $119,176,686 $606,113,629 $7,472,390 $57,919,112 $1,619,809,030 $336,822,808 $127,447,071 $108,565,904 $81,944,928

$33,191 $52,546 $28,900 $47,215 $41,416 $38,030 $50,649 $28,715 $29,056 $54,806 $36,286 $36,337 $40,659 $33,465 $35,164 $50,311 $25,176 $37,250 $41,555 $30,777 $40,628 $45,901 $30,552 $39,923 $36,609 $42,105 $70,282 $38,594 $37,371 $46,909 $38,280 $61,426 $42,040 $38,886 $40,831 $40,044 $38,490 $41,181 $35,840 $36,085 $34,714

$32,576 $48,925 $26,778 $45,432 $39,625 $37,560 $50,070 $27,205 $26,641 $52,515 $33,655 $35,944 $38,693 $33,197 $34,186 $50,177 $23,452 $35,719 $38,333 $29,759 $40,001 $44,949 $29,056 $38,154 $35,119 $41,532 $65,179 $34,892 $35,355 $46,569 $35,406 $58,627 $41,643 $38,046 $47,153 $38,491 $38,159 $38,927 $35,297 $35,803 $33,839

Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research
Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

23

Northwest WIA R E G I O N A L E M P LO Y M E N T O U T LO O K
Occupational Category

BY

O C C U PAT I O N : 2004-2014
Employment Change 2004-2014

2004 TOTAL, ALL OCCUPATIONS Management Occupations Business and Financial Operations Occupations Computer and Mathematical Occupations Architecture and Engineering Occupations Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations Community and Social Services Occupations Legal Occupations Education, Training, and Library Occupations Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Occupations Healthcare Support Occupations Protective Service Occupations Food Preparation and Serving Related Occupations Building, Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance Occupations Personal Care and Service Occupations Sales and Related Occupations Office and Administrative Support Occupations Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations Construction and Extraction Occupations Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations Production Occupations Transportation and Material Moving Occupations
Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research

2014 258,570 13,210 10,740 6,410 4,850 3,540 5,320 1,960 18,870 3,700 15,410 9,250 4,820 17,950 9,900 9,440 29,600 38,780 680 11,450 9,050 18,990 14,640

Net 22,760 1,470 1,100 1,090 350 620 780 170 2,250 380 2,150 1,500 340 2,450 1,130 1,380 2,700 850 70 1,060 920 -900 860

% 9.7% 12.5% 11.4% 20.5% 7.8% 21.2% 17.2% 9.5% 13.5% 11.4% 16.2% 19.4% 7.6% 15.8% 12.9% 17.1% 10.0% 2.2% 11.5% 10.2% 11.3% -4.5% 6.2%

Total Annual Openings

235,810 11,740 9,640 5,320 4,500 2,920 4,540 1,790 16,620 3,320 13,260 7,750 4,480 15,500 8,770 8,060 26,900 37,930 610 10,390 8,130 19,890 13,780

8,149 368 286 185 138 138 166 38 575 105 460 269 168 867 289 327 1,182 1,069 24 311 276 514 395

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

24

Northwest WIA NEW HOUSING PERMITS
2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 # Change 2005-06 # Change 2000-06

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

9,236 1,621 8 49 12 7 76 6 68 4 10 318 38 7 23 13 31 60 6 78 15 22 84 36 2 9 14 13 54 7 11 10 8 34 12 61 12 15 195 62 33 76 22

11,885 2,215 8 16 6 6 83 5 39 7 6 598 44 8 24 18 49 85 9 99 43 35 83 97 7 8 33 131 34 15 13 15 23 66 14 108 17 18 143 63 39 62 38

11,837 2,082 17 28 7 7 89 3 55 9 12 435 54 4 30 16 55 70 7 99 42 46 116 137 3 11 37 21 46 14 14 20 23 109 36 110 14 10 71 68 29 65 43

10,435 1,890 16 76 11 5 77 3 87 4 9 206 44 6 19 13 29 42 3 66 29 47 136 159 6 7 28 32 44 16 12 11 20 116 23 111 13 7 138 52 48 60 59

9,731 1,965 23 61 20 9 55 4 52 7 10 261 43 7 30 13 33 33 13 66 23 61 138 195 2 5 31 34 52 17 18 10 40 113 46 102 10 8 69 58 27 115 51

9,290 1,774 24 90 20 5 32 4 88 7 7 236 35 5 17 9 33 30 14 47 34 63 146 164 3 5 32 25 66 23 17 7 28 70 32 82 12 8 46 65 18 76 49

9,376 1,917 16 40 20 10 46 3 68 8 4 381 42 9 25 12 23 34 17 68 28 48 123 103 4 4 64 50 68 24 9 13 27 81 53 71 10 10 114 65 15 64 43

-2,649 -594 0 33 6 1 -7 1 29 -3 4 -280 -6 -1 -1 -5 -18 -25 -3 -21 -28 -13 1 -61 -5 1 -19 -118 20 -8 -2 -5 -15 -32 -2 -47 -5 -3 52 -1 -6 14 -16

-140 -296 -8 9 -8 -3 30 3 0 -4 6 -63 -4 -2 -2 1 8 26 -11 10 -13 -26 -39 -67 -2 5 -50 -37 -14 -17 2 -3 -19 -47 -41 -10 2 5 81 -3 18 12 -21

Source: Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

25

Northwest WIA HOME SALES
AND
Home Sales

MEDIAN SALES PRICES
2000
Home Sales Median Sales Price Home Sales

2006
Median Sales Price

1996
Median Sales Price

Change 2000 to 2006 Home Sales Median Sales Price

Change 1996 to 2006 Home Sales Median Sales Price

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

37,665 6,762 44 179 34 18 203 14 263 20 20 583 69 23 71 38 118 123 28 477 208 93 340 372 36 45 98 113 336 24 54 48 41 178 67 567 21 51 1,103 220 156 187 79

$275,000 $340,000 $273,250 $378,500 $342,500 $486,750 $440,000 $225,000 $340,000 $267,250 $331,000 $365,000 $393,000 $230,000 $285,000 $358,903 $303,750 $330,000 $313,000 $233,580 $417,000 $254,950 $359,270 $455,000 $304,000 $210,000 $270,000 $675,000 $779,500 $700,000 $425,000 $360,000 $430,005 $426,250 $219,500 $179,900 $435,000 $410,000 $159,900 $242,700 $171,750 $240,000 $400,000

56,032 10,437 52 345 55 28 371 27 503 25 25 1,468 54 20 58 81 128 104 42 466 298 108 690 573 39 40 144 185 581 39 83 65 91 546 151 626 21 78 1,315 319 197 202 194

$135,500 $161,875 $145,000 $175,000 $170,000 $227,000 $189,050 $85,000 $170,625 $137,500 $200,000 $141,000 $172,750 $149,750 $141,000 $157,000 $163,750 $160,000 $165,000 $105,000 $189,500 $136,800 $157,000 $241,000 $155,000 $85,000 $148,000 $390,000 $335,000 $305,000 $212,000 $180,000 $223,750 N/A $110,000 $90,000 $189,250 $233,750 $73,900 $123,825 $100,250 $120,000 $176,000

56,333 10,089 48 344 51 44 364 20 504 19 36 1,166 48 27 69 71 140 120 44 447 306 85 542 513 41 41 118 190 642 56 89 89 72 543 95 581 16 110 1,513 298 173 219 195

$138,000 $152,500 $139,000 $169,950 $168,750 $219,000 $180,000 $132,500 $178,500 $136,250 $206,000 $143,500 $161,663 $133,000 $133,000 $142,000 $150,000 $164,500 $130,000 $119,950 $214,000 $155,000 $152,500 $225,000 $135,000 $90,000 $146,000 $347,313 $347,000 $265,000 $170,000 $179,500 $244,500 $140,000 $111,250 $95,950 $165,000 $210,000 $78,000 $126,131 $100,000 $125,000 $174,500

-18,367 -3,675 -8 -166 -21 -10 -168 -13 -240 -5 -5 -885 15 3 13 -43 -10 19 -14 11 -90 -15 -350 -201 -3 5 -46 -72 -245 -15 -29 -17 -50 -368 -84 -59 0 -27 -212 -99 -41 -15

$139,500 $178,125 $128,250 $203,500 $172,500 $259,750 $250,950 $140,000 $169,375 $129,750 $131,000 $224,000 $220,250 $80,250 $144,000 $201,903 $140,000 $170,000 $148,000 $128,580 $227,500 $118,150 $202,270 $214,000 $149,000 $125,000 $122,000 $285,000 $444,500 $395,000 $213,000 $180,000 $206,255 N/A $109,500 $89,900 $245,750 $176,250 $86,000 $118,875 $71,500 $120,000

-18,668 -3,327 -4 -165 -17 -26 -161 -6 -241 1 -16 -583 21 -4 2 -33 -22 3 -16 30 -98 8 -202 -141 -5 4 -20 -77 -306 -32 -35 -41 -31 -365 -28 -14 5 -59 -410 -78 -17 -32

$137,000 $187,500 $134,250 $208,550 $173,750 $267,750 $260,000 $92,500 $161,500 $131,000 $125,000 $221,500 $231,337 $97,000 $152,000 $216,903 $153,750 $165,500 $183,000 $113,630 $203,000 $99,950 $206,770 $230,000 $169,000 $120,000 $124,000 $327,687 $432,500 $435,000 $255,000 $180,500 $185,505 $286,250 $108,250 $83,950 $270,000 $200,000 $81,900 $116,569 $71,750 $115,000 $225,500

Source: Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

-115 $224,000 -116 N/A = data not available

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

26

Northwest WIA H O U S I N G S I T U AT I O N
Total Housing Inventory 2006 2000 1996 Change 2000-2006 Change 1996-2000 Total Owner-Occupied 2000* 1996 Change 1996-2000 Total Subsidized Housing Units 2001*

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

1,439,221 1,399,819 1,366,410 241,945 1,527 6,958 1,458 813 6,151 630 9,886 692 927 30,524 1,737 796 2,164 1,538 3,855 2,836 1,227 12,758 5,330 2,616 11,344 9,341 893 1,480 3,257 3,312 9,062 1,105 2,473 1,684 1,746 8,281 3,173 16,672 727 1,826 47,325 8,646 5,077 5,972 4,126 211,635 1,489 6,771 1,410 825 5,823 613 9,638 680 893 28,270 1,477 788 2,065 1,556 3,777 2,578 1,186 12,551 5,510 2,599 10,602 8,952 931 1,497 3,085 3,244 8,888 1,053 2,561 1,684 1,658 7,792 3,072 15,913 669 1,999 47,536 8,276 5,238 5,697 3,904 204,590 1,408 6,632 1,348 788 5,612 602 9,204 652 871 26,477 1,369 766 1,966 1,508 3,583 2,469 1,139 12,352 5,392 2,475 10,097 8,246 921 1,480 2,857 3,082 8,502 965 2,539 1,656 1,560 7,261 2,873 15,658 633 1,958 47,689 7,964 5,143 5,392 3,679

39,402 30,310 38 187 48 -12 328 17 248 12 34 2,254 260 8 99 -18 78 258 41 207 -180 17 742 389 -38 -17 172 68 174 52 -88 0 88 489 101 759 58 -173 -211 370 -161 275 222

33,409 7,045 81 139 62 37 211 11 434 28 22 1,793 108 22 99 48 194 109 47 199 118 124 505 706 10 17 228 162 386 88 22 28 98 531 199 255 36 41 -153 312 95 305 225

869,742 135,550 1,152 4,980 1,065 633 4,963 366 8,088 490 489 15,839 936 648 1,822 837 2,598 2,145 717 7,863 4,334 1,926 7,768 7,662 498 901 2,795 2,631 7,193 743 1,204 960 1,311 6,470 2,151 9,528 434 1,111 20,299 6,381 2,821 4,768 2,784

807,559 123,702 1,019 4,630 930 562 4,326 355 7,103 452 481 14,478 744 573 1,691 733 2,392 1,980 649 7,606 3,965 1,770 6,328 6,038 503 921 2,380 2,452 6,252 597 1,177 946 969 5,340 1,911 8,704 410 1,176 21,159 5,670 2,720 4,127 2,339

62,183 11,848 133 350 135 71 637 11 985 38 8 1,361 192 75 131 104 206 165 68 257 369 156 1,440 1,624 -5 -20 415 179 941 146 27 14 342 1,130 240 824 24 -65 -860 711 101 641 445

148,930 18,522 25 272 25 2 108 8 232 8 19 2,675 3 19 44 37 179 99 24 1,227 57 36 312 163 33 131 22 0 157 3 40 27 4 78 161 1,879 1 21 10,391 367 601 283 59

Source: Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development

*current available data

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

27

Northwest WIA FAIR MARKET RENTS
Fair Market Rents (FMRs) For The Section 8 Housing Assistance Payments Program
FMRs are gross rent estimates. They include the shelter rent plus the cost of all tenant-paid utilities (except telephones, cable or satellite television service, and internet service). HUD sets FMRs to assure that a sufficient supply of rental housing is available to program participants. To accomplish this objective, FMRs must be both high enough to permit a selection of units and neighborhoods, and low enough to serve as many low-income families as possible.

2008* Efficiency Apartment Connecticut** Northwest WIA** Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury $709 $674 $609 $942 $609 $609 $942 $609 $834 $609 $609 $942 $609 $673 $609 $609 $609 $561 $609 $561 $942 $609 $609 $942 $609 $609 $561 $942 $942 $609 $609 $609 $942 $561 $609 $609 $609 $609 $561 $609 $609 $561 $609 1 BR Apartment $856 $856 $794 $1,143 $794 $794 $1,143 $794 $946 $794 $794 $1,143 $794 $806 $794 $794 $794 $726 $794 $726 $1,143 $794 $794 $1,143 $794 $794 $726 $1,143 $1,143 $794 $794 $794 $1,143 $726 $794 $794 $794 $794 $726 $794 $794 $726 $794 2 BR Apartment $1,033 $1,033 $937 $1,451 $937 $937 $1,451 $937 $1,142 $937 $937 $1,451 $937 $985 $937 $937 $937 $863 $937 $863 $1,451 $937 $937 $1,451 $937 $937 $863 $1,451 $1,451 $937 $937 $937 $1,451 $863 $937 $937 $937 $937 $863 $937 $937 $863 $937 Efficiency Apartment $688 $631 $584 $822 $584 $584 $822 $584 $777 $584 $584 $822 $584 $703 $584 $584 $584 $536 $584 $536 $822 $584 $584 $822 $584 $584 $536 $822 $822 $584 $584 $584 $822 $536 $584 $584 $584 $584 $536 $584 $584 $536 $584

2007 1 BR Apartment $830 $802 $761 $998 $761 $761 $998 $761 $882 $761 $761 $998 $761 $842 $761 $761 $761 $694 $761 $694 $998 $761 $761 $998 $761 $761 $694 $998 $998 $761 $761 $761 $998 $694 $761 $761 $761 $761 $694 $761 $761 $694 $761 2 BR Apartment $1,002 $967 $898 $1,267 $898 $898 $1,267 $898 $1,065 $898 $898 $1,267 $898 $1,029 $898 $898 $898 $825 $898 $825 $1,267 $898 $898 $1,267 $898 $898 $825 $1,267 $1,267 $898 $898 $898 $1,267 $825 $898 $898 $898 $898 $825 $898 $898 $825 Efficiency Apartment $654 $607 $555 $821 $555 $555 $821 $555 $732 $555 $555 $821 $555 $669 $555 $555 $555 $505 $555 $505 $821 $555 $555 $821 $555 $555 $505 $821 $821 $555 $555 $555 $821 $505 $555 $555 $555 $555 $505 $555 $555 $505

2006 1 BR Apartment $789 $770 $723 $992 $723 $723 $992 $723 $830 $723 $723 $992 $723 $801 $723 $723 $723 $653 $723 $653 $992 $723 $723 $992 $723 $723 $653 $992 $992 $723 $723 $723 $992 $653 $723 $723 $723 $723 $653 $723 $723 $653 2 BR Apartment $948 $907 $854 $1,148 $854 $854 $1,148 $854 $1,003 $854 $854 $1,148 $854 $979 $854 $854 $854 $777 $854 $777 $1,148 $854 $854 $1,148 $854 $854 $777 $1,148 $1,148 $854 $854 $854 $1,148 $777 $854 $854 $854 $854 $777 $854 $854 $777 $854

* Proposed as of July 2007 - final FMRs will be published by October 1, 2008 Note: Figures represent 100% of Fair Market Rents. For all Section 8 properties - the actual monthly payment amount is influenced by a number of factors including the deduction of utility allowances, condition of the property, market comparisons, and any other policies of the local housing authority. The figures above represent the highest monthly dollar amount that HUD may pay through Section 8. Source: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

$898 $555 $723 ** CT and WIA average FMRs

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

28

Northwest WIA F O O D S TA M P
AND
TOTAL 2006

T E M P O R A R Y F A M I LY A S S I S TA N C E R E C I P I E N T S
Food Stamp Recipients TOTAL 2005 # Change 05-06 % Change 05-06 Regular Temporary Family Assistance Recipients UP* TOTAL 2006 TOTAL 2005 # Change 05-06 % Change 05-06

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

194,311 28,274 36 240 32 6 80 38 162 10 13 2,587 31 17 43 38 80 44 30 1,427 80 57 425 143 18 84 76 16 60 2 27 81 14 88 152 2,151 3 31 18,647 334 589 230 52

188,591 26,838 35 185 30 4 72 36 155 12 13 2,539 32 18 35 40 81 40 22 1,394 65 44 402 119 16 59 71 12 59 6 21 66 12 85 127 1,927 3 25 17,781 344 594 206 51

5,720 1,436 1 55 2 2 8 2 7 -2 0 48 -1 -1 8 -2 -1 4 8 33 15 13 23 24 2 25 5 4 1 -4 6 15 2 3 25 224 0 6 866 -10 -5 24 1

3.0% 5.4% 2.9% 29.7% 6.7% 50.0% 11.1% 5.6% 4.5% -16.7% 0.0% 1.9% -3.1% -5.6% 22.9% -5.0% -1.2% 10.0% 36.4% 2.4% 23.1% 29.5% 5.7% 20.2% 12.5% 42.4% 7.0% 33.3% 1.7% -66.7% 28.6% 22.7% 16.7% 3.5% 19.7% 11.6% 0.0% 24.0% 4.9% -2.9% -0.8% 11.7% 2.0%

39,822 5,469 6 22 6 1 13 2 24 2 374 3 3 12 5 17 6 8 251 22 9 69 28 11 16 14 5 5 10 2 7 21 25 335 1 13 3,911 62 90 49 9

4,543 761

44,365 6,230 6

48,174 6,445 8 12 3 0 12 4 26 1 3 471 7 3 9 7 20 5 9 339 16 11 89 31 10 10 15 5 4 1 13 3 7 23 25 430 1 5 4,500 91 152 57 7

-3,809 -215 -2 12 3 1 3 -2 3 -1 -1 -63 -3 0 3 -2 0 2 -1 -55 6 -2 -1 6 1 6 -1 0 1 -1 -1 -1 0 5 7 -3 0 10 -84 -14 -46 -3 3

-7.9% -3.3% -25.0% 100.0% 100.0% N/A 25.0% -50.0% 11.5% -100.0% -33.3% -13.4% -42.9% 0.0% 33.3% -28.6% 0.0% 40.0% -11.1% -16.2% 37.5% -18.2% -1.1% 19.4% 10.0% 60.0% -6.7% 0.0% 25.0% -100.0% -7.7% -33.3% 0.0% 21.7% 28.0% -0.7% 0.0% 200.0% -1.9% -15.4% -30.3% -5.3% 42.9%

2

24 6 1

2 5

15 2 29 0 2

34 1

408 4 3 12 5

3 1 33

20 7 8 284 22 9

19 9

88 37 11 16 14 5 5 0

2

12 2 7

7 7 92 2 505 15 16 5 1

28 32 427 1 15 4,416 77 106 54 10

Source: Connecticut Department of Social Services

*Two parent household - primary wage earner is unemployed

N/A - Not Applicable Note: Due to rounding, program/statewide totals may not add

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

29

Northwest WIA S TAT E S U P P L E M E N T
Aged Blind

AND

MEDICAID RECIPIENTS
Medicaid Recipients* # Change 05-06 % Change 05-06 TOTAL 2006 TOTAL 2004** # Change 04-06 % Change 04-06 TOTAL 2006 TOTAL 2005

State Supplement Recipients Disabled

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

4,751 640

91 7

10,756 1,764 1

15,599 2,424 1 24 4 0 8 2 97 1 1 206 9 11 20 7 71 4 4 96 9 17 54 14 6 3 14 1 7 7 7 0 0

16,492 2,539 2 22 4 0 9 4 99 1 1 232 9 11 19 9 73 4 3 85 7 16 55 14 12 6 15 1 4 9 9 0 0 45 16 256 0 4 1,215 113 79 49 27

-893 -115 -1 2 0 0 -1 -2 -2 0 0 -26 0 0 1 -2 -2 0 1 11 2 1 -1 0 -6 -3 -1 0 3 -2 -2 0 0 4 1 -12 0 -1 -60 -2 -3 -4 -8

-5.4% -4.5% -50.0% 9.1% 0.0% N/A -11.1% -50.0% -2.0% 0.0% 0.0% -11.2% 0.0% 0.0% 5.3% -22.2% -2.7% 0.0% 33.3% 12.9% 28.6% 6.3% -1.8% 0.0% -50.0% -50.0% -6.7% 0.0% 75.0% -22.2% -22.2% N/A N/A 8.9% 6.3% -4.7% N/A -25.0% -4.9% -1.8% -3.8% -8.2%

397,641 63,284 194 1,042 187 51 497 133 934 36 89 8,087 125 103 246 218 551 222 130 3,593 497 258 1,759 784 104 386 454 121 386 56 242 167 147 1,121 550 5,400 34 186 29,683 1,420 1,642 1,091

392,027 61,546 188 958 187 44 442 185 877 28 94 7,822 128 96 200 208 528 215 130 3,525 547 239 1,788 803 125 322 467 114 427 62 245 170 142 1,187 540 5,016 47 206 28,761 1,381 1,722 1,016

5,614 1,738 6 84 0 7 55 -52 57 8 -5 265 -3 7 46 10 23 7 0 68 -50 19 -29 -19 -21 64 -13 7 -41 -6 -3 -3 5 -66 10 384 -13 -20 922 39 -80 75

1.4% 2.8% 3.2% 8.8% 0.0% 15.9% 12.4% -28.1% 6.5% 28.6% -5.3% 3.4% -2.3% 7.3% 23.0% 4.8% 4.4% 3.3% 0.0% 1.9% -9.1% 7.9% -1.6% -2.4% -16.8% 19.9% -2.8% 6.1% -9.6% -9.7% -1.2% -1.8% 3.5% -5.6% 1.9% 7.7% -27.7% -9.7% 3.2% 2.8% -4.6% 7.4%

8

16 4

3 51 1 1

5 2 45 1

84 1 2 3 30

122 9 10 18 4 40 4 3

23 3 1 16 6 1 3 1 2 5

72 6 16 38 7 5 3 11 6 5 1

15 2 31 1 321 17 3 4 4 1 1 2

33 14 210 2 832 92 72 40 15

49 17 244 0 3 1,155 111 76 45 19

Source: Connecticut Department of Social Services N/A - Not Applicable Note: Due to rounding, program and statewide totals may not add

358 -29.6% 364 -6 -1.6% *State Supp. & Medicaid only, excluding QMB/SLMB **2005 Medicaid data not available

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

30

Northwest WIA S TAT E A D M I N I S T E R E D G E N E R A L A S S I S TA N C E R E C I P I E N T S
2006
Cash Med Cash

2005
Med Cash

2004
Med Cash

2003
Med Cash

2002
Med Cash

2001
Med Cash

2000
Med

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

4,100 527 1 11 2 1 2 1 5

31,307 4,326 8 51 8 1 23 2 34 2 1

4,076 506 1 12 2 4 6

29,840 3,981 10 44 7 26 2 33 2 2

4,170 532 10

27,509 3,656 9 36 3 1

4,757 551 8

25,643 3,292 6 33 2 3

4,326 458 1 7 1 1 4

22,364 2,721 4 30 4 6 15 4 13 3

4,179 471 3 9 1 1 6

20,403 2,304 5 26 3 8 12 2 11 1 2

4,133 471 3 11 1 3 2

18,085 2,033 7 29 2 5 14 2 12 2 2

3 4

22 3 23 1

1 5

20 3 16 3

65 2 1 3 3 2 26 2 3 17 5 1 4 1

511 10 3 11 13 24 8 6 199 25 15 91 66 6 13 24 5 14 2 6

58 3 1 1 3

508 6 2 11 7 22 7 4

62 1

458 5 2 10 8

67 1 1 1 6 2 27 2 20 7 1 6 3 4

415 6 3 6 8 15 7 3 132 16 15 69 46 6 9 13 6 18 9 53 3 17

63

375 4 1 7 8

64 1 1 1 1

348 3 6 6 5 5 2

65 1

336 3 3

1 1

6 6 2 2

3 1 1 35 3 1 17 5

17 5 5 139 16 16 84 62 5 8

1 1 26 1 1 10 6 1 3 3 5

8 6 2 106 13 11 56 49 3 8 10 3 14 1 6 52 3

30 2 3 18 3 1 3

162 18 15 89 62 4 19 17 2 15 1 5 56 2

19 2 1 9 6 1 1 2 3 2

98 12 9 53 65 2 10 9 3 8 2 4 49

22 2 1 13 7

82 7 5 44 60 2 7

4 2

15 5 19 1 7 61 3

1 3 3

10 2 9 1 2 35 2

1 2 3 48

60 3 32 34 402 1 9 1 4 43

1 6 4 28

4 20 17 200 1 4 6 4 24

26 31 364 1 9

1 3 49 1 287 12 20 5 2

16 28 331 1 11 2,015 74 84 34 13 1 299 12 22 4 1 3 47

2 4 34

18 14 243 2 4

12 12 152 4

23 313 1 7 1,799 59 90 29 10

281 13 12 7 2

2,360 90 87 48 18

271 12 15 6 3

2,169 81 82 41 17

253 10 14 5 1

1,476 39 68 26 6

266 11 13 7 1

1,170 37 48 24 10

271 9 14 2 1

1,061 25 37 22 7

Source: Connecticut Department of Social Services

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

31

Northwest WIA D E PA R T M E N T
Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

OF

M E N TA L R E TA R D AT I O N -A C T I V E C L I E N T S
June 2006 15,018 2,932 15 54 8 0 51 15 153 7 3 255 5 15 24 8 29 21 6 117 36 27 97 67 9 1 40 13 27 10 8 6 1 600 24 317 3 5 518 131 97 91 18 June 2005 14,943 2,968 11 51 11 0 51 18 147 6 3 251 4 15 24 8 31 20 9 112 36 22 103 65 20 1 42 15 30 10 7 6 1 620 26 312 3 5 535 133 92 92 20 June 2004 14,936 2,970 10 53 12 0 48 17 136 7 3 259 4 14 23 8 31 20 7 99 35 24 102 58 20 1 42 15 27 10 6 6 3 635 30 311 1 5 547 136 93 89 23 June 2003 14,667 2,942 9 51 12 0 47 17 129 7 3 259 5 15 22 7 28 19 7 101 35 23 100 58 19 1 33 15 27 10 5 6 3 649 29 296 1 5 535 130 105 94 25 June 2002 14,580 2,993 5 57 14 0 52 20 127 7 3 269 6 16 20 9 30 18 7 93 35 22 99 59 18 1 32 14 27 9 5 7 5 662 29 304 1 5 556 127 101 98 24 Change 2006-07 -14 45 2 -1 1 0 0 0 11 0 0 13 0 -1 0 -1 0 0 -1 3 0 0 -2 -2 -1 0 10 0 -1 0 -2 -1 0 -19 -1 11 0 -1 26 2 3 -8 5 Change 2002-07 424 -16 12 -4 -5 0 -1 -5 37 0 0 -1 -1 -2 4 -2 -1 3 -2 27 1 5 -4 6 -10 0 18 -1 -1 1 1 -2 -4 -81 -6 24 2 -1 -12 6 -1 -15 -1

June 2007 15,004 2,977 17 53 9 0 51 15 164 7 3 268 5 14 24 7 29 21 5 120 36 27 95 65 8 1 50 13 26 10 6 5 1 581 23 328 3 4 544 133 100 83 23

Source: Connecticut Department of Mental Retardation, Active Clients as of June 2007. Note: Statewide totals include unknown area or out-of-state DMR clients - 121 in June 2003, 130 in June 2004, 125 in June 2005, and 162 in June 2006.

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

32

Northwest WIA
D EPARTMENT
OF

M ENTAL H EALTH

AND

A DDICTION S ERVICES -S UBSTANCE A BUSE C LIENTS
34,610 4,624 1 92 12 2 61 17 95 3 1 697 21 1 22 7 32 17 14 263 33 30 121 78 12 3 29 16 50 5 7 48 4 60 57 592 3 3 1,889 90 13 83 40
* Number of persons (unduplicated) receiving any substance abuse treatment services in licensed or state-operated programs as reported to the Dept. of Mental Health and Addiction Services' Substance Abuse Treatment Information System (SATIS) for SFY 2006 (July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006). Note: Information based upon client's most current ZIP code reported at time of admission to treatment. Some ZIP codes include more than one town. Individuals are only included in this count if the database indicates that they received services during at least one of their Admissions. Source: Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Substance Abuse Treatment Information System (SATIS), March 17, 2007.

Unduplicated Substance and Drug Abuse Clients Served in SFY 2006*

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

33

Northwest WIA A D U LT P R O B AT I O N E R S
June 2007 State GSSC
**

TOTAL

June 2006

June 2005

June 2004

# Change 2006-07

# Change 2004-07

Connecticut

*

40,732 5,719 9 104 17 4 55 34 80 4 3 672 8 8 32 17 40 24 9 355 50 32 169 105 9 13 44 13 52 9 14 32 8 65 57 570 5 18 2,558 134 160 91 36

12,505 2,153 17 71 6 3 38 11 40 6 5 479 8 7 9 7 26 7 7 98 45 17 110 66 5 1 20 12 46 4 5 7 12 29 32 168 3 9 549 55 52 40 21

53,125 7,872 26 175 23 7 93 45 120 10 8 1,151 16 15 41 24 66 31 16 453 95 49 279 171 14 14 64 25 98 13 19 39 20 94 89 738 8 27 3,107 189 212 131 57

52,132 7,737 26 168 21 10 102 36 111 13 9 1,121 21 8 36 22 77 38 21 433 93 44 306 168 17 22 58 32 100 8 24 26 20 100 97 745 10 27 3,014 190 202 113 48

50,579 7,111 25 135 20 6 89 43 89 12 6 1,042 27 8 39 29 64 41 23 383 83 49 284 156 13 31 50 36 57 8 23 35 12 86 85 715 10 31 2,737 177 182 128 42

49,431 6,432 24 142 23 4 78 49 93 7 5 978 19 9 37 22 68 26 11 339 76 46 230 144 8 17 41 42 68 6 29 23 12 70 65 578 8 21 2,516 147 189 121 41

993 135 0 7 2 -3 -9 9 9 -3 -1 30 -5 7 5 2 -11 -7 -5 20 2 5 -27 3 -3 -8 6 -7 -2 5 -5 13 0 -6 -8 -7 -2 0 93 -1 10 18 9

3,694 1,440 2 33 0 3 15 -4 27 3 3 173 -3 6 4 2 -2 5 5 114 19 3 49 27 6 -3 23 -17 30 7 -10 16 8 24 24 160 0 6 591 42 23 10 16
* June 2007 Connecticut totals include 213 (190 State and 23 GSSC) probationers without town designations. ** GSSC - General Security Services Corp. Note: some clients are serviced both by the State and GSSC and may be counted twice. Source: Connecticut Judicial Department Office of Adult Probation

Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

34

Northwest WIA HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT
School District
2005-06

AND

D R O P O U T R AT E S
GRADES 9 - 12 Dropouts
Number
2003-04 2005-06 2004-05 2003-04 2005-06

Total Enrollment
2004-05

Rate
2004-05 2003-04

Connecticut Northwest WIA Bethel Brookfield Cheshire Danbury Litchfield Naugatuck New Fairfield New Milford Newtown Ridgefield Thomaston Torrington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Regional School District 1 Regional School District 6 Regional School District 7 Regional School District 9
a b c d e

173,709 30,015 1,024 950 1,655 2,986 432 1,527 897 1,576 1,688 1,703 357 1,438 4,386 995 25 891 627 420 781 987 718 413 855 1,341 784 479 80 10,325

173,225 29,692 1,010 940 1,633 2,942 445 1,591 904 1,642 1,624 1,595 392 1,471 4,255 957 36 850 613 386 752 984 709 410 833 1,316 808 516 78 10,836

168,628 28,723 960 936 1,588 2,886 417 1,638 907 1,556 1,561 1,520 373 1,420 4,013 948 29 835 596 375 739 940 693 405 796 1,279 713 530 70 11,253

3,212 544 0 5 12 79 6 26 4 17 16 7 11 94 148 10 5 23 16 3 3 2 6 0 3 20 15 12 1 47

3,027 520 0 0 17 63 10 31 5 19 19 8 6 106 112 13 3 20 26 1 5 2 7 1 4 12 15 14 1 7

2,956 467 0 0 20 65 3 36 5 7 16 5 6 48 135 11 1 13 17 3 9 5 8 10 1 14 12 13 4 63

1.8% 1.8% 0.0% 0.5% 0.7% 2.6% 1.4% 1.7% 0.4% 1.1% 0.9% 0.4% 3.1% 6.5% 3.4% 1.0% 20.0% 2.6% 2.6% 0.7% 0.4% 0.2% 0.8% 0.0% 0.4% 1.5% 1.9% 2.5% 1.3% 0.5%

1.7% 1.8% 0.0% 0.0% 1.0% 2.1% 2.2% 1.9% 0.6% 1.2% 1.2% 0.5% 1.5% 7.2% 2.6% 1.4% 8.3% 2.4% 4.2% 0.3% 0.7% 0.2% 1.0% 0.2% 0.5% 0.9% 1.9% 2.7% 1.3% 0.1%

1.8% 1.6% 0.0% 0.0% 1.3% 2.3% 0.7% 2.2% 0.6% 0.4% 1.0% 0.3% 1.6% 3.4% 3.4% 1.2% 3.4% 1.6% 2.9% 0.8% 1.2% 0.5% 1.2% 2.5% 0.1% 1.1% 1.7% 2.5% 5.7% 0.6%

Regional School District 10 Regional School District 14 Regional School District 15 Regional School District 16 Explorations (Winchester)

Regional School District 12f
g h i

The Gilbert School (Winchester) CT Technical High Schoolsj
a b c d e f g h i j

Regional School District 1 serves the towns of Canaan, Cornwall, Kent, North Canaan, Salisbury, Sharon Regional School District 6 serves the towns of Goshen, Morris, Warren Regional School District 7 serves the towns of Barkhamsted, Colebrook, New Hartford, Norfolk Regional School District 9 serves the towns of Easton, Redding Regional School District 10 serves the towns of Burlington, Harwinton Regional School District 12 serves the towns of Bridgewater, Roxbury, Washington Regional School District 14 serves the towns of Bethlehem, Woodbury Regional School District 15 serves the towns of Middlebury, Southbury

Regional School District 16 serves the towns of Beacon Falls and Prospect

CT Tech High School System (4 in EA WIA, 3 in NC, 3 in NW, 4 in SC, 3 in SW) data reflected in CT total--not WIA total Source: Connecticut Department of Education, Bureau of Evaluation and Student Assessment

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

35

Northwest WIA E D U C AT I O N A L A T TA I N M E N T
Total Population (age 25 or older) Educated Population* High School Diploma Some College** Bachelor's or higher Total
% of Total Population with HS Diploma or Higher % of Total Population with a Bachelor's or Higher

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Bridgewater Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Hartford New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Redding Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Warren Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

2,295,617 388,743 2,467 12,078 2,426 1,327 10,624 763 19,137 1,045 1,042 51,223 1,959 1,365 3,681 2,066 5,899 4,662 1,631 20,451 9,111 4,207 18,154 16,765 1,182 2,393 6,015 5,670 15,667 1,595 2,952 2,201 2,688 13,727 5,131 24,916 904 2,451 69,791 14,922 7,468 10,350 6,637

653,300 111,902 642 3,416 601 254 2,464 209 4,051 323 217 14,688 529 438 1,109 638 1,571 1,082 489 7,280 2,456 853 5,672 3,262 284 943 1,998 770 1,799 318 570 568 643 2,968 2,002 9,334 276 596 23,961 4,708 2,540 3,909 1,471

553,667 96,889 749 2,881 742 344 2,791 237 4,499 270 277 10,862 600 407 1,074 415 1,605 1,271 478 5,815 2,365 1,051 5,220 3,938 357 576 1,871 1,148 2,915 473 730 619 757 3,442 1,520 6,305 243 615 16,411 4,065 2,041 3,173 1,737

720,994 118,187 897 4,439 856 640 4,664 252 9,142 350 494 13,884 635 391 1,213 868 2,119 1,933 413 3,882 3,713 1,802 5,532 8,354 438 497 1,372 3,577 10,323 744 1,338 798 1,136 5,832 947 3,902 312 1,018 9,678 3,727 1,297 2,001 2,777

1,927,961 326,978 2,288 10,736 2,199 1,238 9,919 698 17,692 943 988 39,434 1,764 1,236 3,396 1,921 5,295 4,286 1,380 16,977 8,534 3,706 16,424 15,554 1,079 2,016 5,241 5,495 15,037 1,535 2,638 1,985 2,536 12,242 4,469 19,541 831 2,229 50,050 12,500 5,878 9,083 5,985

84.0% 84.1% 92.7% 88.9% 90.6% 93.3% 93.4% 91.5% 92.4% 90.2% 94.8% 77.0% 90.0% 90.5% 92.3% 93.0% 89.8% 91.9% 84.6% 83.0% 93.7% 88.1% 90.5% 92.8% 91.3% 84.2% 87.1% 96.9% 96.0% 96.2% 89.4% 90.2% 94.3% 89.2% 87.1% 78.4% 91.9% 90.9% 71.7% 83.8% 78.7% 87.8% 90.2%

31.4% 30.4% 36.4% 36.8% 35.3% 48.2% 43.9% 33.0% 47.8% 33.5% 47.4% 27.1% 32.4% 28.6% 33.0% 42.0% 35.9% 41.5% 25.3% 19.0% 40.8% 42.8% 30.5% 49.8% 37.1% 20.8% 22.8% 63.1% 65.9% 46.6% 45.3% 36.3% 42.3% 42.5% 18.5% 15.7% 34.5% 41.5% 13.9% 25.0% 17.4% 19.3% 41.8%

* Educated Population: age 25 or older - with a HS Diploma, or some college, or Bachelor’s Degree or higher ** Some College: no degree up to associate's degree Source: U.S. Census Bureau - 2000 Census

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

36

Northwest WIA BIRTHS
TO

TEENAGE MOTHERS
2005
<15 Years 15 Years 16 Years 17 Years 18 Years 19 Years

TOTAL 2005 2,842 431 1 6 0 2 0 2 0 1 50 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 29 3 7 2 1 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 4 36 1 246 8 8 7 4 2004 2,909 430 1 5 1 2 1 2 1 1 55 0 2 1 1 3 1 1 21 4 15 5 1 2 4 0 1 1 0 1 2 3 34 1 237 5 7 8 0 2003 2,881 428 1 6 0 3 0 1 0 1 70 1 2 0 1 2 2 0 18 2 7 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 5 24 2 255 3 11 1 2

Connecticut Northwest WIA Barkhamsted Bethel Bethlehem Brookfield Canaan Cheshire Colebrook Cornwall Danbury Goshen Hartland Harwinton Kent Litchfield Middlebury Morris Naugatuck New Fairfield New Milford Newtown Norfolk North Canaan Prospect Ridgefield Roxbury Salisbury Sharon Sherman Southbury Thomaston Torrington Washington Waterbury Watertown Winchester Wolcott Woodbury

29 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0

124 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 13 0 0 0 0

259 42 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 31 0 0 1 0

526 90 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 58 0 1 1 1

779 104 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 9 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 9 0 56 2 3 0 2

1,125 169 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 26 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 11 0 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 17 0 81 6 4 5 1

Source: Connecticut Department of Public Health - Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

37

STATEWIDE P O P U L AT I O N C H A N G E (%) 2000
Salisbury North Canaan Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Norfolk Hartland Granby

TO

2006
Suffield Enfield Somers Stafford Union Woodstock Thompson

East Ellingto n GranbyWindsor Putnam Simsb ury Locks WillingtonAshford Eastford Windsor East Tolland Pomfret Windsor Sharon Canton Goshen Bloomfield Torrington Killingly Vernon South New Windsor Chaplin Hartford Cornwall Avon HamptonBrooklyn Coventry Mansfield Manchester Bolton West Hartford HarwintonBurlin gton Litchfield Warren East Hartford Andover Kent Farmington Hartford Windham WethersfieldGlastonbury ScotlandCanterbury PlainfieldSterling Columbia Morris BristolPlainville Newington Thomaston Hebron Plymouth Washington New Rocky Sprague Bethlehem Marlboroug h Lebanon Britain Hill Franklin Watertown Berlin Cromwell Lisbon Wolcott Southington Portland New Griswold Voluntown Sherman Milford Woodbury Colchester East Waterbury Roxbury Norwich MiddletownHampton Cheshire Meriden Bozrah Middlebury Middlefield BridgePreston Prospect water Salem New Naugatuck Southbu ry East Haddam Montville Fairfield Brookfield North Wallingford Durham Haddam Stonington Ledyard Oxford Beacon Falls Bethany Chester Danb ury Waterford Newtown Hamden Lyme Seymour Stonington Beth el Groton North North Woodbridge Killing- Deep Ansonia East River Essex New Monroe Madisonwo rth Haven Branford Derby Old Lyme London Guilford Shelton Lyme Ridgefield Redding New East Clinton WestOld Branford HavenHaven Orange brook Saybrook Easton Trumbull West Haven Weston Milford k Population Change Wilton Stratford Population % Change Bridgeport 2000 to 2006 Fairfield 2000 to 2006 New Westport Negative growth Canaan Norwalk 0% to 3% Stamford 3% to 6% Darien Greenwich 6% to 10%

Population % Change 2000 to 2006
Negative growth 0% to 3% 3% to 6% Over 10% 6% to 10%

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

38

STATEWIDE LABOR FORCE
Annual Average
2006 2005 2004 2003 #

Change 2005-06
%

Labor Force UNITED STATES Employed Unemployed Rate
Labor Force

151,428,000 144,427,000 7,001,000 4.6
1,844,200 1,765,100 79,200 4.3

149,320,000 141,730,000 7,591,000 5.1
1,817,000 1,727,900 89,100 4.9

147,401,000 139,252,000 8,149,000 5.5
1,803,200 1,714,000 89,100 4.9

146,510,000 137,736,000 8,774,000 6.0
1,806,500 1,707,500 99,000 5.5

2,108,000 2,697,000 -590,000 -0.5
27,200 37,200 -9,900 -0.6

1.4 1.9 -7.8 ***
1.5 2.2 -11.1 ***

CONNECTICUT

Employed Unemployed Rate

Labor Force EASTERN WIA Employed Unemployed Rate Labor Force NORTH CENTRAL WIA Employed Unemployed Rate Labor Force NORTHWEST WIA Employed Unemployed Rate Labor Force SOUTH CENTRAL WIA Employed Unemployed Rate Labor Force SOUTHWEST WIA Employed Unemployed Rate

237,000 226,800 10,200 4.3 511,000 487,600 23,400 4.6 312,000 299,100 12,900 4.1 388,000 371,200 16,800 4.3 396,300 380,400 15,900 4.0

233,363 222,437 10,926 4.7 503,891 477,328 26,563 5.3 308,430 293,788 14,642 4.7 381,072 362,397 18,675 4.9 390,276 371,984 18,292 4.7

230,332 219,562 10,770 4.7 499,152 472,154 26,998 5.4 306,837 292,069 14,768 4.8 378,358 360,051 18,307 4.8 388,484 370,178 18,306 4.7

230,584 218,887 11,697 5.1 500,142 470,154 29,988 6.0 306,889 290,639 16,250 5.3 378,137 357,860 20,277 5.4 390,757 369,923 20,834 5.3

3,637 4,363 -726 -0.4 7,109 10,272 -3,163 -0.7 3,570 5,312 -1,742 -0.6 6,928 8,803 -1,875 -0.6 6,024 8,416 -2,392 -0.7

1.6 2.0 -6.6 *** 1.4 2.2 -11.9 *** 1.2 1.8 -11.9 *** 1.8 2.4 -10.0 *** 1.5 2.3 -13.1 ***

Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

39

STATEWIDE U N E M P LO Y M E N T R AT E
Salisbury North Canaan Canaan WinchesterBarkhamsted Colebrook Norfolk Hartland Granby East GranbyWindsor Locks Suffield Enfield Somers Stafford Ellington Union Woodstock Thompson

Putnam Eastford Willington East Tolland Ashf ord Simsbury Windsor Windsor Pomfret Sharon Canton Bloomfield Goshen Torrington Killingly Vernon South New Windsor Chaplin Hartford Cornwall West Hampton Brooklyn Coventry Mansfield Avon Manchester Hartford Hartford Bolton HarwintonBurlington East Andover Litchfield Warren Farmington Hartford Kent Windham Sterling Wethersfield Scotland CanterburyPlainfield Columbia Glastonbury Morris Bristol Plainville Newington Thomaston Plymouth Washington New Rocky Sprague Bethlehem Marlboroug h Britain Hill Lebanon Franklin Cromwell Watertown Hebron Southington Berlin Lisbon Wolcott Portland New GriswoldVoluntown ShermanMilford Woodbury Colchester East Waterbury Roxbury Norwich Preston MiddletownHampton Cheshire Meriden Bozrah Middlebury Middlefield BridgeProspect water Salem New Naugatuck Southbury East Haddam Fairfield Brookfield North Wallingford Durham Montville Haddam Stonington Ledyard Beacon Bethany Oxford Falls Chester Waterford Hamden Lyme Danbury Newtown Seymour Stonington North Bethel Groton Woodbridge Killing- Deep Haven North Ansonia East RiverEssex New Monroe Branford Madisonworth Derby Old Lyme London Guilford Lyme Ridgefield Redding New East Clinton WestShelton Old Branford HavenHaven Orange brook Saybrook West Trumbull Easton Haven Weston Milford y Stratford Wilton Unemployment Rate Bridgeport Fairfield 2006 New Westport 3% and under Canaan Norwalk 3% to 4% Stamford 4% to 5% Darien Greenwich 5% to 6% Over 6%

Unemployment Rate 2006
3% and under 3% to 4% 4% to 5% 5% to 6%

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

40

STATEWIDE W O R KS I T E S
Size Class Number of Employees

BY

SIZE CLASS
2006 - 4th Qtr Number of Worksites* Employment* 2005 - 4th Qtr Number of Worksites* Employment* 2004 - 4th Qtr Number of Worksites* Employment*

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

0-4 5-9 10 - 19 20 - 49 50 - 99 100 - 249 250 - 499 500 - 999 1000+

64,930 18,307 11,980 8,134 2,898 1,682 357 111 73 108,472

105,250 121,176 161,224 247,646 198,776 255,520 120,404 72,618 169,721 1,452,335

63,596 18,293 11,904 7,921 2,805 1,628 363 112 71 106,693

103,974 121,110 160,006 239,654 193,941 248,904 122,312 73,089 165,849 1,428,839

62,847 18,161 11,857 7,892 2,730 1,641 352 115 75 105,670

102,396 119,963 158,780 239,490 189,123 251,329 118,341 73,619 170,450 1,423,491

* Excludes government Size Class is determined by the number of employees at a worksite. NOTE: The sum of the areas is less than the statewide total because some firms only report statewide employment and are not included in the area data. Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research Information by county and labor market area is available online at www.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

41

STATEWIDE E M P LO Y M E N T
NAICS Code Total, All Industries 11 111 112 113 114 115 21 211 212 213 22 221 23 236 237 238 31-33 311 312 313 314 315 316 321 322 323 324 325 326 327 331 332 333 334 335 336 337 339 42 423 424 425 44-45 441 442 443 444 445 446 447 Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting Crop production Animal production Forestry and logging Fishing, hunting and trapping Agriculture and forestry support activities Mining Oil and gas extraction Mining, except oil and gas Support activities for mining Utilities Utilities Construction Construction of buildings Heavy and civil engineering construction Specialty trade construction Manufacturing Food manufacturing Beverage and tobacco product manufacturing Textile mills Textile product mills Apparel manufacturing Leather and allied product manufacturing Wood product manufacturing Paper manufacturing Printing and related support activities Petroleum and coal products manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Plastics and rubber products manufacturing Nonmetallic mineral product manufacturing Primary metal manufacturing Fabricated metal product manufacturing Machinery manufacturing Computer and electronic product manufacturing Electrical equipment and appliance manufacturing Transportation equipment manufacturing Furniture and related product manufacturing Miscellaneous manufacturing Wholesale trade Merchant wholesalers, durable goods Merchant wholesalers, nondurable goods Electronic markets and agents and brokers Retail trade Motor vehicle and parts dealers Furniture and home furnishings stores Electronics and appliance stores Building material and garden supply stores Food and beverage stores Health and personal care stores Gasoline stations

AND

WAGES
Industry

B Y I N D U S T R Y -2006
Units 112,151 358 176 91 11 15 65 55 * 48 * 161 161 11,159 3,179 558 7,422 5,317 278 38 34 104 35 * 147 91 479 * 186 220 153 86 1,362 573 352 183 252 322 393 9,951 2,933 1,387 5,631 13,256 1,313 843 667 945 2,241 923 1,103

ANNUAL AVERAGE
Total Annual Wages $91,705,530,712 $137,625,502 $99,637,652 $25,271,925 $585,052 $2,390,346 $9,740,527 $45,236,825 * $42,819,988 * $647,474,397 $647,474,397 $3,553,761,976 $827,271,111 $415,079,071 $2,311,411,794 $12,774,318,633 $286,557,489 $108,679,819 $37,179,437 $45,843,936 $14,567,756 * $76,705,064 $309,542,842 $407,747,512 * $1,761,552,444 $351,117,200 $143,955,331 $249,275,058 $1,835,668,522 $1,271,669,956 $906,411,317 $762,417,373 $3,343,732,713 $151,814,936 $618,495,733 $5,230,403,057 $2,339,264,971 $1,523,605,934 $1,367,532,152 $5,641,820,002 $1,048,936,575 $257,484,510 $278,250,978 $608,932,338 $962,997,230 $424,436,014 $149,257,648 Annual Average Wages $54,843 $26,822 $26,152 $30,895 $30,792 $45,101 $22,600 $61,463 * $60,056 * $97,087 $97,087 $52,890 $57,573 $67,165 $49,556 $65,940 $38,187 $104,701 $42,883 $35,593 $42,225 * $43,957 $63,353 $51,373 * $106,477 $47,823 $50,475 $56,576 $54,186 $70,445 $62,365 $72,889 $76,649 $42,501 $50,985 $77,264 $73,255 $69,182 $99,537 $29,494 $47,048 $32,585 $42,494 $37,037 $23,066 $30,321 $23,034 Average Weekly Wages $1,055 $516 $503 $594 $592 $867 $435 $1,182 * $1,155 * $1,867 $1,867 $1,017 $1,107 $1,292 $953 $1,268 $734 $2,013 $825 $684 $812 * $845 $1,218 $988 * $2,048 $920 $971 $1,088 $1,042 $1,355 $1,199 $1,402 $1,474 $817 $980 $1,486 $1,409 $1,330 $1,914 $567 $905 $627 $817 $712 $444 $583 $443

Annual Average Employment 1,672,161 5,131 3,810 818 19 53 431 736 * 713 * 6,669 6,669 67,191 14,369 6,180 46,642 193,727 7,504 1,038 867 1,288 345 * 1,745 4,886 7,937 * 16,544 7,342 2,852 4,406 33,877 18,052 14,534 10,460 43,624 3,572 12,131 67,695 31,933 22,023 13,739 191,287 22,295 7,902 6,548 16,441 41,750 13,998 6,480

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

42

STATEWIDE E M P LO Y M E N T
NAICS Code Total, All Industries 448 451 452 453 454 48-49 481 482 483 484 485 486 487 488 491 492 493 51 511 512 515 516 517 518 519 52 521 522 523 524 525 53 531 532 533 54 541 55 551 56 561 562 61 611 62 621 622 623 624 71 Clothing and clothing accessories stores Sporting goods, hobby, book and music stores General merchandise stores Miscellaneous store retailers Nonstore retailers Transportation and warehousing Air transportation Rail transportation Water transportation Truck transportation Transit and ground passenger transportation Pipeline transportation Scenic and sightseeing transportation Support activities for transportation Postal service Couriers and messengers Warehousing and storage Information Publishing industries, except Internet Motion picture and sound recording industries Broadcasting, except Internet Internet publishing and broadcasting Telecommunications ISPs, search portals, and data processing Other information services Finance and insurance Monetary authorities - central bank Credit intermediation and related activities Securities, commodity contracts, investments Insurance carriers and related activities Funds, trusts, and other financial vehicles Real estate and rental and leasing Real estate Rental and leasing services Lessors of nonfinancial intangible assets Professional and technical services Professional and technical services Management of companies and enterprises Management of companies and enterprises Administrative and waste management Administrative and support activities Waste management and remediation services Educational services Educational services Health care and social assistance Ambulatory health care services Hospitals Nursing and residential care facilities Social assistance Arts, entertainment, and recreation

AND

WAGES
Industry

B Y I N D U S T R Y -2006
Units 112,151 1,804 909 366 1,456 686 1,829 82 * 35 731 346 5 18 329 * 152 120 1,801 483 310 110 64 488 251 95 7,181 * 2,557 2,056 2,450 * 3,722 3,040 * * 12,830 12,830 666 666 6,664 6,177 487 1,364 1,364 9,462 6,332 51 1,172 1,907 1,711

ANNUAL AVERAGE
Total Annual Wages $91,705,530,712 $445,793,118 $170,328,053 $521,277,719 $245,788,787 $528,337,032 $1,770,474,755 $104,911,137 * $73,922,453 $314,866,566 $320,175,168 $15,280,935 $2,260,404 $298,110,341 * $274,141,060 $363,127,843 $2,479,762,442 $688,864,528 $66,744,841 $409,362,180 $45,802,780 $928,818,607 $309,040,209 $31,129,297 $16,687,544,136 * $2,548,976,832 $7,075,801,447 $6,396,039,821 * $1,047,501,459 $716,744,478 * * $7,137,840,439 $7,137,840,439 $3,635,939,501 $3,635,939,501 $2,978,474,472 $2,678,642,237 $299,832,235 $2,217,446,460 $2,217,446,460 $9,677,496,317 $3,954,814,697 $2,984,708,675 $1,872,288,798 $865,684,147 $644,755,620 Annual Average Wages $54,843 $20,562 $18,711 $20,883 $23,113 $55,650 $42,441 $54,302 * $87,070 $43,823 $27,410 $92,054 $20,182 $75,490 * $38,299 $42,249 $65,719 $58,532 $30,449 $81,709 $80,781 $73,757 $70,509 $25,537 $135,366 * $79,583 $343,036 $97,635 * $49,744 $49,843 * * $78,046 $78,046 $137,835 $137,835 $33,769 $32,675 $48,181 $46,486 $46,486 $43,002 $53,960 $52,577 $32,473 $23,188 $27,033 Average Weekly Wages $1,055 $395 $360 $402 $444 $1,070 $816 $1,044 * $1,674 $843 $527 $1,770 $388 $1,452 * $737 $812 $1,264 $1,126 $586 $1,571 $1,553 $1,418 $1,356 $491 $2,603 * $1,530 $6,597 $1,878 * $957 $959 * * $1,501 $1,501 $2,651 $2,651 $649 $628 $927 $894 $894 $827 $1,038 $1,011 $624 $446 $520

Annual Average Employment 1,672,161 21,680 9,103 24,962 10,634 9,494 41,716 1,932 * 849 7,185 11,681 166 112 3,949 * 7,158 8,595 37,733 11,769 2,192 5,010 567 12,593 4,383 1,219 123,277 * 32,029 20,627 65,510 * 21,058 14,380 * * 91,457 91,457 26,379 26,379 88,202 81,979 6,223 47,701 47,701 225,049 73,292 56,768 57,656 37,333 23,851

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

43

STATEWIDE E M P LO Y M E N T
NAICS Code Total, All Industries 711 712 713 72 721 722 81 811 812 813 814

AND

WAGES
Industry

B Y I N D U S T R Y -2006
Units 112,151

ANNUAL AVERAGE
Total Annual Wages $91,705,530,712 Annual Average Wages $54,843 Average Weekly Wages $1,055

Annual Average Employment 1,672,161

Performing arts and spectator sports 533 4,295 $209,707,457 $48,826 $939 Museums, historical sites, zoos, and parks 105 2,037 $53,835,603 $26,429 $508 Amusement, gambling, and recreation 1,073 17,519 $381,212,560 $21,760 $418 Accommodation and food services 7,323 108,732 $1,875,048,442 $17,245 $332 Accommodation 462 11,980 $290,148,127 $24,219 $466 Food services and drinking places 6,861 96,752 $1,584,900,315 $16,381 $315 Other services, except public administration 13,369 57,747 $1,634,352,339 $28,302 $544 Repair and maintenance 2,732 14,432 $537,884,981 $37,270 $717 Personal and laundry services 3,205 19,554 $459,820,735 $23,515 $452 Membership associations and organizations 2,061 15,920 $469,321,565 $29,480 $567 Private households 5,371 7,841 $167,325,058 $21,340 $410 Total government 3,677 246,566 $11,871,862,373 $48,149 $926 Federal 619 19,669 $1,124,323,411 $57,162 $1,099 State 760 69,761 $3,650,038,583 $52,322 $1,006 Local** 2,298 157,136 $7,097,500,379 $45,168 $869 99 Nonclassifiable establishments 295 257 $16,391,565 $63,780 $1,227 * Disclosure provisions of Connecticut's Unemployment Insurance Law probhibit the release of figures which tend to reveal data reported by individual firms. ** Includes Indian tribal government employment Note: State Government sector data may not be fully comparable with last year's data due mainly to a new reporting system for State Government that was in use this year. Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research (2006 QCEW Program Data)

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

44

STATEWIDE E M P LO Y M E N T O U T LO O K
BY

O C C U PAT I O N : 2004-2014

Connecticut's Major Occupational Categories by 2014 Projected Employment
Occupational Category Employment 2004 2014 Change 2004-2014 Net % Total Annual Openings

TOTAL, ALL OCCUPATIONS Office & Administrative Support Sales & Related Food Preparation & Serving Related Education, Training, & Library Production Healthcare Practitioners & Technical Management Business & Financial Operations Transportation & Material Moving Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance Construction & Extraction Personal Care & Service Installation, Maintenance, & Repair Healthcare Support Computer & Mathematical Architecture & Engineering Protective Service Community & Social Services Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, & Media Life, Physical, & Social Science Legal Farming, Fishing, & Forestry

1,760,690 300,310 198,420 116,100 113,070 119,190 94,750 93,250 91,740 97,290 65,900 68,180 64,040 59,250 50,700 47,890 39,940 37,810 31,990 28,550 20,490 16,880 4,960

1,910,870 308,310 214,700 131,070 123,270 115,100 108,490 104,050 103,270 102,840 73,480 73,300 73,160 64,940 59,050 57,260 42,140 40,560 37,440 32,280 22,810 18,160 5,200

150,180 8,000 16,280 14,970 10,200 -4,090 13,740 10,800 11,530 5,550 7,580 5,120 9,120 5,690 8,350 9,370 2,200 2,750 5,450 3,730 2,320 1,280 240

8.5% 2.7% 8.2% 12.9% 9.0% -3.4% 14.5% 11.6% 12.6% 5.7% 11.5% 7.5% 14.2% 9.6% 16.5% 19.6% 5.5% 7.3% 17.0% 13.1% 11.3% 7.6% 4.9%

57,533 8,233 8,102 6,164 3,390 2,967 3,111 2,815 2,759 2,734 2,065 1,844 2,459 1,914 1,611 1,605 1,147 1,331 1,159 911 740 318 155

Source: Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

45

STATEWIDE HOME SALES
AND

MEDIAN SALES PRICES
North Canaan Canaan Winchester Barkhamsted Colebrook Norfolk Hartland Granby Suffield Enfield Somers Stafford Union Woodstock Thompson

Salisbury

Sharon

Goshen Cornwall Warren

Canton Torrington New Hartford

East Windsor Ellington Granby Locks Simsbury East Willington AshfordEastford Wind sor Windsor Tolland Bloomfield South Windsor Vernon Coventry

Putnam Pomfret Killingly

Manchester Hartford Bolton West East Hartford Andover Farmington Hartford Windham WethersfieldGlastonbury Scotland CanterburyPlainfieldSterling Columbia Morris BristolPlainville Newington Hebron Thomaston Plymo uth Washington New Rocky Sprague Beth lehem Marlborough Lebanon Britain Hill Watertown Franklin Berlin Cromwell Lisbon Wolcott Southington Portland New GriswoldVoluntown ShermanMilford Woodbury Colchester East Waterbury Roxbury Norwich MiddletownHampton Cheshire Meriden Bozrah Middlebury Middlefield BridgePreston Prospect water Salem New Naug atuck Southbury Haddam East Montville North Fairfield Brookfield Wallingford Durham Haddam Stonington Ledyard Oxford Bethany Chester Danbury Waterford Newtown Hamden Lyme Seymour Stoning ton North Bethel KillingDeep Groton East Woodbridge Haven North wo rth River Essex New Lyme Monroe Ansonia Branford Madison Derby London Guilford Old Shelton Ridgefield Redding New East Clinton West - Old Lyme Branford Orange HavenHaven brookSaybrook Easton Trumbull West Haven Weston Milford Wilton Stratford Bridgeport Fairfield Kent Litchfield HarwintonBurlington New Westport Canaan Norwalk Stamford Greenwich Darien

Avon

Chap lin Mansfield HamptonBrooklyn

Home Sales Home Sales 2000 - 2000 2006to 2006

Decrease of 500 or more Decrease between 250 and 499 Decrease between 1 and 249 No increase or decrease Increase in sales

Salisbury

North Canaan Canaan

Colebrook Norfolk Winchester

Hartland Granby

Suffield

Enfield

Somers

Stafford

Union Woodstock

Thompson

Barkhamsted

Sharon

Goshen Cornwall Warren

Canton Torrington New Hartford

East Windsor Ellington Granby Locks Simsbury East Willington AshfordEastford Wind sor Windso r Tolland Bloomfield South Windsor Vernon Coventry

Putnam Pomfret Killingly

Manchester Bolton West Hartford East Hartford Andover Farmington Hartford Windham WethersfieldGlastonbury Scotland CanterburyPlainfieldSterling Columbia Morris Newington BristolPlainville Hebron Thomaston Plymo uth Washington New Rocky Sprague Beth lehem Marlborough Lebanon Britain Hill Watertown Franklin Berlin Cromwell Lisbon Wolcott Southington Portland New GriswoldVoluntown ShermanMilford Woodbury Colchester East Waterbury Roxbury Norwich MiddletownHampton Cheshire Meriden Bozrah Middlebury Middlefield BridgePreston Prospect water Salem New Naug atuck Southbury Brookfield Haddam East Montville North Fairfield Wallingford Durham Haddam Stonington Ledyard Oxford Bethany Danbury Chester Waterford Newtown Hamden Lyme Seymour Stoning ton North Bethel KillingDeep Groton East Woodbridge Haven North worth Ansonia River Essex New Monroe Lyme Branford Madison Derby London Guilford Old Shelton Ridgefield Redding New East Clinton West - Old Lyme Branford HavenHaven Orange brookSaybrook Easton Trumbull West Haven Weston Milford Wilton Stratford Bridgeport Fairfield Kent Litchfield HarwintonBurlington

Avon

Chap lin Mansfield HamptonBrooklyn

Median HomePrices Median Home Prices 2006 2006
$250,000 and under $250,001 - $350,000 $350,001 - $500,000 $500,001 - $1,000,000 Over $1,000,000

New Westport Canaan Norwalk Stamford Darien Greenwich

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

46

STATEWIDE POVERTY INCOME GUIDELINES
FAMILY SIZE

AND

L O W E R L I V I N G S TA N D A R D I N C O M E L E V E L S

2007 POVERTY INCOME GUIDELINES*
POVERTY INCOME LEVEL

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

$ 10,210 $ 13,690 $ 17,170 $ 20,650 $ 24,130 $ 27,610 $ 31,090 $ 34,570

For the poverty income level for families of more than eight members, add $3,480 for each additional member. * For the 48 contiguous States and D.C.
Source: U. S. Department of Health and Human Services

http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/07poverty.shtml

2007 LOWER LIVING STANDARD INCOME LEVELS (LLSIL) 70% LLSIL*
U.S. Northeast Region METRO NON-METRO FAMILY SIZE 1 $ 10,210 $ 10,210 2 $ 14,900 $ 14,310 3 $ 20,460 $ 19,640 4 $ 25,250 $ 24,240 5 $ 29,800 $ 28,610 6 $ 34,850 $ 33,460

For a family with over six members, add $5,050 (Metro) or $4,850 (Non-Metro). * Where the poverty income level is higher than the 70% LLSIL, the table shows the poverty income level.

UPDATED 2007 LLSIL, Minimum Level for Establishing Self-Sufficiency 100% LLSIL*
U.S. Northeast Region METRO NON-METRO FAMILY SIZE 1 $ 12,990 $ 12,470 2 $ 21,290 $ 20,440 3 $ 29,220 $ 28,060 4 $ 36,070 $ 34,630 5 $ 42,570 $ 40,870 6 $ 49,780 $ 47,790

For a family with over six members, add $7,210 (Metro) or $6,920 (Non-Metro). * Where the poverty income level is higher than the 70% LLSIL, the table shows the poverty income level. Note: Effective June 4, 2007 SOURCE: United States Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

47

STATEWIDE P E R C A P I TA P E R S O N A L I N C O M E , M E D I A N F A M I LY I N C O M E , HOUSEHOLD INCOME
Per Capita Income Family Median Income

AND

MEDIAN

Household Median Income

U.S. Rank 2006p 2005r 2006 2005 2006 2005

U.S. Rank 2006 2005 2006 2005

U.S. Rank 2006 2005

United States
Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Rhode Island Vermont

$36,276
$49,852 $32,348 $45,877 $39,311 $46,344 $42,392 $36,680 $37,388 $34,264

$34,471
$47,388 $30,808 $43,501 $37,768 $43,831 $39,967 $34,937 $35,324 $32,717

-1

-1 37 3 6 2 5 18 17 25

$58,526
$78,154 $52,793 $74,463 $71,176 $77,875 $62,138 $58,148 $64,733 $58,163

$55,832
$75,541 $52,338 $71,655 $67,354 $75,311 $59,686 $55,904 $64,657 $57,170

-1

-1 32 4 5 2 16 21 9 19

$48,451
$63,422 $43,439 $59,963 $59,683 $64,470 $51,384 $46,259 $51,814 $47,665

$46,242
$60,941 $42,801 $57,184 $56,768 $61,672 $49,480 $44,537 $51,458 $45,686

-3

-3 33 5 6 1 15 25 12 23

34 3 7 2 5 18 15 24

37 4 5 2 16 21 10 20

35 5 6 2 18 26 17 21

p preliminary, r revised SOURCE: Per Capita Income: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis Median Family and Household Income: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 American Community Survey

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

48

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
STARTUPS AND EXPANSIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

STARTUP/ EXPANSION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

Aldi's
Statewide

2007 Spring 2007 2010 2008 Summer 2008 Summer 2008 Spring 2008 2007 2007 2007 Fall 2007 February 2007 2009 2009 2008 Fall 2008 Spring 2008 March 2008 20072008 20072008 2007 2007 2007

South Windsor, Torrington, Bristol, Wallingford, Waterbury

Grocery Store & Warehouse Restaurant Casino Wood-Burning Energy Resort & Casino Live Music Venue Retail Medical Databases Utility Services Supermarket Movie Studio Theme Park Home Improvement Financial Services Optical Fibers & Fiber Lasers Drugstore Distribution Home Improvement Steel Manufacturer Food Production Aircraft Parts Manufacturing Insurance Municipality Servicing Jets

575 200 2,000 275 2,300 80 450 70-75 25-30 200 4,700 120 300 180 550 165-180 80-100 225 48 25 600 10 60

Grocery stores and a warehouse are being built Franchise will open two new restaurants 2nd round of expansion plan Company will build a new facility Expansion Historic building will be renovated Store will be built in new plaza across from Lisbon Landing New business is opening New business is opening Store will be built on the Regal Cinemas property Movie studio/theme park to be built at Norwich Hospital site Store has opened in the new Montville Commons Plaza Company will build a new campus Company plans to expand Company building a new distribution center New Store will open on Route 372 Company will open a plant in the old GM factory Company is moving iths headquarters and expanding Company is expanding Company is expanding Increase in business City is hiring new police officers Company will build a service center at Bradley Airport

Hartford Courant 1/25/07 Stamford Advocate 12/19/06 Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 11/14/06 Stamford Advocate 3/9/06 New London Day 2/1/05 New London Day 5/4/06 New London Day 10/10/06 Norwich Bulletin 9/13/06 Norwich Bulletin 9/13/06 New London Day 4/5/06 Hartford Courant 5/24/06 New London Day 2/15/07 New London Day 12/8/06 Hartford Courant 6/6/07 Hartford Courant 1/18/06 Hartford Courant 3/24/07 Bristol Press 5/11/07 New Britain Herald 6/13/07 Manchester Journal Inquirer 8/17/07 Bristol Press 9/9/05 Hartford Courant 7/25/06 Hartford Courant 10/3/06 Hartford Courant 10/17/06

Statewide Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern Eastern North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central

Houlihan's Stamford, Danbury Mohegan Sun Uncasville NuPower Plainfield Foxwoods Ledyard Capitol Theater New London Target Lisbon Center for Excellence Plainfield Plainfield Renewable Energy Plainfield Stop & Shop Stonington Utopia Studios Preston Home Depot Montville The Hartford Windsor Nufern Inc. East Granby Walgreen Corp. Windsor Lowe's Cromwell ClarkWestern Bldg. Systems Bristol Carval Corp. New Britain Aero Gear, Inc. Windsor C&M Screw Machine Bristol St. Paul Travelers Hartford & Windsor City of East Hartford Embraer Windsor Locks

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

49

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
STARTUPS AND EXPANSIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

STARTUP/ EXPANSION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central Northwest Northwest Northwest Northwest Northwest

2007 2007 2007 2007 Winter 2007 Winter 2007 Winter 2007 December 2007 Fall 2007 Fall 2007 Fall 2007 Fall 2007 Summer 2007 August 2007 August 2007 June 2007 March 2007 December 2006 2009 2009 2008 2007 2007

Moriarty & Associates Windsor Volvo Aero Newington St. Paul Travelers Hartford & Windsor Cabela's Inc. East Hartford Comcast Enfield Stew Leonard's Newington TyMetrix Hartford Cummings & Lockwood West Hartford Oakleaf Waste Management East Hartford Emhart Glass Windsor TIGHITCO Berlin Goodwin College East Hartford Westinghouse Electric Windsor L.L. Bean South Windsor SPARTA Insurance Co. Hartford Frank Pepe's Pizzeria Manchester Bliss Market Hartford GlobeOp Financial Services Hartford MannKind Corp. Danbury F&S Oil Waterbury TnT Expense Management Newtown Chef's Warehouse Ridgefield Target Corp. Torrington

Construction Fan Cases for Jet Engines Insurance Outdoor Merchandise Cable, Phone & Internet Retail Food Store Software Developer Law Firm Waste Disposal Glass Making Aerospace Manufacturing Higher Education Power Plant Fuel Outdoor Merchandise Commercial Insurance Restaurant Grocery Store Admin. & Financial Svcs Pharmaceuticals Bio-Fuel Payroll Specialty Food Distribution Retail Store

150 40 600 450 170 400 20 10 100 10 60 300 100 125 21 30 32 150 400 24 60 50-100 200

Hartford Courant 11/7/06 Manchester Journal Inquirer 10/10/06 Hartford Courant 7/25/06 Hartford Courant 8/11/05 Hartford Courant New call center is opening 12/12/06 New store will open in former Hartford Courant Caldor building 2/4/06 Hartford Business Expansion Journal 12/12/06 Office will move to Blue Back Hartford Courant Square and expand 2/3/07 Hartford Courant Company rec'd new financing 8/3/07 Company is building a new Hartford Courant research center 4/17/07 Company is relocating from New Britain Herald Vernon and expanding 5/3/07 College is undergoing an Manchester Journal $80M expansion Inquirer 9/9/05 New nuclear power plants Hartford Courant are being built 6/20/07 Maine-based retailer opened a Manchester Journal store at Evergreen Walk Inquirer 8/1/07 New company opened Hartford Courant in City Place II 8/3/07 New restaurant will open at Manchester Journal Buckland Hills Inquirer 12/6/06 New store opened in the Hartford Courant Hartford 21 Tower 9/8/06 Company is opening Hartford Courant new office 8/26/06 Danbury News-Times Expansion 9/27/06 Company is building Waterbury Republicana new factory American 4/4/07 Company is building a new office Danbury News-Times and will expand 6/20/07 Company's moving its distrib. Danbury News-Times center from NY to CT 6/20/07 New store will be built off East Waterbury RepublicanMain Street American 4/12/06

New ING headquarters building project Company is a subcontractor for Pratt & Whitney Increase in business and profits Superstore is being planned for the Rentschler Field site

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

50

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
STARTUPS AND EXPANSIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

STARTUP/ EXPANSION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

Northwest Northwest Northwest Northwest Northwest Northwest Northwest South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central South Central

September 2007 Summer 2007 July 2007 July 2007 Spring 2007 January 2007 December 2006 2008 2008 October 2008 Summer 2008 20072008 20072008 2007 2007 November 2007 September 2007 September 2007 Summer 2007 August 2007 Spring 2007 April 2007 April 2007

Volubilis Food Inc. Waterbury Music Theatre International New Hartford Goodwill Industries Brookfield First Nat'l Bank of Litchfield New Milford Big Y Bethel Thomaston Savings Bank Middlebury Oil Purification Systems Waterbury Yale-New Haven Hospital New Haven Pilgrim Furniture Milford Griffin Hospital Wallingford Capitol Theater New London City of New Haven Premier eSecurity Milford Lowe's Milford Mortgage Lenders Network Wallingford Humphrey's Wallingford Health Haven Middletown L.L. Bean Orange The Shack New London Wal-Mart Milford Polylok, Inc. Wallingford Saybrook Country Barn Old Saybrook Golf Galaxy Milford

Olive Oil Processing Scripts & Sheet Music Used Clothing Retailer Bank Supermarket Banking Services Oil Filters Hospital Furniture Retailer Healthcare Live Music Venue Municipality Spam Filters Home Improvement Financial Services Restaurant Nursing Home Outdoor Merchandise Restaurant Retail Store Molded Plastics Home Furnishings Golf Equipment Retailer

12 12 25 10 225 10 45 400 75-100 60 80 85 20 500 1,000 40 100 25 15 286 20 10 21

Company is establishing operations on Brookside Road Company is relocating its warehouse from NY to CT New 'Super Store' will open New branch will open New supermarket is being built on Route 6 Bank is opening a new branch on Straits Turnpike Company has moved to CT from Florida A new cancer center will be built New store will open on Boston Post Road Hospital is expanding Historic building will be renovated City will hire new police officers Growing market for computer security New store will be built at the former jai-alai site Company has expanded New restaurant will open in the Wallingford Plaza Need more staff Maine-based retailer will open an outlet store on Post Road Restaurant is moving from East Lyme and will expand New store opened in the Milford Crossing Center New headquarters will be built Store is expanding at its current location New store has opened on Boston Post Road

Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 7/22/07 Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 3/6/07 Danbury News-Times 4/13/07 Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 5/10/06 New Haven Register 1/29/07 Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 7/12/06 Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 12/14/06 Hartford Courant 12/1/04 Connecticut Post 8/10/07 Meriden RecordJournal 6/20/07 New Londay Day 5/4/06 WTNH-Channel 8 11/16/06 Hartford Courant 8/23/07 Connecticut Post 5/4/06 New Haven Register 12/2/05 New Haven Register 8/15/07 Havenhealthcare.com New Haven Register 8/8/07 New Londay Day 7/19/07 New Haven Register 8/2/07 New Haven Register 1/20/06 New Londay Day 1/23/07 New Haven Register 4/10/07

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

51

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
STARTUPS AND EXPANSIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

STARTUP/ EXPANSION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

South Central South Central South Central Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest

March 2007 March 2007 December 2006 2010 2009 2008 2008 2008 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 2007 September 2007 August 2007 Summer 2007 July 2007 July 2007 April 2007 February 2007 January 2007

Starbucks New Haven Wal-Mart West Haven Moe's Southwest Grill Milford Gilbert & Bennett Mill Georgetown Swiss Army Brands Monroe Walgreens Stamford Hawley Lane Shoes Shelton Royal Bank of Scotland Stamford Webloyalty Norwalk Bank of New Canaan Fairfield BJ's Wholesale Club Stratford Wendy's Bridgeport Cervalis Stamford Eurospeed USA Ansonia BML Tool & Mfg. Monroe Zara Greenwich City of Bridgeport Health Net Shelton Credit Suisse Securities Greenwich B.J. Ryan's Norwalk Saltwater Grille Stamford Moore Physical Therapy Stamford Ferrante's Stamford

Coffee Shop Retail Store Fast Food Restaurant Housing & Retail Knives Drugstore Shoe Store Global Finance Online Services Marketing Banking Services Wholesale Club Fast Food Restaurant Data Storage Motorcycle Components Metal Stamping Clothing & Accessories Municipality Health Insurance Investment Products Restaurant Restaurant Physical Therapy Restaurant

20-25 300 25 1,500 20-25 35 40 800 40-90 12-15 140 30 15 1,000 18 40-50 18 110 25 20 50 10 22

Franchise will open shop on Chapel Street New store has opened on Sawmill Road Franchise has opened a restaurant on Boston Post Road Housing and retail complex will be built at Mill site New company headquarters will lead to increase in employment New store will be built at site of Suburban Cadillac-Pontiac Company is moving from Trumbull and plans to expand New jobs when new building is completed Growing customer base Expansion Store will open in the old Bradlees building Franchise will be built on Fairfield Avenue New facility is being built Work previously done in China will be done in CT Firm is moving from Fairfield and will expand National chain is opening a new store on Greenwich Avenue City hired new firefighters Jobs resulting from ending venture with Guardian Life Ins. Company to open a new office in Pickwick Plaza Restaurant opening on corner of Main and Hoyt Streets New restaurant will open at the site of Rusty Scupper New business will open on Danbury Road New restaurant is opening on Summer Street

New Haven Register 1/24/07 New Haven Register 3/14/07 New Haven Register 12/7/06 Hartford Courant 1/23/07 Connecticut Post 6/9/06 Stamford Advocate 3/16/06 New Haven Register 1/4/06 Connecticut Post 9/15/05 Stamford Advocate 9/5/06 Stamford Advocate 9/8/06 Connecticut Post 9/7/06 Connecticut Post 9/19/06 Stamford Advocate 10/13/06 New Haven Register 1/29/07 Connecticut Post 3/2/07 Stamford Advocate 7/19/07 Connecticut Post 8/23/07 Hartford Courant 2/28/07 Stamford Advocate 5/8/07 Stamford Advocate 7/11/07 Stamford Advocate 1/19/07 Stamford Advocate 12/5/06 Stamford Advocate 12/19/06

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

52

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
STARTUPS AND EXPANSIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

STARTUP/ EXPANSION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest

20062007 December 2006 December 2006 November 2006 November 2006

City of Norwalk HSBC USA, Inc. Greenwich Creative Metal Fab Stamford Tuesday Morning Corp. Wallingford HSBC USA, Inc. Shelton & Stamford

Municipality Tax Advisory Services Metal Work Fabrication Retail Home Goods International Bank

20 40 14 20-30 20-24

City is recruiting new police officers New office opening Company is moving to a larger building New store has opened in Staples Plaza New branches have opened

Stamford Advocate 8/14/06 Stamford Advocate 9/19/06 Stamford Advocate 12/12/06 New Haven Register 11/3/06 New Haven Register 11/21/06

LAYOFFS AND STAFF REDUCTIONS
WIA LAYOFF/ REDUCTION DATE COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED REASON/ COMMENTS SOURCE

Statewide Statewide Eastern Eastern Eastern North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central North Central

Summer 2007 February 2007 2007

May No. Haven, Milford, Waterford 2007 April Helikon Furniture Co. 2007 Taftville March Federal Reserve Bank 2009 Windsor Locks September General Electric 2008 Plainville Fall Pratt & Whitney 2007 East Hartford October The Hartford 2007 Hartford & Windsor September Qualex, Inc. 2007 East Hartford April The Hartford 2007 Hartford March Hoke, Inc. 2007 Berlin March Lego Group 2007 Enfield February Woodworking Loft 2007 Winsted January Westinghouse Electric 2007 New Britain

TD Banknorth, Inc. New Britain & Waterbury Tribune Company Hartford & New Haven Pfizer Corp. Groton Tweeter

Bank Television Stations Pharmaceuticals Electronics Retailer Office Furniture Bank Payment Clearinghouse Circuit Breakers Jet Engines Insurance Photofinishing Insurance Valves Toy Manufacturer Woodworking Control Systems

15 11 300 26 25 146 57 300 48 81 110 50 300 30 58

Branches are closing Workers are being replaced by technology Company will phase out manufacturing operations Stores are closing Company is closing due to decline in earnings Check cashing operations are moving to Philadelphia Industrial production plant will be closing Company is trying to cut costs Information technology jobs are being outsourced Company closing due to digital photography Data center jobs are being outsourced to IBM Plant has closed Production is being shifted to Mexico Company closed due to credit problems Operations will be phased out due to declining workload

Hartford Courant 3/24/07 Hartford Courant 2/3/07 Norwich Bulletin 6/20/06 New Haven Register 4/6/07 New London Day 3/23/07 Manchester JournalInquirer 6/28/07 Bristol Press 8/10/07 Hartford Courant 8/14/07 Hartford Courant 3/8/07 Hartford Courant 8/8/07 Hartford Courant 1/24/07 New Britain Herald 3/7/07 WTNH-Channel 8 6/20/06 Waterbury RepublicanAmerican 2/13/07 New Britain Herald 9/4/06

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

53

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
LAYOFFS AND STAFF REDUCTIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

LAYOFF/ REDUCTION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

A.J. Wright Manchester Guardsmark, LLC North Central Bristol Aetna, Inc. North Central Hartford The Timken Co. Northwest 2007 Torrington Fall Hershey Co. Northwest 2007 Naugatuck Summer Voltarc Technologies Northwest 2007 Waterbury September Pitney Bowes Northwest 2007 Danbury August Mark Ford-Mercury Northwest 2007 New Milford June IBM Northwest 2007 Southbury December EbLens Northwest 2006 Torrington October New Milford Hospital Northwest 2006 New Milford Winter Clairol South Central 2010 Stamford March Bayer South Central 2008 West Haven New Haven Copper Co. South 2007 Central Seymour Fall General Electric South Central 2007 Bridgeport July CuraGen Corp. South Central 2007 New Haven Spring Citigroup, Inc. South Central 2007 New Haven May Anthem Blue Cross South Central 2007 North Haven April American Medical Response South Central 2007 New Haven April Webster Financial Corp. South Central 2007 Hamden February Town & Country Corp. South Central 2007 Middletown February Bennigan's South Central 2007 Milford & Hamden January Mortgage Lenders Network South Central 2007 Middletown
North Central

January 2007 December 2006 Fall 2006

Retail Store Security Healthcare Precision Bearings Candy Factory Electric Lamps Mail Equipment Car Dealership Information Technology Casual Clothing Hospital Hair Color Pharmaceuticals Copper Mill Appliance Switches Proteins & Antibodies Financial Institution Insurance Medical Billing Mortgages & Insurance Auto Dealership Restaurant Subprime Mortgages

45 40 280 88 200 26 48 15 45 10-12 20 235 1,000 50 32 40 75 67 51 20 85 77 800

Manchester JournalInquirer 12/6/06 Hartford Courant Lost contract with ESPN 12/4/06 Layoffs to reduce the Bristol Press cost structure 10/13/06 Operations are moving to Hartford Courant Ohio & New Hampshire 11/28/06 Company is closing its Waterbury RepublicanPeter Paul facility American 4/25/07 Waterbury RepublicanLayoffs due to foreign competition American 8/16/07 Information technology jobs Connecticut Post are being outsourced 7/20/07 Construction on Rte 7 Danbury News-Times has impacted business 8/24/07 Cut in workforce due to Hartford Courant decline in earnings 5/3/07 Waterbury RepublicanStore is closing American 12/15/06 Danbury News-Times Layoffs to reduce expenses 10/3/06 Plant is closing and operations Stamford Advocate are moving to Mexico 6/8/07 WTNH-Channel 8 Research operation is closing 11/9/06 Plant closing due to reduced Hartford Courant demand for copper 11/30/06 Connecticut Post Plant is closing 11/13/06 Hartford Courant Plant is closing 6/20/07 New Haven Register Restructuring to reduce costs 4/12/07 Work is being outsourced to New Haven Register a Dallas-based company 5/2/07 Operations are being New Haven Register consolidated in Ohio 2/14/07 Mortgage operations have shut Hartford Courant down and jobs outsourced 4/6/07 Hartford Courant Business is reorganizing 2/21/07 Restaurants closed due to New Haven Register decline in business 3/1/07 Slowing housing market and Hartford Courant rising defaults by borrowers 1/3/07 Store is closing

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

54

STATEWIDE BUSINESS
WIA

AND

E M P LO Y M E N T C H A N G E S A N N O U N C E D
LAYOFFS AND STAFF REDUCTIONS
COMPANY AND LOCATION PRINCIPAL PRODUCT # OF WORKERS INVOLVED

IN THE

MEDIA
SOURCE

LAYOFF/ REDUCTION DATE

REASON/ COMMENTS

Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest Southwest

2007 June 2007 April 2007 April 2007 March 2007 February 2007 October 2006

Unilever Greenwich PanAmSat Holding Wilton Ansonia Copper & Brass Ansonia Ameriquest Shelton Atrium Companies, Inc. Shelton Madison's Shelton Amaranth Advisors Greenwich

Soap & Detergents Data & Voice Communications Copper & Brass Milling Subprime Mortgages Windows & Doors Restaurant & Banquet Hall Hedge Funds

100 129 84 28 60 30 250

Office closing will offset expansion at Trumbull location Office is closing as a result of merger with Intelsat Ltd. Cutbacks due to high prices for energy and raw materials Office has closed Facility is closing due to unfavorable market conditions Closing due to lack of funding Funds are being liquidated

Hartford Courant 10/26/06 Stamford Advocate 6/2/06 Connecticut Post 2/2/07 New Haven Register 4/11/07 New Haven Register 1/10/07 Connecticut Post 2/13/07 Stamford Advocate 10/7/06

SOURCE: ‘Business and Employment Changes Announced in the News Media’ (Aug. 2007) This report is also available on the Connecticut Department of Labor, Office of Research website at: www.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

55

STATEWIDE CHARACTERISTICS
OF

CT W O R KS A P P L I C A N T S

Wagner-Peyser Program

By Gender, Ethnic Group, etc July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Active Clients EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS 20,696 39,785 21,993 29,957 21,221 133,652 Male 11,822 22,636 12,776 16,870 11,545 75,649 Female 8,874 17,148 9,217 13,086 9,676 58,001 White 2,100 8,637 3,502 4,286 4,775 23,300 Black 15,693 19,877 14,617 17,626 9,188 77,001 Hispanic 1,613 8,542 2,655 5,988 5,703 24,501 Asian 284 609 338 391 364 1,986 Native American 260 235 135 151 102 883 Pacific Islander 32 49 21 22 34 158 Veteran 1,334 1,492 1,192 1,295 790 6,103 Disabled 345 438 298 268 127 1,476

By Age and Education Level July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Age at exit from program or June 30, 2007 None/ Unknown 1,849 3,450 1,790 2,183 1,914 11,186 Education Level No Diploma/ GED 10,514 20,591 11,176 16,441 10,802 69,524 H.S. Diploma/ GED 3,754 6,323 3,629 3,457 2,500 19,663 Some Post H.S. 2,449 4,880 2,559 3,957 2,602 16,447 College Degree 2,130 4,541 2,839 3,919 3,403 16,832

14-18

19-21

22-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS

335 568 289 334 264 1,790

1,564 2,740 1,330 1,702 1,227 8,563

4,579 8,913 4,499 6,448 4,491 28,930

4,512 9,205 5,017 6,821 4,846 30,401

5,123 9,716 5,404 4,779 5,331 30,353

3,328 6,153 3,742 4,974 3,420 21,617

1,255 2,490 1,712 2,199 1,642 9,298

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

56

STATEWIDE CHARACTERISTICS
OF

CT W O R KS A P P L I C A N T S

Jobs First Employment Services (JFES) Program

By Gender, Ethnic Group, etc July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Active Clients EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS 1,950 5,895 2,524 3,320 2,569 16,258 Male 355 861 417 426 338 2,397 Female 1,595 5,034 2,107 2,894 2,231 13,861 White 584 2,866 1,034 1,061 1,005 6,550 Black 1,392 2,980 1,537 1,438 1,010 8,357 Hispanic 267 1,497 474 1,294 1,042 4,574 Asian 16 56 16 36 28 152 Native American 9 9 0 0 2 20 Pacific Islander 4 6 1 1 6 18 Veteran 24 29 22 21 23 119 Disabled 19 60 19 83 11 192

By Age and Education Level July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Age at exit from program or June 30, 2007 None/ Unknown 711 2,587 1,090 1,162 1,025 6,575 Education Level No Diploma/ GED 281 366 183 374 272 1,476 H.S. Diploma/ GED 704 2,111 924 1,316 858 5,913 Some Post H.S. 232 746 285 418 368 2,049 College Degree 22 85 42 50 46 245

14-18

19-21

22-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS

5 26 8 7 7 53

224 1,023 427 454 405 2,533

894 2,672 1,110 1,550 1,173 7,399

541 1,429 668 837 628 4,103

242 602 260 401 308 1,813

40 140 50 68 48 346

4 3 1 0 3 11

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

57

STATEWIDE CHARACTERISTICS
OF

CT W O R KS A P P L I C A N T S

WIA Programs (Adults, Dislocated Workers, National Emergency Grant, Youth)

By Gender, Ethnic Group, etc July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Active Clients EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS 1,028 1,263 882 918 1,644 5,735 Male 607 431 425 555 626 2,644 Female 421 832 457 363 1,018 3,091 White 148 252 194 175 414 1,183 Black 749 541 491 377 402 2,560 Hispanic 117 473 190 349 865 1,994 Asian 12 17 15 5 9 58 Native American 17 9 8 10 20 64 Pacific Islander 1 1 0 3 3 8 Veteran 114 50 53 48 66 331 Disabled 50 48 24 89 99 310

By Age and Education Level July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Age at exit from program or June 30, 2007 None/ Unknown 56 108 33 29 103 329 Education Level No Diploma/ GED 380 240 264 402 530 1,816 H.S. Diploma/ GED 335 532 406 278 671 2,222 Some Post H.S. 209 292 101 155 263 1,020 College Degree 48 91 78 54 77 348

14-18

19-21

22-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS

100 31 85 108 58 382

119 194 75 118 200 706

261 246 118 131 413 1,169

161 205 180 178 400 1,124

200 357 244 216 343 1,360

157 196 150 137 173 813

30 34 30 30 57 181

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

58

STATEWIDE CHARACTERISTICS
OF

CT W O R KS A P P L I C A N T S

All Programs—Totals

By Gender, Ethnic Group, etc July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Active Clients EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS 22,057 44,143 23,894 32,697 23,886 146,677 Male 12,189 23,375 13,205 17,438 12,123 78,330 Female 9,868 20,767 10,689 15,258 11,763 68,345 White 2,462 10,608 4,275 5,176 5,662 28,183 Black 16,641 22,028 15,738 18,780 10,106 83,293 Hispanic 1,790 9,597 2,960 7,011 6,860 28,218 Asian 291 664 355 419 397 2,126 Native American 271 240 138 157 116 922 Pacific Islander 33 53 21 24 37 168 Veteran 1,374 1,514 1,212 1,308 819 6,227 Disabled 381 499 323 401 201 1,805

By Age and Education Level July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Age at exit from program or June 30, 2007 None/ Unknown 1,948 3,627 1,876 2,395 2,071 11,917 Education Level No Diploma/ GED 10,978 22,206 11,896 17,371 11,681 74,132 H.S. Diploma/ GED 4,358 8,307 4,497 4,732 3,730 25,624 Some Post H.S. 2,596 5,357 2,722 4,225 2,916 17,816 College Degree 2,177 4,646 2,903 3,974 3,488 17,188

14-18

19-21

22-29

30-39

40-49

50-59

60+

EA WIA NC WIA NW WIA SC WIA SW WIA TOTALS

424 613 377 442 321 2,177

1,732 3,596 1,631 2,143 1,670 10,772

5,118 10,715 5,203 7,570 5,473 34,079

4,818 10,162 5,481 7,477 5,467 33,405

5,300 10,208 5,640 7,798 5,714 34,660

3,393 6,336 3,833 5,058 3,557 22,177

1,272 2,513 1,729 2,209 1,684 9,407

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

59

Glossary of Terms

Base Period: A selected period of time, frequently one year, against which changes to other points in time are calculated (also see Index Number). Benchmarking: The process of re-estimating statistics as more complete data become available. Estimates are usually calculated using only a sample of the universe (total count). Therefore, benchmarking allows for correction of estimating errors. New benchmarking levels are introduced on an annual basis. Covered Employment: Employment in any industry insured under the provisions of the Connecticut Unemployment Compensation Law. Current Population Survey: A national household survey conducted each month by the Census Bureau for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Information is gathered from a sample of about 60,000 households (1,200 in Connecticut) designed to represent the civilian non-institutional population of persons 16 years of age and over. Discouraged Workers: Persons not included in the unemployment count who say they did not look for work because they think none is available, or they believe they lack the skills necessary to compete in the labor market. Dislocated Worker: As defined under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, an individual who: 1. (a) has been terminated or laid off, or received notice of same; (b) is eligible for or has exhausted entitlement to unemployment compensation, or has demonstrated attachment to the workforce but is not eligible for unemployment compensation; and (c) is unlikely to return to a previous industry or occupation. 2. (a) has been terminated or laid off, or has received notice of same, as a result of permanent closure or substantial layoff at a plant, facility or enterprise; or (b) is employed at a facility at which employer has made a general announcement that such facility will close within 180 days; (c) for purposes of receiving certain services, is employed at a facility at which the employer has made a general announcement that such facility will close; (d) was selfemployed but is unemployed as a result of general economic conditions in the community in which the individual resides or because of natural disasters; (e) is a displaced homemaker. Displaced Homemaker: An individual who has been providing unpaid services to family members in the home and who: (a) has been dependent on the income of another family member but is no longer supported by that income; and (b) is unemployed or underemployed and is experiencing difficulty in obtaining or upgrading employment. Durable Goods: Items with a normal life expectancy of three years or more. Automobiles, furniture, household appliances, and mobile homes are examples. Because of their nature, expenditures for durable goods are generally

postponable. Consequently, durable goods sales are the most volatile component of consumer expenditures. Employed Persons: Those individuals who are 16 years of age and over who worked for pay any time during the week which includes the 12th day of the month, or who worked unpaid for 15 hours or more in a family-owned business, and individuals who were temporarily absent from their jobs due to illness, bad weather, vacation, labor dispute, or personal reasons. Excluded are persons whose only activity consists of work around the house and volunteer work for religious, charitable, and similar organizations. Employment Concentration: Industry Employment Concentration, or Location Quotient reflects the importance of an industry to the economy of a geographical area, in terms of the number of jobs it provides. It is a calculated ratio that determines whether or not the local economy has a greater share of that industry than expected. This publication uses Location Quotients to compare workforce investment area employment by industry relative to Connecticut. A Location Quotient of greater than 1.0 indicates a higher level of employment concentration in an area, while a Location Quotient of 2.0 shows that an industry has twice the employment concentration in that area relative to Connecticut as a whole. Establishment: An economic unit such as a farm, mine, factory, or store, which produces goods or provides services. It is usually at a single physical location and engaged in one predominant type of economic activity. Family: A group of two or more people who reside together and who are related by birth, marriage, or adoption. Farm Employment: Persons who work as owners and operators of farms, as unpaid family workers on farms, or as hired workers who are engaged in farm activities. Full-Time Employment: Employment of 35 or more hours per week. Household: A household includes all the people who occupy a housing unit as their usual place of residence. Housing Permits: Counted by the Bureau of the Census, new housing permits include permits issued for all new privately owned, attached and detached single-family houses. Index Number: A measure of the relative changes occurring in a series of values compared with a base period. The base period usually equals 100, and any changes from it represent percentages. By use of an index number, large or unwieldy data, such as sales in thousands of dollars or costs in dollars and cents, are reduced to a form in which they can be readily understood.

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

60

Industry: A generic term for a distinct group of economic activities. Industries are described and classified by their primary activity or product. Initial Claim: A notice filed by a worker, at the beginning of a period of unemployment, requesting a determination of insured status for jobless benefits. Labor Force: All persons 16 years of age and over who are classified as employed, unemployed and seeking employment, or involved in a labor-management dispute. The labor force does not include persons who never worked a full-time job lasting two weeks or longer and “discouraged workers” who have been unemployed for a substantial length of time and are no longer actively seeking employment. Members of the armed forces stationed either in the United States or abroad are counted by their place of residence. The civilian labor force excludes members of the armed forces and the institutionalized population. Labor Force Participation Rate: The proportion of the total civilian non-institutional population or of a demographic subgroup of that population classified as “in the labor force.” Labor Market Area (LMA): As defined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an economically integrated geographic area within which individuals can reside and find employment within a reasonable distance or can readily change employment without changing their place of residence. Labor Market Information (LMI): The body of information that deals with the functioning of labor markets and the determination of the demand for and supply of labor. It includes, but is not limited to, such key factors as changes in the level and/or composition of economic activity, the population, employment and unemployment, income and earnings, wage rates, and fringe benefits. Labor Surplus Area: A civil jurisdiction where the average unemployment rate is at least 20 percent above the average unemployment for all states, or its unemployment during the previous two calendar years was ten percent or more. The designation allows establishments in the area preference in bidding for certain federal contracts. Location Quotients: Measures an industry’s concentration or specialization in one geographical area relative to a larger area (also see Employment Concentration). Manufacturing: Includes establishments engaged in the mechanical or chemical transformation of materials or substances into new products. These establishments are usually described as plants, factories, or mills and characteristically use power-driven machines and materials handling equipment. The new product of a

manufacturing establishment may be “finished” in the sense that it is ready for utilization and consumption, or it may be “semi-finished” to become a raw material for an establishment engaged in further manufacturing. Median: The middle value or midpoint between two middle values in a set of data arranged in order of increasing or decreasing magnitude. As such, one-half of the items in the set are less than the median and one-half are greater. Median Income: The median divides the income distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median income and one-half above the median. For households and families, the median income is based on the distribution of the total number of households and families, including those with no income. Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA): The general concept of a Metropolitan Statistical Area is one of a large population nucleus, together with adjacent communities which have a high degree of economic and social integration with that nucleus. Connecticut currently has seven Metropolitan Statistical Areas, as defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget. Money Income: Census-based money income is derived from a sample of individuals 15 years of age and older, and consists only of income that is received by individuals in cash and its equivalents. Nondurable Goods: Items that generally last for only a short period of time (three years or less). Food, beverages, apparel, and gasoline are common examples. Because of their nature, nondurable goods are generally purchased when needed. Nonfarm Employment: The total number of persons on establishment payroll employed full- or part-time who received pay for any part of the pay-period which includes the 12th day of the month. Temporary and intermittent employees are included, as are any workers who are on paid sick leave, on paid holiday, or who work during only part of the specified pay period. A striking worker who only works a small portion of the survey period, and is paid, is included. Persons on the payroll of more than one establishment are counted in each establishment. Data exclude proprietors, self-employed, unpaid family or volunteer workers, farm workers, and domestic workers. Persons on layoff the entire pay-period, on leave without pay, on strike for the entire period or who have not yet reported for work are not counted as employed. Occupation: A name or title of a job that identifies a set of activities or tasks that employees are paid to perform. Employees that perform essentially the same tasks are in the same occupation, whether or not they are in the same industry. Some occupations are concentrated in a few particular industries, other occupations are found in the majority of industries.

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

61

Part-Time Employment: As defined by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in which a worker is regularly scheduled to work fewer than 35 hours a week. Per Capita Personal Income: The annual total personal income of residents divided by resident population as of July 1st of current year. Personal Income: Measures the net earnings, rental income, personal dividend income, personal interest income, and transfer payments by place of residence before the deduction of personal income taxes and other personal taxes. Reported in current dollars. Private Household Workers: Persons who work for profit or fees in private households such as child care workers, cooks, housekeepers or other household staff. Production Worker: Employees, up through the level of working supervisor, who are directly engaged in the manufacture of the product of an establishment. Among those excluded from this category are persons in executive and managerial positions and persons engaged in activities such as accounting, sales, advertising, routine clerical work, and professional and technical functions. SAGA (State-Administered General Assistance): Provides cash, medical, and emergency assistance to persons who do not qualify for federal and state assistance programs, such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Temporary Family Assistance (TFA), and Medicaid. Seasonal Adjustments: The adjustment of time-series data to eliminate the effect of intra-year variations that tend to occur each year in approximately the same manner. Examples of such variations include school terms, holidays, and yearly weather patterns. Seasonal Industry: An industry in which activity is affected by regularly recurring weather changes, holidays, vacations, etc. The construction and recreational industries are typically characterized as “seasonal.” Self-Employed Workers: Persons who work for profit or fees in their own business, profession, trade, or farm. Self-employed persons whose businesses are incorporated are included among wage and salary workers, because technically, they are paid employees of a corporation. Underemployed: Persons working full- or part-time in jobs that are below their earning capacity or level of competence. The terms “underemployed” and “underutilized” are used interchangeably. Underemployment has also been defined as “involuntary part-time” employment or employment of a person on a part-time basis when full-time work is desired. Unemployed: Persons who, during the survey week, had no employment but were available for work and: (a) had

engaged in any specific job-seeking activity within the past four weeks, such as registering at a public or private employment office, meeting with prospective employers, checking with friends or relatives, placing or answering advertisements, writing letters of application, or being on a union or professional register; (b) were waiting to be called back from a job from which they had been laid off; or (c) were waiting to report to a new wage or salary job within 30 days. Unemployment Rate: Represents the number unemployed as a percent of the labor force. The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate eliminates the influence of regularly recurring seasonal fluctuations which can be ascribed to weather, crop-growing cycles, holidays, vacations, etc., and therefore, more clearly shows the underlying basic trend of unemployment. Units: (see Establishment) Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998: Represents significant changes to federal statutes governing programs of job training, adult education and literacy, and vocational rehabilitation in order to establish a coordinated, streamlined and more flexible workforce development system. It is a revitalized system that focuses on providing employers with skilled workers, and the economic and workforce information they need to conduct business effectively - and on providing workers with the information, advice, job search assistance, and training they need to get and keep good jobs. Worksite: A worksite is an economic unit, generally at a single physical location, where business is conducted or where services or industrial operations are performed (e.g. factory, mill, store, hotel, restaurant).

Information for Workforce Investment Planning — 2007 Connecticut Department of Labor — Office of Research — Labor Market Information

62

Connecticut Department of Labor’s Office of Research Publications: BUSINESS AND EMPLOYMENT CHANGES ANNOUNCED IN THE NEWS MEDIA CONNECTICUT CAREER PATHS CONNECTICUT DATA FOR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLANS CONNECTICUT ECONOMIC DIGEST, THE CONNECTICUT LABOR MARKET INFORMATION AT-A-GLANCE CONNECTICUT’S EVOLVING ECONOMY CONNECTICUT LABOR SITUATION CONNECTICUT OCCUPATIONAL EMPLOYMENT & WAGES CONNECTICUT WORKFORCE DEMANDS EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY SPECIAL CENSUS FILE INFORMATION FOR WORKFORCE INVESTMENT PLANNING CONNECTICUT FORECAST ONNECTICUT LABOR FORCE DATA FOR LABOR MARKET AREAS & TOWNS SOARING TO NEW HEIGHTS...CONNECTICUT JOB OUTLOOK WRITING YOUR RÉSUMÉ FOR SUCCESS YOUR JOB SEARCH GUIDE Many of these publications are available online at: www.ctdol.state.ct.us/lmi

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