Did God Really Say That?

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Did God Really Say That?
This article refutes the idea of the "Catholic Religion Proved by the Protestant Bible."
Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the LORD God had made. And he said unto the woman, Yea,hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the arden! And the woman said unto the serpent, "e may eat of the fruit of the trees of the arden# $ut of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the arden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die...% &Genesis '#(&)

*ver since the serpent in the arden the enemies of God+s truth have sou ht, throu h subtility and deception, to cause God+s people to disobey Gods word. Li,e common con&artists, these impostors in pretense claim to have deeper understandin into God+s word, in order to ain our trust. %... Yea,hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the arden!...% &Genesis '#( $ut the true intentions of these impostors is in their desire to ma,e the word of God of no effect. %...And the serpent said unto the woman, Ye shall not surely die# ...% &Genesis '#) -n addition to layin aside the commandments of God to hold the traditions of men, there is another note worthy characteristic of these impostors. .hey ma,e promises that are not theirs to ive. % /or God doth ,now that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be opened, and ye shall be as ods, ,nowin ood and evil.% & Genesis '#0 %"hile they promise them liberty, they themselves are the servants of corruption# ...% & 12eter 1#(3 %...And if the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch.% & 4att. (0#() .he followin was written in response to a tape called %5atholic Reli ion 2roved by 2rotestant $ible% by 6eep the /aith, -nc. the tape is narrated by 7oel $la,e, all 8uotes, unless otherwise noted, are his. - received this tape by a friend of mine who wanted to prove the validity of 5atholicism to me.

Section A !ntroduction to the Ro"an Catholic Doctrine
.he tape is introduced with the claims that Roman 5atholic doctrine is purportedly derived from# (. .he $ible & what is e9plicitly or implicitly stated. 1. Available $ible material & derived from history, tradition, catacombs. '. .he :oly ;pirit <7n. ()#(=, 1=>. ). .he Lord?s presence <4att. 1@#1A>. .his writin will be e9aminin these claims. .he first two items will be directly responded to. "hether or not the 'rd and )th items are accurate statements should become discernible by the time the followin material has been covered.

Section A.#. Scri$ture
%o& did 'esus re$ly to those &ho taught &hat scri$ture only i"$lied( and did not e)$licitly state? %.hen was 7esus led up of the spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the devil. And when he had fasted forty days and forty ni hts, he was afterward an hun red. And when the tempter came to him, he said, -f thou be the ;on of God, command that these stones be made bread. $ut he ans&ered and said( *!t is &ritten, 4an shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.? .hen the devil ta,eth him up into the holy city, and setteth him on a pinnacle of the temple, And saith unto him, -f thou be the ;on of God, cast thyself down# for it is written, :e shall ive his an els char e concernin thee# and in their hands they shall bear thee up, lest at any time thou dash thy foot a ainst a stone. 7esus said unto him, *!t is &ritten again, .hou shalt not tempt the Lord thy God.? A ain, the devil ta,eth him up into an e9ceedin hi h mountain, and sheweth him all the ,in doms of the world, and the lory of themB And saith unto him, All these thin s will - ive thee, if thou wilt fall down and worship me. .hen saith 7esus unto him, ?Get thee hence, ;atan# for it is &ritten, .hou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.% &4atthew )#(&(A.

Section A.+. Tradition
,hat &as 'esus* re$ly to those &ho &ould teach "traditions" rather than the e)$ressly stated scri$ture? %.hen came to 7esus scribes and 2harisees, which were of 7erusalem, sayin ( ,hy do thy disci$les transgress the tradition of the elders! for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. $ut he answered and said unto them, *,hy do ye also transgress the co""and"ent of God by your tradition! /or God commanded, sayin , :onour thy father and mother# and, :e that curseth father or mother, let him die the death. $ut ye say, "hosoever shall say to his father or his mother, -t is a ift, by whatsoever thou mi htest be profited by meB And honour not his father or his mother, he shall be free. .hus have ye made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition. Ye hypocrites, well did *saias prophesy of you, sayin , .his people draweth ni h unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lipsB but their heart is far from me. $ut in vain they do &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en.% &4atthew (0#'&3. .hen the 2harisees and scribes as,ed him, ,hy &al- not thy disci$les according to the tradition of the elders... :e answered and said unto them, ?"ell hath *saias prophesied of you hypocrites, as it is written, .his people honoureth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me. :owbeit in vain do they &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en. .or laying aside the co""and"ent of God( ye hold the tradition of "en, as the washin of pots and cups# and "any other such li-e things ye do.? And he said unto them, ?/ull well ye reCect the commandment of God, that ye may ,eep your own tradition... /a-ing the &ord of God of none effect through your tradition( &hich ye have delivered # and many such li,e thin s do ye.% &4ar, D#=&('. But &here is one verse of scri$ture that &arns against holding God*s %oly ,ord above tradition? There is none0 But( does scri$ture not &arn against the traditions of "en? %/orasmuch as ye ,now that ye &ere not redee"ed &ith corru$tible things, as silver and old, fro" your vain conversation received by tradition from your fathersB $ut with the precious blood of 5hrist, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot# "ho verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you, "ho by him do believe in God, that raised him up from the dead, and ave him loryB that your faith and hope mi ht be in God. ;eein ye have purified your souls in obeyin the truth throu h the ;pirit unto unfei ned love of the brethren, see that ye love one another with a pure heart fervently# Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the &ord of God, which liveth and abideth for ever. /or all flesh is as rass, and all the lory of man as the flower of rass. .he rass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away# $ut the &ord of the 1ord endureth for ever. And this is the &ord &hich by the gos$el is $reached unto you. ,herefore laying aside all... hy$ocrisies... As newborn babes, desire the sincere "il- of the &ord( that ye "ay gro& thereby...% &( 2eter (#(@&1#D. %Be&are lest any "an s$oil you through philosophy and vain deceit( after the tradition of "en( after the rudiments of the world, and not after 5hrist.% &5olossians 1#@.

%.his second epistle, beloved, ! no& &rite unto youB in both which - stir up your pure minds by way of remembrance# .hat ye may be "indful of the &ords &hich &ere s$o-en before by the holy $ro$hets( and of the co""and"ent of us the a$ostles of the Lord and ;aviour# 6nowin this first, that there shall come in the last days scoffers, wal,in after their own lusts...% &1 2eter '#(&0. %"hosoever therefore shall brea, one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called the least in the ,in dom of heaven# but whosoever shall do and teach them, the same shall be called reat in the ,in dom of heaven.% &4att. 0#(3 %...These things teach and e)hort. !f any "an teach other&ise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord 7esus 5hrist, and to the doctrine which is accordin to odlinessB %e is $roud( -no&ing nothing... whereof cometh envy, strife, railin s, evil surmisin s, 2erverse disputin s of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth... fro" such &ithdra& thyself.% &( .imothy =#1&0 %- char e thee therefore before God, and the Lord 7esus 5hrist, who shall Cud e the 8uic, and the dead at his appearin and his ,in domB Preach the &ordB be instant in season, out of seasonB reprove, rebu,e, e9hort with all lon sufferin and doctrine. /or the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrineB but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, havin itchin earsB And they shall turn a&ay their ears fro" the truth( and shall be turned unto fables.% &1 .imothy )#(&). At &hat $oint in history did tradition begin to be held as e2ual &ith scri$ture? %-n (0)0 at the 5ouncil of .rent, the Catholic Church voted to hold tradition e2ual to the teaching of the Bible.% &Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p '@.

Section B ,ritten &ord( Tradition and Pa$acy
Quote- "The Roman Catholic church existed 350 years before the New Testament was under one cover !"00 years before #rintin$ - which com#letely refutes the %ible only theory of today&s "00 sects'" The Bible says %.his people draweth ni h unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lipsB but their heart is far from me. $ut in vain they do worship me, teachin for doctrines the commandments of men.% <4att (0#@> and %Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord 7esus 5hrist, that ye withdraw yourselves from every brother that wal,eth disorderly, and not after the tradition which he received of us.% <1 .hess. '#=>. Does history and scri$ture $rove that the traditions taught by the Catholic Church are the traditions of "en( &arned against in the Bible( or the traditions taught by the a$ostles? Did the Ro"an Catholic church e)ist as it is today fro" a$ostolic ti"es? %Catholic structure and Catholic belief cannot be clearly $erceived before the +nd century ... .he emperors Decius, Ealerian, and Diocletian in the 'rd century... did not foresee that Christianity &ould reach a co"$ro"ise with the empire, that it &ould beco"e *Ro"an*... % &*ncyclopedia $rittanica, vol. (0, pa es 3@=&3@D. %Later Developments. Based u$on Augustine*s vie&s... in the "est, a ne& $o&er &as for"ed3 the Ro"an church... .his church understood itself as the successor of the e)tinct Ro"an 4"$ire... .he church beca"e reat and powerful as the heir to the Ro"an 4"$ire. Only within this vacuum could the idea of the papacy develop in which the reat $o$es( as bisho$s of Ro"e( ste$$ed into the $osition of the vanished e"$erors. %On the ideolo ical basis of the ? ift of the emperor 5onstantine?& the Donation of 5onstantine <a for ed document that ranted the papacy territorial ri hts to much of the "estern world>& became possible, to which the later development of the papacy was connected. .he Donation atte"$ted to reconstruct the history of the Ro"an $a$acy in retros$ect in order to ma,e le itimate the ne&ly gained ecclesiastical and $olitical $osition of the $o$es after the e9tinction of the "estern Roman imperial rei n... %-n this theory, the myth of $yFantium, the ?new Rome,? was reconstructed by a new myth of the 5hristian Rome# the Ro"an bisho$( the ne& lord in the 5hristian Rome, had ta,en over all functions of the emperor himself... %.he Roman popes not only based their claim to form and lead their own church state on a spiritual&secular

Cudicial understandin but they also created a theocracy within areas that until then were part of the provinces of the $yFantine emperor. .hey renounced a number of former imperial ri hts and claimed them for themselves. .hey e9tended the secular claim of overnment of the church beyond the borders of the church&state and developed the so&called theory of the two swords, statin that 5hrist ave the pope not only spiritual power over the church but also secular power over the worldly ,in doms.%& (ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa es 0((&0(1. (ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. ), pa e )=@# %5hristianity... The early Christian Church... of the first three centuries turned decisively against the state religion of Ro"e... because their religion could not be fitted into the politically sanctioned $agan religious syste"... 5onstantine, in the early 5th century... ended the persecution of the church and made it itself the basis for the spiritual unity of the Roman *mpire. .he church thereby beca"e the partner of the... state... p )D=# %Doctrinal Orientations... .he Roman church was stron ly 7ewish&5hristian in character and co"bined this character... with the basic orientation of the Ro"an vie& of reli ion... The legal character of Ro"an religion &as e)$ressed in the fact that the efficacy of the state cult ceremonies was dependent upon the strictest observation of a wide variety of re ulations. Later developments of Ro"an Catholic Christianity de$ended largely u$on the basis of this legal thin-ing... %.he develo$"ent of the "estern notion... of the priesthood is also dominated by the le al concept... -n the sphere of this ,ind of le al thin,in the papacy and the doctrine of papal primacy develo$ed. .he idea of a Curisdictional primacy played a prominent role in the for"ation of the doctrine of the papacy... On the basis of this le al consciousness the "estern church also develo$ed its own canon law... 7udicial thin,in was similarly si nificant in the theolo y of the "est... .ertullian <c.1AA> introduced a series of fundamental Curidical concepts into theolo y... .hrou h indul ences, re8uiems, and other acts, the church e)$anded its spiritual&Cudicial authority even to this realm of the departed souls of pur atory...% p )3(# %-n the Roman 5hurch the $a$acy evolved out of the monarchical episcopate... A leadin role develo$ed upon the leadin bishop of the Roman community... .his... or aniFation followed the provincial or aniFation of the Roman *mpire. .he theolo ical underpinnin of this special position was emphasiFed by 2etrine theolo y, which saw in the words of 7esus, ?You are 2eter, and on this roc, - will build my church? <4att. (=#(@>, a spiritual&le al institutin of the papacy by 7esus 5hrist himself. -n the Gree, 5hurch of the *ast <e. . Ori ien> and also in Au ustine in the "est, however, these &ords &ere referred to Peter*s confession of faithB <only> since the ti"e of $o$es Gelasius ! <rei ned )31&)3=>, ;ymmachus <rei ned )3@&0()>, and Gre ory - <rei ned 03A&=A)>, these words have served as the foundation for the claim of papal primacy over the entire 5hristian 5hurch.% p 0A@&0A3# %....here evolved the concept of caesaropapism... %.he Ro"an Church... $reserved in its episcopal dioceses the Ro"an $rovincial arrange"ent... .he church <and its leader, the pope> lar ely depended upon the old imperial law... .he Roman popes used this power, which was in fact allotted to them by circumstances, to develo$ a specific ecclesiastical state and to base this state u$on a ne& theocratic ideology& the idea that the pope was the representative of 5hrist and the successor of 2eter... %.he evolution of the Ro"an $a$acy into an ecclesiastical state was not reco niFed by $yFantium <but> was instead understood as a $olitical revolt...% Let it now be established that it is a historical( and &ell docu"ented fact the Roman 5atholic 5hurch has a lon history of attemptin to %reconstruct the history of the Ro"an $a$acy in retros$ect.% "hat motive would the Roman 5hurch have to attempt to rewrite history and conceal the facts! %5hristianity of 5onstantine was but of a very doubtful ,ind, the pa ans seein nothin in it to hinder but that when he died, he should be enrolled amon their ods.&<*utropius,9.pp.('(&(''>% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 1'0.

%$ut we have still to discover when and how the /ellow in the 5ap <the pa an od 4ithra, hence the mitre hat worn by 5atholic priests> was incorporated into the 5hristian foldB why and how he disappeared as thou h he had never been, and above all, where he has been livin and thrivin since the fourth century of our era... %.hose earnest 5hristian /athers Fealously burnin and tearin up every scrap of written evidence as to the nature of the cult they wished to e9terminate may, in so"e cases, enuinely have thou ht that they were savin humanity from the contamination of pa anism. $ut these could only have been the most i norant of $ishops. The scholars could not have failed to -no& of the adulteration of the original creed of Christ by /ithrais"( and "ust surely have foreseen that their action( far fro" eli"inating that cult( &ould be $er$etuating and $rotecting it in the na"e of Christianity. 6othing short of this( and the resultant fear of their co"$licity in such adulteration being discovered( could account for the meticulous care and fanatical fervor with which they destroyed everythin relatin to their former rival.? &"ynne&.yson, pa es 01, 0'.% As 8uoted from Three )ersons- from the %ible* +r %abylon, by .homas "eisser, pa es 10& 1=. ,ere "ost of the $ractices of the Catholic Church $racticed by the early church( or &ere they introduced fro" $aganis"? %.emples, incense, oil lamps, votive offerin s, holy water, holydays, and seasons of devotion, processions, blessin of fields, sacerdotal vestments, the tonsure <of priests, mon,s, and nuns>, ima es, are all of $agan origin%... /rom 5ardinal Newman?s boo, entitled, &The ,evelo#ment of the Christian Reli$ion&, pa e '03, per Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %-acts for Roman Catholics%, p . '@

Section B.# Did 'esus &rite?
Quote- ",id .esus write any scri#ture - ,id the /ord command the a#ostles to write* 0f the %ible were necessary for salvation our /ord would have said so" ,hat &as 'esus* attitude to&ard the %oly scri$tures? %-n the last day, that reat day of the feast, 7esus stood and cried, sayin , ?-f any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drin,. :e that believeth on "e( as the scri$ture hath said( out of his belly shall flow rivers of livin water.% &7ohn D#'D&'@. %7esus answered them, ?-s it not written... and the scri$ture cannot be bro-en...% &7ohn (A#')&'0. Did 'esus reco""end ta-ing the &ords and traditions of religious leaders for granted in "atters of doctrine? 7r did %e teach us to be&are of their hy$ocrisies? %.hen came to 7esus scribes and 2harisees, which were of 7erusalem, sayin , ,hy do thy disci$les transgress the tradition of the elders! for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. $ut he answered and said unto them, *,hy do ye also transgress the co""and"ent of God by your tradition! /or God commanded, sayin , :onour thy father and mother# and, :e that curseth father or mother, let him die the death. $ut ye say, "hosoever shall say to his father or his mother, -t is a ift, by whatsoever thou mi htest be profited by meB And honour not his father or his mother, he shall be free. .hus have ye "ade the co""and"ent of God of none effect by your tradition. 8e hy$ocrites , well did *saias prophesy of you, sayin , .his people draweth ni h unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lipsB but their heart is far from me. $ut in vain they do &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en." &4atthew (0#'&3. .hen the 2harisees and scribes as,ed him, ,hy &al- not thy disci$les according to the tradition of the elders... :e answered and said unto them, ?"ell hath *saias prophesied of you hypocrites, as it is written, .his people honoureth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me. :owbeit in vain do they &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en. .or laying aside the co""and"ent of God( ye hold the tradition of "en( as the &ashing of $ots and cu$s3 and "any other such li-e things ye do.* And he said unto the"( *.ull &ell ye re9ect the co""and"ent of God( that ye "ay -ee$ your o&n tradition... /a-ing the &ord of God of none effect through your tradition( &hich ye have delivered # and many such li,e thin s do ye.% &4ar, D#=&('. %;o then faith co"eth by hearing, and hearin by the &ord of God.% &Romans (A#(D. %"herefore lay apart all filthiness and superfluity of nau htiness, and receive with mee,ness the engrafted

&ord, which is able to save your souls. $ut be ye doers of the &ord, and not hearers only, deceivin your own selves. /or if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is li,e unto a man beholdin his natural face in a lass# /or he beholdeth himself, and oeth his way, and strai htway for etteth what manner of man he was. $ut whoso loo,eth into the $erfect la& of liberty, and continueth therein, he bein not a for etful hearer, but a doer of the wor,, this "an shall be blessed in his deed.% &7ames (#11&10. %And that from a child thou hast ,nown the holy scri$tures, which are able to ma,e thee wise unto salvation throu h faith which is in 5hrist 7esus. %All scri$ture is given by inspiration of God, and is $rofitable for doctrine( for re$roof( for correction( for instruction in ri hteousness# That the "an of God "ay be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all ood wor,s. ! charge thee therefore before God, and the Lord 7esus 5hrist, who shall Cud e the 8uic, and the dead at his appearin and his ,in domB Preach the &ordB be instant in season, out of seasonB reprove, rebu,e, e9hort with all lon sufferin and doctrine. /or the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrineB but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, havin itchin earsB And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.% &1 .imothy '#(=&)#). %$ut these are &ritten( that ye "ight believe that 7esus is the 5hrist, the ;on of GodB and that believin ye mi ht have life throu h his name.% &7ohn 1A#'(

Section B.+ 6u"ber of A$ostolic &riters
Quote- "1ow many a#ostles actually wrote scri#ture - The others were derelict in their duty if doctrine was %ible only and they ado#ted #reachin$ only'"

Section B.: Teaching or Bible &riting
Quote- "2as it a teachin$ or %ible writin$ Church that Christ founded* 3says Christ founded a teachin$ church4'" Did the a$ostle Paul co""end to us the traditions of "en( or God*s &ord? %...- have not shunned to declare unto you all the counsel of God. .a,e heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the floc,, over the which the :oly Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood. /or - ,now this, that after "y de$arting shall grievous &olves enter in a"ong you, not sparin the floc,. Also of your o&n selves shall "en arise( s$ea-ing $erverse things, to draw away disciples after them. .herefore watch, and re"e"ber( that by the s$ace of three years ! ceased not to &arn every one night and day &ith tears. And now, brethren, ! co""end you to God, and to the &ord of his grace, which is able to build you up, and to give you an inheritance amon all them which are sanctified.% &Acts 1A#1D&'1. Did Peter teach to $lace great faith in the scri$tures? %And account that the lon sufferin of our Lord is salvationB even as our beloved brother Paul also according to the &isdo" given unto hi" hath &ritten unto youB As also in all his epistles, spea,in in them of these thin sB in which are some thin s hard to be understood, &hich they that are unlearned and unstable &rest( as they do A1S7 the 7T%4R scri$tures( unto their o&n destruction .% 1 2eter '#(0&(=. !t is a fact that only certain ones &ere chosen by God to be ins$ired &ith %is &ords. But( Are God*s "inisters re2uired to "anifest the sa"e talents and gifts in order for their "inistries to be valid? %Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same ;pirit. And there are differences of administrations, but the same Lord. And there are diversities of operations, but it is the same God which wor,eth all in all. $ut the manifestation of the ;pirit is iven to every man to profit withal. /or to one is given by the S$irit the &ord of wisdomB to another the word of ,nowled e by the same ;piritB To another faith by the same ;piritB to another the gifts of healing by the same ;piritB .o another the wor,in of miraclesB to another prophecyB to another discernin of spiritsB to another divers ,inds of ton uesB to another the interpretation of ton ues# $ut all these &or-eth that one and the selfsa"e S$irit( dividing to every "an severally as he &ill. /or as the body is one, and hath many members, and all the members of that one body, bein many, are one body# so also is 5hrist.... /or the body is not one member, but many. -f the foot shall say, Because ! a" not the hand( ! a" not of the body; is it therefore not of the body! And if the ear shall say, $ecause - am not the eye, - am not of the bodyB is it therefore not of the body! -f the whole body were an eye, where were the hearin ! -f the whole were hearin , where were the smellin ! But no& hath God set the

"e"bers every one of the" in the body( as it hath $leased hi".% &( 5orinthians (1#)&(@. %/or the ,in dom of heaven is as a man travelin into a far country, who called his own servants, and delivered unto them his oods. And unto one he ave five talents, to another two, and to another oneB to every man accordin to his several abilityB and strai htway too, his Courney...% &4atthew 10#()&(0. !n these "different" "inistries( is it Biblically acce$table to $reach beyond the doctrines of scri$ture( to add to it*s &ords( or teach doctrines contrary to God*s &ord? %And if any man obey not our word by this epistle, note that man, and have no company with him, that he may be ashamed.% &1 .hessalonians '#(). "Preach the &ordB be instant in season, out of seasonB reprove, rebu,e, e9hort with all lon sufferin and doctrine. /or the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrineB but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, havin itchin earsB And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.% &1 .imothy )#1. %4very &ord of God is $ure# he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. Add thou not unto his &ords( lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.% &2roverbs 'A#0&=

Section B.5 Teaching and &riting differences
Quote- "2as there any drastic difference between what our /ord commanded our a#ostles to teach and what the New Testament contains* 3The )rotestant %ible says itself it does not contain all of our /ords doctrines .n 50630 5!655'4"

Section B.< Reference to un&ritten &ord
Quote- ",oes the New Testament ex#ressly refer to Christ&s unwritten word* .n 50630 5!655''' Comment - since the %ible is incom#lete it needs somethin$ else to su##lement it which is tradition'" Do the above 2uoted scri$tures "e)$ressly refer" to "doctrines" that 'esus taught =as the above 2uote clai"s they do>( or "e)$ressly" only to the "any "things" =i.e. signs and "iracles> that 'esus "did"? %And many other signs truly did 7esus in the presence of his disciples, &hich are not &ritten in this boo,% &7ohn 1A#'A. %And there are also many other things which 7esus did, the which, if they should be written every one, suppose that even the world itself could not contain the boo,s that should be written. Amen.% &7ohn 1(#10. But( did the &riters of the scri$tures teach that the Bible &as "inco"$lete"( and does not thoroughly furnish us &ith doctrines( corrections( instructions( etc. as Catholics affir"? 7r does the Bible teach other&ise? %All scri$ture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine( for re$roof( for correction( for instruction in ri hteousness# That the "an of God "ay be $erfect( thoroughly furnished unto all ood wor,s.% &1 .imothy '#(=. %.he former treatise have - made, O .heophilus, of all that 7esus be an both to do and teach, Gntil the day in which he was ta,en up, after that he throu h the :oly Ghost had iven commandments unto the apostles whom he had chosen#% &Acts (#(&1. ,hat &arning does the ,ord of God give for adding to the scri$tures( as this Ro"an Catholic teacher has done in saying the Bible is inco"$lete in teachings of doctrine? %Ye shall not add unto the word which - command you, neither shall ye diminish ou ht from it, that ye may ,eep the commandments of the LORD your God which - command you.% &Deuteronomy )#1. %"hat thin soever - command you, observe to do it# thou shalt not add thereto, nor diminish from it.% &Deuteronomy (1#'1. %Add thou not unto his &ords( lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.% &2roverbs 'A#=. %/or - testify unto every man that heareth the &ords of the $ro$hecy of this boo-( !f any "an shall add

unto these things( God shall add unto hi" the $lagues that are &ritten in this boo- # And if any man shall ta,e away from the words of the boo, of this prophecy, God shall ta,e away his part out of the boo, of life, and out of the holy city, and from the thin s which are written in this boo,.% &Revelation 11#(@. %"hat! came the word of God out from you! or came it unto you only! -f any man thin, himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him ac,nowled e that the things that ! &rite unto you are the co""and"ents of the 1ord.% &( 5orinthians ()#'=&'D. Did the believers &ho &ere taught by the a$ostles teach that the Bible did contain all of the a$ostles doctrines( or that they &ere inco"$lete and needed traditions to "su$$le"ent " the"? -n (vidence That ,emands a 7erdict, <:ere?s Life 2ublishers> 7osh 4cDowell pa es ='&=), writes and 8uotes# %*usebius, in his (cclesiastical 1istory 000'38, preserves the writin s of 2apias, the bishop of :eirapolis <('A A.D.> which 2apias ot from the *lder <apostle 7ohn># ?.he *lder used to say this also# */ar-, havin been the interpreter of 2eter, &rote do&n accurately all that he =Peter> "entioned, whether sayin s or doin s of 5hrist, not, however, in order. /or he was neither a hearer nor a companion of the LordB but afterwards, as - said, he accompanied 2eter, who adapted his teachin s as necessity re8uired, not as thou h he were ma,in a compilation of the sayin s of the Lord. ;o then /ar- "ade no "ista-e, writin down in this way some thin s as he <2eter> mentioned themB for he $aid attention to this one thing( not to o"it anything that he heard, not to include any false statement amon them.? ?... %-renaeus, $ishop of Lyons <A.D. (@A>, who was a student of 2olycarp, $ishop of ;myrnaB martyred in (0= A.D., had been a 5hristian for @= years, and was a disciple of 7ohn the Apostle. :e wrote# ?;o fir" is the ground u$on &hich these Gos$els rest, that the very heretics themselves bear witness to them, and, startin from these, each one of them endeavors to establish his own particular doctrine...? ?4atthew published his ospel amon the :ebrews in their own ton ue, when <2aul was> preachin the ospel in Rome and foundin the church there. After their departure <i.e. death> 4ar,, the disciple and interpreter of 2eter, himself handed down to us in writin the substance of 2eter?s preachin . Lu,e, the follower of 2aul, set down in a boo, the ospel preached by his teacher. .hen 7ohn, the disciple of the Lord, who also leaned on :is breast <this is the reference to 7ohn ('#10 and 1(#1A>, himself produced his Gospel, while he was livin at *phesus in Asia.? <9$ainst 1eresies 000>%

Section B.? %istory of tradition
Quote- "2hat became of the unwritten truths which our /ord and the a#ostles tau$ht* The church has #resented this historical word of mouth teachin$ called tradition 5 Thess' 56!5 5 Tim' 565''' Comment - 1ence not only scri#ture but also other sources must be consulted to $et the whole of Christ&s teachin$' Reli$ions founded on %ible only are incom#lete'" %.hen came to 7esus scribes and 2harisees, which were of 7erusalem, sayin ( ,hy do thy disci$les transgress the tradition of the elders! for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. $ut he answered and said unto them, *,hy do ye also transgress the co""and"ent of God by your tradition?... !n vain they do &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en .% &4atthew (0#'&3. %As - besou ht thee to abide still at *phesus, when - went into 4acedonia, that thou mi htest char e some that they teach no other doctrine, Neither ive heed to fables... which minister 8uestions, rather than odly edifyin which is in faith# so do.% &( .imothy (#'&). %/orasmuch as ye ,now that ye &ere not redee"ed... by tradition fro" your fathersB $ut with the precious blood of 5hrist, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot# "ho verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you, "ho by him do believe in God, that raised him up from the dead, and ave him loryB that your faith and hope mi ht be in God. ;eein ye have purified your souls in obeyin the truth throu h the ;pirit unto unfei ned love of the brethren, see that ye love one another with a pure heart fervently# Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the &ord of God( &hich liveth and abideth for ever. /or all flesh is as rass, and all the lory of man as the flower of rass. .he rass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth

away# $ut the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gos$el is $reached unto you. "herefore layin aside all malice, and all uile, and hypocrisies, and envies, all evil spea,in s, As newborn babes, desire the sincere "il- of the &ord, that ye may gro& thereby# -f so be ye have tasted that the Lord is racious. .o whom comin , as unto a livin stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, and precious, Ye also, as lively stones, are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by 7esus 5hrist. "herefore also it is contained in the scripture, $ehold, - lay in ;ion a chief corner stone, elect, precious# and he that believeth on him shall not be confounded. Gnto you therefore which believe he is precious# but unto the" &hich be disobedient, the stone which the builders disallowed, the same is made the head of the corner, And a stone of stumblin , and a roc, of offence, even to the" &hich stu"ble at the &ord( being disobedient3 &hereunto also they &ere a$$ointed.% &( 2eter (#(@&1#@. %.herefore seein we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we faint notB $ut have renounced the hidden thin s of dishonesty, not &al-ing in craftiness( nor handling the &ord of God deceitfullyB but by manifestation of the truth commendin ourselves to every man?s conscience in the si ht of God.% &1 5orinthians )#(&1. %5ursed be he that doeth the wor, of the 1ord deceitfully...% &7eremiah )@#(A. 5omment# :ow similar we find this 5atholic authors words to be of the serpent in the ardenH .o subtily entice his listeners to %supplement% the word of the Almi hty GodH .he $ible only says there were other thin s 7esus did. .he $ible, God+s "ord, does not say there were more unwritten truths that 7esus tau ht. "hat other motive would this defender of .he Roman 5atholic 5hurch have to teach %other% doctrines than to add to, or ta,e away from, God+s "ord!

Section B.@ 8ears 6e& Testa"ent &as &ritten
Quote- "%etween what years were the !st and last boo:s of the New Testament written* ;atthew 5nd year 9',' .ohn " < Revelation !00 9',''' "Comment - 0ma$ine if #resent day %ible only theory would have a##eared at a time when the #a$es were not only unavailable but unwritten'" The real 2uestion is( &ere the &ords the a$ostles &rote different fro" the &ords of the 1ord( &hich they $reached? And &hy did the a$ostles feel the need to &rite( and not 9ust leave doctrine to be $assed do&n by traditions( if traditions &ere the su$erior( and $referred "ethod of co""unicating and $reserving Gods $lans and doctrines for %is church? %-f any man thin, himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him ac,nowled e that the thin s that - write unto you are the commandments of the Lord.% ( 5orinthians ()#'D. %.his second epistle, beloved, ! no& &rite unto youB in both which ! stir u$ your pure minds by &ay of re"e"brance# .hat ye may be "indful of the &ords &hich &ere s$o-en before by the holy prophets, and of the commandment of us the apostles of the Lord and ;aviour.% &1 2eter '#(&1. %.herefore watch, and remember, that by the space of three years - ceased not to warn every one ni ht and day with tears. And now, brethren, ! co""end you to God, and to the &ord of his grace( &hich is able to build you u$( and to give you an inheritance amon all them which are sanctified.% &Acts 1A#'(&'1. %And they continued stedfastly in the a$ostles* doctrine and fellowship, and in brea,in of bread, and in prayers.% &Acts 1#)1. %As - besou ht thee to abide still at *phesus, when - went into 4acedonia, that thou mi htest char e some that they teach no other doctrine% &( .imothy (#'. %.a,e heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrineB continue in them# for in doin this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee.% &( .imothy )#(=. %....hese thin s teach and e9hort. -f any man teach otherwise, and consent not to wholesome words, even

the words of our Lord 7esus 5hrist, and to the doctrine which is accordin to odliness, :e is proud, ,nowin nothin ,.% &( .imothy =#1&). %$eloved, when - ave all dili ence to write unto you of the common salvation, it &as needful for "e to &rite unto you( and e)hort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith &hich &as once delivered unto the saints. /or there are certain men crept in unawares, who were before of old ordained to this condemnation, un odly men, turnin the race of our God into lasciviousness, and denyin the only Lord God, and our Lord 7esus 5hrist.% &7ude (#'&). %That &hich &e have seen and heard declare &e unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us# and truly our fellowship is with the /ather, and with his ;on 7esus 5hrist. And these things &rite &e unto you( that your Coy may be full.% &( 7ohn (#'&). - natius, <d. ((0 A.D.>, wrote& %Gnless - find it written in the ori inals, - will not believe it to be written in the Gospel. and when - said, ?-t is written,? they answered what lay before them in their corrupted copies% as 8uoted from .he ;tory of 5hristian Ori ins, by 4artin A. Larson, New Republic $oo,, pa e 0A(, reprinted here from Ancient 5hampions of Oneness by "illiam $. 5halfant. According to the &ords of the a$ostles( &ere scri$tures not available to the early church? %And the brethren immediately sent away 2aul and ;ilas by ni ht unto $erea# who comin thither went into the syna o ue of the 7ews. These &ere "ore noble than those in .hessalonica, in that they received the &ord with all readiness of mind, and searched the scri$tures daily( &hether those things &ere so. .herefore many of them believedB also of honourable women which were Gree,s, and of men, not a few. $ut when the 7ews of .hessalonica had ,nowled e that the &ord of God &as $reached of 2aul at $erea, they came thither also, and stirred up the people.% &Acts (D#(A&('. %/or whatsoever thin s were written aforetime &ere &ritten for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scri$tures mi ht have hope.% &Romans (0#().

Section B.A Date 6e& Testa"ent under one cover
Quote- "2hen was the New Testament #laced under one cover* - 38= 9',' by the council of Cartha$e no other source was available'"

Section B.B Delay in 6e& Testa"ent
Quote- "2hy so much delay in com#ilin$ the New Testament* - )rior to 38= certain $rou#s retained #arts of the %ible this dis#roves the %ible only since it wasn&t available then'" %Au ustine of :ippo... .he immortal story of his conversion in the ei hth boo, of 5onfessions tells of... when, at the sound of a child?s voice callin ... he opened the New .estament Letters and read in Letter of 2aul to .he Romans the words, ?...put on the Lord 7esus 5hrist, and ma,e no provision for the flesh, to ratify its desires? <Rom. ('#()>. .his was in the summer of the year '@=.% *ncyclopedia $rittanica, vol. 1, pa e '=0. :mm, - wonder how a man not yet a convert to 5hristianity had in his possession a copy of the $ible the papists don?t admit as bein available until years laterH Did the Christians after the a$ostles &rite as if the 6e& Testa"ent scri$tures &ere unavailable to the"( or did they &rite as if the 6e& Testa"ent &as readily available( and ought to be obeyed? /irst, what did the New .estament writers testify in re ards to the authority of their written words& %-f any man thin, himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him ac,nowled e that the thin s that - write unto you are the commandments of the Lord.% &( 5orinthians ()#'D. %And if any "an obey not our &ord by this e$istle, note that man, and have no co"$any &ith hi", that he may be ashamed.% &1 .hessalonians '#(). %.his second epistle, beloved, ! no& &rite unto youB in both which - stir up your pure minds by way of remembrance# That ye "ay be "indful of the words which were spo,en before by the holy prophets, and of the co""and"ent of us the a$ostles of the Lord and ;aviour.% &1 2eter '#(&1. %/or - testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this boo,, -f any man shall add unto

these thin s, God shall add unto him the pla ues that are written in this boo,# And if any man shall ta,e away from the words of the boo, of this prophecy, God shall ta,e away his part out of the boo, of life, and out of the holy city, and from the thin s which are written in this boo,.% &Revelation 11#(@&(3. %...Our beloved brother 2aul also accordin to the wisdom iven unto him hath written unto youB As also in all his epistles, spea,in in them of these thin sB in which are some thin s hard to be understood, &hich they that are unlearned and unstable &rest, as they do also the other scri$tures, unto their own destruction. Ye therefore, beloved, seein ye ,now these thin s before, beware lest ye also, bein led away with the error of the wic,ed, fall from your own stedfastness.% 1 2eter '#(0&(=. %/or the scripture saith, .hou shalt not muFFle the o9 that treadeth out the corn. And, .he labourer is worthy of his reward.% &( .imothy 0#(@ <2aul is 8uotin Old .estament& Deut. 10#), and New .estament& Lu,e (A#D, and callin both e8ually scripture.> -n %God?s -nfallible "ord% by David $ernard, pa es 3A&3(, he writes#%...$y about (0A we find numerous New .estament 8uotations representin every boo, e9cept one to four short personal letters. By about +CC &e have clear $ostbiblical &itnesses to every boo- of the 6e& Testa"ent... -t is important to note that they <re ional councils at :ippo&'3' and 5artha e& '3D I )(3> si"$ly ratified &hat grass roots believers as a &hole had $racticed for centuries# ?.he decisions of church councils in the fourth and fifth centuries did not deter"ine the canon( nor did they even first discover or recogniDe it. -n no sense was the authority of the canonical boo,s contin ent upon the later church councils. All those councils did was to ive later, broader, and final reco nition to what was already a fact, namely, that God had inspired them and that the people of God had accepted them in the first century.? <Geisler and Ni9, rev. ed., 1'(. As an e9ample of a point on which &e should not follo& the teaching of fourth and fifth century leaders( under the influence of Augustine the three councils 9ust "entioned included the A$ocry$ha as $art of the 7ld Testa"ent.> %.hus we do not depend on the authority of fourth century leaders when we accept the New .estament canon, nor need we endorse all doctrines they tau ht. Neither should we re ard the authority of the post& apostolic church as prior, superior, or e8ual to that of ;cripture# ?.he 5hurch no more ave us the New .estament canon than ;ir -saac Newton ave us the force of ravity... Newton did not create ravity, but reco niFed it... All the churches were tryin to do was to see which of the boo,s claimin to be in some sufficient sense apostolic really were so& a 8uestion principally of historical fact.? <7.-. 2ac,er, >od has s#o:en, <Grand Rapids# $a,er, (3D3> pa e ((3.% -n The ?earch for the 2ord of >od, by Daniel ;e raves <"ord Aflame 2ress>, pa es )1&)', he writes# %.he early church fathers, followin the death of the last apostle, continued to perpetuate the same re ard for the perfect preservation of the ;criptures. 2olycarp said, ?"hosoever perverts the sayin s of the Lord... that one is the firstborn of ;atan.? "ithin one hundred years of the death of the apostles, a heretic named 4arcion corrupted the "ord of God by ma,in copies in which he shortened some boo,s and i nored others. :e was soundly condemned by -renaeus. -n fact, -renaeus was so concerned that the te9t be preserved perfectly that he defended the traditional readin of a sin le letter. 7ustin 4artyr also condemned 4arcion by sayin , ?...the wic,ed demons have also put forward 4arcion of 2ontus.? .ertullian, near the year 1A@, seemed to claim that the ori inal manuscripts written by the apostles, or their e9act copies, were still bein read.%

Section B.#C Deter"ining 6e& Testa"ent content $roble"s
Quote- "2hat other #roblem confronted those who wished to determine the contents of the New Testament* - %efore the ins#ired other boo:s were written and thou$ht to be ins#ired'" Though the $eo$le of God for "any centuries before Christ did not have their o&n $ersonal Bibles( &ere they still e)$ected to -no& and -ee$ it*s teachings? %.he secret thin s belon unto the 1ord our God# but those thin s which are revealed belon unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the words of this law.% &Deuteronomy 13#13. %-f thou shalt hear,en unto the voice of the 1ord thy God, to ,eep his commandments and his statutes &hich are &ritten in this boo- of the la&, and if thou turn unto the 1ord thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul. .or this co""and"ent &hich ! co""and thee this day( it is not hidden fro" thee(

neither is it far off. !t is not in heaven( that thou shouldest say( ,ho shall go u$ for us to heaven( and bring it unto us( that &e "ay hear it( and do it! Neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldest say, "ho shall o over the sea for us, and brin it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it! $ut the &ord is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou "ayest do it. ;ee, - have set before thee this day life and ood, and death and evilB -n that - command thee this day to love the 1ord thy God, to wal, in his ways, and to ,eep his commandments and his statutes and his Cud ments, that thou mayest live and multiply# and the 1ord thy God shall bless thee in the land whither thou oest to possess it.% &Deuteronomy 'A#(A&(= %.his boo, of the law shall not depart out of thy mouthB but thou shalt meditate therein day and ni ht, that thou mayest observe to do accordin to all that is written therein# for then thou shalt ma,e thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have ood success.% &7oshua (#@. 'ust ho& "uch e"$hasis does God $ut on the &ritten ,ord? 2salm ((3#3 "herewithal shall a youn man cleanse his way! by ta-ing heed thereto according to thy &ord. 2salm ((3#(A "ith my whole heart have - sou ht thee# 7 let "e not &ander fro" thy co""and"ents. 2salm ((3#(( Thy &ord have ! hid in "ine heart( that ! "ight not sin against thee . 2salm ((3#(1 $lessed art thou, 7 1ord# teach me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#(' "ith my lips have - declared all the Cud ments of thy mouth. 2salm ((3#() - have reCoiced in the way of thy testimonies, as much as in all riches. 2salm ((3#(0 - will meditate in thy precepts, and have respect unto thy ways. 2salm ((3#(= - will deli ht myself in thy statutes# - will not for et thy word. 2salm ((3#(D Deal bountifully with thy servant, that - may live, and ,eep thy word. 2salm ((3#(@ Open thou mine eyes, that - may behold wondrous thin s out of thy law. 2salm ((3#(3 - am a stran er in the earth# hide not thy co""and"ents fro" "e. 2salm ((3#1A 4y soul brea,eth for the lon in that it hath unto thy Cud ments at all times. 2salm ((3#1( .hou hast rebu,ed the $roud that are cursed, which do err fro" thy co""and"ents. 2salm ((3#11 Remove from me reproach and contemptB for - have ,ept thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#1' 2rinces also did sit and spea, a ainst me# but thy servant did meditate in thy statutes. 2salm ((3#1) .hy testimonies also are my deli ht and my counselors. 2salm ((3#10 4y soul cleaveth unto the dust# 8uic,en thou me accordin to thy word. 2salm ((3#1= - have declared my ways, and thou heardest me# teach me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#1D 4a,e me to understand the way of thy precepts# so shall - tal, of thy wondrous wor,s. 2salm ((3#1@ 4y soul melteth for heaviness# stren then thou me accordin unto thy word. 2salm ((3#13 Re"ove fro" "e the &ay of lying3 and grant "e thy la& raciously. 2salm ((3#'A ! have chosen the &ay of truth3 thy 9udg"ents have ! laid before "e. 2salm ((3#'( - have stuc, unto thy testimonies# 7 1ord, put me not to shame. 2salm ((3#'1 - will run the way of thy commandments, when thou shalt enlar e my heart. 2salm ((3#'' .each me, 7 1ord, the way of thy statutesB and - shall ,eep it unto the end. 2salm ((3#') Give me understandin , and - shall ,eep thy lawB yea, - shall observe it with my whole heart. 2salm ((3#'0 4a,e me to o in the path of thy commandmentsB for therein do - deli ht. 2salm ((3#'= -ncline my heart unto thy testimonies, and not to covetousness. 2salm ((3#'D .urn away mine eyes from beholdin vanityB and 8uic,en thou me in thy way.

2salm ((3#'@ ;tablish thy word unto thy servant, who is devoted to thy fear. 2salm ((3#'3 .urn away my reproach which - fear# for thy Cud ments are ood. 2salm ((3#)A $ehold, - have lon ed after thy precepts# 8uic,en me in thy ri hteousness. 2salm ((3#)( Let thy mercies come also unto me, 7 1ord( even thy salvation( according to thy &ord. 2salm ((3#)1 ;o shall - have wherewith to answer him that reproacheth me# for - trust in thy word. 2salm ((3#)' And ta,e not the word of truth utterly out of my mouthB for - have hoped in thy Cud ments. 2salm ((3#)) ;o shall - ,eep thy law continually for ever and ever. 2salm ((3#)0 And - will wal, at liberty# for - see, thy precepts. 2salm ((3#)= - will spea, of thy testimonies also before ,in s, and will not be ashamed. 2salm ((3#)D And - will deli ht myself in thy commandments, which - have loved. 2salm ((3#)@ 4y hands also will - lift up unto thy commandments, which - have lovedB and - will meditate in thy statutes. 2salm ((3#)3 Remember the word unto thy servant, upon which thou hast caused me to hope. 2salm ((3#0A .his is my comfort in my affliction# for thy word hath 8uic,ened me. 2salm ((3#0( .he proud have had me reatly in derision# yet have - not declined from thy law. 2salm ((3#01 - remembered thy Cud ments of old, 7 1ordB and have comforted myself. 2salm ((3#0' :orror hath ta,en hold upon me because of the &ic-ed that forsa-e thy la&. 2salm ((3#0) .hy statutes have been my son s in the house of my pil rima e. 2salm ((3#00 - have remembered thy name, 7 1ord, in the ni ht, and have ,ept thy law. 2salm ((3#0= .his - had, because - ,ept thy precepts. 2salm ((3#0D .hou art my portion, 7 1ord# - have said that - would ,eep thy words. 2salm ((3#0@ - intreated thy favour with my whole heart# be merciful unto me accordin to thy word. 2salm ((3#03 - thou ht on my ways, and turned my feet unto thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#=A - made haste, and delayed not to ,eep thy commandments. 2salm ((3#=( .he bands of the wic,ed have robbed me# but - have not for otten thy law. 2salm ((3#=1 At midni ht - will rise to ive than,s unto thee because of thy ri hteous Cud ments. 2salm ((3#=' - am a companion of all them that fear thee, and of them that ,eep thy precepts. 2salm ((3#=) .he earth, 7 1ord, is full of thy mercy# teach me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#=0 .hou hast dealt well with thy servant, 7 1ord, accordin unto thy word. 2salm ((3#== .each me ood Cud ment and ,nowled e# for - have believed thy commandments. 2salm ((3#=D $efore - was afflicted - went astray# but now have - ,ept thy word. 2salm ((3#=@ .hou art ood, and doest oodB teach me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#=3 The $roud have forged a lie against "e3 but ! &ill -ee$ thy $rece$ts with my whole heart. 2salm ((3#DA .heir heart is as fat as reaseB but - deli ht in thy law. 2salm ((3#D( -t is ood for me that - have been afflictedB that - mi ht learn thy statutes. 2salm ((3#D1 .he law of thy mouth is better unto me than thousands of old and silver. 2salm ((3#D' .hy hands have made me and fashioned me# give "e understanding( that ! "ay learn thy co""and"ents. 2salm ((3#D) .hey that fear thee will be lad when they see meB because - have hoped in thy word.

2salm ((3#D0 - ,now, 7 1ord, that thy Cud ments are ri ht, and that thou in faithfulness hast afflicted me. 2salm ((3#D= Let, - pray thee, thy merciful ,indness be for my comfort, accordin to thy word unto thy servant. 2salm ((3#DD Let thy tender mercies come unto me, that - may live# for thy law is my deli ht. 2salm ((3#D@ Let the proud be ashamedB for they dealt perversely with me without a cause# but - will meditate in thy precepts. 2salm ((3#D3 Let those that fear thee turn unto me, and those that have ,nown thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#@A Let my heart be sound in thy statutesB that - be not ashamed. 2salm ((3#@( 4y soul fainteth for thy salvation# but - hope in thy word. 2salm ((3#@1 4ine eyes fail for thy word, sayin , "hen wilt thou comfort me! 2salm ((3#@' /or - am become li,e a bottle in the smo,eB yet do - not for et thy statutes. 2salm ((3#@) :ow many are the days of thy servant! when wilt thou e9ecute Cud ment on them that persecute me! 2salm ((3#@0 .he proud have di ed pits for me, which are not after thy law. 2salm ((3#@= All thy commandments are faithful# they persecute me wron fullyB help thou me. 2salm ((3#@D .hey had almost consumed me upon earthB but - forsoo, not thy precepts. 2salm ((3#@@ Juic,en me after thy lovin ,indnessB so shall - ,eep the testimony of thy mouth. 2salm ((3#@3 /or ever, 7 1ord, thy word is settled in heaven. 2salm ((3#3A .hy faithfulness is unto all enerations# thou hast established the earth, and it abideth. 2salm ((3#3( .hey continue this day accordin to thine ordinances# for all are thy servants. 2salm ((3#31 Enless thy la& had been "y delights( ! should then have $erished in "ine affliction . 2salm ((3#3' - will never for et thy precepts# for with them thou hast 8uic,ened me. 2salm ((3#3) - am thine, save me# for - have sou ht thy precepts. 2salm ((3#30 .he wic,ed have waited for me to destroy me# but - will consider thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#3= - have seen an end of all perfection# but thy commandment is e9ceedin broad. 2salm ((3#3D O how - love thy lawH it is my meditation all the day. 2salm ((3#3@ .hou throu h thy commandments hast made me wiser than mine enemies# for they are ever with me. 2salm ((3#33 ! have "ore understanding than all "y teachers3 for thy testi"onies are "y "editation . 2salm ((3#(AA ! understand "ore than the ancients( because ! -ee$ thy $rece$ts. 2salm ((3#(A( - have refrained my feet from every evil way, that - mi ht ,eep thy word. 2salm ((3#(A1 - have not departed from thy Cud ments# for thou hast tau ht me. 2salm ((3#(A' :ow sweet are thy words unto my tasteH yea, sweeter than honey to my mouthH 2salm ((3#(A) .hrou h thy precepts - et understandin # therefore - hate every false way. 2salm ((3#(A0 Thy &ord is a la"$ unto "y feet( and a light unto "y $ath. 2salm ((3#(A= - have sworn, and - will perform it, that - will ,eep thy ri hteous Cud ments. 2salm ((3#(AD - am afflicted very much# 8uic,en me, 7 1ord, accordin unto thy word. 2salm ((3#(A@ Accept, - beseech thee, the freewill offerin s of my mouth, 7 1ord, and teach me thy Cud ments. 2salm ((3#(A3 4y soul is continually in my hand# yet do - not for et thy law.

2salm ((3#((A .he wic,ed have laid a snare for me# yet - erred not from thy precepts. 2salm ((3#((( .hy testimonies have - ta,en as an herita e for ever# for they are the reCoicin of my heart. 2salm ((3#((1 ! have inclined "ine heart to $erfor" thy statutes al&ay( even unto the end. 2salm ((3#((' ! hate vain thoughts3 but thy la& do ! love. 2salm ((3#(() .hou art my hidin place and my shield# - hope in thy word. 2salm ((3#((0 De$art fro" "e( ye evildoers3 for ! &ill -ee$ the co""and"ents of "y God. 2salm ((3#((= Gphold me accordin unto thy word, that - may live# and let me not be ashamed of my hope. 2salm ((3#((D :old thou me up, and - shall be safe# and - will have respect unto thy statutes continually. 2salm ((3#((@ Thou hast trodden do&n all the" that err fro" thy statutes3 for their deceit is falsehood. 2salm ((3#((3 .hou puttest away all the wic,ed of the earth li,e dross# therefore - love thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#(1A 4y flesh trembleth for fear of theeB and - am afraid of thy Cud ments. 2salm ((3#(1( - have done Cud ment and Custice# leave me not to mine oppressors. 2salm ((3#(11 $e surety for thy servant for ood# let not the proud oppress me. 2salm ((3#(1' 4ine eyes fail for thy salvation, and for the word of thy ri hteousness. 2salm ((3#(1) Deal with thy servant accordin unto thy mercy, and teach me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#(10 - am thy servantB ive me understandin , that - may ,now thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#(1= -t is time for thee, 1ord, to wor,# for they have made void thy law. 2salm ((3#(1D .herefore - love thy commandments above oldB yea, above fine old. 2salm ((3#(1@ .herefore ! estee" all thy $rece$ts concerning all things to be right; and ! hate every false &ay. 2salm ((3#(13 .hy testimonies are wonderful# therefore doth my soul ,eep them. 2salm ((3#('A .he entrance of thy &ords giveth light; it giveth understanding unto the si"$le. 2salm ((3#('( - opened my mouth, and panted# for - lon ed for thy commandments. 2salm ((3#('1 Loo, thou upon me, and be merciful unto me, as thou usest to do unto those that love thy name. 2salm ((3#('' Order my steps in thy word# and let not any ini8uity have dominion over me. 2salm ((3#(') Deliver me from the oppression of man# so will - ,eep thy precepts. 2salm ((3#('0 4a,e thy face to shine upon thy servantB and teach me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#('= Rivers of &aters run do&n "ine eyes( because they -ee$ not thy la&. 2salm ((3#('D Ri hteous art thou, 7 1ord, and upri ht are thy Cud ments. 2salm ((3#('@ Thy testi"onies that thou hast co""anded are righteous and very faithful. 2salm ((3#('3 4y Feal hath consumed me, because mine enemies have for otten thy words. 2salm ((3#()A .hy word is very pure# therefore thy servant loveth it. 2salm ((3#()( - am small and despised# yet do not - for et thy precepts. 2salm ((3#()1 .hy ri hteousness is an everlastin ri hteousness, and thy law is the truth. 2salm ((3#()' .rouble and an uish have ta,en hold on me# yet thy commandments are my deli hts. 2salm ((3#()) .he ri hteousness of thy testimonies is everlastin # ive me understandin , and - shall live. 2salm ((3#()0 - cried with my whole heartB hear me, 7 1ord# - will ,eep thy statutes. 2salm ((3#()= - cried unto theeB save me, and - shall ,eep thy testimonies.

2salm ((3#()D - prevented the dawnin of the mornin , and cried# - hoped in thy word. 2salm ((3#()@ 4ine eyes prevent the ni ht watches, that - mi ht meditate in thy word. 2salm ((3#()3 :ear my voice accordin unto thy lovin ,indness# 7 1ord, 8uic,en me accordin to thy Cud ment. 2salm ((3#(0A .hey draw ni h that follow after mischief# they are far from thy law. 2salm ((3#(0( .hou art near, 7 1ordB and all thy commandments are truth. 2salm ((3#(01 5oncernin thy testimonies, - have ,nown of old that thou hast founded them for ever. 2salm ((3#(0' 5onsider mine affliction, and deliver me# for - do not for et thy law. 2salm ((3#(0) 2lead my cause, and deliver me# 8uic,en me accordin to thy word. 2salm ((3#(00 Salvation is far fro" the &ic-ed3 for they see- not thy statutes . 2salm ((3#(0= Great are thy tender mercies, 7 1ord# 8uic,en me accordin to thy Cud ments. 2salm ((3#(0D 4any are my persecutors and mine enemiesB yet do - not decline from thy testimonies. 2salm ((3#(0@ ! beheld the transgressors( and &as grieved; because they -e$t not thy &ord . 2salm ((3#(03 5onsider how - love thy precepts# 8uic,en me, 7 1ord, accordin to thy lovin ,indness. 2salm ((3#(=A Thy &ord is true fro" the beginning3 and every one of thy righteous 9udg"ents endureth for ever. 2salm ((3#(=( 2rinces have persecuted me without a cause# but my heart standeth in awe of thy word. 2salm ((3#(=1 - reCoice at thy word, as one that findeth reat spoil. 2salm ((3#(=' - hate and abhor lyin # but thy law do - love. 2salm ((3#(=) ;even times a day do - praise thee because of thy ri hteous Cud ments. 2salm ((3#(=0 Great peace have they which love thy law# and nothin shall offend them. 2salm ((3#(== 1ord, - have hoped for thy salvation, and done thy commandments. 2salm ((3#(=D 4y soul hath ,ept thy testimoniesB and - love them e9ceedin ly. 2salm ((3#(=@ - have ,ept thy precepts and thy testimonies# for all my ways are before thee. 2salm ((3#(=3 Let my cry come near before thee, 7 1ord# ive me understandin accordin to thy word. 2salm ((3#(DA Let my supplication come before thee# deliver me accordin to thy word. 2salm ((3#(D( 4y lips shall utter praise, when thou hast tau ht me thy statutes. 2salm ((3#(D1 4y ton ue shall spea, of thy word# for all thy commandments are ri hteousness. 2salm ((3#(D' Let thine hand help meB for - have chosen thy precepts. 2salm ((3#(D) - have lon ed for thy salvation, 7 1ordB and thy law is my deli ht. 2salm ((3#(D0 Let my soul live, and it shall praise theeB and let thy Cud ments help me. 2salm ((3#(D= - have one astray li,e a lost sheepB see, thy servantB for - do not for et thy commandments. %*very word of God is pure# he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. Add thou not unto his &ords( lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.% &2roverbs 'A#0&=. %.o the law and to the testimony3 if they s$ea- not according to this &ord( it is because there is no light in the".% &-saiah @#1A. %-f any man spea,, let him spea, as the oracles of GodB if any man minister, let him do it as of the ability which God iveth# that God in all thin s may be lorified throu h 7esus 5hrist, to whom be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.% &( 2eter )#((. %See- ye out of the boo- of the 17RD( and read3 no one of these shall fail, none shall want her mate# for my mouth it hath commanded, and his spirit it hath athered them.% &-saiah ')#(=.

6o God ins$ired Scri$ture $uts any&here near as "uch e"$hasis on tradition as it does on Scri$ture.

Section B.## ,ho decided &hat &as 6e& Testa"ent
Quote- "2ho finally did decide which boo:s were ins#ired and therefore New Testament* - %efore "00 9',' the infallible authority of the Roman Catholic church decided which were and which were not' 0f church was not infallible then why not now*" <2lease refer to sections $ I K where the claim of the Roman 5atholic 5hurch?s e9istence before the )th century is completely refuted.> %.owards the end of the second century most of the New .estament as we ,now it today was canoniFed.% &"illiston "al,er, 9 1istory of the Christian Church, p . =A, as 8uoted in 9fter The 2ay Called 1eresy, by .homas "eisser, pa e =A.

Section B.#+ Church &or-s $revious to 5CC A.D.
Quote- "2ould the theory of #rivate inter#retation of the New Testament been #ossible before the year "00 9','* - No because no New Testament as such was in existence'" .he above 5atholic statement be s clarity for the followin reasons& A> .he New .estament did not need to be under one cover in order to be the inspired ;cripture as commanded by God </or e9ample& - have an *ncyclopedia that is contained in over 1 doFen volumes, and have an *ncyclopedia on one 5D&RO4 that is therefor only one volume. -s the 5D&RO4 version the only one that can be actually considered an entire *ncyclopedia! Or is it a mute point, li,e comparin whether or not the ;criptures need to be under one cover in order to be called the New .estament!> $> -f the above author is claimin that his %New .estament% was not in e9istence prior to )AA A.D. it is evident that the body of wor, he claims as his New .estament are not those writin s ascribed to the apostles. -n other words, his New .estament wor,s are spurious, and not <at least> copies of the actual commandments of the Lord as presented and preserved by the apostles in their written commandments to the churches.

Section B.#: Possibility of 6e& Testa"ent theory in 5CC A.D.
Quote- "2ould the #rivate inter#retation theory have been #ossible between "00 9',' < !""0 9',' when #rintin$ was invented*"

Section B.#5 Possibility of 6e& Testa"ent theory bet&een 5CC #55C A.D.
Quote- "2ho co#ied < conserved the %ible durin$ the interval between "00 9',' < !""0 9','* Catholic mon:s' 0n s#ite of this the Catholic church is accused of havin$ tried to destroy the %ible' 0f she had tried she had !500 years to do so'" The 2uestion is did the Ro"an Catholic church really conserve the co""and"ents of the 1ord as taught in the Bible( or did she atte"$t to ta-e sole $ossession of the Bible in order to $ervert it*s teachings( and $rohibit it*s true doctrines fro" being read? /rom Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p s '&)# %!n an address by the cardinals of the <Roman 5atholic> church to Po$e Pius !!!, who rei ned in (0A', the followin words are recorded. ?Of all the advice that we can offer your holiness, we must open your eyes well and use all possible force in the matter, namely, to $er"it the reading of the gos$el as little as $ossible in all the countries under your Curisdiction. Let the very little part of the ospel which is usually read in mass, and let no one be $er"itted to read it more. ;o lon as people will be content with the small amount, your interest will prosperB but as soon as the people want to read more, your interest will be in to fail. The Bible is the boo- which more than any other thin has raised a ainst us the tumults and tempests by &hich &e have al"ost $erished. -n fact, if one co"$ares the teaching of the Bible &ith &hat ta-es $lace in our churches( he &ill soon find discord, and will realiDe that our teachings are often different fro" the Bible( and often still( contrary to it.?

.he above is to be found in the National Library of 2aris, Eol. 1# pa es =0A and =0(.% Also from Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p s )&0, he 8uotes# 5atholic 5atechism, (3DA# Juestion @, pa e (@# %-s the $ible historically accurate! Answer# %Not always. Records were scarce in those centuries and people were little concerned or e8uipped for approachin history scientifically. .he accounts are accurate enou h for the overall history they contain.% Juestion (A on pa e (3# %-s any of the bible outdated! Answer# %Yes. 4uch of the lan ua e and ideas it contains belon to another a e and culture and is no lon er in use. .he $ible?s understandin of nature and the universe is very primitive and hopelessly behind modern science. *ven many of its reli ious laws and practices mean little to modern man. .hese thin s ma,e it difficult for us to read it easily today and we need e9pert help to understand it.% .his above 5atholic statement is of course referrin to their $ible, the Douay version, which does contain errors, both in doctrine, and in science. .his is not true of the Gree, and :ebrew te9t that is the basis of the 6in 7ames version. -t has been proven time and time a ain to be doctrinally, and scientifically accurate.

Section B.#< Bible $reservation 5CC #55C A.D.
Quote- "2ho $ave the reformers the authority to chan$e over from the ! faith ! fold #ro$ram* >al' !6@'" <A ain, please see sections $ and K.( for the historical evidence of who actually first chan ed over from the one faith, one fold pro ram>.

Section B.#? Refor"ers authority
Quote- "?ince /uther what conseAuences have followed from the use of a %ible only theory and it&s #ersonal inter#retation* 5 Tim' "63''' Comment - The %ible only theory may indeed cater to the self exaltation of the individual but certainly does not conduce to the acAuisition of divine truth'" Re$ly ,ho gave the Ro"an Catholic church the authority to lay aside the co""and"ents of God( and to substitute for the" the doctrines and $ractices of $agan Ro"e? And &ho gave the Ro"an Catholic church the authority to teach things( in a Ro"an Catholic college of cardinal*s o&n &ords "different fro" the Bible( and often still( contrary to it"? %$ut - say unto you, .hat every idle word that men shall spea,, they shall ive account thereof in the day of Cud ment. /or by thy words thou shalt be Custified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.% &4atthew (1#'=&'D. %$ut be ye doers of the &ord, and not hearers only( deceiving your o&n selves. /or if any be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he is li,e unto a man beholdin his natural face in a lass# /or he beholdeth himself, and oeth his way, and strai htway for etteth what manner of man he was. $ut whoso loo,eth into the perfect law of liberty, and continueth therein, he bein not a for etful hearer, but a doer of the wor,, this man shall be blessed in his deed.% 7ames (#11&10. %.he holy scriptures... are able to "a-e thee &ise unto salvation throu h faith which is in 5hrist 7esus. All scri$ture is given by ins$iration of God( and is $rofitable for doctrine( for re$roof( for correction( for instruction in righteousness# .hat the man of God may be perfect, thorou hly furnished unto all ood wor,s. ! charge thee therefore before God, and the Lord 7esus 5hrist, who shall Cud e the 8uic, and the dead at his appearin and his ,in domB Preach the &ordB be instant in season, out of seasonB reprove, rebu,e, e9hort with all lon sufferin and doctrine. .or the ti"e &ill co"e &hen they &ill not endure sound doctrineB but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, havin itchin ears...% &1 .imothy '#(0&)#'. %$ut these are &ritten( that ye "ight believe that 7esus is the 5hrist, the ;on of GodB and that believin ye mi ht have life throu h his name.% &7ohn 1A#'( %;o then faith cometh by hearin , and hearin by the word of God.% &Romans (A#(D.

%:e that believeth on "e( as the scri$ture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of livin water. <$ut this spa,e he of the ;pirit, which they that believe on him should receive# for the :oly Ghost was not yet ivenB because that 7esus was not yet lorified.>% &7ohn D#'@&'3. %/orasmuch as ye ,now that ye &ere not redee"ed with corruptible thin s, as silver and old, from your vain conversation received by tradition fro" your fathersB $ut with the precious blood of 5hrist, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot#... $ein born a ain, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the &ord of God, which liveth and abideth for ever.% &( 2eter (#(@&1'.

Section B.#@ Conse2uences of 1uther
Quote- "0n Christ&s system what im#ortant #art has the %ible* - The %ible is one source of truth' +thers are - historical records tradition < the abidin$ #resence of the 1oly ?#irit' (limination of any of the three elements in the eAuation of Christ&s true church would be fatal to it&s claims to be such'" !n Christ*s o&n &ords( &hat $rofit is there in the traditions of "en that lay aside the &ritten co""and"ents of God? %$ut he answered and said unto them, ?"hy do ye also trans ress the commandment of God by your tradition!... Ye hypocrites, well did *saias prophesy of you, sayin ( This $eo$le dra&eth nigh unto "e &ith their "outh( and honoureth "e &ith their li$s; but their heart is far fro" "e. But in vain they do &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en." &4atthew (0#'&3. %.hen the Pharisees and scribes as-ed hi"( ,hy &al- not thy disci$les according to the tradition of the elders...! :e answered and said unto them, "ell hath *saias prophesied of you hypocrites, as it is written, .his people honoureth me with their lips, but their heart is far from me. %o&beit in vain do they &orshi$ "e( teaching for doctrines the co""and"ents of "en. .or laying aside the co""and"ent of God( ye hold the tradition of "en... /ull well ye re9ect the co""and"ent of God( that ye "ay -ee$ your o&n tradition... /a-ing the &ord of God of none effect through your tradition , which ye have delivered# and "any such li-e things do ye." &4ar, D#0&('.

Section B.#A Bible and Christ*s syste"
Quote- "Now that the New Testament is com#lete < available what unsolvable #roblem remains* The im#ossibility of the %ible to ex#lain itself' The %ible must have an authoriBed inter#reter' 5 )eter !650 5 )eter 36!C 9cts @630-3!'" %"herefore, my beloved, as ye have always obeyed, not as in my presence only, but now much more in my absence, wor, out your own salvation with fear and tremblin .% &2hilippians 1#(1. %"ho art thou that Cud est another man?s servant! to his own master he standeth or falleth. Yea, he shall be holden up# for God is able to ma,e him stand. One man esteemeth one day above another# another esteemeth every day ali,e. 1et every "an be fully $ersuaded in his o&n "ind." &Romans ()#)&0. %The elders which are amon you ! e)hort, who am also an elder, and a witness of the sufferin s of 5hrist, and also a parta,er of the lory that shall be revealed# /eed the floc, of God which is amon you, ta,in the oversi ht thereof, not by constraint, but willin lyB not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mindB 6either as being lords over God*s heritage, but bein ensamples to the floc,.% &( 2eter 0#(&'.

Section B.#B 6e& Testa"ent insolvable $roble"s today
Quote- "2ho is the official ex#ounder of the scri#tures* The 1oly ?#irit actin$ throu$h < within the church which Christ founded !8 centuries a$o' /u:e !06!C ;atthew !C6!@'" And &ho is the true church( those &ho lay aside the co""and"ents of God? Those that $ro"ote the $ractices and doctrines of $agans( and conde"n to death as heretics those &ho don*t? 7r those &ho -ee$ the ,ord of God( and the original doctrines as taught by the a$ostles intact? %.hen they that gladly received his &ord were baptiFed# and the same day there were added unto them about three thousand souls. And they <such as should be saved& v.)D> continued stedfastly in the a$ostles* doctrine...% &Acts 1#)(&)D.

%...- besou ht thee to... char e some that they teach no other doctrine,... /rom which some havin swerved have turned aside unto vain Can lin ...% &( .imothy (#'&=. %.a,e heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in the"3 for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself( and the" that hear thee." &( timothy )#(=. !f the Ro"an Catholic church is not the true church( fro" &here did she co"e? %.he maCor elements of what appeared later as Catholic structure and Catholic belief cannot be clearly $erceived before the +nd century... the traditional persecutions of the 5hristians were isolated local incidents, e9cept for the persecutions by the emperors Decius, Ealerian, and Diocletian in the 'rd century... they did not foresee that Christianity &ould reach a co"$ro"ise with the empire, that it &ould beco"e *Ro"an*... .he most important theolo ical event of the period was the establishment of the school of Ale9andria, illuminated by 5lement and Ori en, which initiated a celebrated school of Platonists." &*ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol. (0, pa es 3@=&3@D.

Section B.+C 4)$ounder of Scri$ture
Quote- "2hat are the effects of the catholic use of the %ible* 1er system $ets results in unity of faith'" %as the catholic use of the Bible assured unity of faith? -n %abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, Ralph *. "oodrow, on pa es 31&3=, writes& %*ven a number of popes& includin Eirilinus, -nnocent ---, 5lement -E, Gre ory L-, :adrian E-, and 2aul -E& had reCected the doctrine of papal infallibilityH... $ishop 7oseph ;trossmayer <(@(0&(3A0>... pointed out that some of the popes had opposed other popes... 2ope ;tephen E- <@3=&@3D> had brou ht former pope /ormosus to trial... pope /ormosus had been dead for ei ht months... %2ope :onorius -, after his death, was denounced as a heretic by the ;i9th council... %2ope Ei ilius... removed his condemnation... Duelin was authoriFed by 2ope *u ene --- <(()0&((0'>. Later 2ope 7ulius -- <(0A'&(0('> and 2ope 2ius -E <(003&(0=0> forbade it. At one time in the eleventh century, there were three popes, all of which were deposed by the council convened by the *mperor :enry ---. Later in the same century 5lement --- was opposed by Eictor --- and afterwards by Grban -- . %o& could $o$es be infallible &hen they o$$osed each other? %"hat is ,nown as the reat schism came in ('D@ and lasted for fifty years. -talians elected Grban E- and the /rench cardinals chose 5lement E--. 2opes cursed each other year after year until a council disposed both and elected anotherH %2ope ;i9tus had a version of the $ible prepared which he declared to be authentic. .wo years later 2ope 5lement E--- declared that it was full of errors and ordered another to be madeH %2ope Gre ory - repudiated the title of ?Gniversal $ishop? as bein ?profane, superstitious, hau hty, and invented by the first apostate.? Yet, throu h the centuries, other popes have claimed this title. %2ope :adrian -- <@=D&@D1> declared civil marria e to be valid, but 2ope 2ius E-- <(@AA&(@1'> condemned them as invalid %2ope *u ene -E <())'&())D> condemned 7oan of Arc to be burned alive as a witch. Later, another pope, $enedict -E, in (3(3, declared her to be a ?saint? % .his is Cust a minute e9ample of supposedly %infallible% popes contradictin each other, and provin the hypocrisy of the above 8uote. !s the Catholic syste" of faith fro" the a$ostles and the Bible( or is it fro" $hiloso$hy &hich the Bible &arns against( and conde"ns? %*ven before the Reformation, faith in Ro"an Catholicis" had develo$ed an e"$hasis that is not rooted in the 6e& Testa"ent but can be traced bac, to the Ale9andrian school of theolo y and Au ustine... .his emphasis ultimately was formulated in the ('th century by .homas A8uinas in a definition of faith & canoniFed by the 5ouncil of .rent and the first Eatican council & as an intellectual assent iven to revealed truth... Roman 5atholic theolo ians distin uish between revelation in a broad

sense, which means ,nowled e about God deduced fro" nature and "an...% <and therefore actually $hiloso$hy> &*ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol. (0, pa e 331&33'. %$eware lest any man spoil you throu h philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after 5hrist.% &5olossians 1#@. Does the Catholic insistence on relying on the traditions of "en and &orldly &isdo" of $hiloso$hy assure unity of faith? %"hy do thy disciples trans ress the tradition of the elders! for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. $ut he answered and said unto them, ?"hy do ye also trans ress the commandment of God by your tradition! /or God commanded... $ut ye... made the commandment of God of none effect by your tradition. 8e hy$ocrites, well did *saias prophesy of you, sayin , .his people draweth ni h unto me with their mouth, and honoureth me with their lipsB but their heart is far from me. $ut in vain they do worship me, teachin for doctrines the commandments of men.% &4atthew (0#1&3. %/or it is written, - will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will brin to nothin the understandin of the prudent. "here is the wise! where is the scribe! where is the disputer of this world! hath not God made foolish the wisdom of this world! /or after that in the wisdom of God the &orld by &isdo" -ne& not God, it pleased God by the foolishness of preachin to save them that believe... And my speech and my preachin was not with enticin words of man?s wisdom, but in demonstration of the ;pirit and of power# .hat your faith should not stand in the &isdo" of "en, but in the power of God. :owbeit we spea, wisdom amon them that are perfect# yet not the &isdo" of this &orld, nor of the princes of this world, that come to nou ht# But &e s$ea- the &isdo" of God... ,hich none of the $rinces of this &orld -ne&# for had they ,nown it, they would not have crucified the Lord of lory... /or what man ,noweth the thin s of a man, save the spirit of man which is in him! even so the things of God -no&eth no "an, but the ;pirit of God. Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of GodB that we mi ht ,now the thin s that are freely iven to us of God. "hich thin s also we spea,, not in the words which man?s wisdom teacheth, but which the :oly Ghost teachethB comparin spiritual thin s with spiritual. $ut the natural man receiveth not the thin s of the ;pirit of God# for they are foolishness unto him# neither can he ,now them, because they are spiritually discerned... -f any man thin, himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him ac,nowled e that the thin s that - write unto you are the commandments of the Lord. $ut if any man be i norant, let him be i norant.% &( 5orinthians (#(3&1#(), ()#'D&'@.

Section B.+# 4ffects of Catholic 6e& Testa"ent use
Quote- "2hy are there so many non-Catholic churches* - %ecause there is so much different 3wron$4 inter#retation of the %ible' %ecause system is radically wron$'" ,hat is the real reason there are non Catholic churches? /rom Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p s '&)# "!n an address by the cardinals of the <Roman 5atholic> church to Po$e Pius !!!, who rei ned in (0A', the followin words are recorded. ?Of all the advice that we can offer your holiness, we must open your eyes well and use all $ossible force in the "atter, namely, to $er"it the reading of the gos$el as little as $ossible in all the countries under your Curisdiction. Let the very little part of the ospel which is usually read in mass, and let no one be $er"itted to read it more. so lon as people will be content with the small amount, your interest will properB but as soon as the people want to read more, your interest will be in to fail. The Bible is the boo- which more than any other thin has raised a ainst us the tumults and tempests by &hich &e have al"ost $erished. -n fact, if one co"$ares the teaching of the Bible &ith &hat ta-es $lace in our churches( he &ill soon find discord, and will realiDe that our teachings are often different fro" the Bible( and often still( contrary to it.? .he above is to be found in the National Library of 2aris, Eol. 1# pa es =0A and =0(.% And &hat is the &rong &ay to inter$ret the Bible? %And the 1ord God commanded the man, sayin , Of every tree of the arden thou mayest freely eat# $ut of the tree of the ,nowled e of ood and evil, thou shalt not eat of it# for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die... %Now the serpent was more subtil than any beast of the field which the 1ord God had made. And he said

unto the woman, Yea, hath God said, Ye shall not eat of every tree of the arden! And the woman said unto the serpent, "e may eat of the fruit of the trees of the arden# $ut of the fruit of the tree which is in the midst of the arden, God hath said, Ye shall not eat of it, neither shall ye touch it, lest ye die. And the ser$ent said unto the &o"an( 8e shall not surely die# /or God doth ,now that in the day ye eat thereof, then your eyes shall be o$ened( and ye shall be as gods, ,nowin ood and evil.% &Genesis 1#(=&(DB '#(& 0. %/or layin aside the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washin of pots and cups# and many other such li,e thin s ye do. And he said unto them, /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God, that ye may ,eep your own tradition.% &4ar, D#@&3. !s the Ro"an Catholic church( and "any of her Protestant offs$ring( guilty of "Re9ecting the co""and"ents of God that they "ay -ee$ their o&n tradition"? /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God& %And call no "an your father u$on the earth3 for one is your /ather, which is in heaven.% <4atthew 1'#3.> &that ye may ,eep your own tradition. /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God& %/or there is one God, and one "ediator bet&een God and "en( the "an Christ 'esus.% <( .imothy 1#0.> .hat ye may ,eep your own tradition& %.../rom the Raccolta, a collection of prayers said to be indul enced by the popes and which will therefore ac,nowled e, - presume, to be in the truest sense authoritative# %:ail, Jueen, 4other of 4ercy, our Life, ;weetness, and :ope, all :ailH .o thee we cry, banished sons of *veB to thee we si h, roanin and weepin in this vale of tears. .urn then, O our advocate, thy merciful eye to us, and after this our e9ile, show us 7esus, the blessed fruit of thy womb, O merciful, O love, O sweet Eir in 4ary... %4ary is our refu e, help and Asylum. -n 7udaea, in ancient times, there were cities of refu e, wherein criminals who fled there for protection were e9empt from the punishment they had deserved. 6o&adays these cities of refu e are not so numerousB there is but one( and that is /ary. <:.A. -ronside, in his %Letters .o A Roman 5atholic 2riest%, *a le $oo,sMLoiFeau9 $rothers, on p s 11&1=> /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God& %"herefore, my dearly beloved, flee from idolatry.% <( 5orinthians (A#().> %6now ye not that the unri hteous shall not inherit the ,in dom of God! $e not deceived# neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with man,ind, Nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drun,ards, nor revilers, nor e9tortioners, shall inherit the -ingdo" of God.% <( 5orinthians =#3&(A.> %$ut the hour cometh, and now is, when the true &orshi$$ers shall &orshi$ the .ather in s$irit and in truth# for the /ather see,eth such to worship him. God is a ;pirit# and they that &orshi$ hi" "ust &orshi$ hi" in s$irit and in truth." <7ohn )#1'&1).> .hat ye may ,eep your own tradition& %God approves the use and veneration of sacred pictures and ima es to stimulate reli ious fervor.% /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God& %$eware lest any man spoil you throu h philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after 5hrist.% <5olossians 1#@.> .hat ye may ,eep your own tradition& %Roman 5atholic doctrine is derived from... tradition.% /ull well ye reCect the first commandment of God&

%And 7esus answered him, .he first of all the commandments is, :ear, O -sraelB .he Lord our God is one 1ord# And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy stren th# this is the first commandment. And the second is li,e, namely this, .hou shalt love thy nei hbour as thyself. .here is none other commandment reater than these. <4ar, (1#13&'(.> .hat ye may ,eep your own tradition& %.he :oly .rinity& the basis for the doctrine of the .rinity... .he 8uestion as to how to reconcile the encounter with God in this threefold fi ure <.he /ather, 7esus 5hrist, and the :oly ;pirit> with faith in the oneness of God, which was the 7ews? and 5hristians? characteristic mar, of distinction over a ainst pa anism, a itated the piety of ancient 5hristendom in the deepest way... This 2uestion &as ans&ered in the 6eo$latonic "eta$hysics of bein ... Christian theology too- the 6eo$latonic "eta$hysics of substance as &ell as its doctrine of hy$ostasis as the de$arture $oint for inter$reting the relationshi$ of the ?/ather? to the ?;on?...% &*ncyclopedia $rittannica, (3D), (0th edition, vol. ), pa e )@0. %.R-N-.Y. .he term N.rinityN <Gree, troas> was first used by .heophilus of Antioch <fl.c. (@A A.D.>... 7udaism emer ed...as the purest form of monotheism in the ancient world... .he full development of .rinitarianism too, place in the "est, in the ;cholasticism of the 4iddle A es, when an e9planation was underta,en in terms of philosophy and psycholo y, especially of the recovered Aristotlianism of the ('th century. .he classical e9position is found in the wor,s of ;t. .homas A8uinas, whose views on this subCect have dominated most of later 5hristian theolo y, both Roman 5atholic and 2rotestant.% &*ncyclopedia Americana, (3@'. <Remember& not all 5hristians are either 5atholic, or 2rotestant. 2rotestants are basically Cust dau hter churches of 5atholicism> And, full well ye reCect the second commandment of God& %And 7esus answered him, .he first of all the commandments is, :ear, O -sraelB .he Lord our God is one Lord# And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy stren th# this is the first commandment. And the second is li,e, namely this, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. .here is none other commandment reater than these. <4ar, (1#13&'(.> <Also& 1.h '#()# And if any man obey not our word by this epistle, note that man, and have no company with him, that he may be ashamed. 8et count hi" not as an ene"y, but admonish him as a brother.> .hat ye may ,eep your own tradition& %Gnder stress of special circumstances, various re ulations were made by the church to protect the people from bein spiritually poisoned by the corrupted and distorted translations of the $ible. :ence opposition.% %-n8uisition, 4edieval, a $a$al 9udicial institution that combated heresy... "During Christianity*s first three centuries, penalties a ainst heretics were e)clusively s$iritual, usually e9communication. After 5hristianity had become the established reli ion in the )th century <i.e. Roman 5atholic>, heretics ca"e to be loo-ed u$on as ene"ies... 2enalties included... the death penalty... 4any in8uisitors... won reputations for e)cessive cruelty.% &*ncyclopedia $rittannica, (3D), (0th edition, vol. 0 pa e '==.

Section B.++ ,hy non Catholic churches =bad inter$retation>
Quote- "2ithout divine aid could the catholic church have maintained her ! faith* Not any more than the non-Catholics have done - they are #roof'" !s the true church the only church that &ould last do&n through the ages? %...-t is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman. $ut he who was of the bondwoman was born after the fleshB but he of the freewoman was by promise. ,hich things are an allegory# for these are the two covenantsB the one from the mount ;inai, which endereth to bonda e, which is A ar. /or this A ar is mount ;inai in Arabia, and answereth to 7erusalem which now is, and is in bonda e with her children. $ut 7erusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all. /or it is written, ReCoice, thou barren that bearest notB brea, forth and cry, thou that travailest not# for the desolate hath "any "ore children than she &hich hath an husband. Now we, brethren, as -saac was, are the children of promise. $ut as then he that &as born after the flesh $ersecuted hi" that &as born after the S$irit( even so it is no&. Nevertheless what saith the scripture! 5ast out the bondwoman and her son# for the son of the bondwoman shall not be heir with the son of the freewoman.% &Galatians )#11&'A. %God hath not cast away his people which he fore,new. "ot ye not what the scripture saith of *lias! how

he ma,eth intercession to God a ainst -srael sayin , Lord, they have ,illed thy prophets, and di ed down thine altarsB and - am left alone, and they see, my life. $ut what saith the answer of God unto him! - have reserved to myself seven thousand men, who have not bowed the ,nee to the ima e of $aal. 4ven so then at this $resent ti"e also there is a re"nant according to the election of grace." &Romans ((#1&0. %.ell ye your children of it, and let your children tell their children, and their children another eneration. .hat which the palmerworm hath left hath the locust eatenB and that which the locust hath left hath the can,erworm eatenB and that which the can,erworm hath left hath the caterpillar eaten. Awa,e, ye drun,ards, and weepB and howl, all ye drin,ers of wine, because of the ne& &ine; for it is cut off fro" your "outh. .or a nation is co"e u$ u$on "y land <i.e. pa an Rome has mer ed with 5hristianity>, stron , and without number, whose teeth are the teeth of a lion, and he hath the chee, teeth of a reat lion. %e hath laid "y vine &aste( and bar-ed "y fig tree3 he hath "ade it clean bare( and cast it a&ay; the branches thereof are "ade &hite... .herefore also now, saith the LORD, turn ye even to me with all your heart, and with fastin , and with weepin , and with mournin # And rend your heart, and not your arments, and turn unto the LORD your God# for he is racious and merciful, slow to an er, and of reat ,indness, and repenteth him of the evil.... $e lad then, ye children of Kion, and reCoice in the LORD your God# for he hath iven you the former rain moderately, and he will cause to come down for you the rain, the for"er rain( and the latter rain in the first "onth. And the floors shall be full of wheat, and the fats shall overflow with wine and oil. And - will restore to you the years that the locust hath eaten, the can,erworm, and the caterpillar, and the palmerworm, my reat army which - sent amon you. &7oel (#'&DB 1#(1&('B 1#1'&10.

Section B.+: Catholicis" and Divine aid
Quote- "2ere there any #rinted %ibles before /uther* )rintin$ was invented in !""0 - Des Catholic'" Does this state"ent $rove that the scri$tures do not need to be -e$t and follo&ed above the traditions of "en? The %ebre&s did not have $rinted Bibles either( yet &ere they not co""anded to -ee$ God*s &ritten ,ord? %.his boo, of the law shall not depart out of thy mouthB but thou shalt meditate therein day and ni ht, that thou mayest observe to do accordin to all that is written therein# for then thou shalt ma,e thy way prosperous, and then thou shalt have ood success.% &7oshua (#@. %Go, en8uire of the 1ord for me, and for them that are left in -srael and in 7udah, concernin the words of the boo, that is found# for great is the &rath of the 1ord that is poured out upon us, because our fathers have not -e$t the &ord of the 1ord( to do after all that is &ritten in this boo-.% 1 5hronicles ')#1(. And to us, the apostles wrote such thin s as& %-f any man thin, himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him ac,nowled e that the thin s that - write unto you are the commandments of the Lord.% &( 5orinthians ()#'D. %! &rite not these thin s to shame you, but as my beloved sons ! &arn you. /or thou h ye have ten thousand instructors in 5hrist, yet have ye not "any fathers# for in 5hrist 7esus - have be otten you throu h the ospel.% ( 5orinthians )#()&(0. %.his second epistle, beloved, ! no& &rite unto you; in both &hich ! stir u$ your $ure "inds by &ay of re"e"brance# .hat ye may be mindful of the words which were spo,en before by the holy prophets, and of the commandment of us the apostles of the Lord and ;aviour.% &1 2eter '#(&1. %$eloved, when ! gave all diligence to &rite unto you of the co""on salvation, it was needful for me to write unto you, and e9hort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith which was once delivered unto the saints. /or there are certain men crept in unawares, who were before of old ordained to this condemnation, un odly men, turnin the race of our God into lasciviousness, and denyin the only Lord God, and our Lord 7esus 5hrist.% 7ude (#'&). %4y little children( these things &rite ! unto you( that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the /ather, 7esus 5hrist the ri hteous.% &( 7ohn 1#(.

Section B.+5 Printed Bible before 1uther

Quote- ",urin$ the middle a$es did the Catholic church manifest hostility to the %ible as her adversaries claim* Ender stress of s#ecial circumstances various re$ulations were made by the church to #rotect the #eo#le from bein$ s#iritually #oisoned by the corru#ted and distorted translations of the %ible' 1ence o##osition'" 4)actly &hat -ind of "o$$osition" did the Catholic church i"$ose on those &ho refused to co"e into her fold? *ncyclopedia $rittannica, (3D), (0th edition& %"aldenses... reli ious movement that ori inated in (1th century /rance, the devotees of which sou ht to follow 5hrist in poverty and simplicity... .he "aldenses departed from 5atholic teachin by reCectin some of the seven sacraments and the notion of pur atory. .heir views were based on a simplified biblicism, moral ri orism, and criticism of abuses in the contemporary church... their movement... spread rapidly... Ro"e res$onded vigorously( turning fro" e)co""unication to active $ersecution and death." vol L, pa e 0(3. -n %/o9?s $oo, of 4artyr?s%, edited by "illiam $. /orbush, on pa es )'&@D, we read& %...Disre ardin the ma9ims and the spirit of the ospel, the papal church, armin herself with the power of the sword, ve9ed the 5hurch of God and wasted it for several centuries, a period most appropriately termed in history, the ?dar, a es?... %2ersecutions of the "aldenses of /rance... %Po$ery having brought various innovations into the Church ... some few... plainly determined to show the li ht of the Gospel in its real purity... %$eren arious, who, about the year (AAA, boldly preached Gospel truths, accordin to their primitive purity... .o $eren arius succeeded 2eter $rius... <etc.>... $y the year of 5hrist (()A, the number of the reformed was very reat... -n A.D. (()D... :enericians... &ould not ad"it of any $roofs relative to religion( but &hat could be deduced fro" the scri$tures the"selves, the popish party ave them the name of apostolics... 2eter "aldo... became a strenuous opposer to poperyB and from him the reformed... received the appellation of "aldenses... %2ope Ale9ander --- bein informed by the bishop of Lyons of those transactions, e9communicated "aldo and his adherents, and co""anded the bisho$ to e)ter"inate the", if possible from the face of the earthB hence be an the papal persecutions a ainst the "aldenses... .he proceedin s of "aldo and the reformed, occasioned the first rise of the in8uisitorsB for 2ope -nnocent --- authoriFed certain mon,s as in8uisitors... .he power of the in8uisitors was unlimited... These $ersecutions &ere continued for several centuries under different $o$es and other great dignitaries of the Catholic Church ... %%2ersecutions of the Albi enses %.he Albi enses... were condemned on the score of reli ion in the 5ouncil of Lateran, by order of 2ope Ale9ander ---. The $o$e... sent persons throu hout all *urope, in order to raise forces to act coercively a ainst the Albi enses, and $ro"ised $aradise to all that &ould co"e to this &ar, which he termed a :oly "ar... .his was followed by a severe persecution a ainst the Albi ensesB and e)$ress orders that the laity should not be $er"itted to read the sacred scri$tures ... %4any persons of the reformed persuasion were, about this time, beaten( rac-ed( scourged( and burnt to death... A native of 4alta was burnt by a slo& fire* for sayin that 4ass was a plain denial of the death and passion of 5hrist... %A.D. (0)=, 2eter 5hapot brou ht a number of $ibles in the /rench ton ue to /rance, and publicly sold them thereB for &hich he &as brought to trial, sentenced, and e)ecuted a few days afterward... %.he $artholomew 4assacre at 2aris, etc... %The savage $a$ists... sle& "any reat and honorable persons who were 2rotestants... and fallin upon the common people, they continued the slau hter for many days... ;o furious was their hellish ra e, that they sle& all $a$ists &ho" they sus$ected to be not very staunch in their diabolical religion ...% -n other words, %under stress of special circumstances% the 5atholic church even "urdered their o&n Catholic brethren for being guilty of nothing "ore than being &ea- in their Catholic faith0 ;ince

5atholic teachers claim that the Roman 5atholic 5hurch is the ori inal, unchan ed, apostolic church, and as this 5atholic teacher himself claims it is %infallible%& are your ready, dear 5atholic, to ,ill me for writin these words! Are you ready to ,ill all who oppose the teachin s of 5atholicism, includin those within your faith that are uilty of nothin more than bein wea, in your faith! /or your 5atholic priests claim complete authority over your faith, and this is their historical modus o#erandi.HH -t is unfortunate that the papists did not read and obey the commandments of 7esus 5hrist the Lord as 8uoted in the $ible, for they would have discovered these words& %Another parable put he forth unto them, sayin , .he ,in dom of heaven is li,ened unto a man which sowed ood seed in his field# $ut while men slept, his enemy came and sowed tares amon the wheat, and went his way. $ut when the blade was sprun up, and brou ht forth fruit, then appeared the tares also. ;o the servants of the householder ca"e and said unto hi"( Sir( didst not thou so& good seed in thy field? fro" &hence then hath it tares! :e said unto them, An enemy hath done this. .he servants said unto him, ,ilt thou then that &e go and gather the" u$! $ut he said, 6ay; lest &hile ye gather u$ the tares( ye root u$ also the &heat &ith the". Let both row to ether until the harvest...% &4atthew ('#1)& 'A. %And 7ohn answered and said, 4aster, we saw one castin out devils in thy nameB and we forbad him, because he followeth not with us. And 7esus said unto him, .orbid hi" not# for he that is not a ainst us is for us.% &Lu,e 3#)3&0A. %Ye have heard that it hath been said, .hou shalt love thy nei hbour, and hate thine enemy. But ! say unto you( 1ove your ene"ies, bless them that curse you, do good to the" that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute youB That ye "ay be the children of your .ather &hich is in heaven# for he ma,eth his sun to rise on the evil and on the ood, and sendeth rain on the Cust and on the unCust.% 4atthew 0#)'&)0. %Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather ive place unto wrath# for it is written, Een eance is mineB - will repay, saith the Lord. .herefore if thine ene"y hunger( feed hi"; if he thirst( give hi" drin-# for in so doin thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head. $e not overcome of evil, but overco"e evil &ith good.% &Romans (1#(3&1(. Returnin to %/o9?s $oo, of 4artyr?s%, edited by "illiam $. /orbush, on pa es )'&@D, we read& %.../rom 2aris the destruction spread to all 8uarters of the realm... %At Orleans, a thousand were slain of men, women, and children, and si9 thousand at Rouen. At 4eldith, two hundred were put into prison, and later brou ht out by units, and cruelly murdered. At Lyons, ei ht hundred were massacred. :ere children han in about their parents, and parents affectionately embracin their children, were pleasant food for the swords and bloodthirsty "inds of those &ho call the"selves the Catholic Church. %ere three hundred &ere slain in the bisho$*s house; and the i"$ious "on-s &ould suffer none to be buried... %...So"e $riests, holdin up a crucifi9 in one hand, and a da er in the other, ran to the chiefs of the murderers, and strongly e)horted the" to s$are neither relations nor friends...% %....he "assacres on ;t., $artholomew?s day are $ainted in the royal saloon of the Fatican at Ro"e, with the followin inscription# 2ontife9, 5oli ny necem probat, i.e., ?The $o$e a$$roves of 5oli ny?s death?... %At $ourdeau9, at the insti ation of a villainous mon,, who used to ur e the papists to slau hter in his sermons, two hundred and si9ty four were cruelly murdered... They s$ared neither age nor se); defiling the &o"en( and then "urdering the"... Amon whom were two sisters, abused before their father, whom the assassins bound to a wall to see them, and then slew them and him. %.he president of .urin... was cruelly beaten with clubs, stripped of his clothes, and hun feet upwards, with his head and breast in the river# before he was dead, they opened his belly, pluc,ed out his entrails, and threw them into the riverB and then carried his heart about the city u$on a s$ear...% .he ;criptures say& %$eware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep?s clothin , but inwardly they are ravenin wolves. 8e shall -no& the" by their fruits. Do men ather rapes of thorns, or fi s of thistles! *ven so every

ood tree brin eth forth ood fruitB but a corrupt tree brin eth forth evil fruit. A ood tree cannot brin forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree brin forth ood fruit. *very tree that brin eth not forth ood fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire. "herefore by their fruits ye shall ,now them.% &4atthew D#(0&1A. %Ye serpents, ye eneration of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell! "herefore, behold( ! send unto you $ro$hets( and &ise "en( and scribes3 and so"e of the" ye shall -ill and crucifyB and some of them shall ye scour e in your syna o ues, and persecute them from city to city# That u$on you "ay co"e all the righteous blood shed u$on the earth( fro" the blood of righteous Abel unto the blood of Gacharias son of Barachias( &ho" ye sle& bet&een the te"$le and the altar .% &4atthew 1'#''&'0. %!f the &orld hate you( ye -no& that it hated "e before it hated you. -f ye were of the world, the world would love his own# but because ye are not of the world, but - have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you. Remember the word that - said unto you, .he servant is not reater than his lord. -f they have persecuted me, they will also persecute youB if they have ,ept my sayin , they will ,eep yours also. $ut all these thin s will they do unto you for my name?s sa,e, because they -no& not hi" that sent "e.% &7ohn (0#(@&1(. %And there came one of the seven an els which had the seven vials, and tal,ed with me, sayin unto me, 5ome hither; ! &ill she& unto thee the 9udg"ent of the great &hore that sitteth u$on "any &aters # "ith whom the ,in s of the earth have committed fornication, and the inhabitants of the earth have been made drun, with the wine of her fornication. ;o he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness# and saw a woman sit upon a scarlet coloured beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet colour, and dec,ed with old and precious stones and pearls, havin a olden cup in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication# And upon her forehead was a name written, /ystery( Babylon the Great( the "other of harlots and abo"inations of the earth. And ! sa& the &o"an drun-en &ith the blood of the saints( and &ith the blood of the "artyrs of 'esus# and when - saw her, - wondered with reat admiration. And the an el said unto me, "herefore didst thou marvel! ! &ill tell thee the "ystery of the &o"an, and of the beast that carrieth her, which hath the seven heads and ten horns... %And here is the mind which hath wisdom. The seven heads are seven "ountains( on &hich the &o"an sitteth... %And he saith unto me, The &aters which thou sawest, where the whore sitteth, are $eo$les( and "ultitudes( and nations( and tongues. %And the &o"an which thou sawest is that great city( &hich reigneth over the -ings of the earth. %And after these thin s - saw another an el come down from heaven, havin reat powerB and the earth was li htened with his lory. And he cried mi htily with a stron voice, sayin , $abylon the reat is fallen, is fallen, and is become the habitation of devils, and the hold of every foul spirit, and a ca e of every unclean and hateful bird. .or all nations have drun- of the &ine of the &rath of her fornication, and the ,in s of the earth have committed fornication with her, and the merchants of the earth are wa9ed rich throu h the abundance of her delicacies. And - heard another voice from heaven, sayin , Co"e out of her( "y $eo$le( that ye be not $arta-ers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her pla ues. /or her sins have reached unto heaven, and God hath remembered her ini8uities. Reward her even as she rewarded you, and double unto her double accordin to her wor,s# in the cup which she hath filled fill to her double. :ow much she hath glorified herself, and lived deliciously, so much torment and sorrow ive her# for she saith in her heart( ! sit a 2ueen, and am no widow, and shall see no sorrow. And in her &as found the blood of $ro$hets( and of saints( and of all that &ere slain u$on the earth.% &Revelation (D#(&(@#1). -nterpretations& %The great &hore that sitteth u$on "any &aters" H "The &aters... are $eo$les( and "ultitudes( and nations( and tongues.% Rev. (D#( I (D#(0 "hat church, other than the 5atholic church, can and does claim such %catholicity% amon so many nations of the world! %%aving seven heads" "The seven heads are seven "ountains( on &hich the &o"an sitteth". Rev (D# 'I3

"hich church, claimin hills!

lobal catholicity, is also situated at a place ,nown for bein surrounded by seven

%6o other city in the &orld has ever been celebrated( as the city of Ro"e has( for its situation on seven hills. 2a an poets and orators, who had no thou ht of elucidatin prophecy, have ali,e characteriFed it as ?the seven hilled city.? .hus Eir il refers to it% ?Rome has both become the most beautiful <city> in the world, and alone has surrounded for herself seven heights with a wall.? 2ropertius, in the same strain, spea,s of it <only addin another trait, which completes the Apocalyptic picture> as ?.he lofty city on seven hills, which overn the whole world.? -t?s ? overnin the whole world? is Cust the counterpart of the Divine statement& ?which rei neth over the ,in s of the earth? <Rev. 9vii.(@>. to call Ro"e the city *of the seven hills* &as by its citiDens held to be as descri$tive as to call it by its o&n $ro$er na"e.% &Rev. Ale9ander :islop, %.he .wo $abylons%, p . 1. "The great &hore... the "other of harlots...the &o"an which thou sawest is that great city( &hich reigneth over the -ings of the earth.% Rev (D# (, 0 I(@ %.he Roman 5atholic 5hurch... in fact... has been deeply involved in the politics of *urope. "hen the 2apal states e9isted <D0)&(@DA>, these were as enuinely political as the ,in doms of /rance and ;pain... .he popes were unable to draw a real distinction between their spiritual soverei nty and their temporal soverei nty, and without scruple , it often seemed, they used the 2apal ;tates to support the authority of the church&or more fre8uently&the church to support the power of the 2apal ;tates. 4any of the maneuvers can now be seen to have been abuses of power when that happened. .his has meant that the structure of Roman 5atholic power over the centuries too, on the features of the political soverei nty normal in the 4iddle A es and in early modern times.% &*ncyclopedia $ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. (0, pa e 3@=. /urthermore, then, what lobal reli ious system <woman> which is situated on a seven hilled city, comes close to the claim of rei nin over the ,in s of the earth, as the Roman 5atholic church can! No other sect of 5hristianity comes close to claimin to have any influence over the ,in s of the earth, as the Roman 5atholic 5hurch has. No reli ious system in the world can be compared to this passa e in Revelation as e9actly as can the Roman 5atholic church. Anyone readin this 5hrist iven prophecy ou ht to be deathly afraid of bein associated with a system which comes even close to this, let alone so e9actly fulfils this prophecy a ainst which God :imself uses such condemnin lan ua e. Note# althou h the $ible says& %And this ospel of the ,in dom shall be $reached in all the world for a witness unto all nationsB and then shall the end come.% <&4atthew 1)#()>, .he $ible does not say that the bi 7esus>, the $ible says& est part of the world will be part of the true church <before the return of

%*nter ye in at the strait ate# for &ide is the gate( and broad is the &ay( that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which o in thereat# $ecause strait is the ate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and fe& there be that find it. Be&are of false $ro$hets( &hich co"e to you in shee$*s clothing( but in&ardly they are ravening &olves.% &4atthew D#('&(0. Returnin a ain, to %/o9?s $oo, of 4artyr?s%, edited by "illiam $. /orbush, on pa es )'&@D, we read& %At $arre great cruelty &as used, even to young children... countin it sport to cut off their arms and le s and afterward ,ill them... %An Account of the -n8uisition... %.he most Fealous of all the popish mon,s, and those who most implicitly obeyed the 5hurch of Rome, were the Dominicans and /ranciscans# these, therefore, the pope thou ht proper to invest with an e9clusive ri ht of presidin over the different courts of -n8uisition, and ave them the most unlimited powers, as Cud es dele ated by him, and immediately representin his person# they &ere $er"itted to e)co""unicate( or sentence to death &ho" they thought $ro$er, u$on the "ost slight infor"ation of heresy. they were allowed to publish crusades a ainst all whom they deemed heretics, and enter into lea ues with soverei n princes, to Coin their crusades with their forces... %.he principal accusation a ainst those who are subCect to this <the in8uisition> tribunal is heresy, which comprises all that is spo,en, or written, a ainst any of the articles of the creed, or the traditions of the

Roman 5hurch. .he in8uisition li,ewise ta,es co niFance of such as are accused of bein ma icians, and of such &ho read the Bible in the co""on language... %"hen the person impeached is condemned, he is either severly whipped, violently tortured, sent to the alleys, or sentenced to death... %;ummary of the -n8uisition... %7f the "ultitudes who perished by the -n8uisition throu hout the world, no authentic record is no& discoverable. $ut wherever popery had power, there was the tribunal... %-n ;pain the calculation is more attainable... "e are to recollect that this number was in a country where $ersecution had for ages abolished all religious differences... 8et( even in S$ain( thus gleaned of all heresy( the !n2uisition could still s&ell its lists of "urders to thirty t&o thousand ... %-n the thirteenth century, the popedom was at the summit of mortal dominionB it was independent of all ,in domsB it ruled &ith a ran- of influence never before or since $ossessed by a hu"an sce$tor B it was the ac,nowled ed soverei n of body and soulB to all earthly intents its power was immeasurable for ood or evil... $ut its nature was hostile... Ro"e( in the hour of its consu""ate grandeur( tee"ed &ith the "onstrous and horrid birth of the in2uisition0" $runo, Giordano, a (=th century philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician... is perhaps, chiefly remembered for the tra ic death he suffered at the sta-e... 2ope 5lement E--- ordered that he should be sentenced as an impenitent and pernicious heretic. On /ebruary (D, (=AA he was brou ht to the 5ampo de /iori, his ton ue in a a , and burned alive% (ncyclo#edia %rittannica, (3D), (0th edition, Eol. ', pa es ')0&')D. This is the church Catholics no& clai" as their heritage and lineage directly to Christ. !s the $resent day Ro"an Catholic Church re$entant of these centuries of hideous "urders and $ersecutions? Does the Ro"an Catholic Church disclai" being $arta-ers of such a&ful cruelties and horrors? 7r instead( does the Catholic Church condone the above atrocities? %Ender stress of s$ecial circu"stances( various regulations &ere "ade by the church to $rotect the $eo$le fro" being s$iritually $oisoned by the corrupted and distorted translations of the $ible. %ence o$$osition...% %A new commandment - ive unto you, .hat ye love one anotherB as - have loved you, that ye also love one another. By this shall all "en -no& that ye are "y disci$les( if ye have love one to another.% &7ohn ('#')&'0. %And hereby &e do -no& that we ,now him, if &e -ee$ his co""and"ents. %e that saith( ! -no& hi"( and -ee$eth not his co""and"ents( is a liar( and the truth is not in hi". $ut whoso -ee$eth his &ord, in him verily is the love of God perfected# hereby ,now we that we are in him. %e that saith he abideth in hi" ought hi"self also so to &al-( even as he &al-ed. $rethren, - write no new commandment unto you, but an old commandment which ye had from the be innin . .he old commandment is the word which ye have heard from the be innin . A ain, a new commandment - write unto you, which thin is true in him and in you# because the dar,ness is past, and the true li ht now shineth. %e that saith he is in the light( and hateth his brother( is in dar-ness even until no& . :e that loveth his brother abideth in the li ht, and there is none occasion of stumblin in him. $ut he that hateth his brother is in dar,ness, and wal,eth in dar,ness, and ,noweth not whither he oeth, because that dar-ness hath blinded his eyes.% ( 7ohn 1#'&((.

Section B.+< Catholic hostilities during "iddle =dar-> ages
Does the gro&th of heresies Biblically constitute a "stress of s$ecial circu"stances"? 7r does the Bible give e)$licit instructions( co""and"ents( and e)a"$les fro" 'esus and the a$ostles in 9ust e)actly ho& to deal &ith such circu"stances as heresy? %And if any "an obey not our &ord by this e$istle, note that man, and have no co"$any &ith hi", that he may be ashamed. Yet count hi" not as an ene"y( but ad"onish hi" as a brother." &1 .hessalonians '#()&(0. %Now &e co""and you( brethren, in the name of our Lord 7esus 5hrist, that ye &ithdra& yourselves

from every brother that wal,eth disorderly, and not after the tradition which he received of us.% &1 .hessalonians '#=. %Now - beseech you, brethren, "ar- the" &hich cause divisions and offenses contrary to the doctrine &hich ye have learned; and avoid the". /or they that are such serve not our Lord 7esus 5hrist, but their own bellyB and by ood words and fair speeches deceive the hearts of the simple.% &Romans (=#(D&(@. %....hese thin s teach and e9hort. !f any "an teach other&ise, and consent not to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord 7esus 5hrist, and to the doctrine which is accordin to odlinessB :e is proud, ,nowin nothin , but dotin about 8uestions and strifes of words, whereof cometh envy, strife, railin s, evil surmisin s, 2erverse disputin s of men of corrupt minds, and destitute of the truth, supposin that ain is odliness# fro" such &ithdra& thyself.% &( .imothy =#1&0. %/or &e &restle not against flesh and blood, but a ainst principalities, a ainst powers, a ainst the rulers of the dar,ness of this world, against s$iritual &ic-edness in high =heavenly> $laces. "herefore ta,e unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil day, and havin done all, to stand. ;tand therefore, havin your loins girt about &ith truth, and havin on the breast$late of righteousnessB And your feet shod &ith the $re$aration of the gos$el of peaceB Above all, ta,in the shield of faith( wherewith ye shall be able to 8uench all the fiery darts of the wic,ed. And ta,e the hel"et of salvation, and the s&ord of the S$irit( &hich is the &ord of God.% &*phesians =#(1&(D. %Another parable put he forth unto them, sayin , .he ,in dom of heaven is li,ened unto a man which sowed ood seed in his field# $ut while men slept, his enemy came and sowed tares amon the wheat, and went his way. $ut when the blade was sprun up, and brou ht forth fruit, then appeared the tares also. ;o the servants of the householder ca"e and said unto hi"( Sir( didst not thou so& good seed in thy field? fro" &hence then hath it tares! :e said unto them, An enemy hath done this. .he servants said unto him, ,ilt thou then that &e go and gather the" u$? But he said( 6ay; lest &hile ye gather u$ the tares( ye root u$ also the &heat &ith the". 1et both gro& together until the harvest ...% &4atthew ('#1)&'A. %And 7ohn answered and said, 4aster, we saw one castin out devils in thy nameB and we forbad him, because he followeth not with us. And 7esus said unto him, .orbid hi" not# for he that is not a ainst us is for us.% &Lu,e 3#)3&0A. %Ye have heard that it hath been said, .hou shalt love thy nei hbour, and hate thine enemy. But ! say unto you( 1ove your ene"ies, bless them that curse you, do good to the" that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you, and persecute youB That ye "ay be the children of your .ather &hich is in heaven# for he ma,eth his sun to rise on the evil and on the ood, and sendeth rain on the Cust and on the unCust.% 4atthew 0#)'&)0. %Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather ive place unto wrath# for it is written, Een eance is mineB - will repay, saith the Lord. .herefore if thine ene"y hunger( feed hi"; if he thirst( give hi" drin-# for in so doin thou shalt heap coals of fire on his head. $e not overcome of evil, but overco"e evil &ith good.% &Romans (1#(3&1(.

Section C.# 7rigins of Christ*s church
Quote- "+R0>0N? +- C1R0?T&? C1ERC1" ;atthew 5@6!5-50' 1istory #roves the !st )rotestant church was the /utheran founded in !5!= by the ex-#riest ;artin /uther'" .he above statement appears to ma,e the claim that the Roman 5atholic 5hurch was un8uestionably the only %5hristian% 5hurch for thousands of years. .his may be true as far as actual modern %2rotestant% churches are concerned, but history is far from silent as to other roups of $iblically centered 5hristianity, and the methods used, by the Roman 5atholic 5hurch, for their e9tinction. -n plain terms, to use the words found in /o9?s $oo, of 4artyrs& %...persecution <very specifically that of Roman 5atholicism toward other sects> had for a es abolished all reli ious differences...% %o& far bac- do non Ro"an Catholic churches go? *ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol ), pa e 013&

%*soteric 5hristianity. A tradition of esoteric Christianity has long e)isted alongside institutional <i.e. Roman 5atholic> 5hristianity. !t traces its roots to the 6e& Testa"ent and the early church... %5onse8uences of esoteric 5hristianity... As soon as the church became the established state church <i.e. the 5ouncil of Nicea, :+<. A.D.( and the mer in of pa an Rome with 5hristianity> esoteric roups had to share the eneral fate of all hereticsB i.e., persecution by the sate. -n this way esoteric Christianity &as included in the bloody history of $ersecution of heresies by the state church and the =$a$al Ro"an> Christian state...% Note# statements in parenthesis above are added, and are not of the ori inal author. 5oncernin %esotericism,% the $ible says& %$ut as it is written, *ye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the thin s which God hath prepared for them that love him. $ut God hath revealed them unto us by his ;pirit# for the ;pirit searcheth all thin s, yea, the deep thin s of God. /or what man ,noweth the thin s of a man, save the spirit Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of GodB that we mi ht ,now the thin s that are freely iven to us of God. ,hich things also &e s$ea-( not in the &ords &hich "an*s &isdo" teacheth( but &hich the %oly Ghost teacheth; co"$aring s$iritual things &ith s$iritual. But the natural "an receiveth not the things of the S$irit of God3 for they are foolishness unto hi"3 neither can he -no& the"( because they are s$iritually discerned.% &( 5orinthians 1#3&(). %All thin s are delivered unto me of my /ather# and no man ,noweth the ;on, but the /atherB neither ,noweth any man the /ather, save the ;on, and he to whomsoever the ;on will reveal him.% &4atthew ((#1D. %And the disciples came, and said unto him, "hy spea,est thou unto them in parables! :e answered and said unto them, $ecause it is given unto you to -no& the "ysteries of the -ingdo" of heaven( but to the" it is not given. /or whosoever hath, to him shall be iven, and he shall have more abundance# but whosoever hath not, from him shall be ta,en away even that he hath. .herefore spea, - to them in parables# because they seein see notB and hearin they hear not, neither do they understand. And in them is fulfilled the prophecy of *saias, which saith, $y hearin ye shall hear, and shall not understandB and seein ye shall see, and shall not perceive# /or this people?s heart is wa9ed ross, and their ears are dull of hearin , and their eyes they have closedB lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and - should heal them.% &4atthew ('#(A&(0. %And when he was alone, they that &ere about hi" &ith the t&elve as-ed of hi" the parable. And he said unto the"( Ento you it is given to -no& the "ystery of the ,in dom of God# but unto them that are without, all these thin s are done in parables.% &4ar, )#(A&((. %*ven the mystery which hath been hid from a es and from enerations, but now is made manifest to his saints# .o whom God would ma,e ,nown what is the riches of the lory of this mystery amon the GentilesB which is 5hrist in you, the hope of lory# "hom we preach, warnin every man, and teachin every man in all wisdomB that we may present every man perfect in 5hrist 7esus.% &5olossians (#1=&1@. %o& do the above scri$tural conce$ts co"$are &ith those of the Platonic and 6eo $latonic $hiloso$hers &ho are the actual "Church .athers" of both Ro"an Catholic( and "ost =so called> Protestant deno"inations *ncyclopedia Americana, (3@', p s. =@0 throu h =@D& %AGGG;.-N*, ;.. <'0)&)'A>, 5hristian bishop... theolo ian, and philosopher... %AGGG;.-N-AN-;4. ...2latonic and Neo&2latonic influences united with Au ustine?s reli ious beliefs, 8ualities of mind, and cast of character... %5haracteristically, his $rinci$al argu"ent is Platonic in nature and is based u$on the "ind*s $ossession of i""utable truths... -n Au ustine faith and reason are most closely allied. :ence it is wron to departmentaliFe his mind and to thin, that he offers an e9clusively rational and purely philosophical approach to God.% *ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol.-, pa e =)3&=0A& %Au ustine of :ippo, ;aint... .he dominant personality of the "estern 5hurch of his time... %e fused the

religion of the 6e& Testa"ent &ith the Platonic tradition of Gree, philosophy.... %e turned to neo$latonis"( in &hich he found solutions to his $roble"s about the bein of God and the nature and ori in of evil.% *ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol.1, pa e '=)& %St. Augustine... &as the crucible in which the reli ion of the New .estament was "ost co"$letely fused with the Platonic tradition of Gree- $hiloso$hyB and it was also the means by which the $roduct of the fusion was transmitted to the 5hristendoms of medieval Ro"an Catholicis" and Renaissance Protestantis".% %And this - say, lest any man should be uile you with enticin words.... Be&are lest any man s$oil you through $hiloso$hy and vain deceit( after the tradition of "en( after the rudi"ents of the &orld( and not after Christ.% &5olossians 1#)&@. Contrary to the dece$tive clai" of this Catholic defender. Does not history "$rove" "any different Christian churches e)isted even before 1uther( and before the Ro"an Catholic Church? -n %/o9?s $oo, of 4artyr?s%, edited by "illiam $. /orbush, on pa e )'&)), we read& %2ersecutions of the "aldenses of /rance... %2opery havin brou ht various innovations into the 5hurch... some few... plainly determined to show the li ht of the Gospel in its real purity... %$eren arious, who, about the year #CCC, boldly preached Gospel truths, accordin to their primitive purity... .o $eren arius succeeded 2eter $rius... <etc.>... By the year of Christ ##5C, the number of the reformed was very reat... -n A.D. (()D... :enericians... would not admit of any proofs relative to reli ion, but &hat could be deduced fro" the scri$tures the"selves, the $o$ish $arty gave the" the na"e of a$ostolics... 2eter "aldo... became a strenuous opposer to poperyB and from him the reformed... received the appellation of "aldenses... *ncyclopedia $rittannica, (3D), (0th edition, vol. 0 pa e '==& %-n8uisition, 4edieval... %...About #CCC AD the doctrines of the 5athari be an to spread in *urope, and throu hout the ((th and (1th centuries there were... e9ecutions... %After about ((0A... the numbers of 5athari and, somewhat later, the "aldenses increased to such an e9tent that the state as well as the church appeared to be threatened. Strict decrees conde"ning heretics and obliging secular rulers under threat of deposition to assist in prosecutin heretics &ere $assed by church councils and by the $o$es... %.he powers of the in8uisitors was reat, and the office was loo,ed upon as a hi h di nity. -n8uisitors... could e9communicate even princes... 4any in8uisitors... won reputations for e9cessive cruelty.%

Section D.# Authority of Christ*s Church
Quote- "9ET1+R0TD +- C1R0?T&? C1ERC1 The rulers of Christ&s church have authority which must be obeyed in matters of reli$ion' 1ebrews !36!= ;atthew !@6!= /u:e !06!C ;atthew !C6!8 >alatians !6@'" Ender &hat circu"stances are Christians &arned and co""anded 67T to follo& those &ho clai" to be s$iritual leaders? %.hen spa,e 7esus to the multitude, and to his disciples, .he scribes and the 2harisees sit in 4oses? seat# All therefore whatsoever they bid you observe, that observe and doB but do not ye after their &or-s3 for they say( and do not. /or they bind heavy burdens and rievous to be borne, and lay them on men?s shouldersB but they themselves will not move them with one of their fin ers. $ut all their &or-s they do for to be seen of "en# they ma,e broad their phylacteries, and enlarge the borders of their gar"ents, And love the uppermost rooms at feasts, and the chief seats in the syna o ues, And reetin s in the mar,ets, and to be called of men, Rabbi, Rabbi. But be not ye called Rabbi3 for one is your /aster, even 5hristB and all ye are brethren. And call no "an your father u$on the earth3 for one is your .ather, which is in heaven.

Neither be ye called masters# for one is your 4aster, even 5hrist. $ut he that is reatest amon you shall be your servant. And &hosoever shall e)alt hi"self shall be abasedB and he that shall humble himself shall be e9alted. $ut woe unto you, scribes and 2harisees, hypocritesH for ye shut up the ,in dom of heaven a ainst men# for ye neither o in yourselves, neither suffer ye them that are enterin to o in. "oe unto you, scribes and 2harisees, hypocritesH for ye devour widows? houses, and for a $retense "a-e long $rayer3 therefore ye shall receive the greater da"nation. "oe unto you, scribes and 2harisees, hypocritesH for ye co"$ass sea and land to "a-e one $roselyte( and &hen he is "ade( ye "a-e hi" t&ofold "ore the child of hell than yourselves." &4atthew 1'#(&(0. %$eware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep?s clothin , but inwardly they are ravenin wolves. Ye shall ,now them by their fruits. Do men ather rapes of thorns, or fi s of thistles!.% &4atthew D#(0&(=. %$eloved, believe not every spirit, but try the spirits whether they are of God# because many false prophets are one out into the world.% ( 7ohn )#(. %$ut there were false prophets also amon the people, even as there shall be false teachers a"ong you( who privily shall bring in da"nable heresies, even denyin the Lord that bou ht them, and brin upon themselves swift destruction. And "any shall follow their pernicious waysB by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spo,en of. And throu h covetousness shall they with fei ned words ma,e merchandise of you# whose Cud ment now of a lon time lin ereth not, and their damnation slumbereth not.% &1 2eter 1#(&'. %/or such are false apostles, deceitful wor,ers, transfor"ing the"selves into the a$ostles of Christ. And no marvelB for ;atan himself is transformed into an an el of li ht. .herefore it is no reat thin if his ministers also be transformed as the ministers of ri hteousnessB &hose end shall be according to their &or-s.% 1 5orinthians ((#('&(0. %/or false 5hrist?s and false prophets shall rise, and shall shew si ns and wonders, to seduce, if it were possible, even the elect. $ut ta,e ye heed# behold, - have foretold you all thin s.% &4ar, ('#11&1'. %.he prophet that hath a dream, let him tell a dreamB and he that hath my word, let him spea, my word faithfully. "hat is the chaff to the wheat! saith the 1ord. -s not my word li,e as a fire! saith the LordB and li,e a hammer that brea,eth the roc, in pieces! .herefore, behold, - am a ainst the prophets, saith the Lord, that steal my words every one from his nei hbour. $ehold, - am a ainst the prophets, saith the Lord, that use their ton ues, and say, :e saith. $ehold, - am a ainst them that prophesy false dreams, saith the Lord, and do tell them, and cause my people to err by their lies, and by their li htnessB yet - sent them not, nor commanded them# therefore they shall not profit this people at all, saith the Lord.% 7eremiah 1'#1@&'1. %.hen said -, Ah, Lord GodH behold, the prophets say unto them, Ye shall not see the sword, neither shall ye have famineB but - will ive you assured peace in this place. .hen the Lord said unto me, The $ro$hets $ro$hesy lies in "y na"e3 ! sent the" not, neither have - commanded them, neither spa,e unto them# they prophesy unto you a false vision and divination, and a thin of nou ht, and the deceit of their heart. .herefore thus saith the Lord concernin the prophets that prophesy in my name, and - sent them not, yet they say, ;word and famine shall not be in this landB $y sword and famine shall those prophets be consumed.% &7eremiah ()#('&(0. %And to the an el of the church in 2er amos writeB .hese thin s saith he which hath the sharp sword with two ed es <the word of God>B - ,now thy wor,s, and where thou dwellest, even where ;atan?s seat is# and thou holdest fast my name, and hast not denied my faith, even in those days wherein Antipas was my faithful martyr, who was slain amon you, where ;atan dwelleth. But ! have a fe& things against thee( because thou hast there them that hold the doctrine of $alaam, who tau ht $alac to cast a stu"bling blocbefore the children of !srael( to eat things sacrificed unto idols, and to commit fornication. ;o hast thou also them that hold the doctrine of the Nicolaitanes <to rule over the laity>, which thin - hate. RepentB or else - will come unto thee 8uic,ly, and will fi ht a ainst them with the sword of my mouth <a ain, the word of God>. :e that hath an ear, let him hear what the ;pirit saith unto the churchesB .o him that overcometh will - ive to eat of the hidden manna, and will ive him a white stone, and in the stone a new name written, which no man ,noweth savin he that receiveth it. And unto the an el of the church in .hyatira writeB .hese thin s saith the ;on of God, who hath his eyes li,e unto a flame of fire, and his feet are li,e fine brassB - ,now thy wor,s, and charity, and service, and faith, and thy patience, and thy wor,sB and the last to be more than the first. Notwithstandin - have a few thin s a ainst thee, because thou sufferest that woman 7eFebel, which calleth herself a prophetess, to teach and to seduce my servants to commit

fornication, and to eat things sacrificed unto idols. And - ave her space to repent <the catholic church has had (=AA years& '10 A.D. to today> of her fornicationB and she repented not. $ehold, - will cast her into a bed, and the" that co""it adultery &ith her into reat tribulation, e9cept they repent of their deeds. And - will ,ill her children with deathB and all the churches shall ,now that - am he which searcheth the reins and hearts# and - will ive unto every one of you accordin to your wor,s.% Revelation 1#(1&1'. %And they called them, and commanded them not to spea, at all nor teach in the name of 7esus. $ut 2eter and 7ohn answered and said unto them, ,hether it be right in the sight of God to hear-en unto you "ore than unto God( 9udge ye. /or we cannot but spea, the thin s which we have seen and heard.% &Acts )#(@&1A. %o& are &e to recogniDe those that are the true /inisters( Bisho$s( and Deacons? %.his is a true sayin , -f a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a ood wor,. A bisho$ then "ust be bla"eless( the husband of one &ife, vi ilant, sober, of ood behaviour, iven to hospitality, apt to teachB 6ot given to &ine, no stri,er, not greedy of filthy lucreB but patient, not a brawler, not covetousB One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in sub9ection with all ravityB </or if a man ,now not how to rule his own house, how shall he ta,e care of the church of God!> Not a novice, lest bein lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil. 4oreover he must have a ood report of them which are withoutB lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil. Li,ewise must the deacons be rave, not doubleton ued, not iven to much wine, not reedy of filthy lucreB :oldin the mystery of the faith in a pure conscience. And let these also first be provedB then let them use the office of a deacon, being found bla"eless. 4ven so "ust their &ives be grave, not slanderers, sober, faithful in all thin s. 1et the deacons be the husbands of one &ife, rulin their children and their own houses well. /or they that have used the office of a deacon well purchase to themselves a ood de ree, and reat boldness in the faith which is in 5hrist 7esus.% &( .imothy '#(&('. %Now the ;pirit spea,eth e9pressly, that in the latter times so"e shall de$art fro" the faith, ivin heed to seducin spirits, and doctrines of devilsB ;pea,in lies in hypocrisyB havin their conscience seared with a hot ironB .orbidding to "arry, and commandin to abstain from meats, which God hath created to be received with than,s ivin of them which believe and ,now the truth.% &( .imothy )#(&'. %/or a bishop must be blameless, as the steward of GodB not self&willed, not soon an ry, not iven to wine, no stri,er, not iven to filthy lucreB $ut a lover of hospitality, a lover of ood men, sober, Cust, holy, temperateB %olding fast the faithful &ord as he hath been tau ht, that he may be able by sound doctrine both to e9hort and to convince the ainsayers. .or there are "any unruly and vain tal-ers and deceivers, specially they of the circumcision# "hose mouths must be stopped, who subvert whole houses, teachin thin s which they ou ht not, for filthy lucre?s sa,e.% .itus (#D&((. %.he elders which are amon you - e9hort, who am also an elder, and a witness of the sufferin s of 5hrist, and also a parta,er of the lory that shall be revealed# /eed the floc, of God which is amon you, ta-ing the oversight thereof( not by constraint, but willin lyB not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mindB 6either as being lords over God*s heritage, but bein ensamples to the floc,.% ( 2eter 0#(&'. %-f there arise amon you a prophet, or a dreamer of dreams, and iveth thee a si n or a wonder, And the si n or the wonder come to pass, whereof he spa,e unto thee, sayin , Let us o after other ods, which thou hast not ,nown, and let us serve themB .hou shalt not hear,en unto the words of that prophet, or that dreamer of dreams# for the Lord your God proveth you, to ,now whether ye love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul. &Deuteronomy ('#(&1. %.hen came to 7esus scribes and 2harisees, which were of 7erusalem, sayin , "hy do thy disciples trans ress the tradition of the elders! for they wash not their hands when they eat bread. $ut he answered and said unto them, "hy do ye also trans ress the commandment of God by your tradition! /or God commanded, sayin , :onour thy father and mother# and, :e that curseth father or mother, let him die the death. $ut ye say, "hosoever shall say to his father or his mother, -t is a ift, by whatsoever thou mi htest be profited by meB And honour not his father or his mother, he shall be free. Thus have ye "ade the co""and"ent of God of none effect by your tradition." &4atthew (0#(&=. %/or layin aside the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washin of pots and cups# and "any other such li-e things ye do. And he said unto them, /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God, that ye may ,eep your own tradition.% &4ar, D#@&3.

%$eware lest any man spoil you throu h philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after 5hrist.% &5olossians 1#@.

Section 4.# !nfallibility of Christ*s Church
Quote!' The 1oly >host was teacher of the a#ostles .ohn !"65C !C6!3 9cts !6@ ! Timothy 36!5' 5' The church always has Christ with it and the 1oly >host to $uide it ;atthew 5@650 .ohn !"6!C 0t&s an insult to Christ and the 1oly ?#irit to say that >od&s church fell into error < had to be reformed'" %2ope ;er ius --- <3A)&3((> obtained the papal office by murder. the annals of the church of Rome tell about his life of open sin with 4aroFia who bore him several ille itimate children <5hin8uy, The )riest the woman and The Confessional p.('@.>... .he rei n of 2ope ;er ius --- be an the period ,nown as ?the rule of the harlots? <3A)&3='>...% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e @'. %A number of popes had committed murders, but -nnocent --- <((3@&(1(=> surpassed all of his predecessors in ,illin ... he promoted... the in8uisition. *stimates of the number of ?heretics? that -nnocent <not so innocently> ,illed, run as hi h as one "illion $eo$leH% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e @=. %.his ,now also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. /or men shall be... :avin a form of odliness, but denyin the power thereof# from such turn away. /or of this sort are they which creep into houses, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts, *ver learnin , and never able to come to the ,nowled e of the truth... so do these also resist the truth# men of corrupt minds, reprobate concernin the faith... $ut evil "en and seducers shall &a) &orse and &orse( deceiving( and being deceived. $ut continue thou in the thin s which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, ,nowin of whom thou hast learned themB And that from a child thou hast -no&n the holy scri$tures( &hich are able to "a-e thee &ise unto salvation throu h faith which is in 5hrist 7esus... - char e thee therefore before God, and the Lord 7esus 5hrist, who shall Cud e the 8uic, and the dead at his appearin and his ,in domB Preach the &ordB be instant in season, out of seasonB reprove, rebu,e, e9hort with all lon sufferin and doctrine. .or the ti"e &ill co"e &hen they &ill not endure sound doctrineB but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, havin itchin earsB And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables.% &1 .imothy '#(&)#).. %...$e not soon sha,en in mind, or be troubled, neither by spirit, nor by word, nor by letter as from us, as that the day of 5hrist is at hand... for that day shall not co"e( e)ce$t there co"e a falling a&ay first... /or the mystery of ini8uity doth already wor,# only he who now letteth will let, until he be ta,en out of the way.% &1 .hessalonians 1#1&D. %And "any false $ro$hets shall rise( and shall deceive "any... $ehold, - have told you before.% &4atthew 1)#((&10. ,hich is "ore insulting to Christ and the %oly S$irit? A> .o teach that& the vast maCority of so&called 5hristians have fallen into ross error, Cust as the $ible e9plicitly and repeatedly warned, and e9actly in the manner that it prophesied would happen. Or& $> .o say of the Roman 5atholic 5hurch, after she had introduced innumerable pa an doctrines and practices contrary to the "ord of God, and after she had practiced centuries of tortures, persecutions, and murders contrary to God?s specific 5ommandments& %-t?s an insult to 5hrist and the :oly ;pirit to say that God?s church fell into error I had to be reformed.% %Be&are of false $ro$hets, which come to you in shee$*s clothing, but inwardly they are ravening &olves. Ye shall ,now them by their fruits. Do men ather rapes of thorns, or fi s of thistles! *ven so every ood tree brin eth forth ood fruitB but a corrupt tree brin eth forth evil fruit. A ood tree cannot brin forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree brin forth ood fruit.% &4atthew D#(0&(@.

Does it ta,e a theolo ical enius to discern who the ravenin wolves are in this picture! .he scripture says& %2reach the wordB be instant in season, out of seasonB reprove, rebu,e, e9hort with all lon sufferin and doctrine. .or the ti"e &ill co"e &hen they &ill not endure sound doctrine; but after their o&n lusts shall they hea$ to the"selves teachers( having itching ears; And they shall turn a&ay their ears fro" the truth( and shall be turned unto fables." + Ti"othy 53+ 5. "Beloved( &hen ! gave all diligence to &rite unto you of the co""on salvation( it &as needful for "e to &rite unto you( and e)hort you that ye should earnestly contend for the faith &hich &as once delivered unto the saints. .or there are certain "en cre$t in unawares, who were before of old ordained to this condemnation, un odly men, turnin the race of our God into lasciviousness, and denyin the only Lord God, and our Lord 7esus 5hrist.% &7ude (#'&). %$ut there &ere false $ro$hets also a"ong the $eo$le( even as there shall be false teachers a"ong you , who privily shall brin in damnable heresies, even denyin the Lord that bou ht them, and brin upon themselves swift destruction. And "any shall follo& their $ernicious &ays; by reason of &ho" the &ay of truth shall be evil s$o-en of... .hese... spea, evil of the thin s that they understand notB and shall utterly perish in their own corruption... :avin eyes full of adultery, and that cannot cease fro" sinB be uilin unstable souls# an heart they have e9ercised with covetous practicesB cursed children# ,hich have forsa-en the right &ay( and are gone astray( follo&ing the &ay of Balaa" the son of $osor, who loved the wa es of unri hteousness... /or when they s$ea- great s&elling &ords of vanity, they allure throu h the lusts of the flesh, throu h much wantonness, those that were clean escaped from them who live in error. ,hile they $ro"ise the" liberty( they the"selves are the servants of corru$tion # for of whom a man is overcome, of the same is he brou ht in bonda e... -t had been better for them not to have ,nown the way of ri hteousness, than, after they have ,nown it, to turn from the holy commandment delivered unto them. $ut it is happened unto them accordin to the true proverb, .he do is turned to his own vomit a ainB and the sow that was washed to her wallowin in the mire. .his second epistle, beloved, - now write unto youB in both which - stir up your pure minds by way of remembrance# .hat ye may be "indful of the &ords &hich &ere s$o-en before by the holy $ro$hets( and of the co""and"ent of us the a$ostles of the Lord and ;aviour# 6nowin this first, that there shall co"e in the last days scoffers( &al-ing after their o&n lusts...% &1 2eter 1#(&'#'. %*nter ye in at the strait ate# for wide is the ate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and "any there be &hich go in thereat# $ecause strait is the ate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and fe& there be that find it. $eware of false prophets, which come to you in sheep?s clothin , but inwardly they are ravenin wolves. 8e shall -no& the" by their fruits... Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the ,in dom of heavenB but he that doeth the will of my /ather which is in heaven. 4any will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name! and in thy name have cast out devils! and in thy name done many wonderful wor,s! And then will - profess unto them, never ,new you# de$art fro" "e( ye that &or- ini2uity. .herefore &hosoever heareth these sayings of "ine( and doeth the"( ! &ill li-en hi" unto a &ise "an ...% &4atthew D#('&1). %.hen said one unto him, Lord, are there fe& that be saved! And he said unto them, ;trive to enter in at the strait ate# for "any( ! say unto you( &ill see- to enter in( and shall not be able.% &Lu,e ('#1'&1). %/or it is &ritten( that Abraha" had t&o sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman. $ut he who was of the bondwoman was born after the fleshB but he of the freewoman was by promise. ,hich things are an allegory... /or it is written, ReCoice, thou barren that bearest notB brea, forth and cry, thou that travailest not# for the desolate hath "any "ore children than she &hich hath an husband . Now we, brethren, as -saac was, are the children of promise. $ut as then he that &as born after the flesh $ersecuted hi" that &as born after the S$irit( even so it is no&. Nevertheless what saith the scripture! 5ast out the bondwoman and her son# for the son of the bondwoman shall not be heir with the son of the freewoman. ;o then, brethren, we are not children of the bondwoman, but of the free.% &Galatians )#11&'(.

Section ..# Per$etuity of the 7riginal Church
Quote- "The visible church has had and will have uninterru#ted existence ;atthew 5@6!8-50 !C6!@' The theory that Christ&s church failed and became non-existent for ! 000 years < then

revived by man is untrue'" Did the true church actually fail( or beco"e non e)istent? 7r in reality rather( has Ro"an Catholicis" failed to e)ter"inate her( des$ite her "any efforts? And has the Ro"an Catholic church then atte"$ted to cover u$ the fact that there have al&ays been bible believing( non Catholic Christians since the beginning( and before the rise of Catholicis"? %;ummary of the -n8uisition... %Of the multitudes who perished by the -n8uisition throu hout the world, no authentic record is now discoverable. $ut wherever popery had power, there was the tribunal... %-n ;pain the calculation is more attainable... "e are to recollect that this number was in a country where $ersecution had for ages abolished all religious differences ... Yet, even in ;pain, thus gleaned of all heresy( the !n2uisition could still s&ell its lists of "urders to thirty t&o thousand ...% &/o9?s $oo, of 4artyrs, pa e @=&@D. %;ee that none render evil for evil unto any manB but ever follow that which is ood, both amon yourselves, and to all men.% &( .hessalonians 0#(0. %$ut woe unto you that are richH for ye have received your consolation. "oe unto you that are fullH for ye shall hun er. "oe unto you that lau h nowH for ye shall mourn and weep. "oe unto you, when all men shall spea, well of youH for so did their fathers to the false prophets.%Lu,e =#1). %;o then faith co"eth by hearin , and hearin by the &ord of God. $ut - say, :ave they not heard! Yes verily, their sound went into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the world... - say then, :ath God cast away his people! God forbid... God hath not cast away his people which he fore,new. ,ot ye not &hat the scri$ture saith of 4lias? ho& he "a-eth intercession to God against !srael saying( 1ord( they have -illed thy $ro$hets( and digged do&n thine altars; and ! a" left alone( and they see- "y life. $ut what saith the answer of God unto him! - have reserved to myself seven thousand men, who have not bowed the ,nee to the ima e of $aal. 4ven so then at this $resent ti"e also there is a re"nant accordin to the election of race.% &Romans (A#(D&((#0.

Section G.# Fisible Enity of the Church
Quote- "The %ible teaches that Christ ascribed to 1is church Aualities < $ave to it the names that #roved it to be a visible or$aniBation with visible unity of it&s followers Rom' !565 .ohn !06!C Rom' !56"-5' Contrast the unity of the Catholic church with the "00 some )rotestant churches < the divinity of the former becomes obvious'" %as Catholicis" visibly $roven it*s unity? %ave not it*s doctrines changed &ith every &ind of doctrine( changing &ith $ractically every ne& $o$e? %.hat we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the slei ht of men, and cunnin craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceiveB $ut spea,in the truth in love, may row up into him in all thin s, which is the head, even 5hrist# /rom whom the whole body fitly Coined to ether and compacted by that which every Coint supplieth, accordin to the effectual wor,in in the measure of every part, ma,eth increase of the body unto the edifyin of itself in love. .his - say therefore, and testify in the Lord, that ye henceforth wal, not as other Gentiles wal,, in the vanity of their mind, :avin the understandin dar,ened, bein alienated from the life of God throu h the i norance that is in them, because of the blindness of their heart.% &*phesians )#()&(@. %Nevertheless the foundation of God standeth sure, havin this seal, The 1ord -no&eth the" that are his. And, Let every one that nameth the name of 5hrist depart from ini8uity. $ut in a reat house there are not only vessels of old and of silver, but also of wood and of earthB and some to honour, and some to dishonour.% &1 .imothy 1#(3&1A.

Section %.# Sinners I Christ*s Church
Quote!' The %ible teaches that Christ died for all men both saints < sinners < not merely for the saved

or #redestined 5 Cor' 56!5 ! .ohn 565 ! Tim' 56" 5' Not only the Fust but sinners will always claim external membershi# in the true church ;att' 5565 !3650 ;att' !@6!5G !36"=' ?inners amon$ Catholics don&t #rove it isn&t Christ&s Church'" The 2uestion is not &hether or not there are sinners a"ong the Ro"an Catholic church( but &hether the leaders the"selves are sinners( and false $ro$hets of false doctrines. %A bisho$ then "ust be bla"eless, the husband of one wife, vi ilant, sober, of ood behaviour, iven to hospitality, apt to teachB Not iven to wine, no stri,er, not reedy of filthy lucreB but patient, not a brawler, not covetousB One that ruleth well his own house, havin his children in subCection with all ravityB </or if a man ,now not how to rule his own house, how shall he ta,e care of the church of God!> Not a novice, lest bein lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil. 4oreover he must have a ood report of them which are withoutB lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil. 1i-e&ise "ust the deacons be rave, not doubleton ued, not iven to much wine, not reedy of filthy lucreB :oldin the mystery of the faith in a pure conscience. And let these also first be $rovedB then let them use the office of a deacon, being found bla"eless. *ven so must their wives be rave, not slanderers, sober, faithful in all thin s. Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, rulin their children and their own houses well. /or they that have used the office of a deacon well purchase to themselves a ood de ree, and reat boldness in the faith which is in 5hrist 7esus.% ( .imothy '#1&('. ,hat is the real root of this issue? ,hy has this Catholic teacher voiced this $articular defense of Ro"an Catholicis"*s history? %.he records of all nations where priestly celibacy has been introduced have proved that, instead of ministerin to the purity of those condemned to it, it has only plun ed them in the deepest pollution... Out of a thousand facts of a similar ,ind, let one only be adduced, vouched for by the distin uished Roman 5atholic historian De .hou. "hen 2ope 2aul E. mediated the suppression of the licensed brothels in the ?:oly 5ity,? the Roman ;enate petitioned a ainst his carryin his desi n into effect, on the round that the e9istence of such places was the only means of hinderin the priests from seducin their wives and dau hters.% &.he .wo $abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 11A. %Rome, in those days <of 2ope 2aul E>, was a ?holy city? in name only. Reports estimate that there were about =,AAA prostitutes in this city with a population not e9ceedin (AA,AAA. :istorians tell us that ?all the ecclesiastics had mistresses, and all the convents of the 5apital were houses of bad fame? 5ardinal 2eter D?Ailly said he dared not describe the immorality of the nunneries, and that ?ta,in the veil? was simply another mode of becomin a public prostitute. Eiolations were so bad in the ninth century that ;t. .heodore ;tudita forbade even female animals on monastery propertyH -n the year ()DD, ni ht dances and or ies were held in the 5atholic cloister at 6ercheim that are described in history as bein worse than those to be seen in the public houses of prostitution. 2riests came to be ,nown as ?the husbands of all the women?... Another German bishop be an to char e the priests in his district a ta9 for each female they ,ept and each child that was born. :e discovered there were eleven thousand women ,ept by the cler ymen of his diocese.% &%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa es (A@&(A3. %And spea,in of that ?cloth covered rill? this mi ht be a ood time to mention where that came from. -t was decreed that the rill must be in place when the priests were hearin the confession of a woman. -t first came up in the -talian town of .urin where the $ishop made it a rule after considerable complaint by the fathers and husbands of women who went to confession to some of the local priests. - will let you draw your own conclusions.% &Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %-acts for Roman Catholics%, pa e (D. .his is the immorality that this 5atholic is attemptin to pass over in his statement that& %;inners amon 5atholics don?t prove it isn?t 5hrist?s 5hurch.% -t is throu h this immoral church that 5atholics claim their direct linea e from 5hrist.

Section !.# The Catholicity of the Church
Quote- "The %ible teaches that from the be$innin$ and in every a$e the true church of Christ is all over the world or universal' The >ree: word used is catholicos from which the (n$lish word catholic is derived ;att' 5@6!8 ;ar: !C6!5 9cts !6@ Rom' !06!@'

(xce#t the catholic church what or$aniBation has even a remote claim to universality in #oint of #lace and time*" Do the above 2uoted verses use the &ord "catholicos"( or is this a "$ersonal inter$retation" of this catholic author? %Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptiFin them in the name of the /ather, and of the ;on, and of the :oly Ghost# .eachin them to observe all thin s whatsoever - have commanded you# and, lo, - am with you alway, even unto the end of the world.? Amen.% &4atthew 1@#(3&1A. %And he said unto them, ?Go ye into all the world, and preach the ospel to every creature.% &4ar, (=#(0. %$ut ye shall receive power, after that the :oly Ghost is come upon you# and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in 7erusalem, and in all 7udaea, and in ;amaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth.% &Acts (#@. %$ut - say, :ave they not heard! Yes verily, their sound went into all the earth, and their words unto the ends of the world.% &Romans (A#(@. !n the above 2uoted scri$tures( neither the &ord "catholicos"( nor "universal"( nor the $ro"ise of a "a9ority of follo&ers in "$oint of $lace and ti"e" is stated. The Bible does( ho&ever( s$ecifically state &ho &ill be the $redo"inate religion in this &orld %And there came one of the seven an els which had the seven vials, and tal,ed with me, sayin unto me, 5ome hitherB ! &ill she& unto thee the 9udg"ent of the great &hore that sitteth u$on "any &aters# "ith whom the ,in s of the earth have committed fornication, and the inhabitants of the earth have been "ade drun- &ith the &ine of her fornication. ;o he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness# and - saw a woman... having a golden cu$ in her hand full of abominations and filthiness of her fornication# And upon her forehead was a name written, /ystery( Babylon the Great( the "other of harlots and abo"inations of the earth. And - saw the woman drun-en &ith the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs... And the an el said unto me... - will tell thee the mystery of the woman, and of the beast that carrieth her, which hath the seven heads and ten horns. .he beast that thou sawest was, and is notB and shall ascend out of the bottomless pit, and o into perdition# and they that dwell on the earth shall wonder, whose names were not written in the boo, of life from the foundation of the world, when they behold the beast that was, and is not, and yet is. And here is the mind which hath wisdom. The seven heads are seven "ountains( on &hich the &o"an sitteth <only Rome can and does ma,e this claim of bein situated between seven hills>... And he saith unto me, The &aters &hich thou sa&est( &here the &hore sitteth( are $eo$les( and "ultitudes( and nations( and tongues <:ere is the ?universality in point of place and time? as boasted by this catholic author>... And the &o"an &hich thou sa&est is that great city( &hich reigneth over the -ings of the earth.... /or all nations have drun- of the &ine of the &rath of her fornication( and the -ings of the earth have co""itted fornication &ith her , and the merchants of the earth are wa9ed rich throu h the abundance of her delicacies... And - heard another voice from heaven, sayin , Co"e out of her( "y $eo$le( that ye be not $arta-ers of her sins( and that ye receive not of her $lagues.% &Revelation (D#(&(@#).

Section '.# A$ostolicity
Quote- "The %ible teaches that the a#ostles a##ointed successors to carry on their wor: Titus !65 3elders that is #riests4 9cts !365-3 %y what authority do men found churches if they are not ordained throu$h men*" The %ebre& $riests descended fro" Aaron to his sons as s$ecifically co""anded by God. Did this natural lineage assure the $riests &ere living and teaching the true faith? 7r did 'esus conde"n even the" for not follo&ing %is &ritten &ord? %$ut when he saw many of the 2harisees and ;adducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O eneration of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come! $rin forth therefore fruits meet for repentance# And thin- not to say &ithin yourselves( ,e have Abraha" to our father3 for ! say unto you( that God is able of these stones to raise u$ children unto Abraha". And now also the a9 is laid unto the root of the trees# therefore every tree which brin eth not forth ood fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.% &4atthew '#D&(A. %.hey answered and said unto him, Abraham is our father. 7esus saith unto them, *!f ye &ere Abraha"*s

children( ye &ould do the &or-s of Abraha". $ut now ye see, to ,ill me, a man that hath told you the truth, which - have heard of God# this did not Abraham. 8e do the deeds of your father. .hen said they to him, "e be not born of fornicationB we have one /ather, even God. 7esus said unto them, -f God were your /ather, ye would love me# for - proceeded forth and came from GodB neither came - of myself, but he sent me. ,hy do ye not understand "y s$eech? even because ye cannot hear "y &ord. 8e are of your father the devil, and the lusts of your father ye will do. :e was a murderer from the be innin , and abode not in the truth, because there is no truth in hi". "hen he spea,eth a lie, he spea,eth of his own# for he is a liar, and the father of it. And because - tell you the truth, ye believe me not. "hich of you convinceth me of sin! And if - say the truth, why do ye not believe me! %e that is of God heareth God*s &ords3 ye therefore hear the" not( because ye are not of God.% &7ohn @#'3&)D. %"hat shall we say then that Abraham our father, as pertainin to the flesh, hath found!... .or &hat saith the scri$ture! Abraham believed God, and it was counted unto him for ri hteousness... 5ometh this blessedness then upon the circumcision only, or upon the uncircumcision also! for we say that faith was rec,oned to Abraham for ri hteousness. :ow was it then rec,oned! when he was in circumcision, or in uncircumcision! Not in circumcision, but in uncircumcision. And he received the si n of circumcision, a seal of the ri hteousness of the faith which he had yet bein uncircumcised# that he mi ht be the father of all them that believe, thou h they be not circumcisedB that ri hteousness mi ht be imputed unto them also# And the father of circu"cision to the" &ho are not of the circu"cision only( but &ho also &al- in the ste$s of that faith of our father Abraha"...% &Romans )#(&('. This Catholic &riter clai"s that elders in scri$ture "eans "$riests" is this so? %.he title of priest <Gree, hiereus> is given to no church officer in the 6e& Testa"ent. Nevertheless, the office appears in the 1nd century, no doubt with the development of the monarchical episcopate... the title is by definition a cultic officer, and the title desi nates... the wor, of sanctification... Roman 5atholicism for centuries has fostered a distinct clerical identity, symboliFed by clerical arb, which sets the priest as a class apart... .he most stri,in feature of this caste is celibacy. .here is in the modern church considerable dissatisfaction with this clerical separation and a feelin that it interferes with the ministry. 5ritics point out that neither in the 6e& Testa"ent nor in the $re Constantinian church &as there a clerical caste B the whole church was a people set apart with a mission to the unbelievin world... %.he laity as a class do not appear in the New .estamentB there could only be a laity when there had beco"e a cler y.% &*ncyclopedia $rittanica, vol. (0, pa e 33(&331. "hat ave the emperor of Rome the ri ht to impose its dominion over the :oly 5hurch of 5hrist! "hat ave those individuals in obedience to the emperor of Rome, and practitioners of Rome?s pa an doctrines, the ri ht to claim themselves as 5hrist?s true 5hurch!

Section J.# The .irst Po$e
Quote- "The %ible teaches the one and only one church which Christ founded had ?imon %arFona or )eter for it&s head' +ur /ord chan$ed his name to )eter ;att' !C6!@-!8 .ohn 5!6!5-!= /u:e 55635' +nly the church havin$ )eter < his lawful successors for it&s head can lo$ically claim to be the church of Christ'" ,as there a $o$e in the true original Christian church? Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p s )D&)@# %.he title %pope% was first iven to the $ishop of Rome by the wic,ed *mperor 2hocas about the year =(A... Gre ory - was offered the title and refused it.... the historian /oa,es&7ac,son 8uotes him as sayin that the title of popes as ?*cumenical $ishop% <bishop of the whole church> was %proud and foolish% and an imitation of the devil?... .hen $oniface the third accepted the title of %2ope% sometime between =A= and =(A. .his was basically the reason for the rift between the Gree, and Roman churches... % .he %-nfallibility% of the pope &as voted on by the Eatican council of (@DA. 2er the 5atholic :ome *ncyclopedia, p (1), they declared ?it to be a do ma of divine revelation that when the Roman 2ontiff spea,s e9cathedra & that is, when he, usin his office as shepherd and teacher of all 5hristians, defines a

doctrine of faith or morals to be held by the whole church & he, possesses that infallibility with which the Redeemer was pleased to invest :is church in the definition of doctrine on faith and morals, and that, therefore, such definitions of the Roman 2ontiff are irreformable in their own nature and are not because of consent of the church?.% %2riesthood... 5hristianity... Ori inally the term presbyter <?elder?> and epis,opos <?overseer?>, current in the New .estament and the early church, were probably identical. /rom the 1nd century on, however, the sacerdotal hierarchy develo$ed alon the lines of the :ebrew priesthood, the title episcopus, or bishop, beco"ing reserved for those who $resided over the presbyterate... -n due course the threefold ministry of bishops, priests, and deacons <administrative and litur ical assistants in a parish> beca"e or aniFed on a diocesan basis. .his remained the norm in the "estern 5hurch until the Reformation in the (=th century when it was repudiated by the 5entral Reformers...% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. (), p . (A(A. %.he early bishops of Rome... :istorical evidence... is not e9haustive... .hat ;t. 2aul preached at Rome... is not contested... Less certain is the claim that ;t. 2eter, too, visited Rome and was martyred there about the same time... None of the evidence indicates anythin definite about the nature of 2eter?s position at Rome... Not much li ht is shed on the 8uestion of the primacy by materials from the early post&apostolic era, either by the first lists of the bishops of Rome or by such important... evidences as - 5lement, a letter sent by the church of Rome to the church of 5orinth c.3=, or the letter that - natius of Anticoch sent to the Romans c.((A... -f read in historical conte9t, &hat they actually state constitutes a less than $ersuasive &itness to the $ri"acy of the Ro"an bisho$s in the universal church... $y the :rd century the Ro"an bisho$s &ere clai"ing for the"selves a $ri"acy of authority in the universal church comparable to that of 2eter?s primacy amon the Apostles. This clai"... did not go uno$$osed... 7nly in the 5th and <th centuries &as this clai" transfor"ed into the "ore s&ee$ing clai" to a $ri"acy of 9urisdiction ... 4ost actively responsible for this develo$"ent were the popes Damasus -, ;iricius, -nnocent -, $oniface -, and, above all, Leo - <rei ned ))A&)=(>. The ga$ bet&een theory and $ractice( ho&ever( re"ained i""ense...% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. (', pa es 300&30=. :istorical 5onceptions of papal authority within the church... Before the "id :rd century... and even after that date, some "estern, as well as *astern, patristic e9e etes <*arly 5hurch /athers who in their interpretation of the $ible used critical techni8ues> understood that by the "roc-" Christ "eant to refer not to Peter but to Christ %i"self or to the faith that 2eter professed. Nevertheless, in the late )th and 0th centuries there was an increasin tendency on the part of the Roman bishops... to for"ulate in theoretical terms the ill&defined pre&eminence... to the Roman church and to its bishop. .hus, Da"asus !, despite the e9istence of other churches of apostolic foundation, began to call the Roman church ?the apostolic see?. About the sa"e ti"e the cate ories of the Ro"an la& &ere borro&ed to e9plicate and for"ulate the prero atives of the Roman bishop. .he $rocess of theoretical elaboration reached a culmination in the views of Leo - and Gelasius -, the former understandin himself not simply as 2eter?s successor but also as his representative, or vicar... 2ossessin by analo y with the Roman law of inheritance the full powers 2eter himself had wielded, which he inter$reted as monarchical...% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. (', pa e 3=A %-n Roman 5atholic belief the Roman pontiff is the successor of 2eter... There is no clear assertion of this belief before the conversion of Constantine in :#+. %-t has been noted that in Roman 5atholicism the colle e of bishops is the successor to the colle e of the Apostles... in spite of certain differences between the two offices... .he Apostles had a power that was not defined locallyB every Roman 5atholic bishop is a bishop of a place... ;uch a monarchical officer does not appear in the New .estament.% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. (0, pa e 3@3. %-n the Roman 5hurch the $a$acy evolved out of the monarchical episcopate... A leadin role develo$ed upon the leadin bishop of the Roman community... .his... or aniFation followed the provincial or aniFation of the Roman *mpire. .he theolo ical underpinnin of this special position was emphasiFed by 2etrine theolo y, which saw in the words of 7esus, ?You are 2eter, and on this roc, - will build my church? <4att. (=#(@>, a spiritual&le al institutin of the papacy by 7esus 5hrist himself. -n the Gree, 5hurch of the *ast <e. . Ori ien> and also in Au ustine in the "est, however, these &ords &ere referred to Peter*s confession of faithB =only > S!6C4 the ti"e of $o$es Gelasius ! <rei ned )31&)3=>, ;ymmachus <rei ned )3@&0()>, and Gre ory - <rei ned 03A&=A)>, these &ords have served as the

foundation for the clai" of $a$al $ri"acy over the entire 5hristian 5hurch.% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa e )3(. %.he ,eys that the 2ope bore were the ,eys of a ?2eter? well ,nown to the 2a ans initiated in the 5haldean 4ysteries. That Peter the a$ostle &as ever bisho$ of Ro"e has been $roved again and again to be an arrant fable... :is visit to that city rests on no better authority than that of a writer at the end of the second century... who ravely tells us that on the occasion of his visit, findin ;imon 4a us there, the apostle challen ed him to ive proof of his miraculous or ma ical powers, whereupon the sorcerer flew up into the air, and 2eter brou ht him down in such haste that his le was bro,en. All historians of repute have at once reCected this story... as bein destitute of all contemporary evidence... but, while this is the case with 2eter the 5hristian, it can be shown to be by no means doubtful that before the 5hristian era, and downwards, there was a ?2eter? at Rome, who occupied the hi hest place in the )a$an priesthood. .he priest who e9plained the 4ysteries to the initiated... in primitive 5haldee... his title, as pronounced... was ?2eter?& i.e. ?the -nterpreter? <2ar,hurst?s 1ebrew /exicon p. =A1>... Yea, we have the stron est evidence that, in countries far removed from one another, and far distant from Rome, these ,eys were ,nown by the initiated 2a ans not merely as the ?,eys of 2eter,? but as the ,eys of a 2eter identified with Rome.% & The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 1A@. %...Now... understand... the colle e of 5ardinals. .he term 5ardinal is derived from 5ardo, a hin e. 7anus, whose ,ey the 2ope bears, was the od of doors and hin es, and was called 2atulcius, and 5lusius ?the opener and the shutter.? .his had a blasphemous meanin , for he was worshipped at Rome as the rand mediator... "hatever deity was to be invo,ed, an invocation first of all must be addressed to 7anus... and without that no prayer could be heard& the ?door of heaven? could not be opened... Now to this 7anus, as 4ediator... belon ed all the overnment of the world... .he 2ope, therefore, when he set up as the :i h& priest of 7anus, assumed also the... ?power of turnin the hin e,?& of openin and shuttin in the blasphemous 2a an sense... .he 2a ans, who saw what strides, under 2apal directions, 5hristianity, as professed in Rome, was ma,in towards 2a anism, were more than content to reco niFe the 2ope as possessin this powerB they ladly encoura ed him to rise, step by step, to the full hei ht of the blasphemous pretensions befittin the representative of 7anus...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 1(A&1((. Accordin to scriptures, who is the only one with the power to open and shut doors! %And to the an el of the church in 2hiladelphia writeB .hese thin s saith he that is holy, he that is true, he that hath the ,ey of David, he that openeth, and no man shuttethB and shutteth, and no man openethB - ,now thy wor,s# behold, - have set before thee an open door, and no man can shut it# for thou hast a little stren th, and hast ,ept my word, and hast not denied my name.% &Rev '#D&@ %.he now well&,nown title of ?5ardinals?... had been previously borne by the hi h officials of the Roman *mperor, who, as 2ontife9 4a9imus, had been himself the representative of 7anus, and who dele ated his powers to servants of his own... - have said that the 2ope became the representative of 7anus, who... was none other than the $abylonian 4essiah... -n the countries where the $abylonian system was most thorou hly developed, we find the ;overei n 2ontiff of the $abylonian od invested with the very attributes now ascribed to the 2ope... ?God upon earth,? the ?Eice&God? and ?Eicar of 5hrist.? .he 6in in * ypt, who was ;overei n&2ontiff, was... re arded with the hi hest reverence as ?the re$resentative of the divinity on earth?. -s the 2ope ?-nfallible,? and does the 5hurch of Rome, in conse8uence, boast that it has always been ?unchan ed and unchan eable?! .he same was the case with the 5haldean 2ontiff, and... was believed to be ?inca$able of error?... Are ,in s and ambassadors re8uired to ,iss the 2ope?s slipper! .his, too, is copied from the same pattern... -s the 2ope addressed by the title of ?Your :oliness?! ;o also was the 2a an 2ontiff of Rome.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 1((. %.he 2ope... assumes the ri ht of wieldin the li htnin ?s of 7ehovah, and of blastin by his fulmination?s whoever offends him. 6in s, and whole nations... have trembled and bowed before him... .he priests of 2a anism assumed the very same power...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 103. ,as Peter the "head" of the original and true Christian church? .he apostle 2aul wrote# %...- was not a &hit behind the very chiefest a$ostles.% &1 5orinthians ((#0, %...! ought to have been co""ended of you3 for in nothing a" ! behind the very chiefest a$ostles , thou h -

be nothin .% &1 5orinthians (1#((. And& %<...:e that wrou ht effectually in 2eter to the apostleship of the circumcision, the same &as "ighty in "e toward the Gentiles#> And... &hen Peter &as co"e to Antioch( ! &ithstood hi" to the face( because he &as to be bla"ed.% Galatians 1#@&((. !f Peter &as Paul*s Po$e( i"agine Paul*s audacity to s$ea- these &ords. ! &ould thin- that the Catholic church &ould have to e)co""unicate Paul for his disres$ect to an "infallible" $o$e0 Contrary to Catholic actions of $o$ery( did Peter "act" li-e a $o$e? 2eter was married& %:ave we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as &ell as other a$ostles, and as the brethren of the Lord, and Ce$has!% &( 5orinthians 3#0. 5ontrary to catholic tradition, God?s word says 2eter was the apostle to the circumcision, and 2aul was the apostle to the Gentiles& %$ut contrariwise, when they saw that the gos$el of the uncircu"cision &as co""itted unto "e , as the ospel of the circu"cision &as unto PeterB </or he that wrou ht effectually in Peter to the a$ostleshi$ of the circu"cision, the same was mi hty in me toward the Gentiles#>% &Galatians 1#D&@. <-f 5atholic tradition is correct, 2eter must have forsa,en his 5hrist& iven apostolic callin to preach to the 7ews. -f 2eter denied his callin from God to preach to the 7ews, how can he be trusted to lead the church& unless that church was also disobedient to God?s word and will!> 5ontrary to 5atholic tradition, who does 2eter himself claim the Roc,, which is the :ead of the church, is& %...the 1ord is... a living stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, and precious... "herefore also it is contained in the scri$ture( Behold( ! lay in Sion a chief corner stone, elect, precious# and he that believeth on hi" shall not be confounded. Gnto you therefore which believe he is precious# but unto them which be disobedient, the stone &hich the builders disallo&ed( the sa"e is "ade the head of the corner. And a stone of stu"bling( and a roc- of offence( even to the" &hich stu"ble at the &ord( being disobedient3 whereunto also they were appointed.% &( 2eter 1#'&D. %$ut now in Christ 'esus ye who sometimes were far off are made ni h by the blood of 5hrist... /or throu h him we both have access by one ;pirit unto the /ather. therefore ye are no more stran ers and forei ners, but fellowcitiFens with the saints, and of the household of GodB And are built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, 'esus Christ hi"self being the chief corner stoneB -n whom all the buildin fitly framed to ether roweth unto an holy temple in the Lord# -n whom ye also are builded to ether for an habitation of God throu h the ;pirit.% &*phesians 1#('&11. %...And that Roc, was 5hrist.% &( 5orinthians (A#). %As it is written, $ehold, - lay in ;ion a stumblin stone and roc, of offence# and whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed.% &Romans 3#''. ,here did Ro"an Catholicis" receive the doctrine of "$o$e" fro"( if not fro" the scri$tures( and the a$ostles? %-t is certain that the title ?;upreme 2ontiff? of ?2ontife9 ma9imus? which the pope bears is not a 5hristian desi nation, for it &as the title used by Ro"an e"$erors before the 5hristian *ra. .he word pontiff... means brid e&ma,er. .he priest&,in emperors of pa an days were re arded as the ma,ers and uardians of the brid es of Rome. *ach of them served as hi h priest and claimed to be the brid e or connectin lin, between this life and the ne9t. .hat branch of the mysteries ,nown as 4ithraism rew in Rome until it became& at one time& almost the only faith of the empire. The head $riest &as called the Pater Patru"( that is( the .ather of fathers. .he ?/ather? of 4ithraism had his seat at Rome then, and the ?/ather? of 5atholicism has his their now.% &/rom $abylon 4ystery Reli ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e D0.

Section 1.# Ba$tis"
Quote- "The %ible teaches that in a#ostolic times whole families were ba#tiBed 9cts !C653 ! Cor' !6!C 9cts !C6!5' EnAuestionably there were children in these families' ;oreover the earliest records of the church

#rove that children were ba#tiBed a few days after birth'"

Section 1.+ Ba$tis"
Quote- "The %ible teaches that for $rown #ersons to whom the $os#el can be #reached faith is a necessary condition for ba#tism ;ar: !C6!C ;att' 5@6!8' 0n this text there is no Auestion of children to whom the $os#el could not be #reached and who therefor could not believe'" Did 'esus "a-e s$ecial $rovisions for little children? %$ut 7esus said, ?;uffer <allow> little children, and forbid them not, to come unto me# for of such is the -ingdo" of heaven.% 4atthew (3#(). Do little children need to be ba$tiDed? %...- had not ,nown sin, but by the law# for - had not ,nown lust, e9cept the law had said, .hou shalt not covet. $ut sin, ta,in occasion by the commandment, wrou ht in me all manner of concupiscence. /or without the law sin was dead. /or ! &as alive &ithout the la& once3 but &hen the co""and"ent ca"e( sin revived( and ! died. And the commandment, which was ordained to life, - found to be unto death. .or sin( ta-ing occasion by the co""and"ent( deceived "e( and by it sle& "e..." &Romans D#D&('. %.herefore to hi" that -no&eth to do good( and doeth it not( to hi" it is sin.% &7ames )#(D. And( &hat s$ecifically( is ba$tis" for( according to God*s &ord? %.hen 2eter said unto them, Repent, and be ba$tiDed every one of you in the na"e of 'esus Christ for the re"ission of sins, and ye shall receive the ift of the :oly Ghost.% &Acts 1#'@. %And as they went on their way, they came unto a certain water# and the eunuch said, ;ee, here is waterB what doth hinder me to be baptiFed! And 2hilip said, !f thou believest &ith all thine heart( thou "ayest. And he answered and said, - believe that 7esus 5hrist is the ;on of God.% &Acts @#'=&'@. %o& can an infant believe or disbelieve? .or the scri$ture says %:ow then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed! and ho& shall they believe in hi" of &ho" they have not heard?... So then faith co"eth by hearing( and hearing by the &ord of God.% &Romans (A#()&(D. %,hile Peter yet s$a-e these words, the %oly Ghost fell on all the" &hich heard the &ord. And they of the circumcision which believed were astonished, as many as came with 2eter, because that on the Gentiles also was poured out the ift of the :oly Ghost. /or they heard them spea, with ton ues, and ma nify God. .hen answered 2eter, Can any "an forbid &ater( that these should not be ba$tiDed( &hich have received the %oly Ghost as &ell as &e! And he commanded them to be baptiFed in the name of the Lord. .hen prayed they him to tarry certain days.% &Acts (A#)@. %And now why tarriest thou! arise, and be baptiFed, and &ash a&ay thy sins, callin on the name of the Lord.% &Acts 11#(=. Does not the Catholic church itself actually ad"it that infant ba$tis" is not taught in scri$ture? 5atholic :ome *ncyclopedia, pa e 10=, under the headin %.radition%, Juote# %.he validity of infant baptism is a truth of faith, not revealed in scri$ture, but in tradition.% </rom Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p s ()&(0.> This Catholic &riter has no $roble" &ith adding the &ord children &here God*s &ord does not s$ecifically say it. !s God*s &ord inco"$lete that so"eone should be able to add to %is &ords? %*very word of God is pure# he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him. Add thou not unto his words, lest he reprove thee, and thou be found a liar.% &2roverbs 'A#0&=. %All scripture is iven by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in ri hteousness# .hat the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all ood wor,s. ! charge thee therefore before God( and the 1ord 'esus Christ( &ho shall 9udge the 2uic- and the dead... Preach the &ord...% &1 .imothy '#(=&)#1. Since the Bible does not teach infant ba$tis"( &here does the doctrine co"e fro"?

%.he second <sacrament> is baptism of infants. There is no certain evidence of this earlier than the :rd century, and the ancient ba$tis"al liturgies are all intended for adults... -n Roman law as in modern law, adults are empowered to ma,e decisions for minors.% %5onfirmation since the ((th century has been conferred by a bishop... .his is an echo of the accounts in the Acts of the Apostles... -n Acts, however, the reception of the ;pirit meant the reception and the "anifestation of charismatic ifts <e. ... spea,in with ton ues, ecstasy>B so"ething else is no& "eant... .he postponement of confirmation has led many Roman 5atholic theolo ians to interpret it as a rite of passa e... such rites of passa e are common in tribal cultures. *arly 5hristian $aptism, however, was conferred on adults... .he traditional Roman 5atholic view of the laity as passive has contributed to the ne lect of the theolo y of confirmationB it left no room for a charismatic laity.% & (ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. (0, pa e 33D.

Section 1.: Ba$tis"
Quote- "3' The %ible teaches that no one at all can enter the :in$dom without ba#tism ".esus answered &7erily verily 0 say unto thee (xce#t a man be born of water and of the ?#irit he cannot enter into the :in$dom of >od'" -.ohn 365' The %ible teaches the "sacrament" as "confirmation" or "the layin$ on of hands by which we receive the 1oly >host 9cts @6!" !5 !=G !86C 1eb' C65'" Does the Bible teach that the %oly Ghost could only be received through the laying on of hands? %"hile 2eter yet spa,e... the :oly Ghost fell on all them which heard the word. And they of the circumcision which believed were astonished, as many as came with 2eter, because that on the Gentiles also &as $oured out the gift of the %oly Ghost. .or they heard the" s$ea- &ith tongues, and ma nify God...% &Acts (A#))&)=. %$ut as many as received him, to them ave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name# ,hich &ere born( not of blood, nor of the &ill of the flesh( nor of the &ill of "an( but of God." &7ohn (#(1&('. ,hy &ould adults and older children need to be born again( &hereas infants( &ho have not sinned( &ould not? %...- had not ,nown sin, but by the law# for - had not ,nown lust, e9cept the law had said, .hou shalt not covet. $ut sin, ta,in occasion by the commandment, wrou ht in me all manner of concupiscence. /or without the law sin was dead. /or ! &as alive &ithout the la& once3 but &hen the co""and"ent ca"e( sin revived( and ! died. And the commandment, which was ordained to life, - found to be unto death. /or sin, ta,in occasion by the commandment, deceived me, and by it slew me. "herefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy, and Cust, and ood. "as then that which is ood made death unto me! God forbid. $ut sin, that it mi ht appear sin, wor,in death in me by that which is oodB that sin by the commandment mi ht become e9ceedin sinful.% &Romans D#D&('.

Section /.# The %oly 4ucharist =the actual $resence of Christ therein>
Quote!' Christ $ave to us 1is own body and blood ;ar: !"655-5"- "this is my blood of the New Testament which is shed for many"' Comment- Christ havin$ said "this is my body" who shall deny it and say this is not your body Christ havin$ said "This is my blood" who shall deny it and say this is not your blood*" .irstly( does the Ro"an Catholic church( &hich clai"s to be unchanged( and a$ostolic( actually $ractice the 1ord*s co""and"ent? %.he *ucharist... Ori inally, the *ucharist was a repetition of the common meal of the local roup of disciples with the addition of the bread and the cup sy"boliDing the presence of 7esus. *ven in the 1nd century the meal became vesti ial and was finally abandoned... .he 2rotestant churches denied the sacrificial character of the *ucharist and reCected the mass. Roman 5atholic theolo y has never reached a universally accepted theory e9plainin the connection between the death of 7esus and the mass, but it has firmly insisted that the mass re$eats the rite that 7esus told his disciples to repeat and that the rite is an

effective symbolic commemoration of his death... .he Roman 5atholic theory is difficult to e9plain in terms other than anti2uated Aristotelian $hysics... .he presence is associated with the Ro"an Catholic $ractice of distributin only the bread to the laity, a serious modification in the sacramental si n. Not yet universally restored, 5ommunion under both species has become much more common since the Eatican 5ouncil%. &&(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. (0, pa es 33D&33@. :.A -ronside, in %1etters To A Ro"an Catholic Priest% <p . ((&(1> wrote# %....he canon enCoinin communion in one ,ind was only passed on 'une #<( #5#<, and that &as at a ti"e &hen the Ro"an church &as &ithout a head. .he same council that enacted the decree had deposed 2ope 7ohn LL---... .his decree of the 5ouncil of 5onstance is a direct contradiction to Ro"an canon la& of the centuries $receding. pope Leo the Great, invei hin a ainst the 4anicheans, wrote in his :omily )(# %.hey receive 5hrist?s body <which to him of course, was the communion loaf> with unworthy mouth, and entirely refuse to ta,e the blood of our redemption <referrin to the cup, accordin to the Roman interpretation>B therefore we ive notice to you, holy brethren, that men of this sort, whose sacrile ious deceit has been detected, are to be e9pelled by priestly authority from the fellowship of the saints.% $ut 2ope Gelasius - was stron er yet, for in a letter addressed to the $ishops maCoricus and 7ohn and embodied in the canon law of the Roman church, he wrote# %"e have ascertained that certain persons havin received a portion of the sacred body alone abstain from parta,in of the chalice of the sacred blood. Let such persons, without any doubt, since they are stated to feel thus bound by some superstitious reason, either receive the sacrament in its entirety, or be repelled from the entire sacrament, because a division of one and the sa"e "ystery cannot ta-e $lace &ithout great sacrilege% <5orp. 7ur. 5an. Decre.'#((&(1>. And with this a rees the decree of the 5ouncil of 5lermont, personally resided over by 2ope Grban -- in (A30# %.hat no one shall communicate at the altar, without he receives the body and blood ali,e, unless by way of necessity, or caution... %6o& &hat title has the church of Ro"e to declare itself unchanged( catholic and a$ostolic in its $ractices( as &ell as doctrines( &hen a council &ithout a $o$e can deliberately overthro& the teaching of four <also 2ope 2aschal --, A.D. (((@> $o$es on a "atter of this -ind! %.his to a 5atholic is a most serious thin . "hen our Lord in 7ohn = spea,s of %eatin :is flesh and drin,in :is blood,% Romanists implicitly believe it refers to participation in the eucharist, 8et his church forbids hi" to drin- of the cu$, unless he has ta,en priestly orders.% Secondly( is there Biblical reasons for believing Christ &as s$ea-ing in a $arable( and not literally? %All these things s$a-e 'esus unto the multitude in $arablesB and &ithout a $arable s$a-e he not unto them...% &4atthew ('#'). %/or the -ingdo" of God is not "eat and drin-B but ri hteousness, and peace, and Coy in the :oly Ghost. /or he that in these thin s serveth 5hrist is acceptable to God, and approved of men. Let us therefore follow after the thin s which ma,e for peace, and thin s wherewith one may edify another.% &Romans ()#(D&(3. %$ut these s$ea- evil of those things &hich they -no& not3 but &hat they -no& naturally , as brute beasts, in those thin s they corrupt themselves. "oe unto themH...% &7ude (A&((. Scri$turally s$ea-ing( to &hat s$iritual "eaning do eating and drin-ing s$ecifically refer? %And he humbled thee, and suffered thee to hun er, and fed thee with manna, which thou ,newest not, neither did thy fathers ,nowB that he mi ht ma,e thee ,now that "an doth not live by bread only, but by every &ord that proceedeth out of the mouth of the 1ord doth man live.% Deuteronomy @#' %Thy &ords were found, and ! did eat the"B and thy word was unto me the Coy and reCoicin of mine heart# for - am called by thy name, 7 1ord God of hosts.% &7eremiah (0#(=. %As newborn babes, desire the sincere "il- of the &ord( that ye "ay gro& thereby# -f so be ye have tasted that the Lord is racious.% &( 2eter 1#1&'. %And ! &ill give you $astors accordin to mine heart, &hich shall feed you &ith -no&ledge and understanding.% &7eremiah '#(0. .herefor, 7esus havin said& %-t is the spirit that 8uic,eneth; the flesh $rofiteth nothing3 the &ords that spea, unto you, they are s$irit, and they are life.% <7ohn =#='.>, who shall deny it and insist that only in actually eatin 5hrist?s flesh is there profit!

Section /.+
Quote- "The (ucharist is su#erior to the miraculous food 3.ohn C6!!-!3 5C-354' 0f the 1oly (ucharist were only bread and wine and not the body of Christ these statements would constitute $ross dece#tion'" Contrary to Catholic teaching( did 'esus e)$lain to %is disci$les that %is &ords had a s$iritual( rather than carnal( significance? %As the living .ather hath sent "e, and ! live by the .ather3 so he that eateth "e( even he shall live by "e. This is that bread which came down from heaven# not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead# he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.? These things said he in the synagogue, as he tau ht in 5apernaum. 4any therefore of his disciples, when they had heard this, said, .his is an hard sayin B who can hear it! "hen 7esus ,new in himself that his disciples murmured at it, he said unto them, ?Doth this offend you! "hat and if ye shall see the ;on of man ascend up where he was before! !t is the s$irit that 2uic-enethB the flesh $rofiteth nothing# the &ords that ! s$ea- unto you, they are s$irit, and they are life. $ut there are some of you that believe not....% &7ohn =#0D&=). Did 'esus %i"self believe the bread and &ine &ere changed into %is body and blood( or did %e still s$ea- of the" as being in their original state? %And as they were eatin , 7esus too, bread, and blessed it, and bra,e it, and ave it to the disciples, and said, ?.a,e, eatB this is my body.? And he too, the cup, and ave than,s, and ave it to them, sayin , ?Drin, ye all of itB /or this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins. $ut - say unto you, - will not drin, henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when - drin, it new with you in my /ather?s ,in dom.% &4atthew 1=#1=&13. ,hy then did 'esus s$ea- $arables in the synagogues? ,as he being grossly dece$tive? %And the disciples came, and said unto him, ,hy s$ea-est thou unto the" in $arables! :e answered and said unto them, ?$ecause it is iven unto you to ,now the mysteries of the ,in dom of heaven, but to them it is not iven. /or whosoever hath, to him shall be iven, and he shall have more abundance# but whosoever hath not, from him shall be ta,en away even that he hath. .herefore spea, - to them in parables# because they seeing see not; and hearing they hear not( neither do they understand . And in them is fulfilled the prophecy of *saias, which saith, $y hearin ye shall hear, and shall not understandB and seein ye shall see, and shall not perceive# /or this people?s heart is wa9ed ross, and their ears are dull of hearin , and their eyes they have closedB lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and - should heal them. $ut blessed are your eyes, for they see# and your ears, for they hear. /or verily - say unto you, .hat many prophets and ri hteous men have desired to see those thin s which ye see, and have not seen themB and to hear those thin s which ye hear, and have not heard them. :ear ye therefore the parable...% &4atthew ('#(A&(@. According to God*s &ord( in &hat s$iritual $osition are those &ho inter$ret God*s ,ord only in the natural significance? %$ut these s$ea- evil of those things &hich they -no& not3 but &hat they -no& naturally, as brute beasts, in those thin s they corrupt themselves. "oe unto themH...% &7ude (A&((. %Gnto you therefore which believe he is precious# but unto them which be disobedient, the stone which the builders disallowed, the same is made the head of the corner, And a stone of stu"bling( and a roc- of offence( even to the" &hich stu"ble at the &ord( being disobedient # whereunto also they were appointed.% &( 2eter 1#D&@. %$ut chiefly the" that &al- after the flesh... as natural brute beasts... s$ea- evil of the things that they understand not; and shall utterly $erish in their o&n corru$tion...% 1 2eter 1#(A&(1. %$ut the natural "an receiveth not the things of the S$irit of God# for they are foolishness unto him# neither can he ,now them, because they are s$iritually discerned.% &( 5orinthians 1#().

Section /.:
Quote- "Christ&s 1oly (ucharist actually came down from heaven it was really 1is own very self .ohn C653 35 3@ "@ "8 50 5!'

Comment- mere bread and wine does not come down from heaven nor is it Christ&s flesh as 1e states'" Bread and &ine are "ade by "an. Does God( then( re2uire a te"$le "ade &ith "en*s hands in &hich to d&ell? %:owbeit the "ost %igh d&elleth not in te"$les "ade &ith handsB as saith the prophet, :eaven is my throne, and earth is my footstool# what house will ye build me! saith the Lord# or what is the place of my rest! :ath not my hand made all these thin s! Ye stiff&nec,ed and uncircumcised in heart and ears, ye do always resist the :oly Ghost# as your fathers did, so do ye.% &Acts D#)@&0(. %God that made the world and all thin s therein, seein that he is Lord of heaven and earth, d&elleth not in te"$les "ade &ith hands; 6either is &orshi$$ed &ith "en*s hands , as thou h he needed any thin , seein he iveth to all life, and breath, and all thin sB And hath made of one blood all nations... .hat they should see, the Lord, if haply they mi ht feel after him, and find him, thou h he be not far from every one of us# /or in him we live, and move, and have our bein ... /orasmuch then as we are the offsprin of God, &e ought not to thin- that the Godhead is li,e unto old, or silver, or stone, graven by art and "an*s device. And the times of this i norance God win,ed atB but now commandeth all men every where to repent% &Acts (D#1)&'A.

Section /.5
Quote- "E#on hearin$ of the claims of the /ord&s (ucharist many .ews became #rotesters 3or )rotestant4 .ohn C655'" ,ho are the real $rotesters the ones &ho force a carnal =natural> inter$retation( or those &ho acce$ted the s$iritual a$$lication of the $arables and &ords of 'esus? %And the disciples came, and said unto him, ,hy s$ea-est thou unto the" in $arables! :e answered and said unto them, ?$ecause it is iven unto you to ,now the mysteries of the ,in dom of heaven, but to them it is not iven... .herefore spea, - to them in parables# because they seeing see not; and hearing they hear not( neither do they understand. And in them is fulfilled the prophecy of *saias, which saith, $y hearin ye shall hear, and shall not understand... $ut blessed are your eyes, for they see# and your ears, for they hear. /or verily - say unto you, .hat many prophets and ri hteous men have desired to see those thin s which ye see, and have not seen themB and to hear those thin s which ye hear, and have not heard them. %ear ye therefore the $arable...% &4atthew ('#(A&(@. %$ut these s$ea- evil of those things &hich they -no& not3 but &hat they -no& naturally , as brute beasts, in those thin s they corrupt themselves. "oe unto themH...% &7ude (A&((.

Section /.<
Quote- "0n s#ite of strenuous obFections Christ did not correct or modify 1is statement but insisted more u#on 1is #resence in the (ucharist .ohn C653' Comment- even ta:en as an isolated #roof this is unassailable but ta:en as a #art of a chain of #roofs it becomes as im#re$nable as a wall of $ranite'" Again( &hat $rofit &as the flesh( and &hat &as the nature of the &ine( according to 'esus? %As the livin /ather hath sent me, and - live by the /ather# so he that eateth me, even he shall live by "e. This is that bread which came down from heaven# not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead# he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever... !t is the s$irit that 2uic-eneth; the flesh $rofiteth nothing# the &ords that ! s$ea- unto you, they are s$irit( and they are life. $ut there are some of you that believe not....% &7ohn =#0D&=). %And as they were eatin , 7esus too, bread, and blessed it, and bra,e it, and ave it to the disciples, and said, ?.a,e, eatB this is my body... $ut - say unto you, - will not drin, henceforth of this fruit of the vine, until that day when - drin, it new with you in my /ather?s ,in dom.% &4atthew 1=#1=&13. As for this Catholic*s &all of granite( the scri$ture says %-s not my word li,e as a fire! saith the 1ordB and li-e a ha""er that brea-eth the roc- in $ieces? .herefore, behold, - am a ainst the prophets, saith the 1ord, that steal my words every one from his

nei hbour. $ehold, - am a ainst the prophets, saith the 1ord, that use their ton ues, and say, :e saith. $ehold, - am a ainst them that prophesy false dreams, saith the 1ord, and do tell them, and cause my people to err by their lies, and by their li htnessB yet - sent them not, nor commanded them# therefore they shall not profit this people at all, saith the 1ord.% 7eremiah 1'#1@&'1. %7esus saith unto them, Did ye never read in the scriptures, .he stone which the builders reCected, the same is become the head of the corner# this is the Lord?s doin , and it is marvelous in our eyes! .herefore say unto you, .he ,in dom of God shall be ta,en from you, and iven to a nation brin in forth the fruits thereof. And whosoever shall fall on this stone shall be bro,en# but on &ho"soever it shall fall( it &ill grind hi" to $o&der. And when the chief priests and 2harisees had heard his parables, they perceived that he spa,e of them. $ut when they sou ht to lay hands on him, they feared the multitude, because they too, him for a prophet.% &4atthew 1(#)1&)=.

Section /.?
Quote- ".esus allowed many of 1is disci#les to abandon him rather than to substitute the )rotestant version of 1is 1oly (ucharist for what 1e had $iven .ohn C6!C' Comment- 2hat a stran$e conce#t one must have of Christ to ima$ine that 1e would have acted in this manner if the disci#les had really misunderstood 1im'" %And he said unto them, Gnto you it is iven to ,now the mystery of the ,in dom of God# but unto them that are without, all these thin s are done in parables.% &4ar, )#((. %All these thin s spa,e 7esus unto the multitude in parablesB and &ithout a $arable s$a-e he not unto the"." &4atthew ('#'). .he "ord of God havin said& %without a parable spa,e he not unto them.%, who will deny it, and say :e did not spea, in a parable! "hat a stran e concept one must have of 5hrist& to thin, :e would tell them how :e was oin to spea,, and how to interpret :is sayin s, and then not teach in :is own prescribed mannerH %And the disciples came, and said unto him, "hy spea,est thou unto them in parables! :e answered and said unto them, $ecause it is given unto you to -no& the "ysteries of the -ingdo" of heaven( but to the" it is not given. /or whosoever hath, to him shall be iven, and he shall have more abundance# but whosoever hath not, from him shall be ta,en away even that he hath. .herefore spea, - to them in parables# because they seein see notB and hearin they hear not, neither do they understand. And in them is fulfilled the prophecy of *saias, which saith, $y hearin ye shall hear, and shall not understandB and seein ye shall see, and shall not perceive# /or this people?s heart is wa9ed ross, and their ears are dull of hearin , and their eyes they have closedB lest at any time they should see with their eyes and hear with their ears, and should understand with their heart, and should be converted, and - should heal them.% &4atthew ('#(A&(0. %And when he was alone, they that &ere about hi" &ith the t&elve as-ed of hi" the parable. And he said unto the"( Ento you it is given to -no& the "ystery of the ,in dom of God# but unto them that are without, all these thin s are done in parables.% &4ar, )#(A&((.

Section /.@
Quote- ".esus would have allowed 1is !5 a#ostles also to abandon 1im rather than to $ive them the )rotestant version of 1is 1oly (ucharist 3.ohn C6C=4 )eter as usual had the correct view- he believed < new that Christ was >od- therefore he acce#ted 1is divine word difficult to understand thou$h it may have been' Catholics lovin$ly do the same'" ,as the /ass a doctrine of the original church? %Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p s. 01# %.he mass was instituted in the year (1(0 at the council of Lateran -E.%

Section /.A
Quote- ")aul teaches that the unworthy rece#tion of 1oly Communion constitutes a desecration of

the body and blood of Christ and is the cause of damnation 3! Corinthians !!65= 584 Comment- let unbelievers in the truth of our /ords real #resence endeavor to show how the ta:in$ of a mere #iece of bread or a si# of wine could be a desecration of Christ 1imself and a crime worthy of damnation'" %-n the fourth century when the 8ueen of heaven, under the name of 4ary, was be innin to be worshipped in the 5hristian 5hurch, this ?unbloody sacrifice? also was brou ht in. *piphanius states that the practice of offerin and eatin it be an amon the women of Arabia <*piphanius, Adversus :aereses, vol. i p. (A0)>B and at that time it was well ,nown to have been adopted from the 2a ans. .he very shape of the unbloody sacrifice of Rome may indicate whence it came. -t is a small thin, round waferB and on its roundness the 5hurch of Rome lays so much stress... and that reason will be found, if we loo, at the altars of * ypt. ?.he thin round ca,e,? says "il,inson <* yptians, vol.v.p.'0'> ?occurs on all altars.? .he round dis,, so fre8uent in the sacred emblems of * ypt, symboliFed the sun... %Accordin to the sacred oracle of the reat oddess of * ypt# ?No mortal hath lifted my veil. .he fruit which - have brou ht forth is the ?Sun.?... :urd... describes the embellishments of the Romish <papal> altar...?A plate of silver, in the form of the Sun, is fi9ed opposite to the Sacra"ent on the altarB which, with the li ht of the tapers, ma,es a most brilliant appearance.? <:urd?s Rites and 5eremonies, p. (3=, col. i.>... /rom all this it is manifest that the ima e of the sun above, or on the altar, was one of the reco niFed symbols of those who worshipped $aal, or the ;un. And here, in a so&called 5hristian 5hurch, a brilliant plate of silver, ?in the form of a Sun,? is so placed on the altar, that everyone who adores at that altar must bow down in lowly reverence before that ima e of the ?;un.?...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (03&(=1. !f the Catholic co""union is the co""e"oration of Christ( ho& does their "bread" co"e to be found in $erfect circles &ith the initials of $agan deities on it? %And as they were eatin , 7esus too, bread, and blessed it, and bra,e it, and ave it to the disciples, and said, .a,e, eatB this is my body.% &4atthew 1=#1=. %-f the sun&divinity was worshipped in * ypt as ?the ;eed,? or in $abylon as the ?5orn,? precisely so is the wafer adored in Rome. ?$read&corn of the elect, have mercy on us,? is one of the appointed prayers of the Roman Litany, addressed to the wafer, in the celebration of the mass. And one of the last re2uire"ents... is the very sa"e... of the $abylonian divinity. .hose who parta,e of it are re8uired to parta,e absolutely fastin ... 5onsiderin that our Lord 7esus 5hrist instituted the :oly 5ommunion immediately after :is disciples had parta,en of the paschal feast, such a strict re8uirement of fastin mi ht seem very unaccountable. $ut loo, at this provision in re ard to the ?unbloody sacrifice? of the mass in the li ht of the *leusinian 4ysteries, and it is accounted for at onceB for there the first 8uestion put to those who sou ht initiation was, ?Are you fastin !? and unless that 8uestion was answered in the affirmative, no initiation could ta,e place... %-n re ard to the 2a an character of the ?unbloody sacrifice? of the mass... there is somethin yet to be considered... .here are letters on the wafer that are worth readin . .hese letters are -. :. ;. "hat mean these mystical letters! .o a 5hristian these letters are represented as si nifyin , ? 0esus 1ominum ?alvator& ?7esus the ;aviour of men.? $ut let a Roman worshipper of -sis <for in the a e of the emperors there were innumerable worshippers of -sis in Rome> cast his eyes upon them, and how will he read them! :e will read them, of course, accordin to his own well&,nown system of idolatry# &0sis 1orus ?eb & that is, ?.he 4other, the 5hild, and the /ather of the ods,?& in other words, ?.he * yptian .rinity. 5an the reader ima ine that this double sense is accidental!... "hen the women of Arabia be an to adopt this wafer and offer the ?unbloody sacrifice,? all sound Christians sa& at once the real character of their sacrifice... heresy...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (='&(=). %.he reatest miracle which Rome pretends to wor,, is when... she professes to brin down the body, blood, soul, and divinity of our Lord 7esus 5hrist from heaven, to ma,e :im really and corporeally present in the sacrament of the altar. .he 5haldean priests, pretended, by their ma ic spells, in li,e manner, to brin down their divinities into their statues, so that their ?real presence? should be visibly manifested in them. .his they called the ?ma,in of odsB? and from this no doubt comes the blasphemous sayin of the 2opish priests, that they have power ?to create their 5reator?... the doctrine of transubstantiation is clearly of the very essence of 4a ic, which pretended, on the pronunciation of a few potent words, to chan e one

substance into another... or to substitute another.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 103. %.he 5atholic *ncyclopedia admits# -t may be stated as a eneral fact, that down to the twelfth century, in the "est as well as in the *ast, public 5ommunion in the churches was ordinarily administered and received under both ,inds,? a fact ?clearly beyond dispute.? $ut, after all these centuries, the roman 5atholic church be an to hold bac, the cup from the people, servin them only the bread. the priest dran, the wine... -t was e9plained that ?communion under one ,ind,? as it was called, was Cust as valid as ta,in both...and that...?therefore, is communion under both ,inds not obli atory on the faithful, but the chalice is strictly forbidden by ecclesiastical la& to any but the celebrating $riest*H<The Catholic (ncyclo#edia vol.). p.(D=, article# %5ommunion under both ,inds%> After many centuries, this law has now been rela9ed... %.he historian Durant tells us that the belief in transubstantiation as practiced in the roman 5atholic church, is ?one of the oldest ceremonies of primitive reli ion.? <Durant, The ?tory of CiviliBation6 The Reformation p.D)3>. %-n the scholarly wor, 1astin$s& (ncyclo#edia of Reli$ion and (thics many pa es are devoted to an article ?*atin the od.? -n these pa es, abundant evidence is iven of transubstantiation rites amon many nations, tribes, and reli ions... %-n 2a an Rome also... 4ithraism had a *ucharist..., admits the 5atholic *ncyclopedia < The Catholic (ncyclo#edia vol. (A, p.)A), article# %*ucharist%>. %-n * ypt, a ca,e was consecrated by a priest and was supposed to become the flesh of Osiris. this was then eaten and wine was ta,en as part of the rite. <(ncyclo#edia of Reli$ions vol.1, p.D=> *ven in 4e9ico and central America, amon those who had never heard of 5hrist, the belief in eatin the flesh of a od was found... %2riests of $aal were re8uired to eat human flesh. thus ?5ahna&$al,? that is, ?priest of $aal,? has provided the basis for our modern word cannibal... %:osts are made in a round shape... $ut when 7esus instituted the memorial supper, he simply too, bread and bra,e it. $read does not brea, into round pieces... %-n the mystery reli ion of 4ithraism, the hi her initiates received a small round ca,e or wafer of unleavened bread which symboliFed the solar dis,, <$lavats,y, 0sis Enveiled p.'0(> as did their tonsure. %-n (@0), an ancient temple was discovered in * ypt with inscriptions that show little round ca,es on an altar. Above the altar is a lar e ima e of the sun <-nman, 9ncient )a$an and ;odern Christian ?ymbolism p.')>.% &%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e ((3.

Section 6.# Public ,orshi$ !n The Church
Quote- "There is a sacrifice and a #riesthood in the new law ;al' !6!! 1eb' !36!0' Comment- the usual )rotestant communion service is not intended to be a sacrificial act which the #ro#hets word "altar" connotes' 2here today exce#t in the Catholic Church do you find amon$ Christians an altar of sacrifice of the body and blood of Christ and the a##earance of bread and wine*" Again( is the 6e& Testa"ent altar a natural altar( or( scri$turally s$ea-ing( is it in the hearts of "en to do the &ill of God? %- beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a livin sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service. And be not conformed to this world# but be ye transformed by the renewin of your mind, that ye may prove what is that ood, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.% &Romans (1#(&1. %.he sacrifices of God are a bro,en spirit# a bro,en and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.% &2salm 0(#(D. %"e have an altar, whereof they have no ri ht to eat which serve the tabernacle. /or the bodies of those beasts, whose blood is brou ht into the sanctuary by the hi h priest for sin, are burned without the camp. "herefore 7esus also, that he mi ht sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without the ate. Let

us o forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearin his reproach. /or here have we no continuin city, but we see, one to come. $y him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips ivin than,s to his name. $ut to do ood and to communicate for et not# for with such sacrifices God is well pleased.% :ebrews ('#(A&(=. ,ho( then( are the $riests according to the 6e& Testa"ent? %$ut ye are a chosen eneration, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar peopleB that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of dar,ness into his marvelous li htB "hich in time past were not a people, but are now the $eo$le of God# which had not obtained mercy, but now have obtained mercy.% &( 2eter 1#3&(A. According to scri$ture( &ho alone is our "ediator bet&een us and God? %/or there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man 5hrist 7esusB "ho ave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time. "hereunto - am ordained a preacher, and an apostle...% &( .imothy 1#0&D. !s the sacrificing of 'esus* body to be "ade continually( as the sacrifices &ere in the 7ld Testa"ent( or &as it "ade once for all ti"e? %..."hen 4oses had spo,en every precept to all the people accordin to the law, he too, the blood of calves and of oats, with water, and scarlet wool, and hyssop, and sprin,led both the boo,, and all the people, ;ayin , .his is the blood of the testament which God hath enCoined unto you. 4oreover he sprin,led with blood both the tabernacle, and all the vessels of the ministry. And almost all thin s are by the law pur ed with bloodB and without sheddin of blood is no remission. -t was therefore necessary that the patterns of thin s in the heavens should be purified with theseB but the heavenly thin s themselves with better sacrifices than these. /or 5hrist is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the fi ures of the trueB but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us# Nor yet that he should offer himself often, as the hi h priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of othersB /or then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world# but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the Cud ment# ;o 5hrist was once offered to bear the sins of manyB and unto them that loo, for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. /or the law havin a shadow of ood thin s to come, and not the very ima e of the thin s, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually ma,e the comers thereunto perfect. /or then would they not have ceased to be offered! because that the worshippers once pur ed should have had no more conscience of sins. $ut in those sacrifices there is a remembrance a ain made of sins every year... "herefore when he cometh into the world, he saith, ;acrifice and offerin thou wouldest not, but a body hast thou prepared me# -n burnt offerin s and sacrifices for sin thou hast had no pleasure. .hen said -, Lo, - come <in the volume of the boo, it is written of me,> to do thy will, O God. Above when he said, ;acrifice and offerin and burnt offerin s and offerin for sin thou wouldest not, neither hadst pleasure thereinB which are offered by the lawB .hen said he, Lo, come to do thy will, O God. :e ta,eth away the first, that he may establish the second. $y the which will we are sanctified throu h the offerin of the body of 7esus 5hrist once for all. And every priest standeth daily ministerin and offerin oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never ta,e away sins# $ut this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the ri ht hand of GodB /rom henceforth e9pectin till his enemies be made his footstool. /or by one offerin he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified.% &:ebrews 3#(3&(A#(). !t is( therefor( no &onder that Catholic sacrifices "ust be "ade continually( since "in those sacrifices there is a re"e"brance again "ade of sins"( for( "&ould they not have ceased to be offered"( if they "ade "the co"ers thereunto $erfect"?

Section 7.# Confession
Quote!' The %ible teaches that the confession of sins is the usual reAuisite for obtainin$ for$iveness Numb' 56C-= )rov' 5@6!3 5 ?am' !56!3 /u:e 536"3 ! .ohn !68 ;att' 365-C''' Comment- #rivate confession is necessarily contained in the double #ower to for$ive or retain sins as the circumstances reAuired' To do so #rudently the minister of reconciliation must have the reAuired

information which the #enitent su##lies by confession'" ,hen &as the auricular confession to a $riest actually instituted? %4ost 5atholics are amaFed to find that the auricular confession to a priest was instituted in about (1(0 at the 5ouncil of Latern -E.% &-acts -or Roman Catholics''', pa e (D. The scri$ture says %5onfess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed. .he effectual fervent prayer of a ri hteous man availeth much.% &7ames 0#(=. %"ho can for ive sins but God only!% &Lu,e 0#1(. %/or there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man 5hrist 7esus% &( .imothy 1#0. %$ut if we wal, in the li ht, as he is in the li ht, we have fellowship one with another, and the blood of 7esus 5hrist his ;on cleanseth us from all sin... if we confess our sins, he is faithful and Cust to for ive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unri hteousness... 4y little children, these thin s write - unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the /ather, 7esus 5hrist the ri hteous.% &( 7ohn (#D&1#(. %-f therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, <for under it the people received the law,> what further need was there that another priest should rise after the order of 4elchisedec, and not be called after the order of Aaron! /or the priesthood bein chan ed, there is made of necessity a chan e also of the law. /or he of whom these thin s are spo,en pertaineth to another tribe, of which no man ave attendance at the altar. /or it is evident that our Lord spran out of 7udah of which tribe 4oses spa,e nothin concernin priesthood. And it is yet far more evident# for that after the similitude of 4elchisedec there ariseth another priest, "ho is made, not after the law of a carnal commandment, but after the power of an endless life. /or he testifieth, .hou art a priest for ever after the order of 4elchisedec. /or there is verily a disannullin of the commandment oin before for the wea,ness and unprofitableness thereof. /or the law made nothin perfect, but the brin in in of a better hope didB by the which we draw ni h unto God. And inasmuch as not without an oath he was made priest# </or those priests were made without an oathB but this with an oath by him that said unto him, .he Lord sware and will not repent, .hou art a priest for ever after the order of 4elchisedec#> $y so much was 7esus made a surety of a better testament. And they truly were many priests, because they were not suffered to continue by reason of death# $ut this man, because he continueth ever, hath an unchan eable priesthood... <4aybe this is the real heart of the problem. 4aybe 5atholics don?t really believe 5hrist is alive forever more. 4aybe that?s why they still leave :im han in on the cross in all their pictures and ima es and statuesH> %"herefore he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seein he ever liveth to "a-e intercession for them. /or such an hi h priest became us, who is holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made hi her than the heavensB "ho needeth not daily, as those hi h priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people?s# for this he did once, when he offered up himself. /or the law ma,eth men hi h priests which have infirmityB but the word of the oath, which was since the law, ma,eth the ;on, who is consecrated for evermore. Now of the thin s which we have spo,en this is the sum# "e have such an hi h priest, who is set on the ri ht hand of the throne of the 4aCesty in the heavensB A minister of the sanctuary, and of the true tabernacle, which the Lord pitched, and not man. /or every hi h priest is ordained to offer ifts and sacrifices# wherefore it is of necessity that this man have somewhat also to offer. /or if he were on earth, he should not be a priest, seein that there are priests that offer ifts accordin to the law# "ho serve unto the e9ample and shadow of heavenly thin s, as 4oses was admonished of God when he was about to ma,e the tabernacle# for, ;ee, saith he, that thou ma,e all thin s accordin to the pattern shewed to thee in the mount. $ut now hath he obtained a more e9cellent ministry, by how much also he is the mediator of a better covenant, which was established upon better promises. /or if that first covenant had been faultless, then should no place have been sou ht for the second. /or findin fault with them, he saith, $ehold, the days come, saith the Lord, when - will ma,e a new covenant with the house of -srael and with the house of 7udah# Not accordin to the covenant that - made with their fathers in the day when - too, them by the hand to lead them out of the land of * yptB because they continued not in my covenant, and - re arded them not, saith the Lord. /or this is the covenant that - will ma,e with the

house of -srael after those days, saith the LordB - will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts# and - will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people# And they shall not teach every man his nei hbour, and every man his brother, sayin , 6now the Lord# for all shall ,now me, from the least to the reatest. /or - will be merciful to their unri hteousness, and their sins and their ini8uities will remember no more. -n that he saith, A new covenant, he hath made the first old. Now that which decayeth and wa9eth old is ready to vanish away. .hen verily the first covenant had also ordinances of divine service, and a worldly sanctuary. /or there was a tabernacle madeB the first, wherein was the candlestic,, and the table, and the shewbreadB which is called the sanctuary. And after the second veil, the tabernacle which is called the :oliest of allB "hich had the olden censer, and the ar, of the covenant overlaid round about with old, wherein was the olden pot that had manna, and Aaron?s rod that budded, and the tables of the covenantB And over it the cherubim?s of lory shadowin the mercyseatB of which we cannot now spea, particularly. Now when these thin s were thus ordained, the priests went always into the first tabernacle, accomplishin the service of God. $ut into the second went the hi h priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and for the errors of the people# .he :oly Ghost this si nifyin , that the way into the holiest of all was not yet made manifest, while as the first tabernacle was yet standin # "hich was a fi ure for the time then present, in which were offered both ifts and sacrifices, that could not ma,e him that did the service perfect, as pertainin to the conscienceB "hich stood only in meats and drin,s, and divers washin s, and carnal ordinances, imposed on them until the time of reformation. $ut 5hrist bein come an hi h priest of ood thin s to come, by a reater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this buildin B Neither by the blood of oats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, havin obtained eternal redemption for us. /or if the blood of bulls and of oats, and the ashes of an heifer sprin,lin the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifyin of the flesh# :ow much more shall the blood of 5hrist, who throu h the eternal ;pirit offered himself without spot to God, pur e your conscience from dead wor,s to serve the livin God! And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the trans ressions that were under the first testament, they which are called mi ht receive the promise of eternal inheritance.... /or 5hrist is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the fi ures of the trueB but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us# Nor yet that he should offer himself often, as the hi h priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of othersB /or then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world# but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the Cud ment# ;o 5hrist was once offered to bear the sins of manyB and unto them that loo, for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation. /or the law havin a shadow of ood thin s to come, and not the very ima e of the thin s, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually ma,e the comers thereunto perfect. /or then would they not have ceased to be offered! because that the worshippers once pur ed should have had no more conscience of sins. $ut in those sacrifices there is a remembrance a ain made of sins every year.... And every priest standeth daily ministerin and offerin oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never ta,e away sins# $ut this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the ri ht hand of GodB /rom henceforth e9pectin till his enemies be made his footstool. /or by one offerin he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. "hereof the :oly Ghost also is a witness to us# for after that he had said before, .his is the covenant that - will ma,e with them after those days, saith the Lord, - will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will - write themB And their sins and ini8uities will - remember no more. Now where remission of these is, there is no more offerin for sin. :avin therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of 7esus, $y a new and livin way, which he hath consecrated for us, throu h the veil, that is to say, his fleshB And havin an hi h priest over the house of GodB Let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith...% &:ebrews D#((&(A#11

Section 7.+
Quote- "Christ $ave to the validly ordained ministers of 1is own church the #ower to for$ive sins 5 Cor' 5650 .ohn 5065! 53 ;att' !@6!@' Comment- all #urely s#iritual #owers which Christ inferred on 1is church were $iven to it #er#etually 3exce#t where no need of such a #ower remained4' %ut who will say that there is no lon$er any need of the #ower to for$ive sin that sin is no lon$er a live #roblem on the earth*"

Are God*s "inisters 1ords over God*s $eo$le( that only through the" "ay any one receive re"ission of sins? %ave the Ro"an Catholic $riests clai"ed for the"selves to be the real ob9ects of our faith? %/eed the floc, of God which is amon you, ta,in the oversi ht thereof, not by constraint, but willin lyB not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mindB 6either as bein lords over God?s herita e, but bein ensamples to the floc,.% &( 2eter 0#1&'. %And call no "an your father u$on the earth# for one is your /ather, which is in heaven. Neither be ye called masters# for one is your 4aster, even 5hrist. $ut he that is reatest amon you shall be your servant. And whosoever shall e9alt himself shall be abasedB and he that shall humble himself shall be e9alted.% &4atthew 1'#3&(1. %And there was also a strife amon them, which of them should be accounted the reatest. And he said unto them, .he ,in s of the Gentiles e)ercise lordshi$ over themB and they that e9ercise authority upon them are called benefactors. But ye shall not be so# but he that is reatest amon you, let him be as the youn erB and he that is chief, as he that doth serve. /or whether is reater, he that sitteth at meat, or he that serveth! is not he that sitteth at meat! but - am amon you as he that serveth.% &Lu,e 11#1)&1D. %2enance... .he penitential discipline did not reflect the for iveness of 7esus in the Gospels with all fidelity... ?Auricular confession? & the confessin of faults by an individual penitent to a priest&... must have arisen in the early 4iddle A es with the disappearance of the penitential system.% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. (0, pa es 33D&33@. Rome, leavin the "ord of God, has had recourse to the $abylonian system. -n that system, secret confession to the priest, accordin to a prescribed form, was re8uired of all who were admitted to the ?4ysteriesB? and till such confession had been made, no complete initiation could ta,e place... 5onfession... can be clearly traced to $abylonian ori in.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 3.

Section P.# 4)tre"e Enction
Quote- "The anointin$ of the sic: with oil and #rayer by the #riests of the church 3called extreme unction4 may obtain for$iveness of sins and even refreshment of body .ames 56!"-!C 3elders that is #riests4 Comment- as all such s#iritual ordinances derive from Christ and the a#ostles were of their nature #er#etual there is absolutely no reason for sayin$ that extreme unction as it is here described was but a tem#orary institution'" !s the actual $ur$ose of the Catholic "4)tre"e Enction" to heal the sic-( as the scri$ture states( or as a last rite for the dying? %Durin the 3th&century 5arolin ian reform, priests of the "est were repeatedly e9horted to see to it that no sic, person departed this life without first bein reconciled, anointed, and ranted the *ucharist. .hus, the anointin of the sic, became one of the last rites of the church, and in this conte9t unction came to be re arded as a rite of the dyin and a preparation of death. Accordin ly, the anointin was usually postponed until death was imminent and the dyin 5hristian was in extremisB thus, the name e9treme unction developed. -n the Roman 5atholic church... canon law states that dan er of death, either because of serious illness or old a e, is a necessary condition for anointin a person.% *ncyclopedia $rittanica, vol. -, pa e '3@. ,here did the idea of a "last rite" co"e( if not fro" the Bible and the a$ostles? %.he ?e9treme unction? of Rome , as the very e9pression itself declares... is not intended for healin the sic,... for it is not on any account to be administered till all hope of recovery is one, and death is visibly at the very doors. As the obCect of this anointin is the very opposite of the ;criptural anointin , it must have come from 8uite a different 8uarter. .hat 8uarter is the very same from which the 2apacy has imported so much :eathenism... /rom the 5haldean 4ysteries, e9treme unction has obviously come... .he 2a an system naturally developed itself into ?e9treme unction?. -t?s votaries were anointed for their last Courney, that... their minds mi ht be fortified at once a ainst the sense of uilt and the assaults of the ,in of terrors. /rom this source, and this alone, there can be no doubt came the ?e9treme unction? of the 2apacy, which was entirely un,nown amon 5hristians till corruption was far advanced in the church.% &from The Two

%abylons, by Rev.Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (=0&(=D.

Section K.# %oly 7rders
Quote!' Christ has ambassadors or a$ents 1is bisho#s and #riests who re#resent 1im in this world 5 Cor' 5650 ! Cor' "6! .ohn 5065!' Comment- no wonder that the Catholic church im#oses such serious obli$ations u#on her #riests' The fact that an occasional individual may be faithless #roves nothin$ a$ainst Christ or 1is church' The fact that many slander and vilify the #riests only ma:es them so much the more li:e their divine master'" !s it Scri$tural to "i"$ose" the "obligation" of celibacy on God*s "inisters as the Ro"an Catholic church does? %Now the ;pirit spea,eth e9pressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, ivin heed to seducin spirits, and doctrines of devilsB ;pea,in lies in hypocrisyB havin their conscience seared with a hot ironB /orbiddin to marry, and commandin to abstain from meats...% &( .imothy )#(&'. %:ave we not power to lead about a sister, a wife, as well as other apostles, and as the brethren of the Lord, and 5ephas!% &( 5orinthians 3#0. %.hou shouldest... ordain elders in every city, as - had appointed thee# -f any be blameless, the husband of one wife, havin faithful children not accused of riot or unruly. /or a bishop must be blameless, as the steward of GodB not self&willed, not soon an ry, not iven to wine, no stri,er, not iven to filthy lucre.% &.itus (#0&D. Did "%oly 7rders" originate &ith the a$ostles? %.he term order <Latin ordo, plural ordines> was adopted by the early 5hristian church from Roman civil life and was first used by .ertullian <c. 1A@, .ertullian e9plicitly employed written wor,s of pa an philosophers in support of his 5hristian philosophy> to mean both cler y and laity. Gradually it came to mean some office in the church to which a person had been specifically admitted by a bishop. -n the early church, a person was evidently not re8uired to pass by re ular steps from a lower to a hi her order, and a layman could pass directly to any office in the church. After the ninth century it became a rule that a man must pro ress from a lower to a hi her order.% &*ncyclopedia $rittanica, vol. E., pa e 33.

Section K.+
Quote- "The office of the bisho# #riests etc' in the true church comes from divine a##ointment' That is >od $ives individuals a s#ecial vocation to 1is callin$ 1eb' 56" !' Comment- most unscri#tural therefor is the #ractice of con$re$ations ordainin$ commissionin$ their ministers to #reach the $os#el to them' This authority comes from Christ throu$h the a#ostles and their lawful successors'" Does the Ro"an Catholic church ordain its $riests to $reach and teach true Christian doctrines( or the doctrines of $aganis"? %.here is a direct contrast between the character of the ministers of 5hrist, and that of the 2apal priesthood... "hen the pope ordains his cler y, he ta,es them bound to prohibit, e9cept in special circumstances, the readin of the "ord of God ?in the vul ar ton ue,? that is, in a lan ua e the people can understand. :e ives them, indeed, a commissionB and what is it! -t is couched in these astoundin words# ?Receive the power of sacrificin for the livin and the dead.? "hat blasphemy could be worse than this!... .he sacrifice which the papal priesthood are empowered to offer... is Cust the ?unbloody sacrifice? of the mass, which was offered up in $abylon lon before it was ever heard of in Rome. %...;emiramis, the real ori inal of the 5haldean Jueen of :eaven, to whom the ?unbloody sacrifice? of the mass was first offered, was... the para on of impurity... ;tran e thou h it may seem, yet the voice of anti8uity assi ns to that abandoned 8ueen the invention of clerical celibacy, and that in its most strin ent form... *very scholar ,nows that when the worship of 5ybele, the $abylonian oddess, was introduced into 2a an Rome, it was introduced in its primitive form, with its celibate cler y. "hen the 2ope appropriated

to himself so much that was peculiar to the worship of that oddess, from the very same source, also, he introduced into the priesthood under his authority the bindin obli ation of celibacy... %.hese celibate priests have all a certain mar,... and that is the clerical tonsure... "hat was the meanin of it! -t was the visible inau uration of those who submitted to it as priests of $acchus. .his tonsure cannot have the sli htest pretense to 5hristian authority. -t was indeed the tonsure of 2eter, but not the 2eter of Galilee, but of the 5haldean 2eter of the 4ysteries. :e was a tonsured priest...% &from The Two %abylons, by Rev.Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 1(3&11(. %.he sacrifice which the papal priesthood are empowered to offer... is Cust the ?unbloody sacrifice? of the mass, which was offered up in $abylon lon before it was ever heard of in Rome... the voice of anti8uity assi ns to <;emiramis, the real ori inal of the 5haldean Jueen of :eaven> the invention of clerical celibacy... .hese celibate priests have all a certain mar,... and that is the clerical tonsure... "hat was the meanin of it! -t was the visible inau uration of those who submitted to it as the priests of $acchus... -t was indeed the ?tonsure of 2eter,? but not of the 2eter of Galilee, but of the 5haldean ?2eter? of the 4ysteries. :e was a tonsured priest, for so was the od whose 4ysteries he revealed. 5enturies before the 5hristian era, thus spo,e :erodotus of the $abylonian tonsure# ?the Arabians ac,nowled e no other ods than $acchus and Grania <i.e. the Jueen of :eaven>, and they say that their hair was cut in the same manner as $acchus?s is cutB now, they cut it in a circular form shavin it around the temples.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 1(3&11(.

Section K.:
Quote- "The a#ostles actually a##ointed lawful assistants and successors to carry on their wor: Titus !65' Comment- 1oly orders is a s#ecial sacrament which transmits the a#ostolic #ower and authority down throu$h the centuries'" .ro" &here do %oly 7rders actually originate? %Rome has... as every one ,nows, other reli ious orders... she has innumerable armies of mon,s and nuns all en a ed in her service. "here can there be shown the least warrant for such an institution in ;cripture! -n the reli ion of the $abylonian 4essiah their institution was from the earliest times... *ven in 2eru, durin the rei n of the -ncas, the same system prevailed, and showed so remar,able an analo y, as to indicate that the Eestals of Rome, the nuns of the papacy, and the :oly Eir ins of 2eru, must have sprun from a common ori in <see Gen. ((#3>. thus does 2rescott refer to the 2eruvian nunneries# ?Another sin ular analo y with Roman 5atholic institution is presented by the vir ins of the sun, the elect, as they were called. .hese were youn maidens dedicated to the service of the deity... they were cut off from all communication with the world, even their own family and friends... One is astonished, to find so close a resemblance between the institutions of the American -ndian, the ancient Roman, and the modern 5atholic?.% &from The Two %abylons, by Rev.Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 11'&11).

Section R.# ,o"en As /inisters
Quote- "0t is unlawful to have women ministers who s#ea: or #reach from the churches ! Cor' !"63"''' Comment- in view of all this it is difficult to see how anyone can ta:e it u#on himself to nullify the word of >od by havin$ women #reachers ministers or evan$elists'" %The Catholic (ncyclo#edia says, ?-n the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries this $o$ess was already counted as an historical persona e, &hose e)istence no one doubted. She had her place amon the carved busts which stood in ;iena 5athedral% &as 8uoted in %abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e 3(. =So "uch for $a$al infallibility0>

Section T.# Purgatory
Quote9' ?ome sins are for$iven in the next world' %' ?ome souls are saved in the next world by fire'

C' 0t is useful and beneficial to #ray for the dead ;att' !5635 3some sins can therefor be for$iven after death4''' Comment- as nothin$ defiled can enter heaven Rev' 5!65= there must necessarily exist a state of cleansin$ or #ur$ation usually called )ur$atory'" Since the Bible does not s$ecifically teach the doctrine of Purgatory( &here does the doctrine of Purgatory actually co"e fro"? %.he name pur atory comes from the pa an feast of purification called ?;acrum 2ur atorum.? .he ?Lu entes 5ampe? or dismal re ions of pa anism became the pur atory of the Roman 5hurch... -t first came into e9istence in 5atholic teachin about the year 030 A.D. durin the rei n of Gre ory -. -t was Gre ory - that developed the ideas of penance and pur atory... -t was in ()'@ at the 5ouncil of $asle&/lorence that the idea or theory of pur atory was adopted as a doctrine that had to be believed by 5atholics.% /rom Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p . (3. %-n every system, therefore, e9cept that of the $ible, the doctrine of a pur atory after death, and prayers for the dead, has always been found to occupy a place. o wherever we may, in ancient or modern times, we shall find that 2a anism leaves hope after death for sinners, who at the time of their departure, were consciously unfit for the abodes of the blest. for this purpose a middle state has been fei ned... -n Greece the doctrine of a pur atory was inculcated by... 2lato... -n 2a an Rome, pur atory was e8ually held... -n * ypt, substantially the same doctrine of pur atory was inculcated... 2rayers for the dead ever o hand in hand with pur atoryB but no prayers can be completely efficacious without the interposition of priestsB and no priestly functions can be rendered unless there be s#ecial #ay for them. .herefore, in every land we find the 2a an priesthood &devourin widows? houses&, and ma,in merchandise of the tender feelin s of sorrowin relatives... .he doctrine of pur atory is purely 2a an, and cannot for a moment stand the li ht of ;cripture... -n the 2a an pur atory, fire, water, wind, were represented as combinin to pur e away the stain of sin. -n the 2ur atory of the 2apacy... fire itself has been the rand means of pur ation. .hus, while the pur atorial fires of the future world are Cust the carryin out of the principle embodied in the blaFin and purifyin fires of $aal&fires of the eve of ;t. 7ohn, they form another lin, in identifyin the system of Rome with the system of .ammuF or Koroaster, the reat od of the fire&worshippers.% &from The Two %abylons, by Rev.Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (=D&(DA. %Roman 5atholic ideas about 2ur atory... did not become an actual do ma until the 5ouncil of /lorence in ()03.% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa es =1&='. The scri$ture states3 %None of them can by any means redeem his brother, nor ive to God a ransom for him# </or the redemption of their soul is precious, and it ceaseth for ever...> &2salm )3#D&@. %:e that is unCust, let him be unCust still# and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still# and he that is ri hteous, let him be ri hteous still# and he that is holy, let him be holy still. And, behold, - come 8uic,lyB and my reward is with me, to ive every man accordin as his wor, shall be. - am Alpha and Ome a, the be innin and the end, the first and the last. $lessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have ri ht to the tree of life, and may enter in throu h the ates into the city. /or without are do s, and sorcerers, and whoremon ers, and murderers, and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and ma,eth a lie.% &Revelation 11#((&(0. %$ut when David saw that his servants whispered, David perceived that the child was dead# therefore David said unto his servants, -s the child dead! And they said, :e is dead. .hen David arose from the earth, and washed, and anointed himself, and chan ed his apparel, and came into the house of the 1ord, and worshipped# then he came to his own houseB and when he re8uired, they set bread before him, and he did eat. .hen said his servants unto him, "hat thin is this that thou hast done! thou didst fast and weep for the child, while it was aliveB but when the child was dead, thou didst rise and eat bread. And he said, ,hile the child &as yet alive( ! fasted and &e$t# for - said, "ho can tell whether God will be racious to me, that the child may live! But no& he is dead( &herefore should ! fast! can - brin him bac, a ain! - shall o to him, but he shall not return to me.% &1 ;amuel (1#(3&1'. %And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the Cud ment...% &:ebrews 3#1D. %And if any man hear my words, and believe not, - Cud e him not# for - came not to Cud e the world, but to save the world. :e that reCecteth me, and receiveth not my words, hath one that Cud eth him# the word that -

have spo,en, the same shall Cud e him in the last day.% &7ohn (1#)D&)@.

Section E.# Pictures And Statues
Quote- ">od a##roves the use and veneration of sacred #ictures and ima$es to stimulate reli$ious fervor (xod' 556!@ Num' 5!6@-8 .ohn 36!" ! Hin$s C658' Comment- we are not forbidden to ma:e to thyself a $raven ima$e exce#t where this is to be set u# and adored as a $od'" !s "veneration" of $ictures and statues any different than &orshi$$ing the"( and therefore idolatry? Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p .)A, 8uotes the 5atholic :ome *ncyclopedia, pa e 1D'# %Eeneration. .he word commonly used to e9press in *n lish that &orshi$ iven to the saints either directly or throu h ima es or relics... %Eeneration of the 5ross. .he ceremony on Good /riday mornin durin which the ministers approach the uncovered crucifi9 with three profound enuflection?s and ,iss it. The crucifi) is also $resented to the faithful for the" to -iss. After the 4ass of the 2resanctified the crucifi9 is usually placed on a pillow at the ates to the sanctuary, where the faithful may come to venerate it.% %.hou shalt not bow down to their ods, nor serve them, nor do after their wor,s# but thou shalt utterly overthrow them, and 8uite brea, down their ima es.% &*9odus 1'#1). %.hou shalt not ma,e unto thee any raven ima e, or any li,eness of any thin that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. .hou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them# for - the Lord thy God am a Cealous God, visitin the ini8uity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth eneration of them that hate me.% &*9odus 1A#)&0. %God is a ;pirit# and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.% &7ohn )#1). %At that day shall a man loo, to his 4a,er, and his eyes shall have respect to the :oly One of -srael. And he shall not loo, to the altars, the wor, of his hands, neither shall respect that which his fin ers have made, either the roves, or the ima es.% &-saiah (D#D&@. %.he raven ima es of their ods shall ye burn with fire# thou shalt not desire the silver or old that is on them, nor ta,e it unto thee, lest thou be snared therein# for it is an abomination to the 1ord thy God. Neither shalt thou brin an abomination into thine house, lest thou be a cursed thin li,e it# but thou shalt utterly detest it, and thou shalt utterly abhor itB for it is a cursed thin .% &Deuteronomy D#10&1=. %6now ye not that the unri hteous shall not inherit the ,in dom of God! $e not deceived# neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with man,ind, Nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drun,ards, nor revilers, nor e9tortioners, shall inherit the ,in dom of God.% &( 5orinthians =#(A. %"herefore, my dearly beloved, flee from idolatry.% &( 5orinthians (A#(). %...-dolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the la,e which burneth with fire and brimstone# which is the second death.% &Revelation 1(#@. ,hen and fro" &here did the idea for using $ictures for &orshi$ actually originate? %During the first three centuries of the Christian Church... there &as no Christian art , and the church enerally resisted it with all its mi ht... About the mid&'rd century an incipient pictorial art be an to be used and accepted in the 5hristian 5hurch but not without fervent opposition in some con re ations. Only when the 5hristian 5hurch became the Roman imperial church under *mperor 5onstantine in the early )th century were pictures used in the churches... .he church historian *usebius... characteriFed the use of ima es of the Apostles 2aul and 2eter as well as 5hrist himself as a $agan custo"... Abhorrence of ima es was furthered because the emperor?s cult was so despised by 5hristians.% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa e 0A1. %Dra&ings of Catholic saints are co""only $ictured &ith a circle or aureole around their heads. So did the artists and scul$tors of ancient Babylon around the head of any being they &ished to re$resent as a god or goddess0 .he Romans depicted 5irce, the oddess of the sun, with a circle surroundin her head. "hile not a maCor point in itself, a comparison of the drawin s of 5irce, $uddha, and

;t. Au ustine& each with a circular symbol around their heads& shows that this usa e was influenced by pre& 5hristian custom... %Amon the ancient nations, not only were statues of the ods and oddesses in human form made, other obCects with a hidden or mystery meanin , such as obelis,s, were a part of heathen worship... -nterestin ly enou h, there is also an obelis, at the entrance of ;t. 2eter?s in Rome... -t is not a mere copy of an * yptian obelis,, it is the very same obelis, that stood in * ypt in ancient timesH "hen the mystery reli ion came to Rome in pa an days, not only were obelis,s made and erected at Rome, but obelis,s of * ypt& at reat e9pense& were hauled there and erected by the emperors... the very sa"e obelis- that once stood at the ancient te"$le &hich &as the center of 4gy$tian $aganis"( no& stands before the "other church of Ro"anis"... the red ranite obelis, of the Eatican... was moved to its present location by order of 2ope ;i9tus E... The $o$e had attached the death $enalty if the obelis- &as dro$$ed and bro-en0% &$abylon 4ystery Reli ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e 13&''. ,hat a strange conce$t of Christian love these Ro"an Catholics have that an infallible so called vicar of Christ( &ould have so"eone $ut to death for dro$$ing a $agan statue because he &anted it set u$ in his o&n front yard0 %.here is yet another remar,able characteristic of these pictures worthy of notice, and that is the nimbus or peculiar circle of li ht that fre8uently encompasses the head of the Roman 4adonna... "hat will be searched for in vain in the "ord of God, is found in the artistic representations of the reat ods and oddesses of $abylon. the dis,, and particularly the circle were the well&,nown symbols of the ;un& divinity, and fi ured lar ely in the symbolism of the *ast... 1et anyone co"$are the ni"bus around the head of Circe( &ith that around the head of the Po$ish Firgin( and he &ill see ho& e)actly they corres$ond.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e @D. %.he ? olden beams? around the heads of pictures and ima es called by the name of 5hrist, were intended to sho& the Pagans that they "ight safely &orshi$ the"( as the i"ages of their &ell -no&n divinities , thou h called by a different name.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 1'D. %5atholic saints are commonly pictured with a circle or aureole around their heads. ;o did the artists and sculptors of ancient $abylon around the head of any bein they wished to represent as a od or oddessH% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e 13.

Section F.# Fest"ents At /ass
Quote- "?#ecial vestments are worn by those exercisin$ sacred functions (xod' 5@6"' Comment- hence Catholic vestments are by no means su#erstitious but conformable to %ible #recedent'" ,hat does the Bible say about serving God according to 7ld Testa"ent ordinances of divine service? %-n that he saith, A new covenant, he hath made the first old. Now that which decayeth and wa9eth old is ready to vanish away. .hen verily the first covenant had also ordinances of divine service, and a worldly sanctuary... .he :oly Ghost this si nifyin , that the way into the holiest of all was not yet made manifest, while as the first tabernacle was yet standin # "hich was a fi ure for the time then present, in which were offered both ifts and sacrifices, that could not ma,e him that did the service perfect, as pertainin to the conscienceB... $ut 5hrist bein come an hi h priest of ood thin s to come, by a reater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this buildin B... -t was therefore necessary that the patterns of thin s in the heavens should be purified with theseB but the heavenly thin s themselves with better sacrifices than these. /or 5hrist is not entered into the holy places made with hands, which are the fi ures of the trueB but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us#.. /or the law havin a shadow of ood thin s to come, and not the very ima e of the thin s, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually ma,e the comers thereunto perfect. /or then would they not have ceased to be offered! because that the worshippers once pur ed should have had no more conscience of sins... .hen said he, Lo, - come to do thy will, O God. :e ta,eth away the first, that he may establish the second.% &:ebrews @#('&(A#3. .ro" &here do the Catholic "vest"ents" actually originate?

%.he e9pensive and hi hly decorated arments that the popes wear were patterned after those of the Roman emperors. .he historians have not let this fact o unnoticed, for indeed their testimony is that ?the vestments of the cler y... were le acies from pa an Rome.? .he tiara crown that the popes wear... is identical in shape to that worn by the ods... on ancient pa an Assyrian tablets. -t is similar to that seen on Da on, the fish& od... Layard e9plains that ?the head of the fish formed a mitre...? A famous paintin by 4oretto shows ;t. Ambrose wearin a mitre shaped li,e the head of a fish. .his same type of mitre is worn by the pope... as he delivered a sermon... in (3=0... :.A -ronside says that the pope is ?the direct successor of the hi h priest of the $abylonian mysteries and the servant of the fish& od Da on, for whom he wears, li,e his predecessors, the fisherman?s rin .?... .he pallium which the pope wears over his shoulders... is a arment that was worn by the pa an cler y of Greece and Rome, before the 5hristian *ra. -n modern times the pallium is... a copy of pa anism that was practiced amon the Gree,sH% &from $abylon 4ystery Reli ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e D0&D@. %Now 7anus... was also Da on. 7anus, the two&headed od, ?who had lived in two worlds? was the $abylonian divinity as an incarnation of Noah... As the 2ope bears the ,eys of Canus, so he wears the mitre of Da on. .he e9cavations of Nineveh have put this beyond all possibility of doubt. .he 2apal mitre is entirely different from the mitre of Aaron and the 7ewish hi h priests. .hat mitre was a turban.% & The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 1()&1(0. ,hat does 'esus say about "en &ho atte"$t to dis$lay the $roof of their s$irituality through their "anner of dress? %.hen spa,e 7esus to the multitude, and to his disciples, ;ayin .he scribes and the 2harisees sit in 4oses? seat... do not ye after their wor,s# for they say, and do not... All their &or-s they do for to be seen of "en3 they "a-e broad their $hylacteries( and enlarge the borders of their gar"ents( And love the u$$er"ost roo"s at feasts( and the chief seats in the synagogues( And greetings in the "ar-ets( and to be called of "en( Rabbi( Rabbi. $ut be not ye called Rabbi# for one is your 4aster, even 5hristB and all ye are brethren. And call no man your father upon the earth# for one is your /ather, which is in heaven. Neither be ye called masters# for one is your 4aster, even 5hrist. $ut he that is reatest amon you shall be your servant.% &4atthew 1'#(&((.

Section ,.# %oly ,ater
Quote-">od not only #ermitted but commanded the use of 1oly 2ater Num' 56!= Comment- hence the Catholic church should be commended not blamed for followin$ sacred scri#ture'" The use of holy &ater &as only "entioned in the 7ld Testa"ent( never in the 6e&. Therefore( &hat &as the only Biblically stated $ur$ose for holy &ater? %And the priest shall ta,e holy water in an earthen vesselB and of the dust that is in the floor of the tabernacle the priest shall ta,e, and put it into the water# And the priest shall set the woman before the 1ord, and uncover the woman?s head, and put the offerin of memorial in her hands, which is the Cealousy offerin # and the priest shall have in his hand the bitter &ater that causeth the curse# And the priest shall char e her by an oath, and say unto the woman, -f no man have lain with thee, and if thou hast not one aside to uncleanness with another instead of thy husband, be thou free from this bitter water that causeth the curse# $ut if thou hast one aside to another instead of thy husband, and if thou be defiled, and some man have lain with thee beside thine husband# .hen the priest shall char e the woman with an oath of cursin , and the priest shall say unto the woman, .he Lord ma,e thee a curse and an oath amon thy people, &hen the 1ord doth "a-e thy thigh to rot( and thy belly to s&ell; And this &ater that causeth the curse shall go into thy bo&els( to "a-e thy belly to s&ell( and thy thigh to rot# And the woman shall say, Amen, amen. And the priest shall write these curses in a boo,, and he shall blot them out with the bitter water# And he shall cause the woman to drin, the bitter water that causeth the curse# and the water that causeth the curse shall enter into her, and become bitter. .hen the priest shall ta,e the Cealousy offerin out of the woman?s hand, and shall wave the offerin before the Lord, and offer it upon the altar# And the priest shall ta,e an handful of the offerin , even the memorial thereof, and burn it upon the altar, and afterward shall cause the woman to drin, the water. And &hen he hath "ade her to drin- the &ater( then it shall co"e to $ass( that( if she be defiled( and have done tres$ass against her husband( that the &ater that causeth the curse shall enter into her( and beco"e bitter( and her belly shall s&ell( and her thigh shall

rot3 and the &o"an shall be a curse a"ong her $eo$le. And if the &o"an be not defiled( but be clean; then she shall be free( and shall conceive seed.% &Numbers 0#(D&1@. ,hat is the Catholic use of holy &ater( and fro" &here did that use originate? !s it used for anything li-e the Biblical use above? %:oly water, in the *astern 5hurches and the Roman 5atholic 5hurch, special water that has been blessed and is used to bless churches, homes, and articles of devotion. A natural symbol of purification, water has been used by reli ious peoples, both primitive and advanced, as a means of removin uncleanness, either ritual or moral. !n the early Christian co""unity, the ?livin ? &ater of rivers and streams was preferred for $aptism and apparently received no s$ecial blessing. $y the time of the )th century, the still waters of the baptismal font or pool were e9orcised and blessed with the si n of the cross... -n the course of time, this blessed, or holy, water was used as a reminder of $aptism by the faithful on enterin the church and by the celebrant in sprin,lin the con re ation before the ;unday mass.% &*ncyclopedia $rittanica, vol. E., pa e (AA&(A(. %"e have evidence that the purifyin virtue of the waters, which in 2a an esteem had such efficacy in cleansin from uilt and re eneratin the soul, was derived in part from the passin of the 4ediatorial od, the sun& od and od of fire, throu h these waters durin his humiliation and soCourn in the midst of themB and that the 2apacy at this day retains the very custom which had sprun up from that persuasion... .his water ?was consecrated? says Athenaeus, ?by puttin into it a burnin torch ta,en from the altar.? .he burnin torch was the e9press symbol of the od of fire... Now this very same method is used in the Romish 5hurch for consecratin the water for baptism... -n blessin the waters, a li hted torch is put into the font.? :ere then it is manifest that the baptismal re eneratin of water of Rome is consecrated Cust as the re eneratin and purifyin water of the 2a an was...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e ()'. %Now the ;pirit spea,eth e9pressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, ivin heed to seducin spirits, and doctrines of devils.% &( .imothy )#(.

Section L.# Relics 7f Saints
Quote-"0t is #ro#er and beneficial to venerate the relics of sacred #ersona$es or thin$s 5 Hin$s 56@ (xod' =6!0 ;att' 8650 9cts !86!5 9cts 56!5-!C' Comment- hence while the Catholic church forbids her children to #ray to relics of Christ and the saints or to act towards them as if they had any #ower in themselves she ri$htly teaches to honor the relics for what they re#resent' ?imilarly 9mericans honor the fla$ because of it&s symbolism'" ,here did the "honoring" of relics in the catholic "anner actually originate? %-t is evident that the worship of relics is Cust a part of those ceremonies instituted to commemorate the tra ic death of Osiris or Nimrod... * ypt was covered with sepulchres of its martyred odB and many a le and arm and s,ull, all vouched to be enuine... Not only were these * yptian relics sacred themselves, they consecrated the very round in which they were entombed... -f the places where the relics of Osiris were buried were accounted peculiarly holy, it is easy to see how naturally this would ive rise to the pil rima es so fre8uent amon the heathen. .he reader does not need to be told what merit Rome attaches to such pil rima es to the tombs of saints, and how, in the 4iddle A es, one of the most favorite ways of washin away sin was to underta,e a pil rima e to the shrine of ;t. 7a o di 5ompostella in ;pain, or to the :oly ;epulchre in 7erusalem. Now in the ;cripture there is not the sli htest trace of any such thin as a pil rima e to the tomb of saint, martyr, prophet, or apostle... "e have clearly seen already, that when the $abylonian Koroaster died, he was said to have iven his life as a sacrifice, and to have ?char ed his countrymen to preserve his remains,? assurin them that on the observance or ne lect of this dyin command, the fate of their empire would hin e. And, accordin ly... the ... ?.omb of Ninus,? lon a es thereafter, was one of the monuments of $abylon. Now, in comparin the death and fabled resurrection of the false <$abylonian> 4essiah with the death and resurrection of the true... "hen the false 4essiah died, limb was severed from limb, and his bones were scattered over the country. "hen the death of the true 4essiah too, place, 2rovidence so arran ed that the body should be ,ept entire... No dead body of the Lord was ever afterwards found... Rome, however, to carry out the $abylonian system, has supplied the deficiency by means of the relics of the saintsB and now the relics of ;t. 2eter and ;t. 2aul, of ;t. .homas

A?$ec,ett and ;t. Lawrence O?.oole, occupy the very same place in the worship of the 2apacy as the relics of Osiris in * ypt, or of Koroaster in $abylon.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (D3&(@(.

Section 8.# Ese 7f !ncense
Quote-"0ncense symboliBin$ #rayer can be used in churches for offerin$ #raise and worshi# of >od Rev' @63 )salms !"!65' Comment- hence Catholic ceremonies the use of incense all have scri#tural basis'" !f incense only "sy"boliDes" $rayer( &ouldn*t it be better( according to 6e& Testa"ent Scri$ture( to actually "$ray" in s$irit and in truth( rather than in sy"bolic $retense and false i"itation? %$rin no more vain oblationsB incense is an abomination unto meB the new moons and sabbaths, the callin of assemblies, - cannot away withB it is ini8uity, even the solemn meetin .% &-saiah (#('. %$y him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of our lips ivin than,s to his name. $ut to do ood and to communicate for et not# for with such sacrifices God is well pleased.% &:ebrews ('#(0&(=. %$e ye therefore followers of God, as dear childrenB And wal, in love, as 5hrist also hath loved us, and hath iven himself for us an offerin and a sacrifice to God for a sweet&smellin savour.% &*phesians 0#(&1. Should the Ro"an Catholic church be co""ended for reinstating 7ld Testa"ent $ractices that the a$ostles the"selves discarded( and did not $ractice? %5hrist is become of no effect unto you, whosoever of you are Custified by the lawB ye are fallen from race.% &Galatians 0#). %.his only would - learn of you, Received ye the ;pirit by the wor,s of the law, or by the hearin of faith! Are ye so foolish! havin be un in the ;pirit, are ye now made perfect by the flesh!% &Galatians '#1&'. %/or the law havin a shadow of ood thin s to come, and not the very ima e of the thin s, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually ma,e the comers thereunto perfect. /or then would they not have ceased to be offered! because that the worshippers once pur ed should have had no more conscience of sins. $ut in those sacrifices there is a remembrance a ain made of sins every year.% &:ebrews (A#(&'. 7r does the Ro"an Catholic Church have a different $ur$ose in "ind for &a) candles and incense? %-n the 5haldean lan ua es& and it was from 5haldea and $abylon that the astrolo y so much a feature of 4ithraism was derived& the word Dabar si nifies both a $ee and a "ord. 4ithras was ,nown as the lo os, or "ord... %-t is from the wa9 of the $ee that the tapers and candles were made for the pa an reli ious ceremonies, symboliFin the Li ht that shineth in the dar,ness and enli htens the world... %.he wa9en candles of the Romish church therefore ,eep their ma,er, Dabar, the $ee or the "ord, constantly before the attention of the /aithful. .his would e9plain the prominent part they play in the 5atholic ceremonial, and why their burnin is believed to e9piate sins. -.e., they are destroyed durin the consumption of "isdom, or the "ord, althou h this symbolism may well have been for otten, or never ,nown, by modern priests.? &"ynne&.yson, pa es 0&D.% As 8uoted from Three )ersons- from the %ible* +r %abylon, by .homas "eisser, pa es 1D&1@.

Section G.# %eresies
Quote-"Those who reFect willin$ly the true faith are to be classified with heretics and lost souls Titus 36!0 >al !6@ Rom !C6!=' Comment- therefor one reli$ion is not as $ood as another' 0t is the true reli$ion that >od demands of man' 9nd which men are bound to #ractice if they but :now it '" *ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol ), pa e 013& %*soteric 5hristianity. A tradition of esoteric 5hristianity has lon e9isted alon side institutional <i.e.

Roman 5atholic> 5hristianity. -t traces its roots to the New .estament and the early church... %5onse8uences of esoteric 5hristianity... As soon as the church became the established state church <i.e. the 5ouncil of Nicea, '10. A.D., and the mer in of pa an Rome with 5hristianity> esoteric roups had to share the eneral fate of all hereticsB i.e., persecution by the sate. -n this way esoteric 5hristianity was included in the bloody history of persecution of heresies by the state church and the <papal Roman> 5hristian state...% Note# statements in parenthesis above are added by the author. ,ere "ost of the $ractices of the Catholic Church $racticed by the early church( or &ere they introduced fro" $aganis"? %.emples, incense, oil lamps, votive offerin s, holy water, holydays, and seasons of devotion, processions, blessin of fields, sacerdotal vestments, the tonsure <of priests, mon,s, and nuns>, ima es, are all of pa an ori in%... /rom 5ardinal Newman?s boo, entitled, ?.he Development of the 5hristian Reli ion?, pa e '03, per Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p . '@ %-f a follower of 4ithras were to enter the 5atholic 5hurch today, he would find most of the essentials of his reli ion tau ht and practiced... :e would also reco niFe in the robes of the priests the sumptuous arments of the ma iB the name of the $ishop?s tall cap would echo the name of his od, the derivation of the word 4itre bein the Gree, 4ithra, which was also one of the spellin s of the name of the /ellow in the 5ap. :e would note that the 2ater 2atrum, or 2ope, wore the 2ersian tiara, and that the sword of 4ithras, althou h now called a cross, was still worshipped as a symbol of sacrifice, and that :e who hun up on that cross wore either a halo or crown of thorns both denotin the true nature of the re nant deity, symboliFin the Li ht or rays of the sun or the Radiant 5rown which always adorned the brow of the ;un& God. :e would certainly feel that his God had proved invincible since, even in apparent defeat, he was thus bein worshipped in the very stron hold of his rival?s temple. &"ynne&.yson, pa e ==.% As 8uoted from Three )ersons- from the %ible* +r %abylon, by .homas "eisser, pa es 11&1'. %....he ancient ods do not so easily die, or disappear leavin no trace, especially when their altars have been so firmly and widely established as those of 4ithras... %.here seems somethin both sinister and conspiratorial about it all... especially when we learn of the bitter enmity that e9isted between the *arly 5hurch /athers and priests of 4ithras, who were incidentally also ,nown as /athers by their followers, but were re arded by the 5hristians as devils...? &"ynne&.yson, pa es 1@&13.% As 8uoted from Three )ersons- from the %ible* +r %abylon, by .homas "eisser, pa es 1'&1). %.he ;un&God openly entered the .emple of his rival, and throu h the Apocryphal teachin s that which pretended to be the 5hristian 5hurch became the 5atholic 5hurch of 4ithras&5hristos.? &"ynne&.yson, pa e (='.% As 8uoted from Three )ersons- from the %ible* +r %abylon, by .homas "eisser, pa es 1)&10. %.he overnment of the Roman *mpire tolerated 5hristianity more fre8uently than not... but they did not foresee that 5hristianity would reach a co"$ro"ise with the empire, that it &ould beco"e Ro"an.% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. (0, pa es 3@=&3@D. %5hristianity... .he early 5hristian 5hurch... of the first three centuries turned decisively a ainst the state reli ion of Rome... 5hristians viewed themselves as citiFens of the comin heavenly city and as pil rims and stran ers on earth, whose fatherland is in heaven... .he Roman state and roman society reacted to these attitudes of 5hristians with social and political defamation. 5hristians were considered ? odless? <atheoi>, because their religion could not be fitted into the politically sanctioned pa an reli ious system... .he period of persecution of 5hristians by the Roman emperors of the 1nd and 'rd centuries was the classical period of 5hristian martyrdom... 5onstantine, in the early )th century, was the first Roman emperor who reco niFed the church?s resistance... as a political factor... :e ended the persecution of the church and made it itself the basis for the spiritual unity of the Roman *mpire. .he church thereby beca"e the partner of the 5hristian stateB this $artnershi$... lasted until Napolean dissolved the imperial unity in (@A=.% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa e )=@. %-n the imperial church& especially after the emperor .heodosius in the late )th century& heresy beca"e a criminal trans ression punishable by the state... .hus, bishops at the imperial synods of the )th to @th centuries attempted to declare as heretics the minority of dissenters and to eli"inate the".% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa e )D'.

%Doctrinal Orientations... .he Roman church was stron ly 7ewish&5hristian in character and co"bined this character... with the basic orientation of the Roman view of reli ion... .he le al character of Roman reli ion was e9pressed in the fact that the efficacy of the state cult ceremonies was dependent upon the strictest observation of a wide variety of re ulations. Later developments of Roman 5atholic 5hristianity depended lar ely upon the basis of this le al thin,in ...% &&(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa e )D=. %.he development of the "estern notion... of the priesthood is also dominated by the le al concept... -n the sphere of this ,ind of le al thin,in the papacy and the doctrine of papal primacy develo$ed. .he idea of a Curisdictional primacy played a prominent role in the for"ation of the doctrine of the papacy. 6in ly authority passed over to the priestly, the emperor?s crown to the episcopal tiara. At the hi h point of this development, 2ope $oniface E--- in ('A1 $roclai"ed hi"self the highest ruler of the &orld... spiritual and the temporal... On the basis of this le al consciousness the "estern church also develo$ed its own canon law... 7udicial thin,in was similarly si nificant in the theolo y of the "est... .ertullian <c.1AA> introduced a series of fundamental Curidical concepts into theolo y... .hrou h indul ences, re8uiems, and other acts, the church e9panded its spiritual&Cudicial authority even to this realm of the departed souls of pur atory...% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa e )D=. %.he Pagans, who, in floc,in into the Roman 5hurch, and rallyin around the new 2ontiff, did not change their creed or &orshi$( but brought both into the Church alon with them... And all who resisted the 2a an ideas and 2a an practices, were e9communicated and persecuted.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 101&10'. %.he doctrine of the ?immaculate conception? of 4ary... was pronounced by 2ius -L in (@0).% && %abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e (=. %Amon the 2hoenicians a circle of beads resemblin a rosary was used in the worship of Astarte, the mother oddess, about @AA $.5.% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e 1(. %The Catholic (ncyclo#edia says, ?.here is little or no trace of the hail 4ary as an accepted devotional formula before about (A0A.? .he complete rosary involves repeatin the :ail 4ary 0' times, the Lord?s prayer = times, 0 4ysteries, 0 4editations on the 4ysteries, 0 Glory $e?s, and the Apostles? 5reed. Notice that the prayer to 4ary is repeated almost nine times as often as the Lord?s prayerH% && %abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e 11. %$ut when ye pray, use not vain re$etitions( as the heathen do3 for they thin- that they shall be heard for their "uch s$ea-ing. Be not ye therefore li-e unto the"# for your /ather ,noweth what thin s ye have need of, before ye as, him. After this manner therefore pray ye# Our /ather which art in heaven, :allowed be thy name. .hy ,in dom come. .hy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.% &4atthew =#D&('. %*ven the Catholic (ncyclo#edia says... ?5hristian saints became the successors of local deities, and 5hristian worship supplanted the ancient local worship, this e9plains the reat number of similarities between ods and saints?...% &%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e 1D. %.he oddess $ri hit <re arded as the dau hter of the sun od and who was represented with a child in her arms> was smoothly renamed as ?;aint $rid et.? -n pa an days, her chief temple at 6ildare was served by Eestal Eir ins who tended the sacred fires. Later her temple became a convent and her vestals, nuns. .hey continued to tend the ritual fire, only it was now called ?;t. $rid et?s fire?...% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa es 1D&1@. %.he raven ima es of their ods shall ye burn with fire# thou shalt not desire the silver or old that is on them, nor ta,e it unto thee, lest thou be snared therein# for it is an abomination to the 1ord thy God.% &Deuteronomy D#10. %.hen ye shall drive out all the inhabitants of the land from before you, and destroy all their pictures, and destroy all their molten ima es, and 8uite pluc, down all their hi h places.% &Numbers ''#01.

Section AA.# ,as the Rosary a $art of the original faith?
Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p . )' 8uotes the 5atholic :ome *ncyclopedia, pa e 1D# %.he device of usin beads for countin prayers is very ancient, and is not distinctively 5hristian# :indus, $uddhist, and 4ohammedans use it.%

And on pa e 11D# %.he tradition that the rosary was revealed by our Lady to ;aint Dominic is unprovenB but the devotion has been particularly associated with his order for over )AA years.% %.he rosary, however, is no invention of the 2apacy. -t is of the hi hest anti8uity, and almost universally <catholic!> found amon pa an nations. .he rosary was used... amon the ancient 4e9icans. -t is commonly employed amon the $rahmins of :industanB and in the :indoo sacred boo,s reference is made to it a ain and a ain. thus, in an account of the death of ;ati, the wife of ;hiva, we find the rosary introduced# ?On hearin of this event, ;hiva fainted from riefB then, havin recovered, he hastened to the ban,s of the river of heaven, where he beheld the lyin body of his beloved ;ati, arrayed in white arments, holdin a rosary in her hand, and lowin with splendor, bri ht as burnished old. -n .hibet it has been used from time immemorial... -n 5hina from the .artar reli ion of the Lamas, the rosary of (A@ beads has become a part of the ceremonial dress attached to the nine rades of official ran,...-n asiatic Greece the rosary was commonly used... -n 2a an Rome the same... %-n the 5hurch of Rome a new ,ind of devotion has of late been lar ely introduced... the Rosary of the ;acred :eart.... .he ;acred :eart... was so in ancient $abylon... there also a ;acred :eart was venerated... :ow came it that the ?:eart? became the reco niFed symbol of the child of the Great 4other! .he answer is, ?.he :eart? in 5haldee is ?$el?... .he worship of the ;acred :eart was Cust, under a symbol, the worship of the ;acred $el, that mi hty one of $abylon, who had died a martyr for idolatry... %$el... was, as we have seen, represented as an incarnation of the sun. therefore, to indicate his connection with the fiery and burnin sun, the ;acred :eart was fre8uently represented as a :eart of /lame. ;o the ;acred :eart of Rome is actually worshipped as a flamin heart, as may be seen on the rosaries devoted to that worship.% &from The Two %abylons, by Rev.Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (@D&(3(. %.he Rosary... is no invention of the 2apacy. -t is of the hi hest anti8uity, and almost universally found amon 2a an nations. the rosary was used... amon the ancient 4e9icans... the $rahmins of :industanB and in the :indoo... -n an account of the death of ;ati, the wife of ;hiva, we find the rosary introduced# On the hearin of this event, ;hiva fainted from riefB then, havin recovered, he hastened to the ban,s of the river of heaven, where he beheld lyin the body of his beloved ;ati, arrayed in white arments, holdin$ a rosary in her hand and lowin with splendor... -t is employed in 5hina... in Asiatic Greece... in 2a an Rome... -n the church of Rome... the ?rosary of the ;acred :eart?... was... introduced. -t was so in... the $abylonian system as it appeared in * ypt. .here also a ?;acred :eart? was venerated... :ow came it that the ?:eart? became the reco niFed symbol of the 5hild of the reat 4other! the answer is, ?.he :eart? in 5haldee is ?Bel?B and... the worship of the ?;acred :eart? was Cust, under a symbol, the worship of the ?;acred $el, that mi hty one of $abylon, who had died a martyr for idolatry... $el... was, as we have seen, represented as an incarnation of the sun. therefore, to indicate his connection with the fiery and burnin sun, the ?sacred heart? was fre8uently represented as a ?heart of flame.? so the ?;acred :eart? of Rome is actually worshipped as a flamin$ heart as may be seen on the rosaries devoted to that worship.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (@D&(3(. %/rom the 2ope downwards, all can be shown to be now radically $abylonian. .he colle e of 5ardinals, with the 2ope at its head, is Cust the counterfeit of the 2a an 5olle e of 2ontiffs, with its ?2ontife9 4a9imus,? or ?;overei n 2ontiff,? which had e9isted in Rome from the earliest times, and which is ,nown to have been framed on the model of the rand ori inal council of 2ontiffs at $abylon... .ill the 2ope was invested with the title, which for a thousand years had had attached to it the power of the ,eys of 7anus and 5ybele, no such claim to pre&eminence, or anythin approachin to it, was ever publicly made on his part, on the $round of bein$ the #ossessor of the :eys bestowed on )eter... About 'D@, the 2ope fell heir to the ,eys that were the symbols of two well&,nown 2a an divinities at Rome. 7anus bore a ,ey, and 5ybele bore a ,eyB and these are the two that the 2ope emblaFons on his arms as the ensi ns of his spiritual authority... -n )'(, and not before, did he publicly lay claim to the possession of 2eter?s ,eys... As the statue of 7upiter is worshipped at Rome is the veritable ima e of 2eter, so the ,eys of 7anus and 5ybele have for a es been devoutly believed to represent the ,eys of the same apostle...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es 1A=&1AD. ,hat does the Bible say about introducing Pagan $ractices into Christianity? %.hus saith the 1ord, Learn not the way of the heathen, and be not dismayed at the si ns of heavenB for the heathen are dismayed at them. /or the customs of the people are vain% &7eremiah (A#1&'.

%$ut - say, that the thin s which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God# and - would not that ye should have fellowship with devils. Ye cannot drin, the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils# ye cannot be parta,ers of the Lord?s table, and of the table of devils.% &( 5orinthians (A#1A&1(. %And when the people saw what 2aul had done, they lifted up their voices, sayin in the speech of Lycaonia, .he ods are come down to us in the li,eness of men. And they called $arnabas, 7upiterB and 2aul, 4ercurius, because he was the chief spea,er. .hen the priest of 7upiter, which was before their city, brou ht o9en and arlands unto the ates, and would have done sacrifice with the people. "hich when the apostles, $arnabas and 2aul, heard of, they rent their clothes, and ran in amon the people, cryin out, And sayin , ;irs, why do ye these thin s! "e also are men of li,e passions with you, and preach unto you that ye should turn from these vanities unto the livin God, which made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and all thin s that are therein.% &Acts ()#((&(0. 4ven though the "Rosary" &as not instituted into the Catholic church until "any years after Christ( does the Bible actually give clear cautions against it?3 %$ut when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do# for they thin, that they shall be heard for their much spea,in . $e not ye therefore li,e unto them# for your /ather ,noweth what thin s ye have need of, before ye as, him. After this manner therefore pray ye# Our /ather which art in heaven, :allowed be thy name. .hy ,in dom come. .hy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven...% &4atthew =#D&(A. <Note carefully that our e9ample of prayer is specifically directly to %Our /ather which art in heaven% and not to 4ary, or any other an el or saintH> And when ye spread forth your hands, - will hide mine eyes from you# yea, when ye ma,e many prayers, will not hear...% -saiah (#(0. %"oe unto you, scribes and 2harisees, hypocritesH for ye devour widows? houses, and for a pretense ma,e lon prayer# therefore ye shall receive the reater damnation. "oe unto you, scribes and 2harisees, hypocritesH for ye compass sea and land to ma,e one proselyte, and when he is made, ye ma,e him twofold more the child of hell than yourselves.% &4atthew 1'#(). %- marvel that ye are so soon removed from him that called you into the race of 5hrist unto another ospel# "hich is not anotherB but there be some that trouble you, and would pervert the ospel of 5hrist. $ut thou h we, or an an el from heaven, preach any other ospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed. As we said before, so say - now a ain, if any man preach any other ospel unto you than that ye have received, let him be accursed.% &Galatians (#=&3. %2riesthood... 5hristianity... Ori inally the term presbyter <?elder?> and epis,opos <?overseer?>, current in the New .estament and the early church, were probably identical. /rom the 1nd century on, however, the sacerdotal hierarchy develo$ed alon the lines of the :ebrew priesthood, the title episcopus, or bishop, beco"ing reserved for those who $resided over the presbyterate... -n due course the threefold ministry of bishops, priests, and deacons <administrative and litur ical assistants in a parish> beca"e or aniFed on a diocesan basis. .his remained the norm in the "estern 5hurch until the Reformation in the (=th century when it was repudiated by the 5entral Reformers...% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. (), p . (A(A. %2apacy... Gni8ue is the Roman 5atholic teachin that the bishop of Rome is at the same time successor to ;t. 2eter... $ecause of this belief, the popes have come over the course of ti"e to wield supreme le islative, e9ecutive, and Cudicial powers... Also because of this belief, they had assumed the already in the 0th century the title of supreme pontiff <summus pontife9> that had earlier been borne by the pa an Roman emperors as heads of the colle e of priests... /rom this emer ed the ;acred 5olle e of 5ardinals, a corporate body possessed, from ((D3 onward, of the e9clusive ri ht to elect the pope...% & (ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), vol. (', pa e 300.

Section BB.# %onoring /ary
Quote - ">od made ;ary the earthly mother of the second #erson of the blessed Trinity that true Christians of every a$e must honor her /u:e !65C-35 /u:e !63@' Comment- since >od honored ;ary more than any other an$elic or human bein$ are we not allowed even obli$ed to do the same* 2here outside the Catholic church is this #rece#t this

#ro#hesy fulfilled*" Does the Catholic church "erely "honor" /ary? :.A. -ronside, in his %Letters .o A Roman 5atholic 2riest%, *a le $oo,sMLoiFeau9 $rothers, on p s 11&1=, writes& %... -n the doctrinal and devotional wor,s of Roman 5atholic theolo ians... the place iven 4ary, the mother of our Lord, is that of mediator of race and redemption, and that in the fullest, hi hest sense... 8uote on the authority of Littlefield, from the Raccolta, a collection of prayers said to be indul enced by the popes and which will therefore ac,nowled e, - presume, to be in the truest sense authoritative# %:ail, Jueen, 4other of 4ercy, our Life, ;weetness, and :ope, all :ailH .o thee we cry, banished sons of *veB to thee we si h, roanin and weepin in this vale of tears. .urn then, O our advocate, thy merciful eye to us, and after this our e9ile, show us 7esus, the blessed fruit of thy womb, O merciful, O love, O sweet Eir in 4ary. %"e fly beneath thy shelter, O holy 4other of God, despise not our petitions in our necessity, and deliver us always from all perils, O lorious and $lessed Eir in. %:eart of 4ary, 4other of God... worthy of all the veneration of an els and men... :eart full of oodness, ever compassionate towards our sufferin s, vouchsafe to thaw our icy hearts... -n thee let the :oly church find safe shelterB protect it, and be its sweet Asylum, its tower, its stren th... $e thou our help in need, our comfort in trouble, our stren th in temptation, our refu e in persecution, our aid in dan er. %;weet heart of 4ary, be my salvation. %Leave me not, my 4other, in my own hands, or - am lostB let me but clin to thee. ;ave me, my :opeB save me from hell.% %And... from Li uori?s %Glories of 4ary%... %4ary is our refu e, help and Asylum. -n 7udaea, in ancient times, there were cities of refu e, wherein criminals who fled there for protection were e9empt from the punishment they had deserved. Nowadays these cities of refu e are not so numerousB there is but one, and that is 4ary. %God, before the birth of 4ary, complained by the mouth of the 2rophet *Fe,iel that there was no one to rise up and withhold him from chastisin sinners, that he could find no one, for this office was reserved for our blessed Lady, who withholds his arm till he is pacified. %Often we seem to be heard more 8uic,ly, and be thus preserved, if we have recourse to 4ary, and call upon her name, than we should be if we called upon the name of 7esus our ;aviour. ?4any thin s are as,ed of God and are not rantedB they are as,ed of 4ary, and are obtained. %At the commandment of the Eir in all thin s obey, even God. %.he salvation of all depends on our bein favored and protected by 4ary. he who is protected by 4ary will be savedB he who is not will be lost. %4ary has only to spea, and her son e9ecutes all. %And is it not a fact that the last words which the Roman ritual puts into the mouth of the dyin are# %4ary, 4other of Grace, 4other of 4ercy, do thou protect me from the foe and receive me in the hour of death!% :ow different from the last words of the first martyr ;tephen# %Lord 7esus, receive my spiritH% %and returnin to the Raccolta, what words could be more unscriptural than these! %- ac,nowled e thee, and - venerate thee, most :oly Eir in, Jueen of :eaven, Lady and 4istress of the Gniverse, as dau hter of the eternal /ather, 4other of his well&beloved ;on, and most lovin ;pouse of the :oly ;pirit. 6neelin at the feet of thy reat 4aCesty

with all humility - pray thee, throu h thy divine charity wherewith thou wast so bountifully enriched on thine acceptation into :eaven, to vouchsafe me favor and pity, placin me under thy most safe and faithful protection, and receive me into the number of those happy and hi hly favored servants of thine, whose names thou dost carry raven upon thy vir in breast.% %...One could o on 8uotin indefinitely from Roman 5atholic boo,s of devotion to show that the one mediator of God is completely set aside in favor of a multitude of saints and an els who are evidently supposed to be more approachable than our blessed Lord himself. and yet ;t. 5lement of Ale9andria, A.D. 1AA, wrote# ?;ince there is only one ood God, both we ourselves and the an els su$$licate fro" hi" alone.... %2.;. - have seen a photo raph, ta,en by a missionary laborin in 5entral America, of a Roman 5atholic church which has over the main entrance a Latin inscription, the plain *n lish of which is# ?5ome unto 4ary, All Ye "ho Labor And Are $urdened, And ;he "ill Refresh You.?... "hat a fearful perversion of the precious invitation of our Lord 7esus 5hrist, as recorded in 4atthew ((#1@.% But the Scri$tures teach other&ise3 4atthew ((#1@, 'esus says# %5ome unto "e, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and - will ive you rest.% !s 'esus hard to reach? %;eein then that we have a reat hi h priest, that is passed into the heavens, 7esus the ;on of God, let us hold fast our profession. /or we have not an hi h priest which cannot be touched with the feelin of our infirmities... Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of race, that we may obtain mercy, and find race to help in time of need. "ho can have compassion on the i norant, and on them that are out of the wayB for that he himself also is compassed with infirmity. % &:ebrews )#()&0#1. %/or there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man 5hrist 7esus.% &( .imothy 1#0. Did 'esus e)e"$lify for us a s$ecial honor for /ary? %"hile he yet tal,ed to the people, behold, his mother and his brethren stood without, desirin to spea, with him. .hen one said unto him, $ehold, thy mother and thy brethren stand without, desirin to spea, with thee. $ut he answered and said unto him that told him, ?"ho is my mother! and who are my brethren!? And he stretched forth his hand toward his disciples, and said, ?$ehold my mother and my brethrenH /or whosoever shall do the will of my /ather which is in heaven, the same is my brother, and sister, and mother.% &4atthew (1#)=&0A. !s /ary still a virgin? Did /ary have other children than 'esus? %-s not this the carpenter, the son of 4ary, the brother of 7ames, and 7oses, and of 7udas, and ;imon! and are not his sisters here with us!...% &4ar, =#'. %.hese all continued with one accord in prayer and supplication, with the women, and 4ary the mother of 7esus, and with his brethren.% &Acts (#(). !s there a Biblical reason that so"e $eo$le &ould find it difficult to get straight through to God %i"self? %Now we ,now that God heareth not sinners# but if any man be a worshipper of God, and doeth his &ill( hi" he heareth.% &7ohn 3#'(. Does the Catholic Church really $lace a strong i"$ortance on truth and facts? %4ary?s corporal assumption into heaven is so thorou hly implied in the notion of her personality as iven by $ible and do ma, that the church can dispense with strict historical evidence of the fact% &.his statement is found in the 4anual of 5atholic .heolo y, Eol --, 2a e 11A, as 8uoted by Dr. /abian ;. Reinhart, in %/acts for Roman 5atholics%, p . '). ,here and &hen did the &orshi$ of /ary first a$$ear in Catholic teachings?

%.here are indications that the veneration of Diana as a vir in oddess has contributed somethin to the worship of the Eir in 4ary. "e ,now that one of the earliest churches erected in honor to 4ary occupied the site of the famous temple of Diana at *phesus... -t was at *phesus in )'( that the synod was held at which 4ary was first desi nated 4other of God, and it is of some interest that the procession with which the populace celebrated the deification of 4ary reproduced in such essentials as smo,in censors and flarin torches the processions which for so many centuries had been an important part of the worship of Diana.% &Gordon 7ennin s Lain , ?urvivals of Roman Reli$ion, p s. 3'&3), as 8uoted in 9fter The 2ay Called 1eresy, by .homas "eisser, pa es ))&)0. %.he -mmaculate 5onception of 4ary, the mother of 7esus <2ius -L, (@0)>, and her Assumption <2ius L--, (30A> were defined as do mas. /or neither of these is there any biblical evidenceB more si nificantly, there is no evidence in tradition for either before the ?th century .% &&(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. (0, pa e 33). %Eeneration of the mother of God received its impetus when the 5hristian 5hurch became the imperial church under 5onstantine and the pa an masses streamed into the church. .he peoples of the 4editerranean area and the Near *ast could not ma,e themselves conversant with the absolute power of God the /ather... .heir piety and reli ious consciousness had been formed for millennia throu h the cult of the ? reat mother? oddess and the ?divine vir in,? a development that led all the &ay fro" the old $o$ular religions of Babylonia and Assyria to the mystery cults of the late :ellenistic period... 5ultic veneration of the divine vir in and mother found within the 5hristian 5hurch a new possibility of e9pression in the worship of 4ary as the vir in mother of God... 4ary was... worshipped under the title of the bearer of God <.heoto,os>& an e9pression that Ori en... used in the 'rd century... .he council of 5onstantinople <00'> added the title ?eternal vir in?...% &(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, (0th edition, (3@), Eol. ), pa es )@1&)@'. %"hen it is said that a believer is ?a temple of God,? or a temple of the :oly Ghost, the meanin is <*ph. '#(D> that ?5hrist dwells in the heart by faith.% $ut when Rome says that 4ary is ?.he .emple? or ?.abernacle of God,? the meanin is the e9act 2a an meanin of the term& viF., that the union between her and the Godhead is a union a,in to the hypostatical union between the divine and human nature of 5hrist... The na"es of blas$he"y besto&ed by the Pa$acy on /ary have not one shado& of foundation in the Bible( but are all to be found in the Babylonian idolatry. Yea the very features and comple9ions of the Roman and $abylonian 4adonnas are the same... in a land of dar,&eyed beauties, with raven loc,s, the 4adonna was always represented with blue eyes and olden hair... completely different from the 7ewish comple9ion... but which precisely a rees with that which all anti8uity attributes to the oddess 8ueen of $abylon.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es @)&@0. %.he doctrine on which the festival of the Assumption is founded, is this# that the Eir in 4ary saw no corruption, that in body and soul she was carried up to heaven, and now is invested with all power in heaven and in earth... .his doctrine has now received the stamp of 2apal -nfallibility, havin been embodied in the late blasphemous decree that proclaims the ?-mmaculate 5onception.? Now, it is impossible for the priests of Rome to find one shred of countenance for such a doctrine in ;cripture. $ut, in the $abylonian system, the fable was ready made to their hand. .here it was tau ht that $acchus went down to hell, rescued his mother from the infernal powers, and carried her with him in triumph to heaven... Now, when the mother of the 2a an 4essiah came to be celebrated as havin been thus ?Assumed,? then it was that, under the name of the ?Dove? she was worshipped as the -ncarnation of the ;pirit of God, with whom she was identified. As such as she was re arded as the source of all holiness, and the rand ?2urifier? and, of course, was ,nown herself as the ?Eir in? mother, ?2ure and Gndefiled?.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (10&(1D. %;t. Alphonsus Li uori <5atholic Laymen, 7uly (@0=> tells his readers that the sinner that ventures to come directly to 5hrist may come with dread and apprehension of :is wrathB but let him only employ the mediation of the Eir in with her ;on, and she has only to show that ;on the breasts that ave :im suc,, and :is wrath will immediately be appeased. $ut where in the "ord of God could such an idea have been found! Not surely in the answer of the Lord 7esus to the woman who e9claimed, ?$lessed is the womb that bare thee, and the paps that thou hast suc,edH? 7esus answered and said unto her, ?Yea, rather, blessed are they that hear the ,ord of God and -ee$ it? <Lu,e ((#1D&1@>... Yet this idea... was widely diffused in the realms of 2a anism. .hus we find an e9actly parallel representation in the :indoo mytholo y in re ard to the od ;iva and his wife 6ali, when that od appeared as a little child. ?;iva.? says Lain a 2uran, ?appeared

as an infant in a cemetery, surrounded by hosts, and on beholdin him, 6ali <his wife> too, him up, and, caressin$ him $ave him her breast''' 6ali clas#in$ him to her bosom danced... until he was #leased and deli$hted'''% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (0@&(03. %All this is done only to e9alt the 4other, as more racious and more compassionate than her lorious ;on. Now, this was the very case in $abylon# and to this character of the oddess 8ueen her favorite offerin s e9actly corresponded. .herefore, we find the <evil> women of 7udah represented as simply ?burnin incense, pourin out drin,&offerin s, and offering ca-es to the 8ueen of heaven? <7eremiah ))#(3>. .he ca,es were the unbloody sacrifice she re8uired...% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (03&(=1. %.he 5hinese had a mother oddess called ;hin moo or the ?:oly 4other.? she is pictured with child in arms and rays of lory around her head.<Gross, The 1eathen Reli$ion p.=A>. %.he ancient Germans worshipped the vir in :ertha with child in arms. .he ;candinavians called her Disa who was also pictured with a child. %$ut re ardless of her name or place,? says one writer, ?she was the wife of $aal, the vir in 8ueen of heaven, who bore fruit althou h she never conceived.?<$ach, ?tran$e ?ects and Curious Cults p.(1>. %.he worship of the Great 4other... was very popular under the Roman *mpire. -nscriptions prove that the two <the mother and the child> received divine honours...?</raFer, The >olden %ou$h Eol. (, p.'0=>. %As the *ncyclopedia $rittanica states, during the first centuries of the church( no e"$hasis &as $laced u$on /ary &hatsoever.<(ncyclo#edia %ritannica, Eol.(), p.'A3> this point is admitted by The Catholic (ncyclo#edia also# ?Devotion to Our $lessed Lady... this doctrine is not contained... in the earlier forms of the Apostles? 5reed... we do not meet with any clear traces of the cultus of the $lessed Eir in in the first Christian centuries ? the worship of 4ary bein a later development...% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e D. %4ary worship... became an official doctrine at the 5ouncil of *phesus in )'( A.D.H At *phesus! -t was in this city that Diana had been worshipped as the oddess of vir inity and motherhood from primitive timesH% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa e ((. %/or a certain man named Demetrius, a silversmith, which made silver shrines for Diana, brou ht no small ain unto the craftsmenB "hom he called to ether with the wor,men of li,e occupation, and said, ;irs, ye ,now that by this craft we have our wealth. 4oreover ye see and hear, that not alone at *phesus, but almost throu hout all Asia, this 2aul hath persuaded and turned away much people, sayin that they be no ods, which are made with hands# ;o that not only this our craft is in dan er to be set at nou htB but also that the temple of the reat oddess Diana should be despised, and her ma nificence should be destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth.% &Acts (3#1)&1D. %.he ancient portrait of -sis and the child :orus was ultimately accepted... as the portrait of the Eir in and her child. <;mith, ;an and 1is >ods p.1(=>% %*ven as the pa ans had statues of the oddess, so statues were made of ?4ary.? -t is said that in some cases the very sa"e statues that had been worshipped as -sis <with her child> were simply renamed as 4ary and the 5hrist child.% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa es ('&(). %-n pa an reli ion, the mother was worshipped as much <or more> than her sonH... .ypical of 5atholic ideas concernin 4ary, the illustration on the followin pa e <as seen in the +fficial %altimore Catechism No. 1, Lesson ((> attempts to ive 4ary a central position... -n the drawin , the :oly ;pirit <as a dove> is hoverin over 4aryH Yet as far as the scriptural account is concerned, the only one upon whom the ;pirit as a dove descended was 7esus :imself& not his motherH On the other hand, the pa an vir in oddess under the name of 7uno was often represented with a dove on her head, as was also Astarte, 5ybele, and -sisH <Doane, %ible ;yths p.'0D>.% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa es (0, (@&(3. %:as the ima e of the Eir in been seen to shed tears! 4any a tear was shed by the 2a an ima es... Appolo?s statue at 5umae shed tears for four days without intermission... :as the ima e of 4adonna been made to loo, beni nantly upon a favored worshipper, and send him home assured that his prayer was heard! so did the statues of the * yptian -sis.% &The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa e 10D.

%As thou h to more closely identify 4ary with the mother oddess, some tau ht that 4ary?s body never saw corruption... and is now the Jueen of :eaven... .he words of ;t. $ernard sum up the Roman 5atholic position# ?On the third day after 4ary?s death, when the apostles athered around her tomb, they found it empty. .he sacred body had been carried up to the 5elestial 2aradise... the rave had no power over one who was immaculate... $ut it was not enou h that 4ary should be received into heaven... she had a di nity beyond the reach even of the hi hest of archan els. 4ary was to be crowned Jueen of :eaven by the *ternal /ather# she was to have a throne at her son?s ri ht hand... Now day by day, hour by hour, she is prayin for us, obtainin races for us, preservin us from dan er, shieldin us from temptation, showerin blessin s down upon us?...% &&%abylon ;ystery Reli$ion, by Ralph "oodrow, pa es 1A&1(. %And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the ;on of man which is in heaven.% &7ohn '#('.

Section CC.# %onoring Angels And Saints
Quote- "The citiBens of heaven ta:e an active interest and within limitations intervene in the affairs of men (#h' 56!8 9ct !56= 1eb' !6!" /u:e !56!0' Comment- hence the Catholic church is most consistent in enumeratin$ an$els amon$ men&s #rotectors #atrons well-wishers' The same may be said of >od&s saints in heaven'" Are the saints that have gone on before in heaven no&( or 9ust aslee$? %$ut - would not have you to be i norant, brethren, concernin the" &hich are aslee$, that ye sorrow not, even as others which have no hope. /or if we believe that 7esus died and rose a ain, even so them also which slee$ in 7esus will God brin with him. /or this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive and remain unto the comin of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. /or the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archan el, and with the trump of God# and the dead in 5hrist shall rise first# .hen we which are alive and remain shall be cau ht up to ether &ith the" in the clouds, to "eet the Lord in the air# and so shall we ever be with the Lord.% &( .hessalonians )#('&(D. %/or the livin ,now that they shall die# but the dead -no& not any thing, neither have they any more a rewardB for the memory of them is for otten. Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perishedB neither have they any more a portion for ever in any thin that is done under the sun.% &*cclesiates 3#0. %"hatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy mi htB for there is no wor,, nor device, nor ,nowled e, nor wisdom, in the rave, whither thou oest.% &*cclesiastes 3#(A. %;eein then that we have a reat hi h priest, that is passed into the heavens, 7esus the ;on of God, let us hold fast our profession. /or we have not an hi h priest which cannot be touched with the feelin of our infirmitiesB but was in all points tempted li,e as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of race, that we may obtain mercy, and find race to help in time of need.% &:ebrews )#()&(=. Did the saints in the Bible allo& the"selves to be "honored" or "venerated"? %And - 7ohn saw these thin s, and heard them. And when - had heard and seen, - fell down to worship before the feet of the an el which shewed me these thin s. .hen saith he unto me, ;ee thou do it not# for am thy fellowservant, and of thy brethren the prophets, and of them which ,eep the sayin s of this boo,# &orshi$ God.% &Revelation 11#@&3. %.hen saith 7esus unto him, ?Get thee hence, ;atan# for it is written, .hou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and hi" only shalt thou serve.% 4atthew )#(A. %God is a ;pirit# and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.% &7ohn )#1). %"e find that, in the dar, a es, the 2a an 4essiah has not been brou ht into the church in a mere clandestine manner. Openly and avowedly under his well&,nown classic names of $acchus and Dionysius, has he been canoniFed, and set up for the worship of the ?faithful.? Yes, Rome... has had the unblushin effrontery to ive the rand 2a an adversary of the ;on of God, under his o&n $ro$er na"e, a place in her calendar. .he reader has only to turn to the Roman calendar, and he will find that... October the Dth is set apart to be observed in honour of ?;t. $acchus the 4artyr.?... .hat this ;t. $acchus the 4artyr was the

identical $acchus of the 2a ans, the od of drun,enness and debauchery, is evident from the time of his festival... about the same time does the 2apal festival of ?;t. $acchus the 4artyr? occur.% & The Two %abylons, $y Rev. Ale9ander :islop, LoiFeau9 $rothers, pa es (1A&(11.

Section DD.# ,hy Are There So /any Churches?
"There are so many )rotestant churches because there is so much different inter#retation of the %ible' There is so much different inter#retation of the %ible because there is so much wron$ inter#retation of the %ible' and there is so much wron$ inter#retation of the %ible because the system of inter#retin$ it is radically wron$' Dou cannot have one >od and one she#herd one faith and one ba#tism by lettin$ every man and every woman distort and #ervert the scri#ture to suit their own #et theories' Christ&s truth is chan$eless- for whosoever #reaches any other but the acce#ted Christian faith of #ast centuries by that very fact #roves himself to be a false teacher a false #ro#het- outwardly a shee# but inwardly a ravenin$ wolf' The true faith must be and necessarily has been believed by at least a vast maFority of Christians'" %...$y thy words thou shalt be Custified, and by thy words thou shalt be condemned.% &4atthew (1#'D. Does the %oly S$irit abide in the Ro"an Catholic church? %$eloved, believe not every spirit, but try the spirits whether they are of God# because many false prophets are one out into the world. :ereby ,now ye the ;pirit of God# *very spirit that confesseth that 7esus 5hrist is come in the flesh is of God# And every spirit that confesseth not that 7esus 5hrist is come in the flesh is not of God# and this is that spirit of antichrist, whereof ye have heard that it should comeB and even now already is it in the world.% &( 7ohn )#(&'. %*ven the mystery which hath been hid from a es and from enerations, but now is made manifest to his saints# .o whom God would ma,e ,nown what is the riches of the lory of this mystery amon the GentilesB which is 5hrist in you, the hope of lory# "hom we preach, warnin every man, and teachin every man in all wisdomB that we may present every man perfect in 5hrist 7esus...% &5olossians (#1=&1@. %*9amine yourselves, whether ye be in the faithB prove your own selves. 6now ye not your own selves, how that 7esus 5hrist is in you, e9cept ye be reprobates!% & 1 5orinthians ('#0. %-f there arise amon you a prophet, or a dreamer of dreams, and iveth thee a si n or a wonder, And the si n or the wonder come to pass, whereof he spa,e unto thee, sayin , Let us o after other ods, which thou hast not ,nown, and let us serve themB .hou shalt not hear,en unto the words of that prophet, or that dreamer of dreams# for the 1ord your God proveth you, to ,now whether ye love the 1ord your God with all your heart and with all your soul. Ye shall wal, after the 1ord your God, and fear him, and ,eep his commandments, and obey his voice, and ye shall serve him, and cleave unto him.% &Deuteronomy ('#(&D. ,hat "syste"" of Biblical inter$retation is used by the Ro"an Catholic Church? !s the Ro"an Catholic Church built u$on true Christian doctrines( or is it built on doctrines borro&ed fro" $agan $hiloso$hy? *ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol.-, pa e =)3&=0A& %Au ustine of :ippo, ;aint... .he dominant personality of the "estern 5hurch of his time... :e fused the reli ion of the New .estament with the 2latonic tradition of Gree, philosophy.... :e turned to neoplatonism, in which he found solutions to his problems about the bein of God and the nature and ori in of evil.% %....he reCection of 4odalism <oneness> and the reco nition of 5hrist as the Lo os forced upon the "est the necessity of risin from faith to a philosophical and, in fact, a distinctively Neoplatonic do matic.% &Adolph :arnac,, %:istory of Do ma '% as 8uoted by "illiam $. 5halfant, in %Ancient 5hampions of Oneness%, p s. (1(&(11. %...?Au ustine found his ultimate demonstration of the .rinity in pa an philosophy... li,e Ori en... based his reasonin on the metaphysics of 2lato, who declared that man is a trichotomy consistin of body, mind, soul. Gsin this as a point of departure, Au ustine found it a reflection of the trinal unity of the odhead.% &"illiam $. 5halfant, 8uotin Larson, in %Ancient 5hampions of Oneness%, p (1'.

%-t is not difficult to understand why his opponents asserted that Au ustine had never ceased to be a 4anichee. :is system is in truth that of the Gnostics, the ancestors of the 4anichees.% "illiam $. 5halfant, %Ancient 5hampions of Oneness%, p (1) <5halfant here 8uotes 5harles $i , from %.he 5hristian 2latonists of Ale9andria% O9ford at 5larendon 2ress, (3(', pa e 1@3.> *ncyclopedia $ritannica, vol @, pa e ((D'&((DD. %:umanistic ;cholarship, :istory of... %.he 5ompromise of the 5hurch /athers <post apostolic>. *arly in the 5hristian *ra, the inevitable problem of the new faith?s accommodation with classical culture arose... .he masterpieces of ancient art and thou ht clashed with the revolutionary challen e of the NaFarenesB and to the Gree,s, the notion of the ood tidin s of the crucified 7esus was scandalous and insane... .hus, between Athens and 7erusalem and between humanistic scholarship and 7esus 5hrist, no understandin seemed possible... %.he accommodations between Athens and 7erusalem... %.he 5hristian scholar 7ustin 4artyr <died c. (=0>,... ac,nowled ed that the "ord of God could have inspired the reat pa an authors. About the turn of the century, 5lement of Ale9andria, the founder of 5hristian philosophy, asserted that pa an wisdom to the Gree,s was the e8uivalent of the Old .estament to the 7ews prior to the revelation of the ;on of God. .he new culture represented a fulfillment of, not a breach with, the old culture. Around the 0th century, 7erome <c. ')D&)1A> and Au ustine, the most presti ious fi ures amon .he 5hristian intelli entsia and scholars of the hi hest 8uality, had a profound respect for classical humanismB and, at a time when barbarians were besie in the Roman *mpire on every side, these men smoothed the transition from the -mperium Romanum to the medieval Romania by see,in to save what could be preserved of the venerable treasure of anti8uity. %.he 5hurch /athers played a ,ey role in the history of humanistic scholarship. .hey were responsible for the peaceful coe9istence of the double heritage& the pa an and the 5hristian& that molded the conscience of the "est. .han,s to them, 5hristianity entered into the domain of pa an culture...% %%Other compilers, who min led pa an wisdom with 5hristian doctrine& thus ineptly perpetuatin the memory of the vanished hi h&classical culture& enCoyed widespread renown. -n the "est, as in $yFantium, scholars dwelt amid a humanistic scholarship that was revised by the 5hurch /athers.% "Than-s to the"( Christianity entered into the do"ain of $agan culture..."??? %o& does God feel about a "double heritage" a"ong %is $eo$le? %..."hat fellowship hath ri hteousness with unri hteousness! and what communion hath li ht with dar,ness! And what concord hath 5hrist with $elial! or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel! And &hat agree"ent hath the te"$le of God &ith idols? for ye are the temple of the livin GodB as God hath said, - will dwell in them, and wal, in themB and - will be their God, and they shall be my people. ,herefore co"e out fro" a"ong the"( and be ye se$arate( saith the 1ord, and touch not the unclean thin B and - will receive you, And will be a /ather unto you, and ye shall be my sons and dau hters, saith the Lord Almi hty. :avin therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfectin holiness in the fear of God.% &1 5orinthians =#()&D#(. *ncyclopedia Americana, (3@', p s. =@0 thru =@D& %AGGG;.-N*, ;.. <'0)&)'A>, 5hristian bishop... theolo ian, and philosopher... %AGGG;.-N-AN-;4. ...2latonic and Neo&2latonic influences united with Au ustine?s reli ious beliefs, 8ualities of mind, and cast of character... %5haracteristically, his principal ar ument is 2latonic in nature and is based upon the mind?s possession of immutable truths... -n Au ustine faith and reason are most closely allied. :ence it is wron to departmentaliFe his mind and to thin, that he offers an e9clusively rational and purely philosophical approach to God.% "orld $oo,, (3@D, p . ')3& %4*D-*EAL 2:-LO;O2:Y. Durin the 4iddle A es, "estern philosophy developed more as a part of 5hristian theolo y than as an independent branch of in8uiry. .he philosophy of Greece and Rome survived only in it?s influence on reli ious thou ht.

%;t. Au ustine was the reatest philosopher of the early 4iddle A es... %A system of thou ht called %scholasticism% dominated medieval philosophy from about the llOO?s to the ()AA?s. .he term scholasticism refers to the method of philosophic investi ation used by teachers of philosophy and theolo y in the newly developin universities of western *urope. .he teachers were called scholastics... %;cholasticism was basically enerated by the translation of Aristotle?s wor,s into Latin, the lan ua e of the medieval 5hristian church. .hese wor,s presented medieval thin,ers with the problem of reconcilin Aristotle?s reat body of philosophical thou ht with the $ible and 5hristian doctrine. :is philosophy combined Aristotle?s thou ht with theolo y, and it eventually became the official philosophy of the Roman 5atholic 5hurch.% 5olliers *ncyclopedia, (3@1, p s. 'D' thru 'D=& %AJG-NA;, ;.. .:O4A; <(11=&(1D)>, .../rom the earliest days of his teachin it became apparent to his contemporaries that he was layin the foundations of a revolution in theolo y and philosophy... %:is meetin at Orvieto with his fellow Dominican, "illiam of 4oerbe,e, led to... .homas? series of commentaries, in which there is a careful effort to arrive at Aristotle?s essential teachin s...% %2latonism and Neoplatonism... Ancient and medieval 5hristian 2latonism. Li,e 2hilo, the 5hristian 2latonists ave primacy to revelation and re arded 2latonic philosophy as the best available instrument for understandin and defendin the teachin s of scripture and church tradition... %2atristic 2latonism. /rom the middle of the 1nd century AD, 5hristians who had some trainin in Gree, philosophy be an to feel the need to e9press their faith in its terms... .he philosophy that suited them best was 2latonism...% %.he first 5hristian to use Gree, philosophy in the service of the 5hristian faith was 7ustin 4artyr <martyred c. (=1&(=@>... this was carried on in the Gree, spea,in world by 5lement of Ale9andria <c. (0A& c. 1(0>, a persuasive 5hristian :umanist, and by the reatest of the Ale9andrian 5hristian teachers, Ori en <c.(@)&10)>... .he Gree, philosophical theolo y that developed durin the .rinitarian controversies over the relationships amon the persons of the Godhead, which were settled at the ecumenical councils of Nicea <'10> and 5onstantinople <'@(>, owed a reat deal to Ori en... -ts reatest representatives on the orthodo9 side were the three 5hristian 2latonist theolo ians of 5appadocia, $asil of 5aesarea <c. ''A&'D3>, Gre ory of NaFianus <c. ''A&'3A>, and $asil?s brother Gre ory of Nyssa <died '3)>... %Au ustinian 2latonism. *ach of the reat 5hristian 2latonists understood 2latonism and applied it to the understandin of his faith in his own individual wayB and of no one of them was this more true than of Au ustine... -n his anthropolo y, Au ustine was firmly 2latonist... -n his theolo y, insofar as Au ustine?s thou ht about God was 2latonic, he conformed fairly closely to the eneral pattern of 5hristian 2latonism... 2erhaps the most distinctive influence of 2lotinian Neoplatonism on his thin,in about God was in his .rinitarian theolo y...% &(ncyclo#edia %rittanica, Eol. ), pa e 0)1&0)' %Neoplatonism# -ts Nature and :istory& %Neoplatonism is the modern name iven to the form of 2latonism developed by 2lotinus in the 'rd century AD... -t represents the final form of pa an Gree, philosophy... %2lotinus and his philosophy. As far as is ,nown, the ori inator of this distinctive ,ind of 2latonism as 2lotinus <AD 1A0&1DA>. :e had been the pupil at Ale9andria of a self&tau ht philosopher called Ammonius, who also tau ht the 5hristian, Ori en, and the latter?s pa an namesa,e, and whose influence on his pupils seems to be deep and lastin .% &(ncyclo#edia %rittanica, Eol. ), pa es 0)A&0)'. %Ori en... :e has been char ed with many heresies. -n his lifetime he was often... suspected of adulteratin the Gospel with pa an philosophy... %.he chief accusations a ainst Ori en?s teachin are the followin # ma,in the son inferior to the /ather and thus bein a precursor of Arianism..., spiritualiFin away the resurrection of the bodyB denyin hell..., turnin 5hristianity into a ,ind of Gnosticism... None of these char es is alto ether roundless.% &(ncyclo#edia %rittanica, Eol. (', pa es D'0&D'=. Does the Bible teach that it is acce$table( or &arn against( using the $hiloso$hies of "an to hel$

for"ulate the doctrines and co""and"ents given in the Bible? %....he wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. /or it is written, :e ta,eth the wise in their own craftiness. And a ain, .he Lord ,noweth the thou hts of the wise, that they are vain. .herefore let no man lory in men...% &( 5orinthians '#(3&1(. %...- than, thee, O /ather, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these thin s from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes... and no man ,noweth who the ;on is, but the /ather# and who the /ather is, but the ;on, and he to whom the ;on will reveal :im% &Lu,e (A#1(&11. %..."hom say ye that - am! And ;imon 2eter answered and said, .hou art the 5hrist, the ;on of the livin God. And 7esus answered and said unto him, $lessed art thou, ;imon $arCona# for flesh and blood hath not revealed it unto thee...% &4atthew (=#(0&(D. %$eware lest any man spoil you throu h philosophy and vain deceit, after the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world, and not after 5hrist. /or in :im dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodily. And ye are complete in :im...% &5olossians 1#@&(A. %...-n vain do they worship me, teachin for doctrines the commandments of men. /or layin aside the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men... /ull well ye reCect the commandment of God that ye may ,eep your own tradition% &4ar, D#=&3. Does the Bible state( or i"$ly that a fuller revelation of the Godhead &ould be forthco"ing( or does the Bible rather &arn against co"ing false $ro$hets &ho &ill bring in heretical doctrines? %....each no other doctrine, neither ive heed to fables...% &( .imothy (#'&). %.a,e heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrineB continue in them# for in doin this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee% &( .imothy )#(=. %$e not carried away with diverse and stran e doctrines...% &:ebrews ('#3. %Now the ;pirit spea,eth e9pressly, that in the latter times some shall depart from the faith, ivin heed to seducin spirits, and doctrines of devils...% &( .imothy )#(. %....here shall be false teachers amon you, who privily shall brin in damnable heresies, even denyin the Lord that bou ht them... And many shall follow their pernicious waysB by reason of whom the way of truth shall be evil spo,en of% &1 2eter 1#(&1. %"hosoever trans resseth, and abideth not in the doctrine of 5hrist, hath not God. :e that abideth in the doctrine of 5hrist, he hath both the /ather and the ;on% &1 7ohn 3. %Lord, they have ,illed thy prophets, and di ed down thine altarsB and - am left alone, and they see, my life. $ut what saith the answer of God unto him! - have reserved to myself seven thousand men, who have not bowed the ,nee to the ima e of $aal. *ven so then at this $resent ti"e also there is a re"nant accordin to the election of race.% &Romans ((#'&0. %.hat ye be not soon sha,en in mind, or be troubled, neither by spirit, nor by word, nor by letter as from us, as that the day of 5hrist is at hand. Let no man deceive you by any means# for that day shall not come, e9cept there co"e a falling a&ay first, and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perditionB "ho opposeth and e9alteth himself above all that is called God, or that is worshippedB so that he as God sitteth in the temple of God, shewin himself that he is God.% 1 .hessalonians 1#1&).

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