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ANALYSIS OF THE INFLUENCES OF SOLAR
RADIATION AND FAÇADE GLAZING AREAS
ON THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF
MULTI-FAMILY BUILDINGS

Dipl.-Ing. Günter Haese
Hannover
Thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Technical
University of Bialystok
for the degree of Doctor of Technical Sciences

Doctoral adviser

: Dr. hab. Ing. Miroslaw Zukowski Prof. PB

Reviewer

: Prof. Dr. hab. Ing. Wladyslaw Szaflik
: Prof. Dr. hab. Ing. Jerzy Andrzej Pogorzelski

Defense of doctor’s thesis

: December 6th 2010

Faculty of Building and Environmental Engineering
Technical University of Bialystok
2010

Abstract
Modern, urban multi-family buildings are characterized by large façade glazing areas.
Under the perspective of ecology and the duty to design energy-efficient buildings, these
market requirements are contributing to a technical conflict of goals. It is well known that
large glazing openings are not only responsible for a large part of heat loss in cold periods,
but can also help to collect a lot of energy for living rooms through the passive effect of
solar radiation. The question is which opening sizes, which technical glazing properties
and which directions support an optimal situation between thermal comfort and the use of
primary energy. A qualified answer can only be found in an integrated approach with the
application of modern and complex computer simulation programs which include all
parameters of building geometry, building materials used and the interaction between all
installed heating, cooling and ventilation systems. The aim of this work is to show new
ways of designing modern, energy-efficient dwelling-houses taking solar radiation into
special consideration. Three co-operative apartment houses, which are being built in
Hannover in 2009, are the object of this dissertation.
The detailed simulation method was chosen for the current work. The use of the
EnergyPlus V3-0 simulation tool helped to combine heat and mass transfers, to simulate
multi-zone airflow and to operate heating, cooling and ventilation systems for long periods.
Special attention was focused on the heat transfer through windows. Twelve cases of
fenestration products with different types of low-e-coatings and different configurations of
optical filters on glass surfaces were examined. All relevant parameters of the developed
glazing systems were determined with the help of the WINDOWS 5.2 computer program.
Based on the above analysis, a general procedural method was presented to determine an
optimal window-to-wall ratio (WWR) for any dwelling house. As it turned out in the
investigated case, the annual heating energy consumption could be reduced by over 30 %
when using the considered WWR optimization. The simulations were conducted with
different weather profiles for several locations in Germany. Additionally, experimental
investigations were carried out to determine the thermal performance of a considered
external wall in solid construction and then to calibrate the building simulation software.
Furthermore, the analysis of the influence of the glazing system area on the buildings´
energy demand showed that there is an approximate linear correlation between energy
consumption for space heating and the WWR. Another aspect of the investigations was to
determine the relationship between the energy demand for space heating and the windows´
height above ground level in different seasons. Simulation results indicated that the
difference between the first and the last floor is high and equal to 31 % for balconywindows and up to 66 % for windows in winter. Large fenestration areas can generate
overheating problems for living spaces during intensive solar radiation. Coupled with
external shading devices, cooling through the use of ambient air driven by ventilation
systems is an effective and energy-efficient solution if the ambient temperature is lower

than the inner air temperature. It was found that the amplitude between day and night
internal air temperatures is significantly higher for apartments with variable air volume
systems in comparison to constant air volume systems. The difference between the mean
operative temperature reaches up to 4.4°C. Window shades with the highest reflective
surface mounted outside and near the fenestration guarantee the best protection of gains
from solar radiation. In order to compile the energy balance of the analyzed building, the
operation of a solar domestic hot water system (SDHW) was investigated. Several tilt
angles were tested for the solar collectors, whereas the simulation showed that an angle of
35° is optimal in summer time and an angle of 70°C is optimal for the cold period. If a
fixed tilt angle of 45° is used throughout the year the absorbed solar energy varies only
about 10 % maximum. It turned out that the solar conversion process is about ten times
lower in winter than those during the summer time. Another important question in the
design of a SDHW system is the optimal value of a stratified storage tank. Based on the
analysis of the influence of the volume of accumulated water on the thermal performance
of the SDHW system, it can be concluded that the recommended volume of the storage
tank for the developed case is 4 m3. Results of the calculations showed that the temperature
of storage water increased by over 50°C between April and September. Hereby it could be
shown that the total designed area of solar collectors is too small to be an effective support
of the heating system during the whole year.

Table of contents
ABSTRACT ………………………………………………………..………………………………………………………..…………. 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS .………………………………………………………………………………………………………….…. 4
NOMENCLATURE ………………………………………………………………………………………………..………………….. 6

1

SCIENTIFIC FRAMEWORK.............................................................................................................. 8
1.1

INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................... 8

1.2

BACKGROUND AND LITERATURE REVIEW .......................................................................................... 10

1.2.1

Method for modelling and simulation of building thermal behaviour ..................................... 10

1.2.2

Solar heat gain through windows ............................................................................................ 18

1.2.3

Influence of envelope features on energy consumption and potential savings ........................ 23

1.2.4

Modelling and designing solar domestic hot water systems .................................................... 26

1.2.5

Summary of literature review .................................................................................................. 39

1.3

2

3

1.3.1

Scientific goals......................................................................................................................... 40

1.3.2

Hyphothesis ............................................................................................................................. 40

RESEARCH METHODS .................................................................................................................... 41
2.1

BUILDING ENERGY SIMULATION SOFTWARE ...................................................................................... 41

2.2

EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH METHODS ................................................................................................ 47

2.2.1

Experimental apparatus .......................................................................................................... 47

2.2.2

Experimental methods ............................................................................................................. 48

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .......................................................................................................... 51
3.1

4

RESEARCH GOALS AND HYPOTHESIS .................................................................................................. 40

BUILDING DESCRIPTION ..................................................................................................................... 52

3.1.1

Description of building substructures and HVAC systems ...................................................... 52

3.1.2

Weather conditions for the simulation analysis ....................................................................... 66

3.2

SELECTION OF THE OPTIMAL GLAZING SYSTEM .................................................................................. 68

3.3

ESTIMATION OF THERMAL ENERGY GAIN AND LOSS THROUGH BUILDING FENESTRATION .................. 70

3.3.1

Characterization of heat gain and loss through glazing.......................................................... 70

3.3.2

Analysis of the energy balance for windows ............................................................................ 71

3.3.3

Definition of an optimal value of window-to-wall ratio .......................................................... 76

3.4

TESTING OF A BUILDING INDOOR ENVIRONMENT DURING THE WARM PERIOD .................................... 79

3.5

OPTIMIZATION OF A SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEM .............................................................. 90

3.5.1

Description of the solar collectors........................................................................................... 90

3.5.2

Solar heating systems control .................................................................................................. 91

3.5.3

Assumed parameters of domestic hot water systems ............................................................... 91

3.5.4

Results of computational analysis ........................................................................................... 92

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................................. 99

4.1

SUMMARY .......................................................................................................................................... 99

4.2

COMMENTS AND CONCLUSIONS ....................................................................................................... 101

4.3

FUTURE RESEARCH .......................................................................................................................... 103

REFERENCES ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..……..… 104
APPENDICES ……….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….… 112
APPENDIX 1 PLANS OF BUILDING SUBSTRUCTURES AND THE FRONT/BACK/SIDE ELEVATION VIEWS ……….. 112
APPENDIX 2 LISTING OF THE BUILDING AND HVAC SYSTEM MODEL ……………………………………………..…. 122

Nomenclature
Roman Letter Symbols
a1
a2
A
c
C
C
DD
E
f
F
G
G&

h
I
k
nl
ns
nz
N
o
P
P

q ′′

r
R
t
U
WWR
V&

Xj, Yj, Zj
































thermal transmittance coefficient simple,
thermal transmittance coefficient square,
area,
specific heat,
correction factor,
heat capacitance,
degree-day,
energy,
fraction of time,
angle factor,
solar irradiation,
mass flow rate,
convective heat transfer coefficient,
intensity of solar radiation,
thermal conductivity,
number of heat loads,
number of heat transfer surfaces,
number of adjacent zones,
number of hours,
operative temperature,
power,
energy per building area,
heat flux,
frame to glass ratio for a window,
thermal resistance,
time,
heat transfer coefficient,
window-to-wall ratio,
volume flow rate,
outside, cross and inside CTF coefficients.

W/m2K
W/m2K2
m2
J/kgK

J/°C
°Cd
J or kWh


W/m2
kg/s
W/m2K
W/m2
W/mK




°C
W
kWh/m2
W/m2

mK/W
s
W/m2K

m3/s
W/m2K

solar absorption of the surface,
layer thickness,
surface emissivity,
efficiency,


m



Greek symbols
α –
δ –
ε –
η –

σ –
θ –
ρ –
φ –
Φ –

Stefan-Boltzmann constant,
temperature,
density,
solar azimuth angle,
flux CTF coefficient.

Subscripts
a
A
b
BR
c
c
CON
CONV
eq
E
G
h
h
I
in
in
INF
l
LWR
m
M
MD
MR
out
out
S
SDR
SWR
sf
SUP
w



































air,
ambient,
brick,
beam radiation
cold side,
cooling,
conduction,
convection,
equivalent,
external,
ground,
hot side,
heating,
internal,
inlet boundary,
inflow,
infiltration,
loss,
long wave radiation,
mortar,
mean,
mean daily,
mean radiant,
outlet boundary,
outflow,
surface,
sky diffuse radiation,
short wave radiation,
surface,
supply,
wall,
steady-state conditions.

W m–2K–4
K
kg/m3
degree


1.1 Introduction

8

1 Scientific Framework
1.1 Introduction
It is estimated that the building sector consumes nearly 40 % of the total energy used in
European countries. The potential for saving energy needed for heating, cooling, lighting
and other services is still significant.
Modelling and simulation techniques can help to predict the environmental performance of
building and HVAC systems in the future. Both of these methods are very important in the
early stages of designing, as well as during the operation and management processes.
Modern buildings should be characterized by a low level of primary energy demands and
also provide an optimal thermal comfort environment and indoor air quality for occupants.
Only computer-based predictions can reconcile these other contradictory and conflicting
requirements. Moreover, energy simulations help to understand the interactions between
occupants, building construction, HVAC systems, indoor and outdoor climate conditions.
A sharp rise in energy prices and continuous development in the building industry demand
a new design methodology. Traditional methods of calculation for steady-state conditions
cannot be used in solving the problems of solar gain, passive and active thermal energy
storage, night cooling ventilation and the optimal strategy in automatic control of HVAC
systems. Solar radiation, as an energy source, is very time-dependent. In addition to
variable character, absorption and reflection phenomena make it difficult to estimate its
potential for space heating during the winter and to define its’ influence on the internal
thermal environment during warm periods. Internal and external shading devices, building
overhangs, wing walls and window performance can play a significant role in assessing
solar gain. Modern buildings are characterized by large glazed areas. It provides the
improvement of a visual environment. But on the other hand, large window sizes lead to
overheating problems during the summer and may result in increasing the energy demand
for heating in the winter. Only computer-aid modelling can help designers find the optimal
solution to these complex problems. Also, installing large domestic hot water (DHW)
systems operating with solar panels should be preceded by a simulation analysis. Among
other things, detailed calculations can answer the following questions:





What kind of system connection diagram should be applied?
What is the optimal number and thermal capacity of storage tanks?
How does the tilt angle of solar collectors influence the thermal performance of the
DHW system and the effectiveness of energy conversion?
What is the optimal and maximum power of an auxiliary heater?

1.1 Introduction

9

Another problem, which cannot be analyzed by traditional analytical methods, is the
energy storage process. This phenomenon is clearly observed when solar energy transfers
significantly change, for example during the day and night. Simulation of the thermal
energy storage mechanism can be a precondition before sizing large free and mechanical
night cooling ventilation, passive and active solar-supported heating systems.
Recapitulating above digressions, one should say that modelling and simulation techniques
are necessary tools in the energy-efficient design of buildings. The current research is
carried out as a multi-layered and detailed case study analysis of modern dwelling houses
from the energy consumption point of view. The main goals of this complex investigation
are the reduction of space heating demands and the minimization of the environmental
effects on the auxiliary energy sources.

1.2 Background and literature review

10

1.2 Background and literature review
The duty of environmental protection and its sustainable development requires the design
of energy efficient buildings. Computer-based simulations play a very important role in
this process. Additionally, this type of analysis can be useful in achieving thermal comfort
in occupied spaces. First a survey of problems concerned with the subject of the current
dissertation was carried out in order to perform a more detailed and complex analysis of
the thermal behavior of buildings and to determine the most important factors, especially
solar radiation affecting energy consumption. A strong development of modelling
techniques is observed and there are a lot of analytical and experimental works related to
energy simulation in buildings. For these reasons, the literature review is limited mainly to
scientific investigations that have been performed during the last decade. The current
bibliographic survey and a short description of the elaborated problems are shared in the
following sections and are presented below:





modelling and simulation of building thermal behavior,
analysis of solar heat gain through windows,
influence of building envelope construction on energy consumption,
modelling and designing solar domestic hot water (SDHW) systems.

1.2.1 Method for modelling and simulation of building thermal
behaviour
Building energy simulation methods can be divided into two basic levels: simplified and
detailed analysis techniques. We find in the paper written by Al-Homoud (Al-Homoud,
2001) a complex review of both building energy simulation approaches. It is possible to
distinguish between the four basic simplified methods of estimating energy consumption
that are summarized below.

SIMPIFIED METHODS

Degree-Day (DD) method
The Degree-Day method assumes that heat loss and gain are proportional to the equivalent
heat-loss coefficient of the building envelope. This steady-state procedure is very popular
and widely used to estimate heating and cooling energy demands mainly in small
buildings. The calculating procedure is based on the assumption that the average energy
gain during a long-term counterbalance heat loss for the mean daily inside temperature θF
equals to 18.3°C (65°F), also called a balance point temperature. Therefore, energy
consumption will be proportional to the difference between θF and the mean daily
temperature θMD.

1.2 Background and literature review

11

We can estimate the heating degree-day DDh using the following equation:
d = Dm

∑ (θ
d =1

− θ MD ) .
+

F

(1.1)

Sign + means that we can only take the positive values. Analogically, Eq. (1.2) is used to
determine the cooling degree-day DDc.
d = Dm

∑ (θ
d =1

−θF ) .
+

MD

(1.2)

Based on degree-day DDh it is possible to calculate the energy required for central heating
systems.

24

 E

qL DDh
,
(θ I − θ E )ηhV f

(1.3)

where:
qL –
θI –
θE –
ηh –
Vf –

design heat loss of the buildings,
internal air temperature of the house,
external air temperature (ambient),
efficiency of the heating system,
heating value of fuel.

Modified Degree-Day method
In order to reduce the inaccuracy of the DD procedure, an empirical correction factor CD
(ASHRAE Systems Handbook, 1976) that is a function of outdoor design temperature, is
introduced.

24

qL DDhCD
,
(θ I − θ E )ηhV f

where CD is a correction factor for the heating effect versus degree days.

(1.4)

1.2 Background and literature review

12

Variable Base Degree-Day (VBDD) method
The VBDD procedure first calculates the balance point temperature θB – Eq. (1.5) – that is
the estimate for the whole building.

θI −

Qg

,

UA

(1.5)

where:
Qg – a solar and internal heat gain,
U – an overall coefficient of heat loss,
A – an area of building elements.
Then the heating and cooling degree hours are calculated based on θB. This approach takes
into account different building conditions and requires an hourly weather database. Eq.
(1.6) is used to calculate degree-days for heating in month m and period t out of 24 hours.
d = Dm

∑ (θ
d =1

− θ MD ) .
+

B ,i

(1.6)

Consistently, the energy required for heating the building can be calculated as follows:
i=n

24

∑ ( f UADD )
i =1

i

h

ηh

,

(1.7)

where:
n – a number of operating periods,
fi – a fraction of time for the period t.
In a similar way, we can estimate the energy required for cooling the building.
d = Dm

∑ (θ
d =1

− θ B ,i ) .
+

MD

(1.8)

1.2 Background and literature review

13

i=n

24

∑ ( f UADD )
i =1

i

c

ηc

(1.9)

,

Eq. (1.9) takes into account only heat transfers by conductance. Energy demands for
ventilation and infiltration have to be calculated separately.

Bin method and Bin modified method

This method evolves from the VBDD procedure. It is used to calculate the annual building
heating and cooling loads for a set of temperature samples called “bins”. The space-heating
energy demand is determined based on the following relation:

UA i =n

ηh

∑ N (θ
i =1

BIN ,i

− θ MD,i ) ,
+

B ,i

(1.10)

where:
n – a number of bins,
NBIN,i – a number of hours for i bin.
The Bin procedure is recommended for buildings where the magnitude of internal gains is
dominated. The Bin modified method accounts for the impact of solar and wind effects on
energy consumption and is useful for buildings which do not exceed 2,500 m2 of floor area.

DETAILED DYNAMIC SIMULATION METHODS

The simulation models are detailed and satisfactorily accurate tools that can be very useful
both for energy-efficient design and for the cost-effective retrofitting of buildings. The
flow chart of computer software for the use in determining the thermal behavior of
buildings is presented in Fig. 1.1.

1.2 Background and literature review

BUILDING DESCRIPTION
Location
Design data
Construction data
Thermal zones
Internal loads
Usage profiles
Infiltration

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION
System types and sizes
Supply and return fans
Control and schedules
Outside air requirements

PLANT DESCRIPTION
Equipment types and sizes
Performance characteristics
Auxiliary equipment
Load assignment
Fuel types

ECONOMIC DATA
Economic factors
Project life
First cost
Maintenance cost

14

WEATHER LIBRARY
Dry-bulb temperature
Wet-bulb temperature
Cloud factor
Wind speed
Pressure

LOADS
ANALYSIS

Peak heating and
cooling loads
SYSTEM
ANALYSIS

Hourly equipment
loads by system
PLANT
ANALYSIS

Fuel demand and
consumption
ECONOMIC
ANALYSIS

Life-cycle cost
Fig. 1.1: The overall structure of the building energy simulation software by ASHRAE Handbook Fundamentals (2005)

Large amounts of energy simulation software have been released during the last half
century. Two tendencies in the simulation of the energy transfer processes in buildings can
be distinguished. First, the conception consists of performing heat balance in isothermal
zones that are component parts of the building. Depending on the requirements, the
analysis can be performed over a very long period with different time intervals. We can
find a comparison of the features of twenty major building energy simulation programs
with a heat balance engine in a detailed and complex report prepared by Crawley
(Crawley, et al., 2008) (Crawley, et al., 2005).
Very often the agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental values do not
work well for large spaces and structures. The second conception is a compilation of

1.2 Background and literature review

15

traditional balancing methods and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithms.
Accuracy and agreement between the results of theoretical modelling and physical reality
are the best advantages of this procedure. Simulations are usually performed for not very
long periods of time in respect to complicated 3-D models, short-time calculating steps and
long-time computer work. Often, this hybrid method is used to do steady-state analysis.
The overview of computer software for testing energy transfer in the built environment is
also presented by Addison and Nall (Addison, et al., 2001). The authors concluded that the
best energy analysis tools for the complex and atypical geometry of living spaces should
apply hybrid algorithms. (Rees, et al., 1999) (Maliska, 2001) (Broderick, et al., 2001)
(Beausoleil-Morrison, 2001) They came to similar conclusions about modelling strategy.
Available literature concerning advanced techniques and algorithms, which are used in
whole-building energy performance simulations, is wide-ranging. An overview of the most
important scientific projects is presented below.
Treeck and Rank (Treeck, et al., 2007) developed an algorithm for transforming building
geometry which can be applied to energy simulation codes. The approach is based on a
graph theory. The following graph is selected from a building model: a structural
component, room faces, whole room and relational objects that represent the geometrical
structure in a hierarchical manner. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of developed
algorithms, the authors showed a practical example of the decomposition model based on a
three-storey building with an integrated inner courtyard.
The building shape significantly influences its’ thermal performance. Ourghi and coworkers (Ourghi, et al., 2007) developed a simplified calculation method concerning this
problem. A detailed simulation procedure was carried out with specialized software DOE-2
for several locations around the world. The authors analyzed several building
configurations with different shapes, relative compactness, and various glazing types with
different solar heat gain coefficient and window sizes. Estimates showed a strong influence
of the building shape, the type and the percent of glazing on energy consumption.
A meteorological and a sociological (attitude and culture) influence on thermal load and
energy consumption in buildings was investigated by Pedersen (Pedersen, 2007). The
following different representations of weather data were analyzed: The test reference year
(TRY), design reference year (DRY), typical meteorological year (TMY) and weather year
for energy calculations (WYEC). The current work has presented a summary of different
methodologies for the energy load and its’ estimations such as: neural networks (NN),
engineering method (EM) conditional and demand analysis (CDA).
Detailed building thermal performance is possible to estimate when we apply both
computational fluid dynamic algorithms and building energy simulation tools. The hard
problem of an integration of the two different calculation techniques, which provide
complementary information, was intensely developed and widely applied by Zhai and

1.2 Background and literature review

16

Chen (Zhai, et al., 2002) (Zhai, et al., 2003) (Zhai, et al., 2005) (Zhai, et al., 2006). They
proposed different static, dynamic and bin coupling strategies to decrease the computing
time. A new coupling building energy simulation tool was developed and validated with
experimental data available in literature. It was found that the best efficient coupling
method is a transfer of surface temperatures from the energy simulation code to a CFD
preprocessor. After calculation, heat transfer coefficients and gradients of air temperature
are returned in the opposite direction. In order to reduce CPU-time demands, Zhai and
Chen proposed the optimal staged coupling strategy.
The European Joule–Thermie OFFICE project concerned with labeling buildings checked
the compliance of a building with regulations and evaluated the efficiency of the retrofit.
Within this research project framework Roulet with colleagues (Roulet, et al., 2002)
developed multi-criteria procedures based on a principle component analysis and on the
ELECTRE family partial aggregation method. The proposed methodology can be used
both before and after the retrofit.
Energy management and control units can monitor and optimize the work of various
HVAC components during operation. Salsbury and Diamond (Salsbury, et al., 2000)
created the concept of using simulation in the validation and energy analysis of HVAC
systems in buildings. In this conception, a complex system is composed of a number of
several linked subsystem models. The potential of using a simulation, which represents
virtual and real parallel operating systems, was seen in a dual-duct air-handling unit
located in an office building in San Francisco. Calculations were performed in the
MATLAB programming environment. It was indicated that the use of simplified models
can decrease the number of configuration parameters in a simulation.
Building energy performance can be predicted based on an artificial neural networks
(ANN) method. Yezioro and co-workers (Yezioro, et al., 2008) developed and tested ANN
using data from one week of an experimental period. The Pittsburgh Synergy Solar House
was selected as the reference building. The experimental database consisted of the
following electricity consumption: total, lighting, HVAC and electricity generated in the
photovoltaic system. The MATLAB environment was used to implement the considered
model of ANN. Calculation results from four building performance simulation tools:
Energy_10, Green Building Studio, eQuest and EnergyPlus were used for the comparison
of ANN purposes. It presented a good correlation (mean absolute error equal to 0.9 %)
between the predictions and the results from the mathematical model.
Reducing the number of tests for complex systems can be done by the use of a lattice
method for global optimization (LMGO) which was developed by Saporito (Saporito, et
al., 2001). The influence of different design parameters of building energy consumption
was investigated. In order to identify the main energy saving features, simulations of
thermal behavior in simple office buildings located in Kew (London) with help of
APACHE code were performed. The authors concluded that LMGO can be successfully

1.2 Background and literature review

17

used in both sensitivity studies of dynamic systems and in building optimization problems
with a large number of combination tests.
Building structures and environments are modeled by a system of differential algebraic
equations. Required smoothness assumptions that can be applied in the solution of these
types of equation sets have been proposed by Wetter (Wetter, 2005). A new multi-zone
building energy simulation program called BuildOpt, which differs from other software
because of the inclusion of various smoothing algorithms, was presented. The numerical
experiments indicated a reduction in the computation time and a high precision of
smoothing techniques proposed by the author.
Multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) was used by Wright (Wright, et al., 2002) to
estimate the optimum pay-off characteristic between daily energy costs and the quality of
the thermal environment in the building. An example of a single zone HVAC system
composed of cooling and heating coils, a regenerative heat exchanger and a supply fan was
used to show the benefits of the multi-criterion optimization genetic algorithm. Estimates
indicated that MOGA search methods can be successfully used in the thermal design of
buildings in respect to occupant comfort.
Genetic algorithms were used by Xu and Wang (Xu, et al., 2007) in the thermal modelling
of the building envelope. They developed a method to optimize the parameters of the
simplified dynamic model based on frequency domain regression. Validation of the
optimization method and its effectiveness were conducted by comparing the predictions
with the results from the theoretical model. It was found that the frequency domain
analysis greatly simplified the search for optimal parameters.
Earth-contact heat transfers in built environments were investigated by Davies and
colleagues (Davies, et al., 2001). They improved the efficiency of the numerical technique
by adopting some elements from the response factor method. The results of calculations
based on the new model showed a dramatic decrease in the computing time of the
simulations compared to the traditional finite volume technique in keeping with accuracy
and flexibility.
The accuracy of the building energy simulations strongly depends on the estimate of solar
irradiance on external facades. Loutzenhiser, along with co-workers (Loutzenhiser, et al.,
2007), validated short-wave radiation in solar gain models applied in energy simulation
software. In the experiment, a database of solar radiation from two 25-day measurements
performed on the EMPA campus located in Duebendorf (Switzerland) was used.
Calculations were made using four building energy simulation programs: EnergyPlus,
DOE-2.1e, ESP-r and TRNSYS-TUD and seven solar radiation models. Using the mean
absolute differences method, it verified that the uncertainties of the models are as follows:
14.9 % for the isotropic sky, 9.1 % for the Hay–Davies, 9.4 % for the Reindl, 7.6 % for the
Muneer, 13.2 % for the Klucher, 9.0 % for the modified Perez and 7.9 % for Perez.

1.2 Background and literature review

18

Wurtz and co-workers (Wurtz, et al., 2006) developed energy simulation tools which
implemented a zonal method. The first program was created in an object-oriented SPARK
environment in order to develop and test new algorithms and simulation models. The
second tool, called SIM_ZONAL integrated definite models to quickly estimate the quality
of the indoor thermal environment. These applications integrated single-node models with
computational fluid dynamics algorithms. The authors concluded that the zonal method
implemented in their computer programs can be used to indicate room temperature and
environment quality with adequate accuracy.
The integration of the CFD environment with building simulation techniques was the main
goal of the European Commission project number ERB IC15 CT98 0511, which was
realized by Bartak (Bartak, et al., 2002). The approach taken within the ESP-r computer
code was created. The empirical validation of the new module was carried out at the
Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic). It was also compared with simulation
results supported by measurements realized in a multi-storey block of flats in Gliwice
(Poland). (The authors obtained good agreement between predictions and the results of
measurements as the relative error did not exceed 14 %.)
Yan, along with colleagues (Yan, et al., 2008), carried out a method to simultaneously
estimate thermal performance and indoor air quality in buildings. The new integrated
simulation tool is characterized by applying the following: flexible system control strategy,
multi-parameters analysis, flexible equipment selection and a new zonal model based on
room air age. Computer programs can be used to estimate the energy demands and predict
different indoor parameters (e.g., temperature, humidity, CO2, volatile organic compounds,
particular matter) under different HVAC systems and automatic control strategies. A
detailed analysis of the dynamic performance of a hypothetical health care building in
Miami (USA) was carried out to show all the capabilities of the developed simulation tool.

1.2.2 Solar heat gain through windows
Glazed openings are very important elements in building design. Windows provide natural
daylight into rooms to reduce the use of electric light and allow heat gain from solar
radiation. But large areas of glazing in each facade may result both in increased heat losses
in winter and in deteriorating thermal comfort conditions for occupants by overheating in
summer. The optimal value of the window-to-wall area ratio can be properly estimated
only by energy balancing for a typical year of weather data with the use of simulation
methods.
A good statement used to reduce energy consumption in buildings in cold climates is the
application of low-emissivity window glass coverings. This film layer on the internal side
of the window may significantly reduce heat transmission by long-wave radiation.

1.2 Background and literature review

19

Different energy performance of glazed openings is needed in warm climates. Spectrally
selective coatings should reflect the infra-red and ultra-violet spectrums and
simultaneously transmit visible solar radiation.

exterior screen
motorized blind

interior blind
fixed louvre sunshade

interior screen

exterior blind

between glass blind

Shading devices such as screens, blinds, shutters, drapes, pull-down shades, overhangs and
wing walls can both reduce overheating in summer as well as energy consumption in cold
periods. Simulation tools should allow setting a different location of these devices, as
shown in Fig. 1.2.

Fig. 1.2: Location options of shading devices.

Electrochromic glazing technology is the best solution for buildings in moderate climates
on account of its dynamically varied energy performance. Depending on the voltage
generated by a photovoltaic layer, the window film coating adapts to actual environmental
conditions. It is a very promising future technology but many challenging problems will
need to be resolved such as the control and time change of the spectral properties in
electrochromic layers. The newest shading devices consist of external horizontal louvers
with spectrally selective holographic optical elements (HOE) that redirect sunlight.
A short description of the most important scientific research connected with the analysis of
solar gain entering a building is presented below.

1.2 Background and literature review

20

Yohanis and Norton (Yohanis, et al., 2000) revealed that the investigation of direct solar
gain utilization in buildings can be properly carried out based on a zone-by-zone analysis.
The base-case building (located Hemel Hempstead, England) was divided into fourteen
volume subjects, called zones. The SERI-RES computer program was chosen for
simulation tests. The usefulness of heating buildings is a function of the ratio. The
calculation of solar gain as a function of the ratio of total solar to total loss (TS/TL) on a
base of whole-building analysis can only lead to rough results.
The absorption of solar radiation in buildings depends on the orientation and thermal mass
of the building. This problem was investigated by the same authors (Yohanis, et al., 2002)
based on a single-storey building with glazing areas equal to 42 % of the east and west
elevations and located in London (latitude of 52°). A model of the base-case building was
created in the thermal simulation code SERI-RES. Estimates indicated that for large
thermal mass and for smaller values of the total solar to total loss, the impact of orientation
is not significant. But for the small mass of the considered buildings, the percentage
differences increase to 8 % for east, 10 % for west and 12 % for north orientations.
Florides, with co-workers (Florides, et al., 2002), carried out a thermal response of modern
houses taking into consideration ventilation, solar shading and the type of glazing, as well
as the shape, orientation and thermal mass of the buildings. The heating and cooling loads
were calculated with use of computer software TRNSYS and a typical meteorological year
(TMY) for Nicosia, Cyprus. The considered modern house had a floor area of 196 m2 and
consisted of four external walls with a low conductance and low transmittance window
glazing with area equal to 5.2 m2. The simulation results for the warm period indicated that
night ventilation can reduce peak internal temperatures by 2°C, 3°C and 7°C for one, two
and eleven air changes per hour, respectively. Moreover, nine air changes per hour can
lead to a 7.7 % reduction (maximum value) in annual cooling load.
The problem of controlling the solar heat gains in order to reduce the capacity of an air
conditioning system was studied by Saleh (Saleh, et al., 2004). They proposed a horizontal
rotation of glass windowpanes. The computer program was developed to determine the sun
declination and limits of sunlight hours. It was found that the percentage of direct solar
heat gain changes achievable by a rotation-angle magnitude of 300 and for east wall
orientation equals to -11 % and 42 % for summer and winter solstice time, respectively.
A novel glazing system with a rotatable frame for buildings located in climates where
heating and cooling are required, was investigated by Etzion and Erell (Etzion, et al.,
2000). Frame holds have transparent glazing and absorptive glazing with a low shading
coefficient. Before a heating season, the glazing system rotates and the absorbing part is on
the interior side. The experimental investigations for warm periods showed that the interior
radiation for the reversible new glazing system and reference standard 3 mm transparent
glazing were reduced to approximately 5 % and 37 % of exterior levels, respectively. For

1.2 Background and literature review

21

winter conditions, the solar radiation through the tested windows was identical to the
standard window.
Fissore and Fonseca (Fissore, et al., 2007) investigated the thermal behavior of an enclosed
space with fenestration for temperate winter climates. Experiments were carried out for
heating season conditions and during summer periods. An uncertainly analysis indicated
that the most significant errors are generated from measurements of surfaces and air
temperature. Errors connected with thermocouples and voltage measurement can be
significant. The same authors (Fissore, et al., 2007) analyzed the thermal balance of a
window in an office in climate conditions typical for Concepcion (Chile). One-year
measurements of ambient and indoor parameters under simulation of various operation
conditions showed that heat consumption for uncovered windows during clear winter days
could be smaller about 50 % compared to a cloudy period. For autumn conditions, this
value was reduced to 26.6 %.
The Task 34/Annex 43 project of the International Energy Agency (IEA) included six
experiments in an outdoor test cell in order to provide the necessary data for the validation
of building energy simulation models and computer software (Manza, et al., 2006). The
experimental facility was assembled with two identical cuboid shape test cells with
removable façade elements. An air-water heat exchanger was used to control the air
temperature inside guarded zones. DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, ESP-r and HELIOS building
energy simulation computer programs were used for modelling the thermal behavior of the
tested spaces. Experimental data, which are available on the Internet from
www.empa.ch/ieatask34, can be a good base to investigate solar gains through transparent
elements and can also be used to validate existing software for the energy analysis of
buildings.
The beam solar radiation incident on building fenestration can be controlled with
holographic optical elements. This system was tested by James and Bahaj (James, et al.,
2005) in modern, highly glazed office extensions with a low thermal mass at Southampton
University (UK). The possible solutions of the solar control problem were tested based on
the transient thermal simulation of the building structure with help of the computer code
TRNSYS. The authors assumed that the HOE systems function at a 100 % diffraction
efficiency but required alignment between incident direct radiation and the angle of the
hologram. Moreover, the effects of glare and spectral dispersion may cause the unsuitable
functioning of holographic elements.
Coating with a spectrally selective layer on external walls can affect heat transfer. Prager
and co-workers (Prager, et al., 2006) analyzed the influence of solar radiation and
convection on the energy balance of a building based on test facilities in Freiburg
(Germany). It was found that the considered IR radiative component reduces the heat
demand to between 5 % and 15 % during the winter season. However, in summer time, the

1.2 Background and literature review

22

cooling energy demand increases to between 10 % and 50 % depending on the thermal
resistance of the wall.
One of the factors that influence the building energy balance is ground reflectivity.
Thevenard and Haddad (Thevenard, et al., 2006) developed two snow albedo models. The
first simple approach can be operated together with a typical year and uses the monthly
snow cover. The second advanced model assumes daily or hourly records of snow depth.
Two objects were tested: a passive solar house located in a rural setting in Canada and a
photovoltaic system in order to evaluate both models considered. ESP-r was used as a
simulation tool. The authors indicated that the ground albedo value depends on the surface
and may range from 0.07 to 0.6 in the absence of snow. For snow cover age, this value
ranges from 0.2 to 0.7.
The glazed openings percentage (GOP) may strongly affect a thermal comfort in the
building. A dynamic thermal-circuit zone method to study a type of glazing and the area of
fenestration influence on the maximum and minimum indoor air temperatures was used by
Kontoleon and Bikas (Kontoleon, et al., 2002). The solution procedure assumed the
combined heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation in the space for changing
internal and external environmental behaviors. The simulation results showed that
overheating is observed in buildings with double-glazing and interior insulation when the
GOP exceeds 70 % during the winter season. For the summer period, overheating
disappears if the glazed openings percentage is less than 60 % and exterior insulation is
placed on the horizontal surfaces.
Alvarez with co-workers (Alvarez, et al., 2005) tested the solar heat gain coefficient
(SHGC) for commercial sheet glasses with the following solar control coatings: ZnS (40
nm) – CuS (150 nm) and ZnS (40 nm) – Bi2S3 (75 nm) – CuS (150 nm) at exterior
temperatures of 15°C and 32°C. This work presented the thermal performance of the
different types of laminated glazings as a function of indoor and outdoor convective heat
transfer coefficients. A reduction in SHGC that depends on exterior conditions was
changed from 12 % to 20 % for single glazing with SnO2-based transparent conductive
oxide film.
Double-glazing with vacuum or inert gas is characterized by low heat loss. This type of
window with soft and hard emittance coatings was investigated by Fang (Fang, et al.,
2007). A three-dimensional finite volume model was developed for obtaining vacuum
glazing thermal performance. Experiments with the use of a guarded hot box calorimeter
were carried out as well. It was found that vacuum glazing with a single low emittance has
excellent performance. But the use of two low emittance coatings provides limited
improvement.

1.2 Background and literature review

23

1.2.3 Influence of envelope features on energy consumption and
potential savings
Envelope features play an essential role in absorbing solar and internal gains. The storing
of heat has a positive influence on less temperature fluctuations in living spaces and
improves the quality of the thermal environment. Building structural elements, such as
walls and floors, should be made with materials that have a high heat capacity and density
in passive solar houses. Many complex problems are connected with the natural store of
heat such as the location of thermal masses, wall configuration, insulation thickness, colour
and structure of elevation. Moreover, it is necessary to estimate the optimal value of the
solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), which depends on climate factors, in passive heating
design. The current part of the literature review is dedicated to highlighting these kinds of
issues.
Lindberg with colleagues (Lindberg, et al., 2004) presented the thermal performance of six
different exterior walls which were determined based on a detailed experiment. The
construction of the tested walls were as follows: polyurethane insulated wooden frame
wall, insulated cavity brick wall, insulated log wall, plastered massive brick wall,
autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) block wall and log wall. The dimensions of each test
building were as follows: width and length equal to 2.4 m and height equal to 2.6 m. A
1500 W electric radiator was used as a heat source. Measurements were very detailed and
included: horizontal global solar radiation, wind speed and direction, infiltration, air
tightness, relative humidity, inside-outside air temperatures and temperatures at various
depths within each side of the exterior wall facades. The authors concluded that the
thermal mass of the walls reduces temperature fluctuations and absorbs energy surpluses
from solar and internal gains. As it turned out, the thermal performance of the AAC block
wall is better than that of the massive brick wall. The results of the calculation showed that
one steady-state method leads to an overestimate of the heating or cooling energy transfer
through the building envelope by 40 %.
A method to assess the cost-effectiveness of residential building exterior walls for cold
climate conditions was proposed by Wang (Wang, et al., 2007). Among other things, the
cost/benefit difference is calculated by comparing insulated exterior walls with typical for
Chinese non-insulated solid clay brick exterior walls. An application of the proposed
method was presented by the authors. A seven-storey residential building constructed with
three types of different exterior walls and located in Northern China was chosen as the
object of the cost-efficiency analysis. The calculation results indicated that the economical
evaluation of the insulated exterior walls is a proper and easy way thanks to applying the
proposed methodology. Future work on this project will include the integration of cooling
aspects and other difficulties in construction and environmental impacts.
Smeds and Wall (Smeds, et al., 2007) compared a multi-family apartment building and a
single-family detached house, designed according to the Nordic Building Code, with high
performance houses using the best available technology, which fulfills the target

1.2 Background and literature review

24

requirements of IEATask 28 (2003). Simulations of the buildings for cold climate data in
Stockholm were carried out with computer code DEROB-LTH (2005). This dynamic
simulation tool was built based on a ray tracing model. The results of the calculation
revealed that the space-heating demand can be reduced by up to 83 % for single-family
houses and by up to 85 % for apartment buildings. The authors’ conclusion was that we
should take into consideration the following design features: tightness of the building
envelope, air ventilation balancing and heat recovery systems in order to obtain demand
space-heating requirements equaling less than 15 – 25 kWh/m2.
Experimental investigations of three Danish single-family houses constructed according to
the new building energy requirements introduced in Denmark in 2006, were carried out by
Tommerup and co-authors (Tommerup, et al., 2007). This project assumed a complex
measure of energy consumption for space heating, domestic hot water and electricity
consumption, solar radiation, outdoor and indoor temperatures and temperatures in HVAC
systems. Findings of the experiment indicated that the energy consumption of all
investigated houses can be classified as ‘‘low-energy house class 2’’. It means that energy
consumption is 75 % of the required maximum value. Furthermore, applying existing lowenergy products in analyzed buildings can reduce consumption of electricity by about 40
%. The authors hope that the results of the current project will be a good basis for the
development of energy-saving buildings in the future.
Turkish Standard Number 825 (TS 825) introduces four different degree-day (DD) regions
namely: Izmir (DD: 1450), Bursa (DD: 2203), Eskis-ehir (DD: 3215) and Erzurum (DD:
4856). For these provinces Sisman and co-workers (Sisman, et al., 2007) determined an
optimum insulation thickness for a lifetime of N years. Optimization calculations assumed
exterior air temperature, length of the heating period, operating time of the system,
economical lifetime and properties of the insulation material. The optimum value of
insulation thickness, which is the result of the current analysis, is equal to 0.033 m for
Izmir, 0.047 m for Bursa, 0.061 m for Eskis-ehir and 0.08 m for Erzurum.
Bakos (Bakos, 2000) analyzed the thermal insulation in residential and tertiary sector,
which was built before the enactment of the Greek Thermal Insulation Code. Various
insulation protection approaches for buildings situated in Kavala (Northern Greece) were
investigated. The economical analysis took into account the costs of insulation material,
labour and insurance. Bakos concluded that the correct combination of insulation materials
can make substantial energy savings.
The analysis of heat transfer through composite roofs consisting of different positions of
insulation materials was realized by Ozel and Pihtili (2007). They applied numerical
models based on an implicit finite difference scheme and MATLAB environment in their
simulations. Twelve different roof constructions were investigated for both winter and
summer periods. Ozel and Pihtili (Ozel, et al., 2007) states that “the best load leveling was
achieved in the case where three pieces of insulation of equal thickness were placed one at
the outdoor surface of the roof, the second piece of insulation was placed in the middle of
the roof and the third piece of insulation was placed on the indoor surface of the roof”.

1.2 Background and literature review

25

Fig. 1.3 presents the best location of insulation inside a roof.
glass wool
concrete block
glass wool
concrete block
glass wool

Fig. 1.3: Configuration of insulation selected by Ozel and Pihtili (2007) as the best solution.

Dombayci and co-workers (Dombayci, et al., 2006) investigated the optimization of
external wall insulation thickness for Denizli (southwestern Turkey) weather conditions.
The effects of the energy source types (coal, natural gas, LPG, fuel oil, electricity) on
energy savings and the use of different insulation materials (expanded polystyrene, rock
wool) were analyzed. The difference between the buildings’ heating costs, with and
without the insulation of external walls, was used in a life-cycle cost analysis (LCCA).
Results of the calculations revealed that the life cycle savings are $ 14.09 per square metre
of wall surface area and a very short payback period of 1.43 years for the optimum
insulation-thickness. These results were obtained with coal as the energy source and
expanded polystyrene as the insulating material.
Khaled (Khaled, 2003) comprised two types of roof insulation (polystyrene and fiberglass)
for warm and cold climate conditions. Energy analysis was carried out for a 108 m2 house
in two USA locations: College Station (Texas) and Minneapolis (Minnesota). The
RENCON simulation program (Degelman, et al., 1991) was used to determine annual
heating and cooling energy consumption. Six different insulation resistance levels of the
roof (R5, R10, R15, R20, R25, R30) were examined. In Khaled’s opinion, the most costeffective thermal resistance for polystyrene is R5 and for fiberglass is R10. Besides this,
the author remarked that the payback time of using insulation in a cold climate is shorter
than that of a warm climate and that the best solution for thermal insulation design is the
use of a life-cycle cost analysis rather than the construction budget limitation.
The problem concerning the best insulation level of the envelope of new residential
buildings in 6 Italian climatic zones was studied by Lollini (Lollini, et al., 2006).
Economical analysis was based on two main parameters of investment efficiency: the net
present value (NPV) and the payback rate (PBR). The methodology used in this project
included the following factors: calculation of the optimal insulation thickness, analyses of
market and cost, energy calculation of the reference buildings, calculation for different

1.2 Background and literature review

26

configurations of insulation levels and evaluation of the environmental impact. The EC501
computer code was used to determine the energy consumption for many configurations,
which assumed climatic conditions, selected building characteristics and the insulation
levels. The Lollini at al. study revealed that the better insulated buildings can strongly
reduce the heating energy demand. Moreover, PBR is always shorter than 5 years for the
tower building, and the payback rate is shorter than 8 years for the single-family house.
Persson, with colleagues (Persson, et al., 2006), analyzed the influence of decreasing the
window size facing south and increasing the window size facing north on the energy
consumption of 20 terraced passive houses, which were built outside Gothenburg in
Spring, 2001. DEROB-LTH software (DEROB-LTH, 2005) was used to simulate the
energy demand dynamic conditions over a whole year. Calculations considered different
orientations of buildings and window types. The findings of the simulation showed that it
is possible to enlarge north window areas in order to obtain better conditions in natural
lighting. There is also an optimal south window area, which is smaller than the designed
size of the existing terraced passive houses.

1.2.4 Modelling and designing solar domestic hot water systems
Solar radiation can be converted into thermal and electric energy. In the last two decades a
large-scale development of solar domestic hot water systems has been observed, even in
cold climates. These applications may provide between 40 % to 70 % annual DHW
demand and even 100 % during summer months. A typical SDHW heater is made up of
solar panels, storage tanks and supplemental heat sources.
There are two alternative types of solar collectors for heating water. The most popular in
Europe are flat plate panels which unfortunately have a low efficiency performance and
high energy losses during winter. A typical conversion device is made up of metal or
plastic casing, insulation, a glass or plastic cover and an absorber plate. The collector heats
up a circulating fluid. Tube solar water heaters have a quite different structure. They are
constructed of a series of annealed glass tubes with an integrated metal absorber plate.
There is a vacuum between the inner and outer glass tubes.
European Standard (EN12975-2, 2007) introduced a simple calculation method for the
estimation of solar collector efficiency ηSC. The value of ηSC depends on six parameters
and is defined by:

η

η 0 − a1

θM −θ A
G

− a2

(θ M − θ A )2
G

,

where:
η0 – zero-loss collector efficiency (conversion factor),

(1.11)

1.2 Background and literature review

27

a1, a2 – thermal transmittance (loss) coefficients,
G – solar irradiation,
θM – collector mean temperature,
θA – ambient air temperature.
Consequently, the solar collector power PSC is obtained by the following relation:

η SC AG ,

(1.12)

where A is an area of the solar collector absorber.
The value of solar radiation strongly depends on the time of day and the year. For this
reason, it is necessary to use storage tanks and auxiliary heating units. Photothermal
conversion of solar energy can be carried out as an active or a passive solution. The basic
schemes of SDHW systems are presented in Fig. 1.4 – Fig. 1.7.

Storage tank

DHW supply

cold water
solar
collector

Fig. 1.4: Connection diagram of thermosyphon SDHW with two separate loops.

1.2 Background and literature review

28

Storage tank

DHW supply

cold water
solar
collector

Fig. 1.5: Connection diagram of thermosyphon SDHW with open water loop.

The passive systems do not include any mechanical devices, but are used mostly in
moderate and hot climate regions.

solar
collector

Auxiliary heat source

Storage tank

DHW supply

cold water

Fig. 1.6: Connection diagram of active SDHW system that is coupled with supplementary heater.

1.2 Background and literature review

29

Auxiliary heat source
solar
collector

DHW supply

Storage tank

~

cold water
Fig. 1.7: Connection diagram of active SDHW system with separate supplementary heater.

The closed-loop active systems are recommended in colder climates because they have
high efficiency and can operate throughout the year.
The complexity of the energy conversion effect and the dependence of the solar radiation
rate currently often cause problems in designing large-scale applications. Computer
simulations carried out for the full annual operating period may help to optimize the area
of solar collectors and the volume of storage tanks. Additionally, this type of analysis is
used to estimate energy production by photothermal conversion. The review of the newest
research projects that has focused on the modelling and experimental testing of DHW
systems integrated with solar panels is presented below.
A complex overview of the main tendency in modelling and designing in simulation of the
solar heating process was carried out by Nafey (Nafey, 2005). In order to systematize this
problem, the author classified methods, algorithms, techniques and computer programs.
Two main types of simulation programs were distinguished: special purpose (on-off
programs) and general-purpose (modular programs). The author created a simplified flow
diagram for the simulation of the solar heating process performance as shown in Fig. 1.8.
Each block represents a separate processing unit and the arrow lines represent possible unit
connections with a pipe system.
FEED 1

UNIT A

UNIT B

UNIT C
FEED 2

Fig. 1.8: Flow chart of Nafey (2005), which shows the sequence of actions within the simulation of the
solar heating process.

1.2 Background and literature review

30

The exergy concept and the use of a new feature of the visual programming with
comfortable interfaces were mentioned as developments in the simulation of solar heating
processes in the future.
Kulkarni, with co-workers (Kulkarni, et al., 2007), presented a methodology in the design
space approach for the synthesis, analysis and optimization of solar water heating systems.
The design space in this concept is obtained by tracing constant solar fraction lines on a
collector area versus the storage volume diagram. Results of the calculation showed that a
minimum and maximum storage volume for a given solar fraction and an area of collector
exists. Apart from that, it can be observed that a minimum and maximum collector area for
a fixed solar fraction and storage volume exists. Benefits of the energy savings of the
SDHW system were determined using the economical objective function based on annual
life cycle costs. The methodology proposed by Kulkarni and co-workers can be used in
many different solar thermal configurations, as well as in retrofit cases.
Furbo and Shah (Furbo, et al., 2003) examined the influence of a glass cover with
antireflection surfaces on the thermal performance of solar heating systems and the
efficiency of solar panels. Two glass plates were compared. One of them was covered by
an antireflection layer. Measurement of surface transmittances was performed for different
incidence angles. The dependence of the incidence angle on the transmittance of the
antireflection surfaces was increased by 5–9 %. The influences in increasing solar collector
efficiency by 4–6 % are due to the antireflection. The yearly simulation of the thermal
performance of solar systems revealed that the energy produced by a solar collector
increased by about 12 % using antireflection surfaces, if the mean solar collector fluid
temperature is 60°C. We can obtain a 20 % savings for fluid temperature equal to 100°C.
A discharge process from different levels in solar storage tanks was investigated by Furbo
(Furbo a, et al., 2005) (Furbo b, et al., 2005). They tested two identical small low-flow
SDHW systems which contained standard mantle tanks. The difference between the tanks
lay in that first one was equipped with a PEX pipe for hot water draw-off from the very top
of the tank and the second had an additional PEX pipe placed in the middle of the device.
Auxiliary energy sources were used as electric heating elements in both cases. The
experiment was carried out during a 6-week-period with a draw-off temperature of 50°C
and for 7 weeks with a draw-off temperature of 47°C. The Mantlsim model, which was
developed at the Technical University of Denmark by Furbo and Knudsen (Furbo, et al.,
2004), was used to analyze two low-flow storage systems. Simulations were carried out
with the use of weather data from the Danish Test Reference Year. The findings of the
study indicated that the best level of the second draw-off is in the middle of the tank and
that the increase in the thermal performance by the second draw-off level is about 6 %.
The application of the transparent insulation material (TIM) in minimizing top heat losses
of solar water heaters was proposed by Chaurasia and Twidell (Chaurasia, et al., 2001).
Two identical solar water heaters were tested in order to determine the role of transparent

1.2 Background and literature review

31

insulation. The TIM cover was placed on the absorbing surface of one unit to prevent heat
losses during the night period. The insulation was made of polycarbonate material
consisting of a honeycomb construction with a square section of 3 mm on 3 mm tubes and
100 mm long. The TIM glazing was found to be quite effective as compared to glass
glazing SWH. Experiments showed water at higher temperatures of 8.5°C to 9.5°C by the
next morning thanks to the use of transparent insulation materials. Also, it was found that
the efficiency of solar storage water heaters was 39.8 % with TIM glazing compared to
15.1 % without this insulation.
A method for determining the performance of solar water heating systems was developed
by Yohanis and co-authors (Yohanis, et al., 2006). If the solar-heated rate is at a settemperature, this approach can be used to determine the number of days each month that
solar heating alone satisfies the needs. The authors maintained that their method is easy to
understand by users without knowledge of solar systems which is different from the solar
fractions approach. The computer analysis tool TRNSYS was used to simulate a domesticscale solar hot water system (Fig. 1.9), which consisted of a solar collector, storage tank,
auxiliary heater and controller.
Auxiliary heater

insulated storage tank

DHW
supply

solar
collector

controller

Fig. 1.9: SDHW system, which was analyzed by Yohanis at al. (2006).

~

cold water supply

1.2 Background and literature review

32

In calculations, typical meteorological years (TMY) for Belfast (Northern Ireland) were
applied. Finally, it was concluded that for a lower normalized number of days, solar
fraction is less defined than for a higher number of days and high solar fraction does not
necessarily mean that the storage tank water temperature reached a set temperature.
Norton and Lo (Norton, et al., 2006) discussed technical developments in solar thermal
applications. They presented the taxonomy of principle generic tracking and stationary
solar thermal collectors. It is stated that a thermal characteristic of solar collectors can be
seen, shown in Fig. 1.10, and that it is impossible to select the universally best solar panel.
The authors quoted the following example “in low temperature applications in areas with
high insulation, an unglazed collector with a plastic absorber resistant to ultra-violet
radiation may be the optimal choice. On the other hand, under high insulation conditions,
solar thermal electricity generation requires the use of evacuated tubes located at the
focus of line-axis tracking parabolic reflectors; direct steam generation takes place in the
absorber tube which is coated with a high temperature solar selective absorber”.

ηSC

1,0
0,9
0,8
0,7

Plastic absorber
Air collector
Plat plate collector
Evacuated tube collector

0,6
0,5
0,4
0,3
0,2
0,1
0,0
0,00

0,02

0,04

0,06

0,08

0,10

0,12
2

(θ M -θ A )/G [Km /W]

0,14

0,16

0,18

0,20

Fig. 1.10: Hottel-Whillier-Bliss performance characteristic of low and medium temperature solar collectors.

An alternative way to solve problems concerning the simulation of solar energy conversion
systems is the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) technology.
Kalogirou and co-workers (Kalogirou, et al., 1999) tested an ANN in order to evaluate the
performance characteristics of solar domestic water heating systems. The ANN test
database included 30 known cases varying from collector areas between 1.81 m2 and 4.38
m2. Apart from that, open and closed systems, horizontal and vertical storage tanks, which
operate in variety of weather conditions, were investigated. The energy extracted from the
SDHW system and the rises in temperature in the storage tank were the results of
calculations based on an ANN algorithm. The ANN method can be successfully used even

1.2 Background and literature review

33

in the simulation of completely unknown systems because the authors obtained predictions
within 7.1 % and 9.7 %.
The results of computer simulations of solar domestic hot water systems, based on the time
marching model, were obtained by Bojic (Bojic, et al., 2002). The analyzed system, which
was used for a typical Yugoslavian family, consisted of a flat-plate solar panel having an
area of 3 m2, a storage tank (volume ranged from 60 l to 400 l), an auxiliary heater and a
mixing device. A computer tool called TEMP was created which can be used to design and
operate SDHW systems. Estimates showed, among other things, that when the volume of a
storage tank is larger, the fraction of solar radiation is less sensitive to a variation in the
operation parameters of the system.
Furbo and co-workers (Furbo a, et al., 2005) investigated small systems in which domestic
water may be heated by solar collectors or by an auxiliary electric heat source. Three
different tanks (one traditional and two smart), shown in Fig. 1.11, were experimentally
and theoretically examined in the same operating conditions.
electric
heating
element

side arm

from
solar
collector

to solar
collector

cold water

electric
heating
element

from
solar
collector

to solar
collector

cold water

hot water
electric
heating
element

electric
heating
element

plastic
pipe

from
solar
collector

to solar
collector

cold water

hot water

Fig. 1.11: Three solar tanks investigated by Furbo at. al (2005).

hot water

1.2 Background and literature review

34

The experimental systems were supplied by 3 m2 solar collectors and by horizontal and
vertical electric heating elements. Investigations revealed that the thermal performance of
SDHW systems based on smart solar tanks is 5 % – 35 % higher compared to traditional
systems.
An analysis of heat transfer in a vertical mantle tank, as illustrated in Fig. 1.12, was the
main goal of the Shah, L.J. project (Shah, 2000). The main advantages of the mantle tank
are a large heat transfer area and an effective fluid distribution over the tank wall.
DHW supply

Storage tank

electric heating element

solar
collector

cold water supply

Fig. 1.12: Sketch of a solar domestic hot water system analyzed by Shah L.J. (2000), which is typical in
Denmark and Holland.

The CFD technique was used for the three-dimensional flow simulation in a mantle tank.
The results of the calculations were validated by comparing the measurements and good
agreement was reached. Based on the CFD simulations, Shah L.J. (Shah, 2000) introduced
heat transfer correlations for the analyzed systems.
Investigations of the SDHW systems are mainly based on energy balance. But there are not
many works which utilize exergetic analysis. Gunerhan and Hepbasli (Gunerhan, et al.,
2007) used the exergy approach to model a system, which consisted of a flat solar collector
(2 m2 aperture area), a storage tank as a heat exchanger and a circulation pump. A
characteristic performance of the system was evaluated based on the measurements of
mass flow rates, water temperatures, solar flux, wind velocity and ambient atmospheric
pressure. The experiment was made at the Ege University (Turkey). Estimates indicated
that the exergy efficiency varied in the following ranges: 2,02 % – 3,37 % for the solar
panel, 10,0 % – 16,67 % for the circulation pump and 16 % – 51,72 % for the heat
exchanger at a reference state fluid temperature equal to 32.77°C.

1.2 Background and literature review

35

Strategies (costs and feasibility) of solar energy conversion based on open loop, flat-plate
solar collector systems were studied by Badescu (Badescu, 2008). The optimization
problem was solved by using a direct shooting approach - trajectory optimization by
mathematical programming (TOMP) developed by Kraft (Kraft, 1994). A registry-type,
flat-plate solar collector and meteorological database for Bucharest were used in this study.
Simulations were performed during a one-year operating period and good agreement was
observed in calculations with the measurements available in literature. Estimates obtained
for the considered system indicated that the maximum exergetic efficiency was usually less
than 3 %.
The next study of Badescu (Badescu, 2008) was also conducted to determine the optimal
flow control in a closed loop flat plate solar collector, which cooperated with a water
storage tank. The following design configurations were analyzed: a tank with one
serpentine and a tank with two serpentines. In both cases, a fully mixed regime in the
storage tanks was considered. In the present project, the author implemented an indirect
optimal control technique based on Pontryagin’s maximum principle. As it turned out, the
first considered system performed better than the second configuration. There is one
limitation in the storage system with one serpentine. It should not operate during the winter
period in regions with higher latitudes. Badescu (Badescu, 2008) stated that the optimal
operation strategy consists of two jump steps up and two jump steps down between zero
and the maximum rate of fluid flow in the primary circuit of the storage tank.
Biaou and Bernier (Biaou, et al., 2008) carried out research in the various ways of
domestic hot water production for two climate conditions: Montreal and Los Angeles. The
following renewable energy sources were examined:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

ƒ

conventional electric hot water tank,
ground-source heat pump (GSHP) desuperheater (refrigerant-to-water heat
exchanger) combined with a regular electric hot water tank,
SDHW system composed of flat plate solar collectors, an external heat exchanger, a
solar water storage tank and a regular auxiliary electric water tank, two circulators
and a temperature controller (Fig. 1.13),
heat pump water heater (HPWH) indirectly coupled to a space conditioning
ground-source heat pump.

Four alternative systems were applied in zero-net energy homes (ZNEH), consisting of a
well-insulated two-storey 156 m2 residence with an unheated half-basement.

1.2 Background and literature review

backup tank

controller

external heat
exchanger

electric heaters

DHW
supply

storage tank

solar
collector

36

cold water

Fig. 1.13: SDHW system studied by Biaou and Bernier (2008).

The main examined components were modeled using a TRSNYS and IISIBAT interface.
The results of the simulations explicitly indicated that the system with solar collectors was
the best solution for the production of DHW in zero-net energy homes.
The main goal of the Cardinale and co-workers (Cardinale, et al., 2003) study was an
economical optimization of low-flow solar domestic hot water plants. Domestic hot-water
production was 500 litres a day for a four-person Italian family. The analyzed system, as
shown in Fig. 1.14, consisted of a solar collector (1.9 m2 surface area), a 2.16 m height
storage tank, two pumps powered by photovoltaic panels and an auxiliary heater. The
TRNSYS code was used to estimate the thermo–energetic performances of the solar plant.

heat
exchanger

auxiliary heater to load

Storage tank

solar
collector

PV pump

PV pump

Fig. 1.14: Schematic sketch of the system studied by Cardinale at al. (2003).

from main

1.2 Background and literature review

37

Simulations indicated that there are many advantages for the considered solar system in
comparison with the utilization of electric energy. Moreover, the authors concluded that
the tested plant can be clearly justified when fossil fuel consumption is dramatically
reduced.
The Dahm, with co-workers (Dahm, et al., 1998), tested system, which consisted of an
electrical auxiliary storage heater with a volume of 750 litres, internal heat exchangers and
tempering valves. Fig. 1.15 presents four different storage considered systems.
Investigations were carried out on a statistically generated six-day test sequence and a solar
collector simulator under conditions similar to those in Sweden.

1

1

1
2

2

Configuration 1

Configuration 2

1

1

1

1

3

Configuration 3

3

Configuration 4

Fig. 1.15: The schematic layout of the four configurations considered in the Dahm (1998) experiments.

An acceptable accuracy rate (relative and absolute difference) between the measured and
calculated energy transfer for solar and load heat exchangers was obtained. The authors
concluded that when using a real weather database, the solar fraction is about 10 % lower
than the measured value based on the considered six-day test system for the summer
period.

1.2 Background and literature review

38

Mather, with co-workers (Mather, et al., 2002), investigated a SDHW system, shown in
Fig. 1.16, with a multi-tank configuration and a total volume of water larger than 2000 l.
The authors have proposed an arrangement of small tanks that are serially connected by
immersed-coil heat exchangers. Experimental tests demonstrated a thermodynamically
advantageous ‘thermal diode’ effect that the examined system can achieve. A model for a
considered tank configuration based on a reversion-elimination algorithm of Marshall and
Li (Marshall, et al., 1991) and Newton (Newton, et al., 1995) was developed. Experimental
and analytical modelling proved to be an economical advantage of the thermal energy
storage based on multi-tank systems over a single circulating tank system. The authors
listed the reduction of installation and engineering costs as the main advantages of the
developed configuration.
hot fluid to load

solar
collector

tank 1

tank 2

hottest
tank

heat
load
tank 3

tank 4

coldest
tank

cold fluid to collector

Fig. 1.16: A schematic view of a multi-tank thermal storage system investigated by Mather at al. (2002).

A control strategy of the solar domestic hot water system with a mantle exchanger
manufactured in Switzerland was investigated by Prud'homme and Gillet (Prud'homme, et
al., 2001). Three smaller electrical elements with different lengths as an auxiliary heater
were used in the storage tank under consideration. A principle of a developed optimization
algorithm is explained in Fig. 1.17.
ESTIMATIONS
Weather forcasts:
- solar radiation,
- ambient temperature.
Users’ needs:
- tapped water.

OPTIMAL INPUTS

MODEL-BASED
OPTYMIZER

Flow rate in the collector loop
Power supplies of the auxiliary heaters

Fig. 1.17: A scheme illustrating a control principle introduced by Prud'homme and Gillet (2001).

1.2 Background and literature review

39

The authors stated that an advanced control strategy (structural and control level), coupled
with a considered storage tank, can lead to a significant increase in the solar fraction and a
higher degree of comfort. However, an on/off control system can be more suitable from a
computational point of view.

1.2.5 Summary of literature review
The literature review shows that the impact of solar radiation on the thermal behavior of
buildings is very complicated and still under investigation by scientists. The last decade
has brought a large amount of research on particular aspects of this problem. But according
to the author’s knowledge, there is still not a comprehensive study which includes the wide
scope of the current dissertation research. According to bibliographic searches, one can say
that using detailed analysis techniques, i.e. the energy simulation method, may certainly
lead to an accurate estimation of the dependence of building performance on solar
radiation. The newest simulation software includes: annual weather data-bases that contain
solar radiation, wind speed and direction, humidity and air temperature. This option
enables one to model weather conditions throughout the year as well as during a particular
period with very short time steps. It is especially important due to the strong dependence of
solar radiation on time. There are some works that have applied simplified methods, but
these types of steady-state procedures only give approximate results that may be seen in
preliminary studies. Therefore, in order to prove the thesis of this dissertation, it was
decided to apply the detailed simulation method based on the dynamic heat balance of
isothermal zones. As scientific literature shows, it is necessary to integrate balancing
techniques with CFD algorithms to improve the accuracy of the calculation results. Mainly,
this coupled method is recommended for analyzing large spaces and structures with more
complicated ventilation air-paths. Considering a small volume of isothermal zones, the
author has decided to not take the CFD analysis into account. In the current work, it is
assumed that a single apartment is a base energy balance cell. Furthermore, the detailed
simulation method was chosen, as recommended in the literature, as the best tool for the
research of active solar domestic hot water, heating, ventilation and air conditioning
systems. Simultaneous modelling of building thermal behavior and the operation of plant
and HVAC systems was employed by the author in order to achieve simulation results with
physical reality.

1.3 Research goals and hypothesis

40

1.3 Research goals and hypothesis
The current thesis framework and scope was formulated based on knowledge and
experiences gathered during the design time of high-end apartment buildings in Hannover.
The project, called VASATI 2.0, has been realized by Wohnungsgenossenschaft
Gartenheim eG, architecture office Peter Lassen, engineering office Udo Sprengel and
Wienerberger in cooperation with the Technical University of Bialystok.

1.3.1 Scientific goals
The main objectives pursued in this thesis are the following:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

determination of an optimal value of a window-to-wall ratio that leads to minimum
energy consumption for space heating,
testing the influence of thermal and optical properties of glazing systems on the
thermal performance of buildings,
analyzing how a type of glazing systems may influence the thermal comfort in the
considered houses,
optimization of a solar domestic hot water system,
experimental determination of the thermal performance of a POROTON-T9-30,0
brick in order to calibrate an energy-simulation tool for buildings.

1.3.2 Hyphothesis
Based on literature review and preliminary analysis, the following hypothesis is proposed:
Through the analysis of the influence of the solar radiation in the energy balance of a
multifamily building it is possible to determine an optimal value of window-to-wall ratio
that leads to a minimum of energy consumption for space heating.

2.1 Building energy simulation software

41

2 Research methods
In order to prove the hypothesis, three basic research methods were chosen. Firstly,
detailed literature searches were conducted to identify current published knowledge
concerning the impact of solar radiation on thermal behavior in buildings. Computer
simulation techniques, which grow in popularity each year, were selected as the next step
in our investigation. Additionally, experimental investigations were carried out for the
determination of the thermal performance of the considered external wall and then for
calibrating building simulation software.

2.1 Building energy simulation software
The main goal of this project was to determine the thermal performance of the dwelling
house. The most popular and advanced simulation software that can be used for this type of
analysis for residential and office buildings are the following: BLAST, BSim, DeST, DOE2.1E, ECOTECT, Ener-Win, Energy Express, Energy-10, EnergyPlus, eQUEST, ESP-r,
IDA ICE, IES/VES, HAP, HEED, PowerDomus, SUNREL, Tas, TRACE and TRNSYS.
The EnergyPlus V3-0, as a verified and fully-validated tool, was chosen from a wide
variety of simulation programs. This software contains structured, modular code models
combining heat and mass transfer, simulating multizone airflow and operating conditions
of heating, cooling and ventilation systems in all kinds of buildings for long periods. The
modularity structure of EnergyPlus and links to other programming elements are shown in
Fig. 2.1.

2.1 Building energy simulation software

42

DATA

DESCRIBE BUILDING

DATA

DATA

BUILDING DESCRIPTION

ENERGYPLUS
SIMULATION
MANAGER

WINDOW 5
AIRFLOW
NETWORK
GROUND

HEAT

HEAT AND

BUILDING

SPARK

MASS BALANCE

SYSTEMS

POLLUTION

SIMULATION

THIRD-PARTY USER
INTERFACES

MODELS

SIMULATION

ON-SIDE POWER

TRANSFER

FUTURE MODULES

FUTURE MODULES

ZONE CONDITIONS

DATA

DATA

UPDATE FEEDBACK

CALCULATION RESULTS

DATA

DISPLAY RESULTS

Fig. 2.1: Network structure of EnergyPlus by getting started with EnergyPlus (2007)

EnergyPlus integrates all the following aspects of the simulation process: loads, systems
and plants. Fig. 2.2 depicts connections and relations between these essential parts of
energy modelling for buildings.
ZONE EQUIP.
MODULE

SKY MODEL
MODULE

SHADING
MODULE
DAYLIGHTING
MODULE

ENERGYPLUS INTEGRATED SOLUTION MANAGER
SURFACE HEAT
BALANCE
MANAGER

AIR HEAT
BALANCE
MANAGER

WINDOW
GLASS
MODULE
CTF CALCULATION
MODULE

AIRFLOW NETWORK
MODULE

BUILDING
SYSTEMS
SIMULATION
MANAGER

AIR
LOOP
MODULE
PLANT LOOP
MODULE

CONDEN-SER
LOOP
MODULE
PHOTOVOLTAIC
MODULE

Fig. 2.2: Basic overview of the integration of internal elements structure by getting started with EnergyPlus
(2007)

2.1 Building energy simulation software

43

In EnergyPlus, the scheme of calculations, shown in Fig. 2.3, is based on a series of
elements connected by air or water loops. Each fluid circuit has supply and demand sides.
The Gauss-Seidell scheme is used to integrate, control and solve mass and energy balance
equations for all loops.

ZONE

SYSTEM

PLANT

< FLUID LOOPS >
Fig. 2.3: Simultaneous solution scheme used in EnergyPlus

A concept of heat and mass transfer modelling in EnergyPlus is based on the following
balancing equation for each analyzed zone.

qCONV − IL + qCONV −S + qMIX + qINF + qSYS ,

q

(2.1)

where:

qZi = CZi

dθ Zi
dt

– energy stored in air inside control volume,

i = nl

qCONV − IL = ∑ q L ,i
i =1

– convective internal heat loads,

i = ns

qCONV − S = ∑ hi Ai (θ Si − θ Zi ) – convective heat transfer from the internal surfaces,
i =1
i = nz

qMIX = ∑ G& i c p (θ zj − θ Zi ) – heat transfer between zones due to air mixing,
i =1

qINF = G& INF c p (θe − θ Zi ) – heat transfer due to infiltration,
qSYS = G& SUPc p (θ SUP − θ Zi ) – energy provided to the zone by the ventilation system,
CZi – heat capacitance of air inside zone,

θ Zi

hi








Ai

– heat transfer surface area,

t
nl

q L ,i
ns

temperature of air inside zone,
time,
number of heat loads,
internal heat load by convection,
number of heat transfer surfaces,
convective heat transfer coefficient,

2.1 Building energy simulation software

θ Si
nz

G& i
cp

44

– internal surface temperature,
– number of adjacent zones,
– mass flow rate of air transferred between zones,
– air specific heat at constant pressure,

θ zj – temperature of air inside adjacent zone,
G& INF

θe
G& SUP

– mass flow rate of infiltrated air,
– external air temperature,
– mass flow rate of supply air,

θ SUP – temperature of supply air.
A finite difference approximation of the heat balance equation (2.1), after application of
Euler’s formula provides the relation, is then implemented in the algorithm of the building
energy simulation software.

CZi

θ Zit − θ Zit −δt
Δt

i = nz
⎛ i = ns

+ θ Zit ⎜ ∑ hi Ai + ∑ G& i c p + G& INF c p + G& SUP c p ⎟
i =1
⎝ i =1


i = nl

i = ns

i = nz

i =1

i =1

i =1

(2.2)

∑ qL,i + G& SUP c pθ SUP + ∑ hi Aiθ Sit −δt + ∑ G& i c pθ Zjt −δt + G& INF c pθ et −δt .

In EnergyPlus, the heat conduction through the walls is simulated by widely-used
conduction transfer function (CTF) methods. On the account of linear relationships and the
constant values of coefficients applied in this approach, the CPU time consumption can be
greatly reduced. The basic form of a solution is shown by the conduction transfer function
for indoor is described by Eq. (2.3) and Eq. (2.4) and suits outside heat flux.
i = nz

i = nz

i = nq

j =1

j =1

j =1

i = nz

i = nz

i = nq

j =1

j =1

j =1

′′ (t ) = − Z oθ Sit − ∑ Z jθ Sit − jδ + Yeθ Set + ∑ Y jθ Set − jδ + ∑ Φ j q′Si′t − jδ ,
qCONi

′′ (t ) = −Yoθ Sit − ∑ Y jθ Sit − jδ + X eθ Set + ∑ X jθ Set − jδ + ∑ Φ j q′Se′t − jδ .
qCONe
where:
Xj, Yj, Zj – outside, cross and indoor CFT coefficients,
Φ – flux CFT coefficient.

(2.3)

(2.4)

2.1 Building energy simulation software

45

The state space method is implemented in EnergyPlus for calculating conduction transfer
functions under transient conditions. This technique uses a finite difference grid for
building elements and eliminates the determination of nodal temperatures.
Heat balance on the faces of external and internal zone surfaces (Fig. 2.4) is modeled in
EnergyPlus by using three main components: free and forced convection, conduction and
short- and longwave radiation.

Longwave radiation - qLWR,e

Longwave radiation - qLWR,i

external environment

Convection - qCONV,e

internal environment

Convection - qCONV,i

Conduction-qCON

Shortwave radiation - qSWR,e

Shortwave radiation - qSWR,i

Fig. 2.4: Heat balance on inside and outside faces of the zone surfaces

The following equation illustrates the heat exchange on an inside surface:
CON

qLWR,ex + qLWR,eq + qSWR,l + qSWR,si + qCONV ,

(2.5)

where:
qCON –
qLWR,ex –
qLWR,eq –
qSWR,l –
qSWR,si –
qCONV –

conduction flux,
longwave radiation flux between inside surfaces,
longwave radiation flux from equipment,
shortwave radiation flux from lights,
solar radiation flux,
convection flux.

The heat balance on the external side of building walls is calculated as follows:

′ ,sky + q′LWR
′ ,air ,
′′ = q′SWR
′ ,se + qCONV
′′ + q′LWR
′ , gr + q′LWR
qCON
where:

′ , se
q′SWR

– direct and indirect solar radiation flux,

(2.6)

2.1 Building energy simulation software

(

′ , gr = εσFgr θ Se4 − θ gr4
q′LWR

)

46

– longwave radiation flux exchanged with the ground,

– surface emissivity,
σ – Stefan-Boltzmann constant,
4
4
= εσFsky θ Se − θ sky – longwave radiation flux exchanged with the sky,
ε

′ ,sky
q′LWR

′ ,air = εσFair
q′LWR

(


4
Se

4
− θ air

)
)

– longwave radiation flux exchanged with the ambient air.

In EnergyPlus, solar gain through the transparent structure that depends on direct and
indirect solar radiation is calculated by using the following equation:



A
′ = α ⎜⎜ I BR cosθ SUN + I SDR FS − S + I G FS −G ⎟⎟ ,
q′SG
ASURF



(2.7)

where:

α
IBR

θ

ASUN
ASURF
ISDR
FS-S
IG
FS-G











solar absorption of the surface,
intensity of beam radiation,
angle of incidence of the sun's rays
sunlit area,
area of the surface,
intensity of sky indirect radiation,
angle factor between the surface and the sky,
intensity of ground reflected diffuse radiation,
angle factor between the surface and the ground,

FS −S =

1 + cosφ
,
2

(2.8)

FS −G =

1 − cosφ
,
2

(2.9)

φ

– solar azimuth angle.

The shadowing calculations are based on two procedures: The Groth and Lokmanhekim
(Groth, et al., 1969) coordinate transformation method and the Walton (Walton, 1978)
(Walton, 1983) shadow overlap method. These EnergyPlus procedures were adopted from
BLAST and TARP software.

2.2 Experimental research methods

47

2.2 Experimental research methods
2.2.1 Experimental apparatus
A schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus and instrumentation is shown in Fig.
2.5.
9

7
2

5

~

θin

6

3 θ
h
θout

θ1

θ2

1

θ3

θ4
θc

8
4

Fig. 2.5: Sketch of the experimental set-up.

The tested Poroton-T9 (1) is insulated with 15 cm polystyrene foam sheets and 5 cm
mineral wool (2). An expanded chamber (3) is fitted tightly to the brick. This construction
is connected with the axial fan (4) via plastic ducts. They are joined in a close-loop circuit.
An electronic frequency controller (5), which operates the fan, is used to adjust the air flow
rate. The circulating air is heated by an electrical resistance heater (6). A digital PID
thermo-regulator (7) is used to control the air temperature with an accuracy of ± 0.3 K. A
sensor of the temperature regulator is placed inside the expanded chamber (3). The
volumetric rate of air flow is measured by the vane-anemometer (8), which is mounted
inside the outlet duct. The temperature is measured by Pt100 resistance sensors and the
results are recorded by a 20-channel data logger (9). Apart from that, the thermal
anemometer is used to measure the air velocity inside the chamber and the temperature
field on the external surface of the insulation is monitored by a calibrated infrared

2.2 Experimental research methods

48

thermometer. The experimental set-up is particularly designed to simulate different
convection heat transfer conditions on both sides of the tested object.

2.2.2 Experimental methods
The main effect of the experimental analysis is to determine the thermal performance of
the considered external wall. Some results of the investigations can be used to calibrate the
building simulation software EnergyPlus.
Normally, in order to examine the thermal behavior of building materials, the temperature
difference on both sides of the sample is simulated. The resultant temperature response
depends on the physical properties of the hollow brick. The tested building material is
characterized by a large thermal-storage capacity. For this reason, the data logger ports are
scanned in 60-second intervals and the recording of the data is stopped when the
temperature on the colder brick side does not change during 30 minutes.
The experimental cases were conducted for three temperature differences: 30°C, 25°C and
20°C. The air temperature inside the laboratory was stabilized with an electric convector
heater with ± 0.3°C accuracy and the relative humidity was varied between 35 % and 38 %
during the experimental sessions.
A heat flux qsf′′ on the hot face of the brick was determined based on the following heat
balance equation:

V&a ρa c p (θin − θout ) − ql = q′sf′ Asf .

(2.10)

The rate of heat loss ql through the chamber walls was estimated based on the temperature
measurements on the external surface of the insulation. The value of the heat flux qsf′′ was
obtained after transformation of Eq. (2.10).

q′sf′ =

V&a ρ a c p (θ in − θ out ) − ql
Asf

(2.11)
.

Eq. (2.12) was applied to calculate the thermal resistance Rb of Poroton-T9 and based on
Eq. (2.13) its equivalent thermal conductivity keq at steady-state conditions was
determined.

Rb =

θ sf , h − θ sf ,c
q′sf′ ,∞

(2.12)
.

2.2 Experimental research methods

k eq =

δb
Rb

,

49

(2.13)

where θ sf ,h was measured on the hot side, θ sf ,c on the cold side of the material’s surface
and q′sf′ ,∞ was obtained in steady-state.
The next part of the study was dedicated to the unsteady tests. The temperature variations
measured inside the sample were compared with the results of the numerical simulations in
order to check if the heat capacity of the brick components was correctly estimated. A
computational model was used (Fig. 2.6), which was implemented in the Fluent code by
Miroslaw Zukowski according to EN 1745.

Fig. 2.6: Sketch of the brick model developed by Miroslaw Zukowski.

The experiment consisted of changing the specific heat capacity under numerical
simulations and agreed with physical reality at an acceptable accuracy rate.
The final results of experimental and numerical testing are presented in the third chapter of
this dissertation and the detailed information about all the experiment runs was submitted
as a paper to the Energy&Buildings Journal.
Apart from that, it should be noted that the thermal resistance of the wall Req,w, which
consisted of a Poroton-T9 and a mortar layer, can be treated as two resistances in a parallel
circuit. Thus it is possible to apply the following equation:

1

Req,w

=

1
1
+
.
Rb Rm

(2.14)

2.2 Experimental research methods

50

Thus,
Req , w =

Rb + Rm
,
Rb Rm

where:
Hb – brick height,
Hm – thickness of mortar joints between bricks,
Rm =

δm
km

.

(2.15)

2.2 Experimental research methods

51

3 Results and discussion
A multi-storey flat building, marked in red colour on Fig. 3.1, is the object of the current
project. It is situated in the central area of Hannover, Germany.

Fig. 3.1: Building location plan.

A rendered view of the energy-saving housing estate is shown in Fig. 3.2.

Fig. 3.2: The view of future buildings (east side) prepared by architect Peter Lassen.

Detailed plans of the building substructures and the front/backside elevation views are
found in APPENDIX 1.

3.1 Building description

52

The main goal of this part of the dissertation is to determine the thermal performance of the
analyzed dwelling house.
The current simulation is divided into five sections and is described in the following
sequence:


determination of the thermal performance of the building,



determination and comparison of the gain and loss of thermal energy through
building fenestration,



determination of the thermal environment in the apartments during the warm
period,



modelling of a domestic solar water heating system, which has the following
components: tube collectors, storage tanks and auxiliary water heater.

3.1 Building description
The analyzed five-storey house consists of nineteen apartments, a staircase and a storeroom. The building envelope is designed for the optimal utilization of solar radiation
energy during the heating season.

3.1.1 Description of building substructures and HVAC systems
External walls

The external walls are designed as a three-layer structure. A load-bearing wall is
constructed of ceramic hollow-bricks POROTON Block-T 24,0-1,2 (Fig. 3.3). A new kind
of building material POROTON-T9 (Fig. 3.4) is used to make the curtain walls. The
traditional hollows are filled with a thermal insulation material called perlite. Thanks to
this procedure a very low value of thermal conductivity is obtained.

Fig. 3.3: POROTON Block-T 24,0-1,2.

3.1 Building description

53

Fig. 3.4: POROTON-T9.

A detailed characteristic of these two types of bricks is presented in Table 3.1.
Table 3.1:

Properties of Wienerberger hollow-bricks.
Dimensions
L×W×H
[cm]

Type

Weight of
one brick
[kg]

Density
[kg/m3]

POROTON BLOCK-T
24,0-1,2

37.3×24.0×23.8

21.5

1009.12

POROTON-T9-30,0

24.8×30.0×24.9

12.1

653.15

The steady-state temperature measurements (described in the previous chapter) were used
to determine the thermal resistance and the equivalent heat conductivity of the POROTONT9-30,0 brick. The results of the three temperature differences between the brick sides are
summarized in Table 3.2.
Table 3.2:

Thermal properties of the POROTON-T9.
Rb

keq

[m2K/W]

[W/mK]

20

3.29

0.0912

30

3.11

0.0965

40

3.36

0.0893

θh – θc

3.1 Building description

54

Numerical calculations gave the similar results i.e. Rb=3,205 m2K/W and keq=0,0936
W/mK. The average value of the equivalent heat conductivity keq=0,0923 W/mK and the
equivalent value of specific heat capacity equal 855,1 J/kgK were adopted in the present
study to develop a model in the EnergyPlus environment.
The load-bearing walls and the curtain walls were separated by a 2 cm layer of mineral
wool in accordance with construction requirements. Of course the interior and exterior
surfaces of all walls received a coat of plaster.

Roof

The outside roof insulation was made of Polystyrol with an average thickness of 35 cm and
a thermal conductivity of 0.035 W/mK. The load-bearing layer will be formed by 20 cm
reinforced concrete with an average thermal conductivity equal to 1.7 W/mK.

Floor/ceiling

The construction of the floor/ceiling slab was designed in three layers:


floating floor with a thickness of 5 – 6 cm and a thermal conductivity of 1.35
W/mK,



footfall sound insulation and Polystyrol insulation with a thickness of 8 cm and a
thermal conductivity of 0.035 W/mK,



concrete slab with a thickness of 20 cm and a thermal conductivity of 1.7 W/mK.

Basement ceiling

The basement ceiling consisted of the following layers:


floating floor with a thickness of 5 – 6 cm and a thermal conductivity of 1.35
W/mK,



footfall sound insulation and Polystyrol insulation with a thickness of 8 cm and a
thermal conductivity of 0.035 W/mK,



concrete slab with a thickness of 20 cm and a thermal conductivity of 2.3 W/mK,



insulation made of mineral wool with a thickness of 10 cm and a thermal
conductivity of 0.035 W/mK.

3.1 Building description

55

All internal walls received a special kind of machine-sprayed plaster with an average
thickness of 1.5 cm, which contains a high part of crushed clay. The feeling and the
biological data of the inside plaster is very similar to loam rendering. The external walls
got a mineral render with a thickness of 2 – 3 cm, which is very permeable for vapor
diffusion.

Windows

The type of glazing materials used in building construction makes a significant
contribution to the annual energy consumption. For this reason, it was decided to examine
twelve cases of fenestration products. The glazing systems in Case A1/B1 and Case A2/B2
with low-e coatings are recommended for regions with cold climates. Low solar heat gains
and high reflectivity are characteristic for windows in Case A5/B5 and Case A6/B6. This
type of product is a very good choice for fully air-conditioned living spaces. Meanwhile
glazing systems in Case A3/B3 and Case A4/B4 are designed for maximizing heat gain
throughout the heating period and for reducing cooling costs during summer months.
It is planned to use double glazed balcony windows (cases marked with letter A) and tripleglazing system for north and east elevation windows (cases marked with letter B).
For all cases, it is decided to choose Xenon gas-fill on account of the best thermal
insulation properties, which are the result of very low effective conductivity equal to
0.00516 W/mK.
Thermal and optical properties depend on the location of coatings. Therefore, different
configurations of optical filters on a glass surface are analyzed as shown in Fig. 3.5.

Case A1,3,5

Case A2,4,6

Case B1,3,5

inboard glass

gas

internal glass

gas

outboard glass

inboard glass

gas

internal glass

gas

outboard glass

gas

inboard glass

filter location

outboard glass

inboard glass

gas

outboard glass

filter location

Case B2,4,6

Fig. 3.5: Location of a glass coating for the investigated cases.

Table 3.3 shows the detailed characteristics of the proposed glazing systems, which are
prepared based on the publicly available International Glazing Database (IGDB) (2008).

3.1 Building description

56

This database is the collection of spectral optical, thermal and structural data for over 2500
glass materials.
Table 3.3:
Case no.

Mode
FCMFTIR_3,AFG

Case A1

Case A2

Case A3

Case A4

Case A5

Case A6

Xenon

ε2

keff

3.2 0.496 0.331 0.395 0.780 0.158 0.126 0.000 0.840 0.033 1.000
12.7

0.019

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

Xenon

12.7

0.019

CMFTIR_3,AFG

3.2 0.496 0.395 0.331 0.780 0.126 0.158 0.000 0.033 0.840 1.000

FTiPS_3,AFG

3.1 0.583 0.220 0.280 0.856 0.055 0.045 0.000 0.841 0.060 1.000

Xenon

12.7

0.019

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

Xenon

12.7

0.019

TiPS_3,AFG

3.1 0.583 0.280 0.220 0.856 0.045 0.055 0.000 0.060 0.841 1.000

FCMFTIAC3,AFG

3.1 0.411 0.391 0.457 0.672 0.249 0.189 0.000 0.840 0.037 1.000

Xenon

12.7

0.023

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

Xenon

12.7

0.019

CMFTIAC3,AFG

3.1 0.411 0.457 0.391 0.672 0.189 0.249 0.000 0.037 0.840 1.000

FCMFTIR_3,AFG

3.2 0.496 0.331 0.395 0.780 0.158 0.126 0.000 0.840 0.033 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

12.7

0.019

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000
12.7

0.019

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG
Xenon

12.7

0.019

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000
12.7

0.019

CMFTIR_3,AFG

3.2 0.496 0.395 0.331 0.780 0.126 0.158 0.000 0.033 0.840 1.000

FTiPS_3,AFG

3.1 0.583 0.220 0.280 0.856 0.055 0.045 0.000 0.841 0.060 1.000

Xenon
GREEN_3,AFG
Xenon

Case B4

ε1

GREEN_3,AFG

Xenon

Case B3

Tir

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

Xenon

Case B2

Tsol Rsol1 Rsol2 Tvis Rvis1 Rvis2

GREEN_3,AFG

Xenon

Case B1

Th.

Glass and gas data for testing glazing systems.

12.7

0.019

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000
12.7

0.019

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

Xenon
GREEN_3,AFG

12.7

0.019

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

3.1 Building description

57

12.7

Xenon
TiPS_3,AFG

3.1 0.583 0.280 0.220 0.856 0.045 0.055 0.000 0.060 0.841 1.000

FCMFTIAC3,AFG

3.1 0.411 0.391 0.457 0.672 0.249 0.189 0.000 0.840 0.037 1.000
12.7

Xenon

Case B5

0.023

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

12.7

Xenon

0.023

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000
12.7

Xenon

Case B6

0.019

0.019

3.2 0.610 0.059 0.059 0.833 0.070 0.070 0.000 0.840 0.840 1.000

GREEN_3,AFG

12.7

Xenon

0.019

3.1 0.411 0.457 0.391 0.672 0.189 0.249 0.000 0.037 0.840 1.000

CMFTIAC3,AFG

Explanation of symbols used in the Table 3.3:
Mode
Th.
Tsol
Rsol1
Rsol2
Tvis
Rvis1
Rvis2
Tir
ε1
ε2
keff














an identifier to determine the glass layer in debase,
glass thickness; mm,
solar transmittance of the glazing layer,
solar reflectance of the exterior side of the glazing layer,
solar reflectance of the interior side of the glazing layer,
visible transmittance of the glazing layer,
visible reflectance of the exterior side of the glazing layer,
visible reflectance of the interior side of the glazing layer,
thermal longwave transmittance of the glazing layer,
longwave emittance of the exterior side of the glazing layer,
longwave emittance of the interior side of the glazing layer,
effective conductivity of the glazing system; W/mK.

The next parameters of glazing systems such as visible transmittances, U-factor, solar heat
gain and shading coefficients are determined with the help of the latest release of the
computer program WINDOW 5.2 (2006). The algorithm for analyzing window thermal
and optical performance is developed by the National Fenestration Rating Council (NFRC)
based on the ISO 15099 standard (2003). The results of the calculations of the thermal and
optical transmission properties for twelve cases are presented below in Table 3.4.
Table 3.4:

Thermal and optical properties of glazing systems.

Case no.

keff

Width

U-factor

SHGCc

SCc

VTc

RHG

Case A1

0.0187

19.050

1.16

0.47

0.54

0.66

343.55

Case A2

0.0187

19.050

1.16

0.42

0.48

0.66

310.31

Case A3

0.0201

18.975

1.23

0.54

0.62

0.72

400.80

3.1 Building description

58

Case A4

0.0201

18.975

1.23

0.48

0.55

0.72

355.94

Case A5

0.0189

19.025

1.17

0.39

0.45

0.57

288.36

Case A6

0.0189

19.025

1.17

0.38

0.44

0.57

282.96

Case B1

0.0303

34.925

0.89

0.43

0.49

0.55

315.67

Case B2

0.0285

34.925

0.84

0.35

0.40

0.55

257.89

Case B3

0.0320

34.850

0.93

0.49

0.57

0.60

363.31

Case B4

0.0303

34.850

0.89

0.38

0.45

0.60

287.21

Case B5

0.0305

34.900

0.89

0.36

0.41

0.48

266.59

Case B6

0.0288

34.900

0.85

0.32

0.37

0.48

241.40

Explanation of symbols used in the Table 3.4:
Width
U-factor
(alternatively named

– glazing system width; mm,
– standard measure of the rate of heat flow through the center of
glass in this case; W/m2K,

U-value)

SHGCc

SCc
VTc

– the solar heat gain coefficient represents the solar heat gain
through the center of the glazing system relative to the total
incident solar radiation,
– shading coefficient defines the amount of heat gain through the
center of glass compared to clear glass with 3 mm thickness,
– visible transmittance defines the amount of light in the visible
radiation (portion of the solar spectrum between 380 nm to
760 nm) that passes through the center of glazing material,

The value of the U-factor depends on the thermal and optical properties of the glazing
systems as well as the external and internal environmental factors. The following
conditions are assumed in the computer code WINDOW 5.2:



outside temperature

– -21°C,



indoor temperature

– 18°C,



windward speed

– 5.5 m/s,



sky temperature

– -18°C,



sky emissivity

– 1.0,



direct solar radiation flux

– 0.0 W/m2.

3.1 Building description

59

Of course the visible transmittance of glazing systems should be calculated for different
environmental conditions:

• outside temperature

– 32°C,



indoor temperature

– 24°C,



windward speed

– 2,75 m/s,



sky temperature

– 32°C,



sky emissivity

– 1.0,



direct solar radiation flux

– 783 W/m2.

In the current project, hardwood (Meranti) is used for the window frame profiles with the
following properties:



projected frame dimension

– 60 mm,



material absorption

– 0.9,



frame U-value

– 1.9 W/m2K.

The parameters of the six glazing systems will be utilized in further energy simulations of
the whole building.
U-value of building assemblies

The U-value describes the rate of heat flow per unit area through a single building
assembly in steady-state conditions. The insulation characteristic of each structural
building component is presented in Table 3.5.
Table 3.5:

Exterior opaque and fenestration U-value.

Construction

*

U-Factor [W/m2K]

Exterior wall*

0.225

Roof*

0.090

Basement ceiling*

0.210

Windows (east, north)

0.89 (Case B1)

Balcony windows

1.16 (Case A1)

- no film coefficients

3.1 Building description

60

Building envelope

The building envelope is characterized by the enlarged value of the window-to-wall ratio,
which is highlighted in Table 3.6.
Table 3.6:

Total

*

Window-to-Wall Ratio.
North

East

South

West

315 to 45

45 to 135

135 to 225

225 to 315

deg

deg

deg

deg

Gross Wall Area* (m2)

1855.4

448.41

478.83

448.41

479.74

Window Opening Area (m2)

768.42

148.11

155.67

205.26

259.37

Window-Wall Ratio (%)

41.42

33.03

32.51

45.78

54.07

- dimensions at wall axis

HVAC and DHW systems

The simulation takes a Variable Air Volume (VAV) system into consideration using a heat
recovery exchanger with its economizer (free cooling) controller and baseboard convective
heaters. Fig. 3.6 shows a general schema of zone heating and ventilation equipment.
HVAC systems are designed specifically to reduce energy waste. Details of an energysaving air distribution unit are presented in Fig. 3.7

Zone i (single apartment)
Return air

High temperature convectionradiation heating system

Fig. 3.6: Diagram of HVAC system for a single zone.

Air distribution system

.

Supply air

61

Mixed Air System

Supply Fan

Apartment exhaust

Cooling Coil

Return Fan

option

Heating Coil

Heat Recovery

Relief air Outside air

3.1 Building description

Apartment supply

Zone i (single apartment)

Fig. 3.7: Controlled ventilation system with a heat recovery unit KWL EC 300.

Domestic hot water (DHW) will be warmed by using tube collectors and auxiliary water
heaters. Gas-fired condensing boilers are used in this case as a heat source for DHW and
central heating systems. (Fig. 3.8)

solar
collector

Heat source

Zone equipment

Storage tank

Auxiliary water heater

Fig. 3.8: Two-tank solar heating system connection diagram set in calculations.

3.1 Building description

62

EnergyPlus 3-D model of the building
In the EneryPlus-System, heat and mass balance calculations are conducted for the
separate control volumes called zones. The modelling of heat transfer for building
components includes conduction, natural/forced convection and long/short wave radiation.
In order to achieve a good accuracy rate of calculations, a detailed geometric model of the
building, based on the architectural plans and specifications, is created in a threedimensional Cartesian right hand coordinate system (X-axis points east, Y-axis points
north, Z-axis points up). Rendering views of 3-D models with shading detached and
attached surfaces are presented in Fig. 3.9 and Fig. 3.10.

Fig. 3.9: The complete view of the house without movable protection shield.

3.1 Building description

63

In order to determine solar heat gains it is necessary to calculate shading and sunlit areas.
In the EnergyPlus-System a shadow algorithm is based on the Groth and Lokmanhekim
(1969) coordinate transformation method and the Walton (1983) shadow overlap scheme.
Two houses (house number 146 and 150) and two rows of trees are used as detached
external surfaces to generate shadows. The houses are not transparent for solar radiation
but the trees have seasonally changed their diffuse properties.

Fig. 3.10: The complete model view with movable protection shields mounted on a rail construction on the
level of the building façade and detached shading objects.

The tested building is split into 21 isothermal zones. The zone is defined as an air volume
at a uniform temperature plus all the heat transfer and heat storage surfaces bounding. The
symbol of each zone depends on the floor level and is shown in the figures below.

3.1 Building description

64

EG4

EG6
COR
EG3

EG1
EG2

Fig. 3.11: Separation of the building model on isothermal zones - ground floor.

OG4
OG4-2
OG4-3
OG1
OG1-2
OG1-3
COR

OG3
OG3-2
OG3-3

OG2
OG2-2
OG2-3

Fig. 3.12: Separation of the building model on isothermal zones – the second, third, and forth storey.

3.1 Building description

65

EG4

DG1
COR

DG3

Fig. 3.13: Separation of the building model on isothermal zones – the top storey.

A complete listing of the model description in the EnergyPlus environment is included as
APPENDIX 2.
Table 3.7 presents a characteristic of each zone that is separated from the building
structure and represents one of the apartments.
Table 3.7:

Zone

Area*
2

[m ]

Conditioned

Zone summary.

Volume*
3

[m ]

Gross Wall
Area

*

Window Glass
Area

[m2]

[m2]

People
[persons]

EG1

94

Yes

284.81

75.08

32.17

2

EG2

71.87

Yes

217.76

51.78

27.13

2

EG3

101.02

Yes

306.10

75.66

39.07

2

EG4

100.78

Yes

305.37

95.51

23.25

2

EG6

22.28

No

67.52

35.24

2.67

0

OG1

125.05

Yes

378.90

114.87

39.89

2

OG2

71.87

Yes

217.76

51.78

27.13

2

OG3

101.02

Yes

306.10

75.66

39.07

2

OG4

100.78

Yes

305.37

100.05

25.73

2

OG1-2

250.1

Yes

126.3

114.87

39.89

2

OG2-2

143.74

Yes

72.59

51.78

27.13

2

OG3-2

202.05

Yes

102.03

75.66

39.07

2

OG4-2

201.56

Yes

101.79

100.05

25.73

2

OG1-3

125.05

Yes

378.90

114.87

39.89

2

OG2-3

71.87

Yes

217.76

51.78

27.13

2

3.1 Building description

66

OG3-3

101.02

Yes

306.10

75.66

39.07

2

OG4-3

100.78

Yes

305.37

100.05

25.73

2

DG1

124.71

Yes

379.06

128.81

41.63

2

DG3

101.65

Yes

307.99

104.32

36.87

2

DG4

83.44

Yes

252.81

111.35

30.93

2

COR

57.95

No

909.98

150.56

83.42

0

*

- dimensions at wall axis

3.1.2 Weather conditions for the simulation analysis
Weather data

Calculations were performed for 8760 hours (year-round). Detailed weather data for
Bremen (the nearest town to Hannover) came from the ASHRAE Handbook (ASHRAE,
2005). Some basic parameters of the climate are presented in Fig. 3.14 – Fig. 3.15 for
outdoor dry bulb temperature and in Fig. 3.16 – Fig. 3.17 for daily average surface solar
radiation.

Fig. 3.14: Daily average outdoor dry bulb temperature at heating period.

3.1 Building description

67

Fig. 3.15: Daily average outdoor dry bulb temperature during hot periods.

As we see in the above figures, temperature conditions were moderate. In the EnergyPlus
algorithm, direct as well as indirect solar radiation is considered. We can observe that the
largest level of direct radiation appears in March and indirect radiation reaches the
maximum level from May to August.

Surface Ext Solar Beam Incident [W/m2]

200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20

Fig. 3.16: Daily average surface solar beam radiation incident on a south vertical surface.

12/27

12/07

11/17

10/28

10/08

09/18

08/29

08/09

07/20

06/30

06/10

05/21

05/01

04/11

03/22

03/02

02/10

01/21

01/01

0

3.2 Selection of the optimal glazing system

68

Surface Solar Sky Diffuse Incident [W/m2]

80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10

12/27

12/07

11/17

10/28

10/08

09/18

08/29

08/09

07/20

06/30

06/10

05/21

05/01

04/11

03/22

03/02

02/10

01/21

01/01

0

Fig. 3.17: Daily average surface solar sky diffuse radiation incident on a south vertical surface.

3.2 Selection of the optimal glazing system
Six cases of different types of glazing systems were analyzed and are described in the
above Table 3.3 and Table 3.4. The simulation results are presented as indexes of building
energy consumption, as well as heating and cooling energy demands. Table 3.8 contains
the main parameters gathered over 4752 hours of a warm period (from 1st April to 15th
October) and 4056 hours of a heating season (from 15th October to 31st March). Fig. 3.18
shows the total building energy consumption for testing variants.
Table 3.8:

Results of the building energy simulation for different types of glazing systems.

Case no.

Eh

qh

Ph

Ec

qc

Pc

Eb

Case AB1

29138.56

45331.63

21.98

12054.21

77179.71

5.30

41192.77

Case AB2

31925.54

45124.46

23.20

8886.29

55309.06

3.91

40811.83

Case AB3

29277.56

47050.68

22.04

13466.47

86803.23

5.93

42744.03

Case AB4

32591.46

46853.40

23.50

9759.97

61415.59

4.30

42351.43

Case AB5

32213.23

45592.23

23.33

10554.55

67030.77

4.64

42767.78

Case AB6

33533.86

45387.89

23.91

8940.56

55780.04

3.93

42474.42

3.2 Selection of the optimal glazing system

69

Explanation of symbols used in the Table 3.8
Eh
qh
Ph
Ec
qc
Pc
Eb

– district heating energy; kWh,
– design heating load; W,
– heating energy per conditioned building area; kWh/m2,
– cooling energy; kWh,
– design cooling load; W,
– cooling energy per conditioned building area; kWh/m2,
– total energy for heating and cooling; kWh.

35000

Cooling

Energy consumption [kWh]

Heating
25000
15000

29 139

31 926

29 278

32 591

32 213

33 534

‐9 760

‐10 555

‐8 941

Case AB4

Case AB5

Case AB6

5000
‐5000

‐12 054

‐8 886

‐13 466

‐15000
Case AB1

Case AB2

Case AB3

Fig. 3.18: Building energy consumption for different types of glazing system.

Air-conditioning systems are installed only as an optional device for an additional cost in
the new building. For this reason, glazing systems described in Case AB1 that will be
applied in the next simulations have been selected. As the calculation results show, these
combinations of thermal and optical properties provide small energy consumption
throughout the winter months due to the highest passive solar transmission. Unfortunately,
increased solar heat gain may cause low quality of thermal comfort inside the apartments
during summer periods.

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

70

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through
building fenestration
3.3.1 Characterization of heat gain and loss through glazing
The solar heat gain through glazing systems depends on many factors such as:


thermal and optical properties of glazing systems,



the current sun position in the sky,



degree of cloudiness,



external and internal shading devices,



shaded constructions attached to the building such as awnings and roof overhangs,



detached shading surfaces such as trees and other buildings,



window shading devices such as screens, shutters, curtains and blinds,



window facings.

0,005
0,000
‐0,005
‐0,010
‐0,015
‐0,020

0,270
0,220
0,170
0,120
0,070
0,020
‐0,030
03/01  01:00
03/01  02:00
03/01  03:00
03/01  04:00
03/01  05:00
03/01  06:00
03/01  07:00
03/01  08:00
03/01  09:00
03/01  10:00
03/01  11:00
03/01  12:00
03/01  13:00
03/01  14:00
03/01  15:00
03/01  16:00
03/01  17:00
03/01  18:00
03/01  19:00
03/01  20:00
03/01  21:00
03/01  22:00
03/01  23:00
03/01  24:00

0,010

Window Heat Gain and Loss Energy [kWh/m2]

0,015

12/01  01:00
12/01  02:00
12/01  03:00
12/01  04:00
12/01  05:00
12/01  06:00
12/01  07:00
12/01  08:00
12/01  09:00
12/01  10:00
12/01  11:00
12/01  12:00
12/01  13:00
12/01  14:00
12/01  15:00
12/01  16:00
12/01  17:00
12/01  18:00
12/01  19:00
12/01  20:00
12/01  21:00
12/01  22:00
12/01  23:00
12/01  24:00

Window Heat Gain and Loss Energy [kWh/m2]

The first parameters, i.e. the thermal and optical properties of windows, are examined in
great detail in the previous chapter. As mentioned before, the distribution of passive solar
gain strongly depends upon the time of the day as well as the time of year. Graphs in Fig.
3.19 and Fig. 3.20 present the daily and monthly differences between gain and loss energy
through 1m2 of balcony windows facing south.

Fig. 3.19: Energy balance for the south window on the first day in December (left side of fig.) and on the
first day in March (right side of fig.).

Window Heat Gain and Loss Energy [kWh/m2]

1,000
0,800
0,600
0,400
0,200
0,000
‐0,200
‐0,400

71

1,800
1,600
1,400
1,200
1,000
0,800
0,600
0,400
0,200
0,000
‐0,200

03/31

03/29

03/27

03/25

03/23

03/21

03/19

03/17

03/15

03/13

03/11

03/09

03/07

03/05

03/03

12/31

12/29

12/27

12/25

12/23

12/21

12/19

12/17

12/15

12/13

12/11

12/09

12/07

12/05

12/03

12/01

‐0,400

03/01

Window Heat Gain and Loss Energy [kWh/m2]

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

Fig. 3.20: Energy balance for the south window in December (left side of fig.) and in March (right side of
fig.).

From the above figures, it can clearly be seen that even a window with a view facing south
has a negative balance of energy during December. Therefore it is necessary to analyze not
only the entire building performance, but each façade separately and their influence on the
total energy consumption. All shading surfaces, attached as well as detached to the
building structure, are included within the energy simulation model in order to create the
optimal physical reality.

3.3.2 Analysis of the energy balance for windows
This part of the dissertation focuses on the relationship between the space-heating energy
consumption and the area of the glazing system. It was decided to change the window-towall ratio (WWR) for the whole building to ensure that the optimal value of WWR exists in
the first order. The simulations were done for a heating period and the results are shown in
Fig. 3.21.

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

30 000

design value

29 000
District heating [kWh]

72

28 000
27 000
26 000
25 000
24 000
23 000
22 000
21 000
20 000
0

10

20

30

Window-Wall Ratio [%]

40

50

Fig. 3.21: Relationship between energy for space heating and window-to-wall area.

As it turned out, we could describe the relationship between the energy consumption for
space heating Eh and the window-to-wall ratio with a high level of accuracy by using the
following linear equation:

Eh = 210,8 ⋅WWR + 20262.

(3.1)

It is important to emphasize that it is impossible to find an optimal value of WWR if we use
this simple approach to the subject under examination.
It was proposed to find a procedure for determining the optimal value of the window-towall ratio. This method consists of the three following steps:

I.

calculation of energy balance for windows on each side of the building separately,

II.

increase an area of the windows with the positive energy balance to the maximum
limit,

III.

reduce the size of the windows with a negative energy balance to the minimal
value, which depends on the floor space for all living rooms.

Therefore, in the beginning it was necessary to examine each building façade separately.
Fig. 3.22 – Fig. 3.25 show the energy balance of the glazing systems for the north, south,
west and east faces of the building, respectively. Simulations were conducted for the
following five locations in Germany: Hannover, Berlin, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt and

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

73

Hamburg under different weather conditions. Reports of the calculations are presented for
triple-glazed windows as well as for double–glazed balcony windows.
(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

0,00
-5,00
-10,00
-15,00
-20,00
-25,00
-30,00
-35,00
-40,00
-45,00

HANNOVER

BERLIN

DUSSELDORF

FRANKFURT

HAMBURG

North-Balcony window

-39,98

-40,32

-33,70

-37,38

-40,09

North-Window

-27,86

-28,37

-22,52

-25,41

-28,23

Fig. 3.22: Difference between heat gain and loss energy from north-side windows during a typical heating
season.

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

25,00
20,00
15,00
10,00
5,00
0,00

HANNOVER

BERLIN

DUSSELDORF

FRANKFURT

HAMBURG

South-Balcony window

17,35

10,85

15,87

19,13

11,28

South-Window

18,66

14,48

19,30

23,24

14,71

Fig. 3.23: Difference between heat gain and loss energy from south-side windows during a typical heating
season.

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

74

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

0,00
-5,00
-10,00
-15,00
-20,00
-25,00
-30,00
West-Balcony window

HANNOVER

BERLIN

DUSSELDORF

FRANKFURT

HAMBURG

-26,52

-29,43

-22,46

-21,23

-27,86

Fig. 3.24: Difference between heat gain and loss energy from west-side windows during a typical heating
season.

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

0,00
-5,00
-10,00
-15,00
-20,00
-25,00
-30,00
East-Window

HANNOVER

BERLIN

DUSSELDORF

FRANKFURT

HAMBURG

-21,29

-22,86

-16,97

-15,90

-22,24

Fig. 3.25: Difference between heat gain and loss energy from east-side windows during a typical heating
season.

The results of simulations indicate that:





only south-side windows have a positive energy balance for all examined locations,
the most intensive solar heat gain can be achieved for the weather conditions in
Frankfurt,
the lowest heat loss through the windows we found were in the the locations of
Düsseldorf and Frankfurt,
the most favourable weather, from the viewpoint of energy consumption, appears in
the areas surrounding Berlin.

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

75

A positive energy balance of south-faced windows concerns the whole heating period. This
does not mean that heat gains exceeded losses for each “cold” month. As we can see in
Fig. 3.26 in December and January the windows energy balance is negative.

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

10,00
8,00
6,00
4,00
2,00
0,00
-2,00
-4,00
-6,00
South-Balcony window

October

November

December

January

February

March

5,104

3,466

-4,064

-1,748

5,730

8,862

Fig. 3.26: Month-average energy balance of south-side windows.

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

The next problem, which the computer simulations disclosed, was the variability of passive
solar gain connected to the windows height to the ground level. This relationship is
illustrated in Fig. 3.27.

25,00
20,00
15,00
10,00
5,00
0,00

1st floor

2nd floor

3rd floor

4th floor

5th floor

South-Balcony window

13,70

14,16

15,14

17,35

19,95

South-Window

8,42

9,37

13,21

18,66

25,20

Fig. 3.27: Difference between solar gain and heat loss for south façade.

As expected, the results of the calculations showed a strong relationship between the
passive solar gains and the relative height of the glazing system. It should be noted that the

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

76

energy balance is positive for each storey. The difference between the first and the highest
floor is equal to 31 % for balcony-windows and up to 66 % for windows.

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

30,00
South‐Balcony window
South‐Window
Approximation

25,00
20,00
15,00
10,00
5,00
0,00
0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

Middle of the storey’s height [m]
Fig. 3.28: Dependence of solar gain and heat loss difference in the middle of each storey’s height.

The dependence of the energy transfer Et on windows highest above ground level hs,
shown in Fig. 3.27, we can approximate with a high level of accuracy using the following
equations:


for the south-facing window:

Et = 0,099hs2 − 0,07hs + 8,13,


(3.2)

for the south-facing balcony window:

Et = 0,042hs2 − 0,12hs + 13,78.

(3.3)

3.3.3 Definition of an optimal value of window-to-wall ratio
To summarize the above analysis, it should be noted that only south glazing systems
provide heat gains for all locations in Germany. As mentioned before, east, west and most
of all north façades’ contributions to energy consumption increase during a heating period.
So, it is impossible to talk about the optimal value of window-to-wall ratios with a
reference to these sides of the building. We can determine WWR only for the whole
building with the additional investigation of each type of apartment (zones).

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

77

In the second step of the optimization procedure we should increase an area of the southfacing windows to the maximum value with respect to the building construction limits.
Then, in the third step, the size of the other windows must be reduced and some windows
must be removed. The starting point of this analysis should be to determine the value of a
minimal window area based on natural lighting requirements. The ratio of the glazing
elements area to the floor space for all living rooms is equal to 0.125 by German standards
in Lower Saxony (DVNBauO, 2004). It is important to underline that the window
dimensions are calculated in an unfinished state, i.e. without frames. The new value of the
suitable glazing area Ag can be calculated by using the following equation:

Ag = 0,125 Af (1 + rg − f ) ,

(3.4)

where:
Af
rg-f = 0,25

– area of the floor,
– frame to glass ratio for a window.

The results of the optimization process are shown in Table 3.9 and Table 3.10, and the
view of the new model is presented in Fig. 3.29.

Fig. 3.29: The view of the complete house after the change of the glazing system.

The new characteristic of the building envelope after the change in window size is shown
in Table 3.9. As seen, the total glazing area is reduced by over 46 %. As it turned out, the

3.3 Estimation of thermal energy gain and loss through building fenestration

78

optimal value of the window-to-wall ratio for the entire building was equal to over 22 %.
But the area of the south-facing windows was enlarged to 58 % of the façade size. The
lowest value of WWR, only equal to about 4 %, characterizes the north façade of the
building under consideration.
Table 3.9:

Optimal value of Window-to-Wall Ratio.
Total

North
315 to 45
deg

East
45 to 135
deg

South
135 to 225
deg

West
225 to 315
deg

Window Opening Area
- design value (m2)

768.42

148.11

155.67

205.26

259.37

Window Opening Area
- optimal value (m2)

410.70

17.78

53.77

260.38

78.77

Difference between
optimal value (m2)

design

and

357.72

130.33

101.9

-55.12

180.6

Difference between
optimal value (%)

design

and

46.55

88.00

65.46

-26.85

69.63

22.15

3.96

11.23

58.07

16.45

Optimal value of the
Window-to-Wall Ratio (%)

It is crucial to note that the optimal value of WWR can significantly provide a reduction in
energy consumption. As we see in Table 3.10, it is possible to decrease the space heating
energy requirements by over 30 %.
Table 3.10:

Heating energy consumption.

District
Heating
(kWh)

Energy Per Total

Energy Per Conditioned

Building Area

Building Area (kWh/m2)

(kWh/m2)

29138.56

21.23

21.98

19963.75

17.32

17.93

Difference between design and
optimal value

9174.81

3.910

4.050

Difference between design and
optimal value (%)

31.49

18.42

18.43

Design value
Optimal value

It is important to underline that the results of the optimization procedure, shown above,
cannot be applied to other multi-family buildings because the optimal value of WWR
mainly depends upon the apartment arrangement, the thermal and optical performance of
windows and the building shape. However, the proposed optimization procedure is
universal and can be used for single-family as well as multi-family buildings.

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

79

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm
period
The simulation was carried out to audit the thermal environment in the apartments during
the warm period. Calculations were performed with the following assumptions:


the cooling system is turned off,



mechanical intensive night ventilation with outside air and at a variable flow rate
was realized.

Reduction of gains from solar radiation during the summer was performed by:


protection shields made by movable glass parts printed with various patterns, which
were positioned on a movable rails construction on the level of the building facade
in front of the balconies,



alternatively an internal or external window shade with high reflect parameters.

The zone’s thermal environment was defined by using: Predicted Mean Vote (PMV),
Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD) and operative temperature θO given by:

θ O = Aθ a ,i + (1 − A)θ MR ,

(3.5)

where:
A = hr / (hc + hr)
– surface heat transfer coefficient by radiation,
hr
– surface heat transfer coefficient by convection,
hc
θa,i – the air temperature inside the zone-i,
θMR – the mean radiant temperature.

The calculation of the mean radiant temperature was done by equation (3.6).

θ MR = 4

n

∑ Fo−iθi4,r ,
i =1

where:
n
Fo-i

θi,r

– the number of surfaces inside the zone-i,
– the view factor of the human body,
– the radiant temperature of the isothermal surface.

(3.6)

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

80

For a ‘good’ indoor climate, the following value is recommended: -0.5 < PMV < +0.5.
The calculations were performed from 1 April to 15 October. The optical and thermal
characteristics of a high reflect shading device, used in simulations, is presented in Table
3.11.
Table 3.11:

Characteristic of a window shading device.

Parameter

Value

Solar Transmittance

0.280

Solar Reflectance

0.700

Visible Transmittance

0.280

Visible Reflectance

0.700

Thermal Hemispherical Emissivity

0.850

Thermal Transmittance

0.100

Thickness [m]

0.005

Conductivity [W/mK]

0.100

Shade to Glass Distance [m]

0.050

The solar transmittance value for the shading surfaces is set to 0.3 for the protection
movable shield, 0.2 for trees as detached shading surfaces and 0 for adjacent buildings.
The following four cases were analyzed:
Case 1 -

protection facade shields were used to reduce solar gain,

Case 2 -

exterior window shades were used to reduce solar gain,

Case 3 -

window shades are located on internal sides,

Case 4 -

there are not any protection systems (an extremely disadvantageous
situation).

The selected results for four apartments located on the middle storey are presented below.

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

Case 1

36

81

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

34
32
30
28
26
24
22
20
18
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Fig. 3.30: Zone operate temperature for apartment OG1.

Case 1

36

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

34
32
30
28
26
24
22
20
18
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

Fig. 3.31: Zone operate temperature for apartment OG2.

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

Case 1

36

82

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

34
32
30
28
26
24
22
20
18
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Fig. 3.32: Zone operate temperature for apartment OG3.

Case 1

36

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

34
32
30
28
26
24
22
20
18
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

Fig. 3.33: Zone operate temperature for apartment OG4.

1‐Oct

1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

3,00

Case 1

83

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

2,50
2,00
1,50
1,00
0,50
0,00
‐0,50
‐1,00
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Fig. 3.34: PMV comfort thermal index for OG1 apartment.
3,00

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

2,50
2,00
1,50
1,00
0,50
0,00
‐0,50
‐1,00
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

Fig. 3.35: PMV comfort thermal index for OG2 apartment.

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

3,00

Case 1

2,50

84

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

2,00
1,50
1,00
0,50
0,00
‐0,50
‐1,00
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Fig. 3.36: PMV comfort thermal index for OG3 apartment.
3,00

Case 1

Case 2

Case 3

Case 4

2,50
2,00
1,50
1,00
0,50
0,00
‐0,50
‐1,00
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

Fig. 3.37: PMV comfort thermal index for OG4 apartment.

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

85

Based on the results of the simulation we can affirm that:



Intensive cooling with outside air at night, protection facade shields and window
shades located on the internal side do not secure thermal comfort during more than
half of the warm period,
The window shade with the high reflection surface mounted outside and near the
fenestration guarantees the best protection of gains resulting from solar radiation
during the summer.

First of all, the relatively high inside operate air temperature is the result of a large
fenestration area of each segment and also of internal heat gains. Apart from that, the high
thermal insulation of the windows limits heat transfer when the outside air temperature is
lower than the inside temperature. We can observe the lowest level of thermal comfort in
apartments OG2 and OG3. The PMV index reaches about 3 in June and September.
Comparatively good conditions of comfort are present in segments OG1 and OG4. Due to
effective external shading devices and night cooling, the internal air temperature stays
below 28°C.
The next simulations were conducted to compare the designed fenestration area with the
optimal windows area in summer conditions. Results of the analysis are presented in the
figures below.

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period
30

OG 1

86
OG 2

OG 3

OG 4

28
26
24
22
20
18
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Fig. 3.38: Zone operate temperature for apartments located on the middle storey (red colour – building with optimal value of window-to-wall ratio, blue colour – designed
building).
1,50

OG 1

1,25

OG 2

OG 3

OG 4

1,00
0,75
0,50
0,25
0,00
‐0,25
‐0,50
‐0,75
‐1,00
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Fig. 3.39: PMV comfort thermal index for apartments located on the middle storey (orange colour – building with optimal value of window-to-wall ratio, blue colour –
designed building).

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

87

As seen in Fig. 3.38 and Fig. 3.39, a reduction of the glazing area in an optimal variant
leads to a decrease in the operate temperature and raises thermal comfort conditions. We
can observe these effects in apartments OG1 and OG2. In the calculation of the optimal
value of WWR it is assumed that the south facing windows area in apartments OG3 and
OG4 were increased to the maximum. As it turned out, this assumption does not
significantly influence the thermal comfort in this part of the building. So, we can conclude
that the optimal window-to-wall ratio, which was determined to achieve energy savings in
heating periods, provides a better quality of thermal environment during a warm season.
In order to reduce the internal air temperature we can use intensive mechanical ventilation
when the outdoor temperature is lower than the air temperature in the rooms. The next
series of calculations were performed to investigate how a variable air volume system
influences the thermal environment in living spaces. The typical work schedule of a
ventilation system with intensive night cooling in OG1 apartment for the last week of July
is shown in Fig. 3.40. The total volume of outside air varied approximately between 60 and
210 m3/h. The maximum value of the flow rate appeared very often from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
Practical results of a one-week operation of a VAV system and the comparison with
constant air flow ventilation are demonstrated in Fig. 3.41. We observed that the amplitude
between day and night internal air temperatures was significantly higher for the apartment
with a variable air volume system. Due to this effect we could relatively quickly reduce
and stabilize the air temperature inside the living spaces on a lower level.
As shown in Fig. 3.42 the difference between the operate temperature in an apartment with
the constant air volume system and with a night cooling system using the variable air
volume flow grew from April to first half of June. This value stayed at approximately the
same level equal to about 3.5°C on the next period of warm season. The maximum value
differed from 4.1°C for apartment OG2 to 4.4°C for apartment OG1 and the mean value
differed from 2.7°C to 3.0°C, respectively.
As it turned out, cooling by ambient air can be an energy saving solution. This ventilation
system, coupled with external shading devices, is sufficient to prevent living spaces from
excessive overheating during warm seasons.

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

88

Volume of Outside Air [m3]

220
200
180
160
140
120

CAV

100

VAV

80
60
40
20
0
0

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108 120 132 144 156 168

Time [hour]
Fig. 3.40: Mechanical ventilation in apartment OG1 - total volume of outside air

35

Air temperature [0C]

34
33

CAV

32

VAV

31
30
29
28
0

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108 120 132 144 156 168

Time [hour]
Fig. 3.41: Air temperature in apartment OG1 with different types of air volume flow rate

3.4 Testing of a building indoor environment during the warm period

89

4,5
4
3,5
3
2,5
2
1,5
1

OG 1

0,5

OG 2

OG 3

OG 3

0
1‐Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

1‐Oct

Apr

1‐May

1‐Jun

1‐Jul

1‐Aug

1‐Sep

Fig. 3.42: Operate temperature difference in apartments with the constant air volume system and with the night cooling system using the variable air volume flow.

1‐Oct

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

90

It was decided to check the correlation between the solar passive gain and the relative
height of the glazing system as was done earlier for the heating period.

(Window Heat Gain Energy Window Heat Loss Energy)
per 1m2 of glazing system
[kWh/m2]

120
115

South‐Balcony window
South‐Window
Approximation

110
105
100
95
90
85
80
75
70
0

2

4

6

8

10

12

14

Middle of the storey’s height [m]
Fig. 3.43: Dependence of the solar gain and heat loss difference on the middle of the storey’s height during
the warm period.

The windows’ energy balance (Fig. 3.43) shows that the difference between the first and
the last floor is small in comparison to the results which were obtained for the heating
season. This effect comes from the sun's higher elevation above the horizon.

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system
A developed DHW system is composed of the tube solar collectors, storage tanks and an
auxiliary water heater. As commonly known, the storage tank accumulates heat from the
solar collectors. The auxiliary water heater provides additional heat if the storage tank
water temperature is too low. A connection diagram, which was assumed in the
computational model of a DHW system, is shown in chapter 3.1.1.

3.5.1 Description of the solar collectors
The solar domestic hot water system is designed using 14 vacuum tube collectors (heat
pipe principle) VITOSOL 300-T SP3, which are described by the following specifications:
ƒ
ƒ
ƒ

gross area
– 2.88 m2,
absorber area – 2.05 m2,
aperture area – 2.11 m2

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

91

The total gross area of the solar collectors, which are connected in a parallel liquid flow, is
equal to 40.32 m2. For numerical calculations of energy conversion, the solar panel thermal
performance was adapted from SRCC (2007).

3.5.2 Solar heating systems control
The efficiency of HVAC systems strongly depends on the algorithm which controls the
operation. “The differential thermostat” is chosen to control a developed solar heating
system. In this type of regulation technique, the temperature in the water heater is
compared to the temperature inside the solar collector loop. The pump is turned on when
there is a useful heat gain.
In the current analysis, the Temperature Difference On Limit was set to 10°C and the
Temperature Difference Off Limit was set to 2°C. If the temperature difference between the
collector outlet and the storage tank source outlet was above the Temperature Difference
On Limit, the system was turned on. The system was turned off when the temperature
difference was below the Temperature Difference Off Limit.

3.5.3 Assumed parameters of domestic hot water systems
In accordance to the building owner’s suggestion, each apartment will be occupied by two
persons. The average DHW consumption was estimated at 30 litres per person per day. It
resulted in an annual consumption of 416.1 m3. The temperature of the DHW in the storage
tank was set to 60°C and a mixed temperature in the water tap was set to 45°C.
The simulations included domestic hot water use such as showers, dishwashers, washing
machines, dryers and all types of water outlets together. The following schedule of hot
water equipment use was established.
Table 3.12:
Sinks schedule
Through: 12/31,
For: AllDays,
Until: 7:00,
0.0,
Until: 8:00,
0.3,
Until: 9:00,
0.7,
Until: 11:00,
0.0,
Until: 12:00,
0.1,
Until: 13:00,
0.3,
Until: 17:00,
0.0,

Showers schedule
Through: 12/31,
For: AllDays,
Until: 6:00,
0.0,
Until: 6:30,
0.2,
Until: 7:00,
0.9,
Until: 7:30,
0.0,
Until: 13:00,
0.0,
Until: 19:30,
0.7,
Until: 24:00,
0.0;

Schedules for DHW equipment
Clotheswasher schedule
Through: 12/31,
For: Weekends
SummerDesignDay
WinterDesignDay,
Until: 6:00,
0.0,
Until: 7:00,
1.0,
Until: 12:00,
0.0,
Until: 24:00,
0.0;
For: AllOtherDays,
Until: 24:00,
0.0;

Dishwasher schedule
Through: 12/31,
For: AllDays,
Until: 20:00,
0.0,
Until: 20:30,
1.0,
Until: 22:00,
0.0,
Until: 24:00,
0.0;

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

92

Until: 18:00,
0.2,
Until: 19:00,
0.5,
Until: 20:00,
0.2,
Until: 24:00,
0.0;

The peak volumetric flow rate for water equipment use was set to: 0,000077m3/s for water
outlets, 0.0001022 m3/s for showers, 0.0000786 m3/s for washing machines and 0.0000504
m3/s for dishwashers. The annual consumption equal to 416.11 m3 was given.

3.5.4 Results of computational analysis
In the EnergyPlus-System, the model of the solar collectors adapts the equations from the
ASHRAE Standard 96-1980 (1989), ASHRAE Standard 93-1986 (1991) and Duffie and
Beckman (1991) work. The calculations were performed for an annual operation of the
DHW system and some of the more important results are presented in Table 3.13 and
Table 3.14.
Table 3.13:
Total Site Energy

Site energy demand for heat up DHW.

Energy Per Total Building Area

Energy Per Conditioned Building Area

2

[kWh]

[kWh/m ]

[kWh/m2]

6430.36

2.73

2.83

Table 3.14:

Comparison of energy and uses.

Electricity [kWh]

Purchased Heating [kWh]

Water [m3]

756.51

0.00

0.00

Water Systems

0.00

5673.85

416.11

Total End Uses

756.51

5673.85

416.11

Pumps

The total site energy (in Table 3.13) can be defined as the sum of purchased fossil fuel,
electricity, chilled water and steam (the overall energy use at the building site for all
energy types and categories of use). Purchased heating (in Table 3.14) is defined as heating
available from permanently installed heating units.
The total energy demand for heating domestic water per building is equal to 17198.07
kWh/a. This value consists of an auxiliary source plus pumps energy (6430.36 kWh/a) and

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

93

a solar collectors system (10767.71 kWh/a). It gives only 2.73 kWh/m2 energy per total
building area.
As we know, the solar collector heat transfer energy depends on its tilt angle. The heat
transfer performance for ten angles is simulated: 0°, 25°, 35°, 40°, 45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 75°
and 90° for latitude in Hannover. The results of the calculations are presented in a graph
form in Fig. 3.44 and Fig. 3.45.
60
0
25

50

35
40

Eabs [kWh/month]

45
50

40

55
60
75

30

90

20

10

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

0

Fig. 3.44: Dependence of solar collector’s heat transfer energy on a collector tilt angle during each month.

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

94

400
350

annual

Eabs [kWh/period]

300
250
200

summer

winter

150
100
50
0
0

10

20

30

40
50
60
Collector angle [deg]

70

80

90

Fig. 3.45: Dependence of solar collectors heat transfer energy for cold and warm periods in the year on a
collector tilt angle.

The results indicate that if we change the collector tilt angle from 25° to 60°, the absorbed
solar energy varies only about 10 % in the period of a year. However, applying the extreme
angles 0° (a horizontal position) and 90° (a vertical position) leads to a significant
reduction of the DHW system’s efficiency. The energy conversion decreases to 70 % of
the maximal value in optimal panel position for the angle 0° and for an angle of 90° the
same reduction reaches about 50 %.
As the simulation results show, the best solar collector tilt angle is 70° for the cold period
and 35° for the summer time. If the tilt angel is fixed, the best thermal performance is
obtained at 45°.
It should be noted that the solar installation will heat water in the winter period but the
solar conversion will be about ten times lower than those during the summer time. A
simple calculation method for estimating the solar collector efficiency ηSC by EN12975-2
(2007) is described in chapter 1.2.4 of the current work. The value of ηSC varies strongly
during the day due to changes in the solar radiation flux as shown in Fig. 3.46.

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

95

0,60
0,50

η SC [-]

0,40
0,30
0,20
0,10

08/16 19:00:00

08/16 13:00:00

08/16 07:00:00

08/16 01:00:00

08/15 19:00:00

08/15 13:00:00

08/15 07:00:00

08/15 01:00:00

08/14 19:00:00

08/14 13:00:00

08/14 07:00:00

08/14 01:00:00

08/13 19:00:00

08/13 13:00:00

08/13 07:00:00

08/13 01:00:00

08/12 19:00:00

08/12 13:00:00

08/12 07:00:00

08/12 01:00:00

0,00

Fig. 3.46: Efficiency fluctuation, which is caused by solar radiation vary throughout a day.

Another factor associated with the thermal performance of solar panels is the heat loss to
ambient air caused by convection, conduction and infrared radiation. This disadvantageous
effect can be characterized by a1 and a2 loss coefficients in efficiency Eq. (1.11).
VITOSOL 300-T SP3, assumed in simulations, is specified by a1 = 0.9156 W/m2K and a2 =
0.003 W/m2K2. The lowest value of performance variables a1 and a2, as in the current case,
leads to the higher efficiency of the DHW system. Fluctuation in a heat loss of the solar
panels, presented in Fig. 3.47, strongly depends on ambient air temperature and lasts for
over half a year.

December

November

October

September

August

96

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

0

Qst [W/m2absorber]

-1
-1,48

-1,66

-2
-2,12
-3

-2,24

-2,62

-4

-5
-5,87
-6

Fig. 3.47: The monthly average value of solar collector heat loss.

Another important consideration in the design of a DHW system is the optimal volume of a
storage tank. Calculations were performed for storage volumes ranging from 1 m3 to 12 m3.
The accumulated solar energy rose and auxiliary energy demand decreased with the
enlargement of the volume of the storage tank. As shown in graph below (Fig. 3.48), the
recommended volume of accumulated water, which will be heated by the solar panels, is
about 4 m3. Design of two storage tanks is recommended. One device will work during the
winter and both in parallel connection will be used during the warm periods of the year.

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

97

12 000

Energy [kWh]

10 000
8 000
6 000
4 000

Auxiliary energy demand
Solar energy

2 000
0
0

1

2

3

4
5
6
7
8
9
3
Storage tank volume [m ]

10

11

12

Fig. 3.48: Dependence of accumulated solar energy on the storage tank volume.

Fig. 3.49 depicts the average daily water temperature inside the storage tank with a volume
of 2 m3 (solid line) and of 6 m3 (dashed line). We can clearly observe that the increase in
system thermal capacity leads to the prolonging of the storage tanks operating period with
raised output temperatures. As shown in Fig. 3.49, the simulation results can be
approximated by the second order polynomial function of temperature versus time.

50
40
30
2 m3
6 m3
Approx. 2 m3
Approx. 6 m3

20
10

12/27

12/07

11/17

10/28

10/08

09/18

08/29

08/09

07/20

06/30

06/10

05/21

05/01

04/11

03/22

03/02

02/10

01/21

0
01/01

0

Storage tank temperatute [ C]

60

Fig. 3.49: Average daily storage tank temperature for a volume of 2 m3 and of 6 m3.

Eq. (3.7) represents temperature profile for 2 m3 tank volume and Eq. (3.8) fit the
numerical data for 6 m3 tank volume.

3.5 Optimization of a solar domestic hot water system

98

θ = −0.0011t 2 + 0,3904t + 11,749 .

(3.7)

θ = −0.0012t 2 + 0,4409t + 11,863 .

(3.8)

In the authors’ opinion, this analytical form describing a physical process can be used in
simplified, but at the same time accurate, modelling of thermal energy storage in solar
conversion systems.
Additionally, the capability of a solar collector installation for supporting the heating
central system is verified. The graph, which is presented in Fig. 3.49, shows that the
temperature of stored water increases to over 50°C between April and September.
Unfortunately, the heating system is turned off at this period of the year. So, it can be
concluded that the total designed area of solar collectors is too small for realizing this
conception.

4.1 Summary

99

4 Summary and conclusions
4.1 Summary
The duty of environmental protection and its sustainable development requires the design
of energy-efficient buildings. Computer-based simulations play a very important role in
this process. Additionally, this type of analysis can be useful in achieving thermal comfort
in the occupied spaces.
Three co-operative apartment houses, which are currently being built in Hannover, are the
object of this dissertation. Each of the five storey buildings consists of nineteen
apartments, a staircase and a storeroom for each home. The house envelope was designed
for the optimal utilization of solar radiation energy during the heating season. A HVAC
system of the considered buildings consists of mechanical ventilation, a heat recovery
exchanger with its economizer controller and a combination of baseboard convective
heaters and floor heating.
In order to prove the hypothesis, three basic research methods were chosen. Firstly,
detailed literature research was conducted to identify the current published knowledge
concerning the impact of solar radiation on the thermal behavior of buildings. Computer
simulation technique, which grows in popularity each year, was selected as the next
investigation method. Additionally, experimental investigations were carried out to
determine the thermal performance of the considered external wall and then for calibrating
a building simulation software.
The bibliographic review and state-of-the-art technology was focused on solar heat gain
through windows, the simulation of building thermal behavior, the influence of the
building envelope construction on energy consumption and modelling and designing solar
domestic hot water systems.
The detailed simulation method was chosen, as recommended in the literature, as the best
tool for the research of active solar domestic hot water, heating, ventilation and air
conditioning systems. Simultaneous modelling of building thermal behavior and the
operation of plant and HVAC systems was employed by the author to approach simulation
results with physical reality. The EnergyPlus V3-0, as the verified and fully validated tool,
was chosen from a wide variety of simulation programs. This software with structured,
modular code models combines heat and mass transfer, simulates multi-zone airflow and
operates heating, cooling and ventilating systems in all kinds of buildings for long periods
of time under varying conditions.
First of all, a survey of problems concerned with the subject of the current dissertation in
order to perform a more detailed and complex analysis of thermal behavior of buildings

4.1 Summary

100

and determine the most important factors, especially solar radiation, affecting energy
consumption was carried out.
Special attention was focused on the heat transfer through windows. One of the main goals
of the current work was the determination and comparison of the gain and loss of thermal
energy through the building fenestration. Glazed openings are very important elements in
building design. Windows provide natural day-light into rooms to reduce the use of electric
lights and allow heat gain from solar radiation. The type of glazing materials used in a
building construction makes a significant contribution to the annual energy consumption.
For this reason, it was decided to examine twelve cases of fenestration products with
different types of low-e coatings and different configurations of optical filters on a glass
surface. The parameters of the developed glazing systems such as visible transmittances,
U-factor, solar heat gain and shading coefficients were determined with help of the
computer program WINDOW 5.2. The simulation results as indexes of building energy
consumption, heating and cooling energy demand were used to select the optimal window
performance. Combinations of thermal and optical properties of the recommended glazing
system should provide low energy consumption throughout the winter months due to the
highest passive solar transmission.
Large areas of glazing in each facade of the developed buildings may result both in the
increase of heat losses in winter and the deterioration of thermal comfort conditions for the
occupants by overheating during the summer. So, that is why the optimization procedure
was presented and an optimal value of window-to-wall ratio that leads to a minimum
energy consumption for space heating was determined.
The current work reports energy balance of glazing system for north, south, west and east
face of the developed building. Simulations were conducted for the following five
locations in Germany: Hannover, Berlin, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt and Hamburg with
different weather conditions.
The variability of passive solar gains connected to the windows height above the ground
level for heating and warm periods separately was the next problem resolved by the author.
The research results concerning an analysis of the thermal environment in the living
apartments during the warm period were presented as well. The building indoor
environment was described by using an operative temperature and a PMV index.
A reduction of gains from solar radiation during the summer was performed by different
combinations of protection shields made by movable glass parts printed with various
patterns and internal alternatively external window shades with highly reflective
parameters. In order to reduce the internal air temperature, we used intensive mechanical
ventilation when the outdoor temperature was lower than the air temperature in rooms. The
next series of calculations were performed to investigate how variable air volume system
influences the thermal environment in living spaces.

4.2 Comments and conclusions

101

Solar radiation can be converted into thermal energy by using technical solutions too. In
order to compile the energy balance of the analyzed building, the operation of a solar
domestic hot water system was also investigated. The developed DHW system was
composed of solar collectors, storage tanks and an auxiliary water heater. The heat transfer
performance for tilt angles of solar panels changing from 0° to 90° for Hannover latitude
was simulated.
Another factor that strongly influences the conversion efficiency was heat loss to the
ambient caused by convection, conduction and infrared radiation. The flux of heat loss
from the solar panels was also estimated and discussed.
Another important question in the design of a DHW system is the optimal volume of a
storage tank. Calculations were performed for a storage volume ranging between 1 m3 to
12 m3. The capability of a developed solar active system for supporting the heating central
system was also verified and reported.
General comments and conclusions that could be drawn are summarized in this research.

4.2 Comments and conclusions
Based on the analysis of extensive results obtained from this study the following
conclusions can be made.
ƒ

It is proposed to find a procedure for determining the optimal value of window-towall ratio. This estimation technique consists of the following steps:
-

calculation of the energy balance for the windows on each side of the
building separately,

-

increase an area of the windows with the positive energy balance to the
maximum limit,

-

reduce the size of windows with negative energy balances to the minimal
value (or remove), which depends on the floor space for all living rooms.

This developed procedure is universal and can be used for any dwelling house.
As it turned out, the optimal value of the window-to-wall ratio for the whole
considered building was equal to 22 %. The total glazing area can be reduced by
over 46 % in comparison to the original version. But the area of the south facing
windows can be enlarged to 58 % of the façade size. It is crucial to note that the
optimal value of WWR can provide a reduction in heating energy consumption
significantly, i.e. over 30 %. Therefore, it can be concluded that the hypothesis,
which is raised in this dissertation, has been proven.

4.2 Comments and conclusions

102

Apart from that, a reduction of the glazing area lead to a decrease in the operate
temperature during the warm season, thus provided better thermal environment
quality in living spaces.
Furthermore, the analysis of the influence of the glazing system area on the
buildings energy demands showed that there is a linear correlation, described by
Eq. (3.1), between energy consumption for space heating and the window-to-wall
ratio.
ƒ

The next finding of this study was the determination of the relation between the
energy transfer and the windows’ height above ground level for the warm season as
well for the heating period – Eq. (3.2) and Eq. (3.3). Simulation results indicated
that the difference between the first and the last floor is high and equal to 31 % for
balcony-windows and up to 66 % for windows in winter month. The windows’
energy balance for the summer month showed that the difference between the first
and the last floor is quite small due to the sun's higher elevation above the horizon.

ƒ

The present work was also focused on the investigation of an intensive night
ventilation system during the warm months when the ambient temperature is lower
than inner air temperature. As it turned out, cooling by ambient air can be an
energy-saving solution. This ventilation system, coupled with external shading
devices, is sufficient to prevent living spaces from excessive overheating during the
entire warm part of the year. It was found that the amplitude between day and night
internal air temperatures is significantly higher for apartments with variable air
volume systems. Due to this effect, we can relatively quickly reduce and stabilize
the air temperature to a lower level inside living spaces. The difference between the
operate temperature in apartments with constant air volume systems and with night
cooling systems using the variable air volume flow increases from April to the first
half of June. This value stays approximately at the same level equal to 3.5°C for the
next period of the warm season. The maximum value differs from 4.1°C to 4.4°C
and the mean value differs from 2.7°C to 3.0°C depending on the apartment
location.

ƒ

Based on the results of the multivariate testing of the buildings’ energy
performance and thermal comfort conditions for warm seasons, we are allowed to
state that the window shade with the highest reflection surface mounted outside and
near the fenestration guarantees the best protection of gains from solar radiation.

ƒ

The results indicate that if we change the collector tilt angle from 25° to 60°, the
absorbed solar energy varies only about 10 % in the period of a year. However,
applying the extreme angles 0° (a horizontal position) and 90° (a vertical position)
leads to a significant reduction of the DHW systems efficiency. Energy conversion
decreases to 70 % of the maximal value in an optimal panel position for the angle
0° and for the angle 90° the same reduction reaches about 50 %. Simulation results

4.3 Future research

103

of the annual operation of the solar domestic hot water system revealed that the best
solar collector tilt angle is 70° for the cold period and 35° for summer time. If the
tilt angel is fixed, the best thermal performance can be obtained at an angle of 45°.
It turned out that the solar conversion process is about ten times lower in winter
than those during the summer time. Based on the analysis of the influence of the
volume of accumulated water on the thermal performance of the solar DHW
system, it can be concluded that the recommended volume of the storage tank for
the developed case is 4 m3. Moreover, it was shown how the increase of system
thermal capacity leads to the prolonging of the storage tank operating period with
raised output temperature and a simplified description of this physical process was
proposed. Results of the calculations showed that the temperature of storage water
increased over 50°C only between April and September. We can conclude that the
total designed area of solar collectors is too small to support the heating system.
ƒ

It is suggested to use the following equivalent parameters of Poroton-T9 in the
calculations: heat capacity equal to 855,1 J/kgK, heat conductivity equal to 0,09
W/mK and unit weight equal to 653,15 kg/m3.

4.3 Future research
The future work within the VASATI 2.0 project will be focused on:
ƒ

design and practical application of a building performance monitoring system,

ƒ

further experimental investigations of the thermal performance of complete external
walls and the estimation of real energy consumption when the co-operative
apartment buildings are occupied in order to verify the results of selected
estimations presented in this dissertation.

References

104

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issues and analysis options. From: Cooling Frontiers: The Advanced Edge of Cooling
Research and Applications in the Built Environment. Arizona State University : College of
Architecture and Environmental Design, 2001.
Al-Homoud, M.S. 2001. Computer-aided building energy analysis techniques. 2001.
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Appendix 1

112

PLANS OF BUILDING SUBSTRUCTURES AND THE FRONT / BACK /
SIDE ELEVATION VIEWS

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.1 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, north elevation view

113

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.2 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, east elevation view

114

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.3 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, south elevation view

115

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.4 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, west elevation view

116

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.5 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, apartment floor plan EG

117

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.6 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, apartment floor plan OG.1

118

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.7 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, apartment floor plan OG.2

119

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.8 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, apartment floor plan OG.3

120

Appendix 1

Fig. A1.9 VASATI 2.0-Projekt in Hannover, apartment floor plan DG

121

Appendix 2

LISTING OF THE BUILDING AND HVAC SYSTEM MODEL

122

Appendix 2

123

!-Generator IDFEditor 1.31
!-Option SortedOrder
!-NOTE: All comments with '!-' are ignored by the IDFEditor and are
generated automatically.
!- Use '!' comments if they need to be retained when using the IDFEditor.
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: VERSION ==

Monday, !- Day of Week for Start Day
No, !- Use Weather File Holidays and Special Days
Yes, !- Use Weather File Daylight Saving Period
No, !- Apply Weekend Holiday Rule
Yes, !- Use Weather File Rain Indicators
Yes; !- Use Weather File Snow Indicators

VERSION,
3.0; !- Version Identifier

!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: LOCATION ==

!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: BUILDING ==
Building,
148 - DIPL. ING. GÜNTER HAESE, !- Name
0, !- North Axis {deg}
Urban, !- Terrain
0.04, !- Loads Convergence Tolerance Value
0.2, !- Temperature Convergence Tolerance Value {deltaC}
FullExterior, !- Solar Distribution
50; !- Maximum Number of Warmup Days
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: TIMESTEP IN HOUR ==
Timestep,
4; !- Number of Timesteps per Hour
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: INSIDE CONVECTION ALGORITHM ==
SurfaceConvectionAlgorithm:Inside,
Detailed; !- Algorithm
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: OUTSIDE CONVECTION ALGORITHM ==
SurfaceConvectionAlgorithm:Outside,
Detailed; !- Algorithm
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SOLUTION ALGORITHM ==
HeatBalanceAlgorithm,
ConductionTransferFunction; !- Algorithm
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SHADOWING CALCULATIONS ==
ShadowCalculation,
20, !- Calculation Frequency
200; !- Maximum Figures in Shadow Overlap Calculations
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: DIAGNOSTICS ==
Output:Diagnostics,
DoNotMirrorDetachedShading, !- Key 1
DisplayExtraWarnings; !- Key 2
!== ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ZONE VOLUME CAPACITANCE
MULTIPLIER ==
ZoneCapacitanceMultiplier,
1; !- Multiplier
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: RUN CONTROL ==
SimulationControl,
Yes, !- Do Zone Sizing Calculation
No, !- Do System Sizing Calculation
No, !- Do Plant Sizing Calculation
No, !- Run Simulation for Sizing Periods
Yes; !- Run Simulation for Weather File Run Periods
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: RUNPERIOD ==
RunPeriod,
10, !- Begin Month
14, !- Begin Day of Month
3, !- End Month
31, !- End Day of Month

Site:Location,
HANNOVER, !- Name
52.47, !- Latitude {deg}
9.7, !- Longitude {deg}
1, !- Time Zone {hr}
55; !- Elevation {m}
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: DESIGNDAY ==
SizingPeriod:DesignDay,
Winter Design Day, !- Name
-12.7, !- Maximum Dry-Bulb Temperature {C}
0, !- Daily Temperature Range {deltaC}
-12.7, !- Humidity Indicating Conditions at Maximum Dry-Bulb
100666, !- Barometric Pressure {Pa}
0, !- Wind Speed {m/s}
0, !- Wind Direction {deg}
0, !- Sky Clearness
0, !- Rain Indicator
0, !- Snow Indicator
15, !- Day of Month
1, !- Month
Monday, !- Day Type
0, !- Daylight Saving Time Indicator
WetBulb; !- Humidity Indicating Type
SizingPeriod:DesignDay,
Summer Design Day, !- Name
28.9, !- Maximum Dry-Bulb Temperature {C}
10, !- Daily Temperature Range {deltaC}
19.3, !- Humidity Indicating Conditions at Maximum Dry-Bulb
100666, !- Barometric Pressure {Pa}
0, !- Wind Speed {m/s}
0, !- Wind Direction {deg}
0.98, !- Sky Clearness
0, !- Rain Indicator
0, !- Snow Indicator
15, !- Day of Month
7, !- Month
Monday, !- Day Type
1, !- Daylight Saving Time Indicator
WetBulb; !- Humidity Indicating Type
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: GROUNDREFLECTANCES ==
Site:GroundReflectance,
0.2, !- January Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- February Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- March Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- April Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- May Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- June Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- July Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- August Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- September Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- October Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2, !- November Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.2; !- December Ground Reflectance {dimensionless}
!== ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SNOW GROUND REFLECTANCE
MODIFIERS ==
Site:GroundReflectance:SnowModifier,
1.0, !- Ground Reflected Solar Modifier
1.0; !- Daylighting Ground Reflected Solar Modifier

Appendix 2
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: MATERIAL:REGULAR ==
Material,
Terracotta, !- Name
MediumSmooth, !- Roughness
0.015, !- Thickness {m}
1.3, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
2500, !- Density {kg/m3}
1200, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.85, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.78, !- Solar Absorptance
0.78; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
Stucco, !- Name
Smooth, !- Roughness
0.015, !- Thickness {m}
0.57, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1856, !- Density {kg/m3}
840, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.8, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.6500000, !- Solar Absorptance
0.6500000; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
Poroton_0_24, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.24, !- Thickness {m}
0.5, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1009.12, !- Density {kg/m3}
1000, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.75, !- Solar Absorptance
0.75; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
Poroton_0_30, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.3, !- Thickness {m}
0.0923, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
653.15, !- Density {kg/m3}
855.1, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.75, !- Solar Absorptance
0.75; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
Mineral_fiber_0_02, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.02, !- Thickness {m}
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
20., !- Density {kg/m3}
750., !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.75, !- Solar Absorptance
0.75; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
Mineral_daub, !- Name
MediumSmooth, !- Roughness
0.01, !- Thickness {m}
0.7, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1600, !- Density {kg/m3}
1200, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.85, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.7, !- Solar Absorptance
0.7; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
silicate_brick_0_12, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.12, !- Thickness {m}
0.8, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1600, !- Density {kg/m3}
880, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.85, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.7, !- Solar Absorptance
0.7; !- Visible Absorptance

124

Material,
concrete_0_12, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.12, !- Thickness {m}
0.72, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1400, !- Density {kg/m3}
840, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.7, !- Solar Absorptance
0.7; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
concrete_0_20, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.20, !- Thickness {m}
1.7, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
2500, !- Density {kg/m3}
840, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.7, !- Solar Absorptance
0.7; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
concrete_0_05, !- Name
Rough, !- Roughness
0.05, !- Thickness {m}
1.35, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1900, !- Density {kg/m3}
840, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.7, !- Solar Absorptance
0.7; !- Visible Absorptance
Material,
F17 Carpet, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.0127, !- Thickness {m}
0.06, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
288, !- Density {kg/m3}
1380; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I02 50mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.05, !- Thickness {m}
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
Wood subfloor - 19mm, !- Name
MediumSmooth, !- Roughness
0.019, !- Thickness {m}
0.115, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
800, !- Density {kg/m3}
1380; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I03 80mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.08, !- Thickness {m}
0.045, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I03 100mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.1, !- Thickness {m}
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I04 150mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.15, !- Thickness {m}

Appendix 2
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I05 300mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.3, !- Thickness {m}
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I05 350mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.35, !- Thickness {m}
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
I06 400mm insulation board, !- Name
MediumRough, !- Roughness
0.4, !- Thickness {m}
0.035, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
43, !- Density {kg/m3}
1210; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
Wood door - 35mm, !- Name
MediumSmooth, !- Roughness
0.035, !- Thickness {m}
0.18, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
800, !- Density {kg/m3}
1380; !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
Material,
GP01, !- Name
MediumSmooth, !- Roughness
1.2700000E-02, !- Thickness {m}
0.1600000, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
801.0000, !- Density {kg/m3}
837.0000, !- Specific Heat {J/kg-K}
0.9000000, !- Thermal Absorptance
0.7500000, !- Solar Absorptance
0.7500000; !- Visible Absorptance
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: MATERIAL:WINDOWGLASS ==
WindowMaterial:Glazing,
CLEAR 3MM, !- Name
SpectralAverage, !- Optical Data Type
, !- Window Glass Spectral Data Set Name
0.0032, !- Thickness {m}
0.610, !- Solar Transmittance at Normal Incidence
0.059, !- Front Side Solar Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.059, !- Back Side Solar Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.833, !- Visible Transmittance at Normal Incidence
0.070, !- Front Side Visible Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.070, !- Back Side Visible Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.0, !- Infrared Transmittance at Normal Incidence
0.840, !- Front Side Infrared Hemispherical Emissivity
0.840, !- Back Side Infrared Hemispherical Emissivity
1.000, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1; !- Dirt Correction Factor for Solar and Visible Transmittance
WindowMaterial:Glazing,
COAT 3MM, !- Name
SpectralAverage, !- Optical Data Type
, !- Window Glass Spectral Data Set Name
0.032, !- Thickness {m}
0.496, !- Solar Transmittance at Normal Incidence
0.331, !- Front Side Solar Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.395, !- Back Side Solar Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.780, !- Visible Transmittance at Normal Incidence
0.158, !- Front Side Visible Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.126, !- Back Side Visible Reflectance at Normal Incidence
0.0, !- Infrared Transmittance at Normal Incidence

125
0.840, !- Front Side Infrared Hemispherical Emissivity
0.033, !- Back Side Infrared Hemispherical Emissivity
1.000, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
1; !- Dirt Correction Factor for Solar and Visible Transmittance
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: MATERIAL:WINDOWGAS ==
WindowMaterial:Gas,
XENON 12_7MM, !- Name
Xenon, !- Gas Type
0.0127; !- Thickness {m}
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: MATERIAL:WINDOWSHADE ==
WindowMaterial:Shade,
HIGH REFLECT - LOW TRANS SHADE, !- Name
0.28, !- Solar Transmittance
0.7, !- Solar Reflectance
0.28, !- Visible Transmittance
0.7, !- Visible Reflectance
0.85, !- Thermal Hemispherical Emissivity
0.1, !- Thermal Transmittance
0.005, !- Thickness {m}
0.1, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
0.05, !- Shade to Glass Distance {m}
0.5, !- Top Opening Multiplier
0.5, !- Bottom Opening Multiplier
0.5, !- Left-Side Opening Multiplier
0.5, !- Right-Side Opening Multiplier
0.0; !- Airflow Permeability
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: MATERIAL:WINDOWSCREEN ==
WindowMaterial:Screen,
BRIGHT ALUMINUM SCREEN, !- Name
ModelAsDiffuse, !- Reflected Beam Transmittance Accounting Method
0.6, !- Diffuse Solar Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.6, !- Diffuse Visible Reflectance {dimensionless}
0.9, !- Thermal Hemispherical Emissivity {dimensionless}
221.0, !- Conductivity {W/m-K}
0.00154, !- Screen Material Spacing {m}
0.000254, !- Screen Material Diameter {m}
0.025, !- Screen to Glass Distance {m}
0.0, !- Top Opening Multiplier {dimensionless}
0.0, !- Bottom Opening Multiplier {dimensionless}
0.0, !- Left Side Opening Multiplier {dimensionless}
0.0, !- Right Side Opening Multiplier {dimensionless}
0; !- Angle of Resolution for Screen Transmittance Output Map {deg}
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CONSTRUCTION ==
Construction,
O-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Name
COAT 3MM, !- Outside Layer
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 2
CLEAR 3MM, !- Layer 3
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 4
CLEAR 3MM; !- Layer 5
Construction,
L-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Name
COAT 3MM, !- Outside Layer
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 2
CLEAR 3MM; !- Layer 3
Construction,
DOOR-OUT, !- Name
COAT 3MM, !- Outside Layer
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 2
CLEAR 3MM; !- Layer 3
Construction,
WALL-IN, !- Name
Mineral_daub, !- Outside Layer
silicate_brick_0_12, !- Layer 2
Mineral_daub; !- Layer 3

Appendix 2
Construction,
FLOOR, !- Name
Mineral_daub, !- Outside Layer
I03 100mm insulation board, !- Layer 2
concrete_0_20, !- Layer 3
I03 80mm insulation board, !- Layer 4
concrete_0_05, !- Layer 5
F17 Carpet; !- Layer 6
Construction,
CEILING, !- Name
F17 Carpet, !- Outside Layer
concrete_0_05, !- Layer 2
I03 80mm insulation board, !- Layer 3
concrete_0_20, !- Layer 4
Mineral_daub; !- Layer 5
Construction,
INTRNAL-MASS, !- Name
silicate_brick_0_12; !- Outside Layer
Construction,
DOOR-IN, !- Name
Wood door - 35mm; !- Outside Layer
Construction,
ROOF, !- Name
Mineral_daub, !- Outside Layer
concrete_0_05, !- Layer 2
I05 350mm insulation board, !- Layer 3
concrete_0_20, !- Layer 4
Mineral_daub; !- Layer 5
Construction,
WALL-OUT, !- Name
Mineral_daub, !- Outside Layer
Poroton_0_30, !- Layer 2
Mineral_fiber_0_02, !- Layer 3
Poroton_0_24, !- Layer 4
Stucco; !- Layer 5
Construction,
Screen_O-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Name
BRIGHT ALUMINUM SCREEN, !- Outside Layer
COAT 3MM, !- Layer 2
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 3
CLEAR 3MM, !- Layer 4
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 5
CLEAR 3MM; !- Layer 6
Construction,
Screen_L-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Name
BRIGHT ALUMINUM SCREEN, !- Outside Layer
COAT 3MM, !- Layer 2
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 3
CLEAR 3MM; !- Layer 4
Construction,
Shade_O-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Name
COAT 3MM, !- Outside Layer
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 2
CLEAR 3MM, !- Layer 3
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 4
CLEAR 3MM, !- Layer 5
HIGH REFLECT - LOW TRANS SHADE; !- Layer 6
Construction,
Shade_L-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Name
COAT 3MM, !- Outside Layer
XENON 12_7MM, !- Layer 2
CLEAR 3MM, !- Layer 3
HIGH REFLECT - LOW TRANS SHADE; !- Layer 4
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CONSTRUCTION WITH INTERNAL
SOURCE ==
Construction:InternalSource,
Slab Floor with Radiant, !- Name

126
4, !- Source Present After Layer Number
4, !- Temperature Calculation Requested After Layer Number
1, !- Dimensions for the CTF Calculation
0.15, !- Tube Spacing {m}
Mineral_daub, !- Outside Layer
concrete_0_12, !- Layer 2
I02 50mm insulation board, !- Layer 3
concrete_0_05, !- Layer 4
Terracotta; !- Layer 5
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ZONE ==
Zone,
EG1, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
EG2, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
EG3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
EG4, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
EG6, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}

Appendix 2
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG1, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG2, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG4, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG1-2, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG2-2, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}

127
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG3-2, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG4-2, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG1-3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG2-3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG3-3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm

Appendix 2
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
OG4-3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
DG1, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
DG3, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
DG4, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
Zone,
COR, !- Name
, !- Direction of Relative North {deg}
0, !- X Origin {m}
0, !- Y Origin {m}
0, !- Z Origin {m}
1, !- Type
1, !- Multiplier
0, !- Ceiling Height {m}
0, !- Volume {m3}
, !- Zone Inside Convection Algorithm
, !- Zone Outside Convection Algorithm
Yes; !- Part of Total Floor Area
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: WINDOWSHADINGCONTROL ==
WindowProperty:ShadingControl,
DOUBLE PANE WITH SHADE_W,!- Name
InteriorShade, !- Shading Type
Shade_O-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Construction with Shading Name

128
OnIfScheduleAllows, !- Shading Control Type
Shade_Schedule, !- Schedule Name
10.0, !- Setpoint {W/m2, W or deg C}
YES, !- Shading Control Is Scheduled
NO, !- Glare Control Is Active
, !- Shading Device Material Name
, !- Type of Slat Angle Control for Blinds
; !- Slat Angle Schedule Name
WindowProperty:ShadingControl,
DOUBLE PANE WITH SHADE_L,!- Name
InteriorShade, !- Shading Type
Shade_L-Dbl Clr 3mm/13mm Arg, !- Construction with Shading Name
OnIfScheduleAllows, !- Shading Control Type
Shade_Schedule, !- Schedule Name
10, !- Setpoint {W/m2, W or deg C}
YES, !- Shading Control Is Scheduled
NO, !- Glare Control Is Active
, !- Shading Device Material Name
, !- Type of Slat Angle Control for Blinds
; !- Slat Angle Schedule Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: WINDOWFRAMEANDDIVIDER ==
WindowProperty:FrameAndDivider,
Frame1, !- Name
0.06, !- Frame Width {m}
0.06, !- Frame Outside Projection {m}
0.06, !- Frame Inside Projection {m}
1.9, !- Frame Conductance {W/m2-K}
1.2,
!- Ratio of Frame-Edge Glass Conductance to Center-Of-Glass
Conductance
0.9, !- Frame Solar Absorptance
0.9, !- Frame Visible Absorptance
0.9, !- Frame Thermal Hemispherical Emissivity
, !- Divider Type
, !- Divider Width {m}
, !- Number of Horizontal Dividers
, !- Number of Vertical Dividers
, !- Divider Outside Projection {m}
, !- Divider Inside Projection {m}
, !- Divider Conductance {W/m2-K}
,
!- Ratio of Divider-Edge Glass Conductance to Center-Of-Glass
Conductance
, !- Divider Solar Absorptance
, !- Divider Visible Absorptance
; !- Divider Thermal Hemispherical Emissivity
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: OTHERSIDECOEFFICIENTS ==
SurfaceProperty:OtherSideCoefficients,
KG-temperature, !- Name
6.0, !- Combined Convective/Radiative Film Coefficient
16.0, !- Constant Temperature {C}
1, !- Constant Temperature Coefficient
0, !- External Dry-Bulb Temperature Coefficient
0, !- Ground Temperature Coefficient
0, !- Wind Speed Coefficient
0; !- Zone Air Temperature Coefficient
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SCHEDULETYPE ==
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Any Number; !- Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Fraction, !- Name
0.0 : 1.0, !- Range
Continuous; !- Numeric Type
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Temperature, !- Name
-60:200, !- Range
Continuous; !- Numeric Type
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Control Type, !- Name
0:4, !- Range

Appendix 2
Discrete; !- Numeric Type
ScheduleTypeLimits,
On/Off, !- Name
0:1, !- Range
Discrete; !- Numeric Type
ScheduleTypeLimits,
FlowRate, !- Name
0.0:10, !- Range
Continuous; !- Numeric Type
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Integer, !- Name
0.0:1.0, !- Range
Discrete; !- Numeric Type
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone1WindAC Cycling Fan Schedule Type; !- Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone2WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone3WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone4WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone5WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone6WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone7WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone8WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone9WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone10WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone11WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone12WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone13WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone14WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone15WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,

129
Air Conditioner:Window Zone16WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone17WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone18WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
ScheduleTypeLimits,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone19WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type; !Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SCHEDULE:COMPACT ==
Schedule:Compact,
Work Eff Sch, !- Name
Any Number, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0.0; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
INTERMITTENT, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: WeekDays SummerDesignDay, !- Field 2
Until: 8:00, !- Field 3
1.0, !- Field 4
Until: 18:00, !- Field 5
1.0, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
1.0, !- Field 8
For: AllOtherDays, !- Field 9
Until: 24:00, !- Field 10
1.0; !- Field 11
Schedule:Compact,
ON, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1.0; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Seasonal Reset Supply Air Temp Sch, !- Name
Temperature, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
16.0, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: AllDays, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
12.0, !- Field 8
Through: 12/31, !- Field 9
For: AllDays, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
16.0; !- Field 12
Schedule:Compact,
CW Loop Temp Schedule, !- Name
Temperature, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
6.67; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
HW Loop Temp Schedule, !- Name
Temperature, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3

Appendix 2
60; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1.0, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: WeekDays SummerDesignDay, !- Field 6
Until: 7:00, !- Field 7
1.0, !- Field 8
Until: 22:00, !- Field 9
1.0, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
1.0, !- Field 12
For: WinterDesignDay, !- Field 13
Until: 24:00, !- Field 14
0.0, !- Field 15
For: AllOtherDays, !- Field 16
Until: 24:00, !- Field 17
1.0, !- Field 18
Through: 12/31, !- Field 19
For: AllDays, !- Field 20
Until: 24:00, !- Field 21
1.0; !- Field 22
Schedule:Compact,
Baseboard_Sch, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1.0, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: AllDays, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
0.0, !- Field 8
Through: 12/31, !- Field 9
For: AllDays, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
1.0; !- Field 12
Schedule:Compact,
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0.0, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: WeekDays SummerDesignDay, !- Field 6
Until: 7:00, !- Field 7
1.0, !- Field 8
Until: 22:00, !- Field 9
1.0, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
1.0, !- Field 12
For: WinterDesignDay, !- Field 13
Until: 24:00, !- Field 14
0.0, !- Field 15
For: AllOtherDays, !- Field 16
Until: 24:00, !- Field 17
1.0, !- Field 18
Through: 12/31, !- Field 19
For: AllDays, !- Field 20
Until: 24:00, !- Field 21
0.0; !- Field 22
Schedule:Compact,
Heating Setpoints, !- Name
Temperature, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 7:00, !- Field 3
18.0, !- Field 4
Until: 22:00, !- Field 5

130
21.0, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
18.0, !- Field 8
Through: 10/15, !- Field 9
For: AllDays, !- Field 10
Until: 7:00, !- Field 11
15.0, !- Field 12
Until: 22:00, !- Field 13
15.0, !- Field 14
Until: 24:00, !- Field 15
15.0, !- Field 16
Through: 12/31, !- Field 17
For: AllDays, !- Field 18
Until: 7:00, !- Field 19
18.0, !- Field 20
Until: 22:00, !- Field 21
21.0, !- Field 22
Until: 24:00, !- Field 23
18.0; !- Field 24
Schedule:Compact,
Cooling Setpoints, !- Name
Temperature, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 7:00, !- Field 3
24.0, !- Field 4
Until: 22:00, !- Field 5
24.0, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
24.0; !- Field 8
Schedule:Compact,
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Name
Control Type, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: AllDays, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
2, !- Field 8
Through: 12/31, !- Field 9
For: AllDays, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
1; !- Field 12
Schedule:Compact,
Shading_Surf_Det, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1.0, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: AllDays, !- Field 6
Until: 7:00, !- Field 7
0.05, !- Field 8
Until: 20:00, !- Field 9
0.05, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
0.05, !- Field 12
Through: 12/31, !- Field 13
For: AllDays, !- Field 14
Until: 24:00, !- Field 15
1.0; !- Field 16
Schedule:Compact,
Shading_Surf_Det_House, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0.0; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Shading_Surf_Det_Trees, !- Name

Appendix 2
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0.95, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: AllDays, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
0.20, !- Field 12
Through: 12/31, !- Field 13
For: AllDays, !- Field 14
Until: 24:00, !- Field 15
0.95; !- Field 16
Schedule:Compact,
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Temp Sch, !- Name
Temperature, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
12.0; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
OCCUPY-1, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 8:00, !- Field 3
1.0, !- Field 4
Until: 11:00, !- Field 5
0.50, !- Field 6
Until: 12:00, !- Field 7
0.50, !- Field 8
Until: 13:00, !- Field 9
0.50, !- Field 10
Until: 16:00, !- Field 11
0.50, !- Field 12
Until: 17:00, !- Field 13
1.00, !- Field 14
Until: 19:00, !- Field 15
1.00, !- Field 16
Until: 24:00, !- Field 17
1.00; !- Field 18
Schedule:Compact,
LIGHTS-1, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 8:00, !- Field 3
0.05, !- Field 4
Until: 9:00, !- Field 5
0.05, !- Field 6
Until: 10:00, !- Field 7
0.05, !- Field 8
Until: 11:00, !- Field 9
0.05, !- Field 10
Until: 12:00, !- Field 11
0.05, !- Field 12
Until: 13:00, !- Field 13
0.05, !- Field 14
Until: 14:00, !- Field 15
0.05, !- Field 16
Until: 17:00, !- Field 17
0.5, !- Field 18
Until: 20:00, !- Field 19
1.0, !- Field 20
Until: 23:00, !- Field 21
0.3, !- Field 22
Until: 24:00, !- Field 23
0.05; !- Field 24
Schedule:Compact,
EQUIP-1, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2

131
Until: 7:00, !- Field 3
0.5, !- Field 4
Until: 9:00, !- Field 5
0.2, !- Field 6
Until: 14:00, !- Field 7
0.5, !- Field 8
Until: 15:00, !- Field 9
0.6, !- Field 10
Until: 16:00, !- Field 11
0.8, !- Field 12
Until: 18:00, !- Field 13
1.0, !- Field 14
Until: 22:00, !- Field 15
0.2, !- Field 16
Until: 24:00, !- Field 17
0.02; !- Field 18
Schedule:Compact,
ActSchd, !- Name
Any Number, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
117.239997864; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Clothing Sch, !- Name
Any Number, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1.0; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Velo Sch, !- Name
Any Number, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0.137; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Shade_Schedule, !- Name
Integer, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 4/1, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0, !- Field 4
Through: 10/15, !- Field 5
For: AllDays, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
1, !- Field 8
Through: 12/31, !- Field 9
For: AllDays, !- Field 10
Until: 24:00, !- Field 11
0; !- Field 12
Schedule:Compact,
INFIL-SCH, !- Name
Fraction, !- Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: WeekDays CustomDay1 CustomDay2, !- Field 2
Until: 7:00, !- Field 3
1.0, !- Field 4
Until: 21:00, !- Field 5
1.0, !- Field 6
Until: 24:00, !- Field 7
1.0, !- Field 8
For: Weekends Holiday, !- Field 9
Until: 24:00, !- Field 10
1.0, !- Field 11
For: SummerDesignDay, !- Field 12
Until: 24:00, !- Field 13
1.0, !- Field 14
For: WinterDesignDay, !- Field 15
Until: 24:00, !- Field 16
1.0; !- Field 17

Appendix 2
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone1WindAC Cycling Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone1WindAC Cycling Fan Schedule Type,
Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
0; !- Field 4

132

!-

Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone2WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone2WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone3WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone3WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone4WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone4WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone5WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone5WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone6WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone6WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone7WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone7WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone8WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone8WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone9WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone9WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2

Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone10WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone10WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone11WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone11WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone12WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone12WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone13WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone13WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone14WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone14WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone15WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone15WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone16WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone16WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone17WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone17WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone18WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name

Appendix 2
Air Conditioner:Window Zone18WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
Schedule:Compact,
Air Conditioner:Window Zone19WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone19WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule Type, !Schedule Type Limits Name
Through: 12/31, !- Field 1
For: AllDays, !- Field 2
Until: 24:00, !- Field 3
1; !- Field 4
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PEOPLE ==
People,
EG1 - People, !- Name
EG1, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
EG2 - People, !- Name
EG2, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
EG3 - People, !- Name
EG3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
EG4 - People, !- Name
EG4, !- Zone Name

133
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG1 - People, !- Name
OG1, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG2 - People, !- Name
OG2, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG3 - People, !- Name
OG3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG4 - People, !- Name
OG4, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method

Appendix 2
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG1-2 - People, !- Name
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG2-2 - People, !- Name
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG3-2 - People, !- Name
OG3-2, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG4-2 - People, !- Name
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}

134
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG1-3 - People, !- Name
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG2-3 - People, !- Name
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG3-3 - People, !- Name
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
OG4-3 - People, !- Name
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant

Appendix 2
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
DG1 - People, !- Name
DG1, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
DG3 - People, !- Name
DG3, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
People,
DG4 - People, !- Name
DG4, !- Zone Name
OCCUPY-1, !- Number of People Schedule Name
People, !- Number of People Calculation Method
2, !- Number of People
, !- People per Zone Floor Area {person/m2}
, !- Zone Floor Area per Person {m2/person}
0.3, !- Fraction Radiant
, !- Sensible Heat Fraction
ActSchd, !- Activity Level Schedule Name
, !- Enable ASHRAE 55 Comfort Warnings
ZoneAveraged, !- Mean Radiant Temperature Calculation Type
, !- Surface Name/Angle Factor List Name
Work Eff Sch, !- Work Efficiency Schedule Name
Clothing Sch, !- Clothing Insulation Schedule Name
Air Velo Sch, !- Air Velocity Schedule Name
Fanger; !- Thermal Comfort Model 1 Type
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: LIGHTS ==
Lights,
OG1 Lights 1, !- Name
OG1, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
301, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction

135
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG2 Lights 1, !- Name
OG2, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
251, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG3 Lights 1, !- Name
OG3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
281, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG4 Lights 1, !- Name
OG4, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
271, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG1-2 Lights 1, !- Name
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
301, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG2-2 Lights 1, !- Name
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
251, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG3-2 Lights 1, !- Name
OG3-2, !- Zone Name

Appendix 2
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
281, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG4-2 Lights 1, !- Name
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
271, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG1-3 Lights 1, !- Name
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
301, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG2-3 Lights 1, !- Name
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
251, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG3-3 Lights 1, !- Name
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
281, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
OG4-3 Lights 1, !- Name
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
271, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible

136
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
DG1 Lights 1, !- Name
DG1, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
301, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
DG3 Lights 1, !- Name
DG3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
251, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
DG4 Lights 1, !- Name
DG4, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
281, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
EG1 Lights 1, !- Name
EG1, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
301, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
EG2 Lights 1, !- Name
EG2, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
251, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
EG3 Lights 1, !- Name
EG3, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method

Appendix 2
281, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
EG4 Lights 1, !- Name
EG4, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
271, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
EG6 Lights 1, !- Name
EG6, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
151, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
Lights,
COR Lights 1, !- Name
COR, !- Zone Name
LIGHTS-1, !- Schedule Name
LightingLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
301, !- Lighting Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0.2, !- Return Air Fraction
0.59, !- Fraction Radiant
0.2, !- Fraction Visible
0, !- Fraction Replaceable
GeneralLights; !- End-Use Subcategory
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ELECTRIC EQUIPMENT ==
ElectricEquipment,
OG1 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG1, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
350.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG2 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG2, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
280.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,

137
OG3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG4 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG4, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
EG1 ElecEq 1, !- Name
EG1, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
350.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
EG2 ElecEq 1, !- Name
EG2, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
280.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
EG3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
EG3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
EG4 ElecEq 1, !- Name
EG4, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
DG1 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG1, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
350.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}

Appendix 2
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
DG3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
DG3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
DG4 ElecEq 1, !- Name
DG4, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG1-2 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
350.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG2-2 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
280.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG3-2 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG3-2, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost

138
OG1-3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
350.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG2-3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
280.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG3-3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
ElectricEquipment,
OG4-3 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: INFILTRATION ==
ZoneInfiltration,
COR InfilTRATION, !- Name
COR, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.015, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient

ElectricEquipment,
OG4-2 ElecEq 1, !- Name
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
EQUIP-1, !- Schedule Name
EquipmentLevel, !- Design Level Calculation Method
300.001, !- Design Level {W}
, !- Watts per Zone Floor Area {W/m2}
, !- Watts per Person {W/person}
0, !- Fraction Latent
0.3000000, !- Fraction Radiant
0; !- Fraction Lost

ZoneInfiltration,
OG1 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG1, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0045, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient

ElectricEquipment,

ZoneInfiltration,

Appendix 2
OG2 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG2, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0027, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0038, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG4 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG4, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0036, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG1-2 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0045, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG2-2 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0027, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG3-2 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG3-2, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0038, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour

139
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG4-2 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0036, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG1-3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0045, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG2-3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0027, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG3-3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0038, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
OG4-3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0036, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
EG1 InfilTRATION, !- Name
EG1, !- Zone Name

Appendix 2
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0045, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
EG2 InfilTRATION, !- Name
EG2, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0027, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
EG3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
EG3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0038, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
EG4 InfilTRATION, !- Name
EG4, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0036, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
DG1 InfilTRATION, !- Name
DG1, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0045, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
EG6 InfilTRATION, !- Name
EG6, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0027, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient

140
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
DG3 InfilTRATION, !- Name
DG3, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0038, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
ZoneInfiltration,
DG4 InfilTRATION, !- Name
DG4, !- Zone Name
INFIL-SCH, !- Schedule Name
Flow/Zone, !- Design Flow Rate Calculation Method
0.0036, !- Design Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Flow per Exterior Surface Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Air Changes per Hour
0, !- Constant Term Coefficient
0, !- Temperature Term Coefficient
0.2237, !- Velocity Term Coefficient
0; !- Velocity Squared Term Coefficient
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ZONE SIZING ==
Sizing:Zone,
OG1, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG2, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,

Appendix 2
OG3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG4, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
EG1, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
EG2, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}

141
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
EG3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
EG4, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
DG1, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
DG3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}

Appendix 2
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
DG4, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}

142
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG3-2, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}

Appendix 2
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
Sizing:Zone,
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
16, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
50., !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Temperature {C}
0.009, !- Zone Cooling Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
0.004, !- Zone Heating Design Supply Air Humidity Ratio {kg-H2O/kg-air}
Flow/Person, !- Outdoor Air Method
0.008333333, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Person {m3/s}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
0.0, !- Outdoor Air Flow per Zone {m3/s}
0.0, !- Zone Sizing Factor
DesignDayWithLimit, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Method
, !- Cooling Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow {m3/s}
, !- Cooling Minimum Air Flow Fraction
DesignDay, !- Heating Design Air Flow Method
, !- Heating Design Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow per Zone Floor Area {m3/s-m2}
, !- Heating Maximum Air Flow {m3/s}
; !- Heating Maximum Air Flow Fraction
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CURVE:BIQUADRATIC ==
Curve:Biquadratic,
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Name
0.942587793, !- Coefficient1 Constant
0.009543347, !- Coefficient2 x
0.000683770, !- Coefficient3 x**2
-0.011042676, !- Coefficient4 y
0.000005249, !- Coefficient5 y**2
-0.000009720, !- Coefficient6 x*y
12.77778, !- Minimum Value of x
23.88889, !- Maximum Value of x
23.88889, !- Minimum Value of y
46.11111; !- Maximum Value of y
Curve:Biquadratic,
WindACEIRFT, !- Name

143
0.342414409, !- Coefficient1 Constant
0.034885008, !- Coefficient2 x
-0.000623700, !- Coefficient3 x**2
0.004977216, !- Coefficient4 y
0.000437951, !- Coefficient5 y**2
-0.000728028, !- Coefficient6 x*y
12.77778, !- Minimum Value of x
23.88889, !- Maximum Value of x
23.88889, !- Minimum Value of y
46.11111; !- Maximum Value of y
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CURVE:QUADRATIC ==
Curve:Quadratic,
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Name
0.8, !- Coefficient1 Constant
0.2, !- Coefficient2 x
0.0, !- Coefficient3 x**2
0.5, !- Minimum Value of x
1.5; !- Maximum Value of x
Curve:Quadratic,
WindACEIRFFF, !- Name
1.1552, !- Coefficient1 Constant
-0.1808, !- Coefficient2 x
0.0256, !- Coefficient3 x**2
0.5, !- Minimum Value of x
1.5; !- Maximum Value of x
Curve:Quadratic,
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Name
0.85, !- Coefficient1 Constant
0.15, !- Coefficient2 x
0.0, !- Coefficient3 x**2
0.0, !- Minimum Value of x
1.0; !- Maximum Value of x
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: NODE LIST ==
NodeList,
Hot Water Loop Setpoint Node List, !- Name
HW Supply Outlet Node; !- Node 1 Name
NodeList,
OutsideAirInletNodes, !- Name
Zone1WindACOAInNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone2WindACOAInNode, !- Node 2 Name
Zone3WindACOAInNode, !- Node 3 Name
Zone4WindACOAInNode, !- Node 4 Name
Zone5WindACOAInNode, !- Node 5 Name
Zone6WindACOAInNode, !- Node 6 Name
Zone7WindACOAInNode, !- Node 7 Name
Zone8WindACOAInNode, !- Node 8 Name
Zone9WindACOAInNode, !- Node 9 Name
Zone10WindACOAInNode, !- Node 10 Name
Zone11WindACOAInNode, !- Node 11 Name
Zone12WindACOAInNode, !- Node 12 Name
Zone13WindACOAInNode, !- Node 13 Name
Zone14WindACOAInNode, !- Node 14 Name
Zone15WindACOAInNode, !- Node 15 Name
Zone16WindACOAInNode, !- Node 16 Name
Zone17WindACOAInNode, !- Node 17 Name
Zone18WindACOAInNode, !- Node 18 Name
Zone19WindACOAInNode; !- Node 19 Name
NodeList,
OutsideAirInletNodesERV, !- Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node, !- Node 1 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 2, !- Node 2 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 3, !- Node 3 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 4, !- Node 4 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 5, !- Node 5 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 6, !- Node 6 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 7, !- Node 7 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 8, !- Node 8 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 9, !- Node 9 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 10, !- Node 10 Name
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 11, !- Node 11 Name

Appendix 2
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 12,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 13,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 14,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 15,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 16,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 17,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 18,
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 19;

144
!- Node 12 Name
!- Node 13 Name
!- Node 14 Name
!- Node 15 Name
!- Node 16 Name
!- Node 17 Name
!- Node 18 Name
!- Node 19 Name

NodeList,
Zone1Inlets, !- Name
Zone1WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone1Exhausts, !- Name
Zone1WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 1 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone2Inlets, !- Name
Zone2WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 2; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone2Exhausts, !- Name
Zone2WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 2 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone3Inlets, !- Name
Zone3WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 3; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone3Exhausts, !- Name
Zone3WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 3 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone4Inlets, !- Name
Zone4WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 4; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone4Exhausts, !- Name
Zone4WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 4 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone5Inlets, !- Name
Zone5WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 5; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone5Exhausts, !- Name
Zone5WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 5 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone6Inlets, !- Name
Zone6WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 6; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone6Exhausts, !- Name
Zone6WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 6 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone7Inlets, !- Name
Zone7WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 7; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone7Exhausts, !- Name
Zone7WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 7 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name

NodeList,
Zone8Inlets, !- Name
Zone8WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 8; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone8Exhausts, !- Name
Zone8WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 8 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone9Inlets, !- Name
Zone9WindACAirOutletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 9; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone9Exhausts, !- Name
Zone9WindACAirInletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Zone 9 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone10Inlets, !- Name
Zone10WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 10; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone10Exhausts, !- Name
Zone10WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 10 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone11Inlets, !- Name
Zone11WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 11; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone11Exhausts, !- Name
Zone11WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 11 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone12Inlets, !- Name
Zone12WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 12; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone12Exhausts, !- Name
Zone12WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 12 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone13Inlets, !- Name
Zone13WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 13; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone13Exhausts, !- Name
Zone13WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 13 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone14Inlets, !- Name
Zone14WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 14; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone14Exhausts, !- Name
Zone14WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 14 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone15Inlets, !- Name
Zone15WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 15; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone15Exhausts, !- Name

Appendix 2
Zone15WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 15 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone16Inlets, !- Name
Zone16WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 16; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone16Exhausts, !- Name
Zone16WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 16 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone17Inlets, !- Name
Zone17WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 17; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone17Exhausts, !- Name
Zone17WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 17 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone18Inlets, !- Name
Zone18WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 18; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone18Exhausts, !- Name
Zone18WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 18 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone19Inlets, !- Name
Zone19WindACAirOutletNode, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 19; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Zone19Exhausts, !- Name
Zone19WindACAirInletNode,!- Node 1 Name
Zone 19 Exhaust Node; !- Node 2 Name
NodeList,
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Nodes, !- Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node, !- Node 1 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 2, !- Node 2 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 3, !- Node 3 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 4, !- Node 4 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 5, !- Node 5 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 6, !- Node 6 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 7, !- Node 7 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 8, !- Node 8 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 9, !- Node 9 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 10, !- Node 10 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 11, !- Node 11 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 12, !- Node 12 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 13, !- Node 13 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 14, !- Node 14 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 15, !- Node 15 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 16, !- Node 16 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 17, !- Node 17 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 18, !- Node 18 Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 19; !- Node 19 Name
NodeList,
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Nodes HR, !- Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node, !- Node 1 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 2, !- Node 2 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 3, !- Node 3 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 4, !- Node 4 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 5, !- Node 5 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 6, !- Node 6 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 7, !- Node 7 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 8, !- Node 8 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 9, !- Node 9 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 10, !- Node 10 Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 11, !- Node 11 Name

145
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 12,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 13,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 14,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 15,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 16,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 17,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 18,
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 19;

!- Node 12 Name
!- Node 13 Name
!- Node 14 Name
!- Node 15 Name
!- Node 16 Name
!- Node 17 Name
!- Node 18 Name
!- Node 19 Name

!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: BRANCH LIST ==
BranchList,
Heating Supply Side Branches, !- Name
Heating Supply Inlet Branch, !- Branch 1 Name
Heating Purchased Hot Water Branch, !- Branch 2 Name
Heating Supply Bypass Branch, !- Branch 3 Name
Heating Supply Outlet Branch; !- Branch 4 Name
BranchList,
Heating Demand Side Branches, !- Name
ZonesHWInletBranch, !- Branch 1 Name
Zone1HWBranch, !- Branch 2 Name
Zone2HWBranch, !- Branch 3 Name
Zone3HWBranch, !- Branch 4 Name
Zone4HWBranch, !- Branch 5 Name
Zone5HWBranch, !- Branch 6 Name
Zone6HWBranch, !- Branch 7 Name
Zone7HWBranch, !- Branch 8 Name
Zone8HWBranch, !- Branch 9 Name
Zone9HWBranch, !- Branch 10 Name
Zone10HWBranch, !- Branch 11 Name
Zone11HWBranch, !- Branch 12 Name
Zone12HWBranch, !- Branch 13 Name
Zone13HWBranch, !- Branch 14 Name
Zone14HWBranch, !- Branch 15 Name
Zone15HWBranch, !- Branch 16 Name
Zone16HWBranch, !- Branch 17 Name
Zone17HWBranch, !- Branch 18 Name
Zone18HWBranch, !- Branch 19 Name
Zone19HWBranch, !- Branch 20 Name
ZonesHWBypassBranch, !- Branch 21 Name
ZonesHWOutletBranch; !- Branch 22 Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CONNECTOR LIST ==
ConnectorList,
Heating Supply Side Connectors, !- Name
Connector:Splitter, !- Connector 1 Object Type
Heating Supply Splitter, !- Connector 1 Name
Connector:Mixer, !- Connector 2 Object Type
Heating Supply Mixer; !- Connector 2 Name
ConnectorList,
Heating Demand Side Connectors, !- Name
Connector:Splitter, !- Connector 1 Object Type
Zones HW Splitter, !- Connector 1 Name
Connector:Mixer, !- Connector 2 Object Type
Zones HW Mixer; !- Connector 2 Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: BRANCH ==
Branch,
Heating Supply Inlet Branch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Pump:VariableSpeed, !- Component 1 Object Type
HW Circ Pump, !- Component 1 Name
HW Supply Inlet Node, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
HW Pump Outlet Node, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Heating Purchased Hot Water Branch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
DistrictHeating, !- Component 1 Object Type
Purchased Heating, !- Component 1 Name
Purchased Heat Inlet Node, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Purchased Heat Outlet Node, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type

Appendix 2

Branch,
Heating Supply Bypass Branch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Pipe:Adiabatic, !- Component 1 Object Type
Heating Supply Side Bypass, !- Component 1 Name
Heating Supply Bypass Inlet Node, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Heating Supply Bypass Outlet Node, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Bypass; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Heating Supply Outlet Branch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Pipe:Adiabatic, !- Component 1 Object Type
Heating Supply Outlet, !- Component 1 Name
Heating Supply Exit Pipe Inlet Node, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
HW Supply Outlet Node, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Passive; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
ZonesHWInletBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Pipe:Adiabatic, !- Component 1 Object Type
ZonesHWInletPipe, !- Component 1 Name
HW Demand Inlet Node, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
HW Demand Entrance Pipe Outlet Node, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Passive; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
ZonesHWOutletBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Pipe:Adiabatic, !- Component 1 Object Type
ZonesHWOutletPipe, !- Component 1 Name
HW Demand Exit Pipe Inlet Node, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
HW Demand Outlet Node, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Passive; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone1HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone1Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone1BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone1BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone2HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone2Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone2BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone2BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone3HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone3Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone3BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone3BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone4HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone4Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone4BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone4BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone5HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone5Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name

146
Zone5BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone5BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone6HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone6Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone6BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone6BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone7HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone7Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone7BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone7BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone8HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone8Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone8BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone8BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone9HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone9Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone9BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone9BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone10HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone10Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone10BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone10BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone11HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone11Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone11BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone11BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone12HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone12Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone12BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone12BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone13HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone13Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone13BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone13BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone14HWBranch, !- Name

Appendix 2
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone14Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone14BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone14BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone15HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone15Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone15BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone15BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone16HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone16Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone16BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone16BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone17HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone17Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone17BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone17BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone18HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone18Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone18BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone18BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
Zone19HWBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Component 1 Object Type
Zone19Baseboard, !- Component 1 Name
Zone19BBHWInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
Zone19BBHWOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Active; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
Branch,
ZonesHWBypassBranch, !- Name
0, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Pipe:Adiabatic, !- Component 1 Object Type
ZonesHWBypassPipe, !- Component 1 Name
ZonesHWBypassInletNode, !- Component 1 Inlet Node Name
ZonesHWBypassOutletNode, !- Component 1 Outlet Node Name
Bypass; !- Component 1 Branch Control Type
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PIPE ==
Pipe:Adiabatic,
Heating Supply Side Bypass, !- Name
Heating Supply Bypass Inlet Node, !- Inlet Node Name
Heating Supply Bypass Outlet Node; !- Outlet Node Name
Pipe:Adiabatic,
Heating Supply Outlet, !- Name
Heating Supply Exit Pipe Inlet Node, !- Inlet Node Name
HW Supply Outlet Node; !- Outlet Node Name
Pipe:Adiabatic,
ZonesHWInletPipe, !- Name
HW Demand Inlet Node, !- Inlet Node Name
HW Demand Entrance Pipe Outlet Node; !- Outlet Node Name

147
Pipe:Adiabatic,
ZonesHWOutletPipe, !- Name
HW Demand Exit Pipe Inlet Node, !- Inlet Node Name
HW Demand Outlet Node; !- Outlet Node Name
Pipe:Adiabatic,
ZonesHWBypassPipe, !- Name
ZonesHWBypassInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
ZonesHWBypassOutletNode; !- Outlet Node Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PLANT LOOP ==
PlantLoop,
Hot Water Loop, !- Name
Water, !- Fluid Type
Hot Loop Operation, !- Plant Equipment Operation Scheme Name
HW Supply Outlet Node, !- Loop Temperature Setpoint Node Name
90, !- Maximum Loop Temperature {C}
10, !- Minimum Loop Temperature {C}
0.05, !- Maximum Loop Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Minimum Loop Flow Rate {m3/s}
autocalculate, !- Plant Loop Volume {m3}
HW Supply Inlet Node, !- Plant Side Inlet Node Name
HW Supply Outlet Node, !- Plant Side Outlet Node Name
Heating Supply Side Branches, !- Plant Side Branch List Name
Heating Supply Side Connectors, !- Plant Side Connector List Name
HW Demand Inlet Node, !- Demand Side Inlet Node Name
HW Demand Outlet Node, !- Demand Side Outlet Node Name
Heating Demand Side Branches, !- Demand Side Branch List Name
Heating Demand Side Connectors, !- Demand Side Connector List Name
Optimal; !- Load Distribution Scheme
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PLANT OPERATION SCHEMES ==
PlantEquipmentOperationSchemes,
Hot Loop Operation, !- Name
PlantEquipmentOperation:HeatingLoad, !- Control Scheme 1 Object Type
Purchased Heating Only, !- Control Scheme 1 Name
ON; !- Control Scheme 1 Schedule Name
!== ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: HEATING LOAD RANGE BASED
OPERATION ==
PlantEquipmentOperation:HeatingLoad,
Purchased Heating Only, !- Name
0, !- Load Range 1 Lower Limit {W}
1000000, !- Load Range 1 Upper Limit {W}
heating plant; !- Priority Control 1 Equipment List Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PLANT EQUIPMENT LIST ==
PlantEquipmentList,
heating plant, !- Name
DistrictHeating, !- Equipment 1 Object Type
Purchased Heating; !- Equipment 1 Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SPLITTER ==
Connector:Splitter,
Heating Supply Splitter, !- Name
Heating Supply Inlet Branch, !- Inlet Branch Name
Heating Purchased Hot Water Branch, !- Outlet Branch 1 Name
Heating Supply Bypass Branch; !- Outlet Branch 2 Name
Connector:Splitter,
Zones HW Splitter, !- Name
ZonesHWInletBranch, !- Inlet Branch Name
Zone1HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 1 Name
Zone2HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 2 Name
Zone3HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 3 Name
Zone4HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 4 Name
Zone5HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 5 Name
Zone6HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 6 Name
Zone7HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 7 Name
Zone8HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 8 Name
Zone9HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 9 Name
Zone10HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 10 Name
Zone11HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 11 Name

Appendix 2
Zone12HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 12 Name
Zone13HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 13 Name
Zone14HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 14 Name
Zone15HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 15 Name
Zone16HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 16 Name
Zone17HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 17 Name
Zone18HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 18 Name
Zone19HWBranch, !- Outlet Branch 19 Name
ZonesHWBypassBranch; !- Outlet Branch 20 Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: MIXER ==
Connector:Mixer,
Heating Supply Mixer, !- Name
Heating Supply Outlet Branch, !- Outlet Branch Name
Heating Purchased Hot Water Branch, !- Inlet Branch 1 Name
Heating Supply Bypass Branch; !- Inlet Branch 2 Name
Connector:Mixer,
Zones HW Mixer, !- Name
ZonesHWOutletBranch, !- Outlet Branch Name
Zone1HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 1 Name
Zone2HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 2 Name
Zone3HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 3 Name
Zone4HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 4 Name
Zone5HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 5 Name
Zone6HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 6 Name
Zone7HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 7 Name
Zone8HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 8 Name
Zone9HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 9 Name
Zone10HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 10 Name
Zone11HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 11 Name
Zone12HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 12 Name
Zone13HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 13 Name
Zone14HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 14 Name
Zone15HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 15 Name
Zone16HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 16 Name
Zone17HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 17 Name
Zone18HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 18 Name
Zone19HWBranch, !- Inlet Branch 19 Name
ZonesHWBypassBranch; !- Inlet Branch 20 Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: OUTSIDE AIR INLET NODE LIST ==
OutdoorAir:NodeList,
OutsideAirInletNodes, !- Node or NodeList Name 1
OutsideAirInletNodesERV; !- Node or NodeList Name 2
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: OUTSIDE AIR MIXER ==
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone1WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone1WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone1WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone1WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone1WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone2WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone2WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone2WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone2WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone2WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone3WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone3WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone3WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone3WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone3WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone4WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone4WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone4WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone4WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone4WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name

148
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone5WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone5WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone5WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone5WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone5WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone6WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone6WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone6WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone6WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone6WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone7WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone7WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone7WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone7WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone7WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone8WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone8WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone8WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone8WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone8WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone9WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone9WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone9WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone9WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone9WindACAirInletNode; !- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone10WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone10WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone10WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone10WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone10WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone11WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone11WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone11WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone11WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone11WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone12WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone12WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone12WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone12WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone12WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone13WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone13WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone13WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone13WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone13WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone14WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone14WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone14WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone14WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone14WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone15WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone15WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone15WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone15WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone15WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,

Appendix 2
Zone16WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone16WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone16WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone16WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone16WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone17WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone17WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone17WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone17WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone17WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone18WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone18WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone18WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone18WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone18WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
OutdoorAir:Mixer,
Zone19WindACOAMixer, !- Name
Zone19WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Mixed Air Node Name
Zone19WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Stream Node Name
Zone19WindACExhNode, !- Relief Air Stream Node Name
Zone19WindACAirInletNode;!- Return Air Stream Node Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SET POINT MANAGER:SCHEDULED ==
SetpointManager:Scheduled,
Hot Water Loop Setpoint Manager, !- Name
Temperature, !- Control Variable
HW Loop Temp Schedule, !- Schedule Name
Hot Water Loop Setpoint Node List; !- Setpoint Node or NodeList Name
SetpointManager:Scheduled,
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Temp Manager, !- Name
Temperature, !- Control Variable
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Temp Sch, !- Schedule Name
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Nodes; !- Setpoint Node or NodeList Name
SetpointManager:Scheduled,
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Temp Manager HR, !- Name
Temperature, !- Control Variable
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Temp Sch, !- Schedule Name
Heat Exchanger Supply Air Nodes HR; !- Setpoint Node or NodeList Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CONTROLLER:STAND ALONE ERV ==
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 1, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 2, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 3, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit

149

ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 4, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 5, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 6, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 7, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 8, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 9, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 10, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 11, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name

Appendix 2
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 12, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 13, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 14, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 15, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 16, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 17, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 18, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator:Controller,
ERV OA Controller 19, !- Name
19., !- Temperature High Limit {C}
14., !- Temperature Low Limit {C}
, !- Enthalpy High Limit {J/kg}

150
, !- Dewpoint Temperature Limit {C}
, !- Electronic Enthalpy Limit Curve Name
NoExhaustAirTemperatureLimit, !- Exhaust Air Temperature Limit
NoExhaustAirEnthalpyLimit; !- Exhaust Air Enthalpy Limit
!== ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: CONTROLLED ZONE EQUIP
CONFIGURATION ==
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG1, !- Zone Name
Zone1Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone1Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone1Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 1 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 1 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG2, !- Zone Name
Zone2Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone2Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone2Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 2 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 2 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG3, !- Zone Name
Zone3Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone3Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone3Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 3 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 3 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG4, !- Zone Name
Zone4Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone4Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone4Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 4 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 4 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
EG1, !- Zone Name
Zone5Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone5Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone5Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 5 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 5 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
EG2, !- Zone Name
Zone6Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone6Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone6Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 6 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 6 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
EG3, !- Zone Name
Zone7Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone7Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone7Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 7 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 7 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
EG4, !- Zone Name
Zone8Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone8Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone8Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 8 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 8 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
Zone9Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone9Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone9Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 9 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name

Appendix 2
Zone 9 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
Zone10Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone10Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone10Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 10 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 10 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG3-2, !- Zone Name
Zone11Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone11Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone11Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 11 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 11 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
Zone12Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone12Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone12Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 12 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 12 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
Zone13Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone13Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone13Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 13 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 13 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
Zone14Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone14Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone14Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 14 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 14 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
Zone15Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone15Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone15Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 15 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 15 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
Zone16Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone16Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone16Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 16 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 16 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
DG1, !- Zone Name
Zone17Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone17Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone17Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 17 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 17 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
DG3, !- Zone Name
Zone18Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone18Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name
Zone18Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 18 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 18 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentConnections,
DG4, !- Zone Name
Zone19Equipment, !- Zone Conditioning Equipment List Name
Zone19Inlets, !- Zone Air Inlet Node or NodeList Name

151
Zone19Exhausts, !- Zone Air Exhaust Node or NodeList Name
Zone 19 Node, !- Zone Air Node Name
Zone 19 Outlet Node; !- Zone Return Air Node Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ZONE EQUIPMENT LIST ==
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone1Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone1WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone1Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone2Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 2, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone2WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone2Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone3Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 3, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone3WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone3Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone4Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 4, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone4WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone4Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone5Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 5, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone5WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone5Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name

Appendix 2
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone6Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 6, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone6WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone6Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone7Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 7, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone7WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone7Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone8Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 8, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone8WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone8Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone9Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 9, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone9WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone9Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone10Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 10, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone10WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone10Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority

152
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone11Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 11, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone11WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone11Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone12Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 12, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone12WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone12Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone13Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 13, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone13WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone13Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone14Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 14, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone14WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone14Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone15Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 15, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone15WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone15Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone16Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type

Appendix 2
Stand Alone ERV 16, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone16WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone16Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone17Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 17, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone17WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone17Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone18Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 18, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone18WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone18Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:EquipmentList,
Zone19Equipment, !- Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator, !- Zone Equipment 1 Object Type
Stand Alone ERV 19, !- Zone Equipment 1 Name
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Cooling Priority
1, !- Zone Equipment 1 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner, !- Zone Equipment 2 Object Type
Zone19WindAC, !- Zone Equipment 2 Name
2, !- Zone Equipment 2 Cooling Priority
3, !- Zone Equipment 2 Heating Priority
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water, !- Zone Equipment 3 Object Type
Zone19Baseboard, !- Zone Equipment 3 Name
3, !- Zone Equipment 3 Cooling Priority
2; !- Zone Equipment 3 Heating Priority
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: AIR CONDITIONER:WINDOW:CYCLING
==
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone1WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone1WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone1WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone1WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone1WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone1WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone1WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone1WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone1WindAC Cycling Fan Schedule, !- Supply Air
Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
BlowThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type

153
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone2WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone2WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone2WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone2WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone2WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone2WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone2WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone2WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone2WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
BlowThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone3WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone3WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone3WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone3WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone3WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone3WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone3WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone3WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone3WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone4WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone4WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone4WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone4WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone4WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone4WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone4WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone4WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone4WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone5WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone5WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone5WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone5WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone5WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone5WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone5WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone5WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone5WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone6WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone6WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name

Appendix 2
Zone6WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone6WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone6WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone6WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone6WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone6WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone6WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone7WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone7WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone7WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone7WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone7WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone7WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone7WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone7WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone7WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone8WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone8WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone8WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone8WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone8WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone8WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone8WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone8WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone8WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone9WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone9WindACAirInletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone9WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone9WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone8WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone9WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone9WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone9WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone9WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule, !- Supply
Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone10WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone10WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone10WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone10WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone10WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone10WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone10WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone10WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name

154
Air Conditioner:Window Zone10WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone11WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone11WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone11WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone11WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone11WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone11WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone11WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone11WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone11WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone12WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone12WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone12WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone12WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone12WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone12WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone12WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone12WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone12WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone13WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone13WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone13WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone13WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone13WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone13WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone13WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone13WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone13WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone14WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone14WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone14WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone14WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone14WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone14WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone14WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone14WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone14WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type

!-

!-

!-

!-

!-

Appendix 2
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone15WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone15WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone15WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone15WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone15WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone15WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone15WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone15WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone15WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone16WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone16WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone16WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone16WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone16WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone16WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone16WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone16WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone16WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone17WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone17WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone17WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone17WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone17WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone17WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone17WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone17WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone17WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone18WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone18WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone18WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone18WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone18WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone18WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone18WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone18WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone18WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
ZoneHVAC:WindowAirConditioner,
Zone19WindAC, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.6, !- Maximum Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.0, !- Maximum Outdoor Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone19WindACAirInletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name

155
Zone19WindACAirOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
Zone19WindACOAInNode, !- Outdoor Air Node Name
Zone19WindACExhNode, !- Air Relief Node Name
Zone19WindACOAMixer, !- Outdoor Air Mixer Name
Zone19WindACFan, !- Fan Name
Zone19WindACDXCoil, !- DX Cooling Coil Name
Air Conditioner:Window Zone19WindAC Continuous Fan Schedule,
Supply Air Fan Operating Mode Schedule Name
DrawThrough, !- Fan Placement
0.001, !- Cooling Convergence Tolerance
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed; !- Cooling Coil Object Type
!-

!==
ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ENERGY RECOVERY
VENTILATOR:STAND ALONE ==
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 1, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 1, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 1; !- Controller Name

!-

ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 2, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 2, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 2, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 2, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 2; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 3, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 3, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 3, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 3, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 3; !- Controller Name

!-

ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 4, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 4, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 4, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 4, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 4; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 5, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 5, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 5, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 5, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 5; !- Controller Name

!-

!-

ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 6, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 6, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 6, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 6, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 6; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 7, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name

Appendix 2
OA Heat Recovery 7, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 7, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 7, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 7; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 8, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 8, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 8, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 8, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 8; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 9, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 9, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 9, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 9, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 9; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 10, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 10, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 10, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 10, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 10; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 11, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 11, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 11, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 11, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 11; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 12, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 12, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 12, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 12, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 12; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 13, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 13, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 13, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 13, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 13; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 14, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 14, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 14, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 14, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 14; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,

156
Stand Alone ERV 15, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 15, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 15, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 15, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 15; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 16, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 16, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 16, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 16, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 16; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 17, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 17, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 17, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 17, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 17; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 18, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 18, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 18, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 18, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 18; !- Controller Name
ZoneHVAC:EnergyRecoveryVentilator,
Stand Alone ERV 19, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
OA Heat Recovery 19, !- Heat Exchanger Name
0.016666, !- Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.016666, !- Exhaust Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 19, !- Supply Air Fan Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 19, !- Exhaust Air Fan Name
ERV OA Controller 19; !- Controller Name
!==
ALL OBJECTS
HEATER:WATER:CONVECTIVE ==

IN

ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone1Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone1BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone1BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0008, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone2Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone2BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone2BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0006, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone3Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone3BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone3BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance

CLASS:

BASEBOARD

Appendix 2

ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone4Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone4BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone4BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone5Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone5BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone5BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0008, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone6Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone6BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone6BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0006, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone7Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone7BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone7BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone8Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone8BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone8BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone9Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone9BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone9BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0008, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone10Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone10BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone10BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0006, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone11Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone11BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone11BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone12Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone12BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone12BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name

157
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone13Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone13BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone13BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0008, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone14Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone14BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone14BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0006, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone15Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone15BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone15BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone16Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone16BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone16BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone17Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone17BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone17BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0008, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone18Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone18BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone18BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
ZoneHVAC:Baseboard:Convective:Water,
Zone19Baseboard, !- Name
Baseboard_Sch, !- Availability Schedule Name
Zone19BBHWInletNode, !- Inlet Node Name
Zone19BBHWOutletNode, !- Outlet Node Name
400., !- U-Factor Times Area Value {W/K}
0.0007, !- Maximum Water Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.001; !- Convergence Tolerance
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: ZONE CONTROL:THERMOSTATIC ==
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 1 Thermostat, !- Name
OG1, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name

Appendix 2
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 2 Thermostat, !- Name
OG2, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 3 Thermostat, !- Name
OG3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 4 Thermostat, !- Name
OG4, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 5 Thermostat, !- Name
EG1, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 6 Thermostat, !- Name
EG2, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 7 Thermostat, !- Name
EG3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 8 Thermostat, !- Name
EG4, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 9 Thermostat, !- Name
OG1-2, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 10 Thermostat, !- Name
OG2-2, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name

158
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 11 Thermostat, !- Name
OG3-2, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 12 Thermostat, !- Name
OG4-2, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 13 Thermostat, !- Name
OG1-3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 14 Thermostat, !- Name
OG2-3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 15 Thermostat, !- Name
OG3-3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 16 Thermostat, !- Name
OG4-3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 17 Thermostat, !- Name
DG1, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 18 Thermostat, !- Name
DG3, !- Zone Name
Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name
ZoneControl:Thermostat,
Zone 19 Thermostat, !- Name
DG4, !- Zone Name

Appendix 2

159

Zone Control Type Sched, !- Control Type Schedule Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating, !- Control 1 Object Type
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Control 1 Name
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling, !- Control 2 Object Type
Cooling Setpoint with SB;!- Control 2 Name

WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode

!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SINGLE HEATING SETPOINT ==
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleHeating,
Heating Setpoint with SB,!- Name
Heating Setpoints; !- Setpoint Temperature Schedule Name

Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone3WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone3WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone3WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode

!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: SINGLE COOLING SETPOINT ==
ThermostatSetpoint:SingleCooling,
Cooling Setpoint with SB,!- Name
Cooling Setpoints; !- Setpoint Temperature Schedule Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PURCHASED:HOT WATER ==
DistrictHeating,
Purchased Heating, !- Name
Purchased Heat Inlet Node, !- Hot Water Inlet Node Name
Purchased Heat Outlet Node, !- Hot Water Outlet Node Name
1000000; !- Nominal Capacity {W}
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: PUMP:VARIABLE SPEED ==
Pump:VariableSpeed,
HW Circ Pump, !- Name
HW Supply Inlet Node, !- Inlet Node Name
HW Pump Outlet Node, !- Outlet Node Name
0.02, !- Rated Flow Rate {m3/s}
60000, !- Rated Pump Head {Pa}
2250, !- Rated Power Consumption {W}
0.87, !- Motor Efficiency
0.0, !- Fraction of Motor Inefficiencies to Fluid Stream
0, !- Coefficient 1 of the Part Load Performance Curve
1, !- Coefficient 2 of the Part Load Performance Curve
0, !- Coefficient 3 of the Part Load Performance Curve
0, !- Coefficient 4 of the Part Load Performance Curve
0, !- Minimum Flow Rate {m3/s}
Intermittent; !- Pump Control Type
!==
ALL
OBJECTS
COIL:DX:COOLINGBYPASSFACTOREMPIRICAL ==

IN

CLASS:

Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone1WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone1WindACFanOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone1WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
CyclingFanAndCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone2WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone2WindACFanOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone2WindACAirOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name

Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone4WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone4WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone4WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone5WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone5WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone5WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone6WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone6WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone6WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name

Appendix 2
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone7WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone7WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone7WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone8WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone8WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone8WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone9WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone9WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone9WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone10WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone10WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone10WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name

160
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone11WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone11WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone11WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone12WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone12WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone12WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone13WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone13WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone13WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone14WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone14WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone14WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name

Appendix 2
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone15WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone15WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone15WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone16WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone16WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone16WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone17WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone17WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone17WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone18WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone18WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone18WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode

161

Coil:Cooling:DX:SingleSpeed,
Zone19WindACDXCoil, !- Name
CoolingCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
10500, !- Rated Total Cooling Capacity {W}
0.75, !- Rated Sensible Heat Ratio
3.0, !- Rated COP
0.6, !- Rated Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
Zone19WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone19WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Outlet Node Name
WindACCoolCapFT, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Temperature
Curve Name
WindACCoolCapFFF, !- Total Cooling Capacity Function of Flow Fraction
Curve Name
WindACEIRFT, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Temperature Curve Name
WindACEIRFFF, !- Energy Input Ratio Function of Flow Fraction Curve
Name
WindACPLFFPLR, !- Part Load Fraction Correlation Curve Name
ContinuousFanWithCyclingCompressor; !- Supply Air Fan Operating Mode
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: FAN:SIMPLE:CONSTVOLUME ==
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone2WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone2WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone2WindACFanOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone3WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone3WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone3WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone4WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone4WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone4WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone5WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone5WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone5WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone6WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone6WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone6WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,

Appendix 2
Zone7WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone7WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone7WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone8WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone8WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone8WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone9WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone9WindACDXOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone9WindACAirOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone10WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone10WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone10WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone11WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone11WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone11WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone12WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone12WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone12WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone13WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone13WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone13WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone14WindACFan, !- Name

162
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone14WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone14WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone15WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone15WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone15WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone16WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone16WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone16WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone17WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone17WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone17WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone18WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone18WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone18WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:ConstantVolume,
Zone19WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone19WindACDXOutletNode,!- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone19WindACAirOutletNode; !- Air Outlet Node Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: FAN:SIMPLE:ONOFF ==
Fan:OnOff,
Zone1WindACFan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.6, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Zone1WindACOAMixerOutletNode, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Zone1WindACFanOutletNode;!- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,

Appendix 2
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 2, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 2, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 2; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 2, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 2, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 2; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 3, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 3, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 3; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 3, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 3, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 3; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 4, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 4, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 4; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 4, !- Name

163
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 4, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 4; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 5, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 5, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 5; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 5, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 5, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 5; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 6, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 6, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 6; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 6, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 6, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 6; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 7, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 7, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 7; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 7, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 7, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 7; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 8, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name

Appendix 2
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 8, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 8; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 8, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 8, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 8; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 9, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 9, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 9; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 9, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 9, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 9; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 10, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 10, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 10; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 10, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 10, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 10; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 11, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 11, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 11; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 11, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency

164
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 11, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 11; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 12, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 12, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 12; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 12, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 12, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 12; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 13, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 13, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 13; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 13, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 13, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 13; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 14, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 14, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 14; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 14, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 14, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 14; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 15, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}

Appendix 2
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 15, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 15; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 15, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 15, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 15; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 16, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 16, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 16; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 16, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 16, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 16; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 17, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 17, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 17; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 17, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 17, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 17; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 18, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 18, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 18; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 18, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}

165
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 18, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 18; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan 19, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 19, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Supply Fan Outlet Node 19; !- Air Outlet Node Name
Fan:OnOff,
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan 19, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.5, !- Fan Efficiency
75.0, !- Pressure Rise {Pa}
0.03001, !- Maximum Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.9, !- Motor Efficiency
1.0, !- Motor In Airstream Fraction
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 19, !- Air Inlet Node Name
Stand Alone ERV Exhaust Fan Outlet Node 19; !- Air Outlet Node Name
!== ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: HEAT EXCHANGER:AIR TO
AIR:GENERIC ==
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 1, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 1 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 2, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 2, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 2, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 2 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 2, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 3, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}

Appendix 2
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 3, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 3, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 3 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 3, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 4, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 4, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 4, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 4 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 4, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 5, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 5, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 5, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 5 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 5, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 6, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 6, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 6, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 6 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 6, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name

166
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 7, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 7, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 7, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 7 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 7, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 8, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 8, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 8, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 8 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 8, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 9, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 9, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 9, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 9 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 9, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 10, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}

Appendix 2
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 10, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 10, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 10 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 10, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 11, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 11, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 11, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 11 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 11, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 12, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 12, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 12, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 12 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 12, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 13, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 13, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 13, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 13 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 13, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control

167
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 14, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 14, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 14, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 14 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 14, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 15, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 15, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 15, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 15 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 15, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 16, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 16, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 16, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 16 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 16, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 17, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}

Appendix 2
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 17, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 17, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 17 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 17, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 18, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 18, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 18, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 18 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 18, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
HeatExchanger:AirToAir:SensibleAndLatent,
OA Heat Recovery 19, !- Name
FanAndCoilAvailSched, !- Availability Schedule Name
0.03001, !- Nominal Supply Air Flow Rate {m3/s}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Heating Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.76, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0068, !- Latent Effectiveness at 100% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.81, !- Sensible Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
0.0073, !- Latent Effectiveness at 75% Cooling Air Flow {dimensionless}
ERV Outside Air Inlet Node 19, !- Supply Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Outlet Node 19, !- Supply Air Outlet Node Name
Zone 19 Exhaust Node, !- Exhaust Air Inlet Node Name
Heat Recovery Secondary Outlet Node 19, !- Exhaust Air Outlet Node Name
50.0, !- Nominal Electric Power {W}
Yes, !- Supply Air Outlet Temperature Control
Rotary, !- Heat Exchanger Type
MinimumExhaustTemperature, !- Frost Control Type
1.7; !- Threshold Temperature {C}
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT VARIABLE ==
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Outdoor Dry Bulb, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone/Sys Sensible Cooling Rate, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency

168
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone/Sys Air Temperature,!- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone Window Heat Gain Energy, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone Window Heat Loss Energy, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Baseboard Heating Rate, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Heat Exchanger Total Heating Energy, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Heat Exchanger Total Cooling Energy, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Heat Recovery Sensible Effectiveness, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Heat Recovery Latent Effectiveness, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone Window Heat Gain Energy, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone Window Heat Loss Energy, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
FangerPMV, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT METER ==
Output:Meter,
EnergyTransfer:Building, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter,
Heating:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter,
Cooling:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency

Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone/Sys Sensible Heating Rate, !- Variable Name
Hourly; !- Reporting Frequency

Output:Meter,
HeatRecoveryForHeating:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency

Output:Variable,
*, !- Key Value
Zone Operative Temperature, !- Variable Name

Output:Meter,
HeatRecoveryForCooling:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency

Appendix 2

!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT METERFILEONLY ==
Output:Meter:MeterFileOnly,
Electricity:Building, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter:MeterFileOnly,
Heating:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter:MeterFileOnly,
Cooling:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter:MeterFileOnly,
EnergyTransfer:Building, !- Name
Monthly; !- Reporting Frequency
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT CUMULATIVE METER ==
Output:Meter:Cumulative,
EnergyTransfer:Building, !- Name
Daily; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter:Cumulative,
Heating:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Daily; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter:Cumulative,
Cooling:EnergyTransfer, !- Name
Daily; !- Reporting Frequency
Output:Meter:Cumulative,
Electricity:Plant, !- Name
Daily; !- Reporting Frequency
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT ==
Output:Reports,
VariableDictionary; !- Type of Report
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT:TABLE:STYLE ==
OutputControl:Table:Style,
TabAndHTML, !- Column Separator
JtoKWH; !- Unit Conversion
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT:TABLE:PREDEFINED ==
Output:Table:SummaryReports,
AnnualBuildingUtilityPerformanceSummary, !- Report 1 Name
InputVerificationandResultsSummary, !- Report 2 Name
HVACSizingSummary, !- Report 3 Name
EnvelopeSummary; !- Report 4 Name
!- == ALL OBJECTS IN CLASS: REPORT:TABLE:MONTHLY ==
Output:Table:Monthly,
Zone Heating and Cooling Summary, !- Name

169
2, !- Digits After Decimal
Zone/Sys Sensible Heating Energy, !- Variable or Meter 1 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 1
Zone/Sys Sensible Heating Rate, !- Variable or Meter 2 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 2
Zone/Sys Sensible Cooling Energy, !- Variable or Meter 3 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 3
Zone/Sys Sensible Cooling Rate, !- Variable or Meter 4 Name
SumOrAverage; !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 4
Output:Table:Monthly,
Zone Window Energy Summary, !- Name
, !- Digits After Decimal
Zone Window Heat Gain Energy, !- Variable or Meter 1 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 1
Zone Window Heat Gain, !- Variable or Meter 2 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 2
Zone Window Heat Loss Energy, !- Variable or Meter 3 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 3
Zone Window Heat Loss, !- Variable or Meter 4 Name
SumOrAverage; !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 4
Output:Table:Monthly,
Average Outdoor Conditions, !- Name
2, !- Digits After Decimal
Outdoor Dry Bulb, !- Variable or Meter 1 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 1
Outdoor Relative Humidity, !- Variable or Meter 2 Name
SumOrAverage; !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 2
Output:Table:Monthly,
Mechanical Ventilation Loads, !- Name
, !- Digits After Decimal
Zone Mechanical Ventilation Air Change Rate, !- Variable or Meter 1 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 1
Zone Mechanical Ventilation Volume Flow Rate, !- Variable or Meter 2 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 2
Zone Mechanical Ventilation Total Volume of Outside Air, !- Variable or
Meter 3 Name
SumOrAverage; !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 3
Output:Table:Monthly,
ENERGY TRANSFER, !- Name
2, !- Digits After Decimal
EnergyTransfer:Building, !- Variable or Meter 1 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 1
EnergyTransfer:Facility, !- Variable or Meter 2 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 2
Heating:EnergyTransfer, !- Variable or Meter 3 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 3
Cooling:EnergyTransfer, !- Variable or Meter 4 Name
SumOrAverage; !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 4
Output:Table:Monthly,
HEAT EXCHANGER ENERGY, !- Name
2, !- Digits After Decimal
Heat Exchanger Total Heating Energy, !- Variable or Meter 1 Name
SumOrAverage, !- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 1
Heat Exchanger Total Cooling Energy, !- Variable or Meter 2 Name
SumOrAverage;
!- Aggregation Type for Variable or Meter 2

170

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