focus Magazine Summer 2011 | Maryville College

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S u m m e r 2 011
VOL. 108 | NO. 1

502 East Lamar Alexander Parkway
Maryville, Tennessee 37804
Address Service Requested

Stauych
in toh MC
wit ia
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email

A p u b l i c at i o n f o r A l u m n i &
F r i e n d s o f Ma r y v i l l e C o l l e g E
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Send yo
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Pipes, Glens & Thistles
2 01 2 c o n c e r t c h o i r s p r i n g t o u r

Find out
what it means
to be a Scot!


Ever wanted to experience the history, culture and landscape of Scotland?
“Pipes, Glens & Thistles,” a tour for Maryville College alumni, parents and friends that parallels the
Concert Choir’s Spring Tour to Scotland, is scheduled for May 22-31, 2012.
The 10-day itinerary includes stops in Oban, Loch Ness, the Isles of Mull and Iona, Inverness, Perth and
Edinburgh. The tour also includes visits to some of Scotland’s most famous castles, including Inveraray
Castle, Urquhart Castle, Cawdor Castle, Blair Castle, Glamis Castle, Stirling Castle and Edinburgh Castle.
Deposits are needed by June 30, 2011. For pricing and itineraries, visit casterbridgetours.com/
maryville-alumni.html Contact Andrea May, director of outreach and alumni affairs, at 865.981.8201 or
[email protected] for additional information.

0 Mary Bogart answers
1
questions about her
family
2 Images from the
1
celebration
13 Memorable events
mark Inauguration
Week schedule

f o cus

A Publication for Alumni & Friends of Maryville College

PRESIDENT
Dr. Tom Bogart

Archived
publications

now available

in digital format

Nearly 40,000 pages of Maryville College publications are now digitized and available for viewing and downloading from the Internet. For free!
The publications include more than 100 years of The Chilhowean, Maryville College’s
yearbook; catalogs from 1866 until 2010; college histories, biographies and books
written by professors; and alumni newsletters and magazines dating back to 1875.
“We expect that these digitized items will be a blessing to those wishing to find
information about the College and the many individuals connected to it through the
years,” said Dori May, collection development librarian and archives liaison, who
coordinated the digitization project.
The project was made possible through the LYRASIS Mass Digitization Collaborative
– a Sloan Foundation grant-subsidized program that has made digitization easy and affordable for libraries and cultural institutions across the country.
May said Maryville College has been able to participate in the project because of a
generous gift from the estate of the late Annabelle Libby ’52, who frequently volunteered in the College’s archives.
Through the Collaborative’s partnership with the Internet Archive, all items were
scanned cover-to-cover and in full color.
To view the collections, visit the Internet Archive website, archive.org/details/
maryvillecollege, or visit the Lamar Memorial Library’s web page, accessible through
the MC website: maryvillecollege.edu/library/. Viewing the archived materials from
these sites is free, May emphasized, explaining that E-Yearbook and other sites have
taken this free content and are now charging subscription fees.
The digitization of The Highland Echo, Maryville College’s newspaper, is currently
in process.
According to May, other digitization projects are being organized through the
Appalachian College Association Central Library’s Digital Library of Appalachia.
For more information, e-mail May at [email protected].

EDITORIAL BOARD
Karen Beaty Eldridge ‘94
Director of Communications
Chloe White Kennedy
News & New Media Writer
ART DIRECTION & DESIGN
Jessica Stooksbury Swan

A L U M N I A S S O C I AT I O N
EXECUTIVE BOARD
Kristine Tallent ’96
President
Clara Hardin ’57
Vice President
Harold Turner ’03
Recording Secretary
G. Donald Hickman ’70
Past President

CLASS OF 2011

local residents make



unique donations to Clayon Center

Gifts to the Clayton Center for the Arts don’t always come in the form
of currency.
For three local donors, last year’s opening of the fine and performing arts
center located on the campus of Maryville College presented an opportunity
to give (or craft) a gift that would have personal meaning and, at the same
time, help the Clayton Center become a unique gathering place for artists
and art supporters in the region.
“Area residents have been extremely generous in making the Clayton
Center a reality,” said Holly Jackson-Sullivan, vice president for advancement
and community relations. “Through gifts of money, art, equipment, time
and talent, donors are making a tremendous impact on the facility.”

Centuries-old painting added to
College’s collection
An 18th-century oil paining by Francesco Zuccarelli hung in the home of
Samuel E. Beall, Jr., and wife Mary Anne for years. After donating it to the
Clayton Center, the two said they’re pleased more people will be able to
enjoy the idyllic Italian landscape depicted in the painting.
“The painting belonged to my late brother, William P. Beall, who was an
art enthusiast and decorator,” Beall said, explaining that the gift is from the
Samuel E. Beall, Jr. Family Partnership in memory of William. “The College
has been a favorite of ours through the years, and it is our wish that this
painting be here.”

CLASS OF 2012

CLASS OF 2013
Jason Brooks ’97
Lynn Ramsey Cole ’68
Ed Hawkey ’70
Marcia Kilby Rethwilm ’89
Ann Rigell ’69
Dan Rineer ’65
Sue Van Aken ’83
Eric Weatherbee ’06
Maryville College FOCUS magazine 2011
(issn 314) Published once a year
502 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy
Maryville, TN 37804-5907
865.981.8000 | maryvillecollege.edu
subscription price - none
Copyright © 2011 Maryville College.
Contents may not be reproduced in any manner, either whole or
in part, without prior permission of Maryville College.

portable podium to accommodate speakers and
event emcees.
Dolan and his wife, Sherrie Liafsha, live
in downtown Maryville and said they have
supported the plans for the Clayton Center for
several years.
“We thought it would be fun to walk over
[to the Clayton Center] and enjoy
concerts and other events,” he said. “The podium
was something we could give to support this place
that is going to pull the community together.”
Dolan used cherry wood to construct the
45-inch-by-30-inch-by-22-inch cabinet, leaving
spaces for lights, audio-visual ports and a pullout
shelf. In total, he spent one week on the construction of the podium.
“In imagining a civic arts center for Blount County, thousands of people agreed that this center should celebrate the arts and culture
of this area,” said Jackson-Sullivan. “I believe it is very fitting that we now
have a beautiful and functional podium that was crafted by a local artist and
serves as a focal point on the Nita Eckles West Stage for many events.
“We are very appreciative of the generosity of Mr. Dolan and Ms. Liafsha.”

Defibrillators may save lives

Mary Virginia Ferguson Bond ’54
Carey Cox Coghill ’72
Jeff Denton ’87
Jennifer Windrow Forehand ’99
Clara Gowans Hardin ’57
Adam Ray ’97
Harold Turner ’03

Amber Burley ’04
Josh Collins ’04
Carrie Callaway Denkinger ’92
Mary Jim Bevan Freeman ’54
Wade Knapper ’05
Nichole Johnson McCord ’02
Warren Morgan ’71
Erin Palmer Polly ’99
Mary “Sissy” Gravely Reinhardt ’82

Pete Dolan constructed a beautiful
and functional podium for the Nita
Eckles West Stage.

Samuel E. Beall, Jr., left, and wife Mary Anne presented the Zuccarelli
painting to President Tom Bogart in September 2010.
The Bealls made the presentation to Maryville College President Dr.
Tom Bogart last semester, and artist-in-residence Mark Giangaspero cleaned
it and secured it in its frame in March. Because of the chemical process
involved in cleaning a work of art, chemistry students, as well as art students,
were invited to observe the process.
Expressing his appreciation to the Bealls for their donation, Gombert
called the Zuccarelli a “significant contribution” to the College’s art
collection.
“Our students don’t have unlimited access to real art historical examples,
so this is an important contribution,” the professor added.

Craftsman gives podium
Pete Dolan didn’t have to think too long about how he would support the
Clayton Center.
Dolan, a third-generation woodworker and owner of Woodtec in
Maryville, knew that the Ronald and Lynda Nutt Theatre would need a nice

A Maryville native, Joe Emert said he has seen the area’s need for a civic arts
center for decades. So when childhood friend Ed Harmon, who serves on
Maryville College’s Board of Directors, approached him about joining the
campaign for the Clayton Center for the Arts, Emert listened.
“We’ve needed this for years,” he said of the center. “It’s a great asset
for the community. Everyone needs to support it.”
And Emert and wife Cindy are supporting it. The two made a donation
to cover the costs of two automated external defibrillators (AEDs) that are
now installed in the two buildings that comprise the Clayton Center for
the Arts.
“Ed told us that we could donate money for a seat in the theatre or a
brick paver, but we wanted to do something a little different,” he said.
It was natural for the Emerts to underwrite the costs of the defibrillators.
Emert is a registered nurse by training who just celebrated his 25th year as
president of First Choice Medical in Maryville.
Three Clayton Center staff members have completed CPR and AED
training through the Blount County Chapter of the American Red Cross.
“Until now, Cooper Athletic Center was the only facility on campus
equipped with AEDs,” said Jack Piepenbring, Maryville College director
of safety and security. “With the wide use of the Clayton Center, these new
defibrillators really are life-saving gifts.”

Campaign continues
The campaign for the Clayton Center for the Arts continues, Jackson-Sullivan said. To date, all but about $5 million of the $47-million project has
been raised.
“We are hoping to have the fundraising completed by May 2012,” she
said. “Numerous naming opportunities remain, including the chance to
name the Art and Recital Hall building.”
A list of all available named spaces in the Clayton Center is available for
download on the Maryville College website. Visit maryvillecollege.edu/
giving/capital-projects/.
Interested individuals also are encouraged to contact Jackson-Sullivan at
865.273.8884 or [email protected].

f o cus
CONTENTS

| COVER PHOTO BY WADE PAYNE |

ABOUT THE COVER: Printed materials
and web pages promoting Inauguration

3

events to the College community and

campus

NEWS

faculty

NEWS

public incorporated graphics based
on the College’s official tartan. This
cover shot of the tartan worn as a kilt

9

continues the visual theme.

10

inauguration

SPECIAL

18

campaign
20

class

NEWS

NOTES

2 MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
4 COLLEGE EXPLORES LEED® CERTIFICATION
FOR CRAWFORD HOUSE





Led by project manager Janna McCall Nash ’93,
energy-efficient and “green” products and practices
are being introduced at the 135-year-old farmhouse
that now houses the Mountain Challenge program.

6 SCOTS WILL JOIN NEW CONFERENCE
IN 2012

Standing in front of the Clayton
Center for the Arts, Sam Newton
‘13 belts out a Scottish melody
prior to the beginning of an
Inauguration event.

Maryville’s athletic teams will begin competition in
the USA South Conference as a full member starting
in the 2012-2013 academic year.

12 INAUGURATION COVERAGE
Dr. William T. “Tom” Bogart was officially installed








as Maryville College’s 11th president on April 16, 2011.
The ceremony and events leading up to the big day
were attended by scores of people from the MC
community, as well as civic leaders, business leaders,
clergy, community members and college and university
delegates who participated.

8 CAMPAIGN FOR ANDERSON HALL
1
CONTINUES





The exterior renovation for the campus’ oldest building
has been completed, and now President Bogart is
urging alumni, friends, parents and others to help fund
the interior renovation.

MESSAGE from THE PRESIDENT

SETTLING

in at MARYVILLE

ALMOST FROM THE DAY my family and I arrived in Maryville last summer people have asked us,
“Have you settled in?” I love that question, with its simultaneous recognition of the upheaval of a move
and welcoming attitude that expects us to settle.
What we have discovered in my new role as
president is that Maryville College is an easy place to
make one’s home, but a very dynamic place to think
about settling.

… part of settling in has
“ been
meeting the many
alumni & other friends
of Maryville College.

.”

A significant part of settling in has been meeting
the many alumni and other friends of Maryville
College. Naturally, we have a large number in East
Tennessee, but I’ve also enjoyed visiting with people in California, Illinois, Minnesota, Georgia, and
Texas – so far. An early highlight was participating in my first General Assembly of the PC(USA) in
Minneapolis during my first week in office last July.
Building relationships is not just a personal pleasure, it also reflects the many strong partnerships
that Maryville College enjoys. This year saw four headline partnerships begin: Penrose Farms, Marriott
Business Services, Undergraduate Science and Research Institute and Knox ivi.
The first partnership I’d like to mention is Penrose Farms. This magnificent home for our equestrian
program, owned by Board member Christine “Teenie” Hayworth, has been operated by Maryville
College since last June. In addition to providing fantastic facilities for our riders and their horses, it is
also starting to serve as an educational location for our environmental studies faculty and students, and
we hope to involve other disciplines and activities as time and creativity allow.
The second partnership, with Marriott Business Services, is an example of how our strong liberal arts
education is attractive to employers. Marriott Business Services, located in Knoxville just a few miles
from campus, provides accounting and other services to hotels across the entire world. Once they had
the chance to see our students perform as interns, they wanted to increase their opportunity to recruit
them. In a true example of mutual benefit, they underwrote the development of an intermediate
accounting course offered for the first time in Spring 2011 by Professor Rebecca Treadway. All of our
business students now have access to this course regardless of whether they work for Marriott.
The third partnership grew from a vision of enhancing our preparation of students for scientific
careers. Every student at Maryville College is required to complete a Senior Study and to engage in
experiential education. These requirements are reflected in our new Undergraduate Science and
Research Institute, developed with the help of a $300,000 grant from the Department of Education.
The institute will provide stipends to help students engage in summer research and internship projects
mentored by our faculty. In addition, it will help to update both the equipment used for laboratory
analysis and the equipment used to gather data from the field. The work will not be done in isolation,
with collaborations already arranged with other institutions including Oak Ridge National Laboratories
and the University of Georgia Marine Institute.
The fourth partnership is a way to help the far-flung network of Scots keep up with happenings on
campus. Knox ivi has offered most of our athletic events on streaming video over the web. So you can
follow the action even if you’re not here “where Chilhowee’s lofty mountains pierce the Southern
blue.” The video has not been limited to sports, as Knox ivi has also provided footage of events,
including Convocation, the Presidential Inauguration and the Smoky Mountain Highland Games.
The final relationships I want to highlight are the people who will be our alumni of the future. We
have received a record number of applications for places in the Class of 2015. This result reflects not
only the unquestioned value of Maryville College but also much hard work by the entire campus
community under the leadership of our new Vice President for Enrollment, Dr. Dolph Henry.
Maryville College has been settled in since 1819, and I am grateful for the opportunity to be part
of this wonderful set of relationships. My family and I look forward to continuing to settle in and to
welcome old friends and new.

2

focus | SUMMER
SPRING 2011
2011

campus

NEWS

Natural Sciences awarded

CONGRESSIONAL APPROPRIATION GRANT

The College’s new science institute will enable more students to participate in field research
like this 2006 trip that took MC students into Canada to study tundra wetlands.
THE COLLEGE’S NATURAL SCIENCE Division was recently awarded a $300,000 grant from
the United States Department of Education. With
it, the College is starting a new Undergraduate Science Education and Research Institute.
“This grant will enable us to do what
we often don’t have many resources to
do, and that’s getting outside the classroom and being involved in real projects,” said Dr. Ben Cash, chair of the
division and professor of biology. “Getting into the field is probably the most
important part of training scientists. It’s
fundamental.”
Cash, who is project director for the institute,
said that he and his colleagues in biology, chemistry and physics want to attract – and then prepare
– more talented students for professional lives as
scientists.
Of the $300,000 that the College has been
approved for, roughly half will go toward stipends
for students engaged in summer internships and
salaries for faculty members who are mentoring

COVENANT

students in research-training projects centered at
Maryville College and remote locations. Remaining funds will support the purchase of modern
teaching and research equipment and vehicles
and gear that address the mobility
challenges of field research.
This summer, Cash expects 10 to
12 students and four to five faculty
members to participate in the institute.
In addition to campus laboratories,
research training will take place at the
Oak Ridge National Laboratory and
the University of Georgia Marine Institute at
Sapelo Island.
Maryville College President Dr. Tom Bogart
said experiential education is a vital component
of the College’s core curriculum.
“On behalf of Maryville College, I thank legislators who supported the appropriations bill that
made this funding available, especially Congressman John J. Duncan, Jr., who advocated strongly
for our Undergraduate Science Education and
Research Institute,” the president said.

celebrated

LAST FALL, THE MARYVILLE
COLLEGE community
celebrated the 20th anniversary
of the beginning of discussions
that would lead to the Maryville
College Covenant.
Speakers included Dr. Sue
Wyatt, former dean of students,
and Dr. Gerald W. Gibson, MC
president emeritus, who both
commented on the history of
the Covenant. Current MC
president, Dr. Tom Bogart,
talked about the Covenant’s
importance for the campus
community today.
Attendees signed a Covenant
Students sign the Covenant banner in the Bartlett Atrium
banner, signifying their support of the
prior to the Nov. 30 anniversary celebration.
document that asks campus members to
dedicate themselves to the tenets of scholarship, respect and integrity.
According to the Keepers of the Covenant, a group of faculty, staff and students who promote
awareness of the Covenant and ensure its vitality, Maryville College students adopted ideals outlined
in the Maryville College Statement of Purpose and created the Covenant in 1990. It was officially
approved by the Board of Directors in 1994.
Freshmen and first-year students are asked to sign the document during a Covenent Ceremony
held at the completion of Orientation.

New videos
showcase MC
OVER THE LAST YEAR, the College’s Marketing Office has been working on a new video package that will promote Maryville College to various
audiences.
Produced by Steve Dean and shot by videographer Doug Mills (creators of the Emmy awardwinning Heartland Series), the video package
includes interviews with numerous students,
faculty, staff, administrators and alumni and showcases the campus’ facilities and unique programs
in all seasons. The voices of the College’s Concert
Choir provide the soundtrack for some of the
footage.
A “sneak preview” of the eight-minute video
was screened during Inauguration Weekend to
rave reviews and is now available for viewing on
the College’s YouTube channel, youtube.com/
maryvillecollege.
“We are continuing to refine this video package
as we complete our interviews,” explained Mary
Leidig, the College’s marketing director. “I
believe what many are sharing in these interviews
is both compelling and personal. Clearly,
Maryville College stands out and is making a
difference.
“When it is completed later this summer, the
College will actually have three versions to use:
the eight-minute video that gives what we hope
is an impressive and inspiring overview of the
College; a shorter video targeted at prospective
students; and an even shorter video designed
for commercials,” she added.
Athletics Director Kandis Schram ’85 is interviewed about the
high standards for athletics and academics at the College.

focus

| SUMMER 2011

3

NASH

instrumental
IN PROJECT

By Andrea May ’07
Director of Outreach & Alumni Affairs
FOR JANNA MCCALL NASH ’93, several
chance conversations have made all the difference in
her professional career.
In 2009, about a month before a job interview
with Strata-G, LLC, an environmental engineering
and energy management company in Knoxville,
Nash was brainstorming science-project ideas for
her oldest child with her dad, Andy McCall, the
College’s physical plant director. The concept of
LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design) was mentioned as a project idea. It interested the alumna so much that she spent her time
researching LEED® and during her Strata-G interview, she mentioned it as an initiative she
would like to pursue.
Nash got the job and shortly thereafter
passed the test to become the company’s first
LEED® Accredited Professional (AP).
Just after passing the LEED® AP test, Nash
had a chance run-in with Bruce Guillaume
’76, director of Mountain Challenge, which set
into motion a two-year project to have Crawford House LEED certified.
“I just kept thinking to myself, what a small
world it is,” Nash commented in a recent interview. “That everything came together the way
it did; it was just meant to be.”
A self-described “oddball engineer,” Nash
credits her MC education for her writing and
communication abilities – two very important
skills for LEED® projects.
“You have to be able to paint the picture and
sell people on it,” she explained.
The certification process of the 134-year-old Crawford House is not without its challenges, particularly
as an older building with a limited project budget,
but having Crawford House as one of the first historic
homes to be LEED certified in the state of Tennessee
is well worth the effort.
“Taking care of the earth was engrained in me as
a young kid, and MC has always been a part of my
family with my dad working there, so this is a very
special project to be a part of at the College,”
Nash said.
The work in Crawford House is important to the
alumna because, she said, it promotes the mindset
that retrofitting existing buildings to save energy
is possible.
“This is a stage to prove that LEED® certification
can be done, and done with a small budget,” she
pointed out.
Nash and Guillaume are also sharing the process
with current MC students and classes that are helping
with projects.
4

focus

| SUMMER 2011

LEED® CERTIFICATION EXPLORED
for Crawford House

Strata-G officials (l-r)
Danny Norman, Janna
McCall Nash ’93 and Dan
Hurst pose for a photo
with Mountain Challenge
Director Bruce Guillaume
’76, right, following the
Crawford House-LEED®
announcement last year.

IN 2009, THE COLLEGE partnered with Knoxville-based Strata-G, LLC, to determine the feasibility
of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certification for Crawford House, which
was completed in 1876 and is one of the 13 historic buildings on campus.
During an Earth Day celebration in 2010, administrators at Maryville College and Strata-G officials,
including project manager Janna McCall Nash ’93, announced that the Crawford House project had
been registered with the U.S. Green Building Council under the LEED® Existing Buildings-Operation
and Maintenance rating system.
“What we’re attempting is a pretty big deal,” Nash said at the Earth Day celebration in front of Crawford House. “We don’t know if we’re going to be able to pull it off, but we’ll give it our best shot.”
Fortunately, Strata-G isn’t starting with only 19th-century building practices and technology. In
recent years, several energy-efficient and “green” products and practices have been added at Crawford
House, such as VOC-free paint, a metal roof, dual-flush toilets, timed water heaters and use of salvaged
wood for the deck and salvaged wood chips for ground covering under the climbing tower.
“A connection to the environment has been important to us for a long time,” explained Bruce Guillaume ’76, director of Mountain Challenge, at the Earth Day event.
A pre-LEED® audit by Strata-G conducted during the fall of 2009 resulted in the following recommended improvements to be completed before requesting certification: installation of gas and water
meters for measuring usage; installation of storm windows over existing windows; re-capping fireplaces;
re-insulating the attic and basement; and replacing the HVAC system with appropriate-sized units.
Some of the improvements are being funded by a generous grant for environmental studies awarded by
the Margaret A. Cargill Foundation of Minnesota.

campus

COLLEGE ON TRACK

for record freshman
MARYVILLE COLLEGE is poised to welcome the
largest freshman class in its history this fall.
Dr. Dolph Henry, vice president for enrollment,
announced to the campus community in February
that more than 1,700 students had applied for
inclusion in the Class of 2015, which was more
than the total end-of-year freshman applicant pool
of any year in history.
And as of May 20, 2011, the applicant pool was
up to 1,971 for the incoming class.
Maryville College President Dr. Tom Bogart said
the goal for the incoming class is 350 students.
“Not every student who applies and is accepted
will decide to come to Maryville College,” he
explained. “Therefore, it’s important that we start
with a large enough group of students to end with
our desired class of 350 new students – or future
alumni, as we think of them.”
In previous years, the College received about
1,500 applications for admissions. The freshman
class size for the last five years has averaged 298.
Henry attributed the applicant pool increase to
three main initiatives: more travel and recruitment
outside of Tennessee; promotion of the individual successes
of the College’s students and graduates; and a well-developed communication plan with prospective students that
answers numerous questions about Maryville College,
including its affordability.

NEWS

class

Dr. Angelia Gibson, associate professor of chemistry (center), chats
with students outside Thaw Hall.

PHOTO COURTESY OF PHOTOPLAY STUDIOS

Dr. Mark O’Gorman, associate professor of
political science and environmental studies coordinator at the College, is administrator of the
Cargill grant on campus. At the ceremony, he
praised College administrators – especially Guillaume and Vice President and Dean of Students
Vandy Kemp – for the vision to renovate an existing building in a “green” way.
“What is wonderful is that this event is but one
more step in a long tradition of environmental
stewardship at Maryville College,” he said,
reminding people of Kin Takahashi’s energy efficient brick-building for Bartlett Hall using local
clay, and Dr. Randy Shields’ emphasis on conservation before it was popular. “Maryville College
has, Maryville College is, and Maryville College
will always ‘walk its talk’ when it comes to having
a clear voice about the importance of the environment in our lives.”
If approved, Crawford House would be among
the first historic structures in the state of Tennessee to be LEED® certified.

HENRY



named VP
for ENROLLMENT

DR. DOLPHUS HENRY was named Maryville College’s Vice President
for Enrollment in October.
“Dolph joined the College as an interim VP in March 2010 and
since that time has provided solid leadership for new student and
transfer recruitment and financial aid,” said MC President Dr. Tom
Bogart in making the announcement. “He has developed strong
working relationships with faculty, administrators and Board
members.”
Calling Henry’s approach to recruiting and retaining students
“realistic and farsighted,” Bogart said that the new VP is committed to Maryville College’s goals for enrollment growth.
Henry has extensive experience in higher education, including previous appointments as the vice president for enrollment
at four colleges and universities. He was president of Tusculum
College from 2000 until 2007.
He holds a doctorate in institutional research from Virginia
Tech, a master’s degree from Radford University and a bachelor’s
degree from Roanoke College.

focus

Dr. Dolph Henry

| SUMMER 2011

5

MC PARTNERS WITH
KNOX IVI FOR INTERNET
BROADCASTING
LAST JULY, MARYVILLE COLLEGE’S Scots Broadcasting Network announced a partnership with the online video company Knox ivi to offer MC fans a variety of live internet
video broadcasts of games, both home and away.
Approximately 80 athletic events were broadcast in the 2010-2011 seasons, beginning
with the USA South Athletic Conference’s Football Media Day hosted Aug. 3 at the College. Knox ivi also broadcasted the inauguration ceremony of President Tom Bogart on
April 16, commencement exercises on May 15 and the Smoky Mountain Highland Games
on May 21-22. Additionally, the College collaborated with Knox ivi on a Jan. 13 “Financial Aid
Virtual Town Hall” for prospective students and their families.
The broadcasts improved on the College’s previous video streaming endeavors by utilizing
multiple camera angles, in-game interviews, outstanding video and audio quality, and state-ofthe-art graphics.
Athletics Director Kandis Schram ’85 said she was pleased with the partnership and believed
it was a “great opportunity to showcase the talent and hard work of our many student athletes
and enter the homes of our many fans, alumni and potential Maryville College students.”
Joe Dickey, president and co-founder of Knox ivi, called the partnership “strategic” and
predicted that it would raise the profile of the College’s athletics programs locally, regionally
and nationally.
Games and matches from the 2010-2011 season are archived. Visit maryvillecollege.edu/
athletics or knoxivi.com/maryville_college to view.

MC to join NEW ATHLETIC










CONFERENCE IN 2012

MARYVILLE COLLEGE HAS ACCEPTED an
invitation to join the USA South Athletic Conference, beginning competition in the 2012-2013
academic year.
“On behalf of Maryville College, I am pleased
to accept the invitation to join the USA South
Athletic Conference as a full member in the year
2012,” stated Maryville College President Dr.
Tom Bogart. “We have enjoyed developing rivalries on the football field and look forward to
continuing those rivalries in other sports.
“Maryville College looks forward to being a
constructive and engaged member of the conference,” he continued.
The USA South sponsors championships in
men’s and women’s cross country, men’s and
women’s soccer, women’s volleyball, football,
men’s and women’s basketball, baseball, softball,
men’s and women’s tennis, men’s golf and women’s lacrosse, for a total of 14 sports.
Maryville College Athletics Director
Kandis Schram ’85 said she is excited for
the student-athletes.
“It will be exciting to be affiliated with the
6

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| SUMMER 2011

USA South Athletic Conference in all sports,”
Schram stated. “As a full member in this prestigious league, we look forward to enhancing the
student-athlete experience with automatic bids
and access to NCAA championships in all sports
for men and women while constructing conference schedules that help reduce missed class time
and allow each student-athlete to enjoy the
NCAA Division III experience.”

One of the oldest NCAA Division III conferences in the country, the USA South is presently
made up of 10 institutions in Virginia and North

Carolina: Averett University, Christopher Newport University, Ferrum College, Greensboro
College, Mary Baldwin College, Meredith College, Methodist University, North Carolina Wesleyan College, Peace College and Shenandoah
University. Affiliate members include Agnes Scott
College, (Decatur, Ga.) and LaGrange (Ga.) College in women’s lacrosse only and Maryville
(Tenn.) College in football only.
Georgia’s Piedmont College and LaGrange
College will be joining Maryville in the jump to
the USA South in the 2012-2013 academic year;
Shenandoah University is scheduled to join the
Old Dominion Athletic Conference beginning in
the 2011-2012 year.
Maryville College will compete within the
Great South Athletic Conference in 2011-2012
and conclude its 12-year association with the
GSAC, which the College helped found in 1999.
For more information on the USA South Athletic Conference, visit usasouth.net.

PHOTO COURTESY OF JESSICA STOOKSBURY SWAN

campus

NEWS

College given lease OF PENROSE FARM
IT ISN’T EXACTLY A SATELLITE CAMPUS,
but a West Knoxville horse farm is now another
learning site for Maryville College students.
Through the generous gift of a lease from MC
Board Member Christine G. “Teenie” Hayworth,
Penrose Farm, her 130-acre equine facility located
off Nubbin Ridge Road, is now home to the College’s 15-member equestrian team and could soon
be utilized by science and environmental studies
faculty as a prototype of sustainable agriculture.
“Penrose is one of the most complete equestrian facilities in the area,” said Dr. Mardi Craig,
associate academic dean and faculty advisor for
the MC Equestrian Team. “It is a wonderful combination of form and function.”
The farm includes a main barn with 30 stalls,
fully furnished tack rooms for boarders and students as well as wash areas, tack up areas and storage; two competition barns that offer another
56 stalls; one all-weather show-jumping ring; an
additional dressage ring; and one large covered
arena with mirrors used for dressage instruction
and practice, as well as jumping during inclement
weather.
Jenn Hurst ’11, captain of the team for 20102011, became familiar with Penrose Farm as an
adolescent growing up in nearby Farragut. As a
young rider, she came to the farm for dressage.
“But I never knew the extent of it. It’s amazing,” she said. “It has trails, which is a big plus
for us. We’re not just constantly in the ring.”

GROWING THE PROGRAM
According to Craig, the agreement with Penrose will enable the College to grow its equestrian
program. Begun in the early 1990s by then-student Christen McCammon Khym ’96, the team
is a competitive hunt seat team and member of
the Intercollegiate Horse Show Association Zone
5, Region 1. Khym is now manager of the team

and does most of the instructing.
For a $400 a semester riding fee, students
receive biweekly instruction and practice. Team
members’ riding experience is varied – some have
never ridden a horse prior to enrolling at
Maryville; others have competed nationally. Students may bring their own horses or they can ride
the College horses.
Penrose’s long association with the United
States Pony Club is expected to help connect
horse-minded students in middle and high school
with Maryville College and its equestrian team.
“Having a facility like Penrose is a wonderful
draw to high school students who want to attend
college with their horse or to ride horses,” Craig
explained, adding that she expects hosting clinics
and shows for the Crossroads Dressage Society and
the East Tennessee Hunter Jumper Association will
also raise the program’s visibility in the region.

MISSION FIT
For Hayworth, partnering with the College
made good sense for many reasons. As a board
member and parent of Debbie Hayworth ’81,
she understands and believes in the mission of
the College. As a long-time horse owner, she
sees where an equestrian team supports the
College’s mission.
“My vision for this partnership is the education
of students – and not just girls. (The majority of
members on the team are women.) This experience will prepare students, really, for life,” she
said. “[Being on an equestrian team] requires
organization, discipline and commitment. You
can’t walk away from the care of a large animal.”
Hayworth said seeing Craig’s business plan
proposal convinced her “this was the time” to
offer the lease of Penrose, which she has owned
and operated since 1961. The partnership became
official June 1, 2010.

According to Craig, the farm is independent
of the College financially as it earns money from
horse board that pays the four staff salaries and
its other operational expenses.

MORE OPPORTUNITIES
Craig envisions the farm serving as a field
site for a variety of College courses such as
conservation ecology; conservation history;
the first-year seminar course,
Perspectives on the Environment;
vertebrate field zoology;
nature photography; and
psychology.
Dr. Ben Cash, professor of biology and
chairperson of the College’s Natural Sciences
Division, has spent time at
Penrose to learn more about
the farm and its efforts toward
Biology
sustainability.
Knoxville, Tennessee
Hayworth has fenced off some
protected land and water areas to
encourage natural plant and wildlife
to replenish itself. Last fall, the farm
began purchasing and feeding locally
grown organic hay. Limited organic
farming demonstration sites are being
considered.
“There is a conservation easement
with the Foothills Land Conservancy,”
Craig explained. “Teenie’s intentional
environmental practices were implemented before environmental advocacy
was recognized as important. We are
delighted to build on her foundation in that
regard. Implementing environmental sustainable farming practices is not always the
easiest, but her commitment stands.”

Hillary Brown

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| SUMMER 2011

7

SIX

join Board of Directors

King

Mercer

MARYVILLE COLLEGE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS recently welcomed six new members. Joining the governing body of the College
were: Rufus King, Adriel McCord ’00, Dr.
Charles Mercer, Virginia “Ginny” Morrow,
Kristine Tallent ’96 and Dr. Taylor Weatherbee.
King is a retired executive vice president and
chief credit officer with First National Bank in
Nashville. He earned a bachelor’s degree from
Manchester College and an M.B.A. from the
University of Tennessee.
King is an honorary trustee of Manchester
College. His community involvement includes
Leadership Knoxville, Knoxville Opera Association and Kiwanis Club of Maryville. His previous
service with the College included membership
on the National Advisory Council.
He and wife Rebecca live in Friendsville, Tenn.
They are members of Highland Presbyterian
Church.
McCord is SunTrust Bank’s Blount County
President and Client Advisor. His community
activities include Leadership Blount, the Blount
County Chamber of Commerce and United Way
of Blount County. McCord is a 2005 winner of the
College’s Kin Takahashi Award for Young Alumni.

MC PARTNERS

McCord

He lives in Maryville with wife Nichole Johnson McCord ’02 and son Jaydan. They attend
First Baptist Church of Maryville.
Mercer is a retired physician, professor of medicine and executive vice chancellor and CEO of
the University of Tennessee Medical Center in
Knoxville. He earned his bachelor’s degree from
Murray State University and his medical degree
from the University of Louisville.
Mercer is an elder at Sequoyah Hills Presbyterian Church and active with the American Heart
Association, the Fish Food Ministry and the
Crescent City Institutional Review Board.
He and wife Alice live in Knoxville. They have
two daughters, Melissa Mercer Kantrow and
Mary Catherine “M.C.” Mercer ’11.
Morrow, an elder at Knoxville’s First Presbyterian Church, joined the Board as the Presbytery
of East Tennessee’s lay representative. A graduate
of the University of Alabama, she is senior vice
president of philanthropy for Covenant Health in
Knoxville and serves as president of the Fort
Sanders Foundation.
Morrow is active in Leadership Knoxville, the
Rotary Club of Knoxville and AAA East Tennessee. She served on the College’s Board of Directors from 1993 until 2002.

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| SUMMER 2011

Tallent

Weatherby

She is married to William E. Morrow, and they
live in Knoxville.
Tallent joined the Board as president of the
MC Alumni Association. She holds a master’s
degree from Carnegie Mellon University and is
employed as director of management and budget
for the City of Maryville.
The College’s 2007 winner of the Kin Takahashi Award for Young Alumni, Tallent lives in
Maryville.
Weatherbee is a physician with Blount Heart
Consultants and former chief of staff at Blount
Memorial Hospital. He earned his bachelor’s
degree from Cornell University and his medical
degree from Creighton University School of
Medicine.
Weatherbee is a USATF Track-Field Official at
the University of Tennessee and participated in
the Experience Your Smokies program in 2009.
He and wife Kristi live in Walland, Tenn. They
have two sons and one daughter. Son Eric
Weatherbee ’06 and son-in-law Wesley Blalock
’04 are MC graduates.

with Marriott Business Services

MARYVILLE COLLEGE HAS TEAMED UP with Marriott Business
Services (MBS) in a partnership that will strengthen the accounting minor
at Maryville College and provide more opportunities for accounting.
Business 366: Advanced Financial Reporting was offered for the first time
during the Spring 2011 semester, thanks to funding from MBS, which is
located in nearby Louisville, Tenn., and provides a variety of accounting services to thousands of Marriott hotels and operating units around the world.
“There has been increasing student demand for this
course over the last several years,” said Rebecca Treadway,
assistant professor of management at Maryville College.
Treadway, along with Division Chair of Social Sciences
Barbara Wells and Regional Advancement Officer Carrie
McConkey, facilitated the partnership for the College.
“With the funding that Marriott Business Services
offers for the course, our students will have the opportunity to embrace a deeper level of financial reporting,” Treadway said.
Jack Neithammer, director of human resources at MBS, said Maryville
College is a good fit for this type of partnership.
8

Morrow

“Maryville College is our neighbor in Blount County, and we have a
desire to connect more closely with the College,” he said. “Although it is
primarily a liberal arts college, we learned that there are students with an
interest in business and accounting, and we wanted to tap into that.”
As a part of the partnership, MBS will notify the College about available
summer internship opportunities, provide financial executive guest speakers
for classes and invite classes to tour MBS’ facility.
The organization will also fund an annual $500 scholarship
for a promising student in accounting.
“The partnership with Marriott is valuable to Maryville College on many levels,” Treadway said. “It will enhance our students’ exposure to financial reporting and better prepare them
for financial positions and graduate programs. The partnership
is really about promoting knowledge – the knowledge of and
exposure to a corporate entity such as Marriott, the knowledge
that relationships/connections are critically important in business and the
knowledge that giving to and giving back provide many with bright opportunities.”

faculty
WELCOME
NEW faculty
DR. VICTORIA
MESSMAN
ASSISTANT
PROFESSOR OF
MANAGEMENT
TEACHING AREAS:
Management, finance,
economics.
DEGREES: Ph.D. in
Business Administration, University of TennesseeKnoxville (2010); M.B.A., University of Southern
Mississippi (2002); B.S., University of Southern
Mississippi (2000). PREVIOUS APPOINTMENTS: Instructor, Maryville College, UTK and
the University of Southern Mississippi. OTHER
NOTABLES: For four semesters, Messman was a
“business coach” for an upper-level business
administration course at UTK. In this role, she
advised, guided and evaluated student teams who
competed in a realistic computer-simulated international business setting. She majored in polymer
science as an undergraduate.

NEWS

BOOKS BY FACULTY MEMBERS







published
TWO MC FACULTY MEMBERS recently celebrated the publication of their research.
In February, Oxford University Press released Faithful Revolution: How Voice of the Faithful is
Changing the Church by Dr. Tricia C. Bruce, assistant professor of sociology.
In the book, Bruce, whose research interests include the sociology of religion, Catholic identity,
social movements and organizations, gives an in-depth look at the development of Voice of the Faithful, a national movement of lay Catholics that
mobilized in response to the crisis of child
abuse by clergy in the Catholic Church.
Dr. Ronald Wells, director of the Maryville
Symposium on Faith and the Liberal Arts, traveled Northern Ireland last semester promoting
Hope and Reconciliation in Northern Ireland:
The Role of Faith-Based Organisations (Dublin:
The Liffey Press, 2010). It is his third book on
peace efforts in the country.
Wells, who has written extensively about the
conflict in Northern Ireland, or “the Troubles,” explored how Christian peacemakers see
the way forward now that the longed-for peace
in Northern Ireland has come.
Dr. Ronald Wells (above, center)
For more on Bruce’s research, visit faithfulrevolution.com.
recently traveled to Northern Ireland
Both books are available in the MC Bookstore and online at amazon.com. to promote his book about peace
efforts in the country.

MR. DAN ROSS
ASSISTANT
PROFESSOR OF
MATHEMATICS
TEACHING AREAS:
Mathematics education, geometry, statistics, foundations of
research in mathematics and math education. DEGREES: M.S.T. in
Mathematics, University of Missouri, Columbia
(2007); B.S., Mathematics Education, Martin
Luther College (2000). Ross is currently pursuing
a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the
University of Missouri, Columbia. PREVIOUS
APPOINTMENTS: Graduate Research Assistant,
University of Missouri, Columbia; Graduate
Teaching Assistant, University of Missouri,
Columbia. OTHER NOTABLES: Ross participated in the Comparing Options in Secondary
Mathematics: Investigating Curriculum (COSMIC) Project, an NSF-funded longitudinal study
investigating high school students’ mathematics
learning from textbooks embodying two distinct
approaches to content organization: an integrated
approach and a subject-specific approach.

Dr. Tricia Bruce explains her research at a book
launch March 3 in the Clayton Center for the Arts.

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9

inuaguration

SPECIAL

Meet the Bogarts


Tom’s grandfather’s family moved east from Gaines County,
Texas, to Fort Worth – a distance of about 325 miles – in two covered wagons. His grandfather, Burl Elder, was 7 years old when he
made the trip and walked in front of the first wagon, removing
rocks from the road so the mules would have an easier time. Burl
was a great storyteller and loved to play dominos.

Tom and I were very close to our
grandparents and have fond memories
of them. We both have our grandparents’ names. Tom’s paternal grandfather was William Thomas Bogart, and
my name is the first name of each my
grandmothers: Mary Madora.

FOCUS: What is your
educational background?
MDB: I attended Fernway Elemen-

From the MG of Rob Kennedy ‘71, Mary and Tom Bogart wave to the crowd gathered
along the Homecoming Parade route. Daughter Elizabeth is seated in the front seat.
(Above, right) Mary peeks out from behind the Covenant Stone on campus.

BY NOW, THE BOGARTS ARE FULL-FLEDGED
MEMBERS OF THE MARYVILLE COLLEGE FAMILY.
Nearly all members of the faculty and staff know them. Students easily chat with “Dr.
Bogart” in the cafeteria, at athletic games and around campus, and he greets hundreds
of them by their first names. First Lady Mary Denney Bogart visits alumni and helps host
guests at the Clayton Center for the Arts. Daughter Elizabeth is sharing her musical gifts
with campus ensembles.
But if you don’t live near the campus and couldn’t attend the “Meet the Bogarts”
reception at Homecoming or an outreach event held in various cities since July, you probably don’t know Maryville College’s 11th president and the two women who keep him on
his toes.
To help Maryville College’s constituents better know the new First Family (particularly
those members who don’t go by “Tom”) FOCUS editor Karen Beaty Eldridge ’94 sent
Mary Bogart a list of questions – answers to which are printed here.

FOCUS: When people ask “Where are the Bogarts from?”
what is your response?
MDB: I’m from Cleveland, Ohio, which is why I have a nasal sounding
Northern Ohio accent. If Tom pauses when asked this question,
here’s why: He was born in Berea, Ohio (his mother and I went to
the same college), spent his elementary school years in New Jersey,
high school years in Northern Virginia, college years in Houston,
Texas, and graduate school years in Princeton, N.J. After that he
(we) lived in Cleveland, Ohio, and York, Pa. Tom says he’s from
Texas because that’s where his parents grew up and where he
spent most of his summers.
10

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| SUMMER 2011

tary School and Laurel School in
Shaker Heights, Ohio, and graduated
from Proctor Academy in Andover,
N.H., in 1983. I’m a non-traditional
college student: I graduated in 1991 from Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, with a B.A. in English and Secondary Education. I completed my M.A. in English/Creative Writing in 2005
from Cleveland State University.

FOCUS: What is your professional background?
MDB: I taught English for 7th, 9th and 11th grades for Mentor Public
Schools for five years. I was also a writing instructor at Washtenaw
Community College in Ann Arbor, Mich., Cleveland State University and York College of Pennsylvania, where I also worked as a
tutor in their respective writing centers.

FOCUS: How and where did you meet Tom?
MDB: Tom and I met through mutual friends in 1990 after he moved
to Cleveland from Princeton. We have been married for 19 years.
Our first date was at a comedy club. (We are both fans of
stand-up comedy.)

FOCUS: How are you different from Tom?
MDB: Tom likes meeting a lot of people and is comfortable in large
crowds. Being more shy, I prefer meeting people in small groups
or one person at time. I love animals, especially horses and dogs,
and Tom tolerates them. It drives Tom crazy that I do not have a
memory for peoples’ names, but I can remember the names and
breeds of their dogs. Tom likes spicy foods and I do not, although
I recently started putting Tabasco sauce on my eggs.

FOCUS: Tell us something about Tom and Mary Bogart that
people might not know.
MDB: Tom likes to play Frisbee or disc golf, and I’m a big fan of figure
skating and have attended four national competitions and one
world competition.

The Bogarts enjoy a moment
during Homecoming festivities.

FOCUS: What characteristics/experiences/perspectives does
Tom have that will make him a great president at MC?
MDB: Tom looks forward to going to work every day; he genuinely

MDB:

loves what he is doing. He is detail-oriented but can also see the
big picture. Maryville College is his dream job, and we all wanted
to move here.

FOCUS: What do you consider your greatest achievements
to be?
MDB: Our daughter.
FOCUS: What are your hobbies?
MDB: I enjoy gardening, although I have never grown vegetables, but
I’m going to try this spring. Last summer, people brought vegetables to church and put them on a table in the lobby. I asked someone, “Why are these vegetables here?” and she said that people
share vegetables from their garden and if I needed a vegetable, just
to take one home. So hopefully I’ll have some vegetables to share
this summer. I also like to keep up with people on Facebook.

Ask me this question next year,
and I will have a
better idea. This
year I have been
learning about
MC – getting to
know everyone – and hopefully, I will find my niche soon. Right
now, I am especially interested in the history of the MC. I’ve
started collecting MC memorabilia to give to the college archives.
I like to talk to alumni and hear about their time at MC. (I’m
learning that the College has a rich history of student pranks!) I
also like hearing about everyone’s senior thesis. I would like to
find a way for alumni and current students to share their experiences with their senior thesis.

FOCUS: What has the Bogart family enjoyed thus far about
being the Maryville College’s “First Family?”
MDB:
We have enjoyed getting to know students and alumni and going
to events on campus.

FOCUS: You're a writer. Who is your favorite author?
MDB: I have an ear for dialogue and am interested with how dialogue
moves a story forward, so some of my favorite authors are Flannery O’Conner, Edith Wharton and David Mamet.

FOCUS: Years from now, what do you think will be your favorite memory from this first year with the MC family?
MDB:
Being a part of the Homecoming parade sticks out in my mind
right now because I’ve never been in a parade, and it was quite a
celebration. Homecoming Weekend was an amazing time for all
of us!

FOCUS: Tell us about Elizabeth.
MDB: Elizabeth (who likes to be called “Beth”) is 14 years old and is in



the 8th grade at Maryville Middle School. She is much more outgoing than Tom and I.
She is a figure skater but wanted to try a different sport this fall,
so she ran with the middle school’s cross country team. Next year
she plans to join the Maryville High School rowing team and the
marching band. She plays trombone and is in the wind ensemble
in the middle school’s concert band and plays piano in jazz band.
She played trombone in the College’s pep band and sings with
MC’s Voices of Praise. She loves being with her friends from
school and church youth group. (We are members at Broadway
United Methodist Church.)

FOCUS: The community of Maryville—what are you involved
in and/or what do you hope to become involved in?
MDB:
I am interested in adult education and literacy in general. I have



FOCUS: Tell us about Rosie.
MDB: Rosie is our 6-year-old Basset Hound. She was a gift from Tom’s
brother, Bob, and his wife, Lisa, who live in Independence, Va.
You can follow her on Twitter @Rossie_Bassett. Rosie has a loud
howl, which is why we don’t bring her to campus very often. We
also have a horse, an American Mustang, named “Rambo.”

FOCUS: What does the Bogart family do for fun?
MDB:
We like to travel, visit local museums and parks and spend time
with family and friends. We are having a good time exploring
the area.

FOCUS: Why were you supportive of Tom’s candidacy for
president of MC?
MDB:
After visiting MC for the first time, we knew it would be a good
fit for Tom, and Maryville is a great town to raise a family.

FOCUS: As the spouse of the president, what will be your role
with the College?



always volunteered in some capacity. However, I promised Tom
that I would wait a year to join anything because I tend to
become very busy with volunteer work.
Some of my favorite past volunteer assignments includes working
as a court watcher for the Victim and Witness Protection Agency
in Cleveland, where I documented municipal judges’ role in
domestic violence cases; reading to injured children; and working
at the York Hospital Gift Shop delivering flowers. I have also
volunteered as a public address announcer for local figure skating
competitions.
I am determined to learn to play a couple of instruments. I like
to listen to bluegrass music and want to learn to play the guitar
and mandolin. Both Tom and Elizabeth play piano, and I took
piano lessons as a child. Around here, it seems that people either
play two instruments or sing and play at least one instrument.
When I told someone I didn’t play an instrument, they said,
“Oh, so you’re the non-musical one in your family.” I didn’t care
to be called non-musical, so I want to learn to play music.

FOCUS: Have you gotten to know the Gibsons?
MDB:
[Previous First Lady and President Emeritus] Rachel and Gerald
have been wonderful and generous with their time, and we have
become good friends this year. Tom and I are so glad that they
are living in Maryville. People always ask about them, so here’s a
quick update: Gerald is finishing a book, and Rachel has been
signing her emails to me “Rachel, Lady of Leisure.”

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| SUMMER 2011

11

(Left) With the Medal of Office
around his neck, Dr. William T.
“Tom” Bogart takes the podium
to deliver the Inaugural Address.
(Below) Members of Off Kilter
perform at the Inaugural Dinner.

Opposite page:
(L-R) Mary Bogart introduces her
mother, Cindy Denney, to Dotty
Barber Bushing ‘42 during a
coffee hosted by the Chilhowee
Club; U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander
and Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam
congratulate the College’s newest
leader during a Civic Leadership
Luncheon; Dr. Bogart joins students
in planting a Tulip Poplar.

12

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| SUMMER 2011

inauguration

SPECIAL

Inauguration Week FULL OF MEMORABLE EVENTS

WATCHING THE INAUGURATION of
Maryville College’s 11th president in the Ronald
and Lynda Nutt Theatre on April 16, Sarah
Davies ’11 was a little surprised by the emotions
she was feeling.
“I knew that I would be happy on Inauguration Day, but I was not prepared for the overwhelming sense of pride in both Dr. Bogart and
Maryville College,” she said. “As a senior, the
Inauguration gave me a chance to express my love
for my school and the hope that I have in our
new president.”
Davies was not the only student to be deeply
moved by the historic moment. When Mary Bogart and Carl Bogart, the new president’s wife and

father, finally placed the Medal of Office around
Dr. Bogart’s neck during the installment ceremony, the loudest cheers originated from the student section.
Unified in heart and voice, Davies and her
peers were unified in dress, as well. Hundreds
sported garnet T-shirts with orange lettering that
read “I [Heart] Bogart” for the ceremony. The
shirts were the brainchild of Davies and a few of
her friends.
The writing/communication and business
double-major from Maineville, Ohio, interned
with the College’s Marketing Office for the
Spring 2011 semester and collaborated with Mary
Leidig, director of marketing, on ways to encour-

age a strong student presence at Inauguration.
“We wanted to make the shirts so that Dr.
Bogart would know how much we appreciate
him,” Davies said. “And with the shirts, we [students] were all connected and felt a part of the
celebration. We were all aware that we were there
for Dr. Bogart. We wanted him to know how
happy we were about his Inauguration.”
Borrowing from the tradition of faculty and
staff forming an honor guard through which
graduates walk following commencement exercises, students attending the April 16 ceremony
formed an honor guard through which Dr. Bogart led the procession out of the Nutt Theatre and
onto the Clayton Center Plaza. The new presi-

Inaugural Address of Dr. William T. Bogart

Preparing Students for Uncertain Times

Vice-chair Greaser, Chairman Ellis (in Portugal via live streaming video), Dr. Gibson, distinguished guests, and members of the Maryville College Board, staff, faculty, alumni,
and students: It is a privilege to take my place today as part of Maryville College. As Dr.
Gibson said in October 1993, in his address the last time we celebrated an inauguration,
“I give thanks, acknowledging readily that this is certainly not my personal event, but one
of the significant rituals in the life of the college…” So many people have done so many
things for both me and the college that I could easily use up all my time thanking them.
It was tempting to consider just saying thank you and naming as many people as possible
instead of writing an actual address, but I will succumb only to recognize my family.
Many of you already know my wife, Mary, and daughter, Elizabeth. Also here today are
Mary’s parents, Jon and Cindy Denney, and my father, Carl Bogart. My mother, Barbara
Elder Bogart, passed away in 2008 but is present in spirit. I want to mention briefly that
perhaps one reason I feel so at home at Maryville College is that my mother’s ancestors,
the Elders, were originally Scots Presbyterian. In fact, around the time that Isaac Anderson was founding Maryville College, the Elders were living in Pickett and Overton counties not far from here to the northwest.
Our Statement of Purpose claims that we “prepare students for a world of uncertainty
and accelerating change” and I want to take the opportunity today to explore what that

means. In particular, it gives me a chance to highlight how our emphasis on developing
the whole person, both for growth in academic knowledge and in faith, is vital for preparing people to face the real challenges ahead. I’m an economist by training, so uncertainty
has a particular technical meaning that I think is instructive. This is an institution of
higher education, so I hope you’ll bear with me as I tell you about that technical meaning
and relate it to Maryville College’s mission to prepare students.
Frank Knight is a name unknown to most people, but familiar to economists because
of his association with the distinction between risk and uncertainty proposed in his 1921
book, Risk, Uncertainty, and Profit. Risk, according to Knight, represents measurable
unknowns. For example, if one is flipping a fair coin, there is risk, as the result could be
heads or tails with a 50 percent probability.
Uncertainty, though, is unmeasurable. Many, perhaps most, of the decisions that we
make daily involve situations where probabilities of specific outcomes can’t be quantified.
To extend the example of flipping a coin, suppose that the coin had an unknown number
of sides, some of which were heads and some tails. Given that information, how would
you assess the probability of a head or tail coming up? While this example might be awkward, it captures the heart of the concept of Knightian uncertainty. In broader culture,
the idea of uncertainty has surfaced under the term “black swan” popularized in the book

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13

(L-R) Worshippers join in song at the service held at New
Providence Presbyterian Church; former First Lady Rachel
Gibson pins a corsage on new First Lady Mary Bogart before
the Inauguration Ceremony; Dr. Bogart gets a congratulatory
hug from daughter Elizabeth.

dent laughed, shook hands and gave high fives
along the route.
It was a memorable event in a succession of
memorable events that began April 13, when
piper Sam Newton ’13 called people to the campus with traditional Scottish melodies. The Inauguration Committee, led by co-chairs Natalie
Haslam and Mark Ingram, put together a slate of
events that not only celebrated Dr. Bogart as the
new leader, they also celebrated the College’s rigorous academic opportunities, its emphasis on a
total learning experience and its proud and distinguished history.
Celebrating the academics of the institution,
the inaugural schedule included one-act presenta-

tions from theatre students, a Senior Study Student Symposium that showcased exceptional
undergraduate research by current students and
presentations that addressed faith and learning,
economics and education, and environmental
sustainability.
The College’s strong and historic town-gown
relationships were evident in the April 14 worship
service held at New Providence Presbyterian
Church that brought together the MC community
with many congregations and clergy members.
The town-gown relationships were also evident
at the April 15 Civic Leadership Luncheon, where
Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam and U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander addressed scores of local

of the same name (The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable, Random House,
2007) by Nassim Taleb. Because humans are uncomfortable with uncertainty, he argues
that we are both surprised when it manifests itself and that we construct explanations with
the benefit of hindsight that reduce the uncertainty to risk.
The difference between uncertainty and risk is not strictly academic, as it has implications for how people behave – and how they should behave. Risk can be understood and
sometimes reduced. The insurance industry is based on this idea, and Maryville College,
unfortunately, has a great deal of experience with insurance, specifically fire insurance.
Major fires have destroyed or seriously damaged buildings on campus including Carnegie
Hall, Pearsons Hall (twice), and most recently Fayerweather Hall. Because the risks of
property damage were understood by the college and because these risks could be quantified by insurance underwriters, we were able to rebuild all of the buildings I’ve named
and they continue in use today.
Although risk can be addressed, it is important to realize that people are generally not
good at dealing with risk. An important line of research in economics (that overlaps with
psychology) is behavioral economics, which uses experiments to understand the ways in
which people make decisions. When faced with situations of risk, there are predictable
ways that people will deviate from the best responses. For example, the phenomenon of
“anchoring” finds people leaning too heavily on the current situation as a prediction of
the future or a gauge of what to expect as normal. The phenomenon of “framing” has
people making different decisions depending solely on how a question is posed. And perhaps most worrisome, people tend to believe that risk is less than its true amount. When
asked to indicate a range in which they expect outcomes to occur, people are usually

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Opposite page: Led by Amy Newell ’11
(center, front), a choreographed “flash mob”
of dancers entertains the after-inauguration
lunch crowd. The dancers included students,
faculty and staff members.

elected officials and College friends inside the
Alumni Gymnasium.
Haslam called Maryville College “an incredibly
important part” of East Tennessee because of its
preparation of students for leadership and meaningful work. Sharing personal stories of learning to
swim and play the piano on the Maryville College
campus, Alexander told attendees that the College
“enriches our community in many, many ways.”
Later that day, as rain threatened, the Student
Government Association, along with the Keepers
of the Covenant, planted a Tulip Poplar in Bogart’s honor near Humphreys Court.
“… the Keepers are honored to have you as
our new president to lead us in our growth, and

much too confident that the outcome will occur in a narrow range, ignoring the possibility of chance or even their own ignorance. This phenomenon is not new. In the early Han
dynasty (207 BCE – 220 CE), eight Taoist sages were invited by the king of Huainan to
discuss what they had learned. Their teachings were recorded and compiled, and I will
quote one appropriate excerpt now. “When the unexpected happens, the ignorant are surprised; knowers don’t think it strange.” (Tao of Politics edited and translated by Thomas
Cleary, Shambhala Dragon Editions paperback, 1990, p. 60) To conclude, people look at
risk in biased ways that often do not even recognize their true exposure to risk.
Uncertainty is different than risk. Before becoming famous for helping leak the Pentagon Papers, Daniel Ellsberg was a social scientist who developed an experiment that
linked psychology and economics and highlighted the difference between risk and uncertainty. In the experiment people were given a choice of a risky situation and an uncertain
situation that had less risk. Systematically, people chose the risky situation. As a classroom
instructor, I regularly replicated this experiment with my students. His discovery is known
as the Ellsberg Paradox, and it shows that people would rather face situations of risk than
uncertainty, even at the hazard of magnifying some of the risk. Known unknowns are preferred to unknown unknowns, and as Taleb emphasizes in The Black Swan, people often
want to retrospectively reduce the unknowns to knowns. In addition to this important
finding, the Ellsberg Paradox illustrates the importance of close collaboration between
disciplines and communication across disciplines – a hallmark of the liberal arts approach
championed at Maryville College.
While experimental evidence in the relatively controlled setting of the laboratory is
interesting, it is not sufficient to convince most people. Fortunately – although that’s not

inauguration

SPECIAL

really the right word – we have a prominent example of uncertainty regularly dominating
the news. Anthropogenic climate change is a large scale long term set of issues that has,
ironically, often generated more heat than light in public discussion.
The standard approach that economists use to analyze long term situations involving
the future is cost-benefit analysis. The usual framework of such analysis is that it assumes
that we know what the probability is for various outcomes, in other words that we are in a
situation of risk. However, there are some fundamental uncertainties involved in the
potential impact of climate change. In particular, the possibility of strong threshold effects
where a small change in temperature leads to a dramatic shift in some other condition
means that the standard cost-benefit analysis might not apply. As a result, much attention
is focused on the possibility of extreme events and in understanding how uncertainty,
rather than just risk, can best be mitigated. In an article discussing the Stern Review on the
Economics of Climate Change, Harvard professor Martin Weitzman summarizes, “The
basic issue here is that spending money to slow global warming should perhaps not be
conceptualized primarily as being about consumption smoothing as much as being about
how much insurance to buy to offset the small chance of a ruinous catastrophe that is difficult to compensate by ordinary savings.” (quote is from the abstract on p. 703)
(Weitzman, Martin. L. 2007. “A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate
Change.” Journal of Economic Literature, 45(3): 703–724) This conclusion does not
automatically imply any specific government policy will be better than actions by private
individuals – after all governments are elected by and composed of people. Rather, it
implies that we should look for approaches that recognize with appropriate humility our
limited ability to foresee all possible outcomes. As Weitzman says, “gathering information
about [thicktailed] uncertainties representing rare climate disasters (and developing a real-

istic emergency plan were they to materialize) should be a priority of research.” (p. 704)
While climate change caused by people is an important question, it is not the only
complication caused by the fact that we deal with individuals rather than automata.
Another influential economic thinker, Joseph Schumpeter, said, “Without committing
ourselves either to hero worship or to its hardly less absurd opposite, we have got to realize that, since the emergence of exceptional individuals does not lend itself to scientific
generalization, there is here an element that, together with the element of random occurrences with which it may be amalgamated, seriously limits our ability to forecast the
future.” (Thomas K. McCraw, Prophet of Innovation: Joseph Schumpeter and Creative
Destruction, Belknap Press (Harvard University Press): Cambridge, MA, 2007, pp. 475476, quoting Schumpeter regarding “The Personal Element and the Element of Chance:
A Principle of Indeterminateness”, part of the Walgreen Lectures that he was preparing to
give in 1950, notes prepared in 1949)
And of course we return to the Bible. The book of James (4:13-14) reminds us that
the future is always uncertain.
[13] Go to now, ye that say, To day or to morrow we will go into such a city, and continue there a year, and buy and sell, and get gain:
[14] Whereas ye know not what shall be on the morrow. For what is your life? It is even
a vapour, that appeareth for a little time, and then vanisheth away.
In Risk, Uncertainty, and Profit (1921, Chapter IX, first paragraph), Frank Knight
says, “We live in a world full of contradiction and paradox, a fact of which perhaps the
most fundamental illustration is this: that the existence of a problem of knowledge

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15

President Bogart and platform
speakers depart the Nutt
Theatre through an honor
guard of students.

depends on the future being different from the past, while the possibility of the solution
depends on the future being like the past.”
Again quoting from the masters of Huainan, “What is to be done for prosperity
today, and what is to be done for justice tomorrow – this is easily said. What is to be done
for justice today, and what is to be done for prosperity tomorrow – this is hardly known.”
(Tao of Politics, p. 60)
Despite this uncertainty, it is vital to move forward with faith, as the nature of uncertainty
is that it is never completely resolved. In Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare gives Brutus
something memorable to say on this subject. (Julius Caesar Act IV, Scene 3, 218-224)
Brutus: There is a tide in the affairs of men.
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
On such a full sea are we now afloat,
And we must take the current when it serves,
Or lose our ventures.
Our mission statement begins with the phrase “Maryville College prepares students”
and that has been the organizing theme of this week’s celebration of the college. We conclude our mission statement by stating what we are preparing them for: “to search for
truth, grow in wisdom, work for justice, and dedicate a life of creativity and service to the
peoples of the world.”


Creativity is inextricably linked to faith. As the author of Hebrews says (11:1), “Faith

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is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.” When we create,
we are bringing something to the world that was not seen before, something that we and
perhaps others had hoped for.
This creativity is also inextricably linked to knowledge. In one of my favorite books,
His Master’s Voice, the Polish author Stanislaw Lem poses the question, what would happen if we received a message from another world and couldn’t decipher it? The narrator
introduces the story by including a criticism of how people often approach science, “acting like a child who thinks the names of the stars and planets are written on them, and
that the astronomers read these off through their telescopes” (pp. 20-21, NY: Harcourt
Brace Jovanovich, 1968 [translation 1983]) in order to introduce the theme that true
research and discovery involve creativity. In senior studies, our students experience – the
hard way – the process of discovery and as a result are prepared to succeed in whatever
setting they find themselves after they leave. Faith and learning are complements and
Maryville College will continue to thrive in its distinctive blending where both aspects of
human development are taken seriously.
I requested one of the two songs that you’ve heard so beautifully performed by our
choir. They sang “The Road Not Taken” and its message is clearly linked to the idea of
preparing for a world of uncertainty. But that wasn’t the song I requested. There are two
reasons that I asked that “Ain’t Got Time to Die” be sung today. The first is that it’s been
a favorite of my family since we discovered a version by the Maryville College choir on
YouTube. The second and more important reason is that I don’t know of another song
that better describes the spirit of service I have found at Maryville College. Our students
are not passively absorbing lessons here nor are they quietly going out into the world.

inauguration

SPECIAL

(L-R) President Bogart joins attendess in some warm-up exercises prior to the one-act performances in
the Haslam Family Flex Theatre; President Emeritus Dr. Gerald W. Gibson (left) shakes hands with the new
president after the ceremony, as Gary Luhr, executive director of the Association of Presbyterian Colleges
and Universities (center) looks on.; Dr. Bogart receives hugs from wife Mary and father Carl after they
place the Medal of Office around his neck. Watching at left is Sheridan H. “Dan” Greaser ’60, vice chairman of the College’s Board of Directors.

like this Tulip Poplar that has been planted in your
honor, we stand behind you, young but strong, with
pride and ambition, ready to follow you through the
growth of Maryville College and its future,” said
Chelsey Cole ’12 before asking fellow Keepers to
pick up their ceremonial shovels.
Students in the College’s vocal ensemble, Off Kilter, entertained the crowed at the Inaugural Dinner
in Knoxville. At one point, the group serenaded Bogart with a unique arrangement of Bobby McFerrin’s
“Don’t Worry, Be Happy,” which brought much
laughter from the head table. Following Off Kilter’s
performance, the president took the microphone and
answered random questions that attendees had submitted on pieces of paper during the meal.

Inquiries ranged from his top three goals for the
institution to his pronunciation of M-A-R-Y-V-I-L-L-E.
“Ah, … am I a two-syllable or three-syllable person?” Bogart jokingly expounded.
“Maryville” was three syllables in the Inaugural
Address, where the new president outlined how
Maryville College has prepared – and will continue to
prepare – students for a world of risk and uncertainty.
“All I was thinking about was how proud I was
that Dr. Bogart is our new president,” Davies
remembered from that moment.
After the honor guard disbanded in the William
Baxter Lee III Grand Foyer of the Clayton Center
for the Arts, the MC senior and her friends headed
for the lunch on the grounds and one final memory-

Rather, they are passionately looking for ways to connect their experiences on campus
with the world off campus while here in preparation for going forth to give “lives of citizenship and leadership” that bless the world.
Maryville College prepares students:
• For risk: by helping them gain knowledge and develop the habits of study that will lead
to a lifelong ability to grow in knowledge
• For uncertainty: by helping them gain wisdom (including the wisdom to distinguish
risk and uncertainty) and by helping them to grow in faith
Our preparation of students will build on the same principles that have guided us in
the past. The best preparation for the future is a liberal arts education, and that education
must include a core curriculum that extends through all four years of undergraduate
study. In addition to the breadth of preparation in the core, we will help students delve in
depth into their major field of study. That depth will be reflected in high quality senior
studies and also combined with breadth in demonstrating accountability as we do in our
current system of comprehensive exams. Our students will benefit from engagement with
area businesses in the form of internships and practica as we work together to build productive partnerships that enhance this region.
One activity we will soon engage in is the complete renovation of Anderson Hall,
named for the college’s founder and the oldest academic space on campus, constructed in
1870. Some of the earliest students to learn in that space said the following in the student
newspaper of 1875: “it is not so much the amount of knowledge which we cram into our
brains as the quality, and the manner in which it is kept; for if we fill our heads with a

making event: A surprise “flash mob” of choreographed dancers (students, faculty and staff) in
front of 101-year-old Pearsons Hall, all moving
to the beat of En Vogue’s “Free Your Mind.”
Dr. and Mrs. Bogart watched and cheered from
the steps of Pearsons.
And before the day was over, Davies was taking
orders from faculty and staff, parents and board
members who wanted their own “I [Heart]
Bogart” T-shirts.

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confused mass of rules, problems, dead languages and scraps of history, and do not keep
them in order and ready for use, we are perhaps no better prepared for the duties of life
than we would be had we never obtained that knowledge.” (Maryville Student, 1875, via
digital archives)
In Maryville College’s first inaugural address delivered in 1822 (a microfilm version is
contained in the mace that is carried at the head of all of our academic processions), our
founder Isaac Anderson summarized why we must undertake a broad course of study.
“The mind of man is incapable of examining, or even of forming a judgment respecting
the extensive materials that are necessarily connected with the forgoing enquires, unless it
is enlarged by a knowledge of grammar in general, of logic, metaphysics, natural philosophy, mathematics, natural history, and polite literature. These expand the mind, give
direction to its energies, and furnish it with just rules by which every subject as to be
examined is submitted to its inspection.” Those words are as true today as they were
almost two hundred years ago.
Maryville College has always been more than just an academic setting. Our students
engage in a wide range of extracurricular and service activities, as they find their vocation
not only in their profession but also in the ways that they connect with others. Our Faith
and Learning Statement articulates this vital purpose. “The goal of a Maryville education
is not simply the adoption of a particular stance or worldview, but rather the search for
truth, wherever it may be found, and the ability to recognize and take seriously life’s basic
questions of faith, meaning and value.” Let us study to develop knowledge and wisdom
so that we can go forth prepared for a world of risk and uncertainty.


GOD BLESS YOU AND GOD BLESS MARYVILLE COLLEGE.

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17

campaign

NEWS

Anderson renovation IS TOP PRIORITY

















FOR NEW PRESIDENT

AT THE INAUGURAL DINNER for Maryville College President Tom Bogart on April 14, an
attendee asked the new leader to name three things he hoped to accomplish in the next five years.
Standing at the podium in front of approximately 200 people gathered in the Summit Ballroom of
Knoxville’s Crowne Plaza Hotel, Bogart didn’t hesitate.
“First, to see Anderson Hall completely renovated,” he answered, conveying an urgency in getting
the project moving again.
Converting 19th-century Anderson for 21st-century usage has been discussed for several years. Three
years ago, the College completed Phase I of the project, which was focused on securing the exterior of
the building. Scaffolding went up in the spring of 2008 so that workers could remove old mortar in the
brickwork and replace with new mortar, restore the bell tower and mount new gutters and downspouts.
A new slate roof was installed, and footings and foundations (first poured just four years after the Civil
War’s ending) were stabilized.
The plan was to begin Phase II – the interior renovation – soon after 2008, but fundraising slowed
on the project as the United States’ economy fell into a recession.
“In its 141-year history, the interior of Anderson Hall has never benefited from an extensive refurbishment,” Bogart explained in a recent interview. “Plans call for taking the interior back to the supporting structure and replacing everything from floors and walls to steam piping and doorknobs.”
The interior renovation will include reconfiguring the floor plans of all four stories, redesigning all
learning and work spaces, installing an elevator and other accessibility features, installing central heat
and air conditioning, replacing or restoring all windows and doors and adding modern technology
infrastructure to all classroom and office spaces.
Last December, the College spent $60,000 to complete extensive ceiling repair work in Anderson
that was badly needed. Bogart said that is not the way he wants to maintain the historic structure.
“I fear that the College may be forced to take care of pressing needs in a similar fashion –
spending thousands for short-term fixes,” he said. “As an economist and a college president, I
want to be a better steward of our resources than that.”
Completing the renovation in time for the 2014-2015 academic year is a specific goal
that Bogart would like the College to meet.
But it will require raising approximately $4.2 million within the next 18 months.
“I am confident that we can meet this goal,” he said. “In January, the College’s Board
of Directors collectively committed to raising $750,000 for this project. Numerous
alumni from reunion classes have come together to secure named spaces inside the
building, and many other individuals have stepped up to help.”

ANDERSON ROOM will pay homage



TO ALUMNA’S DESIRE TO HELP PEOPLE
BARBARA WALLIN ’50
ALWAYS WANTED TO
HELP PEOPLE.
As a psychology major and
education minor at Maryville
College, she planned on a
career helping children reach
their potential. As the first
occupational therapist at East18

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| SUMMER 2011

ern State Mental Hospital in Knoxville, she made
a tremendous difference in the lives of hundreds
of patients.
And even though she died Feb. 22, 2007, Wallin
is still positively impacting the lives of others.
John Greene, a close friend of Wallin’s for
more than 40 years, has continued the alumna’s
legacy of giving through the establishment of the
Wallin Family Memorial Scholarship at Maryville

College and the naming of the Wallin Family
Education Resource Room in Anderson Hall.
“I wish people could know how much she
enjoyed helping people,” Greene said in a recent
interview. “She affected the lives of many people
in her work, and she continued to do that after
she retired.”

ANDERSON WILL MEET ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS
Bogart said the College is in discussions with architect Duane Grieve and
building contractors about possibly seeking Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certification for Anderson Hall.
Currently, no building on the Maryville College campus is LEED®-certified,
although environmental and energy-saving initiatives underway at Crawford
House are positioning the 135-year-old farmhouse for certification. (See story,
page 4.)
Regardless of the College’s decision to pursue or not pursue LEED® certification for Anderson Hall, Bogart said the renovation will incorporate green
building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions.
“By bringing 21st-century environmental standards to this 19th-century
building, we will not only enhance the academic climate but demonstrate that
our icon reflects our values,” the president said.
More information on the planned renovation and campaign, as well as old
photos and alumni memories of the 141-year-old building, can be found on the
College’s website, maryvillecollege.edu/giving/capital-projects. To make a
gift, contact Holly Jackson-Sullivan, vice president for advancement and community relations, at 865.273.8884.

A HEART FOR PEOPLE
Wallin came to Maryville College from Greene
County, Tenn., in 1946. Her father, Stephen
Eldridge Wallin ’16 graduated from Maryville
College and went on to a career as a lawyer and
judge. Her mother, Jessie Gray Wallin, was a Tusculum College graduate and taught in public
school systems.
Wallin thought she would follow in her mother’s footsteps and become a teacher, but she met
someone from Eastern State Mental Hospital

(now known as Lakeshore Mental Health Institute) who quickly picked up on Wallin’s empathy
and sincerity.
“This person at Eastern said to her, ‘I can tell
you care,’” Green explained, adding that Eastern
eventually offered to send Wallin to the Virginia
Commonwealth School of Occupational Therapy
for more education. She took it.
The first occupational therapist at Eastern, the
MC alumna worked continuously for the hospital
for 35 years. She started programs such as needle-

working and ceramics for the patients. She convinced her supervisors to build a greenhouse so
that patients could grow plants year-round. She
opened a gift shop at the hospital so that the public could buy products made or grown by patients.
After retiring from the hospital, she continued
her commitment to mental health by serving as a
consultant with the Helen Ross McNabb Center
of Knoxville. Declining health eventually pushed
her to leave her field, but she volunteered
through her church, Erin Presbyterian Church
in Knoxville, as she was able.

‘FITTING’ MEMORIALS
Greene said Wallin “really loved Maryville
College” and the friends she made on campus,
especially Ruth Davis Dameron ’50 and Hilda
Roberts Walker ’50. He said his friend would be
pleased to know that current and future students
are benefitting from her work.
Endowing the Wallin Family Memorial Scholarship at Maryville College with funds from Wallin’s estate, Greene said he set the criteria for the
award based on what he believed would be the
wishes of Barbara and her family.
The scholarship is awarded annually to a student of financial need who is interested in the
field of education or teacher licensure. Criteria
include enrolling at the College from a rural
community with preference given to students
from Greene County, Tenn., or East Tennessee.
The education resource room – slated for a
renovated Anderson Hall – is “very fitting,”
Greene said, given the family’s belief in and commitment to education. Greene was also drawn to
the plan for the room’s usage and how it could
impact all of the students and faculty of the College – not just one academic division.
“It seemed that a room like that would appeal
to her very much,” he said.
After Anderson Hall is renovated, the Wallin
Family Education Resource Room will open on
the first floor of the building, located in the space
long occupied by the Registrar’s Office.
Other naming opportunities exist inside Anderson Hall, said Holly Jackson-Sullivan, vice president for advancement and community relations.
“From both a historical and practical standpoint, Anderson Hall is a vitally important building on our campus, and we are deeply appreciative
to John Greene for supporting Anderson’s renovation through gifts made from the Wallin estate,”
she said. “I know that he carefully selected the
programs and initiatives that Barbara would have
wanted to support, which make the scholarship
and resource room all the more meaningful to her
classmates and her alma mater.”

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19

EDITOR’S NOTE:
The College received information printed below between
July 22, 2010, and Jan. 31, 2011. Class notes received after Jan. 31,
2011 should appear in the next issue of Alumni News & Notes.

C L A S S notes

1940
Phyllis Rainard Haxton and husband Richard have moved into
their new home, which is a cottage in a retirement home in
Harrisonburg, Va. Due to a
severe fall, she is very limited in
her mobility and is now dependent on a walker. She would like
to hear from classmates.

1941
Jean White Byrne is living at
Shannondale of Maryville,
taking part in many of the
activities provided, including
attending many events on the
MC campus. Husband Art
passed away in 2007; daughter
Janice lives nearby and is her
“out of town” chauffeur and
chef. Daughter Terry lives in
Rochester, N.Y.

1942
Ruth Lane Prewett celebrated her
90th birthday Nov. 27 with
a luncheon at Miss Olivia’s Table
in Maryville. The event was
hosted by her children, Gary
Prewett and Ann Prewett
Harris ’70.

Dorsey D. Ellis Jr. ’60 dean emeritus and the William R.
Orthwien Distinguished Professor of Law Emeritus at
the University, received a Fulbright grant to teach at
Catholic University of Portugal in 2010-2011. Ellis has
previously taught and researched in Belgium, Japan,
Netherlands, New Zealand, Taiwan, and the United
Kingdom. He teaches in the areas of antitrust, products
liability, laws and economics, and torts.

Snapshots of Blount County
History. Stone is a member of
the 21-member commission.

1948
Julia Pancoast Householder was
inducted into the Sevier County
Education Hall of Fame on April
27, 2010. She was a member of
the first group to be inducted.
She taught 32 years at Sevier
County High Schoool.

1950
Faye Robinson Doyle and
husband Russell celebrated
their 56th wedding anniversary
this year. They are still active
and enjoy persuing their
hobbies of rail trail bike riding
and down hill skiing. Faye is
retired from the family medical
practice and currently runs the

Bill Proffitt Sr. ‘49 (left) and son Bill Proffit Jr. medaled
in the Tennessee Senior Olympics held in July 2010.
Bill Sr., then 86 years old, won gold medals in two
cycling events and one javelin throw. He said he
enjoys cycling and bikes about 50 miles a week.

1946
PHOTO COURTESY OF
THE DAILY TIMES

20

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| SUMMER 2011

Dean Stone, Daily Times editor,
was honored by the Tennessee
Historical Commission for the
six-volume set of books

local historical society near
Oxford, Pa.
Ed-Ben Gearhart is now retired
for the third time. In good
health, he travels, enjoys

educational television and is
involved in church work.
James Marvin won a gold medal
in Senior Smarts, a silver medal
in golf chipping and a bronze
medal in darts in the Polk
County (Fla) Senior Games.
With an average of 276 for 27
games, he was also the lead
bowler for his virtual bowling
team. “The Woodchoppers”
finished second in the national
2010 Spring Senior Wii Bowling
Championship.
Virginia Schwarz Mock has lived
in Macomb, Ill., for the past 50
years. She volunteers for Meals
on Wheels, Hospice, and LIFE,
a non-credit course for adults.
She and husband Gordon
attend the Y, where she enjoys
stair climbing and weight lifting.

1953
Peggy-Ann Kessler Duke is still
very involved with several local
and national art organizations,
especially the Sumi-e Society of
America, Inc. (oriental art). She
recently won a “Best Show”
award in a local show. Her
husband’s latest publication,
The Green Pharmacy Guide to
Healing Foods, published by
Rodale, has been very well
received.

class

Don & Barbara Nielson Steinke ’62 (left) enjoyed a visit
by Mike Ducey ’61 and Connie Bondurant Ducey ’62
last summer. The Steinkes took their guests to nearby
Yosemite National Park, where they posed in front of
the park’s “Half Dome.”

1955
Sarah Pledger Fechter wrote that
daughter Wendy Crane Johnson
died on April 20, 2010, of
melanoma cancer. Her husband,
Charles Fechter, passed away
on June 8, 2010.

1956
James Laster appeared in
Wayside Theatre’s 2009
production of Miracle on 34th
Street as Judge Harper and the
theatre’s 2010 production of
Harvey as Judge Gaffney. He
also participated in the reading
of a new two-character play,
Chances Were, by Thomas
Stephens, for the Playwright’s
Forum in Washington, D.C. He
continues to play for various
churches when substitute
organists are required.
Charles Partee recently retired
from the faculty of Pittsburgh
Theological Seminary after 30
years as the P.C. Rossin
Professor of Church History. His
fourth book, The Theology of
John Calvin, was published by
Westminster John Knox in 2008.

1963
Paul Elliott has written a comedy
for stage entitled Exit Laughing.
The play was performed in

Seattle and Los Angeles last
year and received rave reviews.
More about Elliott’s work can be
found at innericreatives.com.

Harold N. Cones, Jr., retired at
the rank of Distinguished
Professor after 40 years at
Christopher Newport University.
Wife Linda Schug Cones also
retired after 27 years as a high
school librarian. Harold now
lectures on cruise ships.

1968

Kenneth MacHarg and Polly
Ballantine MacHarg spent six
months in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan,
where Ken was the interim
pastor of the International
Church of Bishkek. The church
is a multi-national, multi-

1973

PATRICIA PENLAND MOUTON ’61 died of a heart attack March 15,
2010, while presiding as chair of the Liverpool (N.Y.) Board of Education
during a contentious meeting involving the closing of an elementary school.
Ten months later, the school district dedicated the Liverpool High School
library in her honor.
Mouton was a teacher at Liverpool High for 19 years and served as a member of the school board for eight years.
“Our family was very, very pleased about the dedication of the library,”
Stephen Mouton ’59, Pat’s husband, told the Post-Standard newspaper in
January. “I thought it was a very fitting memorial to my wife who gave 27 years
to the district.”
The Mouton family donated about 700 books from Pat’s personal collection (mostly on the subjects of folklore and mythology) to the library.
Mouton was twice chosen as a National Endowment for the Humanities
scholar, first at Wayne State University in Detroit to study Grimm’s fairy tales,
and later at the University of Maryland to study Greek mythology.
In addition to Stephen, survivors include two children and one grandchild.

Katherine Yoder Joseph just
completed her sixth season
working as a volunteer docent
at the Salem Historical Society
Museum in Salem, Ohio.

Thomas Bennett wrote “Maryville
College receives prominent
mention in my murder-mystery
novel, Charleston Nights.”
The novel is available through
amazon.com.

1975
Kathleen “Kathy” WassumHamel is a four-year colon
cancer survivor. She is still a
music teacher at Orange
County (Fla.) Public Schools and
is looking forward to being a
grandmother for the first time.

1977
George Naron is now in his
third year of being Dean of
Students at the Knox School
on Long Island.

1978
1964
Phyllis Deloteus Garrett is
looking forward to seeing the
Class of ‘64 at her 50th reunion
in 2014.

1965
Virginia S. Brown has retired from
teaching kindergarten after 44
years. The last six years were
spent in the Hillsborough County
School District in Tampa, Fla.

denominational Englishlanguage congregation.
Jack Spencer has worked as a
contractor for the Centers for
Disease Control since his
retirement after 40 years with
CDC. His assignments have
put him in 23 developing
countries in Africa, Asia, and
South America as a manager
for the Global Aids Program.

Mark Conover accepted a position as sales manager with SKYLOTEC N.A., LP, a global safety
equipment manufacturer with
U.S. headquaters located in
Boulder, Colo. He and his family
have relocated to Colorado.

1979
Edward C. Herbert was recognized with the 2010 Servants
Heart Award from Mountain
States Health Alliance. The

focus

| SUMMER 2011

21

NOTES

MARRIAGES
& UNIONS

Kathleen “Kathy” Wassum ‘75
to Dennis “Bear” Hamel
June 2006
Kristin Kant ‘96
to Carl Byers
Sept. 29, 2007
Daniel P. Ramsey ‘01
to Patricia Norton
June 14, 2008
Rachel Bowman ‘02
to Hugh Austin
Oct. 17, 2009

award is the healthcare system’s
most prestigious recognition,
honoring team members who
exemplify in their daily lives the
philosophy of patient-centered
care. Ed joined MSHA as vice
president of communications
and marketing in 1999.

1981
W. Mark Burnett celebrated
the birth of this first grandson,
Tanner Ray Smyre, born
Oct. 9, 2010.

1982
Jane Helwig Fortney and
husband David moved from
Wisconsin to Winston-Salem,

the Seattle Regional Office
and oversees the American
Community Survey.

1983
Kathryn Long Alwood, husband
Bruce and the youngest of their
three children began a five-year
missionary stint in Ireland as
part of the World Harvest
Mission in July 2010.
J. Michael Hester has recently
been promoted to the position
of director of operations for
the Flexible Packaging division
of Tekni-Plex Corp, a maker
of lidding materials.
Susan van Aken was awarded the
2009 Disability Advocate Award

GEOFFERY KENNEDY ’07

&

GEOFFERY
PATRICIA
WEAVER
KENNEDY
’07KENNEDY ’08

June 10, 2010

Amanda Atkins ‘05
to Jarrod Davis
Sept. 11, 2010
Heather R. Mathis ‘06
to Mark R. Bryan,
Aug. 7, 2010
Bret Lindsey ’06
to Lauren Fleming ’08
Dec. 4, 2009
Gary Murray ‘08
to Ashley Redmon ‘08
May 28, 2010

22

focus

| SUMMER 2011

Neal McBrayer has been
recognized as a leader in the
commercial bankruptcy law
field by being selected as a
contributing author of the
recently released book, Inside
the Minds: Navigating Recent
Bankruptcy Law Trends. He
practices in the Nashville office
of Miller & Martin, PLLC.

1987
Darrel Lauderdale was inducted
into the Tennessee Wrestling
Hall of Fame on October 9,
2010. The former wrestling
coach at Seymour High School
is now the southeastern director
for AAU Wrestling. He has been
involved with AAU wrestling
since 1995 and is directly
responsible for its growth from
3 members to 4,000 members.

1995

OCT. 31, 2009
to PATRICIA
WEAVER ’08

Carrie Crain ‘04
to Travis Williams
April 9, 2010

1986

The Geoffrey Kennedy ‘07 - Patricia Weaver ‘08 wedding held at
Maryville’s New Providence Presbyterian Church was Scottish-themed
and included several MC grads. They included (L-R) Laura Paslay ’08,
Nancy Kennedy Wallace ’72 (aunt of the groom), Brianna Merrill Cook
’05, Rachael Whaley Pate ’08, John Pate ’09, Robert Kennedy ’71
(father of the groom), Ernest Reihl ’10 and Calvin Taylor ’08.
N.C., last summer. “It is great to
be back in the South again
and closer to our extended
families!” she wrote.
Vanessa Logan enjoys living in the
Seattle, Wash., area with her
two children Natalie (13) and
Nathan (12). She now works for
the U.S. Census Bureau as a
supervisory survey statistician in

by the Somerset County (N.J.)
Office for the Disabled. The
award recognizes people that
go beyond their daily duties
to make things better for the
disabled. She has been with
the Franklin Township
Recreation Department since
1984 and has developed and
coordinated several programs
for the disabled.

Ginni Dillon Jabbour was named
the 2010 Dr. Howard Sisco Outstanding Teacher Award winner
by the Tennessee Educational
Technology Association. The
award is given to teachers who
have “deliberately planned for
and incorporated the use of
technology” in the classroom,
resulting in an improved educational setting. She is a technology specialist and math teacher
at Maryville High School.
John Trotter was named to
the Tennessee Historical
Commission. He represents
East Tennessee.

1999
Adam McCall was named
“Tennessee Bachelor 2010” by
Cosmopolitan magazine. In the
Cosmo profile, he listed his
three must-haves as “sushi, a
hammock, and music.” Adam
lives in Greenback and designs

class

boats for Malibu Boats of
Tennessee in Loudon, Tenn. He
was featured recently in a WBIRTV’s “Your Stories” segment.

2000
Parri Sikes Thurman has returned
to teaching after five years of
being a stay-at-home mom. She
teaches second grade at the
Episcopal School of Knoxville,
where daughter Camilla is in
the first grade.
Paul Gibson co-owner of VIEO
Design, beat out numerous
larger and better-known
companies for the 2010 “Best
Web Programmer” award from
AAF-Knoxville, an organization
for advertising professionals.
VIEO Design specializes in
user interface, graphic design,
PHP development and
content management system
customization. Paul and Rob
Spurlock formed VIEO in 2008.
Cristina Wieck Welhoelter was
named site lead for Dell in
Nashville and Regional Sales
Manager for Medium Business,
East Coast, in April 2009.

MC grads and former
Sign Language Interpreting students
Mikey Rickman ’04
and Jason Dean ’10
ran into each other at
the Cologne Cathedral
in Germany on July 30,
2010, a day before the
VIII Gay Games opening ceremony. Rickman participated in the games as a
member of the East Coast Fusion Softball Team (which
took home gold) while Dean volunteered as an ASL
interpreter for the Gay Deaf American athletes.

2001

2004

Robert Lough resigned his
commission as an officer in the
U.S. Air Force in 2006, a tenure
which included four tours of
duty to Iraq and surrounding
countries in support of
Operations Iraqi and Enduring
Freedom. He graduated from
the Candler School of Theology
at Emory University in 2009 with
a master’s of divinity degree.
Along with his wife, Dr. Andrea
(Andee) Lough, he lives in
Pembroke, Va., where he serves
as senior pastor of Pembroke
First United Methodist Church.

Jamey Cook earned her master’s
degree in Spanish on May 9,
2010 from University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Jamey,
who has been blind since the
age of 6 months, is now hoping
to go into medical interpreting
or another field where she can
help people.

DR. JARRED YOUNGER ’98 returned to campus
during Homecoming 2010 to give the presentation
“Romantic Love Reduces Pain: Pictures from the Brain
in Love” just days after his research on the subject
became national news.
Younger, assistant professor in the Stanford (Calif.)
University School of Medicine’s Department of Anesthesia, teamed with three other researchers from Stanford and another from State University of New York at
Stony Brook on a study that examined how the brain
allows love to reduce pain.
The three researchers found that love activates brain
regions that control feelings of reward and
euphoria. Once activated, those regions
then block pain at the spinal cord, keeping pain messages from reaching the
brain.
In addition to mainstream news, the
findings were published in the online journal PLoS ONE.
Most of Younger’s research is focused on discovering mechanisms and treatments of chronic pain.

Randi Earley received a school
counselor certification from the
State of Tennessee in 2009. She
is currently the manager of the
John Titlow Band and is active
in the Maryville/Alcoa Jaycees,
serving as the Jaycees’ Christmas Parade Project Chair.

2005
Amanda Atkins Davis works for
Eastman Chemical Company
as a Market Insight and Strategy
Manager in sustainability. She
lives in Asheville, N.C.
Brittany Lloyd Drake works for
the Knox County (Tenn.) School
System as a music teacher.
Richard Drake works for ADT
Security Services as a sales rep.
He and wife Brittany Lloyd
Drake live in Knoxville.
J. Michelle Reed graduated
from Walden University with
a master’s degree in research
psychology and program

MARRIAGES
& UNIONS

Nathan Nehf ’08
to Kelli Ierulli ’10
June 11, 2010
Rachel Rushworth ’08
to Chris Hollander
Dec. 19, 2010
Scott Stevens ‘08
to Chelse Nieri ’09
June 26, 2010
Corinne Davidson ’09
to Adam Bradley
Nov. 4, 2010
Cate Culbertson ‘09
to Matthew Mart ‘09
July 3, 2010
Danielle Chapman ‘10
to Kevin Tupper
June 12, 2010

BIRTHS &
ADOPTIONS

J. Elithe Truett Carnes ‘92
& husband Richard, a daughter
Zion “Zee” Vesper-Grace,
July 14, 2009
Suzanne Long Averill ‘94
husband Michael Averill ’94,
a daughter, Elizabeth Renee,
July 9, 2010
Amy Lee Baggett ‘95
& husband Kip, a son,
Isaac Timothy,
Oct. 14, 2010
Kristin Kant-Byers &
husband Carl, a daughter,
Karlainan Mareene,
Sept. 3, 2010

focus

| SUMMER 2011

23

NOTES

JIMMY MAKUACH ’06 recently
joined the staff of Salva Kiir, president of
Southern Sudan.
His title is “president’s minutes
taker,” and his job involves recording
discussions held and decisions made
during presidential meetings.

BIRTHS &
ADOPTIONS

David Hopkins Hughs ‘97
& wife Shawn, a son,
Talon David Hughs,
August 13, 2010
Audrey McFadden Selecman ‘99
& husband JB, sons,
Andrew Benton & John Mark,
Jan. 29, 2010
Molly Winton Lothamer ‘00
& husband Casey, a son &
a daughter, Cooper Allen &
Charlotte “Charlie” Jo,
Aug. 2, 2010
Cristina Wieck Welhoelter ‘00
& husband Robert,
a daughter, Serafina Florence,
Nov. 13, 2009
Kevin Wingo ’01 & wife Katie,
a daughter, Josie Belle,
April 8, 2010
Nicole Williams Wicker ‘03
& husband J. Ben Wicker ‘03,
a daughter, Campbell Elizabeth,
Aug. 11, 2010

For the past four years, Makuach,
once a “Lost Boy” of Sudan, has
worked to build peace in Southern
Sudan through development work as a
senior programs coordinator with Sudan Production Aid (SUPRAID), a
Southern Sudanese non-government development organization.
“It’s really an honor to be called upon and to continue to serve and
provide the social basic services for the people of Southern Sudan that have
gone through a lot in their lifetime,” he wrote in an email to the College.
evaluation and is working as
a psychology instructor at
Northeast State Community
College in Blountville, Tenn.
She is already working on her
doctorate and has begun her
dissertation.
Rennie Salata has been named
to serve as a Duke Divinity
School intern by the North
Carolina Council of Churches.
Since enrolling at the school,
Rennie has served two field
education placements in local
church settings.

Christie Latimer Knapper ‘04
& husband
Wade Knapper ‘05
a daughter, Camryn Lynn
Dec. 17, 2010
Brittany Lloyd Rickard ‘05
& husband Drake Rickard ‘05,
a daughter, Morgan Sophia,
Sept. 18, 2009
Chistopher Beeler ’05
& wife Carrie, a daughter,
Chloe Elizabeth, March 2, 2010
Lauren Fleming Lindsey ‘08
& husband Bret Lindsey ‘06,
a son, Bo Darrell Howard,
Sept. 19, 2010
24

focus

| SUMMER 2011

Ralph Anderson ’07 and
Lauren Gomes ’07 are
now living in Alaska,
where Ralph is working

2007
Cora Cain recently accepted a
position as membership and
community development coordinator with the Jefferson
County (Tenn.) Chamber of
Commerce. In this new position,
she will be involved in developing current memberships as
well as securing new members
and coordinating numerous

Len Turner is pursuing a master’s
degree in divinity at Princeton
Theological Seminary and
ordination in the Presbyterian
Church (USA).

2008
Katie Warner Asquith has
accepted a one-year clerkship
on the Alaska Supreme Court.
She and husband Chris Asquith
will be moving to Fairbanks,
Alaska, this summer for the
course of the 2011-2012 term.
Emily Harrill completed a master
of arts degree in liberal studies
with a concentration in archival
studies from ETSU on May 8,
2010. Emily has worked as a
graduate assistant in the
Archives of Appalachia at
ETSU while pursuing her
degree. For her senior project,
she processed the James H.
Quillen Collection at the City
of Kingsport archives.
John C. Mackersie graduated
with a master’s degree in
sport psychology from Miami
University (Ohio) in May 2010.
Currently, he is the assistant
strength and conditioning
coach at the university.

as a park ranger at
Denali National Park
and Reserve. The two
met while studying
outdoor recreation and
working with the
Mountain Challenge
program at the College.
They have worked with
several national parks
since graduation.

2009

community programs throughout the year.

2010

Thomas Russell earned his
M.B.A. in international business
at Appalachian State University
in December 2010.

Jennifer Roy is currently in
Washington, D.C., attending
law school and volunteering
for the District of Columbia’s
Time-Dollar Youth Court. Youth
are mandated to participate in
some or all of the following: jury
duty; community service; essay
writing; an apology to parents/
guardians; and/or youth
developmental workshops.

Whitney Hall Durfee continues
to serve as a parish associate at
the First Presbyterian Church in
Lancaster, Pa.

class

C L A S S notes

MEMORIAMS
1933

1938



Sept. 13, 2010, in Akron, Ohio. Following
MC, she earned a master’s degree from Francis
Payne Bolton School of Nursing and worked
as a nurse and nursing instructor throughout
her life. An elder in the Presbyterian Church,
she was active in local congregations and the
Presbyterian Women. Survivors include four
children and their families; sisters Margaret
Lodwick Pittman ’41 and Agnes Lodwick
Kilby ’45; and cousin Hedwig Nabholz
Lodwick ’49.

Mary Mize Longwell
Dec. 12, 2009, in Lenoir City, Tenn. She
taught in the Loudon County schools for
42 years and spent 25 years as an American
Red Cross volunteer. She was also a member
of the Loudon Couty Historical Association
and served a term on the board of Maryville
College Alumni Association.

1936

R. Stuart Gillis
Nov. 22, 2009, in Denver, Colo. He was
owner and partner of Industrial Denver
Company. Survivors include wife Marie,
daughter Merilynn Zakhem and sister
Elizabeth Gillis Ridenour ’34.

Cora Deats Huskey
Nov. 26, 2010, in Pittman Center, Tenn. She
taught home economics and French, among
other subjects, at Pittman Center and Gatlinburg Pittman High School for over 30 years.

Wiley E. Steakley
Aug. 31, 2010, in Fort Walton Beach, Fla.
He spent more than 40 years in electronic
components and televisions systems, as a
metallurgist, manufacturer’s representative and
applications and sales engineer in Ohio, West
Virginia and New Jersey. Survivors include one
son, two daughters and their families.

Madge Mcquagge Ulmer
Feb. 11, 2010, in Sarasota, Fla. Survivors
include one daughter.

1937

Charlotte Browder Eason
Jan. 9, 2010, in Baxley, Ga. She earned a
master’s degree from Georgia Southern
University and taught social studies at Appling
County High School in Baxley, Ga. Survivors
include daughter Ann Singer, sister Mary Keith
and their families.

Marian Lodwick Bauer

Ruth Emory Porter
April 28, 2010, in Eden, N.C. She taught
seventh grade in public high schools in North
Carolina following graduation from Maryville
College. Survivors include four children and
their families.

1939

Etta Culbertson Williams
Oct. 13, 2010, in Signal Mountain, Tenn.
After Maryville, she earned a master’s degree
from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.
She was a member of St. Timothy’s Episcopal
Church. She is survived by one daughter,
Evelyn Kennedy Tharpe.

1940

Earle Vaughan Lyons
July 25, 2010, in Point Loma, Calif. He
earned degrees from Princeton Theological
Seminary, the University of Pennsylvania and
Chapman College. Lyons was a Navy chaplain
for 30 years, serving in World War II and the
Korean and Vietnam wars. He retired as a captain, Chief of Chaplains Office. He served as
moderator of the Synod of Southern California
and Hawaii. Survivors include wife Suzanne,
two sons, one daughter and their families.

Eloise Caughron Millsaps
Oct. 22, 2009, in Tampa, Fla. She operated
her own kindergarten and worked at the
Lauderdale Medical Group until her retirement

at age 70. Survivors include one daughter,
one brother and their families.

1942
Frank Barr
Sept. 15, 2010, in Durham, N.C. Following
service in World War II, he earned a master’s
degree in public health from the University
of North Carolina School of Public Health.
After 36 years with the Durham County
Health Department, he retired as director
of environmental health. Survivors include
two daughters and two brothers.

1943

James Barr
July 16, 2010, in Riverhead, N.Y. He earned
his master of divinity degree from Union
Theological Seminary and was a longtime
Presbyterian minister, retiring from Cutchogue
(N.Y.) Presbyterian Church. Survivors include
four children, including Mary Ellen Barr
Wolf ’71 and David Barr ’73, and their
families; and two brothers.

E. Barbara Lorentz Farley
Jan. 20, 2011, in Lopatcong Township,
N.J. She earned her medical degree from
Hahnemann Medical College and was a
pediatrician at the Warren Hospital of
Phillipsburg. From 1989 until her retirement
in 1995, she also served as the hospital’s vice
president of medical affairs. Survivors include
two nephews and two nieces.

Elizabeth “Betty”
Winter Lowther
Aug. 19, 2010, in Ellensburg, Wash. She
taught piano to numerous junior high students
in the Central Washington area. Survivors
include husband Lawrence, two children and
their families.

Meredith Preston Pierce
July 26, 2010, in Rehoboth Beach, Del. In
addition to assisting her husband in his medical
practice, she developed the kindergarten
program in Rehoboth Beach and served on
the boards of two school districts. She taught

focus

| SUMMER 2011

25

NOTES

Sunday School at Westminster Presbyterian
Church and was a Girl Scout and Cub Scout
leader. Survivors include five children and their
families, including daughters Meredith Pierce
Cox ’67 and Pamela Pierce Wilson ’70 and
son Carl Pierce ’73.

Alice K. Reed
Aug. 24, 2009, in Mansfield, Conn. She had
lived in Willimantic, Conn., for many years
where she was a longtime member of the
Willimantic Camp Meeting Association.
Survivors include sister Jessie Reed Greve ’43
and nephew David Greve ’72.

A. James Yonker Jr.
Dec. 1, 2009, in Northport, Ala. He graduated from Princeton Theological Seminary
and earned degrees from Temple University
and the University of Evansville. He served
Presbyterian churches in Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Alabama, Indiana and Florida and faced
numerous death threats in the 1950s and
1960s because of his civil rights work. Survivors include wife Dawn, three daughters and
their children.

1944

Veronica Hansel George
Dec. 31, 2010, in Media, Pa. Survivors include
three children and their families.

Mary Wintermute Kent
Jan. 23, 2011, in Kingston, N.Y. She was given
a number of awards for her advocacy and work
with persons who had problems dealing with
the complexities of life. Her death was unexpected; she was talking with friends shortly
after church when she passed out and didn’t
regain consciousness. Survivors include husband J. Donald Kent ’42; seven children,
including Rachel Kent ’71; nine grandchildren; and brother Orval Wintermute ’50.

Kathryn Woodward Tipton
Aug. 11, 2010, in Memphis, Tenn. At the
request of Dr. Edwin Hunter, she taught
freshman English after graduating and while
her husband was serving in World War II.
For many years she was a member of Eudora
Baptist Church in Memphis, and most recently,
First Baptist Church in Maryville. Survivors
include son David.

1945

Luther Cross
June 14, 2009, in Orlando, Fla. He earned a
degree from Princeton Theological Seminary
26

focus

| SUMMER 2011

ALICIA BERRY (also

known as “Alicia Greenburg”),
May 28, 2010, in Charlotte,
N.C. Berry, a certified public
accountant who held degrees
from American University and
the University of TennesseeKnoxville, joined the MC
faculty in 1984 as an assistant
professor of business. In
1989, her duties were split
between teaching and work in the College’s business office. She was named
the College’s director of accounting in 1991 and continued to teach part-time in the
Social Sciences Division until she left the College in 1995. Survivors include daughter
Jessica Greenburg, sister Pamela Hodge and brother Bill Berry and their families.

and served churches in New York and Illinois.
He was an accomplished cartoonist and
ventriloquist – talents that he used effectively
in his ministry. He wrote several books of
children’s story sermons illustrated with his
cartoons. Survivors include sisters Margaret
Cross Scruggs ’46 and Ruth Cross Reid ’53
and cousin Frank Moore Cross ’42.

1946

Dorothy Dick Friddle
Dec. 30, 2009, in Martinsburg, W.Va. She
earned a master’s degree in guidance and
counseling from Shippensburg University and
served as a teacher, guidance counselor and
school administrator in Berkeley and Washington counties in West Virginia. She was active
in professional and civic groups in Martinsburg. Survivors include daughter Susan, one
sister, one brother and their families.

Ethel Park Hogue
Oct. 6, 2010, in Chattanooga, Tenn. Married
to a Presbyterian minister, she served churches
in Indiana, Colorado, California, New Mexico,
Ohio, New Jersey and Tennessee in a variety
of roles. She was also an elementary school
teacher. Survivors include four children and
their families, including son James L. Hogue
Jr. ’68 and daughter-in-law Sherry Wood
Hogue ’68.

1947

Helen C. “Lynn” Wilhoit Moroney
Nov. 4, 2010, in Dallas, Tex. While a college
student, she sang in the USO and at Red
Cross shows on the weekends. After college
she performed (as “Lynn Hoyt”) with the
Teddy Phillips Orchestra in hotels and ballrooms across the country and on radio and
television. She is survived by four children
and their families.

Charlotte Proffitt Paxton
Oct. 13, 2010, in Maryville, Tenn. She taught
in the Alcoa City School system before leaving
to help with a family business. She was an elder
at New Providence Presbyterian Church in
Maryville for several years. Survivors include
husband Kenneth Paxton ’48, three children
and their families, including daughter Cynthia
Paxton Freeman ’70.

1950

A. W. “Al” Hall
Feb. 25, 2010, in Knoxville, Tenn. He was a
retired supervisor from the U. S. Postal Services
with 35 years of service. After retirement, he
was a real estate agent. Survivors include wife
Lorene Summitt Hall ’49, two daughters,
one sister, and their families.

Thomas Lacy
Oct. 15, 2010, in Claremore, Okla. A
decorated veteran, he flew combat in both
the Korean and Vietnam wars, earning a

class

residents. Survivors include five children,
including daughter Janna Bryles Bopp ’81.

Wilma Trumbull Gray

PAUL FOX ’38, Feb. 14, 2010, in Richmond, Va.

During a 42-year career with Reynolds Metals Company,
Fox rose to corporate vice president. He headed up
operations for 63 countries and worked with such world
leaders as former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and
former Egyptian President Anwar Sadat. He was active in
Richmond-area businesses and non-profits. He was presented
the Alumni Citation in 1965. Survivors include two
daughters and great nephew Jeffrey Denton ’87.

BETTY BURTON PINNER-POOLE ’47, Aug. 22, 2009, in New York.
She was a researcher in the departments of physiology and rehabilitation medicine for the New
York University School of Medicine. She was awarded the Alumni Citation in 1980.

Distinguished Flying Cross in each of them.
He retired as a U.S. Air Force Brigadier
General and devoted many hours to the cause
of former prisoners of war and those missing
in action. Survivors include two daughters and
their families.

Thomas Stovall
Oct. 9, 2010, in Nashville, Tenn. He earned
master’s and doctoral degrees from George
Peabody College for Teachers and was a
professor and administrator for several
universities during his career. He served as
executive dean for academic affairs at Peabody
College before retiring in 1990. Survivors
include wife Virginia Gress Stovall ’49,
three sons and their families.

Donald Whelan
Aug. 20, 2010, in Waterville, N.Y. A veteran
newspaperman, he worked for the Burlington,
Vermont Free Press as a young man, then for
the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle in
Rochester, N.Y., in the early 1960s, before
joining the staff of Newsday, where he worked
until his retirement.

1951

Kenneth Boram
June 22, 2010, in Jerseyville, Ill. He held
various accounting and engineering positions
with companies in Tennessee, Florida and
Kentucky. Survivors include wife Laura, two
children and their families.

1952

June Hood Huffman
Nov. 3, 2010, in Jackson, Tenn. She earned
a master’s degree in music from the University
of Texas and taught at Union University for
several years. Survivors include husband
Charles Huffman ’49, three daughters and
their families.

Beverly Jacobi Rees
July 13, 2010, in Martinsburg, W.Va.
Survivors include husband Donald, two
children and their families.

1953

Daniel Dunbar
Nov. 3, 2010, in Owensboro, Ky. After a few
years in the Navy, he was hired by Southern
Bell and worked in microwave transmission.
He worked for Bell Laboratories, then
Southern Bell Headquarters. When he retired
in 1991 from BellSouth, he was working with
digital switching systems. Survivors include
wife Carolyn, four children and their families.

1954

Moody Bryles
Feb. 25, 2010, in Poplar Bluff, Mo. He earned
a master’s degree in psychiatric social service
and from 1968 until 1990, served as the director of the Poplar Bluff (Mo.) Regional Center,
serving mentally and developmentally disabled

Dec. 8, 2009, in Alexandria, Va. She taught
in the Fairfax County School System for
years. Survivors include husband Charles,
four children and one sister.

James Squires
Oct. 29, 2009, in Gainesville, Ga. He was
the owner and operator of Southeastern
Investigations for 40 years and later founded
Ambit Hearing Aid Corporation. Survivors
include wife Carol Moore Squires ’54,
two children and their families.

1955

Dwight Moody
Dec. 25, 2009, in Springfield, Ill. He held
degrees in agriculture and geology and was
employed by the United States Department
of Defense in Kansas City, Mo., from 1960
to 1967. He farmed in the Buffalo Hart (Ill.)
area from 1967 until his retirement in 2004.
He and his wife celebrated their 50th wedding
anniversary Sept. 13, 2009. Survivors include
wife Mary, three children and their families.

1956

Don Adams
Jan. 3, 2011, in Santa Claus, Ind. Following
teaching positions in Blount County, he
began a 38-year career as a National Park
Service ranger, overseeing sites in Tennessee,
the Virgin Islands and Indiana. Survivors
include wife Grace Harrison Adams ’55,
two children and their families.

John Barrows, Jr.
May 22, 2010, in Bowling Green, Fla.

Benjamin Preston Bogia
Nov. 19, 2009, in Princess Anne, Md. He
earned a divinity degree from Princeton
Theological Seminary and became an ordained
Presbyterian minister. Much of his career was
spent in clinical pastoral education, teaching
at Topeka (Kan.) State Hospital and the
University of Kentucky School of Medicine.
He earned a Ph.D. from UK in 1995. Survivors include wife Kay, two sons, two brothers
and their families.

1960

Norman “Patt” Patterson
Nov. 18, 2010, in Mayhill, N.M. He completed
a master’s degree in contracting/procurement

focus

| SUMMER 2011

27

NOTES

ELIZABETH S.
“LIBBY” WELSH ’59,

JEAN CAMPBELL ROKES ’33,

Feb. 10, 2011, in Maryville, Tenn. Following
graduation, she pursed a career as a flight attendant.
She met future husband Nelson Rokes, and they
married in 1944. With Nelson the chief pilot for
Proctor & Gamble, they traveled the world. She
moved to Maryville following his death in 1979 and
was active in the College’s alumni initiatives, New
Providence Presbyterian Church, the Sam Houston
Schoolhouse and Blount Memorial Hospice. She was
presented the Alumni Citation in 1989. Survivors
include one son, one granddaughter and her family.

in 1984. An Army pilot, Patt retired in 1985
and went to work in weapons testing at White
Sands Missile Range in New Mexico. Survivors
include wife Patricia and one daughter.

1963

H. Edwin Bruce
Aug. 25, 2010, in Birmingham, Ala. He
retired in 2001 after teaching and coaching
for 38 years in the Bessemer, Birmingham, and
Jefferson County School Systems. He was an
inductee of the Alabama High School Sports
Hall of Fame. Survivors include wife Charlotte
Speigner Bruce ‘65, one daughter, one brother
and their families.

Ann Mcilhenny Harward
June 18, 2009, in Newark, Del. Married to a
college administrator and president, she was
involved in the campus lives of the College
of Wooster, Bates College and the University
of Delaware. She was also active in the
communities surrounding the campuses,
forming a hospice program and directing a
United Way organization in Wayne County,
Ohio. Survivors include husband Donald
Harward ’61, two children and their families.

28

focus

| SUMMER 2011

Jan. 20, 2011, in Maryville, Tenn.
She was instrumental in establishing
and building Maryville College’s
admissions and development
programs during her 47 years of
employment. She went to work in
1959 as assistant in the newly
established alumni office, helping
recruit new students and communicate with alumni. Until her retirement, Libby worked
continuously in the Advancement Division of the College. She held the titles of office manager,
alumni director, director of campus events, administrative assistant to the vice president and
director of donor records and research. After her retirement in 2006, she was a regular volunteer
in the Advancement Division. She was awarded the Alumni Citation in 2009. Survivors include
sister and brother-in-law, Margaret “Peggy” and Donald Curlovic, and their children and
grandchildren; uncle D. Edward Renegar ’47 and wife Helen; and many cousins. Memorial
gifts may be made to Maryville College, Office of Advancement, 502 E. Lamar Alexander
Parkway, Maryville, TN 37804.

1964

Mary Dilkes Bangert
Oct. 20, 2009, in Lincoln University, Pa.
She taught high school English and computer
science in New Jersey for 25 years, retiring in
2002. Survivors include husband Roger, two
children and their families.

David Huffstetler
Jan. 2, 2011, in Toledo, Ohio. He retired from
the University of Toledo in December of 2008,
where he served as head athletic trainer for 25
years. He had previously spent 14 years as the
head trainer at the University of South
Carolina, one year as the head athletic trainer
at Baylor University and two years as the head
athletic trainer at Eastern Kentucky University.
Survivors include wife Anna, two children,
one brother and their families.

1966

Jack Mullins, Sr.
Oct. 8, 2009, in Colonial Heights, Va. He
served as a football coach and athletic director
for 33 years in Virginia and Tennessee, and
was associated with several state championship
teams. Survivors include wife Margaret, two
children and their families.

1967

Joan Jenkins Thatcher
Dec. 31, 2010, in Paris, Tenn. The last
student to graduate from MC with a major
in home economics, she taught for 11 years
as a high school home economics, English
and geography teacher and coached track,
and cheerleading. For 14 years she was
an emergency medical technician of an
industrial plant, and later became a statecertified fire-fighter/EMT. Survivors include
husband Dale, one daughter and one stepson.

2010

Matthew Moran
Feb. 13, 2011, in Oveido, Fla. He was a
community service officer with the University
of Central Florida Police Department and
was scheduled to begin the Police Academy at
Seminole State College in February. Survivors
include his parents, one brother, four sisters
and grandparents.

f o cus

A Publication for Alumni & Friends of Maryville College

PRESIDENT
Dr. Tom Bogart

Archived
publications

now available

in digital format

Nearly 40,000 pages of Maryville College publications are now digitized and available for viewing and downloading from the Internet. For free!
The publications include more than 100 years of The Chilhowean, Maryville College’s
yearbook; catalogs from 1866 until 2010; college histories, biographies and books
written by professors; and alumni newsletters and magazines dating back to 1875.
“We expect that these digitized items will be a blessing to those wishing to find
information about the College and the many individuals connected to it through the
years,” said Dori May, collection development librarian and archives liaison, who
coordinated the digitization project.
The project was made possible through the LYRASIS Mass Digitization Collaborative
– a Sloan Foundation grant-subsidized program that has made digitization easy and affordable for libraries and cultural institutions across the country.
May said Maryville College has been able to participate in the project because of a
generous gift from the estate of the late Annabelle Libby ’52, who frequently volunteered in the College’s archives.
Through the Collaborative’s partnership with the Internet Archive, all items were
scanned cover-to-cover and in full color.
To view the collections, visit the Internet Archive website, archive.org/details/
maryvillecollege, or visit the Lamar Memorial Library’s web page, accessible through
the MC website: maryvillecollege.edu/library/. Viewing the archived materials from
these sites is free, May emphasized, explaining that E-Yearbook and other sites have
taken this free content and are now charging subscription fees.
The digitization of The Highland Echo, Maryville College’s newspaper, is currently
in process.
According to May, other digitization projects are being organized through the
Appalachian College Association Central Library’s Digital Library of Appalachia.
For more information, e-mail May at [email protected].

EDITORIAL BOARD
Karen Beaty Eldridge ‘94
Director of Communications
Chloe White Kennedy
News & New Media Writer
ART DIRECTION & DESIGN
Jessica Stooksbury Swan

A L U M N I A S S O C I AT I O N
EXECUTIVE BOARD
Kristine Tallent ’96
President
Clara Hardin ’57
Vice President
Harold Turner ’03
Recording Secretary
G. Donald Hickman ’70
Past President

CLASS OF 2011

local residents make



unique donations to Clayon Center

Gifts to the Clayton Center for the Arts don’t always come in the form
of currency.
For three local donors, last year’s opening of the fine and performing arts
center located on the campus of Maryville College presented an opportunity
to give (or craft) a gift that would have personal meaning and, at the same
time, help the Clayton Center become a unique gathering place for artists
and art supporters in the region.
“Area residents have been extremely generous in making the Clayton
Center a reality,” said Holly Jackson-Sullivan, vice president for advancement
and community relations. “Through gifts of money, art, equipment, time
and talent, donors are making a tremendous impact on the facility.”

Centuries-old painting added to
College’s collection
An 18th-century oil paining by Francesco Zuccarelli hung in the home of
Samuel E. Beall, Jr., and wife Mary Anne for years. After donating it to the
Clayton Center, the two said they’re pleased more people will be able to
enjoy the idyllic Italian landscape depicted in the painting.
“The painting belonged to my late brother, William P. Beall, who was an
art enthusiast and decorator,” Beall said, explaining that the gift is from the
Samuel E. Beall, Jr. Family Partnership in memory of William. “The College
has been a favorite of ours through the years, and it is our wish that this
painting be here.”

CLASS OF 2012

CLASS OF 2013
Jason Brooks ’97
Lynn Ramsey Cole ’68
Ed Hawkey ’70
Marcia Kilby Rethwilm ’89
Ann Rigell ’69
Dan Rineer ’65
Sue Van Aken ’83
Eric Weatherbee ’06
Maryville College FOCUS magazine 2011
(issn 314) Published once a year
502 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy
Maryville, TN 37804-5907
865.981.8000 | maryvillecollege.edu
subscription price - none
Copyright © 2011 Maryville College.
Contents may not be reproduced in any manner, either whole or
in part, without prior permission of Maryville College.

portable podium to accommodate speakers and
event emcees.
Dolan and his wife, Sherrie Liafsha, live
in downtown Maryville and said they have
supported the plans for the Clayton Center for
several years.
“We thought it would be fun to walk over
[to the Clayton Center] and enjoy
concerts and other events,” he said. “The podium
was something we could give to support this place
that is going to pull the community together.”
Dolan used cherry wood to construct the
45-inch-by-30-inch-by-22-inch cabinet, leaving
spaces for lights, audio-visual ports and a pullout
shelf. In total, he spent one week on the construction of the podium.
“In imagining a civic arts center for Blount County, thousands of people agreed that this center should celebrate the arts and culture
of this area,” said Jackson-Sullivan. “I believe it is very fitting that we now
have a beautiful and functional podium that was crafted by a local artist and
serves as a focal point on the Nita Eckles West Stage for many events.
“We are very appreciative of the generosity of Mr. Dolan and Ms. Liafsha.”

Defibrillators may save lives

Mary Virginia Ferguson Bond ’54
Carey Cox Coghill ’72
Jeff Denton ’87
Jennifer Windrow Forehand ’99
Clara Gowans Hardin ’57
Adam Ray ’97
Harold Turner ’03

Amber Burley ’04
Josh Collins ’04
Carrie Callaway Denkinger ’92
Mary Jim Bevan Freeman ’54
Wade Knapper ’05
Nichole Johnson McCord ’02
Warren Morgan ’71
Erin Palmer Polly ’99
Mary “Sissy” Gravely Reinhardt ’82

Pete Dolan constructed a beautiful
and functional podium for the Nita
Eckles West Stage.

Samuel E. Beall, Jr., left, and wife Mary Anne presented the Zuccarelli
painting to President Tom Bogart in September 2010.
The Bealls made the presentation to Maryville College President Dr.
Tom Bogart last semester, and artist-in-residence Mark Giangaspero cleaned
it and secured it in its frame in March. Because of the chemical process
involved in cleaning a work of art, chemistry students, as well as art students,
were invited to observe the process.
Expressing his appreciation to the Bealls for their donation, Gombert
called the Zuccarelli a “significant contribution” to the College’s art
collection.
“Our students don’t have unlimited access to real art historical examples,
so this is an important contribution,” the professor added.

Craftsman gives podium
Pete Dolan didn’t have to think too long about how he would support the
Clayton Center.
Dolan, a third-generation woodworker and owner of Woodtec in
Maryville, knew that the Ronald and Lynda Nutt Theatre would need a nice

A Maryville native, Joe Emert said he has seen the area’s need for a civic arts
center for decades. So when childhood friend Ed Harmon, who serves on
Maryville College’s Board of Directors, approached him about joining the
campaign for the Clayton Center for the Arts, Emert listened.
“We’ve needed this for years,” he said of the center. “It’s a great asset
for the community. Everyone needs to support it.”
And Emert and wife Cindy are supporting it. The two made a donation
to cover the costs of two automated external defibrillators (AEDs) that are
now installed in the two buildings that comprise the Clayton Center for
the Arts.
“Ed told us that we could donate money for a seat in the theatre or a
brick paver, but we wanted to do something a little different,” he said.
It was natural for the Emerts to underwrite the costs of the defibrillators.
Emert is a registered nurse by training who just celebrated his 25th year as
president of First Choice Medical in Maryville.
Three Clayton Center staff members have completed CPR and AED
training through the Blount County Chapter of the American Red Cross.
“Until now, Cooper Athletic Center was the only facility on campus
equipped with AEDs,” said Jack Piepenbring, Maryville College director
of safety and security. “With the wide use of the Clayton Center, these new
defibrillators really are life-saving gifts.”

Campaign continues
The campaign for the Clayton Center for the Arts continues, Jackson-Sullivan said. To date, all but about $5 million of the $47-million project has
been raised.
“We are hoping to have the fundraising completed by May 2012,” she
said. “Numerous naming opportunities remain, including the chance to
name the Art and Recital Hall building.”
A list of all available named spaces in the Clayton Center is available for
download on the Maryville College website. Visit maryvillecollege.edu/
giving/capital-projects/.
Interested individuals also are encouraged to contact Jackson-Sullivan at
865.273.8884 or [email protected].

focus

S u m m e r 2 011
VOL. 108 | NO. 1

502 East Lamar Alexander Parkway
Maryville, Tennessee 37804
Address Service Requested

Stauych
in toh MC
wit ia
v
email

A p u b l i c at i o n f o r A l u m n i &
F r i e n d s o f Ma r y v i l l e C o l l e g E
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Send yo
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Pipes, Glens & Thistles
2 01 2 c o n c e r t c h o i r s p r i n g t o u r

Find out
what it means
to be a Scot!


Ever wanted to experience the history, culture and landscape of Scotland?
“Pipes, Glens & Thistles,” a tour for Maryville College alumni, parents and friends that parallels the
Concert Choir’s Spring Tour to Scotland, is scheduled for May 22-31, 2012.
The 10-day itinerary includes stops in Oban, Loch Ness, the Isles of Mull and Iona, Inverness, Perth and
Edinburgh. The tour also includes visits to some of Scotland’s most famous castles, including Inveraray
Castle, Urquhart Castle, Cawdor Castle, Blair Castle, Glamis Castle, Stirling Castle and Edinburgh Castle.
Deposits are needed by June 30, 2011. For pricing and itineraries, visit casterbridgetours.com/
maryville-alumni.html Contact Andrea May, director of outreach and alumni affairs, at 865.981.8201 or
[email protected] for additional information.

0 Mary Bogart answers
1
questions about her
family
2 Images from the
1
celebration
13 Memorable events
mark Inauguration
Week schedule

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