Ford Motor Company

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Ford Motor Company

Company Profile
Publication Date: 20 Sep 2010

www.datamonitor.com
Europe, Middle East & Africa 119 Farringdon Road London EC1R 3DA United Kingdom t: +44 20 7551 9000 f: +44 20 7551 9090 e: [email protected] Americas 245 5th Avenue 4th Floor New York, NY 10016 USA t: +1 212 686 7400 f: +1 212 686 2626 e: [email protected] Asia Pacific Level 46 2 Park Street Sydney, NSW 2000 Australia t: +61 2 8705 6900 f: +61 2 8088 7405 e: [email protected]

Ford Motor Company

ABOUT DATAMONITOR
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Ford Motor Company
TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Company Overview..............................................................................................4 Key Facts...............................................................................................................4 Business Description...........................................................................................5 History...................................................................................................................7 Key Employees...................................................................................................11 Key Employee Biographies................................................................................13 Major Products and Services............................................................................19 Revenue Analysis...............................................................................................20 SWOT Analysis...................................................................................................22 Top Competitors.................................................................................................29 Company View.....................................................................................................30 Locations and Subsidiaries...............................................................................33

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Ford Motor Company
Company Overview

COMPANY OVERVIEW
Ford Motor (Ford) is one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the world. It manufactures and distributes automobiles across six continents. The company's automotive vehicle brands include Ford, Lincoln, Mercury and Volvo. The company primarily operates in the US and Europe. It is headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, and employs about 176,000 people. The company recorded revenues of $118,308 million in the financial year ended December 2009 (FY2009), a decrease of 18.5% compared to FY2008. The operating profit of the company was $4,004 million in FY2009, compared to an operating loss of $5,292 million in FY2008. The net profit was $2,717 million in FY2009, compared to a net loss of $14,766 million in FY2008.

KEY FACTS
Head Office Ford Motor Company One American Road Suite 1026 Dearborn Michigan 48126 USA 1 313 845 8540 1 313 845 6073 http://www.ford.com

Phone Fax Web Address

Revenue / turnover 118,308.0 (USD Mn) Financial Year End Employees New York Ticker December 176,000 F

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Ford Motor Company
Business Description

BUSINESS DESCRIPTION
Ford Motor (Ford) is one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the world. The company manufactures and distributes automobiles across six continents. With 80 manufacturing facilities worldwide, the company's core and affiliated automotive brands include Ford, Lincoln, Mercury and Volvo. The company conducts its business through two divisions: automotive and financial services. Within these divisions, Ford's automotive business is further classified into reportable segments based upon its geographical and organizational structure. The automotive business division consists of the design, development, manufacture, sale and service of cars, trucks and service parts. Through this division, Ford produces a wide range of vehicles including cars for the small, medium, large and premium segments; trucks; buses/vans (including minivans); full-size pickups; sport utility vehicles (SUV) and vehicles for the medium/heavy segments. In FY2009, the company sold approximately 4,817,000 vehicles at wholesale throughout the world. The company's automotive business is organized into the following segments: Ford North America, Ford South America, Ford Europe, Ford Asia Pacific and Africa, and Volvo. The Ford North America segment primarily includes the sale of Ford, Lincoln and Mercury brand vehicles and related service parts in North America (the US, Canada and Mexico), together with the associated costs to design, develop, manufacture and service these vehicles and parts. This segment also included the sale of Mazda6 vehicles through its consolidated subsidiary, AutoAlliance International (AAI). This business was sold in January 2010. The Ford South America and Ford Europe segment includes primarily the sale of Ford brand vehicles and related service parts in South America and in Europe (including all parts of Turkey and Russia), respectively. Ford Asia Pacific and Africa segment primarily includes the sale of Ford-brand vehicles and related service parts in the Asia Pacific region and South Africa. The Volvo segment includes primarily the sale of Volvo brand vehicles and related service parts throughout the world (including in North America, South America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Africa). In addition to producing and selling cars and trucks, Ford also provides a range of after sales services and products through its dealer network. In addition to the products that are sold to dealers for retail sale, Ford also sells cars and trucks to its dealers for sale to fleet customers, including daily rental car companies, commercial fleet customers, leasing companies and governments. The company provides services such as maintenance and light repair, heavy repair, collision, vehicle accessories and extended service warranty. In North America, the company markets these products and services under several brands, including Genuine Ford and Lincoln-Mercury Parts and Service, Ford Custom Accessories, Ford Extended Service Plan, and Motorcraft. At the end of December 2009, the number of dealerships distributing Ford’s vehicle brands worldwide was approximately 17,107 (including 11,682 for Ford, 2,269 for Volvo, 1,780 for Mercury, and 1,376 for Lincoln).

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Ford Motor Company
Business Description

The financial services division operates through the company subsidiary, Ford Motor Credit (Ford Credit). Ford Credit offers a wide variety of automotive financing products to, and through automotive dealers throughout the world. The predominant share of Ford Credit's business consists of financing Ford vehicles and supporting the company's dealers. Ford Credit's primary financial products fall into three categories: retail financing, wholesale financing, and other financing. Ford Credit also services the finance receivables and leases that it originates and purchases, makes loans to affiliates, purchases receivables from company subsidiaries, and provides selected insurance services. Ford Credit's revenues are earned primarily from payments made under retail installment sale contracts and retail leases, and from payments made under wholesale and other dealer loan financing programs. Ford Credit does business in all states in the US and in all provinces in Canada through automotive dealer financing branches and regional business centers. Outside US, FCE Bank (FCE) is Ford Credit's largest operation. FCE's primary business is to support the sale of Ford's vehicles in Europe through its dealer network. FCE offers a variety of retail, leasing and wholesale finance plans in most countries in which it operates; FCE does business in the UK, Germany and most other European countries. Ford Credit, through its subsidiaries, also operates in the Asia Pacific and Latin American regions. In addition, FCE, through its worldwide trade financing division, provides financing to dealers in countries where typically Ford has no established local presence.

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Ford Motor Company
History

HISTORY
Ford Motor (Ford) was established in 1903 by Henry Ford and 11 other associates. In the same year, the company made its first shipment. In 1908, Ford launched its model 'T'. The company began producing trucks and tractors, in 1917. In 1925, Ford acquired the Lincoln Motor Company, branching out into luxury cars. In 1956, Ford went public. In the same decade, Ford produced one of its most successful cars, the Thunderbird. The global expansion of Ford continued during 1960s when the company established Ford Europe in 1967. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Ford continued to expand, with further moves into Europe and Asia. In 1987, Ford helped to form the Park Ridge in order to acquire the Hertz car rental business. Ford experienced further growth in the 1990s. In 1990, Ford acquired Jaguar.The company increased its stake in Hertz to 100% in 1994. The company acquired the repair chain Kwik-Fit in 1999 and later Volvo's passenger vehicle business. Ford spun off its Visteon automotive components business unit during 2000. Ford also acquired Land Rover from BMW in the same year. In late 2002, the company concluded the sale of Collision Team of America (CTA) and Kwik-Fit. The company expanded its presence in China during 2002 and 2003. The Changan Ford (a joint venture operation with Changan Automobile) assembly plant located in Chongqing became operational and production of the Fiesta in China started in mid 2003. The company's Ford Services Thailand became operational later in 2003. Ford sold Cosworth, its motor sport technology engineering company and Jaguar Racing, its Formula One team, in 2004. In the same year, the company recalled about 600,000 vehicles of its Escape and Mazda Tribute SUVs. Subsequently, the company launched the 2005 F-Series Super Duty and also introduced the Ford Expedition King Ranch. In 2005, Ford recalled about 792,000 pickup trucks and sport utility vehicles, because of a fire risk from overheating of the speed control switch. The recall involved some of Ford's 2000 model-year F-150 pickup trucks, Expedition and Navigator SUVs, and 2001 model-year F-Series Supercrew pickup trucks equipped with speed control. Further in 2005, the company made several acquisitions. This included the reacquisition of Visteon's 23 North American facilities in order to protect its supply of components. Ford also acquired a minority interest in the Beanstalk Group, a majority owned subsidiary that licensed trademarks and subsequently sold 100% interest in the Beanstalk Group. Further in 2005, Ford sold its subsidiary Hertz, to a private equity group for $5.6 billion. In the same year, the company sold its interests in Mahindra & Mahindra and Vastera. Subsequently, the company exchanged its 8.3 million shares in Ballard Power Systems for an equity interest in NuCellSys, a 50:50 joint venture with DaimlerChrysler.

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Ford Motor Company
History

In 2006, Ford became the first automotive manufacturer to commence the production of dedicated hydrogen fueled V-10 engines. In the same year, British construction machinery group JCB announced that it was interested in buying carmaker Jaguar from Ford. Subsequently, Valeo Management Services signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with Ford to acquire its climate control business, including its plant in Plymouth Township, Michigan. In 2007, Ford entered into a definitive agreement to sell Automobile Protection (APCO) to Trident IV, a private equity fund managed by Stone Point Capital. In the same year, Ford sold its sports car business, Aston Martin, to a consortium comprised of David Richards, John Sinders, Investment Dar and Adeem Investment. Later in the year, Ford signed a long-term agreement with Sony electronics division to offer Sony-branded audio systems in Ford and Mercury vehicles. Further in 2007, Ford's Japanese affiliate Mazda and China's Changan Automotive Group began full production, at a new engine plant in eastern China's Nanjing. In the same year, Ford Mazda Automobile (a China-based joint company of Ford Motor, Mazda Motor and Chongqing Changan Automobile) recalled 7,924 cars manufactured in China, due to the failure of power generator. Later in the year, Ford and Mazda Motor announced plans for a new Thai car factory with an investment of about $500 million. Subsequently, the company recalled about 1.2 million vans, sport utility vehicles and heavy-duty pickup trucks due to a flaw in an engine sensor. Ford sold its Jaguar Land Rover operations to Tata Motors in 2008. In the same year, the company acquired 72.4% stake in Romania's state-owned Automobile Craiova assembly plant. Further in 2008, the company announced an investment of $10 million to expand production at Ford Vietnam's Haiduong assembly plant, increasing annual production capacity by 35%. Subsequently, Ford Motor, Automotive Components Holdings and Zeledyne sold the ACH Glass business and its three plants. Further in 2008, Ford's southern African arm secured an export contract to supply the Ranger pickup truck to African markets. In the same year, Western Power Distribution renewed its contract with Ford to supply its light commercial vehicles and small business cars. Later in the same year, Ford started its operations at a new engine assembly plant near Chennai, India. Subsequently, the company sold its St. Louis Assembly Plant property in Hazelwood, Missouri, to Panattoni Development Company. It also sold the Atlanta Assembly Plant property in Hapeville, Georgia, to Jacoby Development in the same year. Subsequently in 2008, Ford, Automotive Components Holdings and Johnson Controls, terminated their MoU for sale of the ACH interiors business and ACH's Saline, Michigan. In the same year, Ford announced its plan to invest $75 million to prepare Michigan Truck Plant for small-vehicle production. In 2008, Ford was awarded a $10 million grant by the US Department of Energy for research, development and demonstration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). In the same year, Ford unveiled its all-new 'CUSTOM' KA at Paris motor show and 2010 Mustang at the Los Angeles auto show. Later in the year, Ford launched a brand new version of its customer website (www.ford.co.uk) to deliver an easily accessible, user-friendly and practical tool for car and light commercial vehicle buyers across the UK.

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Ford Motor Company
History

In January 2009, Ford and Navistar International reached an agreement to restructure their ongoing business relationship and settle all existing litigation between the companies. Further in January 2009, the new Ford Fiesta started its production at the Changan Ford Mazda Automobile manufacturing facility in Nanjing, China. In the same month, Ford announced to introduce an advanced dual-clutch PowerShift six-speed transmission in North America in 2010 for the small-car segment. In February 2009, American Electric Power (AEP) joined with Ford and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in a project designed to research and develop plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) as part of a complete vehicle, home and grid energy system. In the same month, the 2010 Ford Harley-Davidson F-150 edition was unveiled at the Chicago Auto Show. Later in the same month, the United Auto Workers union and Ford reached a tentative agreement to modify certain operating provisions of the 2007 UAW-Ford National Labor Agreement. Further in February 2009, Ford received a $55 million incentive from the Michigan Economic Development for its work in advanced battery and electrical vehicle development. In the same month, Smith Electric Vehicles, a trading division of Tanfield Group announced an electric vehicle development collaboration with Ford. Smith Electric Vehicles will work with Ford to introduce a battery-electric light van. In March 2009, the new Ford Fiesta won an award for its international product design. In the same month, the all-new 2010 Fusion and Fusion Hybrid received a 'Top Safety Pick' rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). In May 2009, Ford decided to invest $550 million to transform Michigan Assembly Plant (formerly Michigan Truck Plant) from a large SUV factory into a modern, flexible small car plant. In the same month, Ford started the production of its advanced fuel-efficient EcoBoost engines at Cleveland. In August 2009, Ford and its utility partners tested the vehicle-to-electric grid communications and control systems, which enable electric vehicles to interface with the grid for optimal recharging. In the following month, Ford reached an agreement in principle to sell Wixom Assembly Plant to Xtreme Power of Austin, Texas, and Clairvoyant Energy of Santa Barbara, California. In the same month, Ford’s joint venture in China Changan Ford Mazda Automobile (CFMA) started building a new, and highly flexible passenger car plant in Chongqing, China, scheduled for completion in 2012. Ford and the United Auto Workers (UAW) union reached a tentative agreement on additional modifications to the 2007 UAW-Ford national labor agreement in October 2009, which will help Ford improve its current and long-term competitiveness in the US. In the same month, Ford announced that Azure Dynamics Corporation joined in a collaborative effort to deliver a pure battery electric Ford Transit Connect van for the US and Canadian markets in 2010. Ford’s passenger vehicle joint venture in China recalled 11,112 Volvo S40 sedans in December 2009 because of an oil pump flaw. In the same month, Ford confirmed that all substantive commercial terms relating to the potential sale of Volvo Car Corporation were settled between Ford and Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Company Limited.

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Ford Motor Company
History

In January 2010, Ford announced to invest an additional $450 million in its electric vehicle plan, paving the way to build a hybrid and plug-in hybrid vehicle in Michigan beginning in 2012. In the following month, Ford decided to invest $155 million at its Cleveland operations to build a new fuel-efficient V-6 engine for the 2011 Mustang. The investment at Ford's Cleveland Engine Plant brings the company's investment in powertrain engineering and facility upgrades in North America to $1.8 billion to support its 2011 vehicle launches. In March 2010, Ford entered into a definitive agreement to sell Volvo Car Corporation and related assets to Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Company Limited. The sale is expected to close in the third quarter of 2010. In the same month, the company decided to invest $135 million to design, engineer and produce key components for the company’s next-generation hybrid-electric vehicles. Ford engineers in Dearborn will design the battery packs while engineers in Livonia will design electric-drive transaxles for the next-generation hybrids, based on Ford’s global C- and CD-car platforms, which go into production in North America in 2012. Further in March 2010, the company introduced its first hybrid car under its brand Lincoln in the US. In the same month, the company launched Ford Figo, a new compact car in India. Further in May 2010, Ford started the production of the all-new 2011 Ford Fiesta at its Cuautitlan Stamping and Assembly Plant (CSAP). In May 2010, SimplexGrinnell, US based company specialized in fire protection systems and communication systems, purchased 200 Ford Fusion Hybrids to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, waste and water consumption by 25% over the next five years. In June 2010, Ford announced a partnership with Coulomb Technologies to provide free in-home ChargePoint Networked Charging Stations for some of the company’s first electric vehicle customers under the Ford Blue Oval ChargePoint Program.

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employees

KEY EMPLOYEES
Name
William Clay Ford, Jr. Alan R. Mulally Stephen G. Butler Kimberly A. Casiano Anthony F. Earley, Jr. Edsel B. Ford II Richard A. Gephardt Irvine O. Hockaday, Jr. Richard A. Manoogian Ellen R. Marram Homer A. Neal Gerald L. Shaheen John L. Thornton William Clay Ford Michael E. Bannister

Job Title

Board

Compensation
16834274 USD 17916654 USD 98998 USD 94816 USD 45158 USD 574269 USD 45158 USD 84132 USD 90992 USD 93738 USD 111173 USD 93768 USD 110524 USD

Executive Chairman and Chairman Executive Board of the Board of Directors President and Chief Executive Officer Director Director Director Director Director Director Director Director Director Director Director Director Emeritus Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board Non Executive Board

Executive Vice President; Chairman Senior Management and Chief Executive Officer, Ford Motor Credit Company Executive Vice President and Chief Senior Management Financial Officer Executive Vice President and President, The Americas Chairman, Ford of Europe and Executive Vice President, Global Manufacturing and Labor Affairs Group Vice President, Global Purchasing Senior Management Senior Management

Lewis W. K. Booth Mark Fields John Fleming

Thomas K. Brown Susan M. Cischke James D. Farley Felicia J. Fields Bennie W. Fowler

Senior Management

Group Vice President, Sustainability, Senior Management Environment and Safety Engineering Group Vice President, Global Marketing and CMSA Senior Management

Group Vice President, Human Senior Management Resources and Corporate Services Group Vice President, Quality Senior Management

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employees

Name
Joseph R. Hinrichs Derrick M. Kuzak David G. Leitch J C. Mays Ziad S. Ojakli Nicholas J. Smither

Job Title

Board

Compensation

Group Vice President and President, Senior Management Asia Pacific and Africa Group Vice President, Global Product Development Group Vice President and General Counsel Group Vice President, Design and Chief Creative Officer Senior Management Senior Management Senior Management

Group Vice President, Government Senior Management and Community Relations Group Vice President and Chief Information Officer Senior Management

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employee Biographies

KEY EMPLOYEE BIOGRAPHIES
William Clay Ford, Jr.
Board: Executive Board Job Title: Executive Chairman and Chairman of the Board of Directors Since: 2006 Age: 52 Mr. Ford has been the Executive Chairman and Chairman of the Board of Directors at Ford Motor Company since 2006. He held a number of management positions within Ford, including Vice President of Commercial Truck Vehicle Center. From 1995 to 2001, Mr. Ford was the Chair of the Finance Committee. From 1999, he was elected the Chairman of the Board of Directors and from 2001, he was elected the Chief Executive Officer of the company. Mr. Ford also is Vice Chairman of The Detroit Lions, Chairman of the Detroit Economic Club, and Trustee of The Henry Ford. He also is a Vice Chairman of Business Leaders for Michigan. He is currently a Director at eBay.

Alan R. Mulally
Board: Executive Board Job Title: President and Chief Executive Officer Since: 2006 Age: 64 Mr. Mulally has been the President and Chief Executive Officer at Ford Motor Company since 2006. From 2001, Mr. Mulally had been the Executive Vice President at the Boeing Company and President and Chief Executive Officer at Boeing Commercial Airplanes. Prior to that time, Mr. Mulally served as the President and Chief Executive Officer at Boeing’s space and defense businesses. He has served as co-chair of the Washington Competitive Council, and served on the Advisory Boards of NASA, the University of Washington, the University of Kansas, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of England’s Royal Academy of Engineering.

Stephen G. Butler
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 2004 Age: 62 Mr. Butler has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 2004. He served as the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at KPMG from 1996 until his retirement in 2002. Mr. Butler

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employee Biographies

held a variety of management positions, both in the US and internationally, during his 33-year career at KPMG. He is currently a Director at Cooper Industries and ConAgra Foods.

Kimberly A. Casiano
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 2003 Age: 52 Ms. Casiano has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 2003. She established Kimberly Casiano & Associates in January 2010, where she is the President. The firm provides advisory services in marketing, communications, public affairs, advocacy, and diversity to target the US Hispanic market. From 1994 to 2009, Ms. Casiano was the President and Chief Operating Officer at Casiano Communications, a publishing and direct marketing company. From 1987 to 1994, she held a number of management positions within Casiano Communications in the periodicals and magazines and the bilingual direct marketing and call center divisions of the company. Ms. Casiano is a member of the Board of Directors at Mutual of America, the Board of Trustees of the Hispanic College Fund, and the Board of Advisors of the Moffitt Cancer Center.

Anthony F. Earley, Jr.
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 2009 Age: 60 Mr. Earley has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 2009. He has been the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at DTE Energy since 1998. Mr. Earley joined DTE Energy in 1994 as the President and Chief Operating Officer. Prior to that time, Mr. Earley served as the President and Chief Operating Officer at the Long Island Lighting Company, an electric and gas utility in New York. He is a Director at the Nuclear Energy Institute and the Edison Electric Institute. Mr. Earley also serves as a Director for several charitable organizations including Cornerstone Schools, Detroit Zoological Society, Business Leaders for Michigan, and United Way for Southeastern Michigan. He served on Advisory Boards of the New York Stock Exchange and the University of Notre Dame. Mr. Earley also served as an officer in the US Navy nuclear submarine program where he was qualified as a chief engineer officer. Within the past five years, Mr. Earley served on the Board of Comerica. He currently serves as a Director at DTE Energy and Masco Corporation.

Edsel B. Ford II
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employee Biographies

Since: 1988 Age: 61 Mr. Ford has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 1988. He is a retired Vice President at Ford Motor Company and former President and Chief Operating Officer at Ford Motor Credit Company. He presently serves as a consultant to the company. He also currently serves as a Director at International Speedway Corporation.

Richard A. Gephardt
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 2009 Age: 69 Mr. Gephardt has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 2009. He has been the President and Chief Executive Officer at Gephardt Group, a multi-disciplined consulting firm, since 2005. He also serves as a Strategic Advisor since 2005 for the Government Affairs practice group of DLA Piper, one of the world’s largest legal services providers, and as a consultant to Goldman Sachs since 2005. Mr. Gephardt is the former Majority Leader of the US House of Representatives and served 14 terms in Congress from 1976 to 2005. He is also a member of the Professional Advisory Board at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Within the past five years, Mr. Gephardt served on the Board at Dana Holding Corporation. He also serves as a Director at Centene Corporation, CenturyLink, Spirit Aerosystems Holding, and United States Steel Corporation.

Irvine O. Hockaday, Jr.
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 1987 Age: 73 Mr. Hockaday has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 1987. He was President and Chief Executive Officer at Hallmark Cards since 1986, and a Director since 1978. He retired in 2001. Within the past five years, Mr. Hockaday served on the Boards at Aquila, Dow Jones & Company, and Sprint Corp. Currently he serves as a Director at Crown Media Holdings and The Estee Lauder Companies.

Richard A. Manoogian
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employee Biographies

Since: 2001 Age: 73 Mr. Manoogian has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 2001. He has been with Masco since 1958, became the Vice President and a member of the Board in 1964, President in 1968 and Chairman in 1985. Mr. Manoogian served as the Chief Executive Officer at Masco from 1985 until he transitioned to Executive Chairman in 2007. In 2009, Mr. Manoogian retired from the position of Executive Chairman at Masco. He is a member of the Board of Business Leaders for Michigan, The Henry Ford, and the Detroit Economic Club. Within the past five years, Mr. Manoogian served on the Boards at Metaldyne Corporation and JPMorgan Chase & Co. Currently he serves as a Director at Masco Corporation.

Ellen R. Marram
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 1988 Age: 62 Ms. Marram has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 1988. She is the President at the Barnegat Group, a business advisory firm. From 2000 to 2005, Ms. Marram was the Managing Director at North Castle Partners, a private equity firm. She served as the President and Chief Executive Officer at efdex from 1999 to 2000. Previously, she served as the President and Chief Executive Officer at Tropicana Beverage Group from 1997 to 1998, and had previously served as the President of the Group, as well as the Executive Vice President at The Seagram Company and Joseph E. Seagram & Sons. Before joining Seagram in 1993, she served as President and Chief Executive Officer at Nabisco Biscuit Company and Senior Vice President of the Nabisco Foods Group from 1988 to 1993. Within the past five years, Ms. Marram served on the Board at Cadbury Schweppes. She currently serves as a Director at The New York Times Company and Eli Lilly and Company.

Homer A. Neal
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 1997 Age: 67 Dr. Neal has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 1997. He is a Director at University of Michigan ATLAS Project, Samuel A. Goudsmit Distinguished Professor of Physics, Interim President Emeritus and Vice President for Research Emeritus at the University of Michigan. He joined the University as Chairman of its Physics Department in 1987 and in 1993 was named the Vice President of Research. Dr. Neal served as Interim President of the University of Michigan from 1996 to 1997. He has served as a member of the US National Science Board, the Advisory

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employee Biographies

Board of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, as a Trustee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies and as a member of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution. Dr. Neal currently is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Richard Lounsbery Foundation and a member of the Advisory Board for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is also a member of the Board of Physics and Astronomy of the National Academy of Sciences and a member of the Council of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Gerald L. Shaheen
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 2007 Age: 65 Mr. Shaheen has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 2007. He was appointed the Group President at Caterpillar in 1998 and had responsibility for the design, development and production of the company’s large construction and mining equipment, as well as marketing and sales operations in North America, Caterpillar’s components business, and its research and development division. Mr. Shaheen joined Caterpillar in 1967 and held a variety of management positions. He retired from Caterpillar in 2008. He is a Board member and past Chairman of the US Chamber of Commerce, a board member of the National Chamber Foundation, and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Bradley University. Within the past five years, Mr. Shaheen served on the board at National City Corporation. He also serves as a Director at AGCO Corporation.

John L. Thornton
Board: Non Executive Board Job Title: Director Since: 1996 Age: 56 Mr. Thornton has been a Non Executive Director at Ford Motor Company since 1996. He retired as the President and Co-Chief Operating Officer at The Goldman Sachs Group in 2003. He was appointed to that post in 1999 and formerly served as the Chairman at Goldman Sachs Asia from 1996 to 1998. He was previously the Co-Chief Executive at Goldman Sachs International, the firm’s business in Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. Mr. Thornton was elected as the Non Executive Chairman at HSBC North America Holdings in 2008. He also is the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Brookings Institution. Within the past five years, Mr. Thornton served on the Boards at China Netcom Group Corp. and Industrial Commercial Bank of China Limited.

James D. Farley
Board: Senior Management

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Ford Motor Company
Key Employee Biographies

Job Title: Group Vice President, Global Marketing and CMSA Since: 2007 Age: 47 Mr. Farley has been the Group Vice President of Global Marketing and CMSA at Ford Motor Company since 2007. Prior to joining Ford, Mr. Farley was the Group Vice President and General Manager at Lexus, responsible for all sales, marketing and customer satisfaction activities for Toyota’s luxury brand. Before leading Lexus, he served as the Group Vice President at Toyota Division marketing and was responsible for all Toyota Division market planning, advertising, merchandising, sales promotion, incentives and Internet activities.

David G. Leitch
Board: Senior Management Job Title: Group Vice President and General Counsel Since: 2005 Age: 49 Mr. Leitch has been the Group Vice President and General Counsel at Ford Motor Company since 2005. He served as the Deputy Assistant and Deputy Counsel to President George W. Bush from 2002 to 2005. From 2001 to 2002, he served as the Chief Counsel for the Federal Aviation Administration, overseeing a staff of 290 in Washington and the agency's 11 regional offices. Prior to 2001, Mr. Leitch was a partner at Hogan & Hartson in Washington, where his practice focused on appellate litigation in state and federal court.

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Ford Motor Company
Major Products and Services

MAJOR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
Ford Motor (Ford) is one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the world. It manufactures and distributes automobiles across six continents. The company's key products and services include the following: Automotive: Passenger cars Trucks Buses and vans Sport utility vehicles Vehicle accessories After sales vehicle parts and products Extended repair service products Maintenance and vehicle repair services Financial services: Retail financing Wholesale financing Third-party claim management services

Brands: Ford Mercury Lincoln Volvo

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Ford Motor Company
Revenue Analysis

REVENUE ANALYSIS
Overview Ford Motor Company (Ford) recorded revenues of $118,308 million in FY2009, a decrease of 18.5% compared with FY2008. For FY2009, the US, the company's largest geographic market, accounted for 46% of the total revenues. Ford Motor generates revenues through two business divisions: automotive (89.5% of the total revenues in FY2009) and financial services (10.5%). Revenues by division In FY2009, the automotive division recorded revenues of $105,893 million, a decrease of 18% compared to FY2008. The financial services division recorded revenues of $12,415 million in FY2009, a decrease of 22.2% compared to FY2008. Revenues by Geography The US, Ford Motor's largest geographical market, accounted for 46% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from the US reached $54,377 million in FY2009, a decrease of 10.1% compared to FY2008. The UK accounted for 7.1% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from the UK reached $8,448 million in FY2009, a decrease of 41.4% compared to FY2008. Canada accounted for 6.7% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Canada reached $7,974 million in FY2009, an increase of 0.1% over 2008. Germany accounted for 6.6% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Germany reached $7,843 million in FY2009, a decrease of 14.2% compared to FY2008. Italy accounted for 3.8% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Italy reached $4,529 million in FY2009, a decrease of 10.4% compared to FY2008. France accounted for 2.6% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from France reached $3,102 million in FY2009, a decrease of 12.7% compared to FY2008. Spain accounted for 1.8% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Spain reached $2,174 million in FY2009, a decrease of 38.8% compared to FY2008.

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Ford Motor Company
Revenue Analysis

Russia accounted for 1.3% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Russia reached $1,573 million in FY2009, a decrease of 69.8% compared to FY2008. Belgium accounted for 1.2% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Belgium reached $1,460 million in FY2009, a decrease of 28% compared to FY2008. Mexico and others accounted for 1.1% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from Mexico and others reached $1,336 million in FY2009, a decrease of 39.9% compared to FY2008. Other European countries accounted for 7.6% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from other European countries reached $8,976 million in FY2009, a decrease of 32.4% compared to FY2008. All other countries accounted for 14% of the total revenues in FY2009. Revenues from all other countries reached $16,516 million in FY2009, a decrease of 9.3% compared to FY2008.

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

SWOT ANALYSIS
Ford Motor (Ford) is one of the largest automotive manufacturers in the world. The company has strong engineering capability. The company's strong engineering capabilities allow it to broaden its product portfolio and remain in the forefront of the automotive industry. However, intense competition could have a substantial adverse effect on Ford’s financial condition and results of operations Strengths Strong engineering capability Extensive dealer network Diversified product base Strong market position Opportunities Growing Asia Pacific new cars market Increasing demand for hybrid electric vehicles Strategic investments Weaknesses Product recalls Scrutiny for pedal acceleration problems Poor cash flows

Threats Intense price competition Stringent regulations Supplier distress

Strengths

Strong engineering capability The company engages in engineering, research and development primarily to improve the performance (including fuel efficiency), safety, customer satisfaction, and to develop new products. The company operates over 65 engineering, research and development centers worldwide. Ford maintains extensive engineering, research and design centers in Dearborn, Michigan; Dunton, England; Gothenburg, Sweden (part of the company’s held-for-sale Volvo operations); and Aachen and Merkenich, Germany. In FY2009, Ford recorded $4.9 billion of engineering, research, and development costs. In August 2009, Ford and its utility partners tested the vehicle-to-electric grid communications and control systems, which enable electric vehicles to interface with the grid for optimal recharging. Ford is also leading the way in leveraging the growing consumer trend of smartphone applications with an innovative approach to control the applications through SYNC. This application programming interface (API) brings popular applications such as Pandora internet radio, Stitcher smart radio and the Twitter client OpenBeak into the car. In this context, in April 2010, Ford introduced MyFord Touch and the next-generation of SYNC technology that would help in accessing and personalizing vehicle settings and functions using a mix of graphic, touch, and voice user interfaces.The company's strong

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

engineering capabilities allow it to broaden its product portfolio and remain in the forefront of the automotive industry. Extensive dealer network Ford has an extensive dealer network. It manufactures and distributes automobiles across six continents. Dealers are a source of strength in North America and around the world, especially in rural areas and small towns where they represent the face of Ford. Substantially all of the company’s cars, trucks and parts are marketed through retail dealers in North America, and through distributors and dealers outside of North America, majority of which are independently owned. Ford's core and affiliated automotive brands include Ford, Lincoln, Mercury and Volvo. Ford network is comprised of 11,682 dealers and has presence in 110 markets; Lincoln has 1,376 dealers in 30 markets; Mercury has 1,780 dealers in 20 markets; and Volvo has 2,269 dealers in 103 markets. An extensive network serving more than 100 countries enables Ford to meet the demand for its products in multiple regions in a cost efficient way. Diversified product base Ford has a diversified product portfolio. It is present in almost all the segments of automobiles. Ford produces a wide range of vehicles including cars for the small, medium, large and premium segments; trucks; and trucks by compact pickup, bus/van (including minivans), full-size pickup, crossover utility vehicles (CUVs) and traditional sport utility vehicles (SUVs), and medium/heavy segments. In FY2009, the company sold approximately 4,817,000 vehicles at wholesale throughout the world.The company’s vehicle brands included Ford, Mercury, Lincoln, and Volvo. Out of the total vehicles sold in 2009, Ford North America sold 1,959,000 vehicles (including sales of Mazda6 by Ford’s consolidated subsidiary, AAI, which was sold in January 2010), Ford South America sold 443,000 vehicles, Ford Europe sold 1,568,000 vehicles, Ford Asia Pacific and Africa sold 523,000 vehicles and Volvo sold 324,000 vehicles, respectively. A diverse product portfolio allows Ford to record steady revenue and provides cross selling opportunities. Strong market position Ford is one of the leading automobile manufacturers in the world. In FY2009, the company had a 15.3% (third place) market share in the combined car and truck market share in the US. Although the General Motors had a better market share in FY2009 compared to Ford, General Motors’ market share declined more than 10% compared to FY2009. Similarly, Toyota had a better market share than Ford in FY2009, but Toyota’s market share increased slightly (1.8%) compared to Ford, whereas Ford’s market share increased considerably (7.7%) from 14.2% in 2008 to 15.3% in FY2009. The market share for Volvo vehicles in the US was approximately 0.6% in 2009, up 0.1% points from 2008.This increase in market share primarily reflected the introduction of the new XC60 and improved sales of the V50.

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

The improvement in the company’s overall market share was primarily due to the result of several factors, including favorable acceptance of its redesigned products, product focus on industry growth segments, and customers' increasing awareness and acceptance of Ford’s commitment to leadership in quality, fuel efficiency, safety, smart technologies and value. Further, in terms of revenues, Ford was ranked eight among the largest American corporations in the 2009 Fortune 500 companies list. The company can leverage its strong brand name and market leadership position to gain competitive advantage and also expand into international markets.

Weaknesses

Product recalls Ford announced recalls that cover some of its most popular models due to manufacturing and design problems. For instance, in June 2010, Ford recalled more than 200,000 sedans in China. Ford confirmed problems with the ignition operation of some vehicles after carrying out several tests under different conditions. Ford has also offered to fix over 200,000 cars by installing new engine calibration software to correct the problem. Similarly in May 2010, the Brazilian unit of Ford Motor recalled about 170,000 of its popular KA models in Argentina and Brazil because of a wiring problem. Some 155,000 cars of this model have been sold in Brazil, according to Brazil's National Federation of Motor Vehicles Distribution. At least 14,369 were sold in Argentina between 2008 and 2009. Altogether, including the latest Ford announcement, recalls have affected nearly 700,000 Brazilian-made motor vehicles so far in 2010, with problems ranging from faulty ball bearings to bad window switches. Significant product recalls indicates decline in product quality which could negatively affect the consumer confidence in Ford’s products and could strain its sales. Scrutiny for pedal acceleration problems Ford Fusion, Ford Escape and Mercury Milan are under scrutiny of the US regulatory authorities for a possible pedal acceleration problem. In 2010, the US Safety regulators have initiated a preliminary investigation in the models manufactured under the brand Ford Fusion having gas pedals that can get trapped in floor mats during acceleration. So far the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in the US has received three complaints about Ford Fusion models of accelerator pedals being trapped by unsecured 'all-weather' floormats in the current production model year of the Fusion. All three complaints have been verified which has led to investigation of 2,49,301 models of Ford Fusion in the country. Such scrutinies may lead to penalizations which could affect the operating results of the company. Poor cash flows

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

In FY2009, Ford witnessed decline in its cash flows compared to 2008.The cash and cash equivalents decreased 2.8% to reach $21,441 million in FY2009 compared to $22,048 million in 2008. Poor cash position implies ineffective cost management and poor decision making by Ford's management. A continuation of this trend could reduce availability of resources for the company to pursue growth plans.

Opportunities

Growing Asia Pacific new cars market The Asia-Pacific new cars market witnessed a strong growth in recent years and the trend is likely to continue in the future. The Asia-Pacific new cars market generated total revenues of $285.5 billion in 2009, representing a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 3.8% for the period spanning 2005-09. In comparison, the Chinese and Indian markets grew with CAGRs of 17.3% and 8.9% respectively, over the same period, to reach respective values of $98.7 billion and $25.9 billion in 2009. The performance of the market is forecast to accelerate, with an anticipated CAGR of 5.3% for the five-year period 2009-2014, which is expected to drive the market to a value of $368.9 billion by the end of 2014. Comparatively, the Chinese and Indian markets would grow with CAGRs of 12% and 10% respectively, over the same period, to reach respective values of $177.6 billion and $41.6 billion in 2014. China and India are the key emerging markets that would continue to drive economic growth in the Asia Pacific region. In FY2009, Ford’s combined car and truck share in Chinese and Indian market (including sales of Ford-brand vehicles, and market share for certain unconsolidated affiliates particularly in China) was 1.9% and 1.3%, respectively. In line with these trends, Ford is strategically investing to improve its manufacturing capacity in Asia Pacific. At the company’s joint venture assembly facility in Rayong, Thailand, Ford invested $500 million in an expansion for the production of small passenger cars. In India, Ford invested $500 million to significantly increase its presence through expansion of its current manufacturing facility in Chennai to begin production of its new Ford Figo, and construction of a fully-integrated and flexible engine manufacturing plant. Further in September 2009, Ford also broke ground on a new plant in Chongqing, China to meet anticipated demand and grow Ford-brand market share. Therefore, the company is well positioned to capitalize on the growing Asia Pacific new cars markets. Increasing demand for hybrid electric vehicles Worldwide demand for light hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) is expected to increase. By 2015, it is expected that the US will be the largest market for HEVs and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), selling approximately 640,000 vehicles in small car and small SUV segments combined. China is expected to be the second-largest market with more than 560,000 hybrid vehicles sold in 2015. By that time, there will be an estimated total of 1.7 million PHEVs on the world’s roadways. Global

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

problems that include the environmental challenges of global warming and the need to conserve resources and energy are the key drivers for the company's to develop HEVs. In order to meet the demand Ford is continuously focused on developing new high technology products for hybrid electric vehicles. The company is introducing EcoBoost engines, six-speed transmissions and other fuel saving technologies across a wide range of vehicles. In 2009, Ford plans to double its hybrid models and volumes in the US. In 2009, the company also announced an aggressive electric vehicle strategy that would bring at least four new electric vehicles to market in the US within the next three years. Furthermore, in March 2010, Lincoln, Ford’s brand introduced its first hybrid, the new 2011 Lincoln MKZ Hybrid in the US. Later in the year, the Ford Transit Connect Electric, a small, all-electric commercial van would be introduced to the market, aimed at commercial vehicle owners. In 2011, Ford is expected to begin the production of a zero-emission Ford Focus Electric vehicle at its Michigan Assembly Plant. At the same facility, the company would produce the next-generation hybrid vehicle and plug-in hybrid, in 2012. Electric vehicle projects also are underway in Germany and the UK. A positive outlook for light hybrid electric vehicles market would boost demand for Ford's products. Strategic investments Ford is planning to invest aggressively to enhance its production facilities. In this context, in March 2010, the company decided to invest $135 million to design, engineer and produce key components for the company’s next-generation hybrid-electric vehicles. Ford engineers in Dearborn would design the battery packs while engineers in Livonia would design electric-drive transaxles for the next-generation hybrids, based on Ford’s global C- and CD-car platforms, which go into production in North America in 2012. Ford’s Rawsonville Plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, would assemble the battery packs beginning in 2012, moving work to Michigan that is currently performed in Mexico by a supplier. Ford’s Van Dyke Transmission Plant in Sterling Heights, Michigan, would build the electric drive transaxles beginning in 2012 from a supplier facility in Japan. Similarly, in February 2010, Ford decided to invest $155 million at its Cleveland operations to build a new fuel-efficient V-6 engine for the 2011 Mustang. The investment at Ford's Cleveland Engine Plant brings the company's investment in powertrain engineering and facility upgrades in North America to $1.8 billion to support its 2011 vehicle launches. Further in March 2009, Ford decided to invest $550 million to transform its Michigan Assembly Plant into a lean, green and flexible manufacturing complex that would build Ford’s next-generation Focus global small car along with a new battery-electric version of the Focus for the North American market. The plant, formerly the production site for Ford Expedition and Lincoln Navigators SUVs, is one of three North American light truck plants Ford is retooling to build fuel-efficient global small cars in the coming years. The new Focus would begin rolling off the line in 2010 and the battery-electric version of the Focus, Ford’s first all-electric passenger car would debut in 2011.

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

Such strategic investments would enhance the production facilities of Ford and helps it to manufacture more efficient products to its customers.

Threats

Intense price competition The global automotive industry is intensely competitive, with manufacturing capacity far exceeding current demand. According to CSM Worldwide's January 2010 report, the global automotive industry is estimated to have had excess capacity of 29 million units in 2009. Industry overcapacity has resulted in many manufacturers offering marketing incentives on vehicles in an attempt to maintain and grow market share; these incentives historically have included a combination of subsidized financing or leasing programs, price rebates, and other incentives. As a result, Ford is not necessarily able to set its prices to offset higher costs of marketing incentives or other cost increases, or the impact of adverse currency fluctuations in either the US or European markets. While Ford and its domestic competitors have initiated plans to reduce capacity significantly, successful reductions may require further cooperation of organized labor, take several years to complete, or only partially address the industry's overcapacity problems, particularly in light of recent, dramatic decreases in industry sales volume. A continuation or increase in excess capacity could have a substantial adverse effect on Ford’s financial condition and results of operations. Stringent regulations The worldwide automotive industry is governed by a substantial amount of governmental regulation, which often differs by state, region, and country. Governmental regulation has arisen, and proposals for additional regulation are advanced, primarily out of concern for the environment (including concerns about the possibility of global climate change and its impact), vehicle safety, and energy independence. In addition, many governments regulate local product content and/or impose import requirements as a means of creating jobs, protecting domestic producers, and influencing their balance of payments. In recent years, Ford has made significant changes to its product cycle plan to improve the overall fuel economy of vehicles the company produce, thereby reducing their GHG emissions. The cost to comply with existing governmental regulations is substantial, and future, additional regulations (already enacted, adopted or proposed) could have a substantial adverse impact on Ford’s financial condition and results of operations. Supplier distress Automotive industry is highly interdependent, with broad overlap of supplier and dealer networks among manufacturers. The interdependency is such that any uncontrolled bankruptcy or insolvency

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Ford Motor Company
SWOT Analysis

of a major competitor or major suppliers could threaten supplier or dealer network and thus could pose a threat to Ford as well. Even in the absence of such an event, the company’s supply base has experienced increased economic distress due to the sudden and substantial drop in industry sales volumes that has affected all manufacturers. Dramatically lower industry sales volume made existing debt obligations and fixed cost levels difficult for many suppliers to manage. These factors have increased pressure on the supply base. As a result, suppliers not only have been less willing to reduce prices, but some have requested direct or indirect price increases, as well as new and shorter payment terms. Suppliers also are exiting certain lines of business or closing facilities, which results in additional costs associated with transitioning to new suppliers. This may cause supply disruptions to Ford’s production during any such transitional period. In addition, Ford has taken and may continue to take actions to provide financial assistance to certain suppliers to ensure an uninterrupted supply of materials and components. Such actions could increase the company’s operating costs and affect its liquidity which may lead to low profit margins.

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Ford Motor Company
Top Competitors

TOP COMPETITORS

The following companies are the major competitors of Ford Motor Company

General Motors Corporation Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Suzuki Motor Corporation Toyota Motor Corporation Volkswagen AG Chrysler Group LLC Fiat S.p.A. PSA Peugeot Citroen S.A. Renault SA

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Ford Motor Company
Company View

COMPANY VIEW
A statement by Alan R. Mulally, President and Chief Executive Officer at Ford Motor Company is given below. The statement has been taken from the company’s annual report for FY2009. Ford Motor Company emerged from the challenging business environment of 2009 with the strongest proof yet that our ONE Ford plan is working. We reported full year 2009 net income of $2.7 billion, which was the company’s first full year of positive net income since 2005 and a $17.5 billion improvement over the previous year. We achieved a pre-tax operating profit, excluding special items, of $472 million in 2009, which was a $7.3 billion improvement over 2008. We still face significant challenges, but by following the ONE Ford plan we put in place three and a half years ago we are forging a path toward profitable growth. Our plan remains unchanged: • Aggressively restructure to operate profitably at the current lower demand and the changing model mix. • Accelerate the development of high-quality, fuel-efficient, safe new products that customers want and value. • Finance our plan and improve our balance sheet. • Work together as one team, leveraging our global assets. ONE Ford helped us achieve profitability and grow our business despite a global recession. In every part of the world we are providing customers with great products, building a stronger business and contributing to a better world. Great Products In 2007 we created a single global product development organization to maximize economies of scale and share best practices and ideas. That allows us to fully leverage our resources so that we can offer a full range of vehicles with the best quality, fuel-efficiency, safety, smart design and value. Taking full advantage of our global scale and talent to build products customers want and value is already paying off for us in markets around the world. And within the next four years, all Ford vehicles competing in global product segments will be common in North America, South America, Europe and Asia Pacific Africa. In 2009 our strong products drove full year market share gains in North America, Europe and South America while maintaining share in the rapidly growing Asia Pacific Africa region.

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Ford Motor Company
Company View

In the U.S., Ford F-Series was the best-selling truck for the 33rd year in a row in 2009. In the utilities segment, the Ford brand was the top-selling brand of crossovers in the U.S., led by the Ford Escape. Every consumer metric about the Ford brand – including favorable opinion, consideration, shopping and intention to buy – ended the year at record levels. Full-year total market share was 15.3 percent, more than one point higher than 2008, marking the company’s first full-year U.S. market share increase since 1995. In Canada, Ford was the best-selling brand in 2009, and the Ford F-Series was the best-selling truck for the 44th year in a row. Led by the Fiesta, Focus and Ka, Ford strengthened its position as Europe’s second highest-selling brand in 2009. Ford Europe’s market share of 9.1 percent was a half point increase for the year and set an 11-year high. In South America, Ford Brazil achieved its best ever full-year sales in 2009 by selling 325,000 vehicles, a 15 percent increase over the previous year. Ford Asia Pacific Africa’s sales were up 14 percent in 2009, and set a full-year record. Ford sales in China, up 45 percent, led the increase in the region. More great products are on the way this year, including the new Ford Fiesta in the U.S., freshened versions of the Ford S-MAX and Galaxy in Europe, and the new Ford Figo in India. Strong Business Ford has completed major cost reduction actions over the past four years to substantially restructure its business, including personnel levels, facilities and related costs, and the settlement of the United Auto Workers retiree health care Voluntary Employee Beneficiary Association (VEBA) agreement. We also obtained capital and liquidity ahead of the financial market crisis, which helped us maintain our investments in new products during a difficult economic period. In 2009, we achieved $5.1 billion in Automotive structural cost reductions, exceeding our target of $4 billion. For the full year, Automotive operating-related cash flow was negative $300 million; an improvement of $19.2 billion over 2008. We finished the year with $25.5 billion in Automotive gross cash, which was up from $23.8 billion at the end of the third quarter of 2009. Ford Motor Credit Company reported net income of $1.3 billion in 2009, an improvement of $2.8 billion from a net loss of $1.5 billion a year earlier. Contributing to this improvement was the non-recurrence of an impairment charge for operating leases and lower depreciation expense for leased vehicles due to higher resale values. Our intense focus on improving our cost structure and strengthening our balance sheet will continue going forward. Among other actions, we anticipate completing the sale of Volvo Cars to Zhejiang Geely Holding Group Co. Ltd. in the second quarter of 2010. Better World

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Ford Motor Company
Company View

Great companies are driven by purpose as well as profit. Ford has a proud heritage of improving people’s lives and making their world a better place. We want to build on this heritage by being a good neighbor locally and a trusted corporate citizen globally, operating responsibly and sustainably wherever we do business. A central element of our efforts is providing affordable fuel economy for millions of customers, not just expensive, low-volume niche vehicles. To do that we have introduced innovative fuel-saving technologies across a wide range of vehicles. We now have more fuel-saving six-speed transmissions on the road than any other manufacturer. We are also the leading U.S.- based producer of hybrid-electric vehicles, with record sales that were up 72 percent in 2009. The EcoBoost engine technology we introduced last year delivers up to 20 percent better fuel economy and will be offered on a wide range of vehicles with projected production reaching half a million annually in North America within 5 years. In that same time period, we will introduce a series of four new electric, next-generation hybrid and plug-in hybrid vehicles that use advanced lithium ion batteries. In 2009, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report showed that Ford Motor Company improved its combined car and truck fuel economy by nearly 20 percent during the 5-year period 2004-2009, almost double the improvement of the next closest competitor. Giving back to the community also is an important part of our efforts to help build a better world. Ford Motor Company Fund and Community Services, our philanthropic organization, celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2009. Our Ford Volunteer Corps, which was established in 2005, encourages salaried employees to take two work days per year to serve as volunteers. Last year 16,000 Ford employees and retirees volunteered more than 77,000 hours to help people in their local communities. Looking Forward We are more convinced than ever that Ford has the right plan to lead us through near-term economic pressures and continue to deliver profitable growth. We expect to be profitable for the full year in 2010 on a pre-tax basis, excluding special items. That includes full year profitability for our Ford North America and total Automotive operations, with positive Automotive operating-related cash flow. The entire extended Ford team is absolutely committed to building on our progress and working together as a lean global enterprise focused on delivering great products. By doing that, we will create an exciting and viable company with profitable growth for all. As always, we thank you for your support of our efforts.

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Ford Motor Company
Locations and Subsidiaries

LOCATIONS AND SUBSIDIARIES
Head Office
Ford Motor Company One American Road Suite 1026 Dearborn Michigan 48126 USA P:1 313 845 8540 F:1 313 845 6073 http://www.ford.com

Other Locations and Subsidiaries
Ford Motor Company of Canada, Ltd. Oakville Ontario L6J 5E4 CAN Mercury Dearborn Michigan 48121 USA Lincoln Dearborn Michigan 48121 USA Volvo Cars of North America, LLC 1 Volvo Drive Rockleigh New Jersey 07647 USA Ford Credit Abbot House Everard Close St Albans AL1 2RW GBR Ford-Werke GmbH Postfach 71 02 65 50 742 Cologne DEU

Ford Motor Co Ltd Brentwood CM14 9HE GBR

Ford India P Ltd, S.P. Koil Post Chengalpattu 603204 Tamil Nadu IND

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