Frederick County Report 1/11/12

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Frederick County Report is the local newspaper for all of Frederick County and Winchester City, Virginia.

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Serving all of
Frederick County
and Winchester City
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January 11 – 17, 2012
FredCoReport.com
FREE FREE
Volume IV, Issue 2
Letters to the editor
2
Another night in
Middletown
Fireworks ignite at Town
Council meeting
6
Romney takes
New Hampshire
8
4
Galleries at
Night
Art, jazz
& wine
Page 2 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Editor;
As a member of the Middle-
town Planning Commission for
almost three years I am horrifed
that in an efort to remove Mark
Davis from the Commission, the
Commission has been accused of
nonfeasance at a public meeting
by Mr. Brown. Tis accusation
comes with no evidence, much
less documentation. Additionally
Mr. Brown expected the Town
Councilors to decide on the re-
placement of an extremely valu-
able Commission member with no
prior discussion. One councilor
has questioned Mr. Brown’s ethics
and I agree.
Te job of the Planning Com-
mission is to research and advise.
We do not make policy. To an-
swer the accusations: We have
addressed the Comprehensive
Plan update. See the minutes.
We were given the CIP to com-
ment on and we did just that. See
the minutes. Te creation of the
by-laws governing the behavior
of the Planning Commission was
crucial for the Commission to deal
with past ethics questions. Mr.
Brown has sneered at this as not
worthwhile.
Te job of liaison is to forward
tasks from the Council to Com-
mission and return results. As
far as I am concerned Mr. Davis
has done this satisfactorily. Tere
have been no complaints from
Council. Te liaison does not run
the Planning Commission. Mr.
Davis has been through Virginia
Certifcation for planning com-
missioners. His replacement has
not, nor has he voiced an intention
to do so. Mr. Davis has tirelessly
researched issues and provided
valuable framework for those is-
sues the Commission has been
tasked with.
Mr. Brown states that the Plan-
ning Commission has “the respon-
sibility to set priorities that refect
those of this administration”. No;
a Planning Commission should
have a good working relationship
with its Town Council. But a
good working relationship does
not mean functioning as a pup-
pet organization. Independence
of viewpoint is essential, and our
priorities are set by the Compre-
hensive Plan, not by the admin-
istration.
Mr. Brown has eliminated a
very dedicated, educated, inde-
pendent, strong member of the
Planning Commission and in-
serted one who will not provide
the expertise, man hours and
interest the planning commission
deserves. (Te replacement has
been to no planning meetings for
the last two years.)
Mr. Brown’s ravings about the
possible boundary adjustment
have absolutely nothing to do with
Mr. Davis or Planning Commis-
sion. If there is a failure to com-
municate with the County it is not
the Commission’s or Mr. Davis’.
I considered resigning in protest
but we have done so many good
things while I have been a member
that I don’t want it to drain away
due to lack of interest and lazy,
backward thinking.
I stated in my citizen’s comment
to council Monday night that the
replacement of Mr. Davis was a
mistake. I now consider it an efort
of megalomania by a mayor I have
no trust in to guide Middletown
into a strong future.
Anita Holley
7841 Main St., Middletown VA
Editor;

As a member of the St. Tomas
Chapel Trust Board, I would like to
thank your paper and Sue Golden
for the article on St. Tomas Cha-
pel in Middletown. Te Chapel is
a true gem of this area and has not
been given publicity. Ms. Golden
wrote an outstanding article about
the history and its value to this
area.
After the article was published
I received several telephone calls
about the use of the Chapel for
weddings. Tose calling had not
been aware of the availability of
the building for weddings. Te
Board maintains the building from
income received from usage. Your
exposure has aided in the preser-
vation of a very important piece of
local history.
Tank you,
Susan Chewning
Community
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
WINCHESTER CITY
Christmas Tree and Yard Waste Collection

Remember to place your live Christmas tree by the curb for pick up
this Wednesday (1/11/12). Te last day for Christmas tree collection is
Wednesday, January 18th. Please be sure to remove all decorations.

NOTE: Wednesday, January 18th is the last day for Yard Waste col-
lection until March 14, 2012.

Please place materials on the curb by 7:30 am on the day of collection,
but not before 5:00 pm on the evening before collection.
Letters to the editor
Handley regional library breaks
ground for its children’s garden
WINCHESTER, Va. – Handley Regional Library will break ground for its
Children’s Garden on January 17, 2012 at 3:30 p.m. Representatives from
Lowe’s will be a part of the ceremony. Te public is invited.
Te Library system has seen a lot of cuts to its operating budget lately.
Te Library Board and staf are grateful to Lowe’s for the grant, for this
project could not have come out of the operating budget. As an added
bonus, Lowe’s employees will help with construction of the project and
participate in future programs in the new Children’s Reading Garden.
Reader-Swartz Architects designed the project.
Director Trish Ridgeway commented that people will be able to get a
feel for the entire design at the groundbreaking. “We are marking all the
areas so everyone can visualize the space.”
“Lowe’s is committed to recognizing and supporting eforts that enrich
the lives of our neighbors and customers,” said Larry D. Stone, chair-
man of Lowe’s Charitable and Educational Foundation. “By supporting
libraries like Handley Regional Library, we are contributing to a cause
that’s important to our customers and employees and helping build a
stronger foundation for the children who will be tomorrow’s employees,
homeowners and community leaders.” For more information, visit lowes.
com/community.
(From a release)
On the Road Driving School, LLC
Garland T. Williams, Owner
5336 Water Street, Stephens City, VA 22655
Ph: (540) 869-6105 Cell: (540) 247-3197
www.ontheroaddrivingschool.com
Driver Improvement Clinic
Driver Education Class
Tues. Jan. 17 - Feb. 25
Classes at 153 Narrow Ln.
Mt. View Christian Academy Stephens City, VA
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Classes at Holiday Inn Express
142 Foxridge Ln. Winchester, VA 22601
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January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 3 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Community
Frederick
County Report
Frederick
County Report
Frederick
County Report
Member
Virginia Press Association
Winchester
Stephens City
Kernstown
Middletown
Frederick County
Press releases should be
emailed to:
[email protected]
Publisher
Daniel P. McDermott
(540) 305-3000
News Reporters:
Sue Golden
Jonathan Lucci
Jonathan Bennett
Rachel Hamman
Advertising Sales Representatives:
Angie Buterakos
(540) 683-9197
[email protected]
Alison Duvall
(540) 551-2072
[email protected]
Graphics Department
[email protected]
Jeff Richmond
Rob Shultz
Billing Coordinator:
[email protected]
Cartoonist:
Ryan Koch
If you are interested in contributing
articles to our paper, please e-mail:
[email protected]
This publication is proudly
printed on 100% recycled paper
with soy-based ink.
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
Cornelia G. Unger
Cornelia Gordon Unger, 85, of Winchester, Virginia, went to be with her
Lord, Monday, January 2, 2012, after a lengthy illness. Memorial contributions
may be made to Virginia Weekly Religious Education Association, Inc., 358 Elk
Mountain Road, Afton, Virginia 22920.
Doris McKeown Hamman
Doris McKeown Hamman,87, formerly of Luray, Virginia and Mt. Rainier,
Maryland, died January 4, 2012, in Winchester, Virginia. In lieu of fowers,
memorial contributions may be made to the Blue Ridge Hospice, 333 West
Cork Street, Winchester, Virginia, 22601.
Mildred Snyder Nef
Mildred Snyder Nef, 95, of Stephens City, Virginia, died Wednesday, January 4, 2011, in
a local nursing facility. Memorial contributions may be made to Stephens City Volunteer
Fire and Rescue, P.O. Box 253, Stephens City, Virginia, 22655.
James M. Kerns, Sr.
James Madison Kerns, Sr., 73, of Frederick County, Virginia died Sunday,
January 1, 2012, at his home. Memorial contributions may be made to the
American Cancer Society, 2654 Valley Avenue, Suite B., Winchester, Virginia,
22601.
Charlotte V. Paugh
Charlotte Virginia Campbell Paugh, 77, of Frederick County, Virginia, died
Sunday, January 1, 2012 in the Winchester Medical Center. Memorial con-
tributions may be made to Blue Ridge Hospice, 333 W. Cork St., Suite 405,
Winchester, VA 22601.
Dr. George L. Shepard, Jr.
Dr. George L. Sheppard, Jr. passed away on Tursday, January 5, 2012 at
Winchester Medical Center surrounded by his family. Donations may be made
to the capital campaign for Te Laurel Center, on behalf of which Dr. Shep-
pard served as a board member, at P.O. Box 14, Winchester, VA 22604. Tese
funds will be used to create a safe haven for women and children in need in
the community. Contributions may also be made to theBuilding Endowment
Fund of Braddock Street United Methodist Church, where Dr. Sheppard was a
faithful and active member for over 40 years, at 115 Wolfe Street, Winchester,
VA 22601.
Viola L. Jones
Viola L. Jones, 86, of Winchester, VA died on Wednesday, January 4, 2012
at the Winchester Medical Center. Memorial contributions may be made to
Meadow Brook Bible Baptist Church, P. O. Box 153, Middletown, VA 22645.
Harold Leon Bowman
Harold Leon Bowman, 81, of Winchester, VA, died Tuesday, January 3, 2012
at his residence. Memorial contributions may be made to Blue Ridge Hospice,
333 W. Cork Street, Winchester, VA, the Adult Care Center, 115 Wolfe Street,
Winchester, VA and First Presbyterian Church, 116 South Loudoun Street,
Winchester, VA 22601.
Lavonda L. Marsh
Lavonda Lavee McPherson Marsh, 76, of Frederick County, Virginia, died
Sunday, January 8, 2012, in her home. In lieu of fowers, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to Blue Ridge Hospice, 333 West Cork Street, Suite 405,
Winchester, Virginia, 22601.
Death notices
Frederick
County Report
Frederick
County Report
Frederick
County Report
Angie Buterakos
Advertising Sales
Cell: (540) 683-9197
[email protected]
Frederick
County Report
Frederick
County Report
Frederick
County Report
Alison Duvall
Advertising Sales
Cell: (540) 551-2072
[email protected]
Winchester Crime of the Week - January 2, 2012

Location: 300 block of Tevis St
Date of Crime: December 22, 2011
Type of Crime: Larceny
Te victim advised that he was expecting a package to be de-
livered on this date and when it didn’t show up, he reviewed his
surveillance video for the front of his residence. Video showed
the package was delivered at 15:58 and a male taking the package
from the porch at 17:20. Te suspect was described as a white
male, 5’10”, 220 lbs, had close cropped hair, wearing a sweatshirt
and blue jeans. He was driving a white quad cab truck with silver
freezers in the truck bed.
If you should have any information in reference to this or any
other crimes, please contact the Crime Solvers Hotline at (540)
665 – TIPS. Case # 11057439 Ofcer Wyant
crime of the week
Correction: Te stories on pages 7 and 10 of the previous issue
(Vol. IV, Iss. 1) were in fact written by Jonathan Lucci, not Jonathan
Bennett.
Monitor Body Temperature
Infants less than one year old should never sleep in a cold room
because (1) infants lose body heat more easily than adults; and (2)
unlike adults, infants can’t make enough body heat by shivering.
Provide warm clothing for infants and try to maintain a warm in-
door temperature. If the temperature cannot be maintained, make
temporary arrangements to stay elsewhere. In an emergency, you
can keep an infant warm using your own body heat. If you must
sleep, take precautions to prevent rolling on the baby. Pillows and
other soft bedding can also present a risk of smothering; remove
them from the area near the baby.
Older adults often make less body heat because of a slower me-
tabolism and less physical activity. If you are over 65 years of age,
check the temperature in your home often during severely cold
weather. Also, check on elderly friends and neighbors frequently
to ensure that their homes are adequately heated.
tip of the week
Page 4 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
The arts
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
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EOC M/F/H/D RA 06-035
Upwardly mobile entertainment in the valley
By Jonathan Bennett
Frederick County Report
Ever been to the Museum of
the Shenandoah Valley? No? Me
either. But I’m going this Friday
night, and here’s why.
Te Museum is ofering a series
of tours known as ‘Galleries at
Night’ on Friday, January 12th.
Tere are three tours, the frst be-
ginning at six o’clock, followed by
one at seven and the last at eight.
After the frst and second tours,
the Dixie Rhythm jazz band will
play forty-fve minute sets in the
Reception Hall. Te Museum Café
will be open for dinner, and there
will be wine for sale in the lobby.
Yes. Art and live jazz and wine.
The folks at the Museum have
unwittingly aided my 2012 resolu-
tion to appear more sophisticated
than I actually might be. Perhaps
I’ll wear a monacle…
Indeed. While the Museum’s
main structure, the Glen Burnie
Historic House, is closed for
renovations until 2014, it’s unique
and abundant collection of objets
de’art will be rotated into the Mu-
seum galleries. Much of the core
collection is the vision of Julian
Wood Glass Jr., a descendant of
surveyor James Wood (kind of
a big name in these parts.) Glass
turned the house into a country
retreat, subsequently transform-
ing the surrounding landscape
into the Glen Burnie Gardens.
Just before his death in 1992, he
created the Glass-Glen Burnie
Foundation and commissioned
the assembly of the Museum,
which opened in 2005.
As for Friday (and practically
every other day), three of the four
main galleries in eleven rooms
will be open. The Shenandoah
Valley gallery ofers an overview
of Valley history from the 1700s to
the present. Visitors can immerse
themselves in the history of the
valley with an interactive media
display allowing them to record
their own stories and experiences
in the context of the Shenandoah
Valley. Tis unofcial ‘beginning’
of the tour presents a multi-media
overview of the local geography
and the area’s frst settlers lead-
ing up to the region we call home
today. Te works of more than
sixty artists are displayed here.
Te Julian Wood Glass Jr. Gal-
lery houses the works of about
ffty more artists dating back to
the mid-eighteenth century as
Re-creations of histori-
cal kitchens are displayed
in timber-framed gallery
rooms.
January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 5 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
well. Paintings—oil, watercolor,
and pastel—adorn the walls sur-
rounding a furniture collection
that includes a couch once owned
by the Queen of England. Don’t
touch anything.
Next is a display befitting a
troupe of oompa-loompas. (Ob-
scure movie reference…c’mon…)
Te R. Lee Taylor Miniatures dis-
play is a collection of tiny houses
created by dozens of scale-model-
ists. Tese small reproductions of
real regional structures contain
even smaller pieces of furniture
and accoutrements for those
roaming gnomes that may or may
not live in them. Tere’s a touch-
screen tour that takes you through
each one so you can see just how
detailed the models are.
Lastly (but not least) is the
Changing Exhibition Gallery. Tis
gallery is just what it sounds like;
an ever-varying collection of tem-
porary displays, the most recent of
which was Daughters of the Stars:
Shenandoah Valley Star Quilts
and Teir Makers. Julie Armel,
Public Relations Director at the
Museum, says that this section
is closed (‘dark’) until February
10th. No worries; this just means
there’s more time for the other
three. And jazz. And wine. Also,
the Museum Store will be open
Friday evening should you like
to take home a token from your
visit; maybe a piece of pottery, or
a book, or a postcard…
If you’d like to attend, it’s fve
dollars general admission. If
you’re already a member of the
MSV (as I hope to be soon; again,
the whole ‘urbane-sophisticate’
thing), it’s free. See you Friday.
And don’t wear a monacle. More
than one in the same room and
someone could lose an eye.
For more information on the
Museum of the Shenandoah Val-
ley and its exhibits, visit
www.shenandoahmuseum.org or
call 540-662-1473.
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
The arts
NOW OPEN!!!
14
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Page 6 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
By Sue Golden
Frederick County Report
Te freworks started right away at
Monday’s Middletown Town Coun-
cil meeting. During the Citizens’
Comment period, Susan Chewning
chastised the Council for many of
its recent actions. Ms. Chewning
questioned why the fourteen percent
water rate increase was being passed
on to the citizens, when the citizens
were already paying more than the
cost of water to the Town; why the
Town hired a mechanic, and whether
the Town was going to invest in tools
for the mechanic; what money was
being received and where it was go-
ing when the Town “loaned” out the
drug-snifng dog, the bilingual police
ofcer, or the mechanic; and why no
one knew about the last election to
the Council until they went to vote
in November.
Ms. Chewning said she had called
the Frederick County Sherif’s De-
partment and was told that there was
no “Mutual Support Agreement” as
reported in this paper. Ms. Chewning
said the Council was not working to-
gether to support the citizens; that the
constant “bickering” was bothering
people; and that people were embar-
rassed by the conduct of the Council.
Finally, Ms. Chewning said a lot of
people in Town are discussing dis-
solving the Town Charter all together.
She then thanked the Council for all
of their hard work at a difcult job.
Anita Holley, a member of the
Planning Commission, then spoke
regarding her experiences working
with Councilor Mark H. Davis as the
liaison to the Planning Commission.
Ms. Holley said Councilor Davis is
“a perfectionist, that occasionally
makes her crazy,” but that he has done
a signifcant amount of work for the
Planning Commission. Councilor
Davis, according to Ms. Holley, is
organized and trained as a planning
commissioner. Ms. Holley feels that
losing Councilor Davis from the Plan-
ning Commission would be a “very
large mistake.”
Ms. Holley said most of the Town’s
ordinances date from the 1970s and
1980s. The Planning Commission
needs forward thinking people, ac-
cording to Ms. Holley, not people who
“think in the past with no changes.”
Ms. Holley’s comments became
clear when about midway through
the meeting Mayor Mark Brown
began reading a prepared statement,
requesting that the Council appoint
Councilor John W. Blaisdell, Jr. to be
the liaison to the Planning Commis-
sion, replacing Councilor Davis. (See
sidebar.) As the Mayor read his state-
ment, Councilor Carl H. Bernhards,
Jr. called out “Point of Order!” Te
Mayor said let me fnish, when the
Mayor finished he asked for com-
ments. Councilor Bernhards said, “at
which side would you like to start?”
Mayor Brown turned to Councilor
Bernhards and said “I will warn you
one time: use decorum, and act like a
councilor.”
Councilor Davis defended himself
by saying that the Mayor will not
speak with the Chair of the Planning
Commission. Councilor Davis said he
has been threatened with law suits by
the Mayor over actions taken by the
Planning Commission. Councilor
Davis was shocked to hear that the
Reliance Road boundary adjustment
was threatened by a lack of action by
the Planning Commission. Te Coun-
cilor said that the Planning Com-
mission provided the Council with
two pages of “thoroughly researched
recommendations” regarding the
proposed boundary adjustment, and
was surprised when he learned that
the Mayor never passed on the rec-
ommendations to the Reliance Road
Committee. Councilor Davis said the
Mayor never requested anything from
the Commission.
Furthermore, by Virginia State
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
Middletown
One of the privileges accorded
me as Mayor, is the authority to
select committee chairs that I feel
best support me in achieving the
goals I have set for my Administra-
tion. Te position of Liaison to the
Planning Commission is not a chair,
and as such, does not fall under
my prerogative. However, under
the provisions of Section 2-40 of
the Middletown Town Code, I am
requesting that Council appoint a
new Liaison to the Planning Com-
mission to bring about a diferent approach that better serves the interests
of Middletown in achieving those goals.
Increased state & federal regulatory requirements, utilities, salaries,
infrastructure repair, and just the basic everyday needs to do business have
placed an unfair growing burden on our community and its families. As
an example, our drinking water costs have jumped 11% during the past
two years and will increase by 14% this year and another 14% next year.
Middletown has little or no revenue, beyond that which is provided for
by its residents through real estate taxes, personal property taxes, and
utilities. Te economic turndown stopped all residential construction,
drying up any chance for increased tax revenues from new homes that
could have helped to spread the impact. And the only relief Middletown
has in the foreseeable future is a boundary adjustment across 1-81 that
has the potential to bring multiple retail projects such as hotels, shops
and restaurants into town, creating new revenue sources as well as job
opportunities for our residents.
I have continuously stressed the need for long range planning so that
Middletown can successfully complete this boundary adjustment. Fred-
erick County has repeatedly expressed reservations about the adjustment
because of water availability. And yet, Councilor Davis has failed as Liaison
to communicate the need and urgency for two of the most basic docu-
ments, placing this action at risk of failure.
Te Planning Commission failed to meet their responsibilities in set-
ting priorities that refect those of this administration. Tis has resulted
in a failure to produce an update to the 2005 Middletown Comprehensive
Plan. Te update’should have provided County planning ofcials with
documented evidence of Middletown’s proactive stance on transportation,
population demographics, housing, infrastructure, recreation, etc., for the
new addition, as well as the needed changes in our current infrastructure
to respond to the expansion. Te Commission also refused to update the
Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) as requested by this administration. Te
CIP is the long range plan required to implement and support concepts
identifed in the Comprehensive Plan, which must include identifcation
of those resources required to ensure Middletown has sufcient water
for future expansion. Both an up-to-date Comprehensive Plan and CIP
are mandatory for a successful Boundary Adjustment request later this
summer. Instead the Commission has spent nearly two years crafting in-
ternal procedural guidelines and a new zoning ordinance for a boundary
adjustment that is now at risk.
Tis administration needs both a Liaison and a Planning Commission
that are responsive to its requirements.
Mayor Marshall J. “Mark”
Brown
Another Middletown night
Middletown Town Council meeting, January 9th
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January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 7 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Code, the Comprehensive Plan must
be reviewed every fve years, accord-
ing to Councilor Davis. “There is
lots of stuf that is confusing in the
Plan but there are no real problems,”
said the Councilor. Councilor Davis
stated that “no one is interested in
the Comprehensive Plan, unless it is
used against someone.” Te Councilor
said the Commission is updating the
Plan with new statistics, and remov-
ing excess. Te only people to cite the
plan have been Councilors Davis and
Bernhards.
Davis believes that as liaison, his
duty is to bring action items from
the Council to the Commission.
Middletown paid for Davis’ training
as a planner. Councilor Davis insisted
he is doing a good job.
Councilor Donna M. G. Gray told
the Council that she will “no longer
be forced to vote on matters without
discussion. Mayor Brown wants to
enforce his own agenda.” Councilor
Gray called Mayor Brown’s actions an
“unethical practice,” and asked, “Why
allow a dictatorship?”
Councilor Gilbert Barrington
weighed into the debate saying that
“all I’ve seen since being on Council
is one side or the other.” He said his
“interest is not personal; it’s for this
Town.”
Charles H. Harbaugh, IV asked
Councilor Blaisdell, who had re-
mained silent on the issue, what
changes he would make if he were
appointed. Councilor Blaisdell said he
would “do what needs to be done to
go forward, . . . so the Town can grow
and prosper and be realistic.”
Councilor Bernhards waded into
the fray next. He said “there were
no discussions prior to the meeting;
there was only email trafc.” He said
only one of his three simple questions
had been answered. Te Councilor
said Councilor Blaisdell never ex-
pressed any interest in the Planning
Commission and that as Chair of the
Planning and Zoning Committee he
never attended any meetings of the
Commission.
Councilor Bernhards questioned,
“why replace the liaison, when the
Town paid for Councilor Davis’
training.” He questioned whether
Councilor Blaisdell would pay his
own way to the training class. He
claimed that Councilor Davis was “up
to date on what needs to be done;” he
questioned the judgment of replacing
a “well trained Council member who
has attended every meeting for the
last ten years.” Finally, he said the vote
was “out of order” and “wrong.”
Te Council voted on the Mayor’s
motion, with Councilors Barrington
and Blaisdell voting “yes,” Councilors
Gray and Harbaugh “abstaining,” and
Councilors Bernhards and Davis vot-
ing “no.” In casting the deciding vote,
the Mayor noted that the Council was
divided. “Will this Council ever come
together? No.” Te Mayor voted to re-
place Councilor Davis with Councilor
Blaisdell. Councilor Gray commented
that we “do not do this; it is ugly and
wrong.” Te Mayor retorted that he
“discussed this a year ago, and an
email went out a week in advance.”
Te discussion was equally vitriolic
when discussing the fourteen percent
increase in the water bill from Win-
chester which is supposed to take
efect on June 1st. Councilor Gray
opened the discussion by saying that
she acknowledged the need to pass
on the increase; however, she believes
that charging the increase two months
in advance burdens the citizens under
false pretenses. She summed up her
view by saying the action was “not
kosher.”
Councilor Davis opposed the mo-
tion as moved, saying that to increase
the water rates fourteen percent
means that everyone should pay $.66
more per one thousand gallons of
water without any special categories
for those who would pay more as
proposed. According to Councilor
Davis’ research, the “pass-along” will
be paying for the sewage system since
“the water system is in the black; the
sewer system is in the red.” Te Coun-
cilor believes there needs to be a rate
adjustment for the sewer system.
Councilor Bernhards agreed with
Councilor Davis. Te Councilor said
he could not fgure out where some
of the numbers in the proposal came
from. He had wanted to discuss the
fgures at the last meeting but they
were not discussed. He refused to vote
for the proposal as written.
Mayor Brown responded that “the
Town receives revenue from very
few sources; the revenue from the
water helps to pay for everything in
Town. Making calculations on what to
charge for water is very complicated;
professionals charge approximately
$8,000 to come in to a town and calcu-
late the current cost of the water. Te
calculation includes water rates, costs,
profts, and the replacement of equip-
ment down the road.” Te Mayor said
the national average cost of water is
$125 per month. Last year, the cost
increase was implemented late, so the
Town lost money. Te Mayor believes
the solution is to become water inde-
pendent.
Councilors Blaisdell and Bar-
rington were the sole “yes” votes so
the motion failed. Councilor Gray
commented that the Council needed
to “curb spending.” A visibly upset
Mayor stated that the approved
budget was predicated on the water
increase and that “we cannot operate
like this; we will need to start shutting
down services.”
At the end of the meeting, Coun-
cilor Bernhards proposed revising the
water rate increase proposal to a fat
fourteen percent increase to begin
on June 1st. This proposal passed
with only Councilor Gray voting “no.”
Tere will be a public hearing on the
water rate increase on February 13th
at 6:30 pm.
Another heated topic was the audit
of the Town. Councilor Bernhards
moved to make the audit bi-annual.
Councilor Gray, who has consistently
brought up the topic of the audit and
its lack of timeliness called the move
to a bi-annual calendar “disturbing,
and irresponsible,” claiming there
are “discrepancies on financials.”
Councilor Gray said she was told the
2009/10 audit had to be completed
before the 2010/11 audit could begin.
Now, they want to move to a bi-an-
nual schedule.
Mayor Brown responded that, by
law, towns with 3500 or more citizens
needed to have an annual audit. Oth-
erwise, the federal government says
there must be an audit every three
years. Audits generally cost $14,000,
so by moving to a bi-annual schedule,
the Town will save $7,000 a year. If a
discrepancy is found in the audit, the
audit for the next year will start im-
mediately.
Councilor Davis agreed with Coun-
cilor Gray, saying there were lots of
delays. One delay was the Council’s
conscious decision to go with a new
auditing frm for a fresh set of eyes.
The new auditors have been very
slow.
Town Manager Joan Roche is send-
ing a letter to the auditors requesting
a report by the end of next week.
Councilor Bernhards pointed out that
he requested the vote to move to a bi-
annual schedule be postponed until
after receiving the auditor’s report
but was denied. Councilor Gray voted
“no” to the motion.
Councilor Harbaugh presented a
motion to support “local events and
programs” for the 200th anniversary
of the War of 1812. According to
the resolution, there “were some 73
armed encounters with the British
that took place in Virginia during the
war, and Virginians actively fought
in Maryland, Virginia, and Ohio
and in naval engagements” and “an
estimated 70,000 Virginians served.”
Councilor Davis objected to commit-
ting Middletown to undefned “local
events and programs,” and voted
against the motion.
Te Mayor and Councilors Bern-
hards and Gray had a very testy non-
discussion about an ordinance that
Councilor Gray wanted to report on
as Chair of the Ordinance Committee.
As Councilor Gray began to make
her report, the Mayor shut her down,
saying “No. Tis is not on the agenda.”
Councilor Gray retorted that she is
“continuously ignored and brushed
off when working on ordinances.”
Councilor Gray claimed she is not
being taken seriously as Chair of the
Ordinance Committee. Te Mayor
and Councilor Gray disagreed about
whether the Town was enforcing the
ordinance correctly.
Councilor Bernhards weighed in
that he “fnds it hard to believe no
other ordinances need to be worked
on.” He said Councilor Gray had been
working on this ordinance change for
fve months and it had been discussed
at great length. The Council was
presented with a State Code section
to read. Te Councilor believes the
Ordinance Committee should decide
if and what changes need to be made
and present them to Council.
Te Council unanimously voted to
approve a bid by Russell Roofng to fx
the roof on Town Hall for $2,250.
Te Mayor charged Councilor Har-
baugh with creating a “study group for
the purpose of determining the most
appropriate use of non-recreational
park land . . . recently profered to this
community.” Te land in questioned
encompasses 1.8 acres on the south
end of Town. Anyone interested in
serving on the study group should
contact Town Hall.
Te July 4th Committee will have
its next meeting on January 15th at 7
pm at Town Hall. Work on Church
Street will begin on January 17th.
Middletown
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
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Page 8 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Jonathan Lucci
Frederick County Report
It has been a busy and crucial
seven days in the race for the nom-
ination of the Republican Party
for the Presidency. Last week in
Iowa, in one of the closest primary
elections in American history,
former Massachusetts Governor
Mitt Romney fnished in frst place
by a mere eight votes, edging out
former Pennsylvania Senator Rick
Santorum. Eight votes, out of a
combined sixty thousand between
Santorum and Romney, separated
the two when the fnal precinct
was counted in the early morning
hours of Wednesday. And last
night, Romney scored a decisive
victory in the New Hampshire pri-
mary, a result widely expected but
still evident of his strength going
forward into the next few races.
In Iowa, Santorum had
surged quickly in the fnal week
of the race, seemingly coming out
of nowhere and capitalizing on the
fall of conservatives like Rick Perry
and Newt Gingrich. Ron Paul
finished a strong third, despite
some entrance polls that indicated
he was headed for a second place
fnish. His movement shows no
signs of slowing down, indeed
his rallies are some of the most
energy-filled of the campaign.
Gingrich fnished fourth, after an
independent SuperPAC that sup-
ports but is not directly controlled
by Mitt Romney aired a barrage of
negative ads at the former Speaker,
whom Romney’s campaign sees as
a more dangerous rival than San-
torum or Paul. Gingrich launched
a scathing attack on Mitt Romney
after the Iowa votes and promised
a larger emphasis on contrasting
his record from Romney’s.
Meanwhile, conserva-
tive Rick Perry sounded like he
was going to exit the race, as he
declared he was returning to Texas
to refect on paths forward. Tose
words usually precede a dropout
speech, but Perry shocked even
some of his own advisers the next
day when he indicated he would
be campaigning in South Caro-
lina which votes next on January
21st. Tea party favorite Michelle
Bachmann fnished behind Perry
and did bow to the pressure and
withdrew from the race.
The last week in New
Hampshire has essentially served
as a coronation of sorts for Mitt
Romney as the primary winner,
as his New England roots and im-
age as a moderate play very well
in a state like New Hampshire.
Some of the more conservative
tendencies in his opponents, par-
ticularly Gingrich and Santorum,
did not play well at all here but
both of them are looking forward
to South Carolina and southern
evangelical electorate. Romney’s
victory in New Hampshire does
give him signifcant momentum
and will likely result in a rallying
by establishment Republicans and
pressure on the other candidates
to at least tone down the negativity
Politics
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
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2011
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Saturday, January 14, 2012
4:00 - 8:00 pm
Join us for our sixth annual exciting and exotic evening of
dining catered by Cute’s Catering. Look for interesting and
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tickets early as we have sold out in previous years.
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Romney takes New Hampshire, solidifes lead
January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 9 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
on the likely GOP nominee.
However, Newt Gingrich
is seemingly out for revenge for
what he believes was a unneces-
sarily negative campaign in Iowa.
A Super PAC that backs him
has launched a blistering nega-
tive campaign against Romney’s
business background, seeking to
portray him as a cold and ruthless
executive. Romney did himself
no favors during a recent health
care speech, saying that he “likes
to be able to fre people,” a remark
meant to be about insurance com-
panies and not workers, but also a
remark easily taken out of context
in a very damaging way by his op-
ponents.
As Gi ngri ch savages
Romney and Perry likely fol-
lows suit in an attempt to stop
his momentum, Rick Santorum
could capitalize on his Iowa per-
formance and engage with a very
conservative electorate in South
Carolina. It is an evangelical elec-
torate, while Santorum is a devout
Catholic, but he shares the view of
most South Carolina Republicans
on the big social issues. Tis is
an area where Romney, who has
changed his mind several times
on the issue of the abortion, could
fnd it difcult to fend of attacks.
He will try to keep the focus on the
economy and President Obama.
Meanwhile, President Obama’s
advisers are watching closely and
it’s obvious from their negative ads
about Romney that they believe
he is the most dangerous and
most likely Republican to gain the
nomination. What they would
love to see is a bloody political
knife fght that drags through the
spring and fractures the Republi-
can party while Obama’s approval
ratings slowly improve and he
raises an amazing amount of
money. South Carolina may well
hold the answer: a Romney win
and the race is likely over, a win by
anyone else particularly Santorum
or Gingrich and the race moves to
delegate-rich and highly expensive
Florida.
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Politics
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We are now accepting applications for Fall 2011-2012 Pre-K program.
Did you know January is National
Glaucoma Awareness Month?
Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the eye’s optic nerve
and result in vision loss and blindness. Glaucoma occurs when the nor-
mal fuid pressure inside the eyes slowly rises. However, recent fndings
now show that glaucoma can occur with normal eye pressure. With early
detection and timely treatment, you can often protect your eyes against
serious vision loss. Your eyes are an important part of your health. You
can do many things to keep them healthy and make sure you’re seeing
your best. Please share the following simple guidelines for maintaining
healthy eyes well into their golden years:
• Have a comprehensive dilated eye exam. You might think your vision is
fne or that your eyes are healthy, but visiting your eye care professional for
a comprehensive dilated eye exam is the only way to really be sure. Regular
eye exams are important for good eye health as well as overall health. A
comprehensive dilated eye exam is a painless procedure in which an eye
care professional examines the eyes to look for common vision problems
and eye diseases, many of which have no early warning signs.
• Know your family’s eye health history. Talk to your family members
about their eye health history. It’s important to know if anyone has been
diagnosed with an eye disease or condition, since many are hereditary.
• Eat right to protect your sight. You’ve heard that carrots are good
for your eyes. But eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables—particularly
dark leafy greens, such as spinach, kale, or collard greens—is important
for keeping your eyes healthy, too.
• Quit smoking or never start.
• Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight or obese increases your
risk of developing diabetes and other systemic conditions, which can
lead to vision loss, such as diabetic eye disease or glaucoma (Diabetic eye
disease refers to various eye problems that may occur as a complication
of diabetes, including diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataract. Tese
conditions can lead to vision loss and blindness).
• Wear protective eyewear. Wear protective eyewear when playing
sports or doing activities around the home.
• Give your eyes a rest. If you spend a lot of time at the computer or
focusing on any one thing, you sometimes forget to blink and your eyes
can get fatigued. Try the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, look away
about 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds. Tis short exercise can help
reduce eyestrain.
• Practice workplace eye safety. Employers are required to provide a
safe work environment. When protective eyewear is required as a part of
your job, make a habit of wearing the appropriate type at all times, and
encourage your coworkers to do the same.
Page 10 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
Sports
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Frederick County Public Schools to
survey parents on grading scales
A committee of parents, teachers and administrators that has been
studying grading scales will be asking the parents of Frederick County
Public Schools’ students to complete a brief online survey concerning
grading scales between January 9 and 18. Te committee has been
studying the possibility of changing the school division’s current grad-
ing scale to a 10-point grading scale. Frederick County Public Schools
current grading scale is 94-100=A, 87-93=B, 77-86=C, 68-76=D and 67
or below=F. A 10-point grading scale is 90-100=A, 80-89=B, 70-79=C,
60-69=D and 59 or below=F.
Assistant Superintendent for Instruction Peter Vernimb says, “Tere
has been a great deal of discussion over the past few years about grading
scales. Te committee has been studying the issue for some time and is
now ready to collect feedback from parents through an online survey. Re-
gardless of the grading scale that’s recommended and ultimately approved
by the School Board, student grades will continue to refect the quality
of the work they produce. A student doing A-level work will continue
to receive A’s while a student doing C-level work will continue to receive
C’s whether the current grading scale is used or a change is made to a
10-point grading scale.”
Parents are encouraged to complete the brief grading scale survey
between January 9 and 18 by visiting http://bit.ly/tGe8rG. A link to
the survey also will be posted on the school division’s homepage (www.
frederick.k12.va.us). Parents who would like to complete a survey, but
do not have access to the Internet should contact their child’s school to
receive a copy. Vernimb says, “Te committee that’s studying the
issue will consider the information collected through the parent survey
and a survey that’s being made available to school staf before making a
report and possible recommendation to the School Board’s Instruction
Committee. If a grading scale change is recommended and approved by
the Board, it would take efect in the 2012-13 school year and only afect
those courses and grade levels in which students currently receive letter
grades.”
Robert E. Aylor Middle
School Receives VIP Award
Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell and the Vir-
ginia Board of Education today recognized Robert
E. Aylor Middle School for its academic excellence
as part of the Virginia Index of Performance (VIP)
program. Te VIP program was created by the Board
of Education in 2007. It recognizes schools and
school divisions for the achievement of excellence
goals established by the Governor and state Board
of Education. Only schools and school divisions that have met all state
and federal accountability requirements for two consecutive years are
eligible for VIP awards. Statewide, 447 schools and two school divisions
earned VIP awards this year.
Four awards are presented through the VIP program and are based
on student achievement during the previous academic year. Te awards
include: the Governor’s Award for Educational Excellence, the Board of
Education’s Excellence Award, the Board of Education’s Competence to
Excellence Award and the Board of Education’s Rising Star Award.
Robert E. Aylor Middle School was one of 171 schools earning the
2012 Board of Education’s Competence to Excellence Award for having
met all state and federal benchmarks for at least two consecutive years
and continuing to make progress toward the goals of the Governor and
Board of Education.
Frederick County Public Schools Superintendent David Sovine says,
“Te administrators, faculty and staf at Aylor should take great pride
in earning a VIP Award. Te team at Aylor has been successful due to
dedication, collaboration and willingness to work together with parents
and other members of the community to support student learning. Re-
ceiving the Competence to Excellence Award is a result of the hard work
and commitment to excellence exhibited by Aylor’s students, parents
and school staf.”
Schools earning the Board of Education’s Competence to Excellence
Award will receive a resolution of commendation from the state Board
of Education.
By Jonathan Lucci
Frederick County Report
Te playofs are here and Bal-
timore Ravens fans now know
who their beloved team will face.
Having earned a frst round bye
and homefeld advantage in the
frst round by winning the AFC
North division, the Ravens were
able to sit back and watch to see
who their opponent would be.
Te Houston Texans defeated the
Cincinnati Bengals and will visit
Baltimore in an attempt to get
the upset and head to the AFC
championship game. Don’t bet
on it.
Te Ravens take into the playof
game a smothering defense, as
usual led by veteran Ray Lewis.
Tey fnished the regular season
as the second best defense when
it came to stopping the run, and
the Texans ran the ball quite a
bit more than they passed it in
their winning efort against the
Bengals. Stopping the run is key,
as the Texans finished second
in the NFL in rushing yards but
possess a more mediocre passing
ofense.
Another key to the game will be
the play of Joe Flacco. Te Ravens
have often had great talent and
seemingly should have won a
Super Bowl in the past few years,
but always lacked the answer at
quarterback that other teams like
the Patriots and the Steelers pos-
sess. Joe Flacco is an exceptional
quarterback, without a doubt.
What is in dispute is whether
he can step up in the playofs,
something he has not necessarily
shown in the past, at least not in
the clutch way a Ben Roethlis-
berger or Aaron Rodgers have.
If he can’t the Ravens will fnd it
hard to beat the Texans, and even
more difcult to win a likely AFC
championship battle with the frst
seeded New England Patriots.
Te diference between a great
team and a championship team
in the modern NFL is very much
an elite quarterback.
For other residents of Frederick
County, those who wear the black
and gold of Pittsburgh, this was
a more depressing week as they
came to terms with the fact that
their Steelers dropped an expect-
ed victory in the wild-card to Tim
Tebow and the Denver Broncos.
The controversial Tebow, who
had an up and down season and
occasionally proved critics of
his throwing mechanics wrong,
led the Broncos to an overtime
win. And just as shocking as the
Steelers defeat is that they were
defeated in large part by the arm
of Tim Tebow, not considered
a strong passer. His intangible
abilities as a leader, however, are
unquestioned and the victory has
put people on notice that he is
certainly not going away.
January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 11 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Event listings
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
WednesdayJanuary11
10am - 12pm A Free and Informative
Linkedin Workshop with hands on com-
puter time to work on your Linkedin Profle!
Shenandoah University/ Halpin-Harrison
Hall Room 111, 1460 University Drive
Winchester, VA 22601 TODAY’S JOB SEEK-
ERS NEED TO NETWORK AND BE VISIBLE!
www.linkedin.com is a virtual goldmine of
opportunity to: Position Yourself and Be Vis-
ible in Today’s Job Market, Build Credibility
through Recommendations, Showcase
your Experience, Establish Viable Networks
and Join Industry Organizations SEATING
IS LIMITED AND RSVP’S ARE APPRECIATED!
Please reserve your seat by contacting:
Samantha Greenfeld, Virginia Employment
Commission (540) 722-3415 or samantha.
[email protected]
ThursdayJanuary12
2pm Professional resume writing. Profes-
sional Resume Writing - Hybrid resume:
Create a resume that best markets your
skills & accomplishments. Virginia Work-
force Connection 100 Premier Place Win-
chester, VA 22602 Phone: 540-722-3415
www.vawc.virginia.gov Offce Hours: Mon,
Tues, Thurs, Friday 8:30am-4:30pm / Wed
9:00am 4:30pm
FridayJanuary13
1:30pm-2:30pm Joint Meeting of Tech-
nical Review Committee/ SU Committee.
Millwood Avenue Design and Engineering
Project. Byrd Board Room, Henkel Hall,
Shenandoah University, 1460 University
Boulevard. Winchester, Virginia.
5:30pm - 8pm Italian Cuisine at Com-
mUnity dinnder. Come enjoy an evening
featuring a delicious, authentic Sicilian
meal and Chef Frank Bruisso’s entertaining
style. Choice of entrée - Chicken Piccata
or Eggplant Rollatini - roasted vegetables,
salad and dessert. Restaurant atmosphere.
$12 adult, $6 for children under 8. Unity
of the Shenandoah, 6460 Valley Pike, two
miles south of Stephens City. For more info
or to RSVP, contact us at 540-868-1903 or
[email protected]
SaturdayJanuary14
8am-4pm The Lord Fairfax EMS Council, a
regional non-proft organization, will offer a
BLS CPR instructor course. The cost of the
course is $350. and includes the textbooks
and all materials. Successful participants
will be able to teach the American Heart As-
sociation Healthcare Provider CPR course,
Heartsaver CPR/First Aid/AED, & Friends
& Family. Registrations are now being
accepted at the Council’s website: www.
lfems.vaems.org. For more information
about this class, contact 540/665-0014.
Monday January 16
6pm - 7: 45pm Mi cr osof t Excel
Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Road, Ste-
phens City. The library is offering free com-
puter workshops at Bowman and Handley
libraries. Check the Handley Regional Li-
brary website events calendar for changes
- www.handleyregional.org. Classes are
free and open to the public, but limited
to six participants. Get your reservations
early by calling the library where the class
is offered. 540-869-9000, ext. 203
6:30pm-9:30pm The Apple Capital Cho-
rus will be performing every Monday in Jan.
at the First United Methodist Church, 309
Braddock St., Winchester. They are a Bar-
ber Shop Chorus, also members of National
Harmony Society of America and will be
singing traditional songs. Also available
for parties, performances or events. For
more info call: Bill 540-335-1565 or Casey
540-247-2946
TuesdayJanuary17
7:30am The Rotary Club of Frederick
County will meet Tuesday morning at
Shenandoah University in the Clement
Board Room - Allen Dining Hall. Club
members, invited guests and visiting Ro-
tarians are welcome. Three club members
will discuss their vocations as part of a
year-long career and vocational program.
For more information contact Stephen M.
Gyurisin at 540-336-7357 or [email protected]
advanceplanningassociates.com
4pm - 8pm The Original Third Tuesdays
Business Networking Social will be held
every Third Tuesday of the month at
Piccadilly’s Public House, 125 E Piccadilly
St. This is a great opportunity to meet and
socialize with other businesses the event
average 65 business persons. Everyone
in the region is invited to attend, bring
a business card; there is no cost and
complimentary appetizers. Contact 540-
722-8700 for questions or visit http://orig-
inalthirdtuesday.eventbrite.com/
SaturdayJanuary21
1pm - 2pm A Veramar Wine Education
Experience. Learn the art of wine tast-
ing and how to get more out of each sip!
Swirl, smell, sip and savor! Homework was
never this much fun! $20/person includes
the class and wine tasting. Limited space
is available, so call early to reserve your
spot! Class begins at 1 pm and will last
approximately 1 hour. Cost: $20 Per Person
for Information: (540) 955-5510 Veramar
Vineyard, 905 Quarry Rd. Berryville, VA
10am-4pm Shenandoah Valley Heritage
Day: Connecting with your Wartime ances-
tors. Tap into your family history at this
FREE event! Presented by the MSV and the
Shenandoah Valley Genealogical Society
(SVGS), the day will include four presenta-
tions from research experts and a display of
tables hosted by genealogical and histori-
cal societies and research organizations. In
the day’s lectures, collector Chris Ferguson
will discuss how to use military ephemera
to learn about your ancestor; professional
genealogist and proprietor of Virginia An-
cestry Victor Dunn, CG, will explain how to
conduct research using Confederate civil-
ian records; Certifed Genealogist Barbara
Vines-Little will talk about researching
women who lived during the Civil War; and
Connie Potter, archivist from the National
Archives in Washington, DC, will share her
expertise and discuss researching Civil
War ancestors with Union connections. A
schedule of lecture times and a listing of
research organizations scheduled to attend
the event will be posted on the MSV web-
site by early December. Please arrive early
as lecture seating is limited.Admission:
Heritage Day activities are free. Regular
admission rates apply for gallery tours.
Snow date: Saturday, January 28, 2012.
Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 901
Amherst Street, Winchester VA
SundayJanuary22
6:30pmStephens City Mennonite Church
will host the Eastern Mennonite University
Chamber Choir for a concert on Sunday
evening, January 22 at 6:00pm. The church
is located at 5540 Valley Pike, Route 11,
Stephens City, 1/2 mile south of the traf-
fc light.
MondayJanuary23
12pm Exchange Club of Winchester will
meet at the Best Western/Lee-Jackson
Banquet Room, Winchester. Guest speaker
is Ken Falke, Founder and Chairman of
the Boulder Crest Retreat for Wounded
Warriors and Shoulder 2 Shoulder, Inc., a
for-proft, socially responsible company
dedicated to multi-media solutions for
wounded warriors and their families, and
the Founder and Chairman of the Wounded
EOD Warrior Foundation. Contact Jeanne
Hoffman 540-533-0100.
6:30pm-9:30pm The Apple Capital Cho-
rus will be performing every Monday in Jan.
at the First United Methodist Church, 309
Braddock St., Winchester. They are a Bar-
ber Shop Chorus, also members of National
Harmony Society of America and will be
singing traditional songs. Also available
for parties, performances or events. For
more info call: Bill 540-335-1565 or Casey
540-247-2946
TuesdayJanuary24
7:30am The Rotary Club of Frederick
County will meet Tuesday morning at
Shenandoah University in the Clement
Board Room - Allen Dining Hall. Club
member Liv Heggoy will outline her GSE
experience. Invited guests, club members
and visiting Rotarians are welcome. For
more information about this program or
the Rotary Club contact Stephen M. Gy-
urisin at 540-336-7357 or [email protected]
advanceplanningassociates.com
6pm & 7:30pm Millbrook High School
“We Can Make a Difference Food Drive.”
Millbook High School is hosting a food
drive during their girls’ and boys’ basket-
ball double-header against Handley High
School. All fans who bring a canned or
non-perishable food item to the game will
receive a voucher for free popcorn from
the concession stand. All donations go to
the Highland Avenue Presbyterian Church
Food Bank.
WednesdayJanuary28
10am-6pm Experience Emotional Free-
dom, It’s Your Birthright! This powerful
two day event offers you opportunity’s
to discover the blocks and change the
Mindset that has limited your Success
in many areas of your Life to include:
Relationships, Spiritual Growth, Prosperity,
Career, Business, Money and much-much
more! Where: New Leaf, 2404 Valley Ave.,
Winchester VA. Your investment $150.00
if enrolled in advance and by Friday,
January 13th, $200.00 after January 13th.
For additional information contact Kelly
Peacock, Life Coach (540) 722-0020 (also
January 29th)
8pm - 10pm Community Art Forum at
Expresso Bar & Cafe, 165 N. Loudoun St.
Winchester VA. A free exchange of art and
ideas, the Community Art Forum’s aim is
to dismantle the barrier between audience
and performer. Before and after each
performance, there is an open discussion
of the piece amongst whomever cares to
voice an opinion. Join like-minded indi-
viduals for a community-wide celebration
of art sharing!
MondayJanuary30
6:30pm-9:30pm The Apple Capital Cho-
rus will be performing every Monday in Jan.
at the First United Methodist Church, 309
Braddock St., Winchester. They are a Bar-
ber Shop Chorus, also members of National
Harmony Society of America and will be
singing traditional songs. Also available
for parties, performances or events. For
more info call: Bill 540-335-1565 or Casey
540-247-2946
TuesdayJanuary31
7:30am The Rotary Club of Frederick
County will meet Tuesday morning at
Shenandoah University in the Clement
Board Room - Allen Dining Hall. Club mem-
bers, invited guests and visiting Rotarians
are welcome. Rotarian Walter Hughes
of the Rotary Club of Rocky Mount will
talk about his experience eradicating the
Guinea Worm in several countries in Africa.
For more information contact Stephen M.
Gyurisin at 540-336-7357 or [email protected]
advanceplanningassociates.com
WednesdayFebruary1
12pm Clarke County Library in Berryville,
Virginia, a member of Handley Regional Li-
brary, is planning to hold book discussions
once a month at the Barns of Rose Hill, also
in Berryville. The programs will be held
every frst Wednesday at 12 noon with the
goals of bringing the community together
and enriching it. Laurine Kennedy, library
branch manager, urges adult residents
to bring their lunch and enjoy an hour of
fun and learning. The program leader will
feature a different book, topic, or writer for
each month. Go to handleyregional.org or
call 540-955-5144 to fnd out the theme
each month.
TuesdayFebruary7
4:30pm-5:30pm “Little Lions” work ses-
sion. We teach children and parents the
skills necessary to succeed in kindergarten.
We sharpen large and small motor skills,
teach letter, number and shape recognition
through stories, music, crafts and snacks.
We meet October - May at Middletown El-
ementary school. We encourage parents to
work with their children with a take home
package. Any questions please call Marge
Davis, president 869-4809 or Jean Turner,
sec./treas. 868-8516
TuesdayFebruary21
4pm - 8pm The Original Third Tuesdays
Business Networking Social will be held
every Third Tuesday of the month at
Piccadilly’s Public House, 125 E Piccadilly
St. This is a great opportunity to meet and
socialize with other businesses. The event
average 65 business persons. Everyone
in the region is invited to attend, bring
a business card; there is no cost and
complimentary appetizers. Contact 540-
722-8700 for questions or visit http://orig-
inalthirdtuesday.eventbrite.com/
ThursdayFebruary23
6pm-7pm “Little Lions” work session.
We teach children and parents the skills
necessary to succeed in kindergarten.
We sharpen large and small motor skills,
teach letter, number and shape recognition
through stories, music, crafts and snacks.
We meet October - May at Middletown El-
ementary school. We encourage parents to
work with their children with a take home
package. Any questions please call Marge
Davis, president 869-4809 or Jean Turner,
sec./treas. 868-8516
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Spay Today, a local reduced -cost spay
and neuter program offers NEW locations
in Cumberland, MD, Moorefeld and Pe-
tersburg, WV and Culpeper, VA! For more
info and MORE vets, please contact: www.
baacs.org or 304-728-8330. Gift vouch-
ers are available!
Serta Queen Si ze
Mattress & Boxspri ngs
ONLY $150!
Cal l 540-409-5268
New In
Plastic!
5199 John Marshall Hwy., Strasburg, VA
www.woodbinefarmmarket.com
540-465-2729
FARMING SINCE 1898
FRESH FROM THE GROUND UP
W
O
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D
B
IN
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M
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E
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Page 12 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Diversions
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 13 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Diversions
To advertise, please contact:
Angie Buterakos: [email protected] or 540-683-9197
Alison Duvall: [email protected] or 540-551-2072
During this election season, it might be
good to keep in mind the following sage
observation, made beloved humorist Will
Rogers: “Te American people are gener-
ous and will forgive almost any weakness
with the exception of stupidity.”
•••
Mountain goats aren’t actually goats;
they’re antelopes.
•••
Tose who study such things say that a
mosquito faps its wings 1,000 times every
second.
•••
If you’ve ever been to London -- or if
you’ve seen a movie that was set there
-- you might remember the iconic black
taxicabs that are ubiquitous in that city;
the high roofs set them apart from other
vehicles on the streets. The headroom
ofered did once serve a purpose. When
the cars were originally designed, top hats
were still de rigueur for a properly dressed
gentleman, and the high roofs allowed
a man so attired to enter and leave the
vehicle without knocking of his hat.
•••
You might be surprised to learn that
some ants can live more than 15 years.
•••
Yes, there’s a name for it. Te next time
you’re opening a bottle of wine, take a
moment to consider the spiral part that
is inserted into the cork: It’s known as a
worm.
•••
Washington is the only U.S. state named
for a president.
•••
Celebrated 19th-century French poet
Arthur Rimbaud wrote for only a few short
years in his late teens. Despite critical suc-
cess, he gave up writing when he was 20
years old and spent the rest of his life as a
soldier and a merchant.
•••
In medieval Japan, dentists removed
patients’ teeth with their bare hands.
•••
Thought for the Day: “Television news
is like a lightning fash. It makes a loud
noise, lights up everything around it, leaves
everything else in darkness and then is sud-
denly gone.” -- Hodding Carter
(c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.
By Samantha Weaver
Avoiding Hospital Readmissions
Question: What’s worse than being
admitted to the hospital? Answer: Being
readmitted quickly after being released.
Far too often, just when we’re out of the
hospital, something happens and we’re
right back where we started.
It’s expensive, and those who study
these things have looked at the reasons
for frequent hospital readmissions.
Here are some of the statistics from
the Center for Studying Health System
Change:
--About 8 percent of adults go back
into the hospital within a month, and
one-third within a year.
--One-third of us don’t see a doctor,
nurse or anyone else within a month of
being released from the hospital. After
90 days, 17 percent of us still haven’t
seen a doctor.
--Tose of us who don’t see a doctor
are at a higher risk for going back into the
hospital, especially those who also have
other medical conditions. Te sicker the
patient, the higher the rate of return.
It doesn’t matter what kind of insur-
ance we have.
Researchers say new ways must be
found to bridge the gap between the
doctors and hospitals. At this point, even
where there are programs and coordina-
tors to manage the discharge process, it
hasn’t changed the rate of readmissions.
Tere’s one additional, potentially seri-
ous glitch: One-third of doctors did not
have the fnal hospital report on patients
who did come in. And if they did have
them, the reports were incomplete, and
new medications might not be listed.
Here’s a suggestion to keep from being
readmitted: When you leave the hospital,
make a nurse write down your prescrip-
tions and instructions for aftercare. Te
minute you get home, call your doctor.
Make the earliest appointment possible,
and take your instructions.
Matilda Charles regrets that she
cannot personally answer reader ques-
tions, but will incorporate them into her
column whenever possible. Write to her
in care of King Features Weekly Service,
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-
6475, or send e-mail to [email protected]
gmail.com.
Top 10 Pop Singles
This Week Last Week
1. LMFAO.............................. No. 2
“Sexy and I Know It” (Party Rock/
will.i.am/Cherrytree)
2. Rihanna feat.
Calvin Harris......................... No. 1
“We Found Love” (SRP/Def Jam)
3. Katy Perry.......................... No. 5
“The One That Got Away” (Capitol)
4. Bruno Mars........................ No. 3
“It Will Rain”..(Summit/Chop
Shop/Elektra)
5. Jay Z Kanye West.............. No. 6
“Ni—as in Paris” (Roc-A-Fella/
Roc Nation/Def Jam)
6. Flo Rida.............................. No. 4
“Good Feeling” (PoeBoy)
7. Adele................................. No. 13
“Set Fire to the Rain” (XL)
8. Adele................................... No. 7
“Someone Like You” (XL)
9. LMFAO feat. Lauren
Bennett and GoonRock....... No. 13
“Party Rock Anthem” (Party Rock/
will.i.am/Cherrytree)
10. Big Sean
feat. Nicki Minaj.................. No. 12
“Dance (A$$)” (G.O.O.D./Def Jam)
Top 10 Albums
1. Michael Buble.................... No. 1
“Christmas” (143/Reprise)
2. Adele................................... No. 3
“21” (XL/Columbia)
3. Young Jeezy................. new entry
“TM:103 Hustlerz Ambition”
(CTE/Def Jam)
4. Justin Bieber...................... No. 3
“Under the Mistletoe” (SchoolBoy/
Raymond/Braun/Island)
5. Drake.................................. No. 7
“Take Care” (Young Money/
Cash Money)
6. Lady Antebellum............... No. 5
“Own the Night”
(Capitol Nashville)
7. Rihanna............................ No. 13
“Talk That Talk” (SRP/Def Jam)
8. Nickelback.......................... No. 6
“Here and Now” (Roadrunner)
9. The Black Keys.................. No. 4
“El Camino” (Nonesuch)
10. Various Artists............... No. 11
“NOW 40” (Universal/EMI/
Sony Music)
Top 10 Hot Country Singles
1. Zac Brown Band................ No. 1
“Keep Me in Mind”
(Southern Ground/Atlantic)
2. Jason Aldean...................... No. 2
“Tattoos On This Town”
(Broken Bow)
3. Rascal Flatts feat.
Natasha Bedingfield.............. No. 3
“Easy” (Big Machine)
4. David Nail........................... No. 4
“Let It Rain” (MCA Nashville)
5. Eric Church........................ No. 6
“Drink In My Hand”
(EMI Nashville)
6. Luke Bryan........................ No. 5
“I Don’t Want This Night to End”
(Capitol Nashville)
7. Chris Young........................ No. 8
“You” (RCA)
8. Lady Antebellum............... No. 7
“We Owned the Night”
(Capitol Nashville)
9. The Band Perry................. No. 9
“All Your Life”
(Republic Nashville)
10. Kenny Chesney.............. No. 10
“Reality” (BNA)
© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
Young Jeezy
—28—
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© 2012
Page 14 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
AUCTIONS
REAL ESTATE
AUTOS
WEDNESDAYJAN.11
SHERLOCKHOLMES:AGAMEOFSHADOWS
11:50a 2:50p 6:40p 10:10p
MISSION:IMPOSSIBLE-GHOSTPROTOCOL
Noon 3:10p 6:30p 9:20p
WEBOUGHTAZOO
12:10p 3:15p 6:20p 8:30p
ALVINANDTHECHIPMUNKS:CHIP-WRECKED
12:20p 4:20p 6:00p 9:30p
THEGIRLWITHTHEDRAGONTATTOO
12:30p 3:20p 7:00p 8:50p
THEADVENTURESOFTINTIN
12:40p 3:30p 6:10p 10:20p
WARHORSE
12:50p 3:00p 4:10p 6:50p 9:40p
MIDNIGHTINPARIS
1:00p 7:40p
THEDARKESTHOUR2D
10:15p
THURSDAYJAN.12
SHERLOCKHOLMES:AGAMEOFSHADOWS
11:50a 2:50p 6:40p 8:30p
MISSION:IMPOSSIBLE-GHOSTPROTOCOL
Noon 3:10p 6:30p 9:20p
WEBOUGHTAZOO
12:10p 3:15p 6:20p 9:50p
THEGIRLWITHTHEDRAGONTATTOO
12:20p 3:20p 7:00p 8:50p
ALVINANDTHECHIPMUNKS:CHIP-WRECKED
12:30p 4:20p 6:00p 9:30p
THEADVENTURESOFTINTIN
12:40p 3:30p 6:10p 10:10p
WARHORSE
12:50p 3:00p 3:50p 6:50p 9:40p
MIDNIGHTINPARIS
1:00p
GirlieNight:SIXTEENCANDLES
7:20p
THEDARKESTHOUR2D
10:30p
FRIDAYJAN.13
WARHORSE
11:50a 2:50p 6:40p 9:30p
WEBOUGHTAZOO
11:55a 3:10p 6:30p 9:50p
JOYFULNOISE
Noon 3:20p 6:20p 10:20p
ALVINANDTHECHIPMUNKS:CHIP-WRECKED
12:05p 4:30p 6:00p
SHERLOCKHOLMES:AGAMEOFSHADOWS
12:10p 3:30p 6:50p 10:05p
CONTRABAND
12:30p 3:35p 6:40p 9:40p
THEGIRLWITHTHEDRAGONTATTOO
12:45p 8:35p 10:30p
BEAUTYANDTHEBEAST2D
12:50p
BEAUTYANDTHEBEAST3D
3:25p 6:10p 8:50p
MISSION:IMPOSSIBLE-GHOSTPROTOCOL
2:40p 7:10p 11:10p
ALAMO Winchester181 Kernstown Commons Blvd.
General Info: (540) 313-4060 Showtime Info: (540) 313-4060
www.drafthouse.com/winchester
DONATE YOUR VEHICLE RECEIVE
$1000 GROCERY COUPON UNITED
BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION. Free
Mammograms, Breast Cancer Info www.
ubcf.info FREE Towing, Tax Deductible,
Non-Runners Accepted, 888-444-8251
—32—
Pez Dispenser
Q:
I have a Pez dispenser of Walt
Disney’s “Goofy.” I pur-
chased it during the 1970s and now
would like to sell it — if the price is
right. — Bill, Palm Coast, Fla.
A:
Your Pez dispenser came in
two designs, one with ears that
moved, the other with the ears fixed.
The swinging ears model generally
sells for about $30, the other $15 to
$20.
***
Q:
I have a set of dishes, ser-
vice for six, acquired during
the 1950s. Each piece was avail-
able in boxes of Duz soap powder.
They are identified as being the
“Golden Wheat” pattern, and each
is trimmed in 22k gold. Are they
worth anything with the gold trim?
— Donna, Lyons, N.Y.
A:
The gold trim contains such a
small amount of the precious
metal that it doesn’t add much to the
value. Dishes were popular premiums
throughout the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s
and often were found in the contain-
ers of oats, cereals and other popu-
lar kitchen products. “Dish Nights”
at movie theaters also were popular.
Between features, lucky ticket hold-
ers won dishes and other prizes.
***
Q:
My family owned and oper-
ated a service station in
New Mexico during the 1940s.
While clearing out a storage locker
recently, I found a small collection
of gas-station memorabilia, includ-
ing vintage oil cans, road maps and
several interesting old signs. How
can I determine if they are worth
keeping? — Carl, Rio Rancho, NM
A:
One of the better references is
“Warman’s Gas Station Col-
lectibles: Identification and Price
Guides” by Mark F. Moran (Krause,
$24.99). Moran’s guide features
more than 1,800 illustrations in full-
color of gas-station cans, bottles,
signs, pumps, globes and other relat-
ed items, in addition to current retail
prices. This is a fun book that should
be helpful.
***
Q:
I have a metal ricer and press
that was used by my mother
during the 1930s. It still has the
wooden piece that was used to pro-
cess or liquefy solid foods, and the
original stand. What is it worth?
— Betty, Sun City, Ariz.
A:
Your press with stand and
wooden wedging element is
valued in the $15 to $20 range.
Write to Larry Cox in care of King
Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box
536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475, or
send e-mail to [email protected]
com. Due to the large volume of mail
he receives, Mr. Cox is unable to per-
sonally answer all reader questions.
Do not send any materials requiring
return mail.
© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
Animal Advocates
DEAR PAW’S CORNER: I
recently read on your website about
a North Carolina county board
that wanted to disallow adoptions
of certain dog breeds from its shel-
ter. The proposal was defeated
thanks to a huge public outcry, but
what about other rulings that don’t
get as much publicity? How do we
find out about them, and how can
we get enough public support to
stop unfair pet laws? — Jane in
Missouri
DEAR JANE: It’s great that you’re
concerned and want to be more active
in the area of pet legislation. The
North Carolina case was a classic
example of legislators (or in this case,
a county board) proposing pet laws
based upon popular but often inaccu-
rate information, particularly about
“bully breeds” (pit bulls, Doberman
pinschers, etc). The county board
shelved its proposal after receiving
tens of thousands of emails and fac-
ing a packed house of dog owners,
rescuers and other advocates at its
board meeting.
Getting started can be as simple as
an Internet search. Major organiza-
tions such as the Humane Society of
the United States, the SPCA (Soci-
ety for the Prevention of Cruelty to
Animals) and growing organizations
like the No-Kill Advocacy Center are
good websites to start with. You often
can find local chapters or local advo-
cacy organizations through larger
nonprofits’ websites.
Facing down local legislators is
just one facet of animal advocacy.
If you want to learn more about pro-
tecting pets, pick up “Defending the
Defenseless: A Guide to Protecting
and Advocating for Pets,” by Allie
Phillips (Rowman and Littlefield).
Phillips is an attorney and animal-
rights advocate, and her book is
packed with information on ways
you can become more active.
Send your questions or tips to [email protected]
pawscorner.com, or write to Paw’s
Corner, c/o King Features Weekly
Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475. For more pet care-
related advice and information, visit
www.pawscorner.com.
© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
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BUSINESS
COKE & M&M VENDING ROUTES
AVAILABLE! Big $$ Locations. 100%
Financing. Do You Earn $2K/Wk?
1-800-367-2106 ext. 6039
EDUCATION
ALLIED HEALTH career training – Attend
college 100% online. Job placement as-
sistance. Computer available. Financial
Aid if qualifed. SCHEV certifed. Call
800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
Medical • Business • Paralegal • Criminal
Justice. Job placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if qualifed.
SCHEV certifed. Call 888-354-9917 www.
CenturaOnline.com
MISC.
AIRLINES ARE HIRING – Train for high
paying Aviation Career. FAA approved. Fi-
nancial aid if qualifed – Job placement as-
sistance. SCHEV certifed. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance 888-245-9553
HOME FIRE DAMAGE? Our 30 years in-
surance/building experience can get you
back home FAST! FREE REVIEW. Even
Earn Referral $$. Call 1-800-211-5660 or
email [email protected]
HELP WANTED
23 ACRES of tall hardwood forest on
Bank Mtn. in Amherst Co. Magnifcent
view, total privacy, bold stream, lots of
critters. $129,900. I’ll fnance. 434-
444-5088.
DRIVER CDL TRAINING – CLASS
“A” or CLASS “B.” Local or O-T-R Job
Placement Assistance. Guaranteed Fi-
nancing Available. $38-45K 1st Year.
CDS Tractor Trailer Training 1-800-
646-2374
Wood/ Metal Working Shop Liquidation
Sale…Lathes, Mills, Planers, Joiners,
Saws…Loads of Misc. Friday October
28th.12-5 PM… 3809 Seminary Ave-
nue, Richmond 23227 For Details www.
dempseyandco.com 804-355-1619
Herbalife Independant Distributor. Se
vende producto de Herbalife. Free
wellness evaluation & product sample.
Zumba 3 days/week.
Call: Elena 540-327-3359
Nicole 540-247-4818
www.shopherbalife.com/nicolefondrk
www.sutiendaherbalife.com/nicolefon-
drk
Earn $500-$2500 per month, training
provided and paid vacations. Call
Nicole : 540-247-4818
Juan : 540-550-8268
www.earnincomenow.com/nicolefondrk
www.puraganancia.com/nicolefondrk
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home.
*Medical *Business *Paralegal *Criminal
Justice. Job placement assistance. Com-
puter available. Financial Aid if qualifed.
SCHEV certifed. Call 888-354-9917 www.
CenturaOnline.com
Satellite Technicians Needed through-
out VA for large & growing Dish network
subcontractor. No Experience Neces-
sary! Background & drug screening.
Independent Contractor. Weekly op-
portunity of $750 to $1500. www.caotti.
net for information. Call 864-852-0533
Traveling Field Analyst-Richmond, VA-
Field Analysts completes feld audits
of products. Travels all over the re-
gion. See job description and apply at:
https://www.inmar.com/Pages/About_
Us/Careers.aspx
Seeking licensed Life & Health Agents
to market voluntary employee benefts
programs to employers for COLONIAL
LIFE. Non-licensed applicants consid-
ered. Contact Rob Fiacco, 804-346-
1375 or [email protected]
Medical Billing Trainees Needed! Train to
become a Certifed Medical Offce Profes-
sional at Career Technical Institute. No Ex-
perience Needed! HS Diploma or GED &
Computer needed to qualify.
1-888-424-9419
Pet of the Week
The SPCA is open Monday thru Friday 10-5 Saturday 10-4
Sunday 12-5. 115 Featherbed Lane, Winchester • 662-8616.
The SPCA accepts donations for the following items, donations can also
be made at Newtown Antiques & Pawn 375 Fairfax Pike Stephens City:
Cat Litter • Kitten, puppy food • Cat and dog food • Toys • Rawhides
• Dog treats • Sheets • Towels • Blankets • Bleach • Pine-Sol • Liquid
dish and laundry detergent • Large trash bags
Smokey
Smokey may look like a pirate with
his ear notched and his gimpy eye (it
never opened correctly at birth) but
he is nothing like one. He is very lovey
and talkative. He loves to get attention
and would love to find a forever home
to give him some. ID 56925
Riley
Riley is a 2 year old unaltered female
JRT mix. She is very energetic and
loves to play. She loves other dogs and
people of all ages. She has not really
been around cats so we don’t know if
she likes them or not. She is timid at
first but once she gets to know you she
is very affectionate. ID 57739
Advertise your auction
here for FREE!
[email protected]
Petfinder.com
MULTI-FAMILY land zoned for 75 apts.
All utilities, 200 yards to major artery,
3 miles to nationally-ranked hospital,
I-81 & I-64. $795,000. 540-294-2007.
MAGNIFICENT ANTEBELLUM MAN-
SION on 292 unspoiled acres. South-
ern Albemarle Co. Historic landmark,
impeccably restored. Great spot for
vineyard. $4,595,000. Natt Hall,
Valley Real Estate Brokers, 434-242-
9893
January 11 – 17, 2012 • Frederick County Report • Page 15 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
Advertiseyourclassifedfor4weeks
4 FREE!
(For Sale, Automobiles, Wanted, etc.)
cl assi f i [email protected] redcoreport . com
FOR SALE
For Sale - Red Chickens, Hens &
Roosters, yearlings.
$10 ea. Call 540-635-1956 (11/16)
FOR RENT
1969 Mercedes Benz 280S
staight-6 Recent Tune- Up. New
radiator, brakes and 2 new car-
burator. AC works great. Under
100,000 original miles. Runs
Good. Only $4000.00 OBO. 540-
869-3521 or 540-303-8275 (7/13)
Bull and commercial heifer sale. An-
gus polled herefords, balancers, gel-
bviehs, black baldies. Friday, Decem-
ber 2 @ noon. Knoll Crest Farm. Red
House, VA 434-376-3567 (11/22)
ATTENTION Diabetics with Medicare
Join America`s Diabetic Savings Club
and receive a FREE diabetic bracelet.
Membership is FREE. Qualify for meter
upgrades, prescription delivery and free
giveaways. Call 1-888-847-7064
FOR SALE
FURNITURE
2 Refurbished Dell Latitude and
Inspiron Laptops. Windows XP,
512MB. In very good condition other
than some minor scratches on top
cover. $100 and up.
Call 540-514-1412 for details. (10/13)
MISC.
3 Childcare Cots with Mattresses $10
ea. - 2 Adult Aluminum/Canvas Army
Cots $15 ea. - Blazing Rails Power
Train Set (NEW, 45x36 Track) w/Tun-
nel & Accessories $20 - 1990 Fleer
(Packaged) Premiere Edition Football
Cards $15 box - 1990 Fleer (Opened)
Football Error Set $10 box - Gallon
Size Bag of Collector Postage Stamps
(with Postmark) from 1950-1960’s
Best Offer. Call Sherry 540-869-2249
AUTOS
Parts for a 1989 Ford Ranger,
bought new, never used: E-coil
$80.00 and Evaporator $60.00 or
B.O. Call 540-683-9197 (7/20)
Fifth Wheel Camper Trailer -2006
Cruiser Model,28RL.2 Slides,10
Gal gas electric hot water heater,
upgrade insolation,15 K BTU, AC,
8 cu ft alloy wheels. Like New.
$19,995.Call 540-869-6686 (7/13)
2007 Ford Focus SES Black, 50K,
PW/PL/PM, Sunroof, Leather in-
terior, 30 MPG. $12,000 OBO.
Call 540-877-1217 (7/13)
2010 Toyota Corolla Sport. White,
16.8K, AUTO, sunroof, spoiler, trac.
ctrl., CD, 32 mpg!! Small scrape on
back bumper. $16,000 OBO.
Call 540-869-1076 (7/13)
2007 Pontiac Vibe, white, 62,300
miles, automatic, sunroof, 29/34
mpg. $12,500 OBO.
Call 540-869-3880. (7/27)
1st & second generation Camaro
parts Engines, Poweglide Transmis-
sions. Also, 1990 Nissan 240 Sx, 5
speed hatchback restored. $3850.00
Call 540-850-0864 (8/3)
Roommate needed. You would have
your own master bedroom on the
other end of the home. All utilities, fur-
niture, dishes, etc..provided in rent .
$760.00 a month. Security Deposit
$760.00. No pets and non smoker
Please call 540-622-6940 (1/10)
Only $275 buys a 25-word classi-
fed ad in 88 newspapers across
Virginia. Call Virginia Press Services
at 804-521-7571 to place your ad
in the STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED
AD NETWORK Multi-Week Special
–Place the same ad four consecu-
tive weeks and receive the ffth week
FREE!
Got a yard sale or garage sale coming up?
Post it here for FREE!
[email protected]
YARD SALES
Antique apple tree ladder, thought
to be of European origin; approx.15’
in height. $25 cash.
Call 540-868-2623 afternoons. (11/30)
Coffee table, slate top, hexagon-
shaped, with wooden base. Slate
top can be lifted off to access storage
area. 40” wide and 17 1/2” high. Ideal
for use with sectional sofas. Excellent
condition. $30. Call 540-364-9773 (8/16)
BBS alloy wheels with winter set of
tires $250. Sewing Machine, Free
Westinghouse, all metal electricm
circa 1960. Works! $50. Kohler 18
gauge stainless steel double sink
$100. Price Pfster Faucet $40.
Brick Pavers, 900 approx. U pick
up $85. Sunset Tripod, geared el-
evator, 3-way pan, tilt head $15.
Call 540-635-6947 (12/6)
Hooked On Phonics Learning Kit. $22.
Call 540-667-2031 (12/27)
Room mate wanted to share large
house in Fredericktowne (Stephens
City.) Split level, 3 bedrooms, living
rm, family rm, dining rm, kitchen, laun-
dry rm, 2 full baths, screen porch, out-
buildings, and garden. Will share one
bedroom which is the large master
bedroom to an individual for 580.00
with utilities and linen closet space
included. Cable TV, WIFI Internet,
Trash Service included in the utilities.
Pictures available via email. AFTER 6
PM 540-303-2808 (11/8)
Beautifully furnished, 1-BR apt.,
utilites uncluded, no pets, Front
Royal, call Mrs. Young for info.
540-635-3059 (11/1)
Ladies Gray leather Biker jacket size
10/12 - $25. White bookshelves, 3
units - $50. Elvis collectible white
ceramic decanter fgurine, 15” tall on
wooden base - $100 OBO
Call 540-450-8741 (11/1)
3 artifcial Christmas Trees - all in ex-
cellent condition, only slightly used.
12’ tall, snow-focked Pine, prelit with
clear lights - $250
9’ tall, Douglas Fir, very full, prelit with
clear lights - $150
7.5’ tall - Slimline Frasier Fir, prelit with
clear lights - $75
Call 540-858-3331 (11/8)
2929 Second Street Winchester. 3
bedroom home with 1 bath, living
room, kitchen w/appliances, CAC,
gas heat, unfnished basement.
$900 security deposit and $900
monthly. Credit Check - No Pets.
Call 540 868-1575 (11/16)
18 1/2 West Whitlock Winchester. 2
bedroom cottage, with 1 bath, laun-
dry room, nice kitchen, all applianc-
es, living room, CAC, gas heat.
$775 security deposit and $775
monthly. Credit Check - No Pets.
Call 540 868-1575 (11/16)
Black walnut kernals. Nice and
clean! $10/lb. Call 540-465-8066 (11/1)
Sony Digital Still Camera with MPE
Movie EX. Cyber Shot 5.0 MP.
Software Disk. Memory Stick 128
MB. AC Power Adaptor. Carl Zeiss
Vario-Sonnar Lens with 10X digital
zoom. Americo Classic Camera
Bag with storage pockets and car-
rying handle/strap. All equipment
and accessories are in excellent
condition/like new. $1000 value for
only $250 cash OBO. Call 540-287-
2997 afternoons/evenings. (11/16)
Sony 27” TV (not fat screen) w/orig-
inal remote. Excellent condition $30.
Call 540-622-2172 (11/1)
New Jeffco Salon Hair Dryer on
wheels, originally $135, asking $50.
Call 540-622-2652 (11/1)
FOR RENT
Commercial Space for Lease.
Prime Location in Historic Down-
town Strasburg. Pre-Civil War
Building with Period Restoration.
Log and Brick with Wide Plank
Floors. New 3 Zone Heat/Air. 4
Exterior Doors. 110 N. Massanut-
ten Street. Monthly Rent $1,500
Off-street parking available. Call
Wendy Connor (540)975-0390(11/16)
Large one bedroom newly reno-
vated. Wood plank foors; mountain
views. Enclosed porch, landscaped
yard, in town. $750 per month in-
cludes water/sewer, garbage & re-
cycle. Off-street parking available.
113 E. King Street, Apt. 1, Strasburg
Sue Golden (202) 302-9129 (11/16)
Large 2.5 bedroom with upgrades
New carpeting, three-sided moun-
tain views. Landscaped yard, in
town. $825/mo.Off-street parking
available. 113 E. King Street, Apt. 2
Strasburg. Call (202) 302-9129 (11/16)
Boys Clothes - Sweaters, Size 4 & 5
$2.00 each. Sweatshirts, Sizes 5,6,7
$1.00 each. Sports Pants & Sweat-
pants Sizes 5,6,7 $1.00 - $1.50 each.
Casual Dress pants, Size 5, Jeans,
Size 4 $2.00 each. Coat & Robe,
Size 5 $3.00 each. Boys Warm Pa-
jamas, Size 6,7,8 &10 $2.00 per pair.
All items are in excellent or very good
condition. Call 540-667-2031 (11/22)
Air Hockey Table - Very Good Con-
dition! Great Gift! $24.00
Call 540-678-1128 (11/22)
SeaScape Beach & Golf Villas. Kitty
Hawk, NC MP 2 1/2. 2 Bedrooms
(Sleeps 6), 2 Baths. April Week 16
$2,800. October Week 41, $2,800
Call 540-667-2031 (11/22)
Outer Banks Beach Club - Beach
Road. MP 9 Nagshead, NC. 2 Bed-
rooms, 2 Bath (Sleeps 6) Septem-
ber Week 38 $3,600.
Call 540-667-2031 (11/22)
Twin Bed. Exc. condition. Wood head
& foot boards w/ mattress & boxspring.
$400 OBO. Call 540-660-3292 (11/22)
Filbert Street, Stephens City,VA. 3
bedrooms, one bath, fenced back
yard, large kitchen/dining area,
stove, refrigerator. Electric heat.
NO PETS, Deposit/credit check re-
quired. $675/mo
Call 540-869-3571 (11/30)
FOR SALE
Tractor, Compact; Allis/Chalmers
(AC) 5015 Diesel 4WD. Turf & Liq-
uid-flled AG tires, bucket, recent
tire & hydraulics service. Used for
snow removal & bush hogging.
With manuals, some tune-up parts;
well maintained, runs good. $5500.
Gainesboro, VA.
Call John 540-88-4859 (12/6)
Compressa Infnity Burr coffee
grinder model #560. Like new. Used
only 1 month. $60 obo.
Call 540-662-2245 (12/6)
Twin bed. Cherry wood, good con-
dition. $75. High quality sofa, good
shape. $100. Stephens City area.
Call 703-434-1130 (12/13)
4 leather chairs $55 ea, blue sofa new
$290, mahogany dining room table,
2 new reupholstered chairs $30 ea,
farm table $50, large offce desk $250,
2 large copiers $200 ea, printer stand
$100, wedding gown size 8 vintage
red and white, wedding gown 25 years
old very vintage, full size bedroom set
with headboard/footboard, dresser,
mirror, chest, night stand, 2 lamps -
$550, antiques rocker and a desk with
chair. Call day or night. 540-686-5769
Front Royal VA location (1/10)
Livingston upright piano - FREE for
the taking. Call 540-868-0136 (12/20)
Vintage 1945 Mahogany Full bed-
room set w/headboard and bed rails.
Includes 5 drawer dress, vanity table
w/drawers and mahogany decor
mirror, vanity bench, and nightstand
$400, negotiable. Antique secretary
desk--also a steamer chest $200. Va-
riety of antique milk glass--must see!
Antique school desk from Pennsylva-
nia schoolhouse. All items located in
storage. Call or text 540-535-6948 for
appt. (12/20)
Three dorm refrigerators for sale:
three different sizes, $65-85.
Call 540-869-7977 (12/20)
Pit Bull puppies. 4 male and 4 fe-
male $75.00 each. Mother and fa-
ther are red nose.
Call 540-336-4435 (12/20)
Chestnut doll bed, 30” X 20” – a cut
down version of a real bed with quilt,
dust ruffe, mattress, small pillow and
would be a wonderful gift for that spe-
cial child: $500.00
Call 540-622-4448 (11/8)
50’s Schwinn bicycle. Needs tires
$100. Wicker baby stroller, old $100.
Radar Detector $35.00
Call 540-662-9023 (12/28)
Kiosk for sale. Sink and refrigerator
built in. Best offer. Salon mate nail
technician’s table. Black with mar-
ble top, used twice, $25. Stainless
steel 3 shelf rolling cart. Used in a
former Daily grind. Excellent condi-
tion. $200 or best offer.
Call 540-305-9664 (12/27)
1994 F150 Pickup truck for parts -
will sell whole or part out –new tires
and rest in good condition.
Call 540-333-1011 after 5pm (1/3)
ROOM MATE NEEDED: Private
Large Br., Bath, Kitchen, Living
Rm.
CALL 540-686-5832 (1/3)
Send us your classifeds!
[email protected]
Page 16 • Frederick County Report • January 11 – 17, 2012 Read all issues in their entirety FREE on www.FredCoReport.com
1. ENTERTAINERS: Which actor’s
birth name was Ramon Estevez?
2. MUSIC: What was the name of
Smokey Robinson’s group?
3. INVENTIONS: Who is credited
with inventing bifocal lenses?
4. PSYCHOLOGY: What irrational
fear is manifested in peniaphobia?
5. LITERATURE: In which of
Shakespeare’s plays does the charac-
ter Shylock appear?
6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Dur-
ing which war did Harry Truman fire
Gen. Douglas MacArthur?
7. HISTORY: When did Austra-
lia become a commonwealth nation,
largely gaining independence from
Britain?
8. ANATOMY: About how long are
the intestines in an adult male?
9. FAMOUS QUOTES: What
American psychologist/philosopher
once once said: “Act as if what you do
makes a difference. It does.”?
10. MEASUREMENTS: Which
month is named for the Roman festival
of ritual purification?
Answers
1. Martin Sheen
2. The Miracles
3. Ben Franklin
4. A fear of poverty
5. “The Merchant of Venice”
6. Korean
7. 1901
8. About 28 feet
9. William James
10. February (Februa)
© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
—12—
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1. Who is the San Diego Padres’ all-
time leader in career home runs?
2. How many times has a Texas
Ranger been named the A.L. Most
Valuable Player?
3. When was the last time before
the 2010 season that Green Bay and
Chicago faced off in an NFL playoff
game?
4. How many NCAA men’s basket-
ball championships have the UConn
Huskies won?
5. Name the first Eastern bloc play-
er to skate in the NHL.
6. Which was the last team before
the L.A. Galaxy in 2011 to win the
MLS Cup after being the No. 1 seed
entering the playoffs?
7. In 2011, thoroughbred Rapid
Redux won his 20th consecutive
race, topping the North American
record held by two horses. Name
either horse.
Answers
1. Nate Colbert, with 163.
2. Six — Jeff Burroughs (1974),
Juan Gonzalez (‘96, ‘98), Ivan Rodri-
guez (‘99), Alex Rodriguez (2003)
and Josh Hamilton (‘10).
3. It was 1941.
4. Three — 1999, 2004 and 2011.
5. Jaroslav Jirik, with St. Louis in
the 1969-70 season.
6. The Columbus Crew, in 2008.
7. Zenyatta and Peppers Pride.
© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
1. Who was born Robert Allen Zim-
merman? Name the first single he
wrote and released.
2. Led Zeppelin ran into a small snag
when the band flew into Singapore to
do a concert. What happened?
3. Name the singer-songwriter who
had a hit with “Crying.”
4. Which group released “Do You
Remember Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio?” and
when?
5. Name the album with these two
songs: “Being for the Benefit of Mr.
Kite!” and “Fixing a Hole.”
6. Which group released “Where the
Streets Have No Name” and when?
Answers
1. Zimmerman was Bob Dylan’s
birth name. His first single, “Mixed-
Up Confusion” backed with “Corrina,
Corrina,” was released in 1962.
2. Singapore officials wouldn’t let
them off the plane because of their
long hair. The concert, in 1972, was
canceled.
3. Roy Orbison, in 1961. He released
a duet with k.d. lang in 1987, but it’s
the original version that ranks No. 69
in Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs
of All Time.
4. The Ramones, in 1980. All mem-
bers of the group took on “Ramone”
as their last name, starting with Doug-
las Colvin, who became Dee Dee
Ramone.
5. The Beatles album “Sgt. Pepper’s
Lonely Hearts Club Band” in 1967.
6. U2, in 1987.
© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.
K
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