Imperial Engineering Degrees Biomedical

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Programme Specifications for the MEng degrees in

Aeronautics Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computing Electrical and Electronic Engineering Materials Mechanical Engineering Aeronautics Biomedical Engineering Computing Electrical and Electronic Engineering Materials Mechanical Engineering

BEng degrees in

PLEASE NOTE. This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if he/she takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. This specification provides a source of information for students and prospective students seeking an understanding of the nature of the programme and may be used by the College for review purposes and sent to external examiners. More detailed information on the learning outcomes, content and teaching, learning and assessment methods of each module can be found in the course handbook and/or on-line at For Aeronautics http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/aeronautics For Biomedical Engineering http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/bioengineering/ For Chemical Engineering http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/chemicalengineering/ For Civil Engineering http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/civilengineering/ For computing http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/computing/ For EEE http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/electricalengineering/ For Materials http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/materials/ For Mechanical Engineering http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering/ The accuracy of the information contained in this document is reviewed by the College and may be checked by the Quality Assurance Agency. 1. Awarding Institution: 2. Teaching Institution: Imperial College London Imperial College London

3. External Accreditation by Professional / Statutory Body: For Aeronautics: RAes and IMechE For Bioengineering: IET and IMechE For Chemical Engineering: IChemE For Civil Engineering: ICE/IStructE For Computing: IET/BCS zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ For Electrical and Electronic Engineering: IET For Materials: IOM3 For Mechanical Engineering: IMechE 4. Name of Final Award (BEng / BSc / MEng etc): MEng/ACGI BEng/ACGI

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5. Programme Title (e.g. Biochemistry with Management): Aeronautical Engineering/Aeronautical Engineering with a year abroad Biomedical Engineering/Biomedical Engineering with Electrical Engineering/Biomedical Engineering with Mechanical Engineering Chemical Engineering/Chemical Engineering with a year abroad/Chemical Engineering with Nuclear Engineering Civil Engineering Computing/Computing Computing (Computation in Biology and Medicine)/Computing (Games, Vision and Interaction)/Computing (Artificial Intelligence)/Computing (International Programme of Study)/Computing (Software Engineering) Electrical and Electronic Engineering/Information Systems Engineering/Electrical and Electronic Engineering/Electrical and Electronic Engineering with Management/Electrical and Electronic Engineering with a Year Abroad/Information Systems Engineering/ Information Systems Engineering with a Year Abroad BEng Materials Science and Engineering/BEng Materials Science and Engineering with Management/BEng Materials Science with a year abroad/MEng Materials Science and Engineering/MEng Aerospace Materials/MEng Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering/MEng Materials and Nuclear Engineering MEng Mechanical Engineering/MEng Mechanical Engineering (Total Technology)/MEng Mechanical Engineering with a Year Abroad/MEng Mechanical Engineering with Nuclear Engineering 6. Name of Department / Division: Aeronautics Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering and Chemical Technology Civil & Environmental Engineering Computing Electrical and Electronic Engineering Materials Mechanical Engineering Engineering

7. Name of Faculty:

8. UCAS Code (or other coding system if relevant): Aero Bioeng Computing Chem Eng Degrees Civ Eng Degree Electrical/Electronic Materials Mechanical Engineering H401/H410 BH81/BH9C/BH9C G400/G401/G430/GG47/G700/G402/G600/ H801/H802/H890 H201 H600/HG65 /H604 /H6N2 /H601 /GH56 /HG6M JF52/J5N2/JFM2/HJ45/BJ95/J5H8/J526/J5NF H301/H304

9. Relevant QAA Subject Benchmarking Group(s) and/or other external/internal reference zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ points (please select and list the QAA Subject Benchmark Statement(s) for your programme, where appropriate, which can be found at http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/benchmark/honours/ There may be other external /internal reference points that you may also wish to add here): http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/benchmark/statements/Engineering06.pdf 10. Level(s) of programme within the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ):

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Bachelor’s (BSc, BEng, MBBS) FOR ALL BEng Integrated Master’s (MSci, MEng) FOR ALL MEng

Level 6 Levels 6 and 7

11. Mode of Study (please indicate whether the programme is available full-time, part-time or both): Full-time 12. Language of Study: English 13. Date of production / revision of this programme specification (month/year): December/2009 14. Educational aims/objectives of the programme (when completing this section you may wish to indicate how the programme supports the College Mission Statement, Subject Benchmarks Statements (as listed above), FHEQ qualification level descriptors and the requirements of Accrediting or Statutory Bodies): We aim to provide a course that ranks as the top course in the UK and one of the best World-wide. This is done through an integrated programme of study wherein the specific engineering disciplines, are learnt from the first week of the first year; we strongly believe that this is the most appropriate approach to achieve our aim and as such we have no general engineering foundation. We also aim to graduate students of the highest quality, who will not only demonstrate technical and professional leadership in their fields, but who are adaptable and therefore well-suited to careers in both the industrial and service sectors. Our students must demonstrate both knowledge and skills and apply them to problems relevant to modern engineering practice in both general terms and in discipline-specific terms. Specifically, the programme aims are: • To provide students with a solid technical basis in all the key areas of the modern disciplinespecific Engineering profession through delivery of a coherent, coordinated and balanced degree course, integrating core engineering science with practical application • To enable students to acquire a mature appreciation of the context in which engineering projects are developed. • To develop in our students excellence in oral, written and graphical communication • To invest graduates with a fitness to enter professional practice and the capacity to have a beneficial impact upon it, whether in the industrial or service sectors generally or in the specific engineering discipline in particular. • To develop an understanding of the physical world and the use of mathematics to represent it • To develop the ability to make rational decisions • To develop clarity and style in professional communication • To develop skills of management, planning, organisaion and teamwork • To appreciate the conceptual and creative aspects of design; to develop the ability to incorporate concepts into the design of new products or processes • To develop an awareness of the place of the individual in business, society and the environment • To develop a commitment to the public interest • To inculcate an understanding of professional behaviour • To develop the intellectual capacity and breadth of vision to remain a learner for life

15. Programme Learning Outcomes (please list the programme learning outcomes under the headings that follow. Please also list the teaching/learning methods and strategies used to promote the programme learning outcomes. Module learning outcomes can be listed within Module Handbooks and are not required for this section): Institutions have an obligation to respond to individual needs and must have due regard to the need to eliminate unlawful disability discrimination and to promote equality of opportunity. To meet the expectations of the Disability Equality Duty (DED), institutions should be pro-active in anticipating the

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variety of possible requirements that disabled students may have, rather than making adjustments for students on an ad hoc basis. This document should list all the skills needed for students to meet the learning outcomes of the programme and may be used by the College’s Disability Advisory Service when considering reasonable adjustments to assessment. You may find the following link to the College Disability Advisory Service useful when completing this section: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/disabilityadvisoryservice

Programme Learning Outcomes are equivalent for all engineering degrees. All learning outcomes below are correct for all MEng degrees. The BEng learning outcomes are a subset of these below and can be identified by excluding all categories with “m” in their headings. The headings correspond to the UK-Spec documentation (2008-2009). 1. US1 Underpinning science, mathematics and associated engineering disciplines Knowledge and understanding of scientific principles and methodology necessary to underpin their education in their engineering discipline, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering context, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments and technologies. A comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of own specialisation and related disciplines. Knowledge and understanding of mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in engineering discipline and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems. An awareness of developing technologies related to own specialisation. Ability to apply and integrate knowledge and understand of other engineering disciplines to support study of their own engineering discipline. A comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to the engineering discipline, and an appreciation of their limitations. An understanding of concepts from a range of areas including some outside engineering, and the ability to apply them effectively in engineering projects.

US1m US2

US2m US3 US3m US4m

2. EA1

Engineering Analysis Understanding of engineering principles and the ability to apply them to analyse key engineering processes. EA1m Ability to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies. EA2 Ability to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques. EA2m Ability to apply mathematical and computer based models for solving problems in engineering, and the ability to assess the limitations of particular cases. EA3 Ability to apply quantitative methods and computer software relevant to the engineering discipline, in order to solve engineering problems. EA3m Ability to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and apply in its solution using computer based engineering tools when appropriate. EA4 Understanding of and ability to apply a systems approach to engineering problems and to work with uncertainty. 3. D1 D1m D2 D2m D3 D4 D5 Design Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints including environmental and sustainability limitation, health and safety and risk assessment issues. Wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and the ability to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations. zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics. Ability to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes to fulfil new needs. Identify and manage cost drivers. Use creativity to establish innovative solutions. Ensure fitness for purpose for all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal.

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D6 4. S1 S1m S2 S2m S3 S4 S5 5. P1 P1m P2 P2m P3 P3m P4 P5 P6 P7 P8

Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes. Economic, social, and environmental context Knowledge and understanding of commercial and economic context of engineering processes. Extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately. Knowledge of management techniques which may be used to achieve engineering objectives within that context. The ability to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks. Understanding of the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development. Awareness of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety, and risk (including environmental risk). Understanding of the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering. Engineering Practice Knowledge of characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes, or products. A thorough understanding of current practice and its limitations, and some appreciation of likely new developments. Workshop and laboratory skills. Extensive knowledge and understand of a wide rage of engineering materials and components Understanding of contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc). Ability to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints. Understanding use of technical literature and other information sources. Awareness of nature of intellectual property and contractual issues Awareness of appropriate codes of practice and industry standards. Awareness of quality issues. Ability to work with technical uncertainty.

Additional learning outcomes are listed below under the College’s headings below: 1. Knowledge and Understanding

These are listed above under the UK-Spec headings. Teaching/learning methods and strategies Acquisition of knowledge is mainly through lectures, tutorials and associated problems sessions to reinforce the lecture content. There is a substantial amount of directed learning through project work at varying degrees of complexity as the student progresses. The programme is designed to permit the student, after a thorough grounding in the first two years of study, a high degree of choice in their final years to suit their aptitudes and career aspirations. Assessment methods and strategies Assessment varies between courses, but in the majority of courses, it is achieved by a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment of coursework and tutorial material. “Mastery” zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ examinations (with a pass mark of 80%) are used in Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering to ensure that the most fundamental concepts have been mastered. In the final years, interim and final oral presentations and progress reports are also assessed. 2. Skills and other Attributes

Intellectual Skills (lateral and critical thinking, logic): 1. perform analysis and, thereby, solve problems in specific areas shown above

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2. 3. 4.

integrate theory and practice in dealing with problems which involve several of the subject areas shown above carry out a synthesis/design of a process when faced with a conflicting set of objectives which are, to some extent, mutually exclusive demonstrate the skills necessary to plan, conduct and report a programme of original research or, alternatively, a project of direct and immediate industrial relevance.

Teaching/learning methods and strategies Lectures followed by tutorials and practical sessions in core subjects are used widely. “Mastery” exercises are used in some departments to develop skills of synthesis. Design projects of increasing complexity are used. The final year also has a major research or industrial internship project, where in two departments these are in groups for the BEng cohorts (materials, mechanical engineering), and in all other cases, these are individual projects. Assessment methods and strategies Assessment of thinking skills is partly achieved in written examinations, but mostly in assessed project work. At the higher levels, reports and oral presentations are also assessed. 3. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Practical Skills

plan and execute safely a series of experiments use laboratory methods to generate data analyse experimental results and determine their accuracy, precision, and validity prepare technical reports give technical presentations use effectively a wide range of computational tools and packages of a general nature use effectively a wide range of computational tools and packages relating specifically to the relevant engineering discipline being studied and to determine the range of their validity make use of knowledge from a number of diverse areas to synthesise a feasible solution to a complex problem of design

Teaching/learning methods and strategies These are covered primarily by first and second year laboratories (some departments have additional laboratory/technical projects such as the pilot plant in chemical engineering). But practice and teaching in all areas is gained via project work in all years. Conventional computer software and modern mathematical/programming software Matlab is used in all engineering degrees from first year on. Special software packages appropriate to the specific engineering disciplines are used in the later years (e.g. Fluent, ABAQUS, MAPLE, ASPEN, gPROMS). Assessment methods and strategies Assessment is primarily by project reports (and by oral presentations where appropriate). 4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. Transferable Skills

communicate effectively through oral presentations and written reports use Information and Communications Technology develop management skills: group coordination, decision processes, objective criteria, problem definition, project design and evaluation needs work as a team and/or independently, as appropriate be adequately prepared to enter a chosen sector of industry as a professional become aware of the environmental, economic and social impact of the specific engineering discipline being studied zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ integrate and evaluate information from a variety of sources learn effectively for the purpose of continuing professional development

Teaching/learning methods and strategies Students are introduced to these skills via project work early in the first year of the course and these skills are continuously developed and sharpened throughout the remaining years with increasingly challenging projects. All departments include specific group projects at which these skills are enhanced.

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Assessment methods and strategies Assessment is almost exclusively by project reports, presentations, and peer review. 16. The following reference points were used in creating this programme specification - QAA Benchmarking Criteria - UG Syllabus - Accreditation Panel Recommendations - UK-Spec accreditation documentation 17. Programme structure and features, curriculum units (modules), ECTS assignment and award requirements: Aeronautics FIRST YEAR MEng and MEng with a Year Abroad A.101 Introduction to aerodynamics A.102 Aircraft performance A.103 Computing A.104 Engineering design A.105 Introduction to management or Languages A.106 Properties of materials A.107 Mathematics A.108 Foundation mechanics A.109 Mechanics A.110 Introduction to structural analysis A.111 Thermodynamics Unexamined: Aeronautical general lectures SECOND YEAR MEng and MEng with a Year Abroad A.201 Aerodynamics A.202 Computing and numerical analysis A.203 Manufacturing processes A.204 Managerial economics or Languages A.205 Signals and systems A.208 Materials A.209 Mathematics and statistics A.211 Mechanics of flight A.212 Propulsion and turbomachinery A.213 Structural mechanics and dynamics THIRD YEAR MEng Compulsory subjects A.301 Aircraft aerodynamics A.302 Control systems A.303 Finite elements A.304 Aircraft structures A.3/403 Aerospace vehicle design A.3/406 Airframe design zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Optional subjects (three to be chosen) A.3/401 Advanced mechanics of flight A.3/409 Materials modelling A.3/410 Mathematics A3/413 Helicopter dynamics A.3/414 Computational fluid dynamics A.3/416 Advanced propulsion BEST course or Languages or Non-language humanities course

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FOURTH YEAR MEng Compulsory subjects A.403 Structural dynamics A.404 Wing design Optional subjects (four to be chosen) A.401 Applications of fluid dynamics A.3/401 Advanced mechanics of flight A.3/409 Materials modelling A.3/413 Helicopter dynamics A.3/414 Computational fluid dynamics Languages or Entrepreneurship FOURTH YEAR MEng with a Year Abroad Compulsory subjects A.403 Structural dynamics A.404 Wing design A.3/403 Aerospace vehicle design A.3/406 Airframe design Optional subjects (six to be chosen) A.302 Control systems A.3/401 Advanced mechanics of flight A.3/409 Materials modelling A.3/410 Mathematics A.3/413 Helicopter dynamics A.3/414 Computational fluid dynamics A.3/416 Advanced propulsion A.401 Applications of fluid dynamics BEST course or Languages or Non-language humanities course Bioengineering FIRST YEAR BE1-HMCP Molecules, cells and processes BE1-HMATH1 Mathematics I BE1-HVAW Mathematical tools, vibrations and waves BE1-HEE1 Electrical engineering I BE1-HEMO1 Electromagnetics and optics I BE1-HLDS Logic and digital systems BE1-HMS1 Medical science I BE1-HPROG1 Programming I BE1-HITM Introduction to mechanics BE1-HHMT1 Heat and mass transport I BE1-HEEL Electrical engineering labs BE1-HEIM Engineering in medicine labs BE1-HWLS Wet lab skills BE1-HTIB Topics in biomedical engineering BE1-HEBP Electronics build project SECOND YEAR zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ BE2-HMS2 Medical science II BE2-HMATH2 Mathematics II BE2-HEM02 Electromagnetics and optics II BE2-HPROG2 Programming II BE2-HEE2 Electrical engineering II BE2-HFLM Fluid mechanics BE2-HHMT2 Heat and mass transport II BE2-HSAS Signals and systems

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BE2-HSDM Solid mechanics BE2-HCTRL Control systems BE2-HMDP Mechanics design project BE2-HMEW Mechanics workshop BE2-HAMSS Atomic and molecular and semiconductor structure BS-0821 Project management THIRD OR FOURTH YEAR BE3-HIPR Image processing BE3-HBIMG Biomedical imaging BE3-HPMDA Physiological monitoring and data analysis BE3-HMIB Modelling in biology BE3-HHEDM Health economics and decision making BE3-HBIP Final year BEng project BE3-MBMX Biomechanics BE4-MAMI Advanced medical imaging BE3-MABM Advanced biological modelling BE3-MCNS Computational neuroscience BE3-MSYNB Synthetic biology BE4-MMGP MEng third year group project BE4-MMIP MEng fourth year individual project BE4-MBMI Brain-machine interfaces BE4-MNMC Neuromuscular control BE4-MCBMX Cellular biomechanics BE4-MOBMX Orthopaedic biomechanics BE4-MMLNC Machine learning and neural computation Modules external to the department of bioengineering. Please note that availability of these modules is subject to change. Department of Mechanical Engineering options ME3-HFFM Fundamentals of fracture mechanics ME3-HMSD Machine system dynamics ME3-HSAN Stress analysis ME3-HSPAP Structure properties and applications of polymers ME3-HFMX Fluid mechanics ME3-HTRB Tribology ME3-HCCM Computational continuum mechanics Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering options E.3.01 Analogue integrated circuits and systems E.3.02 Instrumentation E.3.05 Digital system design E.3.07 Digital signal processing E.3.09 Control engineering E.3.11 Advanced electronic devices E.3.12 Optoelectronics E.3.16 Artificial intelligence Department of Computing options Comp.493 Intelligent data analysis and probabilistic inference Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Department of Materials options MSE.315 Biomaterials and artificial organs Chemical Engineering FIRST YEAR CHE.101 Chemical engineering I (Mastery)

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CHE.102 Process analysis CHE.103 Coursework I CHE.103.1 Design project CHE.103.2 Laboratory course CHE.103.3 Pilot plant project CHE.103.4 Introduction to Matlab CHE.104 Transfer processes I CHE.104.1 Fluid mechanics I CHE.104.2 Heat and mass transfer CHE.105 Thermodynamics I CHE.106 Chemistry CHE.106.1 Chemistry CHE.106.3 Properties of matter CHE.107 Mathematics I (MEng.1.2) CHE.108 Business for engineers I SECOND YEAR CHE.201 Chemical engineering II (Mastery) CHE.202 Transfer processes II CHE.202.1 Heat transfer CHE.202.2 Separation processes I CHE.202.3 Fluid mechanics II CHE.203 Coursework II CHE.203.1 Control project CHE.203.2 Computing CHE.203.3 Laboratory theme CHE.203.5 Reactor design CHE.203.6 Synthesis laboratory (fine chemicals processing stream only) CHE.204 Reaction engineering I CHE.204.1 Industrial chemistry CHE.204.2 Reaction engineering I CHE.205 Thermodynamics II CHE.206 Process dynamics and control CHE.207 Mathematics II1 (MEng.2.2) CHE.208 Fine chemicals stream courses CHE.209 Business for engineers II THIRD YEAR CHE.301 Chemical engineering III (Mastery) CHE.302 Reaction engineering II CHE.303 Transfer processes III o CHE.303.1 Separation processes II o CHE.303.2 Fluid mechanics III o CHE.303.3 Particle engineering CHE.304 Strategy of process design CHE.305 Safety and loss prevention CHE.306 Environmental engineering CHE.307 Coursework III o CHE.307.1 Techno-socio-economic project o CHE.307.2 Synthesis and flowsheeting project o CHE.307.3 Mechanical design o CHE.307.4 Environmental engineering project zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ CHE.309 Fine chemicals stream courses CHE.310 Business for engineers III Together with two electives chosen from the following list (the list may vary from year to year): CHE.413 Formulation engineering and technology CHE.415 Membrane science and membrane separation processes CHE.416 Process heat transfer CHE.419 Fundamentals of biotechnology CHE.423 Product characterisation

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CHE.424 Environmental biotechnology: principles and applications CHE.427 Advanced bioprocess engineering CHE.428 Clean fossil fuels CHE.430 Nuclear chemical engineering BS 0806 Entrepreneurship BS 0808 Finance and financial management BS 0820 Innovation management ME3-HNUCN Introduction to nuclear energy Or any course from the Department of Humanities. FOURTH YEAR In the fourth year all students carry out an industrial internship project or a research project (CHE.401.1) and the plant design project (CHE.401.2). In addition, they are required to take six electives selected from the other courses listed below: CHE.401 Coursework IV CHE.401.1 Industrial internship/research project CHE.401.2 Plant design project CHE.406A Advanced process optimisation I CHE.406B Advanced process optimisation II CHE.407 Polymers and polymerisation processes CHE.408 Dynamic behaviour of process systems CHE.409 Dynamical systems in chemical engineering CHE.413 Formulation engineering and technology CHE.416 Process heat transfer CHE.417 Colloid and interface science CHE.419 Fundamentals of biotechnology CHE.420 Pharmaceutical process development CHE.421 Modelling of biological systems CHE.422 Downstream separation in biotechnology CHE.423 Product characterisation CHE.424 Environmental biotechnology: principles and applications CHE.427 Advanced bioprocess engineering CHE.428 Clean fossil fuels CHE.429 Nuclear thermal hydraulics CHE.430 Nuclear chemical engineering CHE.431 Transport processes in biological systems BS 0806 Entrepreneurship BS 0808 Finance and financial management BS 0820 Innovation management BS 0821 Project management PT3.3 Dynamical systems and chaos ESE5.01 Mineral processing ME3-HNUCN Introduction to nuclear energy MSE.414 Nuclear materials ME4-MNURP Reactor physics Or any course from the Department of Humanities. Fine chemicals stream students may also take courses offered by the Department of Chemistry. Fourth year students may also have the option of selecting other electives in the Faculty-wide ‘flexible Fridays’ scheme. Civil Engineering

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FIRST YEAR CI.120 Mathematics Final, Part I May/June CI.121 Computational methods CI.130 Mechanics CI.131 Structural mechanics CI.132 Materials CI.140 Fluid mechanics

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CI.150 Geotechnics CI.160 Environmental engineering practice CI.180 Management SECOND YEAR CI.220 Mathematics Final, Part II May/June CI.222 Statistics CI.231 Structural mechanics CI.240 Fluid mechanics CI.250 Soils and engineering geology CI.260 Environmental engineering CI.280 Management THIRD YEAR CE.301 Structural mechanics Final, Part III April/May CE.302 Fluid mechanics CE.303 Soil mechanics CE.304 Systems engineering CE.305 Engineering economics and management CE.306 Concrete structures and design CE.308 Computational engineering analysis CE.310 Rock mechanics CE.311 Introductory microbiology/chemistry CE.313 Engineering geomatics CE.312 Highway and traffic engineering CE.314 Coastal engineering FOURTH YEAR Six elective subjects Final, Part IV April/May CE.401 Steel structures and design CE.402 Structural dynamics CE.403 Non-linear structural mechanics CE.405 Advanced soil mechanics CE.406 Applied hydrodynamics CE.407 Water and wastewater engineering CE.408 Water resources engineering CE.409 Transportation and traffic engineering CE.411 Systems analysis CE.413 Earthquake engineering CE.416 Environmental fluid mechanics

Computing FIRST YEAR Compulsory core modules Comp.112 Hardware Comp.113 Computer systems Comp.120 Programming Comp.123 Object-oriented programming Comp.130 Databases I zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Comp.140 Logic Comp.141 Reasoning about programs Comp.142 Discrete mathematics Comp.145 Mathematical methods Comp.161 Laboratory Comp.162 Laboratory workshop I Comp.164 Professional issues

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Optional modules (students must select one) Comp.152 Foreign language I Comp.163 Topics in AI SECOND YEAR Compulsory core modules Comp.202 Software engineering—algorithms Comp.211 Operating systems II Comp.212 Networks and communications Comp.220 Software engineering—design I Comp.221 Compilers Comp.222 Software engineering—design II Comp.240 Models of computation Comp.245 Statistics Comp.261 Laboratory II Comp.262 Laboratory workshop II Optional modules (students must select three) Comp 210 Computer architecture1 Comp.223 Concurrency1 Comp.231 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence I1 Comp.233 Computational techniques Comp.252 Foreign language II Comp.275 C++ Lab Lecture THIRD YEAR BEng Computing Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must participate in a group project and undertake a major individual project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisations and management processes Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Optional modules Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.317 Graphics Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.320 Complex systems Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics Comp.335 Distributed systems Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.343 Operations research Comp. 345 Ludic computing Comp.352 Humanities/foreign language/business2 Comp.395 Machine learning Comp. 430 Network security zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Comp. 482 Type systems for programming languages MEng Computing Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must participate in a group project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisations and management processes

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Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Optional modules Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.317 Graphics Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.320 Complex systems Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics Comp.335 Distributed systems Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.343 Operations research Comp.345 Ludic computing Comp.352 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.395Machine learning Comp.430 Network security Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages MEng Computing (Software Engineering) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must participate in a group project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisations and management processes Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.335 Distributed systems Optional modules Comp.317 Graphics Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.343 Operations research Comp.345 Ludic computing Comp.352 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.395 Machine learning Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages MEng Computing (Artificial Intelligence) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total.In addition, students must participate in a group project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisations and management processes Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.395 Machine learning Optional modules Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.317 Graphics Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.320 Complex systems Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics

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Comp.335 Distributed systems Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Computing 7 Comp.343 Operations research Comp.345 Ludic computing Comp.352 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.430 Network security Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages MEng Computing (International Programme of Study) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must participate in a group project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisation and management processes Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Comp.352 Foreign language Optional modules Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.317 Graphics Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics Comp.335 Distributed systems Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.343 Operations research Comp.345 Ludic computing Comp.395 Machine learning Comp.430 Network security Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages MEng Computing (Games, vision and interaction) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must participate in a group project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisations and management processes Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Comp.317 Graphics Comp.345 Ludic computing Students must also study either: Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.395 Machine learning Optional modules Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.317 Graphics zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.320 Complex systems Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics Comp.335 Distributed systems Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.343 Operations research

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Comp. 345 Ludic computing Comp.352 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.395 Machine learning Comp.430 Network security Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages MEng Computing (Computation in biology and medicine) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must participate in a group project. Compulsory modules BS0819 Organisations and management processes Comp.302 Software engineering—methods Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.395 Machine learning Comp.312 Advanced databases Optional modules Comp.303 Software engineering—systems verification Comp.312 Advanced databases Comp.317 Graphics Comp.318 Custom computing Comp.320 Complex systems Comp.332 Advanced computer architecture Comp.333 Robotics Comp.335 Distributed systems Comp.337 Simulation and modelling Comp.341 Introduction to bioinformatics Comp.343 Operations research Comp. 345 Ludic computing Comp.352 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.395 Machine learning Comp.430 Network security Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages FOURTH YEAR MEng Computing Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must undertake a project outsourcing exercise, complete an industrial placement presentation and report and produce a major individual project. Optional modules Comp.417 Advanced graphics and visualisation Comp.418 Computer vision Comp.420 Cognitive robotics Comp.422 Computational finance Comp.424 Machine learning and neural computation Comp.429 Parallel algorithms Comp.430 Network security Comp.436 Performance analysis Comp.437 Distributed algorithms zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Comp.438 Complexity Comp.452 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.461 Project outsourcing exercise3 Comp.464 Industrial placement—presentation and report2 Comp.470 Programme analysis Comp.471 Advanced issues in object oriented programming Comp.474 Multi-agent systems Comp.475 Advanced topics in software engineering

16 Engineering Degrees

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Comp.477 Computing for optimal decisions Comp.480 Automated reasoning Comp.481 Models of concurrent computation Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages Comp.484 Quantum computing Comp.491 Knowledge representation Comp.493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference Comp.499 Modal and temporal logic MEng Computing (Software Engineering) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total.. In addition, students must undertake a project outsourcing exercise, complete an industrial placement presentation and report and produce a major individual project. Compulsory modules Comp.430 Network security Comp.475 Advanced topics in software engineering Optional modules Comp.417 Advanced graphics and visualisation Comp.418 Computer vision Comp.420 Cognitive robotics Comp.422 Computational finance Comp.424 Machine learning and neural computation Comp.429 Parallel algorithms Comp.436 Performance analysis Comp.437 Distributed algorithms Comp.438 Complexity Comp.452 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.461 Project outsourcing exercise2 Comp.464 Industrial placement—presentation and report2 Comp.470 Program analysis Comp.471 Advanced issues in object-oriented programming Comp.474 Multi-agent systems Comp.477 Computing for optimal decisions Comp.478 Advanced operations research Comp.480 Automated reasoning Comp.481 Models of concurrent computation Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages Comp.484 Quantum computing Comp.491 Knowledge representation Comp.493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference Comp.499 Modal and temporal logic MEng Computing (Artificial Intelligence) Students must take three compulsory modules and eight modules in total. In addition, students must undertake a project outsourcing exercise, complete an industrial placement presentation and report and produce a major individual project. Compulsory modules zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Students must choose three from: Comp.420 Cognitive robotics Comp.474 Multi-agent systems Comp.480 Automated reasoning Comp.491 Knowledge representation Comp.499 Modal and temporal logic Optional modules

17 Engineering Degrees

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Comp.417 Advanced graphics and visualisation Comp.418 Computer vision Comp.422 Computational finance Comp.424 Machine Learning and Neural Computation Comp.429 Parallel algorithms Comp.430 Network security Comp.436 Performance analysis Comp.437 Distributed algorithms Comp.438 Complexity Comp.452 Humanities/foreign language Comp.461 Project outsourcing exercise2 Comp.464 Industrial placement—presentation and report Comp.470 Program analysis Comp.471 Advanced issues in object oriented programming Comp.475 Advanced topics in software engineering Comp.477 Computing for optimal decisions Comp.481 Models of concurrent computation Comp.484 Quantum computing Comp.493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference MEng Computing (Games, Vision and Interaction) Students must take all compulsory modules and take eight modules in total. In addition, students must undertake a project outsourcing exercise, complete an industrial placement presentation and report and produce a major individual project. Compulsory modules Comp.417 Advanced graphics and visualisation Comp.418 Computer vision Comp.437 Distributed algorithms Optional modules Comp.420 Cognitive robotics Comp.422 Computational finance Comp.424 Machine learning and neural computation Comp.429 Parallel algorithms Comp.430 Network security Comp.436 Performance analysis Comp.438 Complexity Comp.452 Humanities/foreign language/business1 Comp.461 Project outsourcing exercise2 Comp.464 Industrial placement—presentation and report2 Comp.470 Programme analysis Comp.471 Advanced issues in object oriented programming Comp.474 Multi-agent systems Comp.475 Advanced topics in software engineering Comp.477 Computing for optimal decisions Comp.480 Automated reasoning Comp.481 Models of concurrent computation Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages Comp.484 Quantum computing Comp.491 Knowledge representation Comp.493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Comp.499 Modal and temporal logic MEng Computing (Computation in Biology and Medicine) Students must take three compulsory modules and select eight modules in total. In addition, students must undertake a project outsourcing exercise, complete an industrial placement presentation and report and produce a major individual project. Compulsory modules

18 Engineering Degrees

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Comp.418 Computer vision Comp.424 Machine learning and neural computation Comp.493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference Optional modules Comp.417 Advanced graphics and visualisation Comp.420 Cognitive robotics Comp.422 Computational finance Comp.429 Parallel algorithms Comp.430 Network security Comp.436 Performance analysis Comp.437 Distributed algorithms Comp.438 Complexity Comp.452 Humanities/foreign language/buisness1 Comp.461 Project outsourcing exercise2 Comp.464 Industrial placement—presentation and report2 Comp.470 Programme analysis Comp.471 Advanced issues in object oriented programming Comp.474 Multi-agent systems Comp.475 Advanced topics in software engineering Comp.477 Computing for optimal decisions Comp.480 Automated reasoning Comp.481 Models of concurrent computation Comp.482 Type systems for programming languages Comp.484 Quantum computing Comp.491 Knowledge representation Comp.499 Modal and temporal logic

Electrical and Electronic Engineering FIRST YEAR E1.1 Analysis of circuits (EEE, ISE) E1.2 Digital electronics I (EEE, ISE) E1.3 Devices and fields (EEE only) E1.4 Analogue electronics I (EEE, ISE) E1.5 Electronic materials (EEE only) E1.6 Communications I (EEE, ISE) E1.7 Introduction to computing (EEE, ISE) E1.8 Algorithms and data structures (ISE only) E1.9 Principles of computers and software engineering (ISE only) E1.10 Mathematics (EEE only) E1.11 Mathematics (ISE only) E1.15 Technical communication (EEE, ISE) E1.16 Introduction to management and organisations (EEE, ISE) Practical work (core to all courses) Electrical laboratory Computing laboratory SECOND YEAR E2.1 Digital electronics II (EEE, ISE) zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ E2.2 Analogue electronics II (EEE only) E2.3A Fields and devices (EEE only) E2.3B Electrical power engineering (EEE only) E2.4 Communications II (EEE, ISE) E2.5 Signals and linear systems (EEE, ISE) E2.6 Control engineering (EEE, ISE) E2.8 Mathematics (EEE only) E2.11 Mathematics (ISE only)

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E2.12 Software engineering II: object-oriented software engineering (ISE only) C210 Computer architecture (ISE only) E2.15 Language processors (ISE only) E2.17 Discrete mathematics and computational complexity (ISE only) E2.18 Algorithms and data structures (EEE only) E2.19 Introduction to Computer architecture (EEE only) Humanities: Students take one of the following courses: Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin (with option for Cantonese speakers), Mandarin Language and Literacy for Heritage Speakers, Russian, Spanish, Art of the twentieth century, Communicating science: the public and the media, Controversies and ethical dilemmas in science and technology, Creative writing, European history 1870-1989, Global history of twentieth century things, History of medicine, Modern Literature and Drama, Music and western civilisation, Music technology, Philosophies of Science: Theory, Society and Communication, Philosophy, Politics, the Roman Empire. Optional courses (EEE only) An additional Humanities course, selected from the list above, may be taken by students of sufficient academic standing. E2.20 Technical communication (EEE, ISE) Practical work (core to all courses) Electrical laboratory Computing laboratory THIRD YEAR (EEE ONLY) E3.01 Analogue integrated circuits and systems E3.02 Instrumentation E3.03 Communication systems E3.05 Digital system design E3.06 VHDL and logic synthesis E3.07 Digital signal processing E3.08 Advanced signal processing E3.09 Control engineering E3.10 Mathematics for Signals and Systems E3.11 Advanced electronic devices E3.12 Optoelectronics E3.13 Electrical energy systems E3.14 Power electronics and machines E3.16 Artificial intelligence E3.17 Communication networks E3.18 Microwave technology E3.19 Real-time digital signal processing E3.20 Discrete mathematics and computational complexity Non-technical modules Business studies modules for the MEng in Electronic and Electrical Engineering with Management (EM stream) Core modules (must be covered across years 3 and 4) BS0822 Accounting BS0821 Project management BS0815 Managerial economics OR BS0602 Business Economics BS0809 Finance and financial management zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ BS0806 Entrepreneurship BS0826 Innovation management Optional modules BS0612 Organisational behaviour and human resource management BS0817 Marketing BS0803 Business strategy BS0826 International business

20 Engineering Degrees

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See Business School section for details. Business studies options (not EM stream) BS0822 Accounting BS0821 Project management BS0815 Managerial economics BS0808 Finance and financial management BS0806 Entrepreneurship BS0820 Innovation management Humanities and language options (see above) THIRD YEAR (ISE ONLY) Technical modules ISE3.1 Human-computer interaction C526 Databases ISE3.3 Communication systems C318 Custom computing ISE3.5 VHDL and logic synthesis ISE3.7 Mathematics for signals and systems C302 Software engineering—methods ISE3.9 Control engineering ISE3.11 Digital signal processing C317 Graphics ISE3.17 Advanced signal processing C337 Simulation and modelling ISE3.19 Digital system design C343 Operations research ISE3.23 Artificial intelligence C223 Concurrency ISE3.31 Communication networks ISE3.33 Real-time digital signal processing ISE3.35 Real-time operating systems C341 Introduction to bioinformatics CC527 Computer networks and distributed systems Non-technical modules Business studies options For all ISE streams: BS0822 Accounting BS0821 Project management BS0815 Managerial economics BS0808 Finance and financial management BS0806 Entrepreneurship BS0820 Innovation management Humanities and language options (see above) FOURTH YEAR (EEE ONLY) Technical modules E4.01 Advanced communication theory zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ E4.03 Mobile radio communication E4.04 Advanced data communication E4.05 Traffic theory and queuing systems E4.06 Optical communication E4.07 Coding theory E4.10 Probability and stochastic processes E4.13 Spectral estimation and adaptive signal processing E4.14 Speech processing

21 Engineering Degrees

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E4.16 Current-mode analogue signal processing E4.17 High performance analogue electronics E4.18 Radio frequency electronics E4.20 Introduction to digital integrated circuit design E4.23 Stability and control of non-linear systems E4.25 Design of linear multivariable control systems E4.26 Estimation and fault detection E4.27 Identification and adaptive control E4.29 Optimisation C332 Advanced computer architecture C317 Graphics E4.40 Information theory C493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference E4.43 Synthesis of digital architectures E4.45 Wavelets and applications E4.46 Distributed computation and networks: a performance perspective E4.47 Modelling and control of multi-body mechanical systems E4.48 Power system control, measurement and protection E4.49 FACTS and power electronics E4.50 Sustainable electrical systems E4.51 Power system economics E4.52 Real-time operating systems E4.53 High voltage technology and HVDC transmission E4.54 Predictive control E4.55 MEMS and nanotechnology C430 Network security E4.57 Discrete-event systems Fourth year students on the T stream MEng may also select ONE module offered under the ‘Envision’ programme. Those available in 09/10 are: 32 Undergraduate syllabuses E4.81 Medical Imaging (Bioengineering Dept module) E4.83 Computational finance (Computing Dept module) E4.84 Performance Analysis (Computing Dept module) E4.85 Environmental impact assessment 1 (ESE Dept module). E4.86 Nanomaterials 1 (Materials Dept module) E4.87Operations research (Computing Dept module) E4.88 Design-led innovation and new venture creation – (Mech Eng module) Business studies modules (MEng in Electronic and Electrical Engineering with Management only) Core modules (must be covered across years 3 and 4) BS0822 Accounting BS0602 Business economics BS0821 Project management BS0809 Finance and financial management BS0806 Entrepreneurship BS0820 Innovation management Optional modules BS0817 Marketing BS0803 Business strategy zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ BS0826 International business BS0612 Organisational behaviour and human resource management Non-technical modules Business studies modules (T stream only) BS0822 Accounting BS0821 Project management BS0808 Finance and financial management

22 Engineering Degrees

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BS0806 Entrepreneurship BS0820 Innovation management BS0815 Managerial Economics See Business School section for details. Humanities and language options (see above) FOURTH YEAR (ISE ONLY) Technical modules C418 Computer vision ISE4.3 Mobile radio communication C312 Advanced databases C474 Multi-agent systems ISE4.9 Advanced data communications C429 Parallel algorithms ISE4.11 Advanced communication theory C430 Network security ISE4.15 Coding theory C475 Advanced topics in software engineering ISE4.17 Speech processing ISE4.19 Introduction to digital integrated circuit design C477 Computing for optimal decisions ISE4.23 Design of linear multivariable control systems ISE4.27 Stability and control of non-linear systems ISE4.31 Spectral estimation and adaptive signal processing ISE 4.36 Optical communication ISE4.41 Identification and adaptive control CC480 Automated reasoning ISE4.43 Synthesis of digital architectures C484 Quantum computing C417 Advanced graphics and visualisation ISE4.47 Wavelets and applications C493 Intelligent data and probabilistic inference ISE4.49 Distributed computation and networks: a performance perspective C436 Performance analysis ISE4.51 Information theory C438 Complexity ISE4.55 Optimisation C332 Advanced computer architecture C395 Machine learning C420 Cognitive robotics ISE4,61 Predictive control C422 Computational finance ISE4.63 Discrete-event systems ISE4.64 Probability and stochastic processes Non-technical modules Business studies modules BS0822 Accounting BS0821 Project management zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ BS0808 Finance and financial management BS0806 Entrepreneurship BS0820 Innovation management BS0815 Managerial Economics Humanities and language options

23 Engineering Degrees

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Materials FIRST YEAR MSE.101 Mathematics and computing MSE.102 Materials chemistry and biology MSE.103 Materials engineering MSE.104 Microstructure and properties of materials MSE.105 Materials physics MSE.106 Business for engineers I MSE.107 Crystallography MSE.108 Skills based exercises MSE.109 Language studies (four-year BEng courses) SECOND YEAR MSE.201 Mathematics and computing MSE.202 Materials chemistry and polymer science MSE.203 Mechanical behaviour MSE.204 Microstructure MSE.205 Electronic properties of materials MSE.206 Materials engineering II MSE.209 Personal development MSE.210 Language studies (four-year BEng courses) THIRD YEAR (Fourth year for BEng Materials with a Year Abroad) Core courses MSE.301 Engineer in industry MSE.302 Materials characterisation MSE.304 Group design study MSE.306 Business for Engineers III Literature review Option courses There are nine materials option courses of 24 lectures, as well as courses in humanities or management subjects. MSE.305 Processing of metals and polymers MSE.307 Engineering alloys MSE.308 Ceramics and glasses MSE.309 Polymers, composites and nanocomposites 4 Undergraduate syllabuses MSE.310 Electronic structure and optoelectronic behaviour MSE.312 Nanomaterials I MSE.315 Biomaterials MSE.316 Humanities or management studies MSE.317 Modelling MSE 318 Introduction to nuclear engineering BEng Materials with Management take the core courses, and take three Materials options and two Management courses, Entrepreneurship, and Innovation Management. MEng Materials Science and Engineering students take the core courses and take five options. MEng Aerospace Materials students must take the core courses, two options as well as: MSE.307 Engineering alloys MSE.309 Polymers, composites and nanocomposites A.101 Introduction to aerodynamics A.110 Introduction to structural analysis MEng Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering students must take the core courses, two options as well as: MSE.309 Polymers and composites

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24 Engineering Degrees

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MSE.315 Biomaterials MEng Materials and Nuclear Engineering students must take all core courses, 3 options as well as: MSE.314 Introduction to nuclear engineering ChE.430 Nuclear chemical engineering FOURTH YEAR (MEng) Core courses BS.0806 Entrepreneurship MSE.420 Research project MSE.421 Industrial project MSE.422 Comprehensive paper There are five options of 24 lectures each available in the fourth year provided by the Department plus Envision Options offered by other Departments within the faculty: MSE.411 Electroceramics MSE.412 Nanomaterials II MSE.413 Aerospace materials MSE.414 Nuclear materials MSE.415 Surfaces and interfaces MSE.416 Humanities/management MSE.417 Advanced biomaterials Envision options MEng Materials Science and Engineering students must take: The core courses plus four options. MEng Aerospace Materials students are required to take the core courses plus the following: MSE.413 Aerospace materials A.406 Airframe design MEng Materials and Nuclear Engineering students are required to take the core courses, plus the following: MSE.414 Nuclear materials ChE 429 Nuclear thermal hydraulics ME4-MNURP Reactor physics

Mechanical Engineering FIRST YEAR Modules in the first year curriculum are taken by all students. ME1-HCPT Computing ME1-HDMF Design and manufacture ME1-HERS Experimental reporting skills ME1-HFMX Fluid mechanics ME1-HMATL Materials ME1-HMCX Mechanics ME1-HMTH Mathematics ME1-HMTX Mechatronics ME1-HSAN Stress analysis ME1-HTHD Thermodynamics Mechanical Engineering SECOND YEAR zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ Modules in the second year curriculum are taken by all students. ME2-HCPT Computing ME2-HDMF Design and manufacture ME2-HDYN Dynamics ME2-HFMX Fluid mechanics ME2-HHTR Heat transfer ME2-HMATL Materials ME2-HMBE Management and business for engineers

25 Engineering Degrees

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ME2-HMTH Mathematics ME2-HMTX Mechatronics ME2-HSAN Stress analysis ME2-HTHD Thermodynamics ME2-HTPS Technical presentation skills THIRD YEAR In the third year, each student must take: • The two core modules (Thermodynamics and energy, and Machine system dynamics); • At least five (but no more than seven) other modules, of which at least two must be chosen from the Technical options group and at least one (but no more than two) must be from the Management and electives groups. Students who will spend their final year abroad are strongly advised to take the relevant language option. Each module normally consists of 20 lectures or equivalent, and up to 10 tutorials. Each student also works on an individual Literature Research project, and then—as one of a group of (normally) five—on a design, make and test project. Core modules: ME3-HMSD Machine system dynamics ME3-HTDE Thermodynamics and energy ME3-MDMT Design, make and test project ME3-HLTR Literature research project Technical option modules: ME3-HCCM Computational continuum mechanics ME3-HDAC Design art and creativity ME3-HFFM Fundamentals of fracture mechanics ME3-HFMX Fluid mechanics ME3-HMTH Mathematics ME3-HNDM Integrated design and manufacture ME3-HNUCN Introduction to nuclear energy ME3-HSAN Stress analysis ME3-HSPAP Structure properties and applications of polymers ME3-HSTAT Statistics ME3-HTRB Tribology Management and elective modules: Management subjects: BS 616 Innovation management BS 618 Project management BS 806 Entrepreneurship BS 607 Finance and financial management Languages and humanities subjects: French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese H.1 Philosophy H.4 Controversies and ethical dilemmas in science and technology H.5 European history 1870-1989 H.6 Politics H.7 History of science: what every scientist and engineer should know. H.8 Global history of twentieth-century things H.9 History of medicine zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ H.10 Modern literature and drama H.11 Art of the twentieth century H.12 Music and western civilisation H.13 Communicating science: the public and the media Descriptions of these modules appear in the Humanities programme undergraduate syllabus. Other subjects in the programme may also be acceptable. FOURTH YEAR

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In the fourth year each student must take an advanced application module and at least five others, but not more than nine in total. A minimum of three subjects must be from the advanced technical option group. At least one (but no more than two) subject(s) must be from the management and electives groups listed above. Students may also take third year technical subjects which they have not followed in the previous year. Each Advanced Application subject normally has 40 lectures or equivalent, and up to 20 tutorials. Other subjects normally have 20 lectures or equivalent, and up to 10 tutorials. Each student works on an individual main project. Advanced application modules ME4-MAET Aircraft engine technology ME4-MMTT Mechanical transmissions technology ME4-MPPT Polymer processing technology ME4-MVPT Vehicle propulsion technology Advanced technical option modules Some subjects in this group have prerequisites of corresponding third year modules. ME4-MASA Advanced stress analysis ME4-MAVE Advanced vibration engineering ME4-MCFD Computational fluid dynamics ME4-MCNTL Advanced control ME4-MFEAA Finite element analysis and applications ME4-MNDP Interfacing and data processing ME4-MNURP Nuclear reactor physics

18. Support provided to students to assist learning (including collaborative students, where appropriate). (The description should include information about the induction programme, welfare and pastoral support, library and other facilities available to students, personal tutoring, and access to teaching and learning support services, English language support, feedback to students and dissemination of actions taken as a result): • • • • • • • • • • Handbooks for each year giving details of course structure, assessment methods and criteria for progression; these handbooks are made available on the virtual learning environment, the internet and in physical form (in some departments) All departments have an established tutorial system with timetabled meetings with personal tutors throughout the course. Favourable staff-student ratio Open-door policy of academic staff to students, including Senior Tutor and DUGs nd Extensive induction programmes Year 1 for introduction to staff, 2 & later year students, library, course structure, computer facilities, safety issues, etc. High staff participation in personal tutorials and project supervision. Extensive computing facilities and free e-mail and internet access. All departments have “Common Room” facilities, including catering. All departments have departmental careers advice to supplement College facilities. Access to Student Counsellors and a wide range of medical services on campus for confidential consultations.

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19. Criteria for admission: From 20010 the typical minimum offer in terms of Advanced Level grades is AAA (or 360 UCAS points). All courses insist on candidates offering Mathematics (with an A grade, 120 UCAS points). All departments have subtle differences in entry criteria that are adjusted on an annual basis. This includes Chemical Engineering requiring Chemistry at A-level, and other departments requiring Physics at A-level as well as some departments requiring A grades in specific A-level modules, including requiring A* in Mathematics. Applicants with Baccalaureates (French, European or International) or the leaving certificates of various non-UK national systems are very much welcomed and are assessed at an equivalent level to those described above. Scottish and Irish applicants, for instance, would be expected to take our required subjects at advanced higher (AH) Level, and through the Irish Leaving Certificate, respectively; typical offers are A grades in all relevant subjects. 20. Processes used to select students: The undergraduate courses in engineering are intended for able students who are selected on the basis of academic ability as well as motivation. The former will normally be judged by performance in examinations, while the latter will be assessed at an interview which all applicants attend if they live within reasonable travelling distance, or if they can meet one of our staff in another place. Individual departments also conduct interviews abroad (in Malaysia and Singapore). 21. Methods for evaluating and improving the quality and standards of teaching and learning Information regarding College-level practices is outlined below. Please amend this as appropriate to incorporate details of departmental activity. This is achieved by several mechanisms including the following: • Review by the (Undergraduate) Teaching Committee (normally a minimum of three meetings annually, in some departments this is held 6 times annually) • Review by Joint Board of Moderators (approximately five year intervals) consisting of academic and industrial reviewers. • Review by Engineering Studies Committee (approximately five year intervals), including a reviewer from industry. • Meetings of the Board of Examiners in withing each department (normally two meetings annually). • Visiting Examiner reports (annually). • Staff/Student Teaching Committee (also named staff/student liaison committee) recommendations including end of the year course reviews in some departments. • SOLE • Peer review of lecturers. • Staff development courses run by the Centre for Education Development, some of which are compulsory for probationary lecturers, including CASLAT. • Imperial College Engineering Studies Committee. • Imperial College Faculty of Engineering Teaching Committee. • Imperial College Quality Assurance Advisory Committee. • Imperial College Senate. • Employer needs and opinions feed into the programme through frequent guest lectures from zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ industry, (including part-time academic/industry lecturing posts), industry-based projects, a series of industry/academic forums, and collaboration between academic staff and industry in research and consultancy. a) Methods for review and evaluation of teaching, learning, assessment, the curriculum and outcome standards:

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The external examiner system and Boards of Examiners are central to the process by which the College monitors the reliability and validity of its assessment procedures and academic standards. Boards of Examiners comment on the assessment procedures within the College and may suggest improvements for action by relevant departmental teaching Committees. The Engineering Studies Committee reviews and considers the reports of external examiners and accrediting bodies and conduct periodic (normally quinquennial) and internal reviews of teaching provision. Regular reviews ensure that there is opportunity to highlight examples of good practice and ensure that recommendations for improvement can be made. At programme level, the Head of Department/Division has overall responsibility for academic standards and the quality of the educational experience delivered within the department or division. In all departments in engineering this responsibility is devolved to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. All of the engineering undergraduate programmes are accredited by professional engineering institutions. Accreditation provides the College with additional assurance that its programmes are of an appropriate standard and relevant to the requirement of industry and the professions. b) Committees with responsibility for monitoring and evaluating quality and standards: The Senate oversees the quality assurance and regulation of degrees offered by the College. It is charged with promoting the academic work of the College, both in teaching and research, and with regulating and supervising the education and discipline of the students of the College. It has responsibility for approval of changes to the Academic Regulations, major changes to degree programmes and approval of new programmes. The Quality Assurance Advisory Committee (QAAC) is the main forum for discussion of QA policy and the regulation of degree programmes at College level. QAAC develops and advises the Senate on the implementation of codes of practice and procedures relating to quality assurance and audit of quality and arrangements necessary to ensure compliance with national and international standards. QAAC also considers amendments to the Academic Regulations before making recommendations for change to the Senate. It also maintains an overview of the statistics on completion rates, withdrawals, examination irregularities (including cases of plagiarism), student appeals and disciplinaries. The Faculty Studies Committees and Graduate School Postgraduate Quality Committees are the major vehicle for the quality assurance of undergraduate / postgraduate courses respectively. Their remit includes: setting the standards and framework, and overseeing the processes of quality assurance, for the areas within their remit; monitoring the provision and quality of e-learning; undertaking reviews of new and existing courses; noting minor changes in existing programme curricula approved by Departments; approving new modules, changes in module titles, major changes in examination structure and programme specifications for existing programmes; and reviewing proposals for new programmes, and the discontinuation of existing programmes, and making recommendations to Senate as appropriate. The Faculty Teaching Committees maintain and develop teaching strategies and promote interdepartmental and inter-faculty teaching activities to enhance the efficiency of teaching within Faculties. They also identify and disseminate examples of good practice in teaching. Departmental Teaching Committees have responsibility for the approval of minor changes to course curricula and examination structures and approve arrangements for course work. They also consider the details of entrance requirements.

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c) Mechanisms for providing prompt feedback to students on their performance in course work and examinations and processes for monitoring that these named processes are effective: The Virtual Learning Environment is used in order to provide rapid feedback to students on their coursework and supplement face-to-face feedback as appropriate. All courses have feedback included in the lectures and tutorials, where appropriate.

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GTAS, specifically trained in the marking of coursework and minor project elements are used to ensure return of marked work within the College specifications. Defaults are reported to the Senior Tutor and/or DUGs for appropriate action. Marked and annotated Coursework is returned to students. Some academic staff provide verbal feedback in class, others distribute written overviews. No engineering department provides feedback information to students on examination performance. d) Mechanisms for gaining student feedback on the quality of teaching and their learning experience and how students are provided with feedback as to actions taken as a result of their comments: Termly staff-student committee meetings and regular meetings between the Senior Tutor, the Director of Undergraduate Studies, and the academic and Departmental representatives are held during which issues related to teaching quality are discussed and feedback is provided to the students on actions taken as a result of their comments. SOLE reports are sent to individual staff and the DUGS. The DUGS is responsible for action on points raised with the relevant member of staff where necessary. In many departments staff student committee meetings and end of year meeting minutes are posted on the Departmental intranet with actionable items included. Annual requests by DUGs to student representatives to nominate staff for teaching awards, highlighting excellence. e) Mechanisms for monitoring the effectiveness of the personal tutoring system:

Termly staff-student committee meetings and regular meetings between the Senior Tutor, the Director of Undergraduate Studies, and the academic and Departmental representatives are held during which issues related to the personal tutoring system are discussed. In some departments: there are additionally end of year staff student committee meetings, a formal Senior Tutor review, a term reports that are completed by both student and personal tutor. f) Mechanisms for recognising and rewarding excellence in teaching and in pastoral care:

Staff are encouraged to reflect on their teaching, in order to introduce enhancements and develop innovative teaching methods. Each year College awards are presented to academic staff for outstanding contributions to teaching, pastoral care or research supervision. A special award for Teaching Innovation, available each year, is presented to a member of staff who has demonstrated an original and innovative approach to teaching. Nominations for these awards come from across the College and students are invited both to nominate staff and to sit on the deciding panels. Additionally, the Faculty of Engineering has an annual teaching celebration at which up to three FoE teaching excellence awards are made. Other awards – for student achievement in engineering education, and graduate teaching assistant awards for each department – are made at the same time. Some departments in engineering additionally have annual departmental teaching awards. g) Staff development priorities for this programme include: All new lecturing staff are required to undertake the College-run Certificate of Advanced Study in Learning and Teaching (CASLAT) programme. Each probationary lecturer is allocated a mentor, one zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ of the requirements of the mentor is to audit teaching. At probationary review the Director of Studies (or Director of Undergraduate Studies) is invited to submit a teaching assessment of the probationer. The aims of CASLAT are “to ensure that participants build on a foundation in the practice and theory of teaching, supervision, learning, assessment and course design in higher education. The teaching methods encourage participants and tutors to engage in constructively critical examination of underpinning theory and principles, to consider the implications of these for pedagogic practice and subject their own practice to scrutiny and enhancement. CASLAT is sensitive to the range of

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disciplines at Imperial, the various levels of teaching (undergraduate and postgraduate) and the Imperial context. The course draws upon education theory and research, but retains a primary intention to focus on practice. It is assumed all participants will be experts in their disciplinary field and be fully conversant with the subject material they teach” (reproduced from the following CASLAT webpage on the Imperial College London website http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/edudev/oldsite/professionaldevelopment/caslat). Upon completion of the CASLAT, lecturers are expected (the following are reproduced from the same webpage as above) • To demonstrate their understanding of the scholarship of how students learn through its impact on the teaching, assessment and course design modes that they employ; • To design a course in their discipline and implement a range of teaching methods; • To examine critically the likely advantages and disadvantages of the approaches to teaching employed; • To employ good practice in respect of student support, feedback and assessment, showing due respect for individual learners and their development; • To use and analyse critically the strengths and weaknesses of a range of methods for evaluating teaching; • To be aware of potential uses and the implications of communications and information technology for changing pedagogic practice; • To be constructively critical and reflective about their own pedagogic practice; • To have a working knowledge of the procedures, codes and norms pertaining to educational processes in their department/division, the College and, as appropriate - more widely - in England. Once staff have successfully completed their probationary period, they participate in the annual appraisal and development system, managed by the Head of Department. This seeks to ensure that all development needs are met for staff members to perform at their full potential. The College runs a variety of courses appropriate to staff at different stages of their careers.

22. Regulation of Assessment (you may find the following link useful when completing this section: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/registry/information/academicregulations) a) Assessment Rules and Degree Classification: For undergraduate programmes classification of degrees will be according to the following range of marks: First class Second class (upper division) Second class (lower division) Third class 70 - 100% 60 - 69.9% 50 - 59.9% 40 - 49.9%

For postgraduate taught programmes: The Pass Mark for postgraduate taught courses is 50%. In order to be awarded a result of merit, a candidate must obtain an aggregate mark of 60% or greater; a result of distinction requires an aggregate mark of 70% or greater. Where appropriate, a Board zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ of Examiners may award a result of merit where a candidate has achieved an aggregate mark of 60% or greater across the programme as a whole AND has obtained a mark of 60% or greater in each element with the exception of one element AND has obtained a mark of 50% or greater in this latter element. Where appropriate, a Board of Examiners may award a result of distinction where a candidate has achieved an aggregate mark of 70% or greater across the programme as a whole AND has obtained a mark of 70% or greater in each element with the exception of one element AND has obtained a mark of 60% or greater in this latter element.

31 Engineering Degrees

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b) Marking Schemes for undergraduate and postgraduate taught programmes: The Pass Mark for all undergraduate modules is 40%. From October 2008 entry all undergraduates are required to pass all their course units to progress to the next year. The Pass Mark for all postgraduate taught course modules is 50%. Students must pass all elements in order to be awarded a degree. c) Processes for dealing with mitigating circumstances: For undergraduate programmes: Candidates with mitigating circumstances are not subject to the borderline restrictions but should be considered individually. However, as a general principle, candidates whose marks are more than 5% below the borderline should not normally be raised to the next higher classification. Where the Board of Examiners determines that a higher classification should be awarded extra marks should be applied to bring the final marks into the higher range. For postgraduate taught programmes: A candidate for a Master’s degree who is prevented owing to illness or the death of a near relative or other cause judged sufficient by the Graduate Schools from completing at the normal time the examination or Part of the examination for which he/she has entered may, at the discretion of the Examiners, (a) Enter the examination in those elements in which he/she was not able to be examined on the next occasion when the examination is held in order to complete the examination, or be set a special examination in those elements of the examination missed as soon as possible and/or be permitted to submit any work prescribed (e.g. report) at a date specified by the Board of Examiners concerned. The special examination shall be in the same format as specified in the course regulations for the element(s) missed. Applications, which must be accompanied by a medical certificate or other statement of the grounds on which the application is made, shall be submitted to the Academic Registrar who will submit them to the Board of Examiners. d) Processes for determining degree classification for borderline candidates: For undergraduate programmes: Candidates who fall no more than 2.5% below the minimum mark for a higher honours classification shall be eligible for review of their final classification; this review could include an oral examination or practical test or other mechanism appropriate to the discipline. Candidates whose marks are below the 2.5% borderline may be considered for a higher honours classification where certain provisions apply. Where the Board of Examiners determines that a candidate should be awarded a higher honours classification extra marks should be applied to bring their final marks into the higher range. Detailed records of all decisions should be recorded in the minutes of the meeting of the Board. For postgraduate taught programmes: Candidates should only be considered for promotion to pass, merit or distinction if their aggregate mark is within 2.5% of the relevant borderline. Nevertheless, candidates whom the Board deems to have exceptional circumstances may be considered for promotion even if their aggregate mark is more than 2.5% from the borderline. In such cases the necessary extra marks should be credited to bring the candidate’s aggregate mark into the zycnzj.com/http://www.zycnzj.com/ higher range. e) Role of external examiners: The primary duty of external examiners is to ensure that the degrees awarded by the College are consistent with that of the national university system. External examiners are also responsible for approval of draft question papers, assessment of examination scripts, projects and coursework (where appropriate) and in some cases will attend viva voce and clinical examinations. Although

32 Engineering Degrees

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external examiners do not have power of veto their views carry considerable weight and will be treated accordingly. External examiners are required to attend each meeting of the Board of Examiners where recommendations on the results of individual examinations are considered. External examiners are required to write an annual report to the Rector of Imperial College which may include observations on teaching, course structure and course content as well as the examination process as a whole. The College provides feedback to external examiners in response to recommendations made within their reports. 23. Indicators of Quality and Standards (e.g. accreditation reports): • • • • • • • • • Consistently high demand for places on our Undergraduate programme Highly favourable comments by External Examiners Highly favourable comments by accreditors High proportion of students graduate with upper second and first class honours Periodic review of degree programmes by external assessors, organised by the QARC Participation in the Engineering Faculty Teaching Committee and Imperial College Senate Consistently high entry qualifications of students High proportion of our graduates obtain employment and many are actively sought by industry Many graduates go on to take postgraduate courses in College.

24. Key sources of information about the programme can be found in (links to course handbook, prospectus, departmental website, syllabus etc): Student handbooks and Undergraduate Prospectus For For For For For For For For Aeronautics Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computing EEE Materials Mechanical Engineering http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/aeronautics http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/bioengineering/ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/chemicalengineering/ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/civilengineering/ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/computing/ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/electricalengineering/ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/materials/ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/mechanicalengineering/

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33 Engineering Degrees

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