Integrated Logistic

Published on January 2017 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 46 | Comments: 0 | Views: 490
of 150
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content

 
 

 

2015
Inteegraated Loggistiics

Beullenns P. 
Univerrsity of South
hampton 
2/1/20015 



Integrated Logistics

 

Contents


Introduction .............................................................................................. 4 
1.1 
Defining Supply Chain Management ........................................................... 4 
1.2 
Understanding Supply Chain Management .................................................... 4 
1.3 
Measuring Supply Chain Performance ......................................................... 4 
1.4 
What is Integrated Logistics? ................................................................... 4 
2  IL & Finance .............................................................................................. 5 
2.1 
Strategy and Finance ............................................................................ 5 
2.2 
Time value of money............................................................................. 6 
2.2.1  Net Present Value for discrete interest rates ............................................. 6 
2.2.2  Net Present Value for continuous interest rates ......................................... 8 
2.2.3  Annuity Stream ............................................................................... 10 
2.2.4  Linear approximations of NPV and AS ..................................................... 10 
2.2.5  NPV and AS of a few useful cases .......................................................... 11 
2.3 
Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) – Harris (1913) ............................................ 14 
2.4 
Economic Production Quantity (EPQ) – Taft (1918) ........................................ 18 
2.5 
EOQ with batch demand – Grubbström (1980) .............................................. 21 
2.6 
Lot-for-lot production at finite rate – Monahan (1984) .................................... 24 
2.7 
EOQ for batch demand – Goyal (1976) ....................................................... 26 
2.8 
EPQ for batch demand – Joglekar (1988) .................................................... 28 
2.9 
Vending machine ................................................................................ 29 
2.10  Payment structures ............................................................................. 30 
2.11  Consignment arrangements .................................................................... 32 
2.12  The profit function of the integrated supply chain ........................................ 34 
2.13  Using the NPV framework to include other cost components ............................ 35 
3  IL in Buyer-Supplier Supply Chains .................................................................. 38 
3.1 
One-to-one shipping............................................................................. 38 
3.1.1  Shortest Path Problem ....................................................................... 38 
3.1.2  Economic Transport Quantity (ETQ) ....................................................... 41 
3.1.3  Maximum Economic Haulage Radius (MEHR) ............................................. 45 
3.1.4  Optimal policy to order N different items from a Cross-Docking Facility (CDF).... 46 
3.2 
One-to-many shipping .......................................................................... 48 
3.2.1  Length of an optimal TSP tour visiting many customers ............................... 48 
3.2.2  Expected length of an optimal TSP tour visiting a few customers ................... 51 
3.2.3  Continuous approximation of an optimal vehicle routing solution ................... 52 
3.2.4  One-to-many ETQ ............................................................................ 54 
4  Strategy in the supply chain: Alliances versus Leaders .......................................... 61 
4.1 
Alliances .......................................................................................... 61 
4.1.1  Cooperative game theory ................................................................... 61 
4.1.2  Alternative methods ......................................................................... 71 
4.2 
Two-party alliances in the supply chain ..................................................... 71 
4.2.1  Two-party alliance: example ............................................................... 71 
4.2.2  Two-party alliance: example 2 ............................................................. 79 
4.3 
Perfect coordination ............................................................................ 82 


 



Integrated Logistics

 
4.3.1  Perfect coordination schemes: examples ................................................ 83 
4.4 
Leaders and followers .......................................................................... 88 
4.4.1  Leaders and followers: Stackelberg games ............................................... 88 
4.4.2  Stackelberg leader in the supply chain: examples ...................................... 90 
5  Stochastic Models ...................................................................................... 96 
5.1 
When is the assumption of a constant demand rate valid? ............................... 96 
5.2 
(r, Q) reorder point models .................................................................... 97 
5.2.1  Backorder case ................................................................................ 98 
5.2.2  Lost sales case .............................................................................. 103 
5.2.3  Service level approach .................................................................... 103 
5.2.4  Standard Tables ............................................................................ 105 
5.2.5  Exercises ..................................................................................... 110 
5.3 
News vendor problems ........................................................................ 111 
5.3.1  Example ...................................................................................... 111 
5.3.2  Cost minimisation .......................................................................... 111 
5.3.3  Profit maximisation ........................................................................ 112 
5.3.4  Regret minimisation ....................................................................... 113 
5.3.5  Exercises ..................................................................................... 114 
6  MRP, JIT, and Bottlenecks .......................................................................... 116 
6.1 
Materials Requirements Planning ........................................................... 116 
6.1.1  MRP inputs ................................................................................... 116 
6.1.2  MRP outputs ................................................................................. 118 
6.1.3  Lot sizing policies .......................................................................... 122 
6.1.4  Remarks on MRP ............................................................................ 125 
6.2 
Just-In-Time .................................................................................... 130 
6.2.1  Motivation ................................................................................... 131 
6.2.2  Push and pull systems ..................................................................... 131 
6.2.3  The Kanban System ........................................................................ 131 
6.2.4  How many cards? ........................................................................... 132 
6.2.5  Subcontractors .............................................................................. 134 
6.2.6  Fluctuations in demand ................................................................... 134 
6.2.7  Comparison JIT and MRP .................................................................. 136 
6.3 
Bottleneck scheduling ........................................................................ 139 
6.3.1  Optimised Production Technology (OPT) ............................................... 139 
6.3.2  Theory Of Constraints (TOC).............................................................. 143 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
 

1 Introduction

For any questions, e‐mail: [email protected] 
 
See also the material on blackboard.  
 
This  text  follows  the  lectures  given,  but  I  may  have  arranged  the  sequence  of  a  few  topics  in  order  to 
arrive at a more logical flow.  

1.1 Defining Supply Chain Management
See slides on blackboard and read the following article (on blackboard): 
MENTZER  J  T,  DE  WITT  W,  KEEBLER  J  S,  MIN  S,  NIX  N  W,  SMITH  C  D,  AND  ZACHARIA  Z  G.  2001. 
DEFINING SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT. JOURNAL OF BUSINESS LOGISTICS 22 (2), 1‐25. 

1.2 Understanding Supply Chain Management
See slides on blackboard and read the following article (on blackboard): 
CHEN IJ AND PAULRAJ A. 2004. UNDERSTANDING SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT: CRITICAL RESEARCH 
AND A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PRODUCTION RESEARCH  42 (1), 131‐
163. 

1.3 Measuring Supply Chain Performance
See slides on blackboard and read the following article (hand‐out): 
SHEPHERD C AND GÜNTER H. 2006. MEASURING SUPPLY CHAIN PERFORMANCE: CURRENT RESEARCH 
AND  FUTURE  DIRECTIONS.  INTERNATIONAL  JOURNAL  OF  PRODUCTIVITY  AND  PERFORMANCE 
MANAGEMENT 55 (3/4), 242‐258. 
 

1.4 What is Integrated Logistics?
See the slides on blackboard. 



 


 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

2 IL & Finance

2.1 Strategy and Finance
Source:  SILVER  A.,  PYKE  D.F.,  AND  PETERSON  R.  1998.  INVENTORY  MANAGEMENT  AND  PRODUCTION 
PLANNING  AND  SCHEDULING,  THIRD  ED.  JOHN  WILEY  &  SONS,  NEW  YORK,  CHAPTER  2:  STRATEGIC 
ISSUES, P. 14. 
 
Integrated  Logistics  (IL)  should  be  linked  to  the  corporate  and  business  strategy.  The  most  important 
objective of any firm is arguably long term profitability. In this context the operating profit is defined as: 
 


 
 
IL can affect both terms on the right hand side. By reducing e.g. aggregate inventory levels in the firm, 
the  investment  cost  can  be  reduced.  By  allocating  proper  inventory  levels  among  different  items  in  an 
improved way, sales revenue may increase.  
 
One  common  aggregate  performance  measure  in  IL  and  inventory  management  is  the  inventory 
turnover:  
 


£
 



£
 
 
An  increase  in  sales  without  a  corresponding  increase  in  inventory  will  increase  the  inventory 
turnover, as will a decrease in inventory without a decline in sales. Turnover can be a useful measure to 
compare divisions of a firm or firms in an industry.  
A higher turnover ratio for the same level of sales means a more profitable business, as less money is 
tied up in inventories. The danger is that a reduction of inventory levels may also negatively affect sales. 
When it is not known with certainty how much demand there is per period, an amount of safety stock is 
needed  to  make  sure  enough  products  are  in  stock  in  case  demand  would  be  somewhat  higher  than 
expected. Furthermore, the right figure of inventory turnover for your firm depends on the level of in‐
house production versus out‐sourcing. A firm that does everything in‐house will need a lower inventory 
turnover than a firm that is completely based on outsourcing of the production. Indeed, the first firm will 
also have a stock of raw materials and work‐in‐process, while the second will only have end products in 
inventory.  These  considerations  are  important  when  comparing  inventory  turnover  figures  of  different 
firms.  
Other useful performance measures for IL include those that measure all sorts of: costs; average and 
variability of lead‐times (often seen as the time between initiation of some sales order and realisation of 
the  sales,  sometimes  also  just  the time is  takes  for  a product  to  move  through  a  particular  part  of  the 
supply  chain);  product  and  service  quality;  customer  satisfaction;  and  innovativeness  (see  also  Section 
1.3). 
 
 



 



Integrated Logistics

 

2.2 Time value of money
Source  (on  blackboard):  GRUBBSTRÖM,  R.W.  1980.  A  PRINCIPLE  FOR  DETERMINING  THE  CORRECT 
CAPITAL  COSTS  OF  WORK‐IN‐PROGRESS  AND  INVENTORY.  INT.  J.  OF  PRODUCTION  ECONOMICS  18(2), 
259‐271. 
 
2.2.1

Net Present Value for discrete interest rates

If I invest V (£) into a project now, the project having a rate of return    =0.2 after one year, what will be 
the amount of money a (£) that I will receive one year later? 
 
 
Cash‐flows 





1

Time


 

The answer:  
 
1

 

 
1.2  
 
If I keep the investment running not for one but for T years in total, what will be my reward at the 
end? 
 
Cash‐flows 





1

... 

2



Time


 

The answer: 
1

1

… 1

 

 
1
 
 
We can turn this around and ask the question: what is the current value V (£) of receiving a (£) within 
T years time from now? Algebraic manipulation of the above equation gives:  
 
1

 

 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
V is called the Net Present Value of a.  It thus all depends on the value of  , called the discount factor, 
interest rate, or internal rate of return.  Companies typically use values of  within the range 0.1 to 0.3.  
 
Consider a sequence of n payments of different amounts  ,
1, … ,  at equidistant points in time 
with cycle time T (see Figure below). What is the Net Present Value of these payments, if   is the rate of 
return over one period T? 
 




a2 
Cash‐flows 




an 

a1 



... 

2



Time 

 

The answer:  
 
1

 

 
 
The rate of return is a function of the time period over which it is defined. For example, if   is the 
rate of return over a one year period, what is the equivalent rate of return defined over a period of one 
month (take this to be 1/12th of a year) that would give the same Net Present Value? 
 
Answer: Let us call  the equivalent rate of return over one month, then with T = 12: 
 
 

1

1
 
 
1

1

 

 
 
Maths refresher 
ln
 
 
 
 
 
 
ln 1
 
 
 

1
ln 1
T

ln 1

ln 1

 

 

 
Thus, if the annual interest rate is 0.2, the equivalent monthly interest rate would be given by:  

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

1
ln 1
12

 
 
 

0.2

ln 1

 

.

1 0.0153 
 
Note that if the interest rate   would be defined over a small time period, then ln 1
 
2.2.2

.  

Net Present Value for continuous interest rates

In  general,  the  conversion  of  interest  rates  corresponding  to  different  lengths  of  period  obeys  the 
formula: 
 
1

ln 1
 
where   is the interest rate pertaining to a period of length  and   is the continuous interest rate 
corresponding to the limit length zero.  
 
The definition of Net Present Value in the continuous case becomes: 
 

 
 
where 
 is the cash‐flow at time   plus some multiple   of Dirac’s Delta function at points   at 
which there are finite payments  . 
 
We will typically need to solve only special cases, given below. 
 
Example 1 – A one‐off lump sum (£) received at future time L
Cash‐flows 


V



L

Time 


 

 

 
 
Thus  the  NPV  of  a  cash‐flow  received  L  time  units  in  the  future  is  the  cash‐flow  multiplied  with  its 
“delay” factor 
.  


 



Integrated Logistics

 
Example 2 – A finite number of cash revenues, each received their own future moment
T1 
T2

a2 

Cash‐flows 

an 

a1 

V
0



... 





Time 
 

 
Example 3 – An infinite number of equal cash revenues received at equidistant moments



Cash‐flows 

... 
a





a



2

... 

Time 
 

 
 
 
 
Maths refresher 
If | | 1 , then 
 
 
 ∑

 
For 
, | | 1 
 
 
Thus:  
 
1

 

 


 


 



Integrated Logistics

 
Example 4 ‐ A continuous cash‐flow at a rate of a (£/year) received for eternity.
Cash‐flows 


.... 



Time
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
2.2.3

Annuity Stream

The Annuity Stream AS of a series of cash‐flows is the Net Present Value V of these cash‐streams times 
the rate of return  :  
 

 
 
From example 4, it is clear that the annuity stream is that continuous stream of cash yielding the same 
net present value as the original series of cash‐flows.  
 
2.2.4

Linear approximations of NPV and AS

 
Maths refresher 
Maclaurin expansion of an exponential function 


1
and converges for    ∞
 
Using this result for 
 

!

!

⋯  
∞ 

, it is easy to see that:  
1

2



 
and it can also be proven (after lengthy algebraic manipulation): 
 
1
 
2
12
1
 
 
This  can  be  used  to  derive  linear  or  quadratic  approximations  in  of  NPV  or  AS  functions,  as 
illustrated in the next section.  
 

10 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
2.2.5

NPV and AS of a few useful cases

Case 1 ‐ A one‐off lump sum a (£) received at future moment L
Cash‐flows 





L

Time 


1

 

 

 


1

 

 
For a one‐off lump sum, both the linear approximation of the NPV and the quadratic approximation in 
  of  the  AS  are  acceptable,  and  indeed  would  be  of  the  same  accuracy.  However,  the  linear 
approximation of AS would be insufficiently accurate – as indeed the above shows,   cannot be the AS 
 
as  a  itself  is  not  its  NPV.  The  linear  approximation  of  the  AS  would  thus  neglect  the  delay  effect 
altogether.  
Case 2 ‐ An infinite series of lump‐sum payments a (£) received with cycle time T.



Cash‐flows 

... 
a









2

... 

Time 

 
1 1
1
 
 

2

1
2

1

12

 

12

 

 
1
1

2

 

 
 
For an infinite series of cash‐flows, the linear approximation of AS is acceptable.  

11 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Case 3 ‐ A continuous cash‐flow at rate a (£/year), starting at time L, and forever lasting.

Cash‐flows 


.... 



Time 
 
 

 


 

 
It can be observed that this result could have been obtained by combining example 4 and case 3 from 
above. Indeed the NPV at time L of the continuous cash‐flow a is a/  (example 4), and then accounting 
for the delay with time L (case 1) gives the above result.  
 
1
 
2
 
 
 
 
1
 
Case 4 ‐ A continuous cash‐flow at rate a (£/year) received in future time period T, starting at
time L.
  
L



Cash‐flows 



Time 
 

 
 
 
 
1

 

 
This result can also be obtained by viewing the temporary continuous cash‐flow a as the sum of two 
infinite continuous cash‐flows +a and –a (starting a time T later), and thus by applying the result of case 3 
twice: 
12 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
1



 

 
To  find  the  linear  approximation,  it  is  safe  to  take  the  quadratic  terms  first  into  consideration  and 
approximate later on:  
 
1

2



1

1—

2



 

 
 

2
 
 
1

 

 
Case 5 ‐ An infinite series of continuous cash‐flows at rate a (£/year) with cycle time L and each
time received for a length of time T (T ≤ L).
 

Cash‐flows 







.... 





Time 

The  result  of  case  4  (without  delay)  can  first  be  applied  to  find  the  NPV  of  the  cash‐flow  of  every 
period L. Using the approach as in case 2 then gives:  
 
1
1

 
1
 
To find the linear approximation of AS, it is again safe to first consider the quadratic terms as well:  
 
1

1
1
1

⋯  
2!
2
 
2

2

 

 
 
 
 
 

13 
 

 



Integrated Logistics

 

2.3 Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) – Harris (1913)
A retailer sells to customers a type of product at the price p per product. Demand for the product can 
be assumed to occur at a constant rate according to an annual demand of   products. 
The retailer has to purchase from an external supplier at price   per product, and also has to pay a 
fixed order cost   for each order placed at this supplier (this could be the fixed cost of transport plus the 
fixed cost of administration to place an order).  
retailer 
w(£/product)
s(£/order) 

y(products/year)
p(£/product) 
Q (products/order)?
T (cycle time) ? 
 

 

Inventory 
retailer 

T

... 
Q

r

L

Time
 

Figure 1. Lot-size model (EOQ).
 
When  the  retailer  would  place  an  order  or  size  Q  (products/order)  with  cycle  time  T,  the  inventory 
level over time at the retailer will follow the classical saw‐tooth pattern as illustrated in the Figure above.  
It can be observed that:  
 



 

 
If  there  is  a  non‐zero  lead‐time  ,  and  we  want  to  make  sure  that  the  order  arrives  when  the 
inventory  drops  to  zero,  we  must  order  in  advance  when  the  inventory  level  is  .  This    is  called  the 
reorder point.  
The traditional approach to deriving the optimal policy
We consider a deterministic system in which all relevant parameters are constant and shortages are not 
allowed. The policy used is (r, Q). Although the aim is to find optimal values for both r and q, the optimal 
value for   is easily determined. The problem therefore reduces to finding the optimal lot size Q. In this 
classic economic lot size system the following assumptions are made: 
 
1. constant annual demand rate y (items / year); 
14 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

constant infinite replenishment rate R = ; 
constant unit holding cost h(£ / item, year); 
constant unit order cost s (£ / order); 
no shortages allowed; 
constant lead time L = 0, easily extended to constant L  0 (years). 
constant replenishment quantity Q (items/order). 

 
The inventory fluctuations in this system are illustrated in Figure 1. It is clear that we place the order 
at exactly that moment so that replenishments arrive when on‐hand inventory reaches zero: if lead time 
L = 0, we order when the inventory level I(t) = r* = 0; if L  0 (and L < T), we order when I(t) = r* = D L. 
Shortages are therefore not possible and shortage costs do not need to be considered. Total costs will 
hence consist of inventory holding costs and procurement costs. Increasing the lot size Q will reduce the 
number of orders to make per year and hence the annual procurement costs. However, it will increase 
the  average  inventory  on‐hand  and  therefore  the  annual  holding  costs.  The  optimal  lot  size  Q*  will  be 
that quantity that minimises the sum of both annual costs. 
 
The average amount of inventory on‐hand being E(I) = Q/2, the holding cost per year is: 
 
hQ
1

 h (Q) 

2

As y/Q represents the number of orders per year, the order cost per year is given by:  

 p (Q) 

2

sy
Q

Per definition we want no backorders or lost sales: 

 s (Q)  0

3

It follows that the total cost equals:  

(Q)   h (Q)   p (Q)   s (Q) 

hQ s y

Q
2

4

To find the optimal lot size we take the derivative of (Q) with respect to Q: 

d(Q) h s y
  2 0
dQ
2 Q

5

which gives:  

Q* 

2s y
h

6

Note that we will always denote with superscript * the optimal value of a decision variable; i.e. Q* is 
the optimal lot size. The corresponding optimal cost is:  
 

15 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
(Q) 

Total cost 
Holding cost 
Order cost 



Q* 


 

Figure 2. Global cost function of the EOQ model.
 

 

 Q*  2 s h y

7

And since  
y = Q/T,

8

Q*
2s

y
hy

9

the optimal cycle time is:  

T* 

 
Graphically,  the  cost  equations  can  be  described  as  in  Figure  2.  At  optimum,  annual  holding  costs 
equal annual replenishment costs.  
 
Using the NPV framework to derive the optimal policy
The NPV framework can also be used to derive the optimal values of Q and T. Therefore, the cash‐flows 
for  the  retailer  have  to  be  determined.  The  following  assumptions  are  adopted:  Since  demand  is 
occurring  at  a  constant  rate  ,  the  customers  pay  a  continuous  cash‐flow  of    to  the  retailer.  The 
 to the 
retailer will pay the set‐up cost   upon receiving every batch  , as well as the amount 
supplier. This is illustrated in Figure 3.  
 
 

16 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

Cash‐flows 
py 

.... 



.... 

Time 

s+wyT 
 
Figure 3. Cash-flows representation of the EOQ model.
 
The annuity stream of the profit function for the retailer is:  
 

1
 
The linear approximation 
 
 

 

in   is thus: 
1
2

 

 
 
Since 
 

2

 

2



2

2

 

 
The  optimal  value  for  Q  can  be  obtained  by  taking  the  derivative  of  this  profit  function  to  Q,  and 
setting this equal to 0:  
 
2

 
 


2



 

 
Thus the same result is obtained, and in addition it becomes very clear how the holding cost (£ per 
product per year), used in the traditional inventory framework, needs to be calculated:  
 
 
 
Thus, the holding cost for the retailer is related to the amount of money invested per product, i.e.  . 
We will later encounter examples were the holding costs per product per year will be different.  
 

17 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

2.4 Economic Production Quantity (EPQ) – Taft (1918)
In this section we will analyse a lot size system in which the replenishment rate is not necessarily infinite 
as has been assumed in the previous section. Specifically, the system has a uniform replenishment rate R 
(items/year), where it is obviously necessary that R  y. This type of replenishing generally occurs when 
the  demand  has  to  be  met  by  a  manufacturing  department  inside  the  company.  The  inventory 
fluctuations can then be described graphically as in Figure 4.  
 
producer
c(£/product)
s(£/order) 
R(products/yr) 

y(products/year)
w(£/product) 
Q (products/order)?
T (cycle time) ? 

 
A producer sells to customers a type of product at the price w per product. Demand for the product 
can be assumed to occur at a constant rate according to an annual demand of   products. 
The producer has to make the products at a variable production cost   per product, and also has to 
pay a fixed set‐up cost   for each run of these products.  Production occurs at a constant finite production 
rate equivalent to an annual rate of   (products per year).  
 
The traditional approach to deriving the optimal policy
 
I(t) 






b

R



Lr 

t


Figure 4. Manufacturing lot size system.
 
The average amount of inventory equals 
 
E(I) = |bc|/2

10

We have the following relationships:  
18 
 

 



Integrated Logistics

 

bc  ac  ab

(geometrical relationship)

11

 

y

ab

R

ac

12

(demand rate)

r

L

                  

Q
Lr



r

L

(replenishment rate)

13

Hence the average amount in inventory can be rewritten as a function of the known parameters y and 
R and the variable Q:  

1
y  Q
y
E ( I )   Q  Q   1  
2
R  2  R

14

The number of replenishments per year equals y/Q. The total system cost is the sum of holding costs 
and replenishment costs: 
 
15
y hQ  y 
y

(Q)  hE( I )  s

Q



1    s
2  R Q

 
The value Q* which minimises total costs can be obtained as follows: 
 

d(Q) h 
y  sy
 1    2  0
dQ
2 R Q

16

 

Q* 

where  Q

*
EOQ

2 sy
*
 QEOQ
y

h 1  
 R

17

1
y

1  
 R

 
 refers to the economic order quantity of the basic EOQ model. The corresponding cost 

is given by substitution of 
 





(Q* ) 

h
y
1  
2 R

2 sy
s
y

h1  
 R

y
2 sy
y

h1  
 R

18

Rearranging:  

19 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

 (Q* ) 

19

y
y


shy1  
shy1  
 R 
 R
2
2

 
20

y
y


 (Q * )  2 shy 1     *EOQ 1  
 R
 R

 
where   *EOQ  refers to the cost obtained in basic EOQ model.  It is easy to show that the EOQ model is 
a special case of the continuous rate EOQ model by simply substituting R = . 
 
Example.
Let y = 1000 items/year, R = 2000 units/year, h= 1.6 £/year, and s = 200 £/year. Then:  
 

2 sy

y

h1  
 R

Q* 

21

2 (1000)(2000)
 500000  707 units/order.
1.61  0.5

Using the NPV framework to derive the optimal policy
The following cash‐flows are assumed: 
 

Cash‐flows  yT/R 
wy 

.... 



.... 

cR 

Time 


 

Then, using Case 5 of Section 2.2.5 for the variable production costs: 
 
1

 

 
 
1
2

2

2

 

 
2

1

2

 

 
The optimal order quantity is derived in the usual manner from the first order conditions: 
 
20 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
2



 

1

 
The same result is thus obtained as in the traditional derivation if: 
 
 

2.5 EOQ with batch demand – Grubbström (1980)
We consider the same system as in the previous section but with two modifications: 
1. The production rate is set such that 
;  
2. Sales occurs in batches of size   
producer 
c(£/product)
s(£/order) 
R(products/yr) 

y(products/year)
w(£/product) 
Q (products/order)?
T (cycle time) ? 
 

The inventory level as a function of time looks like a mirror image of the EOQ sawtooth pattern:  

Inventory 
.... 


Time 
 

The traditional approach to deriving the optimal policy
This would be exactly the same model as the EOQ of Harris and would produce: 
 

(Q)  hE( I )  s



y hQ
y

s  
Q 2
Q



Using the NPV framework to derive the optimal policy
First NPV solution. This is how Grubbström (1980) derived a solution: 

21 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 

 
 
 
on: 
Hencce the linear aapproximatio

1

1

1
2

2

 

 
2

2

Thereefore: 


2

 

This m
means that th
he holding co
osts in the traaditional fram
mework are to be based oon the sales p
price   of 
the prod
duct and not tthe purchase price  : 
 
 
 
delivery of orrders to the ccustomer 
Noticce, however,  that with the increase off   we are delaying the d
while thee start of pro
oduction is ke
ept fixed at ccurrent time  0. We can in
nterpret this  as a model w
where we 
have placed a boundaary condition
n at time 0. Thhis is not neccessarily always the best aassumption.  
 
ution. Beullen
ns and Jansseens (2011) in
ntroduced another model  where this b
boundary 
Alternattive NPV solu
condition is placed att the momen
nt in time wh en the first b
batch to the ccustomer hass to be delive
ered. This 
assumpttion  would  make 
m
more  sense  if  the  ccustomer  waants  this  to  happen, 
h
becaause  otherwise  if  the 
momentt of first delivvery is not fixxed, the custtomer may e
either run out of stock or 
r receive the  products 
too  earlyy  and  has  un
nnecessary  stock  too  earrly.  A  produccer  under  the
ese  circumsttances  would
d  need  to 
derive an
n optimal pollicy from the following NPPV calculation
ns:  
 
This can be re‐written
n as: 
 

22 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 
d constant, w
we need to ffind the optim
mal policy fro
om the functtion inside th
he square 
And sincce   is a fixed
bracketss: 
 
 

 

 
 

 
Giving, when 
 

3
2



2

2

 





2
2

 

 
e latter case,  the produce
er has an ince
entive to makke the lot‐size
e as large 
and  ∗ → ∞ otheerwise. (In the
as alloweed by the cusstomer and su
uch that  ∗
.  
The h
holding costs in this case ccould hence bbe taken as:
 
2
 
Alternatively, we can look at   to derive tw
wo terms: 
 
products, justt like in the ttraditional EO
OQ, to be 
1. TThe producerr will have a  holding cost  of keeping p
vvalued  at  his  own  invesstment  costss  and  this  holding  costt  correspondds  to  the  trraditional 
in
nterpretation
n of being bassed on investtments made
e into the product placed iin stock: 

2. TThe producerr will also havve a positive eeffect from th
he batch deliveries to the 
e customer givving a so‐
ccalled  unit  supplier’s  rew
ward 
    (B
Beullens  and Janssens,  22011).  Note  that  this 
p
produces a reevenue, not a cost! 
 
nction: 
We can tthen rewrite the profit fun
 
3

 
2
2
2
 
usion,  it  is  in
n  some  mode
els  therefore  important  how 
h
to  set  th
he  boundary  condition  in  the  NPV 
In  conclu
framewo
ork. This boun
ndary conditiion is called tthe Anchor Po
oint (Beullens and Janssenns, 2011).  
23 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

2.6 Lot‐for‐lot production at finite rate – Monahan (1984)
We  can  extend  the  previous  model  of  batch  demand  by  assuming  that  the  producer  runs  every  batch 
  at  some  finite  production  rate 
.  The  producer  would  hence  only  start  a  production  run 
some time  /  earlier relative to the delivery of a batch to the customer. 
 

Inventory 

yT/R 
.... 


Time 
 

The classic cost function of this system (Monahan, 1984) is given by: 
 
Φ

 
2

 
A  first  solution  using  NPV  is  found  from  setting  the  Anchor  Point  at  start  of  production  at  time  0, 
assuming the cash‐flows as in the figure below. 

Cash‐flows  yT/R 

wyT 
.... 



.... 

cR 

Time 


 

If the start of production has to occur at time 0, the annuity stream is:  
 
1

 

 
1

1

1
2

2

2

2

 

 
 
2

2

2



2

 

 
Comparing with the classic cost function, we find that 
2
 and we have as an extra term 
the supplier’s reward with 

In the special case that   we retrieve the solution from the previous section: 
 
2

2

 

24 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
and  the  holding  cost  is  then 
.  Note,  however,  that  we  can  always  write 
2
, so instead of adopting a special interpretation 
, we see that we can equally adopt the 
more general interpretation (since valid for any 
of having 
2
 and an extra term, the 
.  
supplier’s reward, with 
 
When setting the Anchor Point at the start of sales, we find: 
 
1

 

 
The function in between the square brackets is re‐written as: 
 
1 2
2

2

2

 

 
Thus  we  can  take 
  and  identify,  again,  the  supplier’s  reward  as  an  extra  term  with 
.  The  special  case  of      is  as  seen  in  the  previous  section  and  can  use  the  same 
interpretations for   and  . 
 
Using the traditional inventory modeling approach, one would only find the first part  . This is in fact 
what happened in the literature that has followed Monahan’s (1984) model, and hence there are models 
in the literature for which it may not be easy to see whether they will lead to inventory policies which will 
also maximise the NPV of the future profits of the firm. See also Beullens (2014).  
 
We finish this section by providing  some  intuition behind the supplier’s reward.  As  shown above, it 
indicates that there is a positive revenue term in the producer’s linearised AS profit function:  
 


2

 

 
The supplier’s reward arises from the fact that the customer orders in batch rather than one product 
at a time. An intuitive explanation is the following: 
 
Case A. Suppose you have two options to receive income: either receiving £1,200 at the start of every 
year,  or  £100  at  the  start  of  every  month,  what  would  you  choose?  The  logical  answer  would  be  to 
choose the first option.  
Case  B.  Suppose  you  have  two  options  to  pay  expenses:  either  paying  £1,200  at  the  start  of  every 
year,  or  £100  at  the  start  of  every  month,  what  would  you  choose?  The  logical  answer  this  time  is  to 
choose the latter option.  
 
The  fact  that  a  customer  orders  in  batch  will  cause  inventory  costs  for  this  customer.  The 
disadvantage for the customer to order in batch is extra inventory holding costs to be valued at invested 
cost  ,  but  at  the  same  time  this  creates  an  advantage  for  the  supplier  as  he  receives  his  revenues 
  earlier.  The  supplier’s  reward  term  incorporates  this  advantage  into  the  supplier’s  profit 
function.  
Homework
Derive the optimal order quantity using the classic cost function Φ
 in which 
and then derive 
the optimal order quantity using the linearised annuity stream function   under the two assumptions of 
the Anchor Point. Compare the three results. 

25 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

2.7 EOQ for batch demand – Goyal (1976)
We consider a model of a distributor who needs to deliver orders of batch size   to customers with an 
average  demand  rate  .  Customers  pay    per  product  to  the  distributor  but  the  distributor  incurs  a 
delivery cost   per delivery. The distributor can place orders of size   to its own supplier and has to pay 
 per product and has an order cost of   per order.  
distributor
c(£/product)
  (£/order) 

y(products/year)
w(£/product) 
 (products/order) 
(£/order)
 

(products/order)?
 (cycle time) ? 

 

Inventory 
.... 


Time 
It can be proven that it is optimal for the distributor to have 
 for   some positive integer. 
See also the above figure. The classic derivation of the cost function is again based on trigonometry and 
produces the result (Goyal, 1976): 
 
Φ





 

1  
2

 
To derive the AS profit function, we use the following cash‐flows: 
 

Cash‐flows 

wyT 

wyT 
.... 




.... 

Time 

 
Note that placing the Anchor Point at start of sales to the customers or placing the Anchor Point at 
start of the first batch arriving from the supplier produces the same boundary condition at time 0. The AS 
function is: 
 
26 
 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
1

2

2

 
Comparison of this result with the classic cost function shows that 

extra term, the supplier’s reward, with 

2

 

, but also that there is an 

Exercise
Derive the optimal order quantity  ∗   ∗ using the classic cost function Φ
 in which 
then derive the optimal order quantity using the linearised annuity stream function  .  
 
We illustrate the procedure for the classic function. We need to minimise: 
 
Φ





and 

1  
2

 
by choosing and optimal integer value, say  . This value must satisfy two conditions: 
 
Φ
1  
Φ
Φ
1  
Φ
From the first condition we can derive: 
 




1

2





1

1

1  
2

 
Hence 
 
1

1
1



 
 
Or  
 

2

1
 
This inequality is a quadratic function in 
 

2

 



. The non‐negative root is given by: 
1
1
2

1

8

 

But  the  solution  has  to  be  integer:    (=the  largest  integer  not  larger  than 
quadratic inequality.  
 
From the second condition we derive similarly that: 
 
2
1


And we can proceed as for the first condition to derive the same 
. Hence: 
together imply   ∗
 






1
1
2

1

8

always  satisfies  the 

 as always feasible. Both conditions 

 

27 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 
 
ptimal  ∗  fo r   can be d
derived from this result foor the classicc function 
Note thaat the derivattion of the op
by  substtitution  of 
.  The  reason 
r
is  thaat  the  supplier’s  reward  is  a  constantt  term  that  does  not 
depend o
on  . 

2.8 E
EPQ for ba
atch dema
and – Jogleekar (198
88)
We  intro
oduce  in  thee  previous  model 
m
a  finitee  production
n  rate  (with

).  In   this  model,    is  the 
production cost per p
product and   is the set‐uup cost for a  production run. The decission variable   is the 
or a single pro
oduction run.. 
production lot‐size fo
producer
c(£/productt) 
  (£/order) 
R (products//year) 
(prooducts/order)?
 (cyccle time) ? 

y(products/year)
w(£/prroduct) 
 (prod
ducts/order) 
(£/orrder)
 

 
If we assume thatt 
 a
as in the prevvious model,  the inventorry level over  time may look like in 
n example). 
the following figure (tthis is just an
 

 

 
unction is derived in Joglekkar (1988): 
The cclassic cost fu
 
Φ





1

2

 
2

 
Settin
ng the Ancho
or Point at sta
art of sales a s in the figurre above, and
d when makinng assumptio
ons about 
the  timing  of  cash‐fflows  as  in  the 
t previouss  sections,  produces  the  following  li nearised  AS  function 
ns, 2014): 
(Beullenss and Janssen
 
2
1
1
 
2
2
2
2
 
Hencce, 

, an
nd again therre is the extraa term with 
 
ng the Ancho
or Point at start of the firsst production
n run will pro
oduce a diffeerent   funcction. We 
Settin
do not derive the result here. 
 
28 
 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
Note that the model of Joglekar incorporates previously considered models: 
 For  → ∞, we get Goyal’s model; 
 For 
1, we get Monahan’s model; 
 For 
1 and 
, the EOQ model with batch demand of Grubbström. 
 
Homework
 in which 
and then derive 
Derive the optimal order quantity using the classic cost function Φ
the optimal order quantity using the linearised annuity stream function  . Compare the two results. 

2.9 Vending machine
We illustrate the usefulness of the NPV framework for deriving the profit function of a vending machine 
operator. We consider a single product sold at a price   in a vending machine of capacity  . The product 
has a cost price   for the vendor. The vendor has a set‐up cost   for delivering a batch of products to the 
vending machine. Upon the delivery of products to the vending machine, the operator collects the coins 
of the customers. Assume a constant demand rate  . 
 
The  inventory  level  over  time  follows  the  EOQ  saw‐tooth  pattern.  The  cash‐flows  however  differ  from 
that in the EOQ model and are given in the figure below.  
 

Cash‐flows 

pyT
.... 



.... 

Time 

s+wyT 
 




 

 
2

2

 

 
The holding cost for a vending machine is to be based on 
, i.e. based on the sum of cost 
price and sales price!  
 
The reason why this result differs from the EOQ model is that the coins put into a vending machine by 
customers is cash that is not yet accessible to the vendor operator. Only upon collection of these coins 
can the vendor have access to this capital for reinvestment. It is as if the customers only exchange the 
cash with the operator the moment the operator empties the vending machine’s coins register.  
 
It can be proven that the optimal lot‐size is 



min

,



 
This example illustrates that the profit function in the NPV framework will depend on the assumptions 
we make about when cash is exchanged. We call this the payment structure and it is further discussed in 
the next section. 
29 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 

2.10 P
Payment sstructuress
Considerr the transfer of a batch  of   productts between aa buyer and  a supplier. Leet   be the  price per 
product  that the buyyer has to pay the supplieer. In the pre
evious sections, we have  consistently  assumed 
that the total amountt   is paid ffor the momeent   that the
e batch arrive
es at the buyeer.  
 
If  thee  payment  occurs  in  full  at  the  time  of  delivery    then  it  is  said  that  the  payment  strructure  is  
Conventtional  (C).  It  is  not  the  on
nly  reasonab le  assumptio
on  we  can  make.  In  realitty,  it  may  be
e  that  the 
buyer paays at differen
nt moments in time, incluuding: 
 
t buyer  paays  at  some  time 
t
before  the  delivery  is  made,  sayy  at  time 
 Cash‐In‐Advaance  (CIA):  the 
, with 
0.  
, with 
 Credit (CR): tthe buyer can
n pay the suppplier later th
han the time of delivery, ssay at time 
0  
 
Theree are furtherm
more the following two coonsiderationss: 
 
n instalmentss. The buyer  may pay, forr example, a  fraction of t he amount d
due 

 Payments in
with 0
1, as CIA (this could be aa deposit paid the momen
nt when the bbuyer places his order 
at the supplier), and the rremainder  1
 witth a CR arrangement. 
ansaction dellays. Due to inefficiencies and costs chharged by the
e financial 
 Transaction costs and tra
used, the sup
pplier may recceive a differrent amount and at a diffferent time re
elative to 
instrument u
the amount aand time the buyer has m
made a payme
ent.  
 
The payment  of the amou
unt   is CIA, of  is C, annd of  is CR
R and has 
The ffigure below  illustrates. T
transactiion  costs  an
nd  delays.  We 
W call  the  first  two  paayments 
  andd  the  third  payment 

 

 

 

will  hencefortth  assume  th
hat  transactioon  costs  and
d  delays  are  zero  or  so  sm
mall  that  the
ey  can  be 
We  w
ignored. All payments further considered are hhence 

 
It is not d
difficult to ad
dapt all previously consideered models for situations where paym
ments occur CIA or CR 
in cases where the tim
me   is speciffied. An exam
mple follows.
EOQ mo
odel with CR
R and CIA pay
yment strucctures
Assume  that all custo
omers pay with a CR of tiime   but th
hat you have to pay the ssupplier with CIA with 
ow diagram is given below
w. Since we  have to pay  the supplier  in advance,  we must 
time  .  The cash‐flo
assume tthat the first delivery will occur at som
me future time   with 

 
 

30 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
L



Cash‐flows 


py 

....



.... Time 

wyT
 

This gives: 








 

 




2

2



 

 
2




 
We also get: 
Φ



 









2

2

 

and 
 




2

2



 


Note. It is easy to see that if customers would pay CIA we can use the above model but consider negative 
values for  . Likewise, we can study the impact of receiving a credit period from the supplier by taking in 
the above model negative values for  . 
Numerical example
The  table  below  illustrates  the  impact  for  an  example  with 
£25/

£150/

2000
/

0  and 
£50/
.  We  take 
0.2.  <Note.  We  only  evaluate 
the part of the profit AS function that is within the square brackets.> 
The % gap is a common measure for getting insight in relative differences between a scenario and a 
base  case  scenario.  In  the  table  it  is  calculated  as  the  percentage  difference  relative  to  the  base  case 
scenario of a conventional payment of the supplier i.e. for 
0. The % gap for measure   is: 
 


0

%

100
∗ 0
 
where  in  the  above  table    is,  respectively,  ,  Φ,  and  .  It  can  be  observed  that  the  increase  in 
logistics  costs  is  much  smaller  than  the  corresponding  profit  loss.  For  assessing  the  impact  of  different 
timings of payments it is hence much safer to consider the profit function.  
 
 
 
 

31 
 



Integrated Logistics

 


(months)

(products/order)

% gap

Φ∗

% gap

(-)

(£/year)

(-)



(£/year)

% gap
(-)

0

346 

0.00 

1732 

0.00 

48253 

0.00 

1

344 

‐0.83 

1747 

0.84 

47398 

‐1.77 

2

341 

‐1.65 

1761 

1.68 

46529 

‐3.57 

3

338 

‐2.47 

1776 

2.53 

45646 

‐5.40 

4

335 

‐3.28 

1791 

3.39 

44747 

‐7.27 

5

332 

‐4.08 

1806 

4.25 

43834 

‐9.16 

6

330 

‐4.88 

1821 

5.13 

42906 

‐11.08 

 

2.11 Consignment arrangements
Consignment  arrangements  are  popular  payment  structures  in  some  industries  between  suppliers  and 
buyers. These buyers are companies themselves and may be retailers or production companies. The stock 
held  at  a  buyer  under  this  arrangement  is  called  the  consignment  stock.  It  is  hence  inventory  that  is 
physically held at the premises of the buyer, but financially it is still under the (partial) ownership of the 
supplier. Only when a product is removed from this consignment stock, will the buyer have to complete 
the payment for the product to the supplier. 
 
Assume that the price for a product that a buyer needs to pay to the supplier is  . 
 
We can distinguish between the following three common consignment arrangements: 
 
 Full Consignment (FC): the supplier retains ownership of the inventory at the buyer and this is 
implemented by letting the buyer pays the supplier the price   for a product only at the moment 
that this product is actually taken out of the consignment stock at the buyer. This product is then 
to be used in the buyer’s production process, or in the case of the buyer being a retailer, when 
the buyer actually sells the product to one of its own customers. 
 
 Partial Consignment (PC): the supplier is paid an amount   for each product when the product is 
delivered  to  the  buyer’s  consignment  inventory,  but  the  remainder 
  is  only  paid  out  the 
moment  the  product  is  taken  out  of  the  consignment  stock  by  the  buyer  (for  reasons  as 
explained  above  for  the  case  of  full  consignment).  The  price    can  in  principle  be  any  agreed 
amount; it does not need to be the supplier’s own cost price. 
 
 Grace period (GP(z)): This is somewhat similar to PC in that the buyer may first pay an amount   
the  moment  that  products  are  delivered  to  its  consignment  stock,  but  the  remainder 
  is 
then to be paid back according to a credit arrangement that depends on the average cycle time   
between deliveries. This credit period is called the grace period and its moment of payment is in 
general as follows: 
 


 
where    is  a  suitably  chosen  constant.  The  idea  is that  when  a  buyer  orders  in  larger  lot‐sizes, 
that the credit period the supplier is willing to offer also becomes longer.  
  
We illustrate the three payment structures with the following example.  
32 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
A buyer‐supplier model with consignment arrangements
We consider a buyer having an EOQ problem and the supplier delivering to this buyer then to have the 
EOQ problem with batch demand. Both models were discussed previously. The AS function of the buyer, 
under conventional payment structures, was: 
 
2

2



 
where the subscript   is used to make clear that it concerns the buyer. The supplier’s AS function was: 
 
1

2

2

2

.  

 
We now introduce a generalised payment structure which has the above discussed three variations of 
consignment in it: 
 
 An amount   is paid for a product when it is delivered to the buyer; 
 An amount   is paid for a product when the buyer sells the product to its own customers; 
  is  paid  for  with  a  grace  period    time  units  after  the 
 The  remainder 
delivery of the product to the buyer. 
 
Hence,  for 
0 , 
0 and 
  this  corresponds  to  FC;  for 
0  but 
0  this 
corresponds to PC; and with 
0 but 
0 to GP(z). The more general case has all three amounts 
non‐zero. Note that 

 
Customers of the buyer still pay according to the conventional structure C, as in the EOQ model. 
 
The buyer’s AS function changes to: 
 


 

 
We linearise the exponential terms in the decision variable   and find: 
 


1

2

2

2

 

 
Note  that  the  holding  cost  for  the  buyer  is  based  on 
1 2 .  For 
,  the 
holding cost for the   component is zero. For 
1, the holding cost for the   component becomes a 
negative cost i.e. will increase the buyer’s profit function. 
 
The supplier’s AS function changes to: 
 


 

 
2
 
The supplier’s reward is affected and now to be based on 

1

1

2
1

2
2

2





33 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

2.12 The profit function of the integrated supply chain
If  firms  in  a  supply  chain  want  to  identify  the  optimal  way  of  coordinating,  then  a  commonly  used 
benchmark is assuming that the firms would operate as one virtual organisation. This virtual organisation 
represents  the  integrated  supply  chain.  To  derive  its  optimal  policy,  we  arguably  need  to  have  a  profit 
function as well. We illustrate with an example what can be done, and where there are still some open 
problems.  
 
Consider  the  buyer‐supplier  model  from  the  previous  section,  but  assume  conventional  payment 
structures. The profit functions of both firms are, respectively: 
 
2

2
1

2



2

2



 
It is tempting to postulate that the profit function of the integrated supply chain is found as their sum: 
 
 
 
This gives: 
 


1

2



 
2

2

 
However, this function now makes use of two different opportunity costs of capital,   and  . Would 
an  integrated  firm  not  be  in  a  position  to  use  one  common  opportunity  cost  of  capital  instead?  If  we 
would assume that both capital cost rates are replaced by one common rate   we would find: 
 




2


1


2

2

2

 
2

 

 
Such a result would also be found if we started from the cash‐flow diagrams of both firms, and then 
recognising that cash‐exchanged between the firms would cancel each other out.  
 
This conundrum has not yet been adequately addressed in the literature. We will assume henceforth 
;  in  this  case  the  problem  does  not  present  itself.  Under  this  assumption,  we  can 
that 
indeed sum the profit functions of individual firms to find the profit function of their integrated supply 
chain.  
Exercise 1
Derive for the above buyer‐supplier model with conventional payment structures the order quantities  ∗  
.  
and  ∗   ∗ ∗ that will maximise 
 
We take the partial derivative of 
,  to   for a constant  , and from setting this to zero we 
find: 
 


 
Substitution of this result into 

2


 


34 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 


2

2

 

2

 

 
 

 
The optimal positive integer value is hence 
 


2


1. Therefore, we also get 

2

 



 
and 




2

2

.  

 
Exercise 2
Consider the buyer‐supplier model with consignment payment structures derived previously. Repeat the 
above analysis for this case, i.e: 
a. Find the profit function of the integrated supply chain; 
b. Find the values of  ∗  and  ∗   ∗ ∗ that maximise this function. 
 
You will find that the profit function of the integrated supply chain is exactly the same, and therefore 
also  the  optimal  values  derived  above  apply.  This  gives  an  important  insight:  the  payment  structures 
between the firms in a supply chain do not affect their integrated profit function! 
 
Homework
Consider the set of models we have looked at so far, and make up your own feasible combination of a 
single supplier – single buyer model and repeat the above analysis, i.e. determine the integrated supply 
chain profit function, and derive the optimal policy that will maximise this function. 
 

2.13 Using the NPV framework to include other cost components
The NPV framework also allows for the consideration of other cost components. We illustrate with a few 
examples, using the EOQ model as our base case scenario.  
Material handling and insurance
 A  variable  material  handling  cost  e  (£/product)  for  each  product  placed  in  inventory,  paid  upon 
receiving the batch    
 A cost   directly proportional to the average inventory level (e.g. the cost of insurance against fire for 
the average amount of inventory held), to be paid as e.g. a continuous stream at the rate of   /2 
(£/year).  
 
The AS function for the EOQ model is adapted to: 
 
2

2

1

 

 
 
35 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
1
2

2

 

 
2

2

 

 
Thus the optimal lot‐size becomes: 
 
2



 

 
and the holding costs are to be calculated as follows: 
 
 
 
In general, we can hence identify two different components of holding costs: 
a. The financial cost of keeping stock, arising from investments made into products stored, here the 
term 

b. Out‐of‐pocket holding costs, arising as real expenses to be made when placing products in stock; 
here  . Note that these costs need to be a function of the stock position i.e. the corresponding 
annual cost needs to vary with  . 
 
It  is  generally  accepted  that  in  many  practical  situations  the  financial  holding  costs  are  much  larger 
than  the  out‐of‐pocket  holding  costs.  That  is  also  why  in  many  models  out‐of‐pocket  holding  costs  are 
simply ignored. 
Price elastic demand functions
Final demand   for a product could be a function of price  . For example, one possible function is (for 
0): 
 
 
where    and    are  positive  constants.  If  the  retailer  with  an  EOQ  model  could  decide  on  the  price 
, then there is the practical constraint:  
 
 
as otherwise the retailer would not make any profits.  
The retailer thus has the AS profit function:  
 
,

2

2

 

 
One way to solve this problem is taking partial derivatives to   and   and solve the non‐linear system 
of two equations. A more pragmatic approach would be to apply the following algorithm: 
 
1. Input: Values for  , , , and a function 
 with maximum price   
,
2 ,…,  
2. For a sequence of prices  ∈ ,
2.1. Determine 
 
2.2. Use this to calculate 


2.3. Calculate 
, ∗
 
3. Retain that price that gives the highest value for 
 

2

,

 




36 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Credit elastic demand functions
Sometimes  firms  will  offer  a  delay  of  payments  in  order  to  boost  demand.  In  the  simplest  case,  the 
complete amount   has to be paid for  time units after the purchase. Assume that the function 
 is 
known. The AS function for the retailer now becomes: 
 
 

1
1

,

2

,

2



2

 
 

 
To find the optimal values for L and Q, the following pragmatic algorithm could be used: 
 
1. Input: Values for  , , ,   and a function 
 with maximum credit period 
 
2. For a sequence of delay values  ∈ 0, , 2 , … ,
2.1. Determine 
 
2.2. Use this to calculate 
2



2.3. Calculate 
, ∗
 
3. Retain that L that gives the highest value for 

,





 


 
References
GRUBBSTRÖM, R.W. 1980. A PRINCIPLE FOR DETERMINING THE CORRECT CAPITAL COSTS OF WORK‐IN‐
PROGRESS AND INVENTORY. INT. J. OF PRODUCTION ECONOMICS 18(2), 259‐271. 
 
BEULLENS,  P.  AND  JANSSENS,  G.K.  2011.  HOLDING  COSTS  UNDER  PUSH  OR  PULL  CONDITIONS  ‐  THE 
IMPACT OF THE ANCHOR POINT. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OPERATIONAL RESEARCH 215, (1), 115‐125.  
 
BEULLENS,  P.  2014.  REVISITING  FOUNDATIONS  IN  LOT  SIZING  ‐  CONNECTIONS  BETWEEN  HARRIS, 
CROWTHER, MONAHAN, AND CLARK. INT. J. OF PRODUCTION ECONOMICS 155, 68‐81.   
 
BEULLENS,  P.  AND  JANSSENS,  G.K.  2014.  ADAPTING  INVENTORY  MODELS  FOR  HANDLING  VARIOUS 
PAYMENT  STRUCTURES  USING  NET  PRESENT  VALUE  EQUIVALENCE  ANALYSIS.  INT.  J.  OF  PRODUCTION 
ECONOMICS 157, 190‐200.   
 
 
 
 
 
 

37 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

3 IL in Buyer-Supplier Supply Chains

3.1 One‐to‐one shipping
This strategy involves shipping products from a location A to a location B, by letting a vehicle (truck, taxi, 
train, ship, airplane) taking a feasible and optimal route, typically the cheapest or fastest.  
Let  us  assume  that  the  vehicle  is  dedicated  to  the  transaction,  i.e.  during  its  trip  it  will  not  make 
detours  or  perform  other  transportation  duties.  It  is  then  also  called  Direct  Shipping  (DS)  or  line‐haul 
shipping.  
 




Figure 5: One-to-one shipping (Direct shipping, line-haul shipping, FTL shipping)

The transit time is the time the goods are underway from the source to the destination. It is in general 
the smallest relative to other shipping strategies (discussed later). 
Because a vehicle is dedicated to this single transportation job, it is in general only justifiable from a 
cost perspective to transport small amounts when the product transported has a high value density (£/m3 
or £/kg) or when it needs to arrive fast (emergency shipment). It is not unusual, for example, to dispatch a 
private jet or helicopter for the transfer of human transplant organs in order to save a life, or to deliver a 
single spare part by taxi in order to prevent excessive delays for a passenger air flight.  
For goods with lower value density, direct shipping is only cost effective when a vehicle can transport 
a  large  enough  amount.  Therefore  this  strategy  is  sometimes  also  referred  to  as  Full‐Truck‐Load  (FTL) 
shipping, although it is not restricted to road transport, nor is it always optimal to ship in quantities that 
fill up the vehicle’s capacity. 
3.1.1

Shortest Path Problem

Finding the optimal route from A to B can be modelled as a Shortest Path Problem (SPP). The SPP calls for 
finding the shortest path from an origin node to a destination node in a connected directed graph G=(N, 
A)  with  node  set  N  and  arc  set  A  and  where  every  arc  a    A  has  a  non‐negative  length.  Shortest  path 
problems can be efficiently solved using Dijkstra’s algorithm.  



3

4
2


2




2








Figure 6: A shortest path problem

 
 
38 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Figure  6  shows  an  example  of  a  shortest  path  problem.  There  are  six  nodes  in  the  graph  numbered 
from 1 to 6, and seven arcs, where each arc’s direction and length is also indicated.  The head of an arc is 
the node adjacent to the arc’s arrow head, and the other adjacent node of an arc is called the arc’s tail.  

Dijkstra’s Algorithm
To find the shortest path from in such graph from some origin node to some destination node, we can 
use Dijkstra’s algorithm: 
 
Dijkstra’s 
 
Algorithm 
 
 
1. Associate with all nodes a temporary label with value  
2. Start at the origin node by changing its label to 0 and make the label permanent. Call it 
the current node.  
3. For every arc going out of the current node that has a head node with a temporary label, 
replace the value of the temporary label of this head node with the value: 
 
min



,




 
 
4. Among all temporary labelled nodes, select one with the smallest label value and make 
the  label  permanent.  If  this  node  is  the  destination  node,  stop,  else  call  this  node  the 
current node and go back to Step 3 (iterate).  
 
The optimal total length is now equal to the label value of the destination node. To determine 
the optimal path, start at the destination node and work backwards in the graph by finding 
the arc which cost corresponds to the difference of the labels of its head and tail nodes. There 
may be more than one optimal path.  
 
Applied to the problem in  Figure 6, the algorithm gives the following sequence of label values for each 
node  (note  that  permanent  label  values  are  indicated  with  a*,  and  the  position  in  the  sequence 
corresponds to the node number): 
 
[               ] 
[0*               ] 
[0*   4   3         ] 
[0*   4   3*         ] 
[0*   4   3*      6   ] 
[0*   4*   3*      6   ] 
[0*   4*   3*   7   6   ] 
[0*   4*   3*   7   6*   ] 
[0*   4*   3*   7   6*   8] 
[0*   4*   3*   7*   6*   8] 
[0*   4*   3*   7*   6*   8*] 
 
The length of the optimal path is thus 8. The optimal path is derived starting from node 6 and going 
back to node 5 since the length 2 of that arc is equal to the difference of its head label and tail labels, 2 = 
8 – 6. It is then either possible to go to node 2, since the arc’s length 2 = 6 – 4, or to node 3 since its arc’s 
length 3 = 6 – 3. From node 2 we go back to node 1. From node 3 we would also go back to node 1. There 
are thus two optimal paths: either the sequence of nodes 1‐2‐5‐6 or the sequence of nodes 1‐3‐5‐6.  
Note  that  all  nodes  in  this  examples  have  permanent  labels  at  the  end.  This  is  not  always  so;  in 
general there could be nodes that still carry temporary labels. Note also that the algorithm still works if 
there there are multiple arcs having the same tail and head nodes, as long as we select in Step 3 of the 
algorithm the shortest arc in the formula.  

39 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
The algorithm finds the optimal solution since every time we make a label of some node j permanent, 
we will have found the shortest path from the origin node to that node j and its permanent label value is 
the  length  of  this  optimal  path.  The  optimality  of  this  path  from  origin  to  j  is  not  depending  on  any 
decisions we need to make later on in the algorithm, and vice versa: if the optimal path from origin to 
destination would pass node j, then the optimal path from the origin to j will be completely part of the 
optimal solution independent of the decision made in the path from j to the destination. We call this the 
principle of optimality. (We will further discuss conditions under which this principle is no longer true and 
therefore the algorithm would not be applicable.)  
Different objective functions
Different objective functions can be used – minimising total length, time or cost – by letting the length of 
each arc in the SPP correspond to its distance, expected transport time to cross the arc, or total cost to 
use it, respectively. It is easy to incorporate any fixed costs or fixed delays encountered on arcs, such as 
on toll roads, at toll bridges, and at toll tunnels, or at border crossings (administration, border control).  
Tachograph legislation
For truck transport over longer distances, attention has to be paid to the so‐called tachograph legislation 
which  requires  drivers  to  take  breaks  and  limits  the  total  number  of  driving  hours  per  day.  Typical 
constraints may include the following:  
 
1. no more than 2 hours of consecutive driving is allowed;  
2. 45 minutes of rest time needs to be taken either after 2 hours of constant driving or during the 2 
hours of driving (in breaks of minimum 15 minutes each);  
3. total number of driving hours per driver and day is restricted to 8 hours.  
 
Companies may have the choice between using two drivers reducing total route time or using a single 
driver  with  longer  total  travel  time.  To  minimise  to  total  costs,  one  can  run  the  SPP  algorithm  on  the 
graph using only travel time related costs for one driver and then, also knowing the total travel time, add 
the costs of the extra driver, required breaks, and rest times to find the total cost and real total time. The 
option that is the cheapest can then be retained.  
Time‐dependent travel times
The problem of minimising total travel time in graphs with time‐dependent expected travel times on arcs 
can  be  adequately  modelled  as  a  SPP  if  the  start  time  at  the  origin  node  is  given.  The  algorithm  now 
needs to use in Step 3 the expected travel time of an arc based on the calculated expected arrival time at 
its tail node.  
Under the assumption that vehicles that arrive later at the tail node of an arc can never arrive earlier 
at the head of the arc then vehicles of the same type that arrived earlier at the tail node, the algorithm 
finds  the  optimal  path.  The  assumption  is  in  general  realistic  for  queue  induced  travel  delays  on  roads 
since vehicles of some type at the end of a queue will find it very difficult to beat vehicles of the same 
type at the top of the queue. The assumption is known as the “no‐overtaking” property. Note that this 
property  implies  that  waiting  at  any  node  in  the  graph  is  never  optimal.  This  approach  also  works  for 
when  a  desired  arrival  time  at  the  destination  node  is  given  by  letting  the  algorithm  start  at  the 
destination node, working back to the origin node, and subtracting times during the search.  
To find minimum cost solutions for time‐dependent travel times for which the no‐overtaking property 
holds,  the  travel  cost  must  be  monotone  increasing  with  travel  time  and  a  given  units  of  driving  time 
must cost the same as the same units of waiting time on nodes. In that case there is always an optimal 
solution in which no waiting occurs, and thus the algorithm will find an optimal solution.  
If  waiting  (i.e.  resting)  is  less  costly  than  driving,  it  may  be  optimal  to  wait  for  times  with  less 
congestion  on  roads  in  order  to  minimise  costs.  However,  waiting  at  some  tail  node  means  that 
opportunities  for  faster  driving  may  be  lost  on  arcs  closer  to  the  destination.  Thus,  the  principle  of 
optimality no longer holds and other algorithms are to be used.  

40 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Multi‐model transportation
Multi‐modal transportation problems can be modelled as SPPs by associating with each arc in the graph 
the data relevant for a specific mode and vehicle type; multi‐model transfer nodes are introduced in the 
graph  which  connect  the  graphs  of  the  different  transportation  modes.  Each  transfer  node  will  add  its 
transfer cost or expected time of transfer to the relevant arc leaving the node. The normal SPP algorithm 
will then be applicable.  
However, there may be other constraints in practice making this approach less realistic. Ships, trains, 
and airplanes typically travel according to pre‐specified schedules and routes and some ships or trains are 
cheaper than others. It may thus be cheaper to wait at a transfer node for the cheapest vehicle (train, 
ship) or route. This however, violates the principle of optimality. 
 
Note.  For  calculating  SPP  on  road  networks,  various  internet‐based  resources  can  now  be  used.  For 
example, Google maps has a function to allow you to seek for the quickest route from A to B, where you 
can specify your starting time and which takes into account time‐dependent travel times. 
3.1.2

Economic Transport Quantity (ETQ)

Consider the situation that a buyer needs regular supply of some good. We construct a cost model for the 
situation  of  direct  shipping  of  the  product  from  a  supplier  to  this  buyer.  We  assume  that  the  optimal 
travel route has been determined (as e.g. an SPP) and that its cost and total travel time are independent 
of the time of the year at which it is undertaken. We denote by   the total transit time. 
 
We assume a buyer with an EOQ model and a supplier producing lot‐for‐lot at a finite production rate. 
We now also consider the intermediate stage where the products are on a vehicle in transit. We place the 
Anchor Point at the delivery of the first batch to the buyer at arbitrary time  .  

Inventory 
supplier 

yT/R 
.... 
Time 


 

 

Inventory 
in transit 

L
.... 
Time 



 

 


Inventory 
buyer 


 
 

L
.... 
Time 
 

41 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

Cash‐flows 
supplier 

L

yT/R 

wyT
.... 



Time 

cR 


 

 


L

Cash‐flows 
3PL 

.... 


Time 

 

 

Cash‐flows 
buyer 



L

.... 


Time 
 

Figure 7: Inventory positions and cash-flows in the direct shipping model

 
We assume that the transport is undertaken by a 3PL and that the buyer pays this company a fixed 
transport cost per shipment and a variable transport cost that depends on the lot‐size being shipped. The 
buyer pays the supplier for the products the moment that a batch is delivered. We assume that next to 
set‐up costs for loading and unloading the vehicle, the 3PL also incurs a transport cost at a rate   for the 
duration of the journey. See also Figure 7. The capacity of the vehicle is  . 
 
We  proceed  by  deriving  the  AS  profit  functions  of  the  three  firms  involved  from  their  cash‐flow 
functions. For the buyer, we have: 
 
 
 
2

2

 

 
 
For the 3PL, we find: 
 
1





 
42 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Define: 
1  
Then: 
 




2

 

2

 
For the supplier, finally, we derive: 
 






1



 

 
This leads to, after some algebraic manipulation: 
 
1





2

2



2





2

 

 
Optimal three‐firm solution
If the three firms are interested in determining the optimal shipping strategy for their integrated supply 
chain,  we  can  derive  this  from  their  supply  chain  profit  function.  This  function  is  found  from  the 
). This produces: 
summation of their profit functions. (As always, assuming 
 
 
 
Define: 
 
1

 

 
1

1

2

 

 
Then: 
 

 
This produces an optimal unrestricted lot‐size 
 
∗∗

∗∗



2


2

 



2


1


1

 

 
However, since the vehicle capacity is  , the optimal feasible Economic Transport Quantity (ETQ) is: 
 

min ∗∗ ,  
 
43 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Determining the value of
The parameter   is an annuity stream cost rate and hence needs to be expressed in (£/year). We show 
how to incorporate two relevant components in case that the vehicle is a road vehicle: driver wages and 
fuel  costs.  Driver  wages  are  typically  given  in  (£/hr),  so  if  a  driver  costs    (£/hr),  then  it  has  to  be 
converted to a cost rate   (£/year) as follows: 
 
8760 , 
 
since  there  are  approximately  24 365
8760  hours  in  one  year  (i.e.  not  counting  years  with  an 
extra day in February). Fuel costs are typically expressed in (£/km). Therefore, a fuel cost   (£/km) has to 
be converted into a rate  (£/year) by assuming an average speed of the vehicle of   (km/hr): 
 
8760 .  
 
If these are the only relevant costs, it would hence produce 

Exercise
Determine the optimal lot‐size when the buyer would independently be able to determine  ∗ .  
 
∗∗
. This produces  ∗ min
,  where: 
In that case, the buyer would aim to maximise 
 
2

∗∗

 

 
Note. Observe that the unrestricted optimal lot‐size for the integrated three‐firm solution is a function of 
the transit lead‐time. However, for the above solution for the buyer it is independent of this lead‐time.  
Optimal solution when transport is outsourced
If  the  3PL  works  independently  and  the  supplier  and  buyer  want  to  determine  the  optimal  shipping 
strategy for themselves as two firms, we can derive this from:  
 
 
 
Redefine: 
 
 
 
1

2

 

 
Then: 
 

 
This produces an optimal unrestricted lot‐size 
 

∗∗



1


2

 




2

∗∗



2

1

 

 
However, since the vehicle capacity is  , the optimal feasible result is 



min

∗∗

,



44 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Note
In international transport by sea it is often that case that buyer and supplier need to rely on a 3PL for the 
shipping.  Here,    could  be  the  maximum  load  of  the  product  into  one  container.  The  3PL  may  charge 
different rates between shipping a full container versus shipping a fraction of a container load. 
Homework
Derive the optimal lot‐size when: (1) buyer and 3PL would seek to find their integrated optimal solution; 
(2) supplier and 3PL would seek to find their integrated optimal solution.  
Note
The situation of lot‐for‐lot at an infinite rate can be retrieved from the above functions by considering the 
case  → ∞. The case that the supplier produces according to an EOQ with batch demand is retrieved by 
setting 
.  
3.1.3

Maximum Economic Haulage Radius (MEHR)

There is a limit as to how far one can reasonably transport a certain type of product using direct shipping. 
In general, the higher the value density of a product the further it can be transported in small quantities. 
This makes it reasonable to use dedicated small transport vehicles such as small vans, taxis, or expensive 
vehicles such as aeroplanes. 
The lower the value density of a product, the shorter the distance over which it can be economically 
transported. To cover longer distances would need shipments in large quantities such as large trucks with 
a second trailer or bulk transport in a barge (inland waterways), or container transport on trains (rail) or 
ships  (sea  and  ocean  transport)  where  transport  costs  can  be  shared  with  other  goods  from  other 
companies.   
Using the profit function to derive the MEHR
Knowledge of the AS profit function allows us to calculate the maximum distance over which a product 
can  be  transported.  Since 
,  only  strictly  positive  value  for    will  also  produce  strictly 
positive values for NPV. As any project is not considered worthwhile by a company if its respective NPV 
would become negative, the boundary condition would be that:  
 
,

 
Note  that  when 
,
0,  this  does  not  mean  that  the  company  would  not  produce  a  positive 
profit in accounting terms. It simply means that it would not produce more profit than from the next best 
available  alternative!  If 
0.20  then  the  firm  would  still  gain  a  respective  20%  of  profits  from  this 
activity.  
 
We  sketch  the  approach  with  the  following  example.  Take  the  three‐firm  integrated  profit  function 
derived previously: 
 
,





2

1


2

 

 
It  is  sufficient  to  focus  on  the  function  in  between  the  square  brackets.  Furthermore,  we  can 
substitute  ∗  into this function, producing the boundary condition: 
 






2



1



0, 

2

 
where 
 
1

 

45 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 
 
1

1

2

 

 
 
now need to cconsider two cases. 
We n
Case ∗
.
The lot‐ssize is in otheer words a co
onstant. It caan be observe
ed from the a
above functioons that we  have two 
types  off  terms  in  th
he  boundary  condition:  tterms  that  arre  not  a  function  of  ,  aand  terms  th
hat  are  a 
function of 
. W
Working out this boundaryy condition, w
we will hence find a formuula of the sortt: 
 


 
wherre working ou
ut the actual vvalues for   aand   is left aas an exercise
e to the read er. This mean
ns that: 
 
1

 
 
The  right‐hand  side 
s
of  this  inequality  w
would  be  the
e  maximum  economic  h aulage  radiu
us 
expresseed in (years). To convert th
his to a distannce, you need
d to considerr the type of vvehicle used.  
∗∗
.
Case ∗
Substituttion of the reesult for 
 

∗∗

 

 derived prreviously wou
uld produce tthe conditionn: 


2

2



1





 
he  maximum  possible  vallue  of  .  Ho
owever,  a 
It  maay  be  difficult  to  derive  an  analytic  result  for  th
practicall  approach  would 
w
be  to  use 
u an  algoritthm  where  you 
y would  increase    unttil  the  right‐h
hand  side 
reduces to zero. (Similar to the alggorithms pressented at the
e end of Section 2.13). 
 
3.1.4

er N differen
nt items from
m a Cross‐D
Docking Faciility (CDF)
Optimal policy to orde

Cross‐D
Docking Facility

Inbound transport 



1
Outbound transport  

 
Figurre 8: Cross-Do
ocking Facility
y

 
46 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
A  Cross‐Docking  Facility  (CDF)  is  typically  located  near  the  boundaries  of  a  populated  area.  It  receives 
goods  in  (large)  vehicles  from  various  suppliers;  these  incoming  goods  are  separated  and  mixed  as 
required  at  the  CDF,  and  subsequently  sent  out  in  vehicles  without  being  held  in  storage  to  different 
destinations in the local area.  
 
The cross‐docking operations may require large areas in the warehouse where inbound materials are 
sorted, consolidated, and stored until the outbound shipment is complete and ready to ship. If this takes 
several days or even weeks it is not considered a CDF but a warehouse. In most CDFs, goods do not stay 
longer than 48 hours.   
Optimal order policy for N items received from a CDF
Consider the problem where your firm represents stocking point 2 in Figure 8. Your firm has a demand for 
N  different  types  of  items  (i  =  1,  ...,  N).  For  each  item  the  uniform  annual  demand  rate  of  your 
customers  is  yi  and  your  cost  price  is  .  You  order  each  of  these  items    from  the  CDF.  Each  time  a 
vehicle from the CDF visits your firm, however, you have to pay a fixed transport cost  . What would be 
the optimal lot‐size   for ordering each item?  
 
Since you have constant annual demand for each item, you have an EOQ‐type problem for each item. 
Your AS profit function for item  , when each item is ordered separately, is then arguably of the following 
form: 
 




2



2

 

 
For  each  delivery,  the  CDF  charges  a  set‐up  cost  ,  and  that  is  why  in  the  above  function  we  have 
. Your total profit function would then be the sum over all items: 
 




2





2

 

 
Could there be a better way of ordering? Is it perhaps worthwhile to order some items together into 
one trip? This would safe on transportation charges  .  
 
Property. An optimal policy contains scheduling periods Ti of equal length, i.e. Ti = T for all i  N.  
 
Proof.  Suppose  the  theorem  does  not  hold.  Let  T  designate  the  smallest  scheduling  period  which 
happens  to  be  for  item  k,  i.e.  T  =  Tk  <  Ti  (  i   k).  Consider  now  an  item  j  for  which  Tj  >  T  and  let  the 
average inventory carried of this item be E(Ij)
.  
Now suppose we decrease its scheduling period to Tj`= T. The average inventory will decrease from 
E(Ij)  to  E(Ij`).  Since  the  replenishment  cost  is  independent  of  the  quantity  ordered,  no  additional 
replenishment cost is incurred for replenishing item type j every Tj` = T units of time. Hence the global 
cost will decrease.   
 
Since an optimal policy contains periods T of equal length, we have: 
 
∀  
 
And we get: 
 


2

 
2

 
47 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

We find: 
 
2



And: 
 





1





 

 

 
 


2

2



 

 

3.2 One‐to‐many shipping
3.2.1

Length of an optimal TSP tour visiting many customers

Draw on a piece of paper a square. Call this your “service region.” Indicate the x and y axis (see  
Figure 9). We arbitrarily take the length of the sides equal to 1 m, so that the service region covers an area 

of 1 x 1 = 1 m2.  
 


(x1, y1)


(x1, y1)

(x1, y1)

(x1, y1)





 

Figure 9: Randomly distributed points in a rectangle.

 
Now draw a random number from the interval [0, 1] and call this x1. Draw a second random number 
from  the  interval  [0,  1]  and  call  this  y1.  Use  these  coordinates  to  draw  a  point  (x1,  y1)  in  your  service 
region.  Repeat  this  procedure.  Now  you  will  have  a  second  point  located  at  some  coordinates  (x2,  y2). 
Continue  until  you  have  generated  n  points  in  your  service  region.  Figure  9  shows  the  exercise  at  four 
different stages, i.e. for n = 5, n = 10, n = 15 and n = 20. We call the set of n point obtained Xn:  
 
X n  {( x1 , y1 ), ( x2 , y2 ),...., ( xn , yn )}  
 
Draw a tour through your n points, visiting each point only once and returning to the first city where 
you started as in  Figure 10. Note that each time you leave a point you have to decide which point to go to 
next. You can thus construct several different tours, all having a different total distance. In fact, there are 
(n‐1)!/2 different possible tours through n points.  
 

48 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

 
 
 
Figure 10: A TSP tour through 9 points.

 
Suppose  we  are  interested  in  that  tour  of  which  the  total  distance  travelled  is  minimal.  If  n  grows 
large,  the  number  of  possible  tours  becomes  excessively  large  and  we  can’t  just  find  the  best  tour  by 
trying all possible tours and retain the best one.  
 
We  call  this  problem  of  finding  the  shortest  tour  through  n  points  the  Travelling  Salesman  Problem 
(TSP). The TSP is one of the classic problems in Operational Research.  
 
Without  knowing  the  optimal  tour  itself,  let  us  call  the  length  of  the  optimal  TSP  tour  T*(Xn)  in  our 
example of randomly distributed points in a square of area 1. Then Beardwood et al. (1959) proved that 
when you make n very large, the ratio T*(Xn)/ n becomes constant. In other words, for very large n:  
 

T *(X n )   n  
 
where the constant is believed to be   0.7124.   
 
In fact, this also holds for a service region of more irregular shapes (as in Figure 11). If A is the area 
(m2) of a service region of any finite shape, then  
 

T *(X n )  

An  

 
 

 
Figure 11: Locations randomly distributed in a service region.
 

 

49 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Finally, the result is even more general than that. The points do not need to be drawn from a uniform 
distribution across the service area, any distribution will do. The Theorem of Beardwood et al. (1959) is 
given in Figure 12. 
 
 
Theorem BBH. (Beardwood et al., 1959). If T*(Xn) is
the length of the optimal travelling salesman tour
through n points which are independently drawn from
an identical distribution  over a bounded region a
of the Euclidean plane, then there exists a constant
 such that with probability one

lim

n

T *(X n )
n

    d

,

a

where the integration is with respect to the
Lebesgue (area) measure. For the uniform
distribution over [0,1]2, the integration term is
equal to one.

Note:   0.7124 (Johnson et al., 1996, Percus and Martin, 1996).     
 

Figure 12: Theorem of Beardwood et al. (1959).
 

Example 1
A printed circuit board of 20 cm by 10 cm needs 1000 little holes drilled in it. Drilling is performed by a 
moving  pin.  What  is  the  expected  distance  that  the  pen  needs  to  travel?  Assume  that  the  holes  are 
uniformly distributed across the board.  
Using the Theorem, we get for A = 200 cm2, n = 1000 
 

T *(X n )  

An  0.71 200(1000)  318 cm 

Example 2
In  his  small  van,  an  express  courier  has  small  packages  destined  for  250  customers  located  across 
Hampshire. Assume that Hampshire covers 22500 km2 and customers are uniformly distributed.  
a) Estimate the distance to be travelled to deliver all mail.  
b) Give a reasonable estimate of how long it is going to take the courier to deliver the mail.  
c) What will be the result of dividing the work up in five vans, each covering an equal part of Hampshire? 
 
a) Using the Theorem, we get for A = 22500 km2, n = 250 
 

T * ( X n )   An  0.71 22500(250)  1690 km 
 
b) Taking an average driving speed of 50 km/hour, total travel time = 1690 km /(50 km/hr) = 33.8 hours. 
In addition, it may take our driver at least one minute for every customer to make the delivery, which 
adds another 250 min = 4.2 hours to the total delivery time.  
c) The distance travelled by each driver, since now A = 22500/5 km2 and n = 250/5 
 

T * ( X n )   An  0.71 (22500 / 5)(250 / 5)  1690/5 = 338 km 
 
Taking an average driving speed of 50 km/hour, total travel time = 338 km /(50 km/hr) = 6.76 hours. A 
driver now visits about 50 customers, which should keep total working time per driver within 8 hours. 
 

50 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
3.2.2

Expected length of an optimal TSP tour visiting a few customers

Computational tests for uniformly generated random customers in a square area find that the formula of 
Beardwood et al. also serves as a good prediction for the expected or average optimal TSP tour length 
even when n is relatively small (Eilon et al., 1971, see also Haimovich and Rinnooy Kan, 1985).   
 

 
 
 
Figure 13: Few customers uniformly distributed in a square.
 
Figure 13 shows three examples. The first row shows four different instances for n = 5. The length of 
the optimal TSP tour in all four will be different, say  Ti * (i  = 1, …,4). The average length, however, can be 
expected to be  
 

1 4 *
 Ti  
4 i 1

An  

A5  0.71 5  

 
Example
A  pizza  takeaway  also  makes  home  deliveries  using  scooters.  On  average  there  are  10  home  delivery 
orders per hour, randomly located in a 50 km2 service region located around the pizza restaurant.  
a)  Estimate  the  average  total  distance  a  scooter  will  travel  to  deliver  3  orders  and  return  to  the 
restaurant. 
b)  Estimate  the  average  total  time  needed  for  a  scooter  to  deliver  3  orders  and  return  to  the  pizza 
restaurant. 
c)  Estimate  the  minimum  number  of  scooters  needed  when  a  scooter  will  deliver  on  average  to  3 
customers per trip. 
d) Estimate the time when the scooter arrives at the third customer on its trip (relative to its starting time 
at the restaurant).  
 
a)  With  three  customers  plus  the  restaurant,  n  =  3  + 1,  and  A  =  50,  the  formula  gives  us  an  estimated 
average time of visiting three customers in the best sequence as to minimise travel distance: 
 

51 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

 An  0.71 50(4)  10 km 
 
b) Assuming the average speed of a scooter is around 35 km/hour, total travel time is 10/35 = 0.28 hour = 
17 min. Assuming it takes 4 minutes to deliver at a customer location, it will take in total on average 17 + 
12 = 29 minutes or about half an hour to make the delivery trip.  
c) It takes one scooter half an hour to deliver to 3 customers and in the same time 10/2 = 5 new orders 
arrive. Therefore one needs minimum 2 scooters. (In order to be able to perform all deliveries with one 
scooter, the average number of delivery orders needs to drop to 6 per hour, or smaller.)  
d) The total travel time of 17 min per trip is divided over 4 “legs”, and the third customer is reached at 
the end of the third “leg”. The scooter is therefore expected to arrive after travelling a total time of ¾ 
(17) = 12.75 min. However, we have to add to this the time is takes for delivering the first and second 
order, in total 8 min. Therefore the time of arrival at the third customer is estimated to be 12.75 + 8  21 
min. after leaving the restaurant.  
3.2.3

Continuous approximation of an optimal vehicle routing solution

In physical distribution, goods need to be delivered using vehicles of limited capacity. In the one‐to‐many 
shipping  mode,  a  vehicle  will  deliver  to  more  than  one  customer  during  one  trip.  In  the  so‐called 
Capacitated  Vehicle  Routing  Problem  (CVRP)  (Dantzig  and  Ramser,  1959),  all  vehicles  have  the  same 
capacity. The CVRP consists of finding a set of vehicle routes of minimum cost such that: every customer 
is serviced exactly by one vehicle, each route starts and ends at the depot and the total demand serviced 
by  a  route  does  not  exceed  vehicle  capacity.  The  CVRP,  like  TSP,  is  a  classic  problem  in  Operational 
Research.   
 
To  find  an  optimal  set  of  routes  for  the  CVRP  is  a  difficult  problem  that  can  require  a  lot  of 
computational time for large problems. One often makes use of heuristics i.e. methods that can find in a 
relatively short time a good, but not necessarily optimal, solution. Good (near‐optimal) solutions typically 
look  like  in  Figure  14  a:  the  total  service  region  is  divided  into  a  number  of  districts;  and  customers 
belonging to one district are served by one and the same vehicle, as indicated in Figure 14 b.  
 
A good approximation for the distance travelled by a vehicle serving a district i is (Daganzo, 1984):  
 

Di*  2ri   (ni ) Ai ni  
 
where Ai is the size of the district,  ri  is the average distance from a customer in district i to the depot, 
ni is the number of customers in the district, and the dimensionless factor  (ni) depends on the metric 
and the number of customers in the district.  For ni  6 and the Euclidean metric,  (ni) is a constant   = 
0.57, and for smaller values of ni, the parameter becomes larger and goes to about 0.73 for ni = 2 (see 
Campbell, 1993).  The first term  2ri  represents the line‐ and backhaul distance travelled by the vehicle 
from the depot to the centre of district i and back.  The second term  
 

 (ni ) Ai ni  
 
represents the local distance travelled to service all customers in the district.  The complete formula 
*
for  Di   is  accurate  when  the  density  of  points  is  (nearly)  uniform  over  the  service  region;  the  density 
should not vary much over a district (Daganzo, 1984, Campbell, 1993).   
 
In  particular, assuming  identical  vehicles  and  unit  loads  and  a  uniform  density  of  the  locations  over 
the area A of the service region, the total route distance over all districts is (taking the sum): 
 

52 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

D *  2r

n
  (q) A n  
q

 
where  r is  the  average  distance  between  a  customer  and  the  depot,  q  is  the  number  of  customers 
*

serviced  per  vehicle,  and  n  is  the  total  number  of  customers.  The  above  formulas  for  Di* and  D also 
hold for situations where the depot would be located outside the service area.  
 

Area A 
b
 
 
Area Ai 
 
 
 
Back‐haul ri 
 
Line‐haul ri 
 
 
Depot 
 
 
 
 
Figure 14: a) Service area, 18 districts, b) A vehicle serving district i
Example
The  data  are  given  in  Table  1.  If  vehicles  can  serve  about  5  customers  on  one  tour,  the  total  distance 
travelled  D *  is approximately (taking  = 0.57) 
 

D *  2r

n
40
  (q) A n  2 (48.62)
 0.57 10000 (40)  1138.47 km  
q
5

 
This solution needs n / q = 40 / 5 = 8 tours (or vehicles).  
When  vehicles  are  bigger  or  smaller  quantities  are  delivered  so  that  10  customers  can  be  served  in 
one tour by a vehicle, then the total distance travelled becomes 
 

D *  2r

n
40
  (q ) A n  2 (48.62)
 0.57 10000 (40)  759.75 km  
q
10

 
and 4 tours are needed.  
 
Approximation when customers order different quantities
Consider  the  situation  where    customers 
1, … , each  order  a  quantity    and  the  vehicles  each 
have a capacity  . Campbell (1993) found that Daganzo’s result is fairly robust if the distribution of order 
quantities is reasonably centred around its average 


 


2

√  
 
 
 
53 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Table 1: Data for example
2

Service area (km )
No. customers

Customer no.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
Total distance
Average distance

 
 
 
3.2.4

10000.00
40.00

Distance to depot
(km)
55.90
48.32
31.70
89.85
71.73
18.45
65.19
53.83
32.59
13.81
74.65
6.16
8.94
47.71
39.65
48.19
32.44
10.40
62.04
15.55
95.75
22.29
47.97
68.17
62.55
61.73
54.90
31.16
54.74
36.30
52.74
90.40
99.25
90.75
13.14
19.65
47.14
39.08
65.69
64.42
1944.92
48.62  

One‐to‐many ETQ

We  model  the  distribution  from  a  supplier  to    buyers.  The  general  optimal  distribution  pattern  is  a 
difficult problem for which a general analytical solution is unknown. We assume that the buyers’ orders 
are  small  relative  to  the  vehicle  capacity,  so  that  an  optimal  integrated  solution  would  make  use  of  a 
CVRP‐type solution. We assume that the total time in transit is relatively small. If, for example, the total 
transport time is one to a few days only for a single distribution round, the effect in the NPV approach 
would remain fairly small so that this lead‐time effect from transport can be easily ignored. 
 
If  the  buyers  are  located  in  close  vicinity  to  each  other  relative  to  the  supplier’s  location,  then  the 
transportation cost is largely determined from the line‐haul distance between the supplier’s location and 
54 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
the  centre  of  these  buyers,  and  this  then  resembles  somewhat  the  problem  we  have  seen  before  of 
ordering N items from a CDF with a common transport cost. We recall from the problem of ordering N 
items from a CDF that in that case it is optimal to order all items with the same cycle time  . 
 
This motives us to develop the following model as depicted in the figure below.  

yT/R 

Inventory 
supplier 

.... 
Time 


 

 

Inventory 
Buyer   

.... 
Time 



 

 

Inventory 
Buyer   

.... 
Time 



 

 
T
Cash‐flows 
supplier 
.... 


Time 


cR

s

cR
 

 

Inventory 
Buyer   


.... 
Time 
 

 
 
55 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
We  further  make  the  simplifying  assumptions  that  all  buyers  order  the  same  product  from  the 
supplier and pay the price  . 
 
We have for buyer  : 
 




 

 


For the supplier, where 
 



2

 









1



 

 


1

1

2



2



2

2



 

 
The integrated profit function across supplier and all buyers: 
 
 
 




1

1

 
One must now be aware of the fact that 
solution from the above function.  

2

1

2





2



 

 is a function of  , so we cannot yet derive the optimal 

Determination of
This is the cost (£) of a CVRP‐solution to deliver from the supplier to the   buyers. It arguably consists of: 
a. The cost for loading a vehicle at the supplier,   (£/vehicle);  
b. The cost for unloading goods at each buyer  ,   (£/stop);  
c. The cost for delivering with a fleet of vehicles. 
 
/  vehicles on the road, the total cost of this is: 
a. Since there are 
 
 

b. Since there are   stops to be made, the total cost of this is: 
 
 
 
c.

The  cost  for  delivering  a  fleet  of  vehicles  are  mainly  arising  from  driver  wages  and  fuel  costs.  The 
total distance travelled in an optimal CVRP solution is approximately: 
 


2

0.57 √

2

0.57 √

 

 

56 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
With   (km/hr) the average vehicle speed, 
we can hence specify the travel cost as: 
 


 (£/hr) the cost for a driver, and   (£/km) the fuel cost, 

2

0.57



 

 
We hence find: 
 


2

0.57



 

 
 
Substition of this result into the profit function: 
 





1

2

2




0.57
2



0.57



1



2
1





2



 

 
After algebraic manipulation this gives: 
 
2






1



2



0.57

0.57





1



2
1



2
2





 

 
And therefore: 
 


2


1

 

0.57




2

 




 
 
Note that this solution will not be found using classic inventory theory. The reason is that in the classic 
inventory theory, the opportunity cost of the set‐up cost   would not be accounted for, and this proves 
in the above derivation of crucial importance to retrieve the correct holding costs in this model, which 
are: 
 
2
1


57 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Example
Consider  an  integrated  supply  chain  of  a  producer  of  sports  articles  and  a  set  of  retailers,  with  the 
following characteristics: 
 The production cost of sports articles is 1000 £/m3 
 Production rate is 20,000 m3/year and set‐up cost is £500/production run 
 There are 45 retailer located across the service area of size 80000 km2  
 Annual demand at each retail shop is on average 300 m3/year 
 The cost of a stop at a retailer is on average £25 
 The cost of dispatching a vehicle (loading at the central depot) is £40 
 All vehicles have a capacity of 20 m3 
 The total variable transport cost (from fuel and driver wages) is 0.5 £/km 
 Average distance between the production facility and a retailer is 160 km 
 The value of sports articles at consumer sales prices is 1500 £/m3 
 The opportunity cost of capital is 20%.  
 
In an optimal distribution pattern for the integrated supply chain, what would be, approximately: 
a) The number of times per year a retail shop will be supplied? 
b) The shipment size per retailer delivery and the number of visits one vehicle will make on one round‐
trip? 
c) The yearly net profit? 
d) The total logistics cost of distribution per year?  
Do not only provide a numerical answer, but show which analytical formulas you have used, and state the 
assumptions on which they are based. 
Solution
We adopt the model developed in LN p.57. (LN: Lecture Notes.) Hence the main assumptions are: 
1. Use of NPV profit functions with Anchor Point at time of delivery of first batch to retailers 
2. Conventional and symmetric payment structures throughout 
3. Production model: lot‐for‐lot as in Monahan (1984) with one lot corresponding to the total freight 
load over all vehicles used in one delivery round 
4. A delivery round as the optimal solution to a CVRP with vehicles loaded at full capacity, in every 
delivery each retailer is visited 
5. A  continuous  approximation  model  as  in  Daganzo  (1984)  to  estimate  the  cost  of  the  CVRP 
solution, for retail locations approximately uniformly distributed over the service region  
6. Lead‐time  in  transit  is  not  in  the  model  since  it  is  assumed  small  compared  to  average  time  a 
product  spends  waiting  at  the  production  site  and  at  the  retailer  before  it  is  sold  to  customers 
(needs to be checked afterwards – see note on p. 60) and then its impact on holding costs can be 
ignored 
7. Each retailer has an EOQ model as in Harris (1913) 
 
a) We first determine the time between two delivery rounds from: 
 


2


1

0.57



2

 



 
 


2 500
0.2 1,000 1

1,125 0.57 0.5 √3,600,000
13,500
40 2 160

0.5 13,500
20,000
20
20

0.03083

11.3

 

 
58 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
32.4
/
 
Therefore each retailer is visited about 
.
 
b) It will depend on each retailer’s annual demand rate since: 
  


 
 
The expected quantity delivered per stop, for an average retailer, is 
 

300 0.0308
9.23 /
 
  
 The  number  of  stops  each  vehicle  will  make  depends  on  the  annual  demand  rate  of  the  set  of 
retailers it visits, as this determines the lot‐size delivered to each. A rough estimate, assuming all retailers 
have a demand rate close to the average: 
 
20
2.17
/
 
9.23
 
c) The linear approximation of the AS profit function for the integrated supply chain is as on LN p. 57, 
and is an approximation of the net profit per year: 
 
2






1



2



0.57

0.57





1



2
1

2



2





 

 
and  a  numerical  value  is  found  from  evaluating  the  above  equation  using  the  optimal  distribution 
cycle time  ∗ . This is left to the reader.  
 
Note that the value of   is an unspecified arbitrary constant, so you can only find a numerical result 
for  the  equation  in  between  the  square  brackets.  It  is,  however,  possible  to  determine  the  smallest 
feasible value for  : 
 




.
,

0.208

76

  

 
And  therefore,  if  your  evaluation  of  the  equation  within  the  square  brackets  leads  to  a  numerical 
value of  , the annual profits can’t be larger than 
£0.96 /

 
d) The logistics costs for the integrated supply chain are found from subtracting from the result  in part 
c) the annual marginal profit: 
 

 
Since 
 

1,500 £/

 

, the annual marginal profit is equal to: 
1,500

1,000 45 300

6,750,000 £/

 

 

59 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
The numerical evaluation is left to the reader. If this finds a logistics cost of  £/
 as in part c) above.  
corrected with factor 

, it should also be 

Note
Is it reasonable to neglect the impact of the lead‐time in transit on holding costs in the above example? 
Lead‐time in transit can be estimated from three components: 
 
1. An estimate for the time of loading a vehicle at the depot. At £40 dispatch costs, assuming driver 
is paid at full cost of around £20/hour, it will take no longer than 2 hours. 
2. The total distance travelled as in LN p.56: 
 


2

0.57 √

2

0.57 √

 

We need to estimate, however, the time it takes for one single vehicle as this is what counts for every 
single product’s time on the road.  
Since there are 

 vehicles on the road, the average time spend on the line‐haul part of a single 

160 . At a conservative speed of 
50 /
 this part takes 3.2 hours.  
vehicle route is 
The  average  local  distance  travelled  by  one  single  vehicle  is  the  total  local  distance  travelled, 
0.57 √

, divided by the number of vehicles, 



0.57√

0.57√3,600,000
52.1  
45 9.23




20
At an average speed (on city roads with some congestion) of 
35 /
, this will take about 
1.5
. The average product will spend about half this time in the vehicle.  
3. An  estimate  for  the  time  of  unloading  at  each  retailer.  At  £25  for  unloading,  driver  wages  of 
£20/hour  plus  one  extra  person  at  retail  shop  at  same  rate,  this  wil  take  about  38  minutes 
0.6
.  
 
In total, we arrive at an approximation of the time a product spends in transit by summation of the 
above results: 
 








 
1.5
0.6 6.55
 
2 3.2
2
 
The average cycle time is 11.3
 (for a product, half of this time is spend in the production site, 
and half of this time is spend at the retailer). So the assumption 6 on p. 58 is reasonable.  
Homework
Consider  the  data  of  the  example  on  p. 58.  Now  consider  an  individual  customer  located  at  a  distance 

  from  the  production  site.  Use  a  direct  shipping  ETQ  model  (LN.  p  41)  to  anwser  the  following 
questions: 
a) In  an  integrated  supply  chain  of  production  site,  3PL,  and  this  retailer  only,  what  is  the  optimal 
delivery  quantity  to  this  retailer  as  a  function  of  ?  (Hints:  (1)  Insert  the  numerical  values  of  all 
known parameters in an appropriate formula; (2) be careful to not confuse distance with lead‐time, 
i.e. 
.)  
b) Which of the following two statements is correct, and why: (X)  If the distance is smaller than some 
critical  value      then  it  is  optimal  to  not  fill  the  vehicle  at  full  capacity,  i.e.  the  optimal  delivery 
quantity is lower than the vehicle capacity; or (Y) If the distance is larger than   then the optimal 
delivery quantity is lower than the vehicle capacity? (Hint: Use the result obtained from answering 
part a) to determine a numerical value for   at which point it becomes optimal to fill the vehicle up 
to capacity.)   
 
60 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

4 Strategy in the supply chain: Alliances
versus Leaders

4.1 Alliances
An alliance is a partnership between two or more companies in which both the risks and rewards of the 
cooperation  are  shared.  Alliances  may  be  formed  when  it  is  thought  to  lead  to  long  term  strategic 
benefits for all partners involved.  
 
One  problem  with  alliances  is  to  reach  an  agreement  about  how  exactly  the  risks  and  rewards  are 
shared. Such an agreement should be (considered) “fair” by each partner, otherwise the alliance might 
break  down. However,  it  is  difficult  to  define  “fairness”:  there  are many  ways  in  which  fairness  can  be 
defined  in  a  seemingly  objective  way.  Therefore  a  single  universal  method  to  devise  such  a  fair 
agreement does not seem to exist.  
 
In  this  section,  we  discuss  two  solution  concepts  to  determine  a  way  for  sharing  risks  or  rewards 
among partners: the core and the Shapley value. Before we do this, we need to introduce some concepts 
from cooperative game theory.  
4.1.1

Cooperative game theory

Source:  WINSTON,  L.W.  1994.  OPERATIONS  RESEARCH:  APPLICATIONS  AND  ALGORITHMS  (3RD  ED.). 
DUXBURY PRESS, CALIFORNIA. ISBN 0534209718. (CHAPTER 15) 
Let  there  be  a  set  of  n  players  N  ={1,  2,  …,  n}.  A  game  between  these  players  is  specified  by  its 
characteristic  function.  The  characteristic  function  v(S),  for  every  subset  S    N,  is  defined  as  the  total 
reward that the members of S can be sure of receiving if they act together and form a coalition.  
Example 1: The Drug Game
Joe Willie has invented a new drug. Joe cannot manufacture the drug
himself, but he can sell the drug’s formula to company 2 or company 3. The
lucky company will split a $1 mio profit with Joe Willie. Find the
characteristic function of this game.
Solution
Letting Joe Willie be player 1, company 2 be player 2, and company 3 be
player 3:
v({})=v({1})= v({2})= v({3})= v({2, 3})=$0
v({1, 2}) = v({1, 3})= v({1, 2, 3}) = $1000000
Example 2: The Garbage Game
Each of 4 property owners has one bag of garbage and must dump it on
somebody’s property. If b bags of garbage are dumped on the coalition of
property owners, the coalition receives a reward of –b. Find the
characteristic function of this game.
Solution

61 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
The best that the members of any coalition S can do is to dump all of their
garbage on the property of owners who are not in S. With |S| denoting the
number of players in S, the characteristic function
v({S})= - 4 + |S|
v({S})= - 4

(if |S| < 4)
(if |S| = 4)

Example 3: The Land Development Game
Player 1 owns a piece of land and values the land at $10000. Player 2 is a
subdivider who can develop the land and increase its worth to $20000.
Player 3 is a subdivider who can develop the land and increase its worth to
$30000. There are no other prospective buyers. Find the characteristic
function for this game.
Solution
Any coalition that does not contain player 1, who owns the land, has a
worth or value of $0. Any other coalition has a value equal to the maximum
value that a member of a coalition places on the piece of land:
v({})= v({2})= v({3})= v({2, 3})=$0
v({1}) = $10000; v({1, 2})=$20000; v({1, 3})=$30000
v({1, 2, 3})=$30000

Consider any two subsets A and B of N such that A and B have no players in common (A  B = ).  In 
many games, the following inequality holds:  
 
v({A, B})  v({A}) + v({B}). 
 
This  property  of  the  characteristic  function  is  called  superaddivitity.  It  is  often  a  valid  assumption, 
because  if  the  players  in  A    B  form  a  coalition,  one  of  their  options  (but  not  necessarily  their  only 
option) is to let players A fend for themselves and let players B fend for themselves. This would result in 
the coalition receiving an amount v({A}) + v({B}). Thus v({A, B}) must at least be as large as v({A}) + v({B}). 
 
Assume  that  we  know  the  characteristic  function.  The  problem  now  is  to  find  a  reasonable  and 
acceptable  way  to  divide  the  reward  v(N)  between  the  n  partners.  Often,  the  solution  concept  is  build 
around  finding  a  reward  vector  x  =  {  x1,  x2,  …,  xn},  in  which  xi  specifies  the  reward  for  player  i  of  the 
coalition. The minimum conditions for x to be reasonable are the following:  
 
 
 
(Group Rationality) 
v(N) = x1 + x2 + …+ xn    
 
(Individual Rationality) 
xi  v({i})        (for each i  N)   
 
Group Rationality says that the sum of individual rewards given to each player need to sum up to the 
total  value  that  can  be  attained  by  the  supercoalition  consisting  of  all  players.  Individual  Rationality 
means  that  each  player  needs  to  be  at  least  as  best  of  as  when  not  participating  at  all  within  any 
coalition, because otherwise this player will indeed play on its own and earn v({i}). If these two conditions 
hold, the reward vector is also called an imputation.  
Example 4
Let there be two players, N = {1, 2}, with the following characteristic
function:
v({1}) = 100, v({2}) = -50, and v({1,2}) = 70.
Questions
a) Does superadditivity hold?
b) Find an imputation.

62 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Solution
a) Yes because v({1,2})  v({1}) + v({2}) since 70  100 -50
b) For x = { x1, x2} to be an imputation, we need
1) group rationality i.e. x1 + x2 = 70
2) individual rationality i.e.
x1  100 and x2  -50
An imputation therefore is e.g. x1 = 110 and x2 = 70 - x1 = - 40
Example 3: The Land Development Game
x
($10000, $10000, $10000)
($5000, $20000, $5000)
($10000, $20000, $0)
($10000, $0, $20000)
($30000, $0, $0)
($12000, $19000, -$1000)
($11000, $11000, $11000)

Is x an imputation?
Yes
No, x1 < v({1})
Yes
Yes
Yes
No, x3 < v({3})
No, v(N) < x1 + x2 + x3

A solution concept for an n‐person game is the specification of how to choose some subset of the set 
of imputations (possibly empty) as the solution to the game. We discuss two solution concepts: the core 
and the Shapley value.  
Core
The core of the game is the set of all imputations which are “undominated”. A more practical definition 
of the core follows: 
 
An imputation x is in the core if and only if:  
 
S  N :  xi  v S 
iS

 
The core is the set of imputations for which also “Subgroup Rationality” holds. Taking a reward vector 
from the core will avoid the situation in which some players would like to form a subgroup and fend for 
themselves because they could be better off by excluding some other players.  
 
Example 3: The Land Development Game
x
($10000, $10000, $10000)

Is x an imputation?
Yes

($10000, $20000, $0)

Yes

($10000, $0, $20000)
($30000, $0, $0)

Yes
Yes

Is x in the core?
No, because {1, 3} could
do better by themselves
No, because {1, 3} could
do better by themselves
Yes
Yes

Example 1: The Drug Game
Find the core of the game.
Solution
For this game, x = { x1, x2, x3} will be an imputation if and only if:
x1
x2
x3
x1




+

0
0
0
x2 + x3 = 1000000

63 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
For this game, x = { x1, x2, x3} will be in the core if and only if in
addition:
x1
x1
x2
x1

+
+
+
+

x2
x3
x3
x2




+

1000000
1000000
0
x3  1000000

The unique solution is ($1000000, 0, 0). The core emphasises the importance
of player 1. The core contains a single solution.
Remark: Consider the game with only two players and show that the core of
the game now puts less emphasis on player 1.
 
Example 2: The Garbage Game
Find the core of the game.
Solution
Requirements for imputation:
x1  -3
x2  -3
x3  -3
x4  -3
x1 + x2 + x3
In addition:
x1 + x2  -2
x1 + x3  -2
x1 + x4  -2
x2 + x3  -2
x2 + x4  -2
x3 + x4  -2
x1 + x2 + x3
x1 + x2 + x4
x1 + x3 + x4
x2 + x3 + x4

+ x4 = -4






-1
-1
-1
-1

The system of equalities has no solution. Indeed, note that the last four
inequalities can be added together, which gives:
3(x1 + x2 + x3 + x4)  -4
But this can never holds since in order to be an imputation,
x4 = -4. Therefore the core of this game is empty!

x1 + x2 + x3 +

Remark: Consider the game with only two players and show that the core is
not empty and equal to (-1, -1) !
Example 3: The Land Development Game
Find the core of the game.
Solution
For this game, x = { x1, x2, x3} will be an imputation if and only if:
x1
x2
x3
x1




+

$10000
$0
$0
x2 + x3 = $30000

64 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
For this game, x = { x1, x2, x3} will be in the core if and only if in
addition:
x1
x1
x2
x1

+
+
+
+

x2
x3
x3
x2




+

$20000
$30000
$0
x3  $30000

The solution is the set of imputations ($20000  x1  $30000, $0, $(30000x1)). The core contains an infinite number of solutions.
 
In  conclusion,  the  core  can  be  empty,  contain  one  unique  solution,  or  have  an  infinite  number  of 
solutions. As a result, the core leaves still room on the negotiation table. 

Shapley Value
The Shapley value given, in contrast to the core, always a unique reward vector x = { x1, x2, …, xn} where: 
 
xi 
pn (S)v S  {i }   v S 

all S for which
i is not in S

 
where 

pn S  

S ! n  S  1!
n!

 
and |S| is the number of players in S, and for n  1, n! = n (n‐1) … 2 (1) 
 
Although the equation seems complex, it has a simple interpretation. Suppose that players 1, 2, …, n 
arrive  in  random  order.  Then,  any  of  the  n!  permutations  of  1,  2,  …,  n  has  a  1/n!  chance  of  being  the 
order in which the players arrive.  
 
Suppose that when player i arrives, he of she finds that the players in the set S have already arrived. If 
player  i  forms  a  coalition  with  the  players  who  are  present  when  he  arrives,  player  i  adds 
v S  {i }   v S   to the coalition S. It can be shown that the probability that when player i arrives the 

players in the coalition S are present is pn S  . The Shapley value implies that player’s i reward should be 
the expected amount that player i adds to the coalition made up of players who are present when he or 
she arrives.  
Example 1: The Drug Game
Find the Shapley value.
Solution
Player 1. First, list all coalitions S for which player 1 is not a member.
For each of these coalitions, we compute v S  {i }   v S  and pn S  .

S

pn S 

vS  {i}  vS 

{ }

2/6

$0

{2}

1/6

$1000000

{3}

1/6

$1000000

{2, 3}

2/6

$1000000

65 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Since player 1 adds on average
(2/6)(0)+(1/6)($1000000)+(2/6)($1000000)+(1/6)($1000000)=$4000000/6

the Shapley value concept recommends that player 1 receive a reward of
$4000000/6.
Player 2. First, list all coalitions S for which player 2 is not a member.
For each of these coalitions, we compute vS  {i}  vS  and pn S 

vS  {i}  vS 

pn S 

S
{ }

2/6

$0

{1}

1/6

$1000000

{3}

1/6

$0

{1, 3}

2/6

$0

The Shapley value concept recommends that player 2 receive a reward of
$1000000/6.
Since v({1, 2, 3}) = $1000000, Player 3 will receive a reward x3 =
$10000000 – x1 – x2=$1000000/6.
Note that, compared to the core in which all the money went to player 1,
the Shapley value gives a more equitable solution.

Alternative solution method for Shapley Value ***RECOMMENDED**
For games with a few players, it may be easier to compute each player’s Shapley value by using the fact 
that player i should receive the expected amount that he or she adds to the coalition present when he or 
she arrives.  
 
For a three player game, the general approach is to fill in this table: 
Order

of

Cost Added by Player’s Arrival

Arrival
Player 1

Player 2

Player 3

1,2,3

v({1})

v({1,2})-v({1})

v({1,2,3}-v({1,2})

1,3,2

v({1})

v({1,2,3}-v({1, 3})

v({1,3})-v({1})

2,1,3

v({1,2})-v({2})

v({2})

v({1,2,3}-v({1,2})

2,3,1

v({1,2,3})-v({2,3})

v({2})

v({2,3})-v({2})

3,1,2

v({1,3})-v({3})

v({1,2,3})-v({1,3})

v({3})

3,2,1

v({1,2,3})-v({2,3})

v({2,3})-v({3})

v({3})

The value assigned to each player is now the sum of its column divided by the number of rows. 
 
Example 1: The Drug Game
Find the Shapley value.

66 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Order

Amount Added by Player’s Arrival

of Arrival
Player 1

Player 2

Player 3

1,2,3

$0

$1000000

$0

1,3,2

$0

$0

$1000000

2,1,3

$1000000

$0

$0

2,3,1

$1000000

$0

$0

3,1,2

$1000000

$0

$0

3,2,1

$1000000

$0

$0

Since each of the six orderings of arrivals are equally likely, the
expected amount added by each player is the average of its column.
Example 5: Runway
Suppose three types of planes (Piper Cubs, DC-10s, and 707s) use an
airport. A Piper Cub requires a 100-yd runway, a DC-10 requires a 250-yd
runway, and a 707 requires a 400-yd runway. Suppose the cost (in $) of
maintaining a runway for one year is equal to the length of the runway.
Since 707s land at the airport, the airport will have a 400-yd runway. How
much of the $400 annual maintenance cost should be charged to each plane?
Solution
Let player 1 = Piper Cub, player 2 = DC-10, player 3 = 707. We can now
define a 3-player game in which the value to a coalition is the cost
associated with the runway length needed to service thee largest plane in
the coalition. The characteristic function therefore is:
v({})=$0
v({1})=-$100
v({2})= v({1, 2})= -$150
v({3})= v({1, 3})= v({2, 3})= v({1, 2, 3})=-$400

Order

of

Cost Added by Player’s Arrival

Arrival
Player 1

Player 2

Player 3

1,2,3

$100

$50

$250

1,3,2

$100

$0

$300

2,1,3

$0

$150

$250

2,3,1

$0

$150

$250

3,1,2

$0

$0

$400

3,2,1

$0

$0

$400

The Shapley value concept suggests that Piper Cub pay $33.33, the DC-10
pay $58.33, and the 707 pay $308.33.
Note. In general, it has been shown that for more than one plane of each
type, the Shapley value for the airport problem allocates runway operating
costs as follows: all planes that use a portion of the runway should divide
equally the cost of that portion of the runway. Thus, all planes should
cover the cost of the first 100 yard of runway, the DC-10s and 707s should
pay for the next 150-100=50 yard of runway, and the 707 should pay for the

67 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
last 400-150 = 250 yard runway. If there were ten Piper Cub landings, five
DC-10 landings, and two 707 landings, the Shapley value concept would
recommend that each Piper Cub pay 100/(10+5+2) = $5.88 in landing fees,
each DC-10 pay $5.88+50/(5+2) = $13.03, and each 707 pay $13.03 + 250/2 =
$138.03.

Exercise 1
Three  companies  consider  a  strategic  alliance  which  has  the  following  characteristic  cost  function:  v(1) 
=10, v(2) = 20, v(3) = 30, v(1,2) = 25, v(1,3) = 32, v(2,3) = 45, v(1,2,3) = 50. 
 
a.  How  much  of  the  total  cost  would  each  company  carry  when  they  would  adopt  the  Shapley  value 
method?  
b.  Check  the  collaboration  for  stability  –  are  there  any  companies  or  subcoalitions  who  might  wish  to 
break from the grand coalition and why (not)?  
Solution 
a. 
arrival 
123 
132 
213 
231 
312 
321 
cost 

Player 1 
10 
10 




6.17 

Player 2
15
18
20
20
18
15
17.67

Player 3
25
22
25
25
30
30
26.17

 
b. Individual rationality = ok; Subgroup rationality: v(1.2) > 6.17 + 17.67 = 23.84; v(1,3) < 6.17 + 26.17 = 
32.34 (slightly); v(2,3)> 17.67 + 26.17 = 43,.. Subgroup (1,3) causes instability and might break‐off (a small 
incentive only).  
Exercise 2
Three  companies  (A,  B,  and  C)  have  their  depot  in  the  harbour  of  Rotterdam,  from  which  they  supply 
their customers in the Netherlands (an area of 10  km2): Company A has 300 customers, Company B 200 
customers, and Company C 100 customers. All three companies use similar vehicles of 10‐ton capacity. 
The  average  demand  for  company  A  is  0.5  ton/customer,  for  B  1  ton/customer,  and  for  C  0.5 
ton/customer.  Assume that all customers are uniformly distributed over the area and that the average 
distance from the depot to a customer is 220 km. We ignore the cost of loading and unloading and use a 
cost of £0.5/km for the transport cost.  
 
a) Estimate the distance travelled for delivery to all customers if company A, B, and C do not cooperate 
with each other.  
b) Estimate  the  distance  travelled  when  company  A,  B,  and  C  would  cooperate  and  share  the  same 
vehicles for distributing to their customers.  
c) Use  the  Shapley  value  to  allocate  the  total  transport  cost  under  cooperation  to  each  of  the 
companies A, B, and C.  
 
Solution 
a) Using Daganzo’s approximation formula for a CVRP solution (LN p. 53): 


2

√  
 
 
 
 
68 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
For A:  


2 220

For B:  


2 220

For B:  


2 220

300 0.5
10
200 1
10
100 0.5
10

0.57 10 300  
0.57 10 200  
0.57 10 100  

 
b) For {A, B, C} (calculate the average load in the linehaul distance term): 
  
3 0.5
2 1
1 0.5
600
6

2 220
0.57 10 600  
, ,
10
 
c) Transport cost for coalition   is 0.5 ∗ . The characteristic function value for grand coalition can be 
found from part b), and for the individual firms from part a). For the subcoalitions, apply the same 
approach: 
 
3 0.5
2 1
500
5

2 220
0.57 10 500  
,
10
 
3 0.5
1 0.5
400
4

2 220
0.57 10 400  
,
10
 
2 1
1 0.5
300
3

2 220
0.57 10 300  
,
10
 
Work out the above formulas to find the numerical values of the costs for each (sub)coalition. Then fill 
in the table for the Shapley value as in the above examples. This is left to the reader.  
 
Homework
The net benefit from cooperation between   players can be defined as: 
 
1, 2, . . ,

 

<for cost games, use negative values for  . > 
 
Prove  that  for  any  cooperative  game  with  two  players,  the  Shapley  value  will  assign  half  of  the  net 
benefit obtained from cooperation to each player.  
 
(Hint:  adapt  the  table  format  developed  for  the  three  player  situation  on  LN  p.  66  to  a  two‐player 
situation and then show that each player   gets its original value 
 plus half the net benefit.) 
 
<Note. This is in general not true for games with more than two players.> 
 
 
 
 
 
 
69 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Exercise 3
Three  companies  A,  B,  and  C  wish  to  explore  how  they  could  benefit  from  sharing  rented  warehouse 
space. It costs £1 per m2 of floor space and per month if rented on a yearly basis, while £1.5 per m2 and 
per month if rented on a monthly basis. Table 1 lists monthly space requirements for each of the three 
companies.  
Table 1: Warehouse space requirements (m2 floor space needed per month) 
 
Month 

B
C
Total 
January
100
50
10
160 
February
100
50
10
160 
March 
100
50
10
160 
April 
100
50
10
160 
May 
50 
100
10
160 
June 
50 
100
10
160 
July 
50 
100
10
160 
August 
50 
100
10
160 
September 

0
200
200 
October

0
200
200 
November 

0
200
200 
December 

0
200
200 
Total 
600
600
880
2080 
 
a) Find the characteristic function.  
b) Using the Shapley value, determine how these companies could split the costs of renting warehouse 
space together as one virtual company.  
c) Is the coalition stable, or will some companies or subcoalitions try to break off from this coalition? 
Justify your answer.  
 
Solution 
a) Let A=1, B=2, C=3.  
 
Method: If company 1 rents for one year is has to rent 100 m2 for 12 months at 1£/m2, thus costing 
£1200 per year. If it rents per month, it would rent 100m2 for 4 months, and 50m2 for another 4 months 
at 1.5£/m2, thus paying £900 per year. Thus v(1) = min{1200,900} = 900.  
 
Similarly: 
v(2) = v(1) = 900,  
v(3) = min{2400,1320}=1320,  
v(1,2) = min{1800,1800}=1800,  
v(1,3)=min{2400,2220}=2220,  
v(2,3)=v(1,3)=2220,  
v(1,2,3)=min{2400,3120}=2400.  
 
b) Shapley value table: 
 
arrival 
A=1
B=2
C=3
123 
900
900
600
132 
900
180
1320
213 
900
900
600
231 
180
900
1320
312 
900
180
1320
321 
180
900
1320
cost 
660
660
1080
70 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
c) Checking stability means checking whether each subcoalition needs to pay less than if it would go by 
itself.  Thus:  v(1)>=600,  v(2)>=660,  v(3)>=  1080,  v(1,3)>=660+1080,  v(1,2)>=660+660, 
v(2,3)>=660+1080. Therefore, the coalition is stable.  
 
(The three companies should rent together a space of 200m2 for a whole year. The extra capacity in 
the first 8 months means they also have the flexibility to use more space if needed.)   
 
4.1.2

Alternative methods

There exists a wealth of other methods in the literature besides the core and Shapley value approaches.  
 
A quite popular approach in practise is the so‐called proportional allocation method. This approach aims 
to let each partner in the cooperation pay costs that are proportional to this partner’s use of the shared 
resources, while making sure that all the cost in the system are allocated. This seems very intuitive but 
may  cause  problems  of  the  coalition  being  unstable.  Indeed,  the  method  does  not  give  any  assurance 
that  partners  working  by  themselves  or  with  only  a  few  of  the  partners  in  the  coalition  are  better  off 
using the cooperative system. If partners break away from the coalition it is not a good thing because, for 
super‐additive games, the grand coalition can achieve globally more efficient outcomes. 
 
There  exist  also  a  variety  of  methods  that  are  based  on  cooperative  game  theory  but  use  other 
mechanisms to find the distribution of the rewards of cooperation. Most of these techniques, such as e.g. 
the nucleolus, are however more mathematically challenging that the Shapley value. 
 
Finally,  there  is  a  specific  strand  of  research  that  investigates  the  efficiency‐fairness  trade‐off,  see  e.g. 
Bertsimas et al. (2012) article “On the efficiency‐fairness trade‐off” published in Management Science 58 
(12). 

4.2 Two‐party alliances in the supply chain
In order to apply the cooperative game theory framework for a situation of a supplier   and its buyer  , 
we will need to find the characteristic functions of the following coalitional sets: 
 
;
;
,  
 
What makes this situation somewhat special compared to the previous examples in this chapter is that 
these  parties,  even  when  `working  alone’,  remain  in  a  relationship  in  which  they  exchange  physical 
goods and cash with each other. Even if these parties would act `independently’, their actions can’t be 
completely  independent  and  at  least  one  of  them  is  going  to  have  to  consider  which  actions  are 
undertaken  by  the  other  party.  Care  should  hence  be  taken  when  defining  the  characteristic  function 
value  of  a  player  acting  alone  how  we  specify  the  assumptions  of  this  working  relationship  and  the 
order of decision making events in such a `status quo’ scenario. The following example illustrates. 
 
4.2.1

Two‐party alliance: example

We consider an EOQ‐type buyer and its supplier as in the model of Goyal (1976). We will use the profit 
functions of the players under consignment arrangements, functions we have developed for this case in 
Section  2.11. In addition, we incorporate a material handling cost   per unit of product as in Section 2.13 
for the buyer, paid upon receiving a batch to an outside third party (i.e. not paid to the supplier). We also 
assume a maximum capacity on the warehouse at the buyer,  . 
 


2

1

2

2

 

 
71 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
1

2

1

2

2

2



 
 
 






2

2

 

 
 
Status‐quo scenario 
To determine 
 and 
, we assume that the buyer, given a payment structure with the supplier, 

|
. The supplier will then determine the 
 that maximises 
will first determine the lot size 


∗ ∗
|
.  
 that will maximise 
,
lot size 
 
We find: If 
1 2
0, then the unconstrained optimal lot‐size is 
 
2

∗∗

1
 
else 
 

∗∗

→ ∞.  Therefore, 



∗∗

min

,

 

2

 , and: 
∗|

 
 
For the supplier, given  ∗ , the problem of identifying the optimal value for   is as was previously derived 
in the exercise of Section 2.7: 
 
1
1
2



8

1



 



 
and hence: 
 
∗ | ∗

 
,
 
Note that the total profits made in this supply chain under the status‐quo scenario are: 
 
∗|
∗ | ∗

 
,
, ∗|
 








2





2

 

 
Alliance 
The value for 
,  is found from considering the alliance between buyer and supplier in which the 
, |

values of   and   are simultaneously derived as to maximise 
 
We start by following the approach of exercise 1 in Section 2.12: 
 
2

∗∗

 
but the capacity constraint implies that 

 


min

∗∗

,

.  
72 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Case 1: The hypothesis is that 
 



∗∗

, |

. Substituting this result into 




2

2

 

 


2

2

 

 
Hence, in the case that 
0,  ∗ 1. In the case that 
Section 2.7. We seek an integer value   such that: 
 

 

 
The first condition: 
 



0, we apply the technique presented first in 

1  
1  

2

2

 

2

2

1

1

 

 
is simplified to: 
 
 

2
2

1

 

1

 
We now take the square of both sides, and simplify to obtain: 
 
1

1

 
Rearranging terms: 
 
1



 

 

 
The procedure now follows the same logic as before in Section 2.7, and we find: 
 


1
1
2

1

4

 

 
It  can  now  be  tested  whether  the  assumption  made  holds.  If  it  does,  then  the  profit  in  the  integrated 
supply chain is: 
 

,
 
, ∗ ∗ |
 
Case 2: The hypothesis is that  ∗
.  
 
73 
 



Integrated Logistics

 






2

2

 

 
The derivation of the optimal value for   is very similar to the procedure applied in LN Section 2.7: 
 


1
1
2

8

1



 

And: 


,
 
 
Shapley value 
The net benefit of cooperation is  
 


 
, ∗|
, ∗|

,
 
In a two‐player cooperative game, the Shapley value will assign half of the net benefit to each player (see 
Homework LN p. 69).  
 
,
, this means that the allocation should be:  
With reward vector 
 

 
2
 

 
2
 
,

Exercise 1
Consider  the  supply  chain  of  an  EOQ‐type  buyer  and  its  EOQ‐with‐batch‐demand‐type  wholesaler.  We 
have the following characteristics: 
 Annual demand rate at buyer is 5,000 products/year; 
 Sales price charged by buyer to customers is £40/product; 
 Capacity of warehouse at the buyer is 800 products; 
 Wholesale price charged by wholesaler to buyer is £30/product; 
 Material handling cost at buyer is £4/product; 
 Set‐up cost at buyer per lot‐size received from wholesaler is £100/order; 
 Set‐up cost for wholesaler to deliver a lot‐size to buyer is £150/order; 
 Acquisition price charged to wholesaler by its supplier is £20/product; 
 Set‐up cost for wholesaler to receive a batch from its supplier is £1000/order. 
 Opportunity cost of capital is 20%. 
 
Determine the value of an alliance for supplier and buyer, and use the Shapley value to find the profits 
each of the parties should earn under the alliance. Do this for the following two cases: 
 
A. In a status‐quo scenario where the payment structure between buyer and supplier is conventional; 
B. In  a  status‐quo  scenario  where  the  payment  structure  between  buyer  and  supplier  is  full 
consignment.  
 
In  each  status‐quo  scenario,  the  buyer  first  determines  its  own  optimal  pattern  of  ordering  from  the 
wholesaler, and knowing this, the wholesaler subsequently determines its own optimal ordering pattern 
from its supplier.  
 
74 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Do not only provide a numerical answer, but show which analytical formulas you have used, and state the 
assumptions on which they are based. 
 
Solution 
We adopt the model developed in LN p. 71‐73. Hence the main assumptions are:  
1. <this is left to the reader…> 
2. <this is left to the reader…> 
3. … 
 
A. Conventional payment structure. 
The buyer has to pay the wholesaler the full price   when a product is delivered. This means that, in the 
scheme as developed in LN Section 2.11, that 
, and 
0. 
 
Since  
1 2
30 4 0 
we have for the buyer: 


2

min

1

,

2

 

 


2 100 5,000
, 800
0.2 30 4

min

min 383.5, 800

383.5

/

 

 
This gives: 
∗|

383.5|0.2  

 







4 5,000

100

2

 
40

30

 
30,000

1,303.8

1

5,000
383.5

10

0.2

100
2

1,303.9

2

0.2 30

£27,382.3/

 

2
4

383.5
 
2
 

 
For the wholesaler: 


1
1
2

8

1





 

 
1
1
2
 

1
1
2

8 1,000 5,000
0.2 20 383.5

1

√1

67.995

4.65

 



 
Therefore: 
 
∗ | ∗

9|383.5,0.2  

,

 






2



1





2

1

2





2

 

75 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
30

20 5,000

1,000
9
0.2 30

 

5,000
383.5
383.5
20
 
2
150

0.2

1,000 150
2

0.2 20 9

1

383.5
2

50,000 3,404.32 115 6,136.0 383.5 £40,728.2/
 
 
For  an  alliance  between  buyer  and  supplier,  we  first  test  for  which  value  of    the  buyer’s  lot‐size  is 
unconstrained: 
 
 
2



800 ? 

 
Numerical  evaluation  shows  that  for  this  to  hold,  it  must  be  that 
3.  Since  for 
0,  the    value 
using  the  unconstrained  lot‐size  for    produces  ∗ 1,  and  given  that    is  small  relative  to  the  other 
cost parameters in the model, we think it will be unlikely that we are in Case 1. Indeed, if we calculate the 
value of   for the unconstrained lot‐size we get: 
 
1
1
2



4

1

 

 

 

1
1
2

1

1
1
2

√1

4 1,000 4
100 150 20

3.2

1.52

  
We see that this would produce an unconstrained value 
800: 
Case 2, with  ∗
 
1
1
2





1


1613.7 ≫ . We hence calculate under 

8

1

 



 

 
1
1
2

8 1,000 5,000
0.2 20 800

1

2.54



 


,



 
40

20

4 5,000

100

0.2 20 2
2

 

80,000

150
4 800
 

4,687.5

125



1,000 5,000
800
2

3,520



2
0.2

100

£71667.5/

150
2



2

 

1,000

 

 
76 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
The net benefit from forming the alliance is hence: 
 

,
£71667.5 £40,728.2 £27,382.3 £3557/
 
 
The Shapley value will hence recommend that this net benefit is shared equally. Therefore the net profits 
of buyer and supplier become, respectively: 
 
£3,557
£27,382.3
£29,160.8/
 
2
 
£3,557
£40,728.2
£42,506.7/
 
2
 
The  benefits  of  forming  the  alliance  in  terms  of  profit  increase  achieved  might  not  seem  much  when 
compared to the overall profit figures of the firms in status‐quo. However, note that this benefit has been 
realised  solely  by  adopting  a  logistics  strategy  that  works  better  for  the  integrated  supply  chain.  It  is 
hence more insightful to compare this logistics benefit relative to the logistics costs of the firms in the 
status‐quo scenario. This is what we do next.  
 
The logistics costs can be found from subtracting the marginal profit term from a firm’s profit function. 
For example, for the buyer the logistics costs in the status‐quo scenario are: 
 

£2,617.7/
 
 
The relative gain is then:  
3,557
2
100%
67.9%, 
2,617.7
 
and thus the buyer saves as a result 67.9% on its logistics costs. Similarly, we find that the logistics costs 
for the wholesales in the status‐quo scenario are £9,271.8/
, and then: 
 
3,557
2
19.2%, 
100%
9,271.8
 
or the wholesaler saves 19.2% on its logistics costs.  
 
B. Full consignment. 
The  buyer  has  to  pay  the  wholesaler  the  full  price    only  the  moment  that  a  product  is  sold  to  its 
customers.  This  means  that,  in  the  scheme  as  developed  in  LN  Section  2.11,  that 
0  and 

Since 
1 2
4 0 
 
we have for the buyer: 


min

2
1

2

,

 

 


min

2 100 5,000
, 800
0.2 4

min 1118.0, 800

800

/

 

 
This gives: 
77 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
∗|

383.5|0.2  

 







2

 
40

30

4 5,000

100

 
30,000

625

1

10

5,000
800

0.2

320

100
2

2

2

0.2 4

£29,045.0/

 

800
 
2

 

 
 
For the wholesaler: 
1
1
2



8

1





 

 
1
1
2

8 1,000 5,000
0.2 20 800

1

 

 
2.53



 
Therefore: 
 
∗ | ∗

9|383.5,0.2  

,

 


 
30

1,000
2

20 5,000
0.2

 



20





2
150

800
 
2

5,000
800

0.2

1





2

1,000 150
2

1

0.2 20 2



2



2
1

 

800
2

50,000 4,062.5 115 1,600 1,600 £42,622.5/
 
 
For an alliance between buyer and supplier, we note that the payment structure adopted between them 
does not influence the integrated supply chain profit function. We therefore find the same optimal result 
800 and  ∗ 2 and gives a total supply chain 
as in Scenario A. We recall that this also takes  ∗
profit of £71667.5/
. The net benefit of an alliance would hence be: 
 
£71667.5 £42,622.5 £29,045.0 £0/
 
 
In  other  words,  if  the  firms  have  adopted  the  full  consignment  scheme  in  status‐quo,  they  derive  no 
benefit from forming an alliance.  
 
Note 1. Under a conventional payment structure, both firms do worse in status‐quo that if they would 
use  a  full  consignment  arrangement  in  status‐quo.  If  you  compare  what  the  firms  would  get  when 
adopting the alliance under a conventional payment structure, then the buyer would gain a bit more than 
working under the full consignment scheme in status‐quo, and also the supplier would gain relatively less 
than what he could get using a full consignment arrangement in status‐quo.  
 
In conclusion, starting from a status‐quo scenario of conventional payments, the buyer would prefer to 
form an alliance and use the Shapley value criterion to distribute the net benefits of the alliance, whereas 
78 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
the  wholesaler  would  rather  want  to  propose  the  adoption  of  a  full  consignment  payment  structure, 
without forming an alliance.  
 
Note  2.  From  a  practical  point  of  view,  changing  the  payment  structure  from  conventional  to  full 
consignment is much easier than implementing the alliance and using the Shapley value.  
 
In  the  alliance  option,  someone  has  to  calculate  the  optimal  scenario  of  the  supply  chain  first,  which 
requires  a  party  having  knowledge  of  the  integrated  supply  chain  function.  This  party  then  needs  to 
enforce  the  buyer  and  wholesaler  to  select  their  decision  variables    and    accordingly.  This  may  be 
difficult to achieve if the logistics managers in both firms are used to select the lot‐sizes that optimises 
the profit functions of their own firms. It may seem to them that the decisions imposed as to arrive to the 
optimal supply chain result is not what optimises their own functions. (Indeed it often does not, prior to 
establishing the net benefits distribution.) This may cause internal friction in the firms between general 
management  and  the  logistics  division.  Then  the  problem  arises  of  calculating  the  net  benefit  of  the 
supply chain and to redistribute these savings to both parties. In fact, the net benefit of £3,557/year is an 
annuity  stream  value,  which  means  that  both  parties  in  effect  need  to  receive  payments  that  are 
equivalent to such a continuous cash flow throughout the year. One may wonder, rightfully, how this is 
going  to  be  established,  since  in  practise  there  will  not  be  a  `central  party’  that  has  such  a  source  of 
funding available… 
 
Adopting the full consignment payment structure in status‐quo is, on the other hand, much more in line 
with  what  will  be  common  practise  in  the  firms.  The  logistics  manager  in  the  buyer’s  firm  will  keep 
selecting the optimal lot‐size that maximises the profit for his firm, and then the logistics manager in the 
wholesaler’s  firm  will  use  this  to  calculate  the  optimal  value  of    that  will  maximise  the  wholesaler’s 
profit  function.  Under  full  consignment,  furthermore,  both  firms  realise  that  this  process  of  sequential 
and independent local decision making, although not optimal in general, would in this case indeed also 
be  optimal  for  their  integrated  supply  chain!  There  is  furthermore  no  need  for  a  central  party  to  keep 
track  of  net  benefits  and  to  redistribute  these  benefits  between  the  parties,  because  under  the  full 
consignment policy they will both fair better in a status‐quo scenario than when using the conventional 
payment structure under a status‐quo scenario.  
 
4.2.2

Two‐party alliance: example 2

Consider  the  supply  chain  of  an  EOQ‐type  buyer  and  a  lot‐for‐lot  producer.  We  have  the  following 
characteristics: 
 Annual demand rate at buyer is 5,000 products/year; 
 Sales price charged by buyer to customers is £40/product; 
 Capacity of warehouse at the buyer is 800 products; 
 Transfer price charged by producer to buyer is £30/product; 
 Material handling cost at buyer is £4/product; 
 Set‐up cost at buyer per lot‐size received from producer is £100/order; 
 Set‐up cost for producer to deliver a lot‐size to buyer is £0/order; 
 Production rate at producer is £10,000 products/year; 
 Production cost at producer is £20/product; 
 Set‐up cost for producer to initiate production is £500/run. 
 Opportunity cost of capital is 20%. 
 
A. Determine  the  value  of  an  alliance  for  producer  and  buyer,  and  use  the  Shapley  value  to  find  the 
profits each of the parties should earn under the alliance. Do this in a case of a conventional payment 
structure between buyer and producer. 
B. Now assume that buyer and producer keep paying each other according to a conventional payment 
structure when adopting the solution that maximises the value of the alliance. Compare the profits 
each of these firms earn with your answer to part A. 
79 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Do not only provide a numerical answer, but show which analytical formulas you have used, and state the 
assumptions on which they are based. 
 
Solution 
We adopt the ETQ model developed in LN Section 3.1.2, but do not consider the 3PL in the middle. Hence 
the main assumptions are:  
1. <this is left to the reader…> 
2. <this is left to the reader…> 
3. … 
 
A. Conventional payment structure. 
 
 
2

 

2

 
 
1



2



2



2

2



 

 
 


1

2


2

 

 
 
where: 
 
 
1

2

 

 
In status‐quo, the buyer will choose: 
 
2



2 100 5000
0.2 30 4

383.5

/

 

 
This gives: 
 


 
40

30

4 5,000

100

5,000
383.5

0.2

 

100
2

0.2 30

4

383.5
2

 

 
 

£27,382.3/
 


 

 


1


2
2





2





2



 

80 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
30

20 5,000

5,000
0
383.5

500

500 1

0.2

2

383.5

2

0.2 30

20

50,000

6,518.9

2

1
2

0

0.2 20

1 383.5

2 2

 

 
100

383.5

383.5

 

 
£43,381.1/
 
 
In the alliance, the lot‐size that maximises the integrated supply chain’s profit function is: 
 
2



2 100
1

500

0.2 20 1

0 5,000
1
4
2

939.3

/

 

 


,



 







 
40

20

4 5,000

600

5,000
939.3

1

2

0.2

1,100
2



0.2 20 1

1
2

2



4

 
939.3

2

 

 
80,000

3193.9

110

3193.9

 

 
£73,502.2/

 

The net benefit is therefore: 
 


73,502.2

43,381.1

27,382.3

 

 
£2,738.8/

 
 
The Shapley value awards the players the following profits when adopting the alliance: 
 
2,738.8
27,382.3
£28,751.7/

 
2
 
2,738.8
43,381.1
£44,750.5/

 
2
 
B. Using  the  conventional  payment  structure  when  adopting  ∗ ,  the  buyer  and  producer  will  get, 
respectively: 
 




 
40

30

4 5,000

2

5,000
939.3

0.2

532.3

10

100

 

2

100
2

0.2 30

4

939.3
2

 

 
30,000

3193.6

 

 
81 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
£26264.1/





 

 

 
30

20 5,000

500

1

2



5,000
939.3





2

0.2

1,000
2

0.2 20





2

1 939.3

2 2

0.2 30

20

2



939.3

2

 

 

 
50,000

2661.6

100

939.3

939.3

 

 
£47,238.4
≫ ≫
 
 
Note that the sum of profits earned by both players is still equal to the supply chain profit of  £73,502.2/
.  
 
However, the producer would reap much more of the benefits. The buyer would earn even less than its 
earnings  obtained  in  the  status‐quo  scenario,  and  therefore  this  solution  violates  the  condition  of 
individual rationality for the buyer. It is very unlikely that this could be adopted (unless the supplier could 
enforce it.) 

4.3 Perfect coordination
We  have  seen  how  for  number  of  firms  in  the  supply  chain  we  can  calculate  the  logistics  policy  that 
would be  optimal for their integrated supply chain. We do this by deriving the integrated supply chain 
profit function and use it to determine the optimal values of all decision variables simultaneously.  
 
We have seen in previous section how we can distribute the net benefits of full cooperation across the 
firms,  based  on  cooperative  game  theory  solution  concepts  such  as  the  Shapley  value.  If  this  finds  a 
, ,…,
 that satisfies the conditions of group rationality, individual 
reward distribution vector 
rationality, and subgroup rationality (i.e. if the reward vector is a solution in the core) then this reward 
scheme  is  stable.  In  that  case,  no  individual  firm  nor  any  subcoalition  would  do  financially  better  by 
breaking off from the grand coalition and acting on their own.  
 
This is not always possible. There are games where the core is empty, and hence no stable reward vector 
exists that can offer this stability. These situations can be handled if the firms in the coalition would be 
able to enforce a contract whereby a firm which breaks off from the coalition would have to pay a fine. If 
the fine is large enough, the net financial benefit of breaking off would become negative. However, we 
do not further explore this here.  
 
The  two  examples  in  the  previous  section  illustrated  that  the  implementation  of  a  reward  distribution 
vector can be difficult in practise. The reason is that the firms in a supply chain, even if they wanted to 
adopt the optimal solution for their supply chain, remain individual firms with their own identity. They 
will likely not agree to set‐up an overarching entity that would coordinate their whole supply chain. This 
entity would not only have to dictate the optimal logistical decisions to be taken by each firm, but will 
have to oversee the financial flows exchanged between them so as to end up with the targeted reward 
distribution vector that will end up distributing the net benefits fairly between the firms.  
 
It would be much easier to find a solution whereby the firms will retain their individual decision making 
power, but such that their individual decisions would lead to the logistics policy that is optimal for the 
integrated supply chain. (One such approach was adopting a full consignment scheme for the situation in 
Section 4.2.1.)  
 
82 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
The following two definitions are adapted from Chen et al. (2001).  
Coordination mechanism
If  the  firms  in  a  supply  chain  maintain  decentralised  decision  making,  a  coordination  mechanism  is  an 
approach by which the structure of costs and revenues of each individual firm are adapted so as to find a 
better alignment of each firm’s decisions to the integrated supply chain’s objective function.  
Perfect coordination
If  the  coordination  mechanism  achieves  the  result  that  the  decentralised  decisions  also  maximise  the 
integrated supply chain’s objective function, the coordination mechanism is said to be perfect. 
4.3.1

Perfect coordination schemes: examples

We  consider  the  situation  of  Section  4.2.2.  The  payment  structure  between  buyer  and  producer  is 
conventional in the status quo scenario. Recall the profit functions: 
 
2

 

2

 
 
1



2



2



2

2



 

 
 
1



1

2
2


2

 

 
Solution 1
In Chen et al. (2001) the coordination mechanism presented is based on: 
 
1. The producer charging the buyer its set‐up cost whenever the buyer places an order 
2. To modify the transfer price   
 
We  now  explore  how  this  work.  In  the  status‐quo  scenario,  the  buyer  determines  the  lot‐size 
maximising its profit function. The terms that are relevant for this are: 
 
Π

2



by 

 

 
When  we  observe  the  supply  chain  profit  function,  then  the  buyer  would  arrive  at  the  correct  lot‐size 

that maximises the supply chain’s profit function if these terms were: 
 
Π



1

 
Take the difference (as always, assume 
 
Π

Π





 
2



2

1

 
2
83 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
For the buyer to arrive at the correct lot‐size  ∗ ≡ ∗ , we can restructure the buyer’s profit function so 
that the above difference becomes zero.  
 
1. The producer charging his set‐up costs 
 every time the buyer places an order 
 
Call the new profit function of the buyer Π . We see that this will produce the result that 
 
Π . 
will drop out of Π′
 
2. Adapt the transfer price  : 
 
 After implementing step 1, the difference remaining is set to zero to calculate the value of  : 
 
Π′

Π



1

2

 


1





2

 

Critical evaluation
If  Solution  1  is  adopted,  what  would  be  the  profits  of  the  firms?  We  keep  assuming  a  conventional 
payment structure between them.  
 
In order to arrive at the correct profit functions of the firms, we need to make assumptions about when 
the  producer charges  his  set‐ups  costs  to  the  buyer.  According  to  the  conventional  payment structure, 
this would happen the moment an order is delivered.  
 
After an analysis of the new cash‐flow functions of the players, and the derivation of linearised annuity 
stream functions, we should find that the profit functions are now: 
 
1
2

 

 
1

1

2



2
2



2

1



2



 

 
The supply chain profit function is the same as presented in Section  4.2.2. Recall that  ∗ 939.3. (You 

. Hence: 
can verify that  ∗
 

 
 
1
5,000
600
1
939.3
40 20 1
4 5,000
600
0.2
0.2 20 1
4
 
2
939.3
2
2
2
 
 
30,000 3,193.9 60 3,193.6
 
£23552.5/
 
 

84 
 



Integrated Logistics

 


20 1

1
2

500
1 939.3
0.2 20
2
2 2
939.3
20

 
2

20 5,000

0.2 20 1

1
2

0.2

 
50,000

50

939.3

939.3

 

 
£49950.0/

 

 
Recall from Section 4.2.2: 
 
£27,382.3/

 

 
£43,381.1/
 

 

27,382.3

2,738.8
2

£28,751.7/



 

43,381.1

2,738.8
2

£44,750.5/



 

 

 
It can be observed that the buyer would not be happy to adopt this perfect coordination scheme since 
under  the  status‐quo  scenario  he  could  make  more  profits.  To  achieve  the  equal  distribution  of  net 
profits when adopting this perfect coordination scheme, the supplier would still need to pay to the buyer 
an amount of: 
 
49950.0 44,750.5
£5199.2/
 
28,751.7 23552.5
 
Coordination mechanisms that require such so‐called side‐payments are not ideal because it is difficult to 
arrange for such side‐payments to be implemented in the real world.  
 
In  conclusion,  perfect  coordination  should  ideally  not  only  look  to  ensure  that  decentralised  decision 
making leads to the logistics policy that is optimal for the integrated supply chain, it should at the same 
time ensure that all parties are automatically financially rewarded without the need to resort to any side‐
payments.  
 
Solution 2
This solution is similar to Solution 1. The set‐up cost payments are the same as in Solution 1. However, 
instead of changing the transfer price   itself, we will change the payment structure between buyer and 
supplier so that its impact on the holding cost term of the buyer has the same effect as to align it to that 
in the supply chain profit function.  
 
Recall from Section  2.11 that by the introduction of prices  , ,  and parameter   we can find profit 
functions  that  reflect  the  impact  of  consignment  arrangements  on  the  firms  profit  functions.  If  we  use 
this scheme for this supply chain, the profit functions are as follows: 
 
2

1

2

2

 

 
 

85 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
1



1

2



2
2



2



2

 

 
1



1


2

2
2

 

 
Therefore,  an  alternative  implementation  of  Solution  1  is  to  keep  the  original  price    but  select  a 
combination of 
1 2  such that: 
 
1

2

1

 

1
 as the amount to be 
This can be done in an infinite number of ways. For example, choose 
  be 
paid  by  buyer  to  producer  the  moment  a  product  is  delivered,  and  let  the  remainder 
paid when the buyer sells the product to its customers.  
 
In general, such an implementation alters the profit functions of buyer and producer less because in their 
marginal profit term we still retain the original price. This is likely to produce results requiring, in most 
situations, less side‐payments. However, it can on itself not eliminate that side‐payments may be needed.  
 
Note. When applying this scheme to the numerical example, we have in this case the same result simply 
because 
20 1

£30/
£30/

  happens,  by  sheer  coincidence,  to  be  equal  to 



1



Solution 3
This  solution  will  adapt  Solution  1  and  also  make  use  of  Solution  2’s  strategy  to  change  the  payment 
structure.  
 
We  start  by  investigating  what  determines  the  optimal  lot‐size  ∗ .  We  realise  this is  given  by  the  ratio 
under the square root: 
 
2
 
1

 
Consider a non‐zero constant  , then we achieve the same  ∗  if the ratio would be: 
 
2
 
1


Property: When 

0:  

Maths refresher
An affine transformation over real numbers is a function 
  : → :

,  
where   and   are constants.  
 is a function of   that reaches its maximum in  ∗  if and only if 
86 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 is a function that reaches its maximum in  ∗ . 
 
Therefore, we will also achieve perfect coordination by making the difference Π′
Π  equal to zero: 
 

Π



1

Π′
2
2
 
This leads to the following coordination scheme: 
 
1. The buyer pays the supplier for every order the set‐up cost at the time the order is delivered: 
 


1
 
 
2. The buyer pays the producer per product upon delivery the price 
 




1



1



 

 the moment that the product is sold by the 
and in addition, will pay the remainder 
buyer to its customers.  
 
Note that for 
1, this scheme is exactly the same as Solution 1, safe for the fact that we change the 
payment structure instead of changing the transfer price   itself. We know from the critical analysis that 
the buyer would be £5199.2/
 short if implementing Solution 1.   
 
3. Hence we determine the value of  ∗  such that:  
 

1
5199.2
 
 
Critical evaluation
We work out the impact of implementing Solution 3.  
  
After an analysis of the new cash‐flow functions of the players, and the derivation of linearised annuity 
stream functions, we should find that the profit functions are now: 
 
1

2

 

2

 
 
1



1
 
Recall that 
 



1

939.3. (You can verify that 
40

30

4 5,000

600




5,000
939.3

2

1



2





2

2

2

 

. Hence: 
0.2

600
2

0.2 20 1

1
2

4

939.3
2

 

 
30,000

3,193.9

60

3,193.6

 
87 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Where we require this to equal 
 

£28,751.7/

20 5,000
0.2 20

.  It follows: 



1248.3
6447.5

1

0.1936 600

 
We can check:  
 
30



1 939.3

2 2

0.2 0.1936 20 1

0.1936 

5,000
939.3

0.2 1

1
2

1

0.1936 4

48.2

50

939.3

20

0.1936

600
2

939.3

2

0.2

500
2

 

 
50,000

2575.6

1636.03

 

 
£44750.4
≡  
 
Hence, this coordination scheme is perfect and will also provide the firms with the financial profits they 
would  receive  when  adopting  the  Shapley  value  distribution  of  net benefits  from  adopting  the  optimal 
solution  of  their  alliance.  It  does  not  require  that  firms  give  up  their  independent  distributed  decision 
making processes, and it does not require side‐payments.  
 
Note that we do not necessarily need to divide the net benefit equally between the firms – this is only a 
requirement that comes from the application of the Shapley value to a two‐player game. By adapting   
we can also find solutions whereby the net benefit is split in some pre‐specified but non‐equal split, e.g. 
1/3 of ∆ goes to one player, and 2/3 of ∆ to the other player. 

4.4 Leaders and followers
The previous sections have looked into the application of cooperative game theory in the supply chain. 
This led to seeking coordination mechanisms that are perfect and require no additional side‐payments for 
fairly distributing the net benefits when adopting the coordination mechanism.  
 
In the real world, not every situation can be handled with what we have seen so far. There are situations 
in which one of the parties has bargaining power. This leads this firm to take on the role of a leader in the 
supply chain, and it will set out conditions (i.e. a contract) under which the other firms need to operate.  
 
While  leaders  thus  have  the  power  to  dictate  to  some  degree  how  other  firms  should  behave,  it  is 
generally accepted that a framework of leadership cannot ignore the fact that each firm retains its own 
decentralised  decision  making  power.  That  is,  each  firm  will  look  at  its  own  profit  function  and  make 
decisions about those variables it controls as to maximise this function. A firm can also step away from a 
proposal made by a leader and therefore not engage in the working relationship with this leader but try 
its chances with other firms instead.  
 
4.4.1

Leaders and followers: Stackelberg games

 
The framework of a Stackelberg game takes the above considerations of individual decentralised decision 
making  power  into  account.  We  illustrate  in  subsequent  sections  how  Stackelberg  leaders  in  a  supply 
chain would formulate their decision problem.  
 

88 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
The key idea is that the Stackelberg leader anticipates how other firms will take decisions that optimise 
their individual profit functions, and knowing this, the Stackelberg leader will set out conditions such that 
those decisions made by other firms under these conditions will maximise the profits of the Stackelberg 
leader.  
 
There are two important considerations we will further explore through investigating some examples: 
 
1. How  will  a  leader  achieve  that  other  firms  are  willing  to  adopt  the  contract?  What  are  the 
minimal concessions a leader has to offer other firms? 
 
2. What is the best possible outcome for a leader? Is it different or equal to the logistics policy that 
is found from maximising the integrated supply chain profit function? Is the profit achievable in 
an integrated supply chain an upper bound on the profit that a Stackelberg leader can achieve? 
 
We will first derive a general model for one firm as a Stackelberg leader and another firm as the follower. 
 be the profit function of the leader, and 
 that of the follower.  
Let 
 
Assume that the Stackelberg leader has power over determining the conditions of working together. Let 
these conditions be called  ∈ , where   is the set (or domain) of all possible ways in which the leader 
can specify these conditions. The follower, given the conditions from the leader as expressed through  , 
will aim to optimise its own profit function:  
, , 
max


 
where   is the set of all possible ways in which the follower can set its own decisions. Let this optimal set 
of  decisions  that  the  buyer  can  make  be  represented  by   
∈ .  We  can  use  the  following 
mathematical notation for this: 
 
,  
arg max


 
Note that according to the NPV criterion the buyer as a firm should engage in activities when the NPV of 
this activity is non‐negative. Hence we have an additional constraint that: 
 
,

 
So this is the minimal condition that the leader has to offer the follower!  
 
The leader therefore, has to find the conditions   under which the follower’s profit remains non‐negative 
and such that the decisions  ,  maximise the profits of the leader.  
 
It is also a requirement that under  ,  the leader’s profit must itself remain non‐negative. 
 
Hence the leader’s problem can be written as follows: 
 
|  
max
∈ , ∈

 
 
 
,

arg max


 

 
,



 

89 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
,



 
4.4.2

Stackelberg leader in the supply chain: examples

We will use the example used previously in Section 4.3.1 and also in Section 4.2.2.  
 
Producer is Stackelberg leader
We consider the situation that the producer is the Stackelberg leader and the buyer is the follower.  
 
You may recall from previous sections that   is the only logistical decision in this model and it is set by 
the buyer. So what is, therefore, the power of the leader?  
 
Contract menu 
We will consider that the leader can determine the financial arrangements of the working relationships, 
including setting the price   for a product and the type of payment structure adopted with the buyer. 
We in particular assume that the ingredients of a contract the leader will offer, i.e.  , is given as follows: 
 
1. The producer will specify a price  ∗  per unit of product that the buyer has to pay as set‐out in 
the condition 4. below; 
2. The producer will specify a non‐zero value for  ∗  that governs what the buyers will pay for and 
how, as set out in conditions 3. and 4 below; 
3. The buyer is to pay the supplier for every order the set‐up cost at the time the order is delivered: 
 


1
 
 
4. The buyer pays the producer per product upon delivery the price 
 




1



1



 


 the moment that the product is sold by 
and in addition, will pay the remainder 
the buyer to its customers.  
 
In short, the leader has to choose values for  ∗  and  ∗ . The buyer will choose the optimal lot‐size  ∗ . 
 
Solution 
We note that the above contract scheme is as what was used in Solution 3 in Section 4.3.1. We hence can 
specify the profit functions of the players as follows: 
 
,



,











2

1

 

2
 
, ,



1





2

1





2

2

2


1

1



2



 

 

90 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
To solve this game, we start by deriving the optimal decision for the follower, given some values 

. The solution that maximises 
, ∗ , ∗  is: 
 


2





,

,





,



 and 

 

1
 
We substitute this into 
 








2

2



1

 

 
Define the square root term as 
 (“logistics costs” of buyer). 
 
Intuition says that an optimal solution for the leader will aim to extract all profits from the buyer, or in 
,
0  is  binding,  i.e.  the  an  optimal  set  ∗ , ∗   will  make 
other  words  that  the  condition 
∗ ∗
0. This means that if we solve for  ∗ , we find the following condition: 
,
 






 

2

 
An interpretation for this is that the leader will set its price equal to the difference between the revenue 
per  product  received  by  the  buyer  and  the  total  logistics  costs  per  product  experienced  by  the  buyer. 
With  the  numerical  data  of  this  example,  we  have 
£40/
,  and  for  ∗ 1,  we  would  get 

40
1.2775 4
0.012 £34.71/

 
We now look at the leader’s profit function. We take account of the result found for  ∗ . We choose 

1. We then get: 
 




1 ,





2







2



1

2



2



 

 
which simplifies to: 


 
We substitute the result for 
 







2
2



 

 and find: 





2



2
2

2
1



 

 
Notice that the producer’s profits are now equal to optimal solution of the integrated supply chain profit 
 as given on 
function. (Recall that  ∗  is the optimal solution for the alliance, and substitute  ∗  into 
LN Section 4.2.1, Solution 2). If you use the numerical data, you will hence find that under this contract: 
 

91 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
£0/

 

 
£73,502.2/





 
 
So, if there is value in this activity from the viewpoint of the integrated supply chain, as is clearly the case 
,
0  is automatically also satisfied. Furthermore, intuition 
in this example, then the condition  
says that this must indeed be an optimal solution for the Stackelberg leader: there is no more value in the 
supply chain then by adopting a policy that is optimal for the integrated supply chain so this must be an 
upper bound.  
 
For any other choice for  ∗ , it can be shown that the same conclusion can be reached.  
 
General conclusion 
It  seems  that  we  can  conclude  that  a  Stackelberg  leader  will  extract  maximum  value  by  ensuring  the 
logistics policy implemented is that which maximises the integrated supply chain profit function, and by 
further specifying the right mix of transfer price and payment structure such that all the profit achieved in 
the integrated supply chain goes to the leader.  
 
We have merely used an example to illustrate this, but it is thought to hold in general.  
 
Buyer is Stackelberg leader
We  consider  the  case  that  the  buyer  is  the  leader.  The  buyer  will  not  only  specify  ∗   but  will  offer  a 
contract setting out the payment conditions. We use the same contract scheme as in the previous case, 
but now   ∗  and  ∗  are specified by the buyer too.  
 
The producer as follower has no decision to take but to consider either to accept the contract or to 
walk away.  
 
We proceed as before, but now when it comes to determining  ∗  and  ∗ , we use the condition: 
 
∗ ∗

, , ∗
That is: 


,



,








If we choose 
 





1



2



1



2
2

2





1



1



2





1 this reduces to: 




2





2



 
Therefore: 




2
2

 

 
An interpretation for this is that the leader will set the price it is willing to pay to the producer to be equal 
to the producer unit cost per product plus all other relevant logistics costs per product, which are in this 
case only the financial opportunity cost of his set‐ups. With 
£20/
, the price offered is just a 

fraction higher, i.e.  ∗ £20.01/
92 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

Substitution of  ∗  and this value for  ∗  into the buyer’s profit function shows that the buyer’s profit 
now equal the maximum profit obtainable from the integrated supply chain profit function: 
 


,





2



2
2

2
1

 
Numerical evaluation thus shows that adopting this contract leads to: 
 
£0/
 
 
£73,502.2/

 
This is again in support of the general conclusion. 
 





 

 

Critical evaluation
Don’t rely on a single powerful buyer or a single powerful supplier 
A Stackelberg leader game is much more `unfair’ for an outsider who would care for both firms equally 
than a cooperative game. Firms who are under threat from finding themselves in a follower’s role should 
anticipate this potential development well in advance and seek business opportunities with other firms. It 
is one of the reasons why good intentions to develop a `strategic relationship’ with one powerful supplier 
or  with  one  powerful  buyer  may  turn  sour.  It  is  good  advice  that  for  strategic  components  of  your 
business you seek to develop relationships with more firms than just one.  
 
Avoid getting trapped ‐ when it requires investment to break away from a relationship with a leader 
Imagine that your firm is a supplier of a particular component to a big manufacturer. The relationship has 
gone so well that your firm is now developing a bespoke component for this manufacturer. As a result, 
the component is of high value for the manufacturer so you still get a good price. However, your firm had 
to  configure  your  own  manufacturing  facility  to  a  highly  specialised  degree,  so  you  can’t  produce 
components for other potential clients anymore.  
 
If  your  firm  wants  to  switch  to  producing  for  another  client,  your  firm  will  need  to  invest  in  new 
 (it will be a negative value.) 
technology. Let the annuity stream value of this investment cost be 
 
Now if the current client manufacturer realises that your firm has locked itself into being too specialised, 
it  can  extort  your  firm  even  more,  since  the  condition  for  your  firm  to  reject  any  contract  from  the 
current manufacture (see the general model in Section 4.4.1) now becomes: 
 

 
In other words, if 
£10,000/
, then the manufacturer can re‐set the boundary condition 
in his leader’s optimisation model to: 
,
10,000 
 
So the leader can extort your firm even more! 
 
This  is  not  entirely  sustainable  because  your  firm  may  have  to  lend money  to  compensate  for  liquidity 
problems and in the long term your firm may go bankrupt. The leader may in fact not care for this if the 
93 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
leader has at the same time relationships with other suppliers. Only if you as a supplier are vital to your 
client manufacturer will you probably get a slightly better deal so that your firm doesn’t go bankrupt. In 
any case, it is then still not an entirely satisfactory way for your firm.  
 
It is for your firm hence not sufficient to stress that your firm is vital to the manufacturer (when is that 
really the case if the manufacturer is a leader?). Your firm must make sure it can somehow create the 
condition under which your firm could switch to supplying another firm, and make sure that this is known 
to the current manufacturer as a credible threat, i.e. an action that your firm can and is willing to take if 
necessary.  
 
An accounting perspective 
You may be sceptical about the Stackelberg games we have analysed in the supplier‐buyer models above. 
In particular, you may find that using the boundary condition: 
 
,
0, 
 
seems unrealistic. However, this only means that the annuity stream profit function is  set to zero. You 
may be more convinced of the reality of this if we analyse the accounting profits of the follower. We will 
show that under these conditions the follower will typically still make a positive accounting profit.  
 
We must first realise the following important difference: 
 
1. The  profit  functions  we  have  used  are  not  those  used  in  traditional  accounting.  Our  profit 
functions reflect the net benefit today of future cash‐flows derived from an activity, i.e. it is to be 
used to make optimal decisions about the future directions for  your firm under the realisation 
that  there  is  a  next  best  available  alternative  activity  that  the  firm  could  invest  its  money  in 
instead.  
 
2. Traditional accounting looks on the other hand into the past, and records which cash‐flows have 
gone out and come in over a fiscal year, without consideration of the actual timing of these cash‐
flows nor of making a comparison with what would be the next best available alternative to the 
firm.  
 
If we use the same example as before, the accounting profit over a past year will be found from our AS 
functions, before substitution of any optimal policy (!), by setting the opportunity cost of capital 
0. 
(This  is  in  fact  a  rough  approximation  of  accounting  profit,  since  e.g.  we  then  do  not  account  for  any 
inventory at the end of the fiscal year, depreciation of assets, etc.) 
 
If we consider the game where the producer is the Stackelberg leader, the accounting profit 
 for the 
buyer with  ∗ 1 is: 


 
With 
 



939.3
40



/

 and 

34.71

4 5,000



£34.71/
600

5,000
939.3

 

, this evaluates to: 
6450

3193.9

£3256.1/

 
0, in accounting terms the follower will still end up with a (small) profit.  
Hence while 
 
If  we  consider  the  game  where  the  buyer  is  the  Stackelberg  leader,  the  accounting  profit 
supplier with  ∗ 1 is: 
 

20.01 20 5,000 £50/
 

 

  for  the 

94 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Quite small indeed, but not zero! 
 
Including all relevant costs 
There  is  also  another  reason  which  may  help  sceptical  readers  look  more  favourably  on  using  the 
,
0. 
boundary condition 
 
In our model we have not considered fixed overhead costs of a business. That is, to be able to execute an 
activity some managers and other employees need to devote some of their time to this activity. This is 
not  a  direct  variable  cost  because  they  are  paid  monthly  salaries.  These  fixed  costs  are  in  part  to  be 
allocated to the current activity nevertheless in order to really establish the profits obtained.  
 
They  are  typically  ignored  in  logistics  models  because  these  costs  do  not  determine  optimal  logistical 
parameters such as a lot‐size. However, in financial terms they would actually need to be included. If we 
would adapt our AS function accordingly, then a Stackelberg leader, from consideration of the boundary 
condition: 
,
0  
 
would arrive at solutions whereby the transfer price  ∗  will not be set so sharply as those value we found 
in our examples in previous sections.  
 
 
 

95 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 

5 Stochastic Models

Source:  PETERSON,  R.  AND  SILVER,  E.  1985.  DECISION  SYSTEMS  FOR  INVENTORY  MANAGEMENT  AND 
PRODUCTION PLANNING. WILEY, NEW‐YORK.  

5.1 When is the assumption of a constant demand rate valid?
Demand is often “irregular” or “lumpy.” This may be caused by seasonality or other factors. If demand is 
irregular, the assumption of having a constant demand rate, used in all the EOQ models, might perhaps 
be inaccurate? 
Suppose  that  d1,  d2,  …,  dn  has  been  the  observed  demand  during  each  of  n  periods  of  time.  We 
assume that this is representative for future demand patterns.  
To  decide  whether  demand  is  sufficiently  regular  to  justify  the  use  of  EOQ  model  assumptions,  the 
following test is reported in Peterson and Silver (1985):  
 
1. Determine the estimate E(D) of average demand per period, given by:  
 

E(D) 

1
n

n

d

i

i 1

2. Determine an estimate of the variance 2 of the per‐period demand from: 
 

1

n



 2    di2   E(D)2
 n i 1 
3. Determine an estimate of the relative variability of demand, called CV, the coefficient of variability: 
 

CV 

2

E(D)2

Note that if all di are equal, then 2 = 0, and also CV = 0. Hence the smaller the value of CV, the more it 
indicates that demand follows a constant demand rate closely. Research has indicated that if CV < 0.20 
then the use of the EOQ‐assumption of a constant demand rate is reasonable.  
Example
We use a small example to illustrate the method. <You would want to use more than four observations if 
available.> Demands during four quarters of the past year have been as follows: 80 units, 100 units, 130 
units, and 90 units. If future demand is known to follow a similar pattern, is the assumption of a constant 
demand rate appropriate? 
 

E ( D) 

1 n
1
di  (80  100  130  90)  100

n i1
4

 

96 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

1
1 n 2
2
d i   E ( D)   (80 2  1002  130 2  90 2 )  1002  350

4
 n i1 

2 
 

CV 

2

E ( D) 

2



350
 0.035  0.2
1002

 
In  conclusion,  the  test  indicates  that  it  would  be  appropriate  to  use  the  assumption  of  a  constant 
demand rate.  

5.2 (r, Q) reorder point models
In  this  section  the  assumption  is  made  that  demand  is a  random  variable    following  a  known  normal 
(Gaussian)  probability  distribution.  This  distribution  is  characterised  by  a  mean  value 
  and  a 
standard deviation 
. This probability distribution is symmetrical around its mean.  
 
Note  
If   represents the demand per year, then 
, where   is the demand rate we have been using in 
our EOQ‐type models so far.  
 
The (r, Q) reorder point model represents a widely used inventory system. It is also known as the “Two‐
Bin System.” Its origins can be traced back to the practice of storing the stock of an item in two storage 
bins,  as  a  visual  inventory  control  device.  Emptying  the  first  bin  is  the  signal  to  the  stock  keeper  to 
reorder a fixed reorder quantity Q, and the contents of the second bin serve to meet the demand until 
the reordered amount has been received.1 Therefore, the amount of stock in this second bin should cover 
for the demand that arises during the lead‐time, that is the time that elapses between the moment an 
order is placed and the moment the goods are received. Upon receipt of the order, the second bin is first 
filled up to its original level, and the rest of the order is placed in the first bin.  
 
Thus, whenever the first bin has been emptied, we know that the reorder point has been reached: the 
reorder point corresponds to the number of items   we keep in our second bin. A mathematical two‐bin 
inventory control system is composed of two parts: 
 
 
Two‐bin  
 
System 
 
 
Part  1.  A  method  of  determining  how  much  to  reorder  when  replenishment  is  necessary.  This 
part  of  the  system  is  taken  to  be  deterministic.  That  is,  it  uses  a  single  value  for  each  of  the 
variables it incorporates; and uses the mean or average annual demand E(D). The order quantity 
Q is thus determined following an EOQ model:  
 


2

Part 2. A method for deciding when to reorder, that is, determining the stock level at which a 
replenishment  order  should  be  placed.  The  method  for  determining  that  reorder  point  s  is 
probabilistic  and  considers  the  item  demand  as  a  random  variable  that  may  have  any  one  of 
several values.  
1

                                                             

In fact, the Kanban system and the basic ideas of the Just-In-Time philosophy by Toyota in Japan supposedly have been
developed from observing such a bin system used in U.S. supermarkets.

97 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
There are two issues to consider: 
 
 Part 1: Is the EOQ order quantity a good approximation for the optimal order quantity? 
 Part 2: To establish a reorder point   so as to account for the proper amount of stock needed to 
cover the demand during the lead‐time. 
 
Note that because demand is probabilistic, shortages (i.e. stock‐outs) may still occur during the period 
of lead‐time demand. We will consider two cases:  
 
 A stock‐out is made up, i.e. the customer is promised the item(s) but will have to wait until the 
next order has arrived. This situation is called the backorder case; 
 A stock‐out results in a lost sale, i.e. the customer leaves and will not purchase the item(s) at your 
shop (warehouse,…). 
5.2.1

Backorder case

We investigate the (r, Q) model making the following assumptions: 
 
1. annual  demand  D  (items  /  year)  is  a  continuous  random  variable with  a  mean E(D),  a  variance 
2(D), and a standard deviation (D); 
2. constant infinite replenishment rate R = ; 
3. constant unit holding cost   (£ / item, year); 
4. constant unit replenishment cost   (£ / order); 
5. constant unit shortage cost cs (£ / item) which does not depend on how long it takes to make up 
the stockout; 
6. constant non‐zero lead time L  0; 
7. constant replenishment quantity   (items/order) and shortages are made up (backorders); 
8. constant reorder point  . 
 
Possible inventory fluctuations in the (r, Q) reorder point model are depicted in Figure 15. Note that 
the lead time L is constant, but the cycle time T, as a consequence of variability of demand, is no longer 
constant.  Also  note  that  the  amount  of  items  left  in  inventory  when  the  order  arrives  varies.  This  is 
caused by the variability of the demand during the lead time.  
I(t)


L





Q





E(X) 

‐ 


= Average demand rate



= Real demand rate 
 

Figure 15: The (r, Q) reorder point model; no backorders occur

98 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Let  X  denote  a  random  variable  representing  the  demand  rate  during  lead  time  L,  with  an  average 
value  a  mean  E(X),  a  variance  2(X),  and  a  standard  deviation  (X).  If  we  assume  that  the  demands  at 
different points in time are independent, then it can be shown that: 
 

 2 ( X )  L  2 ( D)
E ( X )  L E ( D)

 ( X )  L  ( D)
 
Therefore, we can expect that the inventory level during lead time L will drop from the reorder point   
to a level: 

r  E( X )

We call 
 the safety stock inventory. The safety stock is used to buffer against the uncertainty 
on demand during the lead time. It is that part of inventory in the second bin that we will only use when 
demand during lead time is larger than the expected amount E(X). We cannot be sure that we will never 
run  out  of  stock.  Figure  16  depicts  a  situation  where  the  variability  of  demand  during  lead  time  has 
caused stock‐outs, which are then backordered. 
I(t) 









Q


E(X) 

‐ 
backorders 

t
 

Figure 16: The (r, Q) reorder point model; backorders occur
 
The  expected  total  annual  cost  of  the  system  consists  of  expected  replenishment  costs,  expected 
holding costs, and expected shortage costs.  
 
1. We start with the replenishment cost per year. Since eventually all demand will be met during a 
year, we will place on average E(D)/Q orders. Thus the annual replenishment cost is:  
 

 
 
2. The expected annual holding cost is considered next. The expected annual holding costs are:  
 
where E(I) is the expected average inventory level throughout the year. 
 

99 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
To calculate E(I), we will make the assumption that backorders occur very infrequently. That means 
we  can  assume  inventory  levels  to  be  always  positive  for  the  calculation  of  the  expected  average 
inventory  level  E(I).  The  expected  inventory  value  I(t)  at  the  start  of  a  cycle  is  then  r  –  E(X)  +Q;  the 
expected  value  of  I(t)  at  the  end  of  a  cycle  is  r  –  E(X);  and  in  between  it  is  expected  to  follow  a  linear 
downward slope. Therefore the expected total amount in inventory during a cycle of length T is: 
 

1
QT  (r  E ( X ))T
2
and thus the expected average inventory level per year is obtained by dividing by T: 
 

1
E(I )  Q  r  E( X )
2
 
The expected average cost is hence approximately:  
 


1
 h Q  r  E ( X ) 

2
 
3.  We  next  compute  the  expected  average  shortage  cost  per  year.  Let  us  assume  that  X  follows  a 
probability density function f(x). The expected number of stock‐out items during a cycle is therefore:  
 


 ( x  r ) f ( x)dx
r

 
The  expected  number  of  cycles  per  year  is  equal  to  the  expected  number  of  time  we  place  a 
replenishment order, which is E(D)/q. Also remember that we assumed that cs represents the shortage 
cost per unit short (£/item) and that is does not depend on the time it takes to make up the shortage. 
Therefore the annual shortage cost can be written as:  
 


E ( D)
cs
( x  r ) f ( x ) dx
Q r
The total annual cost is the sum of all three cost components:  
 


(r , Q)  s

E ( D)  1
E ( D)

 h Q  r  E ( X )   cs
( x  r ) f ( x)dx
Q
Q r
2


We could now use the well trodden path of taking the partial derivatives, and setting these equal to 
zero to find the optimal values r* and Q*. In most cases when backorders occur very infrequently, it has 
been found that Q* is very close to the EOQ value:  
 


2

If we assume this given value of Q, which is not dependent on r, the total cost formula as a function of 
the reorder point r can be simplified to:  
 

100 
 



Integrated Logistics

 


(r )  s

E ( D)  1
E ( D)

 h Q *  r  E ( X )   cs
( x  r ) f ( x)dx
Q*
Q * r
2


where Q* is now a constant. To find the optimal value of r, we take the derivative:  
 


d ( r ) d  E ( D )
E ( D)
1 *

h
Q
r
E
(
X
)
c
( x  r ) f ( x ) dx   0
 s





 s
*

dr
dr  Q
Q* r
2



Since the annual replenishment cost term is not a function of r this can be simplified to: 
 

d ( r ) d

dr
dr


 1 *

E ( D)

h
Q

r

E
(
X
)

c
( x  r ) f ( x ) dx   0



s

Q* r

 2


 
Further:  


d ( r )
E ( D) d 
 h  cs
  ( x  r ) f ( x ) dx   0
dr
Q * dr  r




d(r )
E ( D)
 h  cs
f ( x)dx  0
dr
Q * r
Note that the probability that a shortage occurs during a cycle equals:  
 


P( X  r )   f ( x)dx
r

Therefore:  
 

P( X  r*) 

hQ*
cs E ( D )

This result is not an explicit but an implicit specification of the reorder point r. In general, we want to 
choose such a value for the reorder point r so that the probability of a stock‐out occurring during a cycle, 
P(X  r), is very small.  
In order to make such calculations, we need to have information about the density function f(x). Often, 
demand during lead time is assumed to follow a normal distribution.  
Example
Given:  

s  $24 / order  

h  $3 / item, year  
cs  $4 / item  
E ( D)  10000 items/year  
X normally distributed random variable during lead time L 
E ( X )  300 items  
 ( X )  100 items  
 
Compute the optimal values for order quantity and reorder point.  
 
101 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
1. Order quantity:  

Q* 

2 sE ( D )

h

2 ( 24) (10000 )
 400 items/order
3

2. Reorder point:  
  

P( X  r*) 

hQ*
3(400)

 0.03
cs E ( D ) 4(10000)

 
This means a 3% probability of having a backorder in a cycle. Thus the reorder point r should be set 
such  that  the  probability  of  a  stock‐out  occurring  during  a  cycle  equals  0.03.  Standardising  the  above 
formula with respect to X, we obtain 
 

P(

X  E( X ) r * E( X )

)  0.03
 (X )
 (X )

 

P( Z 

r * E( X )
)  0.03
 (X )

From a Standard Normal Cumulative Probabilities Table, we can get that  
 

P( Z  1.88)  0.97

Then  

P( Z  1.88)  0.03

Hence 

r * E( X )
 1.88
 (X )

This gives 

r*  1.88 ( X )  E ( X )  488 items

 
The (r, Q) reorder point inventory control policy for this item is now established. An order quantity for 
400 units is placed when the inventory position reaches 488 units. The annual costs for this system are 
shown below to be £1180. This follows from 
 
1. reorder costs:  sE( D) / Q  24(10000) / 400  $600  
2. lot size inventory holding costs:  hQ / 2  3(400) / 2  $600  

3. buffer inventory holding costs:  hr  E ( X )  3(488  300)  $564  


4. stock‐out costs: 

E ( D)
cs  ( x  r ) f ( x)dx  10000
4 (100)(0.0116)  $116  
400
Q
r

(See Partial Expectation for Standard Normally Distributed Random Variable Table) 
 




Note.  ( x  r ) f ( x )dx , i.e. the expected number of items stock out during one cycle, is also called 
r

the partial expectation. The partial expectation for a standard normally distributed random variable can 
102 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
be  found  in  a  Table;  the  partial  expectation  for  any  normally  distributed  variable    can  be  found  by 
simply multiplying the corresponding value with the standard deviation   (X )  of the random variable.  
5.2.2

Lost sales case

In  the  lost  sales  case,  similar  assumptions  hold  as  in  the  backorders  case,  except  the  following 
differences: 
 
 The stock out cost  cs includes the lost profit as well as any penalty costs.  


When replenishment stock arrives the inventory is increases by the full amount of the order i.e. by 
Q, as no backorders exist to be filled.  

 
From the second point, it follows that the expected inventory level is the expected inventory level of 
the backorders case, plus the expected number of items short per cycle. The expected inventory level is 
therefore:  


1
E ( I )  Q  r  E ( X )   ( x  r ) f ( x ) dx
2
r
All the other terms stay equal. Following the same approach as in the backorders case gives: 
 

 (r )  s



1 *

E ( D)
E ( D)







h
Q
r
E
(
X
)
(
x
r
)
f
(
x
)
d
x

c

2
 s Q *  ( x  r ) f ( x )d
Q*
r
r



 




d ( r )
d 
E ( D) d 
 h  h   ( x  r ) f ( x ) d x   cs
  ( x  r ) f ( x ) dx   0
dr
dr  r
Q * dr  r



 




d(r )
E ( D)
 h  h  f ( x)dx  cs
f ( x ) dx  0
dr
Q * r
r
 
Which leads to 

P( X  r*) 

hQ*
cs E ( D)  hQ *

 
Note. The shortage cost  cs is now the penalty cost of a stock out plus the opportunity cost (lost profit) 
of a lost sale. 
5.2.3

Service level approach

It  may  be  very  difficult  to  determine  accurately  the  cost  of  being  one  unit  short.  For  this  reason, 
managers  often  decide  to  control  shortages  by  meeting  a  specified  service  level.  Service  level  can  be 
defined in different ways.  
 
Definition  1.  The  service  level  is  the  expected  number  of  cycles  per  year  during  which  a  shortage 
occurs.  
Definition 2. The service level is the expected fraction of all demand that is met on time.  
 
Assume that all shortages are backordered (backlogged).  
103 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Definition 1
Given a reorder point r, the fraction of all cycles per year that will lead to a stock out is equal to:  
 

P( X  r )

Since  E(D)/Q  cycles  per  year  will  occur,  the  expected  number  of  cycles  per  year  during  which  a 
shortage occurs equals 

P( X  r )

E ( D)
Q*

According to Definition 1, we can write  
 

P( X  r )

E ( D)
 s1
Q*

where s1 is the allowed number of expected stock outs per year. This also gives 
 

P ( X  r*)  s1

Q*
E ( D)

Definition 2
Given a reorder point r, the expected number of items short per cycle is equal to:  
 


 ( x  r ) f ( x)dx
r

 
Since E(D)/Q cycles per year will occur, the expected number items short per year equals 
 


 ( x  r ) f ( x)dx
r

E ( D)
Q*

The  expected  fraction  of  items  short  per  year  is  obtained  by  dividing  the  latter  equation  by  E(D), 
which gives 
 


1
( x  r ) f ( x)dx
Q* r
According to Definition 2, we can write  
 


1
( x  r ) f ( x)dx  1  s2
Q* r
where s2 is the expected fraction of items per year that can be met on time. Rearranged: 
 


 ( x  r*) f ( x)dx  Q (1  s )
*

2

r*



The left‐hand side is also called the Partial Expectation  E ( x  r*)  
 

104 
 



Integrated Logistics

 


E ( x  r*)   ( x  r*) f ( x)dx
r*

For a random variable Z following a standard normal distribution, Partial Expectations  E ( Z  z )   in 
function of Z have been tabulated, Section 5.2.4. If X follows a normal distribution with expected value 
E(X) and standard deviation (X), then  
 

E (Z  z ) 

E ( X  r*) Q* (1  s2 )

 (X )
 (X )

Therefore, from such a table we can derive z. The reorder point can then be found as 
 


 
 
5.2.4

Standard Tables

Standard Normal Cumulative Probability Table
 
If 
 denotes the probability distribution of random variable  , then 
 


P( X  r )   f ( x)dx  
r

 
is the probability that a random draw from the distribution will produce a value of   that will be larger 
or equal to a given constant  .  
 
Given  a  normally  distributed  variable    with  mean 
  and  standard  deviation 
,  then  the 
random variable  , defined as: 
 
 
 
will be standard normally distributed. That is, 
 

0 and 


1. We have: 
 

 
We define: 
 
 
The first two tables on the following pages let you solve any of the following two problems: 
 
1. Given  , what is 

2. Given 
, what is  ? 
 
Examples
 Let 
 ‐2.15. Then from the first table, the row with  2.1 and column with 0.05 intersects at 
the  value  0.0158.  Therefore, 
2.15
0.0158.  “The  probability  that  a  random  trial 
from a normal distribution produces a value not higher than  2.15 is 1.58%.” 
105 
 



Integrated Logistics

 



Let 
1.23. Then from the second table, the row with 1.2 and column with 0.03 intersect at 
the value 
1.23
0.8907. “The probability that a random trial from a normal distribution 
produces a value not higher than 1.23 is 89.07%.” 
Let 
 = 0.9500.  In the second table, we identify this value in between the values 0.9495 
and 0.9505. They are both in the row of 1.6, hence z = 1.6x. To find the value of x, we see from 
the  column  headers  that  it  must  fall  in  between  0.04  and  0.05.  In  aim  to  be  as  accurate  as 
possible, we could (linearly) interpolate between 1.64 and 1.65, leading in this case to z = 1.645. 
However, for the sake of keeping calculations to a minimum, it is adequate to simply take the x 
from the column of which its  
 is closest to 0.9500. Hence both z = 1.64 or z = 1.65 are 
good values.   

 
Note that 
 

1

.  

Standard Normal Loss Function Table
 
Per  definition, 
  if 
0,  and 
random variable  , then 
 

0  if 

0.  If 

  denotes  a  probability  distribution  of 



E ( X  r )   ( x  r ) f ( x)dx  
r

 
denotes the expected value of the random variable 
 
We also have: 

E (Z  z) 

, where   is a given constant.  

E ( X  r )
 (X )

When    is  normally  distributed,    will  be  standard  normally  distributed,  and  the  Standard  Normal 
Loss Table given below can be used to solve any of the following two problems: 
 

1. Given  , what is 
2. Given 
, what is  ? 
Examples
 
 Let 
1.64.  We  look  up  the  value  in  the  table  in  the  row  with  header  1.6  and  column  with 
header 0.04 to find 
1.6611 
0.0075.  In  the  table,  we  identify  this  value  at  the  row  with  value  2.4  and  in 
 Let 
between the columns with values 0.04 and 0.05. Hence z = 2.445 is the value obtained from linear 
interpolation. In practise, we are happy with taking either z = 2.44 or z = 2.45. 

106 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 

 

 

107 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 

 

 
 
 

108 
 



Integrated Logiistics

 

 
109 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
5.2.5

Exercises

1. Each year, a computer store sells an average of 1000 boxes of disks. Annual demand for boxes of disks 
is  normally  distributed  with  a  standard  deviation  of  40.8  boxes.  The  store  orders  disks  from  a  regional 
distributor. Each order is filled in two weeks. The cost of placing each order is $50, and the annual cost of 
holding one box of disks in inventory is $10. The per‐unit stock out cost (because of loss of goodwill and 
the cost of placing a special order) is assumed to be $20. The store is willing to assume that all demand is 
backlogged. Determine for the computer store the proper 
 
a) order quantity 
b) reorder point  
c) safety stock level 
d) What is the probability that stock out occurs during lead time? 
 
Additional questions: 
e)  If  the  lead‐time  increases  to  4  weeks,  investigate  how  this  affects  your  answers  to  the  previous 
questions, a to d? 
f) What is the expected number of boxes per year that are not delivered on time from available stock 
when implementing the reorder point you calculated in part b? 
g) What is the percentage  of annual demand met on time from available stock  when implementing 
the reorder point calculated in part b? 
 
2.  The  same  computer  store  as  in  Question  1  now  doubts  whether  shortages  result  in  backorders. 
Suppose that each box of disks sells for $50 and costs the store $30. Answer the same questions a to d, 
for the case that shortages all result in lost sales! <Hint: you need to estimate a value you will need to use 
for the shortage cost  .> 
 
3. Again, the same computer store as in Question 1 and Question 2. It now doubts whether the values for 
shortage  cost  used  were  realistic!  Answer  the  same  questions,  a  to  d,  for  the  case  that  the  computer 
store wants the average number of stock out cycles per year to be at most equal to 3. 
 
4. Yep, the same computer store as in Question 1, 2, and 3. The store manager now thinks it might be 
best to aim for satisfying at least 95% of annual demand. Answer the same questions, a to d. <Note: this 
example illustrates that a negative safety stock value is possible.> 
 
5. A hospital orders its blood from a regional blood bank. Each year, the hospital uses an average of 1040 
pints of type O blood.  Each order placed with the regional blood bank incurs a cost of $20. The lead time 
for each order is one week. It costs the hospital $20 to hold 1 pint of blood in inventory for a year. The 
per‐pint stock out cost is estimated to be $50. Annual demand for type O blood is normally distributed 
with standard deviation of 43.26 pints. Assume that 52 weeks = 1 year and that all demand is backlogged.  
 
a) Determine the optimal order quantity, reorder point, and safety stock level. 
b) To use the two bin system with backorders, what “unrealistic” assumptions must be made? 
 
6.  Furnco  sells  secretarial  chairs.  Annual  demand  is  normally  distributed  with  mean  of  1040  chairs  and 
standard deviation of 50.99 chairs. Furnco orders its chairs from its flagship store. It costs $100 to place 
an order and the lead time is two weeks. Furnco estimates that each stock out causes a loss  of $50 in 
future goodwill. Furnco pays $60 for each chair and sells it for $100. The annual cost of holding a chair in 
inventory is 30% of its purchase price.  
 
a) Assuming that all demand is backlogged, what are the reorder point and the safety stock level? 
b) Assuming that all stock outs result in lost sales, determine the optimal reorder point and the safety 
stock level. 
 

110 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
7. FOOTD Inc. sells an average of 1000 food processors each year. Each order for food processors placed 
by FOOTD costs $50. The lead time is one month. It costs $10 to hold a food processor in inventory for 
one year. Annual demand for food processors is normally distributed with a standard deviation of 69.28. 
Determine the reorder point for each of the following values of the service level: 
a) 95% of annual demand met on time 
b) 99% 
c) 99.9% 

5.3 News vendor problems
In this section, we consider single‐period or static inventory problems. These are problems in which one 
ordering decision has to be made at one moment in time.  
 
Such  problems  are  often  called  news  vendor  problems.  Consider  a  vendor  who  must  decide  how 
many newspapers should be ordered each day from the newspaper plant. If the vendor orders too many 
papers, he or she will be left with many worthless newspapers at the end of the day. On the other hand, 
the vendor who orders too few newspapers will loose profit (and disappoint customers) that could have 
been earned if enough newspapers to meet customer demand had been ordered. The news vendor must 
order the number of papers that properly balances these two costs.  
 
More  formally,  a  decision  maker  is  faced  with  the  problem  of  determining  the  order  quantity  q  to 
purchase  an  item  based  on  estimates  of  some  future  demand  for  that  item.  Only  after  q  has  been 
determined and the order has been placed, the real value of the demand D becomes known. Depending 
on the values of q and D, the decision maker incurs a revenue R(q, D), a cost (q, D), and a profit P = R – 
.  
5.3.1

Example

A  student  has  obtained  the  concession  for  picnic  lunches  at  local  football  games.  Records  indicate  the 
following demand distribution for lunches (Table 2): 
Table 2: Demand distribution for lunches at the local football club
Demand
Pr(x) = Probability that demand = X
X
0
0.00
1
0.10
2
0.10
3
0.30
4
0.30
5
0.10
6
0.10

The lunches cost £3 and are sold at £5. Any lunches left over can be disposed of for £0.5. The problem 
is to determine the order quantity.  
Three different approaches to solve this problem will be given in the following sections.  
5.3.2

Cost minimisation

Once the decision has been made to place an order, the fixed procurement costs  do not influence the 
ordering decision. Fixed costs per order are therefore irrelevant in this case. The cash flows influenced by 
the order quantity decision are the costs of ordering too less or the cost of ordering too much.  
The cost of ordering too much may include the purchase price of the item plus the cost of disposing 
any unsold items. The cost of ordering too less includes the purchase price of the item and the cost of lost 
sales.  

111 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Let q represent the order quantity and x the realisation of the demand, p the unit purchase price of 
the item, w the salvage value per unit for disposing of it, and r the unit selling price for selling an item to 
our customers. We can then write:  

pq  w(q  x)
q, x   
pq  r(x  q)

(x  q)
(x  q)

where p = £3/unit, w = £0.5/unit, and r = £5/unit. 
The expected cost, for a given order quantity q, is then given by:  


6

x 0

x 1

E (q, x)   q, x  Pr(x)   q, x  Pr(x)

where Pr(x) is the probability that a demand of x units materialises. 
 
We want to select this order quantity q that will minimise the expected cost. It is helpful to show the 
calculations in a matrix, as presented in Table 3. It can be seen that the best decision would be to order 3 
picnic lunches, with an expected cost of £128.5. 
Table 3: Conditional cost matrix
Order

quantity q

1

2

Demand x
3

4

Expected
5

6

cost

E(

(q,x))
1

30

80

130

180

230

280

155.0

2

55

60

110

160

210

260

139.5

3

80

85

90

140

190

240

128.5

4

105

110

115

120

170

220

131.0

5

130

135

140

145

150

200

147.0

6

155

160

165

170

175

180

167.5

Pr(x)

0.10

0.10

0.30

0.30

0.10

0.10

5.3.3

Profit maximisation

For problems involving major changes in revenue in which profit maximisation is the objective, profits 
may be used as a measure of performance rather than costs. Profit equals revenue minus cost.  
 
In case of ordering too much, the profit comes from the sales of units but there is a cost related to the 
disposal of unsold items. In case of ordering too few units, the sole profits arise  from sales. Let P(q, x) 
denote the profit, then: 

(r  p)x  (p  w )(q  x)
P(q, x)  
(r  p)q

(x  q)
(x  q)

The expected profit, for a given order quantity q, is:  

112 
 



Integrated Logistics

 


6

x 0

x 1

E P(q, x)   P q, x Pr( x)   P q, x Pr(x)

We like to select this order quantity to maximise the expected profit. Results are displayed in Table 4. 
The optimal order quantity is again 3 units.  
 
Table 4: Conditional profit matrix
Order
Demand x
Expected
quantity q

1

2

3

4

5

6

profit
E(P(q,x))

1

20

20

20

20

20

20

20.0

2

-5

40

40

40

40

40

35.5

3

-30

15

60

60

60

60

46.5

4

-55

-10

35

80

80

80

44.0

5

-80

-35

10

55

100

100

28.0

6

-105

-60

-15

30

75

120

7.5

Pr(x)

0.10

0.10

0.30

0.30

0.10

0.10

 
5.3.4

Regret minimisation

A  third  approach  to  the  example  utilises  the  same  basic  methodology  for  decision  making,  but  the 
measure  of  performance  can  no  longer  be  obtained  simply  by  examining  the  relevant  cash  flows 
associated with a given order quantity and demand level. The regret measure is obtained by replacing the 
outcome in each cell by the value obtained by subtracting the profit of the cell from the maximum profit 
for any cell in that cell’s column. This simple concept is intuitively evident. For each state of nature (i.e. 
realised  demand  level),  there  is  an  optimum  decision  (yielding  the  maximum  profit).  The  regret 
associated  with  making  the  best  decision  for  a  given  state  of  nature  is  zero.  The  regret  of  each  of  the 
other cells in the column simply indicates the difference in profits between the decision indicated and the 
best decision for the state of nature that occurred. The regret matrix with respect to our example is given 
in Table 5.  
 
Table 5: Conditional regret matrix (in 0.1£)
Order
Demand x
quantity q

Expected
regret

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

0

20

40

60

80

100

50.5

2

25

0

20

40

60

80

34.5

3

50

25

0

20

40

60

23.5

4

75

50

25

0

20

40

26.0

5

100

75

50

25

0

20

42.0

6

125

100

75

50

25

0

62.5

Pr(x)

0.10

0.10

0.30

0.30

0.10

0.10

113 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Note that expected regret plus expected profit sum to £7 for each order quantity. Since this is true for 
each order quantity (q = 1, 2, …6), selecting the alternative that minimises regret is identical to selecting 
the alternative that maximises profit. The sum of the two expected  values (in this case £7) represents the 
expected  profit  if  demand  x  were  known  before  making  decisions.  That  is,  it  is  the  sum  of  the  highest 
profit  outcome  for  each  state  of  nature  times  the  probability  of  the  state.  The  expected  profit  given 
perfect knowledge is:  


6

x 0

x 1

E P(q, x)   P q, x  Pr( x)   P q, x  Pr(x)
 2(0.1)  4(0.1)  6(0.3)  8(0.3)  10(0.1)  12(0.1)  £7
The expected regret can therefore be interpreted as the cost of uncertainty.  
 
The  cost  of  uncertainty  of  the  optimal  decision  represents  the  maximum  value  of  perfect  forecast 
information to the decision maker. For this example, the maximum price the decision maker would pay 
for perfect information is £2.35. 
 
5.3.5

Exercises

 
1.  In  August,  Walton  Bookstore  must  decide  how  many  of  next  year’s  nature  calendars  should  be 
ordered. Each calendar costs the bookstore $2 and is sold for $4.50. After January 1, any unsold calendars 
are  returned  to  the  publisher  for  a  refund  of  $0.75  per  calendar.  Walton  believes  that  the  number  of 
calendars sold by January 1 follows the probability distribution shown in the Table below. Walton wants 
to  maximise  the  expected  net  profit  from  calendar  sales.  How  many  calendars  should  the  bookstore 
order in August? 
5.3.5.1.1 No.
of
Calendars
sold
100
150
200
250
300

Probabili
ty
.3
.2
.3
.15
.05

2.  Every  four  years,  Blockbuster  Publishers  revises  its  textbooks.  It  has  been  three  years  since  the 
best‐selling book, The Joy of OR, has been revised. At present, 2000 copies of the book are in stock, and 
Blockbuster must determine how many copies of the book should be printed for the next year. The sales 
department believes that sales during the next year are governed by the distribution in the Table below. 
Each copy of the book during the next brings the publisher $35 in revenues. Any copies left at the end of 
the  next  year  cannot  be  sold  at  full  price  but  can  be  sold  for  $5  to  Bonds  Ennoble  and  Gitano’s 
Bookstores. The cost of a printing of the book is $50000 plus $15 per book printed. How many copies of 
The Joy should be printed? Would the answer change if 4000 copies were currently in stock? 
Copies Demanded
5000
6000
7000
8000

Probability
.3
.2
.4
.1


114 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
1. Solution: Expected profit is maximised for q* = 250 items/run. 
profit maximisation
acquisition cost
salvage value
revenue

p
w
r

order quantity
q

demand x
0
0
-125
-187.5
-250
-312.5
-375
0
0

0
100
150
200
250
300
0
p(x)

2
0.75
4.5

profit per unit sold
loss per unit unsold

2.5
1.25

expected profit
100
0
250
187.5
125
62.5
0
0
0.3

150
0
250
375
312.5
250
187.5
0
0.2

200
0
250
375
500
437.5
375
0
0.3

250
0
250
375
500
625
562.5
0
0.15

300
0
250
375
500
625
750
0
0.05

0
0
-125
-187.5
-250
-312.5
-375
0
0

0
231.25
328.125
387.5
390.625
346.875
0

2. Answer: Order one print run for 5000 units of the book, estimated profit is 65500‐50000=$15500. 
profit maximisation
acquisition cost
salvage value
revenue

p
w
r

order quantity
q

demand x
0
0
-30000
-40000
-50000
-60000
0
0
0

0
3000
4000
5000
6000
0
0
p(x)

15
5
35

profit per unit sold
loss per unit unsold

20
10

expected profit
3000
0
60000
50000
40000
30000
0
0
0.3

4000
0
60000
80000
70000
60000
0
0
0.2

5000
0
60000
80000
100000
90000
0
0
0.4

6000
0
60000
80000
100000
120000
0
0
0.1

0
0
-30000
-40000
-50000
-60000
0
0
0

0
0
-30000
-40000
-50000
-60000
0
0
0

0
46500
59000
65500
63000
0
0

If 4000 books in stock, then it does not seem worthwhile to print another edition as shown below. 
acquisition cost
salvage value
revenue

p
w
r

order quantity
q

demand x
0
0
-10000
-20000
-30000
-40000
0
0
0

0
1000
2000
3000
4000
0
0
p(x)

 

15
5
35

profit per unit sold
loss per unit unsold

20
10

expected profit
1000
0
20000
10000
0
-10000
0
0
0.3

2000
0
20000
40000
30000
20000
0
0
0.2

3000
0
20000
40000
60000
50000
0
0
0.4

4000
0
20000
40000
60000
80000
0
0
0.1

0
0
-10000
-20000
-30000
-40000
0
0
0

0
0
-10000
-20000
-30000
-40000
0
0
0

0
15500
28000
34500
32000
0
0

 

115 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

6 MRP, JIT, and Bottlenecks

6.1 Materials Requirements Planning
Materials Requirements Planning (MRP) is a computer‐based production planning and inventory control 
system.  It  is  also  known  as  “time‐phased  requirements  planning”,  as  it  recognises  the  time  needed  to 
produce  (or  purchase)  items.  MRP  also  recognises  the  relationship  between  the  demand  for  the  final 
product and the components to make it. These relationships are then used to determine the amount that 
should be produced (or purchased) of each final product, assembly, subassembly, and component during 
each period of a planning horizon.  
6.1.1

MRP inputs

The three major inputs of an MRP system are the master production schedule, the production structure 
records, and the inventory status records (Figure 17).  
 
Customer orders 

Bills 
of materials 

Purchase orders

 

Master 
Production 
Schedule 

Forecast 
demand 

Inventory
records 

MRP 
 

Materials plans 

Work orders

 

Figure 17. MRP environment

Master Production Schedule (MPS)
The Master Production Schedule (MPS) outlines the production plan for all end items. It expresses how 
much of each end item is wanted and when it is wanted. Typically, the MPS works with time buckets of 
one week (month) and the planning horizon of the MPS covers for the next 1 – 6 months (1 – 2 years). 
The MPS is developed from end item customer orders and forecasts.  
The end item customer orders or sales orders represent some contractual commitment on behalf of 
the customer. Customers, however, may change their minds about what they require after having placed 
their  orders.  Considering  that  each  of  several  hundred  customers  may  make  changes  to  their  sales 
orders, not once, but possibly several times after order placement, it is evident that managing the sales 
order book is a complex and dynamic process. An organisation may have to make decisions about how 
much flexibility they will afford to customers and at what stage their customers have to accept liability for 
the implications of their changes.  
Not all operations have the same degree of forward “visibility” in terms of known customer orders. 
Supermarkets, for example, have no advance notice when a customer will arrive and what and how much 
will  be  purchased.  Many  businesses  also  do  not  have  sufficient  time  to  respond  “just‐in‐time”  when 
116 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
customers  place  orders,  because  there  would  be  insufficient  time  left  to  buy  the  required  materials, 
perform the required manufacturing operations on those materials, and then deliver the product to the 
customer.  Many  businesses  therefore  have  to  rely  on  forecasts,  i.e.  predictions  about  likely  future  end 
item  demands  to  ensure  they  have  all  raw  materials,  components,  assemblies  and  end  item  products 
available to meet delivery times once a sales order is received.  
A combination of known orders and forecasted orders is used to represent end item demand in many 
businesses. Important to note is that forecasted orders do not equal sales targets. Sales targets are given 
to  the  sales  force  and  to  give  them  some  incentive,  these  are  typically  set  optimistically  high.  The 
forecasted  orders  should  be  the  best  estimate  available  at  any  time  of  what  reasonably  could  be 
expected to happen.  
A characteristic of demand management is that the further ahead you look into the future, the less 
certainty there is about demand. In the short term, typically, the demand will largely be based on placed 
orders. However, as few customer orders are placed well into the future, the demand in the longer term 
will be largely based on forecasts i.e. market information from sales operatives as well as historical sales 
figures. As time goes by, the fraction of forecast demand for a certain future period will diminish and be 
replaced by newly arriving sales orders.  
The  mix  of  known  orders  and  forecast  orders  will  also  be  determined  by  the  type  of  operation.  A 
concept sometimes used here is the Order Penetration Point (OPP). The OPP is that storage point in the 
supply  chain  where  downstream  operations  are  largely  triggered  by  “make‐to‐order”  demand  and 
upstream operations largely by “make‐to‐stock” decisions. For example, the OPP for a supermarket lies at 
the retail point itself, while for a jobbing builder the OPP lies upstream as materials (and other resources) 
will only be acquired when the builder has been awarded a specific contract. Many businesses have to 
operate  in  a  context  where  the  OPP  is  located  somewhere  within  their  operations  or  downstream  the 
supply  chain.  In  that  case  they  need  to  operate  mainly  using  forecasts.  In  general,  the  information  of 
sales  orders  combined  with  forecast  demand  of  end  items  forms  the  major  input  to  the  Master 
Production Schedule.  
Note  that  MPS  and  MRP  can  also  be  applied  to  a  service  environment.  For  example,  in  a  hospital 
theatre  there  is  an  MPS  which  contains  statements  of  which  operations  are  planned  and  when.  This 
drives  provisioning  of  materials  for  the  operations,  such  as  sterile  instruments,  blood  and  dressings.  It 
also  governs  the  scheduling  of  staff  for  operations,  including  anaesthetists,  nurses,  and  surgeons,  and 
other facilities such as recovery rooms and beds.  
An example of a MPS is given in Table 1. End item demand for the next 9 weeks is given. We start by 
having 30 units of the item on hand at the beginning of week 1, of which 10 can be used to fulfil demand 
for week 1, and 20 remain available inventory. At the end of week 2, available inventory is reduced to 10 
units, just sufficient to satisfy demand for week 3. Therefore, the MPS schedule needs to make available 
at least 10 units at the end of week 3 to satisfy demand for week 4.  
 
Table 6. Example of MPS chase strategy.

 
 
Week number 
 
 
1


4
5
6
7
8

 
Demand 
 
10  10  10
10
15
15
15
20
20   
Available  30  20  10  0 
0
0
0
0
0
 
 
MPS 
 
0

10
15
15
15
20
20
 
 
 
The  chase  strategy  used  in  Table  1  is  to  make  available  only  those  amounts  needed  to  satisfy 
immediate future demand. As a result, inventory levels are eventually reduced to zero. Chasing demand 
involves  adjusting  the  provision  of  resources,  which  may  not  always  be  desirable  or  possible.  Level 
scheduling, on the other hand, (see Table 2) involves averaging the amount required to be completed to 
smooth out peaks and troughs. The average projected inventory of the end item, however, is now much 
higher. In practice, companies may use strategies which fall between the chase and the level strategy.  
 
Table 7. Example of MPS level strategy.

Week number
1
2
3

4

5

6

7

8

9

117 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Demand
10
10
10
10
15
15
15
20
20
Available 30
33
36
39
42
40
38
36
29
MPS
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
 
While the demand for the end items needs to be derived from projected sales orders and forecasts, 
the  demand  for  all  components  necessary  to  produce  these  end  items  can  be  calculated  by  the  MRP 
system from the MPS data.  

Bill of Material (BOM)
To work out the volume and timing of assemblies, sub‐assemblies and materials required to meet the 
MPS,  we  need  information  about  the  list  of  assemblies,  sub‐assemblies  and  components  needed  to 
produce the end items. This is provided by the product structure records or Bills of Materials (BOMs).  
A Bill of Material (BOM) contains the information on every item required to produce an end item: it 
lists all information necessary, in particular the part identification and the quantity needed per assembly. 
An example of a simple BOM is displayed in Figure 18.  


B(1) 

E(1) 

Level 0 

C(3) 

F(2) 

J(1) 

D(1)

G(2)

K(1) 

H(1)

Level 1 

I(1)

Level 2 

Level 3 

Figure 18 Typical BOM. The letters represent assemblies, subassemblies and parts. The numbers in
parentheses are the quantities required for assembly.

In Figure 18, item A is the end item and it requires 1 subassembly B, 1 subassembly D, and 3 parts C. 
One part E and 2 subassemblies F make up 1 subassembly B. One part I, 1 part H, and 2 parts G make up 
the subassembly D. One part J and 1 part K make up 1 subassembly F.  
A BOM should display all components, assemblies and sub‐assemblies in levels representing the way 
in  which  they  are  actually  manufactured:  from  raw  materials  to  components  to  subassemblies  to 
assemblies to end items. The BOM for MRP may be different from a product structure plan constructed 
by design engineers, as a product may not be assembled the way it was designed.  
Inventory status records
These  records  contain  the  status  of  all  items  in  inventory.  All  inventory  items  must  be  uniquely 
identified.  These  records  must  be  kept  up  to  date,  with  each  receipt,  disbursement,  or  withdrawal 
documented to maintain record integrity. They should also contain information on lead times, lot sizes, or 
other item peculiarities. 
Quantities of items in inventory available for the next period are referred to as “on‐hand”; quantities 
that are expected to become available are “scheduled receipts.” 
6.1.2

MRP outputs

MRP takes the MPS for end items, BOM and inventory status records, and determines what components 
and subassemblies are required, how many, and when work orders for subassemblies should be released 
to the manufacturing operation and when orders for parts should be placed with suppliers.   
For  purchased  components,  the  lead  time  is  the  time  interval  between  placement  of  the  purchase 
order  and  the  availability  of  these  components  in  inventory.  After  such  an  order  has  been  placed,  it 
changes from “planned” order to “open” or “on order.” 

118 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
For manufactured subassemblies, the lead time is the interval between release of the work order to 
the manufacturing operation and the availability of the produced subassemblies after completion.  
The actual order quantity released to either the manufacturing floor or the supplier may be the net 
requirements or adjusted to any suitable lot size.  
Example 1: simplified MRP
Question: You are to produce 100 units of product A in period 8. If no stock is on‐hand or scheduled to 
arrive, determine when to release orders for each component and the size of each order. The BOM and 
Lead time information is displayed in Figure 19. 
Solution: Product A is made from components B and C; C is made from components D and E. By simple 
computation we calculate quantities required: 
 
Component B: (1) (number of A’s) = 1 (100) = 100; 
Component C: (2) (number of A’s) = 2 (100) = 200; 
Component D: (1) (number of C’s) = 1 (200) = 200; 
Component E: (2) (number of C’s) = 2 (200) = 400. 
 
Now  we  must  consider  the  time  element  for  all  the  items.  Table  8  below  create  a  simplified  MRP 
based  on  the  demand  for  A,  the  knowledge  of  how  A  is  made,  and  the  time  needed  to  obtain  each 
component.  

Lead time = 4 

B(1) 
Lead time = 3 

C(2) 
Lead time = 2 

D(1) 
Lead time = 1 

E(2) 
Lead time = 1 

Figure 19. BOM/Lead time information of example 1
Table 8. Simplified MRP matrix with solution for example 1.
Item: A

Lead time = 4
Period
1
2

Gross requirements
Planned order releases
Item: B
Lead time = 3
Gross requirements
Planned order releases
Item: C
Lead time = 2

Gross requirements
Planned order releases

4

5

6

7

8
100

100

100
100

Gross requirements
Planned order releases
Item: D
Lead time = 1
Gross requirements
Planned order releases
Item: E
Lead time = 1

3

200
200

200
200

400
400

119 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Planned order releases of a parent item are used to determine gross requirements for its component 
items. Planned order releases of a parent item generate a gross requirement in the same time period for 
its  lower  level  components.  Planned  order  release  dates  of  the  components  are  simply  obtained  by 
offsetting the lead times.  
The  MRP  in  Table  8  shows  which  items  are  needed,  how  many  are  needed,  and  when  they  are 
needed; in order to complete 100 units of product A in period 8, it is necessary to release order for 100 
units of B in period 1, 200 units of C in period 2, 200 units of D in period 1, and 400 units of E in period 1. 
MRP Matrix
The  previous  example  was  a  simplified  case.  In  a  typical  MRP  table,  we  will  instead  encounter  the 
following entries (see Table 9): 
I. Gross requirements: the total anticipated demand for the item. For end items the quantity is 
obtained from the MPS; for components and subassemblies it is derived from the “planned 
order releases” of its parents; 
II. Scheduled  receipts:  material  that  has  been  ordered  previously  and  is  expected  to  arrive  in 
this period; 
III. Projected  on  hand:  expected  quantity  in  inventory  at  the  end  of  the  period,  available  for 
demand  in  subsequent  periods.  It  is  calculated  by  subtracting  the  “gross  requirements”  for 
the period from the “scheduled receipts” and “planned order receipts” for the same period as 
well as the “projected on hand” from the previous period. When “safety stock” is maintained 
and/or  units  are  “allocated”  to  future  orders,  these  amounts  must  be  added  to  the  gross 
requirements before calculating the “projected on hand”; 
IV. Net requirements: the reduction of “gross requirements” by the “scheduled receipts” in the 
period plus the “projected on hand” in the previous period. This indicates the net number of 
items that must be provided to satisfy the parent or master schedule requirements; 
V. Planned order receipts: the size of the planned order (the order has not yet been placed) and 
when  it  is  needed.  This  appears  in  the  same  period  as  “net  requirements”,  but  its  size  is 
modified by the appropriate lot sizing policy (see also next section). If the lot sizing policy is 
not lot‐for‐lot, the planned order quantity will generally exceed the “net requirements.” Any 
excess beyond the “net requirements” goes into “projected on hand” inventory. With lot‐for‐
lot ordering, the “planned order receipts” is always the same as the “net requirements”; 
VI. Planned  order  releases:  when  the  order  should  be  placed  (released)  so  the  items  are 
available when needed by the parent. This is the same as the “planned order receipts” offset 
for  lead  times.  “Planned  order  releases”  at  level  j  generate  material  requirements  are  the 
lower  levels  j  +  1,  etc.  When  the  order  is  placed,  it  is  removed  from  the  “planned  order 
receipts”  and  “planned  order  releases”  rows  and  entered  in  the  “scheduled  receipts”  row. 
“Planned order releases” show the what, how many, and when of MRP.  
Table 9. Typical MRP matrix.
Item:

Level:

Lead time =

On hand =

Period
PD

1

Safety stock =

2

3

Allocated =

4

Lot

5

sizing policy =

6



Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases

Example 2: MRP
Given: There are orders for 103 units of product A in period 8 and 200 units of product Q in period 7. The 
on hand inventory levels for each item are A = 18, Q = 6, B = 10, C = 20, D = 0, and E = 30. A safety stock of 
five  units  is  maintained  on  product  A  and  six  units  on  product  Q  with  no  safety  stock  on  other 
components.  Additionally,  ten  units  of  the  18  units  on  hand  of  product  A  are  already  allocated  to 
particular customers. There are no open orders (scheduled receipts) on any item. The lot size for items A, 
120 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Q, B, and C is the same as the net requirements (lot‐for‐lot ordering), while the lot size for D is 200 units 
and for E is 500 units.  
Question: Develop an MRP plan for products A and Q with the product structures (BOM) given below. 
What should be the size of the orders for each item, and when should orders be released? 
 
 
End item A 
 
Lead time = 4 
 
 
 
 
B(1) 
C(2) 
 
Lead time = 3 
Lead time = 2 
 
 
 
 
D(1) 
E(2) 
 
Lead time = 1 
Lead time = 1 
 
 
End item Q 
 
Lead time = 2 
 
 
 
 
E(1) 
C(1) 
 
Lead time = 1 
Lead time = 2 
 
 
 
 
D(1) 
E(2) 
 
Lead time = 1 
Lead time = 1 
Figure 20. BOM/Lead time information for example 2.

 
Solution
Since item E appears at level 1 and level 2 in product Q and also at level 2 in product A, it is best to assign 
it the lowest level of 2 in order to avoid that we will calculate a material requirements plan for it more 
than  once.  The  MRP  plan  for  103  product  A  and  200  product  Q  is  shown  in  Table  10.  The  table  was 
developed in the following manner:  
The first step is to establish the gross requirements for items A and Q, which are given as 103 and 200 
units, respectively.  
The planned order releases for A and Q in periods 4 and 5 are exploded (multiplied by use quantities 
of items B, C, and E) and accumulated as gross requirements for items B, C, and E. Only items B and C are 
then calculated. 
The planned order releases for B and C in periods 1, 2, and 3 are exploded and accumulated as gross 
requirements  for  items  D  and  E.  Item  E  already  has  a  gross  requirement  of  200  units  in  period  5  from 
item Q’s explosion.  
Note that we have introduced in example 2 safety stocks. Safety stocks can be used within MRP, but it 
does not consider them available for regular use. Safety stock is recommended at the end item level but 
not the component level in MRP. The need for safety stocks of components is reduced by MRP since it 
calculates the quantities of components needed and when they are needed.  
With MRP logic, it is possible to have low level items scheduled in a period that is no longer feasible, 
i.e. it should  have happened in the past. It is then needed to either revise the  MPS and shift end item 
demand to later periods, or otherwise to compress lead time by expediting the item, or to reduce lead 
time for the lot by allowing overtime in the manufacturing shop.  
121 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

Table 10. MPR plan for example 2.
Item:A Level:0
lot-for-lot

Lead time =4
PD

On hand =18
1

2

Safety stock =5
3

4

Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
3
3
3
3
3
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases
100
Item:Q Level:0 Lead time =2 On hand =6 Safety stock =6
lot-for-lot
PD
1
2
3
4
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
0
0
0
0
0
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases
Item:B Level:1 Lead time =3 On hand =10 Safety stock =
lot-for-lot
PD
1
2
3
4
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
10
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases
Item:C Level:1
Lead time =2
policy: lot-for-lot
PD
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
20
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases
Item:D Level:2 Lead time =1
policy: 200
PD
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
0
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases
Item:E Level:2
Lead time =1
policy: 500
PD
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases

6.1.3

30

Allocated =10 Lot sizing policy:
5

6

7

8
103

3

3

Allocated =0
5

6

3

0
100
100

Lot sizing policy:
7

8

200
0

0

200
Allocated = 0
5

6

0
200
200
Lot sizing policy:
7

8

100
10

10

90
On hand =20
1

20

2

20

10

0
90
90

Safety stock =0
3

20

4

5

200

200

0
180
180

0
200
200

180
On hand =0

200
Safety stock =0

1

2

3

180

200

0

20
180
200
200
200
On hand =30

20
180
200

1

2

3

360

400

170
330
500
500

270
230
500

30

500

4

5

Safety stock =0
4

5

Allocated =0
6

7

Allocated =0
6

7

Allocated =0
6

7

Lot sizing
8

Lot sizing
8

Lot sizing
8

200
270

70

Lot sizing policies

Several methods called “lot sizing policies” are commonly used to determine the planned order releases 
for  each  period.  We  have  already  encountered  the  simple  (and  widely  used)  lot‐for‐lot  policy,  which 
basically says that planned order receipts are set equal to net requirements. We now discuss some other 
often used lot sizing policies: period order quantity (POQ), economic order quantity (EOQ), and the part‐
period balancing method (PBB). 
122 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
To illustrate the various methods, we assume that the average demand for a component X is 225 units 
per period, the setup costs of producing (or purchasing) the component X is £225, and the cost of holding 
one unit of X in inventory for one period is £0.5. We use Table 11 as the base case, in which the lot‐for‐lot 
approach is used. 
Table 11. Example to illustrate various lot sizing policies.
Item:X Level:
Lead time =2
On hand =150
policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1
2
3
Gross reqrmnts
Scheduled rcpts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Pl. order rcpts
Pl. order relses

150

100
50
100

150

140

Safety stock =0
4

5

6

Allocated =0

7

Lot sizing

8

9

10

11

12

240

100

340

100

240

100

340

140
140

100
100
340

340
340
100

100
100
100

240
240

100
100
340

340
340

100

240

The total cost is the sum of holding costs and setup costs: 
Holding costs = 0.5(150+150+100)=£200 
Setup costs = 7 (225) = £1575 
Total costs = £200 + £1575 = £1775 
POQ method
This method simply sets, in a period in which production is scheduled (nonzero planned order releases) 
the production quantity equal to the sum of P positive net requirements, where P is a fixed number.  
Table 12. Example using POQ lot sizing method.
Item:X Level:..
policy: POQ

Lead time =2
PD

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

150

On hand =150

1

2

3

4

240

100

150

100
50
100

440
140
580

340

580

5

Safety stock =0
6
340

340

440

7

Allocated =0

8

9

10

100

240

100

340
100
440

100

Lot sizing
11

12
340

340
340
340

Table  12  illustrates  POQ  applied  to  the  example  of  Table  11  assuming  P  =  3.  Note  that  we  must 
produce  in  period  1  to  meet  period  3’s  net  requirements.  Since  P  =  3,  out  planned  order  releases  for 
period 1 should meet total net requirements for periods 3, 4, and 6. To meet net requirements in period 
8, we need to produce in period 6, and the quantity produced equals total net requirements of periods 8, 
9, and 10.  
The total cost is the sum of holding costs and setup costs: 
Holding costs = 0.5(150+100+440+340+340+340+100)=£905 
Setup costs = 3 (225) = £675 
Total costs = £905 + £675 = £1580 
EOQ method
In this method, the batch size is set equal to the well‐known economic order quantity EOQ =  
2 (setup cost)(average demand per period)
Lot size 
(unit holding cost per period)

22 

If this results in a failure to meet any period’s net requirement, we then produce the smallest multiple 
of the EOQ (i.e. lot size = 2 EOQ, or 3 EOQ, and so on) that will avoid a shortage. 
This gives in the example of Table 11: 

123 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Lot size 

23 

2 (225)(225)
 450 units
(0.5)

Table 13. Example using EOQ as lot sizing method.
Item: X Level:..
policy: EOQ

Lead time =2
PD

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

150

On hand =150

1

2

3

4

240

100

150

100
50
100

310
140
450

210

450

Safety stock =0
5

6

7

340
210

320
130
450

450

320

Allocated = 0
8

9

10

100

240

100

220

430
20
450

330

450

Lot sizing
11

12
340

330

440
10
450

450

 
We  begin  by  producing  450  units  during  period  1;  this  will  arrive  in  time  to  meet  period  3 
requirements. These 450 units will enable us to meet all requirements through to period 5, so our next 
production of 450 units will be during period 4. In period 9, we will need more units of X, so we produce 
450 units during period 7. Finally, we need to produce 450 units during period 10.  
The total cost incurred: 
Holding costs = 0.5(150+100+…+ 440)=£1685 
Setup costs = 4 (225) = £900 
Total costs = £1685 + £900 = £2585 
 
Many companies adopt a fixed order quantity lot sizing policy. With this method, each production run 
(or purchase order) is of the same size, not necessarily the EOQ.  
PBB method
In this method, we make each lot sizing decision by producing the number of periods of net requirements 
that makes the holding cost associated with the production batch as close as possible to the setup cost 
for producing (purchasing) the batch. This idea is based on the fact that the EOQ minimises costs at an 
order quantity for which setup and holding costs are equal.  
The calculations when applied to our example from Table 11 are shown in the following three tables. 
We first need to determine the lot size for the first production run which is to produce good for period 3 
at least. We see from Table 14 that the holding costs will be closest to setup costs when producing for 
periods 3 and 4.  
Table 14. Determining the lot size for the first production run.
Produced for periods

Setup costs (£)

Holding costs (£)

3
3,4
3,4,6

225
225
225

0
0.5(100) = 50*
0.5(3(340)+100) = 560

As  we  produce  in  the  first  batch  for  periods  3  and  4,  we  need  to  start  producing  the  next  batch  in 
period 4 to meet (at least) requirements of period 6. Calculations are then shown in Table 15. This gives 
as  solution  to  produce  for  periods  6  and  8.  The  next  production  run  therefore  needs  to  start  with 
producing for period 9 at least; calculations are shown in Table 16.  
Table 15. Determining the lot size for the second production run.
Produced for periods

Setup costs (£)

Holding costs (£)

6
6,8
6,8,9

225
225
225

0
2(0.5)(100) = 100*
2(0.5)(100) +3(0.5)(240) = 460

124 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Table 16. Determining the lot size for the third production run.
Produced for periods

Setup costs (£)

Holding costs (£)

9
9, 10
9,10,12

225
225
225

0
0.5(100) = 50*
0.5(3(340)+100) = 560

The last batch to produce is in period 10 to meet period 12’s requirements. The complete solution is 
displayed in Table 17. 
 
Table 17. Example using PPB as lot sizing method.
Item: X Level: ..
sizing policy: PPB
PD
Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

150

Lead time = 2

On hand = 150

Safety stock =
7

1

2

3

4

240

100

150

100
50
100

240

100
140
240

5

6
340
100
340
440

440

100

340

0

Allocated = 0

8

9

10

100

240

100

11

100
240
340

Lot

12
340

340
340

The total cost incurred: 
Holding costs = 0.5(150+100+…+ 100)=£325 
Setup costs = 4 (225) = £900 
Total costs = £1225 
In this example, PPB produced the lowest total cost. For other examples, however, POQ or EOQ might 
outperform PPB. The only method guaranteed to yield a lot sizing solution that minimises total costs is 
the  Wagner‐Whitin  method.  Unfortunately,  the  Wagner‐Whitin  method  is  more  complex  than  most 
practitioners would like, so it is rarely used. Another method that gives a good performance in practise is 
called  the  Silver‐Meal  method.  Both  the  Wagner‐Whitin  optimal  method  and  the  Silver‐Meal 
approximate method is described in Winston (1994).  
6.1.4



Remarks on MRP

MRP has been come into use with the rise of computers in the late 1970s.  
Even a slight change in the requirements for an end item may cause substantial changes in the timing 
and  lot  sizes  for  subassemblies,  components,  and  parts.  This  phenomenon  is  known  as  the 
nervousness of the MRP system.  
An important decision is the frequency with which MRP records are updated. In a regenerative MPR 
system, the entire record for each end item, subassembly, component, etc is updated periodically. In 
our examples, the record might be updated every period. Every period, we only place orders for the 
first period. The approach is sometimes also referred to as a rolling planning horizon.  
The MPS should be realistic in terms of what the production facility can achieve. MRP and MPS do 
not take capacity restrictions explicitly into account and this may cause practical problems, overtime, 
etc.  
Assuming  everything  works  as  planned,  the  MRP  will  result  in  no  shortages  or  stock  outs. 
Unfortunately, four types of uncertainty may cause shortages to occur:  





 






Lead time uncertainty.  
End item demand time uncertainty. 
End item demand size uncertainty. 
Production yield uncertainty.  

Two approaches are used to avoid shortages causes by these four types of uncertainty: 

125 
 



Integrated Logistics

 



Plan orders so they arrive earlier than needed. This is called the safety lead time approach. 
This works best for dealing with lead time and demand time uncertainty. 
Keep more end items in inventory than what is needed (and increase production batches in 
case this inventory is being depleted). This is the safety stock approach. This works best for 
demand size and production yield uncertainty.  

References
Winston, W.L. 1994. Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms, 3th edition. Duxbury Press. See Chapter 20:
Deterministic Dynamic Programming.
Winston, L.W. 1994. Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms (3rd ed.). Duxbury Press, California. ISBN 0534209718.
Chapter 18, Section 1.

Exercises
1. Given: Table 18 gives gross requirements for final products A and B during the next six weeks. Each unit 
of  A  uses  two  units  of  C,  and  each  unit  of  B  uses  three  units  of  C.  Each  unit  of  C  uses  four  units  of  D. 
Assume that A and B can be produced in zero time once enough C is available. The lead time for both C 
and D is one week. At the beginning of week 1, 120 units of C and 160 units of D are on hand. Fifty units 
of  C  and  80  units  of  D  are  scheduled  to  be  received  at  the  beginning  of  week  2.  The  average  weekly 
demand is 100 units. The cost per production run is £200, and the cost of holding one unit in inventory 
for a week is £4.  
Questions:  
1. Using the lot‐for‐lot method, determine the MRP records for C and D.  
2. Determine the MRP record for C if POC (P = 2) is used.  
3. Determine the MRP record for C if the EOQ lot sizing method is used.  
4. Determine the MRP record for C if the PPB lot sizing method is used. 

Table 18. Data for question 1.
Week
1
20
10

A
B

2
0
30

3
30
0

4
10
10

5
20
5

6
0
10

2. Given: End item A consists of 3 units B, 1 unit C, and 2 units D. B consists of 2 units E and 1 units D. 
C is assembled from 1 unit B and 2 units E. Every unit E consists of a unit F. Components B, C, E and F have 
a lead time of 1 week. A and D’s lead time is 2 weeks. A, B, and F are produced lot‐for‐lot. For C, D, and E, 
a fixed order quantity is used of 50, 100, and 250 units, respectively. Components C, E, and F have 10, 
150,  and  300  units  on  hand,  respectively.  All  other  components  have  no  on  hand  inventory.  The 
scheduled receipts for A are 10 in week 6, 50 units of E and F in week 4, and 100 units D in week 1 and 
again in week 2. There are no other scheduled receipts. The MPS states a gross requirement of 30 units A 
in week 5 and 30 units A in week 8.  
Question: Determine the MRP plan for all items.  
 
3. We presently have 18 units of product A on hand. It takes 2 week to produce a unit of product A; 
POQ (P = 4 weeks) is being used to determine planned production. The gross requirements for product A 
for the next seven weeks are shown in the table below.  
Questions:  
I. Determine planned production for each week. 
II. Suppose  week  2’s  gross  requirements  is  reduced  by  1  (to  13  units).  How  does  the  planned 
production for each week change? How does this illustrate nervousness? 

126 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Table 19. Data for question 3.
Week
1
2

2
14

3
3

4
6

5
2

6
1

7
45

Solutions
1. i. Using the lot‐for‐lot method, we obtain the following MRP records for C and D: 
Item: C Level: 1
Lead time = 1
sizing policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1
Gr.reqrmnts
70
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
120
50
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses
Item: D Level: 2
Lead time = 1
sizing policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1
Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

160

160

On hand =

120

Safety stock = 0

2

3

4

5

6

90
50
10

60

50

55

30

50
50
55
Safety

55
30
55
30
30
stock = 0

50
50
50
50
On hand = 160
2

3

4

5

200
80
40

200

220

120

160
160
220

220
220
120

120
120

160

Allocated =0

Lot

Allocated =0

Lot

Allocated =0

Lot

6

ii. Using the POQ (P = 2) method, we obtain the following MRP record for C: 
Item: C Level: 1
Lead time = 1
sizing policy: POQ (P=2)
PD
1
Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

70
120

50

On hand =

120

Safety stock = 0

2

3

4

5

6

90
50
10

60

50

55

30

50
50
100

(50)

30
55
85

(30)

100

85

iii.  The  EOQ  for  C,  assuming  that  the  average  weekly  demand  of  100  units  is  related  to  C  items,  is 
equal to (2 (200)100/4) = 100 units. We obtain the following MRP record for C: 
Item: C Level: 1
sizing policy: EOQ

Lead time = 1
PD

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

120

On hand =

120

Safety stock = 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

70

90
50
10

60

50

55

30

50
50
100

(50)

45
55
100

15
(30)

50

100

Allocated =0

Lot

100

iv.  Using  PPB,  we  first  have  to  calculate  the  lot  sizes  to  be  used.  The  first  period  for  which  a  net 
requirement arises is period 3. Therefore:  
 
 
Produced for weeks
3
3,4
3,4,5
Produced for weeks
5
5,6

Setup cost
200
200
200
Setup cost
200
200

Holding cost
0
4(50)=200*
4(50 + 2 (55))=640
Holding cost
0
4(30)=120*

127 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

The MRP record therefore is: 
Item: C Level: 1
sizing policy: PPB

Lead time = 1
PD

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

120

On hand =

120

Safety stock = 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

70

90
50
10

60

50

55

30

50
50
100

(50)

30
55
85

(30)

50

100

Allocated =0

Lot

85

By coincidence, this record is equal to the record obtained with the POQ (P = 2) method. 
2. The BOM can be drawn as follows: 
A

B(3) 



Level 0 



E(2) 



D(2) 

Level 1 

Level 2 

E(2) 

Level 3 




E(2) 


Level 4 



Notice that items of the same type arise on more than one level in the BOM. Indeed, B is on level 1 as 
well as level 2, E on level 2 and level 3, D on level 1 and 3, and F on level 3 and 4. The easiest approach is 
to first bring all items down to their lowest level before the MRP calculations start. Therefore we modify 
the BOM to: 

Level 0 

Level 1 
B(3) 



B

E(2) 





Level 2 

E(2) 

E(2) 





D(2) 

Level 3 
Level 4 

128 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Item: A Level: 0
Lead time = 2
sizing policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1
Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses
Item: C Level: 1
sizing policy: 50

3

4

5

Allocated =0
6

7

Lead time = 1
1

50
Lead time = 2

2

30
10
3

30
20
50

50
On hand =

0

10

30

30

10

Safety stock = 0

60

50
90
50
90
90
On hand = 0

60
60

90
100
60

60

On hand =
2

100
150
3

250

8

10

10

4

5

Allocated =0

90

50
100
50

7

Lot

20

50

3

50

6

3

Gr.reqrmnts
100
280
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
150
50
20
20
Net reqrmnts
230
Pl.ord.rcpts
250
Pl.ord.relses
250
Item: F Level: 4
Lead time = 1
On hand = 300
sizing policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1
2
3

300

20
20

2

2

1

5

30
10

8

20
Safety stock = 0
Allocated =0
4

1

Lead time = 1
PD

On hand =

Lot

30

30
30

PD

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses

Safety stock = 0

10
10

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
10
10
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses
Item: B Level: 2
Lead time = 1
sizing policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses
Item: E Level: 3
sizing policy: 250

2

0

30

PD

Gr.reqrmnts
Sched.rcpts
Proj.on hand
Net reqrmnts
Pl.ord.rcpts
Pl.ord.relses
Item: D Level: 3
sizing policy: 100

On hand =

6

60
Safety stock = 0
4

7

6

60

40

40
60
100

(40)

Safety stock = 0
4

5

8

Allocated =0

5

7

Lot

Lot

8

Allocated =0

6

7

8

200

200

200

Lot

120
50
70

200
50
250

250
Safety stock = 0
4

5

6

Allocated =0
7

Lot

8

250
50
50

50
150
150
150

3.
i.

129 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Item: A Level: 0
Lead time = 2
sizing policy: POQ (P=4)
PD
1
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases

18

On hand =

18

Safety stock = 0

Allocated =0

2

3

4

5

6

7

2

14

3

6

2

1

45

16

2

9
1
10

3
6

1
2

1

45
45

10

Lot

45

ii.
Item: A Level: 0
Lead time = 2
sizing policy: POQ (P=4)
PD
1
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases

18

On hand =

18

Safety stock = 0

Allocated =0

2

3

4

5

6

7

2

13

3

6

2

1

45

16

3

48
6
54

46
2

45
1

45

Lot

54

A  slight  change  in  gross  requirements  results  in  a  large  change  in  production  levels  as  well  as 
inventory  levels!  Small  changes  on  MPS  data  may  therefore  result  in  large  changes  down  the  MRP 
explosion.  
The amplification arises especially from the lot sizing technique used, which combines the positive net 
requirements from 4 future periods. If we would use lot‐for‐lot instead, the resulting MRP would show 
much less nervousness: 
Item: A Level: 0
Lead time = 2
sizing policy: lot-for-lot
PD
1
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases

18

Safety stock = 0

Allocated =0

3

4

5

6

7

2

14

3

6

2

1

45

16

2
1
1
2

6
6
1

2
2
45

1
1

45
45

1

18

18

2

Item: A Level: 0
Lead time = 2
sizing policy: POQ (P=4)
PD
1
Gross requirements
Scheduled receipts
Projected on hand
Net requirements
Planned order receipts
Planned order releases

On hand =

6
On hand =

18

Safety stock = 0

Allocated =0

2

3

4

5

6

7

2

13

3

6

2

1

45

16

3
2
2
45

1
1

45
45

2

6
6
1

6

Lot

Lot

6.2 Just‐In‐Time
Based on the example of many successful Japanese companies (most notably Toyota), many companies 
worldwide have attempted to reduce inventory levels by implementing a Just‐In‐Time (JIT) approach to 
production and purchasing. The JIT approach consists of producing products or obtaining products from 
suppliers at the moment they are required. Since JIT strives to reduce inventory levels, JIT is also known 
as “stockless production” or “zero inventories”.  

130 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
6.2.1

Motivation

The  main  motivation  behind  JIT  is  that  inventory  represents  inefficiency.  Just  as  high  water  levels  in  a 
river hide dangerous rocks, high inventory levels in a company hide sources of inefficiency and causes of 
poor product quality.  
Advocates  of  JIT  believe  that  companies  often  underestimate  the  holding  cost  ch  used  in  the 
traditional  inventory  models  such  as  the  Economic  Order  Quantity  (EOQ)  model.  The  advocates  of  JIT 
argue  that  in  the  long  run,  the  “fixed”  costs  of  a  warehouse  and  the  cost  of  shop  storage  should  be 
considered as a variable cost and therefore included in the value of the holding  cost ch. This  would, of 
course, reduce optimal lot size and average inventory levels.  
Another  important  parameter  in  inventory  models  is  the  replenishment  cost  cp.  Often  a  major 
component of it is the time required to setup a machine for a production run. A reduction of setup cost cp 
will  typically  increase  optimal  replenishment  frequency,  reduce  optimal  lot  size,  and  reduce  inventory 
levels. Much of the success of implementing JIT comes from the success with which one can achieve a 
reduction in setup times.  
Another traditional argument to hold inventory is that safety stock must be held to reduce shortages 
caused by demand uncertainty and supply uncertainty (such as variability in lead times). JIT reduces the 
impact of demand uncertainty on inventory levels by “levelling” the production schedule. For example, if 
2000 cars and 1000 lorries per month must be produced and a plant is open 20 days per month, the plant 
should aim for producing 2000/20 = 100 cars per day and 1000/20 = 50 lorries per day, and the sequence 
in which the vehicles roll from the production line should also reflect the relative demand: car, lorry, car, 
car, lorry, car, car, lorry, etc. For JIT to succeed, it is critical that the quantity of a product produced each 
day varies by at most 10% from the average daily production level.  
By reducing safety stock levels, the causes of supply variability (such as unreliable suppliers, frequent 
machine  breakdowns,  product  quality  problems)  are  exposed.  By  reducing  or  eliminating  the causes  of 
supply variability, there is less need to keep large amounts of safety stocks.  
6.2.2

Push and pull systems

To  understand  how  JIT  differs  from  the  traditional  approach,  we  must  understand  the  difference 
between push and pull (production) systems. Consider a manufacturing process in which a product must 
pass through four workstations before being completed, beginning at station 1 and ending at 4. Think of 
the  product  as  flowing  down  a  river.  Then  the  first  workstation  1  is  farthest  upstream  and  station  4  is 
farthest downstream.  
In  a  “push”  system,  materials  push  their  way  through  the  system  from  station  1  to  4.  When,  for 
example, 100 units of a product are completed at station 1, they are pushed toward station 2, causing 
work  for  the  employees  at  station  2.  Once  20  units,  for  example,  are  finished  on  station  2,  they  are 
pushed  to  station  3,  and  so  on.  Traditional  production  systems  are  often  push  systems,  with  relatively 
large  setup  costs,  so  large  production  lot  sizes.  This  can  cause  large  work‐in‐process  inventories  to 
accumulate. Furthermore, if for example at some moment in time station 3 breaks down, then station 1 
and 2 may still produce with stock accumulating before station 3, unless someone tells them to stop.  
In  contrast,  JIT  is  a  pull  system,  a  system  in  which  an  upstream  station  does  not  produce  anything 
unless production is authorised by the immediately succeeding downstream station. For example, station 
2 cannot work on any material unless authorised by station 3. This also means that if at some point in 
time station 3 breaks down, all stations upstream will soon also stop and the build‐up of extra inventory 
is avoided.  
6.2.3

The Kanban System

The best known method used to implement JIT is Toyota’s Kanban system. The following three types of 
items are vital to implementing JIT through the Kanban system: 
I. Containers. Each container holds a standard number of parts – usually less than 10% of the daily 
requirement for the part. This keeps lot sizes relatively small.  

131 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
II. Move cards (also known as withdrawal or conveyance cards). Move cards are used to authorise 
movement of a container between two consecutive operations – for example, from station 4 to 
station 3 and back to station 4. A container cannot move unless a move card is attached to it.  
III. Production  cards.  A  production  card  is  used  to  authorise  production  of  a  container  of  parts. 
Workers cannot produce the parts needed to fill a container unless authorised by a production 
card.  
 
There  is  a  separate  set  of  containers,  move  cards,  and  production  cards  for  each  possible  flow  of 
material. For example, there is one set of containers, move cards, and production cards for movement 
between workstation 3 and 4, one other set for movement between 2 and 3, and yet one other set for 
movement between 1 and 2.  
For example, let’s focus on the movement between station 3 and 4. Suppose we are starting to work 
on  a  container  of  parts  that  arrived  at  station  4.  This  container  will  have  a  move  card  attached  to  it. 
Remove that card and attach it to an empty container at station 4 (call this container 1). Now container 1 
(with its move card) can be transported back to station 3. At station 3, find a full container of parts (call it 
container 2). Container 2 will still have its production card attached to it. Remove that production card 
and  put  it  in  station  3’s  production  card  file  box.  Replace  the  production  card  on  container  2  with  the 
move card from container 1. You can now transport container 2 to station 4. Production workers from 
station 3 can use the production card that you have just placed in the file box to attach it to the empty 
container 1 and can therefore start production to fill up this container.  
This  shows  how  station  4  “pulls”  material  downstream  through  the  system.  The  beauty  of  the 
approach is its simplicity: unlike MRP, for example, no complicated paperwork or computer printouts are 
needed to keep track of the inventory status at each station. The cards do the job automatically. If we 
reduce  the  number  of  cards  between  two  workstations,  we  will  automatically  reduce  the  inventory 
between the two stations. If we have too few cards, however, shortages may occur frequently. Only trial 
and error can determine the “right” number of cards.  
The rules of the Kanban system can be summarised as follows: 
I.
II.
III.
IV.

At all times, each container must have a card (either a move or a production card) attached to it.  
Never move a container unless it has a move card attached to it. 
Never begin producing a container without a production card.  
A container should always contain a standard number of parts.  

If  station  4  breaks  down,  for  example,  then  this  will  eventually  result  in  production  stopping  at  all 
upstream stations (1 – 3). At first glance, this might appear to reduce the plant’s productivity. In reality, 
however, frequent plant shutdowns force workers to concentrate more on quality and plant efficiency. In 
the  long  term,  the  shutdown  will  become  less  frequent,  and  a  more  efficient  (and  higher  quality) 
production process will result.  
 
6.2.4

How many cards?

Here’s a way how to calculate (in theory) how many move and production cards are needed to enable the 
plant  to  meet  daily  demand  without  holding  unnecessary  inventory.  Let  us  again  consider  the  material 
movement between station 3 and 4. Define:  
c   = number of parts in each container (less than 10% of daily requirement); 
Tm  = time (in days) for worker to go from station 4 to get a container at station 3 and return with it 
to station 4; 
Tp  = time (in days) required to produce a container with c parts at station 3; 
D   = daily demand for parts produced at station 3; 
M  = number of move cards; 
P  = number of production cards.  
132 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
How many move cards are needed? We can make 1/Tm trips per day to get containers, and on each 
trip we can get M containers with c parts per container. Since we need D parts per day, in theory we can 
meet daily requirements without accumulating excess inventory if: 

 1 
M c    D
 Tm 
or 

M

DTm
c

How many production cards are needed? With P cards, we can produce up to P containers (each with 
c parts) and this 1/Tp times per day. Since we must produce D units per day, we can in theory meet daily 
requirements without accumulating excess inventory if 

 1
P c 
 Tp



D



or

P

DTp
c

For these formulas to be valid, we must assume that there is no variability in move and production 
times. The validity of the formulas also requires that the containers will be ready to pick up whenever a 
worker from station 4 arrives at station 3. To allow for some slack in the system, the following formulas 
are often used to determine the required number of move and production cards: 

M

DTm (1  k)
c

P

D Tp (1 k)
c

where k is a safety factor. If JIT is working well, k should be near 0. Toyota strives to keep k as close as 
possible to 0.10. In reality, a company may begin with k = 0.50. If shortages are infrequent, a card may be 
removed from the system. This will reduce inventory levels. If shortages are still rare, another card may 
be removed. This process continues until satisfactory results, i.e. infrequent shortages and low inventory 
levels, have been obtained.  
Example
Assume k = 0. Station 4 must obtain 200 parts per day from station 3. Each container contains 10 parts, 
and it takes Tp = 0.10 day at station 3 to fill a container. Going from station 4 to station 3 with an empty 
container, pick up a full container at station 3 and return to station 4 takes a total of Tm = 0.05 day. Then:  
M = 200 (0.05) (1+0)/10 = 1 move card 
P = 200 (0.10) (1+0)/10 = 2 production cards 
The maximum inventory level is (M + P) c = 30 items.  
Let us see how 1 move card and 2 production cards would enable the system to keep up with demand 
without  accumulating  excess  inventories.  Observe  that  station  4  will  “use  up”  a  container  in  0.05  day. 
133 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Suppose that at time 0 (the beginning of a work day) station 4 has one full and one empty container, and 
station 3 has two full containers. At time 0, we begin using parts at station 4, and so a worker takes the 
empty container (with a move card) to station 3. The worker arrives at station 3 at time 0.025. There, the 
worker picks up a full container and removes the production card. At station 3, the detached production 
card is used to start production for filling the empty container. After attaching the move card to the full 
container, the worker heads back to station 4 and arrives at time 0.05, just in time for the full container 
of  parts  to  be  used  when  the  full  container  already  at  station  4  is  used  up  at  time  0.05.  At  time  0.05, 
another  worker  leaves  station  4  and  arrives  at  station  3  at  0.075.  Production  begins  at  station  3  on 
another container. (This is okay, because we have two production cards). We arrive back at station 4 with 
a full container (again, just in time) at time 0.10. At time 0.10, a worker again leaves for station 3, and a 
time 0.125, the worker arrives at station 3 and can pickup the full container whose production began at 
time 0.25. In summary:  
1. At times 0; 0.5; 0.10; 0.15; …, a worker leaves station 4 for station 3. 
2. At times 0.25; 0.75; 0.125; …., a worker arrives at station 3 and picks up a full container. Station 3 
also simultaneously begins producing a container a parts.  
3. At times 0.05; 0.10; 0.15, a worker arrives at station 4 with a full container (just in time) 
The maximum inventory level will be 30 parts. With more cards, the maximum inventory level would 
increase, but there would be slack in the system to handle unexpected shutdowns, shortages, or delays. 
Also  note  that  a  levelled  production  schedule  (i.e.  always  producing  200  parts  per  day,  for  example)  is 
critical to the success of JIT. Section 5 describes how Toyota deals with fluctuations in demand.  
6.2.5

Subcontractors

When a company such as Toyota implements JIT, the subcontractors also have to adopt JIT delivery to the 
Toyota  plants.  It  is  usually  the  subcontractor  who  delivers  its  products  to  the  company.  As  JIT  implies 
frequent deliveries in small lot sizes, the inventory levels at both the Toyota plant and the subcontractors 
can remain low. However, the distribution costs will rise.  
To counter the high distribution costs, these suppliers often collaborate with each other and use the 
so‐called  “round‐tour  mixed‐loading”  transportation  system.  Suppose,  for  example,  that  four 
subcontracted companies A, B, C, and D are all located in the eastern area of the Toyota plant. Suppose 
further that they have to bring their products four times during the day‐shift in small lot sizes. The first 
delivery at 9am could be made by subcontractor A, also picking up on the way products for companies B, 
C, and D in A’s truck. The second delivery at 11am could be made by company B similarly picking up the 
products  of  A,  C,  and  D  on  the  way.  The  third  delivery  at  2pm  would  be  made  by  company  C  and  the 
fourth delivery at 4am would be made by company D.  
The  subcontractors  themselves  would  also  adopt  the  JIT  system  in  their  production  plants  to  keep 
inventory levels of work in process down, to increase product and process quality, and lower costs. This 
will be beneficial to Toyota as the supplies can be offered at lower prices, and ultimately benefit the final 
customers as well. 
6.2.6

Fluctuations in demand

The JIT system works only if production is smoothed (or “levelled”, see also Section 1) and therefore if 
demand is fairly constant. Within reasonable limits, however, the JIT production system of Toyota is able 
to deal with various fluctuations in demand. There are three types of demand changes possible:  
Case 1: No change in daily total production load, the only changes are in the kinds of end products (for 
example, cars in the Toyota situation), their delivery dates, and their quantities.  
The solution adopted by Toyota is to only revise the production schedule for the final production line 
where  the  cars  are  finalised.  Then  the  schedules  for  all  the  preceding  processes  will  be  automatically 
revised by transferring the Kanbans.  

134 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Case 2: Short term small fluctuations in the daily production load, although the monthly total load is 
the same.  
For this case, Toyota does not increase the or decrease the number of Kanbans, but simply increases 
or decreases the number of Kanban movements. The assembly line of Toyota has a two‐shift system. The 
day  shift  is  from  8am  to  6pm,  and  the  night  shift  starts  at  9pm,  ending  at  6am.  By  inserting  early 
attendance and overtime before and after these shifts, the line always has the same number of workers 
at any time the line is in operation. It is thereby able to produce as many units as a three shift system if 
necessary. If, on the other hand, demand is lower, the frequency of Kanban movements is reduced which 
results in idle capacity or idle time for the workers.  Simultaneously, time spent in carrying inventory is 
prolonged. If the lead time is short, however, the loss associated with carrying inventory will not be very 
large.  
Case 3: Seasonal changes in demand, or when the actual monthly demand is larger or smaller than the 
predetermined load or the preceding month’s load.  
In this case, the number of Kanbans must be decreased or increased, and at the same time, all the 
production lines must be rearranged.  
To  better  understand  what  to  do  in  Case  3,  we  first  introduce  the  concept  of  cycle  time.  Take  the 
example of Section 1. If 2000 cars and 1000 lorries per month must be produced and a plant is open 20 
days per month, the plant should aim for producing 2000/20 = 100 cars per day and 1000/20 = 50 lorries 
per  day,  and  the  sequence  in  which  the  vehicles  roll  from  the  production  line  should  also  reflect  the 
relative  demand:  car,  lorry,  car,  car,  lorry,  car,  car,  lorry,  etc.  The  cycle  time    is  the  time  between  two 
vehicles leaving the production line: 

cycle time 

operating hours per day

necessary output per day

21
150

 0.14 hours/vehicle

Therefore  every  0.14  hours  =  8.4  minutes  a  vehicle  should  leave  the  production  line.  If  the  total 
number of vehicles needed per month is now decreased from 3000 to 2500, for example, then the daily 
output necessary is 2500/20 = 125 and the cycle time becomes:  

cycle time 

operating hours per day

necessary output per day

21
125

 0.168 hours/vehicle

or every 10.08 minutes a vehicle should leave the production line.  
How  to  best  achieve  this  change?  The  basic  idea  is  to  lower  the  production  rate  by  reducing  the 
number of operators necessary to do the work. The production layout that is found to be most flexible to 
allow for such adjustment is the U‐turn format, as depicted in the figures below. The top figure shows, for 
example,  the  configuration  under  high  monthly  demand:  five  operators  are  used,  each  operating  two 
machines. 

135 
 



Integrated Logistics

 

entrance 

1
exit 

entrance 

1
exit 

Figure 21. U-form layout and worker allocation under high (top) and low (bottom) monthly demand.

The  bottom  figure  would  then  be  the  configuration  used  when  monthly  demand  is  lower:  three 
operators, two of them operating thee machines and one four machines. The work on each machine will 
go slower as an operator now has more machines under control. As a result, the output will be reduced.  
In order for this to work, operators have to be multi‐skilled workers, as they may have to change work 
from time to time. Each job on each machine has to be perfectly standardised so that different workers 
will always follow the same procedures on each machine so that product quality remains constant.  
6.2.7

Comparison JIT and MRP

Experience  with  JIT  and  MRP  has  shown,  not  surprisingly,  that  MRP  tends  to  outperform  JIT  when 
demand is highly variable and setup costs are high or setup times are long. JIT tends to outperform MRP 
when demand is stable and setup times are small.  
Clearly, the smaller lot sizes associated with JIT will increase the number of setups required. Consider 
a company producing many different products. If such a company uses JIT, high setup costs will probably 
be incurred because it must frequently change from producing one product to another, due to small lot 
size of JIT. This explains why JIT is most commonly used in a repetitive manufacturing environment where 
most setup times are small and very few products are made.  
Exercises
1. Given: In a Kanban production environment, 100 parts per day are required, 5 parts per container are 
used, and Tm = Tp = 0.20 days. Assume that material is being transported from station 1 to station 2.  
Questions:  
a. Determine the number of move and production cards needed.  
136 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
b. At what instants will a person arrive at station 2 with full containers? 
c. At what instants will production on containers begin at station 1? 
d. What is the maximum number of parts in inventory? 
2. Given: In a Kanban production environment, 200 parts per day are needed, 20 parts per container 
are used, and Tm = 0.10 days and Tp = 0.30 days. Assume that material is being transported from station 1 
to station 2.  
Questions:  
a. Determine the number of move and production cards needed.  
b. At what instants will a person arrive at station 2 with full containers? 
c. At what instants will production on containers begin at station 1? 
d. What is the maximum number of parts in inventory? 
e. What is the cycle time? 
3. Given: Consider a BOM as displayed in Figure 22.  
A

B(2) 





E

Figure 22. BOM for question 3.

 
A, B, and C are produced at our own factory. A is assembled in station 2, and components B and C are 
both produced in station 1. The setup times for the machine in station 1 are displayed in Table 20.  
 
Table 20. Data for question 3.
Setup time (days)
From B
From C

To B
0
0.02

To C
0.01
0

Production time to produce one B on station 1 is 0.01. Production time to produce one C on station 1 
is 0.01. Production is controlled according to the JIT approach using a Kanban system. Containers used 
between station 1 and station 2 store 4 B items and 2 C items. The time to bring an empty container from 
station 2 to station 1 and bring a full container back is 0.05 days.  
To  produce  one  item  B,  one  kit  of  parts  D  is  needed.  To  produce  one  item  C,  one  kit  of  parts  E  is 
needed.  D  kits  are  produced  by  supplier  1,  and  E  kits  are  produced  by  supplier  2.  Containers  used  to 
transport D kits from supplier 1 to station 1 contains 16 D kits at a time. The same containers can be used 
to transport 8 E kits from supplier 2 to station 1.  
Supplier 1 needs a time of 0.2 days to produce a container of D kits. Supplier needs a time of 0.15 days 
to produce a container of E kits. To transport a full container, and bring an empty one back, supplier 1 
needs 0.2 days. To transport a full container and bring an empty container back, supplier 2 also needs 0.2 
days. If supplier 1 and supplier 2 would cooperate and adopt the “round‐tour mixed‐loading” system in 
which one container from each is picked up, transport time would be 0.25 days for one roundtrip. The 
daily production requirement is 100 A items.  
Questions:  
a. Determine the number of move and production cards between station 2 and station 1. 
b. Determine  the  number  of  move  cards  between  supplier  1  and  station  1  in  case  of  separate 
transport 
c. Determine  the  number  of  move  cards  between  supplier  2  and  station  1  in  case  of  separate 
transport.  

137 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
d. Determine  the  number  of  move  cards  between  suppliers  1  and  2  and  station  1  in  case  of  the 
round‐tour mixed‐loading approach.  
e. Determine the number of production cards for each supplier.  
f. Determine the maximum inventory level in the supply chain under the separate transport option 
g. Determine the maximum inventory level in the supply chain under the round‐tour mixed‐loading 
approach.  
Solutions
1. Solution: 
a. M = 100 (0.2)/5 = 4 move cards; P = 100 (0.2)/5 = 4 production cards 
b. Arrive at 0.20; 0.25; 0.30; 0.35; 0.40; etc. (because there have to be 4 movements in a period of 0.2.) 
Note: An alternative way to calculate b: cycle time is 1/100 = 0.01 i.e. every 0.01 days an item has to 
roll from the production line, which means that a new container of 5 parts has to arrive every 5 (0.01) 
= 0.05 days. Assuming the first walk from station 2 to station 1 starts at 0.0, the person will arrive at 
station  4  with  first  container  at  time  0,20,  and  then  every  0.05  days  the  following  container  has  to 
arrive at station 4. Hence the sequence is: 0.20; 0.25; 0.30; 0.35; 0.40; etc. 
c. Begin  at  0.1;  0.15;  0.20;  0.25;  0.30;  etc  (4  containers  in  production  in  a  period  of  0.2)  Note:  An 
alternative way to calculate c: cycle time is 0.01 days and 5 parts per container means every 0.05 days 
production to fill a new container has to commence. The first empty container arrives from station 2 
at 0.1, which is the time the production to fill this container starts; then at time 0.15 the next empty 
containers from station 2 arrives and production starts for this second container; etc. 
d. Begin with 4 full containers at each station. Then max inventory level is 8 (5) = 40 items.   
2. Solution:  
a. M = 200 (0.1)/20 = 1 move card; P = 200 (0.3)/20 = 3 production cards 
b. Cycle time is 1/200 = 0.005 days between two items rolling from the production line. A container has 
20  items,  therefore  a  container  needs  to  arrive  at  station  2  every  20(0.005)  =  0.1  days.  The  first 
container will arrive at 0.1; the second at 0.2; then 0.3; etc. 
c. Similarly, every 0.1 days a full container has to be ready at station 1, and therefore production to fill a 
new  container  needs  to  start  every  0.1  days.  Production  can  begin at  0.05; then production  for  the 
next container can start at 0.15; then at 0.25, etc. The first container for which production started at 
0.05 will be ready at 0.35, just in time for pickup by a worker from station 4.   
d. Cycle time = time in a day/ items needed per day = 1 / 200 = 0.005 days. This is the time between two 
items rolling from the production line. 
3. Solution: (Note. In real life, one will have uncertainties in lead times such as those caused by traffic 
jams and therefore one has to introduce safety factors) 
a. Between station 2 and station 1: Station 1 would have to produce in the following order: B, B, C, B, B, 
C, etc (see BOM). A container therefore contains 4 B and 2 C items. Total demand per day in order to 
produce 100 A items per day is therefore 200 B + 100 C = 300 items per day. Thus M = 300 (0.05)/6 = 
2.5 => 3 move cards. At station 1, the time to fill one container is the time to produce: B, B, C, B, B, C 
and  set  the  machine  back  in  a  condition  to  start  production  on  a  B  item.  Total  production  time  is 
hence:  
Production time: 6 (0.01) = 0.06 days 
Setup time: 2 (0.02) + 2 (0.01) = 0.06 days 
Total production time to fill container = 0.06 + 0.06 = 0.12 days 
  Therefore: P = 300 (0.12)/6 = 6 production cards.  
b. M = 200 (0.2)/16 = 2.5 => 3 move cards.  
c. M = 100 (0.2)/8 = 2.5 => 3 move cards. 
d. M = 300 (0.25)/24 = 3.125 = 4 move cards. 
e. For supplier 1: P = 200 (0.2)/16 = 2.5 => 3 production cards. For supplier 2: P = 200 (0.15)/8 = 1.875 => 
2 production cards. 
f. 32 B items and 16 C items in containers in station 1 or somewhere between station 1 and station 2; 48 
D kits at supplier 1; 96 D kits somewhere between supplier 1 and station 1; 16 E kits at supplier 2 and 
40 E kits somewhere between supplier 2 and station 1;  
138 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
g. Like in f., but only 64 D kits and 32 E kits somewhere between supplier 1 or 2 and station 1.  
References
See also e.g. Chapter 18, Section 2 of: Winston, L.W. 1994. Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms (3rd ed.).
Duxbury Press, California. ISBN 0534209718.

 

6.3 Bottleneck scheduling
Optimised Production Technology (OPT) is a technique that derives its name from a computer software 
system for planning and scheduling in an operational facility in the context of variability. The first versions 
of this system were introduced as early as 1979.  
The  internal  algorithms  of  the  OPT  software  are  proprietary,  but  the  general  rules  have  been 
explained  in  Goldratt  and  Cox’s  book  “The  Goal”,  a  book  in  which  the  message  is  presented  as  an 
adventure  story  around  a  manager  facing  the  closure  of  his  factory  unless  a  major  improvement  in 
productivity (more output at lower costs) is obtained within a few days. As a technique, OPT provides yet 
another  perspective  on  planning  and  scheduling  compared  to  MRP  and  JIT,  although  it  is  more  a 
philosophy than a real technique.  
OPT  is  closely  linked  with  TOC,  yet  another  acronym  which  stands  for  the  Theory  of  Constraints, 
explained in several other books with again Goldratt as one of the authors.  
What these two approaches lead to is the view that modelling can help to identify problems and/or to 
optimise  the  Supply  Chain.  The  optimisation  model  of  a  Supply  Chain  is  a  successful  approach 
exemplified by for example the acceptance of Linear Programming.  
6.3.1

Optimised Production Technology (OPT)

The basic idea of OPT is that in a production environment in which different machines or stations should 
work together to produce end products, some of these machines or stations are heavily used and others 
are not. The first and main attention for planning and scheduling should go towards keeping these heavily 
used machines, the so‐called bottlenecks, working at high utilisation levels. The planning and scheduling 
for  the  other  stations,  the  non‐bottlenecks  stations,  comes  second.  These  non‐critical  resources  are 
scheduled below capacity to allow for a safety capacity to exist at all times.  
The general rules of OPT are summarised here and will be further discussed in the sections: 
1.  
Do not balance capacity – balance the flow.  
2.  
The level of utilisation of a non‐bottleneck resource is determined not by its own potential but by 
some other constraint in the system. 
3.  
Activating a resource (making it work) is not synonymous with utilising a resource effectively. 
4.  
An hour lost at a bottleneck is an hour lost for the entire system.  
5.  
An hour saved at a non‐bottleneck is a mirage. 
6.  
Bottlenecks govern both throughput and inventory in the system. 
7.  
The transfer batch may not and many times should not be equal to the process batch. 
8.  
The process batch should be variable both along its route and in time. 
9.  
Priorities can only be set by simultaneously examining all of the system’s constraints. Lead time 
is a derivative of the schedule. 
 
OPT investigates five areas of the production environment: variability, bottlenecks, setups, lot sizes, 
and priorities.  
Variability
Most  scheduling  methods  attempt  to  balance  resources.  The  number  of  workers  will  be  constantly 
adjusted to balance machine capacity with worker capacity, and the plans for the subsequent work will 
utilise  these  resources  at  the  capacity  required  to  meet  demand.  It  has  been  shown  through 
mathematical  simulation  that  a  balanced  plant  cannot  exist  in  the  presence  of  variability.  Variability  in 

139 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
dependent  work  centres  will  cause  schedules  to  be  missed,  resulting  in  a  decreased  throughput, 
increased inventory, and increased operating costs.  
OPT  rules  are  based  on  the  realisation  that  the  constraints  on  an  operation  often  exist  outside  the 
operation.  The  variability  within  an  operation  not  only  affects  that  operation  but  all  subsequent 
operations, especially with bottleneck resources. Therefore, OPT’s first rule is: 1. Do not balance capacity 
– balance the flow.  
Bottlenecks and Non‐bottlenecks
A bottleneck is a restriction or constraint in the flow of material through a resource. A resource, in this 
case, is any element needed to make a product, whether it is a machine, a person, or space. A resource is 
considered a bottleneck when it is required to operate at 100 % capacity to meet the present schedule. 
As the schedule changes or the product mix changes, different resources may become bottlenecks. 
To  illustrate  the  interaction  between  bottlenecks  and  non‐bottlenecks,  four  different  cases  are 
presented  in  Figure  23;  they  represent  virtually  all  the  possible  combinations  of  interaction.  In  the 
examples, a certain product is manufactured that requires the use of two resources, X and Y. This is the 
simplest case and can, of course, be expanded for multiple resources.  Demand for this product places 
different  time  requirements  on  the  two  resources,  and  an  imbalance  occurs.  X  denotes  a  bottleneck 
resource that has a market demand of 100 hours per week; it also has a capacity of 100 hours per week. Y 
denotes a non‐bottleneck resources that has a market demand of 75 hours per week and a capacity of 
100 hours per week. These two resources can only interact in four ways.  
 
X

Bottleneck resource 

Capacity = 100 hours/week 
Demand = 100 hours/week 

Y

Non‐bottleneck resource 

Capacity = 100 hours/week 
Demand = 75 hours/week 

Case 1 

Case 2 

Y

X

Case 3 

A

X

X

Y

Case 4 
Dependent demand 

Y

Independent demand 

Customer

X

Y

 

 
Figure 23. Interaction between resources

 
In case 1, all product flows from X to Y. In this case, resource X has a requirement of 100 hours per 
week and is fully utilised, but resource Y has only 75 hours of work and is therefore underutilised. The 
output from X starves Y.  
In case 2, all product flows from Y to X and X can again be utilised 100 % of the time. If Y, however, is 
activated 100 % of the time, too much product will be produced and flow to resource X; X will not be able 
to process all these products. This will increase work‐in‐process inventory, consume resources, and not 
increase throughput. To balance the flow, Y needs to be activated only 75 % of the time.  
140 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
In case 3, X and Y both feed a common assembly. Having worked through cases 1 and 2, we can see 
that X will be utilised 100 % of the time to meet market demand; however, activating Y 100 % of the time 
will exceed the demand for  this resource and will again build work‐in‐process inventory in front of the 
assembly station. 
In case 4, X and Y both feed independent customer demand and are not interrelated. Activating X 100 
% of the time will exactly meet customer demand. Activating Y 100 % of the time will exceed customer 
demand;  this  will  build  inventory  and  not  increase  throughput.  Y  needs  only  be  activated  75  %  of  the 
time. Note that in this case the market has become the constraint.  
In  all  four  cases  the  same  results  were  obtained.  X  was  always  active,  a  good  indication  of  a 
bottleneck.  Y  could  not  be  activated  more  than  75%  of  the  time,  or  one  or  more  manufacturing  goals 
were contravened. From this example comes OPT’s second and third rules: 2. The level of utilisation of a 
non‐bottleneck  resource  is  determined  not  by  its  own  potential  but  by  some  other  constraint  in  the 
system; 3. Activating a resource (making it work) is not synonymous with utilising a resource effectively. 
All non‐bottleneck resources must therefore be scheduled not on the basis of their own constraints 
but on the basis of the system’s constraints. 
Setups
The available time at a bottleneck resource can be divided into two categories: processing time and setup 
time. If an hour of setup is saved at a bottleneck resource, an hour of processing time is gained. Taking 
the four case example of the previous section, resource X’s capacity has increased to 101 hours per week. 
It means that the entire system is now able to satisfy a higher demand per week, i.e. the throughput of 
the system has increased. This leads to OPT’s fourth rule: 4. An hour lost at a bottleneck is an hour lost 
for the entire system.  
At  non‐bottlenecks,  however,  there  may  be  no  gain  at  all  in  avoiding  setups.  Taking  again  the 
examples of the X and Y machines, increasing Y’s capacity from 100 to 101 hours per week would not give 
us any increase in throughput. In particular, in cases 1‐3, we would never gain from having Y at a capacity 
of  101  hours  per  week,  even  if  machine  X’s  capacity  would  be  101  hours  per  week  and  demand  for  X 
would  likewise  have  increased  to  101  hours  per  week.  We  can  realise  a  throughput  equivalent  to  101 
hours per week of demand for X whether Y’s capacity is 100 or 101 hours per week. In case 4, extending 
machine Y’s capacity does also make no sense with a weekly demand that requires only about 75% of its 
capacity. Therefore OPT’s fifth rule states: 5. An hour saved at a non‐bottleneck is a mirage. 
Lot sizes
It is important that setups be saved at the bottlenecks, since time spent not producing affects the entire 
system. OPT therefore advises to produce in larger batches on the bottleneck resource than traditional 
lot  sizing  methods  (see  e.g.  Chapter  1,  Section  3)  would  indicate.  Indeed,  the  cost  of  a  setup  at  a 
bottleneck  resource  is  not  just  the  cost  associated  with  the  time  and  work  required  at  this  bottleneck 
station, but it should be associated with the loss in throughput for the whole system and therefore it is 
very  high!  Therefore,  OPT’s  sixth  rule  reads  as  follows:  6.  Bottlenecks  govern  both  throughput  and 
inventory in the system. 
Since  non‐bottleneck  resources  have  actually  “spare  time”  available,  it  is  possible  to  produce  in 
smaller  lot  sizes  on  such  resources.  Smaller  lot  sizes  means  more  setups  and  setup  time,  but  time  is 
available and the cost of such setups may only involve the direct labour cost: there is no opportunity cost 
of throughput loss as the one associated with bottleneck resources. 
 

141 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Setup  
time 
X

Run time 

Bottleneck resource

Time saved in setup becomes runtime 
 
Additional  run  time  results  in  additional  hour  of 
throughput for the whole system 

Setup  
time 
Y

Run time 

Idle  
time 

Non‐bottleneck resource 
Any time saved in setup becomes idle time 
 
An additional hour of idle time is worth nothing 

 

 
Figure 24. Resource activities 

 
The benefit of producing in smaller lot sizes on non‐bottleneck stations are system wide advantages in 
that smaller lot sizes may reduce lead times and can help to keep bottleneck resources working all the 
time.  Indeed,  in  case  2  of  the  examples  presented  before  in  which  machine  Y  feeds  the  bottleneck  X, 
smaller  lot  sizes  on  Y  may  be  better  able  to  keep  X  working  all  the  time.  (This  is  especially  relevant  in 
when there is variability in the system).  
As a batch moves through a facility, it encounters both bottleneck and non‐bottleneck resources, and 
the question arises as to whether a batch should be subdivided or remain a single entity. Two different 
types of batches must be considered: 
 

Transfer batch: the lot size viewed from the standpoint of the part. 

Process batch: the lot size viewed from the standpoint of the resource. 
 
The Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) model maintains a balance between holding and setup costs. In 
the case of a bottleneck, the setup cost is viewed from the perspective not only of the resource but of the 
entire system. An hour lost at the bottleneck is an hour lost for the whole system. One should make sure 
the  bottleneck  station  needs  relatively  few  setups  and  has  always  a  buffer  inventory  in  front  of  it. 
Therefore: 7. The transfer batch may not and many times should not be equal to the process batch. 
Since  a  batch  moving  through  manufacturing  will  encounter  both  bottleneck  and  non‐bottleneck 
operations, all with varying setup and processing times, the parameters used in establishing lot size for 
the  batch  must  be  examined  for  validity.  Typically,  batches  launched  on  the  shop  floor  are  split, 
combined, and overlapped to meet the demands of the schedules. The simplicity of the Economic Order 
Quantity (EOQ) formula cannot accommodate the complexities and reality of multiple work centres in a 
manufacturing  environment,  and  it  should  not  be  expected  that  one  batch  size  for  a  product  moving 
through  many  work  centres  should  always  be  the  same:  8.  The  process  batch  should  be  variable  both 
along its route and in time. 
Priorities
Many  rules  exist  to  determine  the  sequence  in  which  orders  should  be  processed.  The  most  widely 
accepted rules consider the amount of time remaining to complete the order and the time available to 
complete the order, or the time to due date.  
142 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
MRP logic looks at the priorities of an item based on the required due date and the lead time offset of 
components. This initial rough cut does not consider capacity constraints and may result in a plan that 
requires reworking until feasible. In effect, MRP looks at priorities and then sees if they fit the capacity. 
Invariably, however, conflicting priorities result, since two or more different jobs will require processing 
at the same work centre at the same time. To satisfy capacity constraints, one job must be processed first 
and the subsequent job(s) delayed. Since delay has occurred, the lead time has been affected.  
The lead time of a job is thus affected not only by the capacity of the various work centres but by the 
priority  of  the  other  jobs.  This  leads  to  the  ninth  and  final  rule:  9.  Priorities  can  only  be  set  by 
simultaneously examining all of the system’s constraints. Lead time is a derivative of the schedule. 
 
6.3.2

Theory Of Constraints (TOC)

 
Step 1. Identify the system’s constraint(s). 
 
Calculate the process load. 
All for breakdowns. 
Determine the number of setups that can be done. 
 
Step 2. Decide how to exploit the system’s constraint(s), 
i.e. how to make the best use of the constraint. 
 
If no bottleneck exists, then make a predetermined schedule for the constraints. 
If a bottleneck does exist, then decide on the product mix before making 
a predetermined schedule. 
 
=  “The Drum Concept.” 
 
Step 3. Subordinate everything else to the decisions made in Step 2. 
 
Release material into the plant according to the needs of the constraints, 
allowing sufficient time for the material to arrive. 
 
= “The Buffer and Rope Concept.” 
 
Step 4. Elevate the system’s constraint(s). 
 
After having made the best possible use of the existing constraint(s), 
the next step is to reduce its (their) limitations on the system’s performance. 
 
 
Example
Assume we operate a simple plant as depicted in Figure 1. We have a product called P which sells for £90 
per  unit,  and  the  market  will  take  100  units  per  week.  In  order  to  make  that  product,  we  have  to  put 
together an assembly. We have resource D, who does all our assembly work, and it requires 10 minutes 
to make one product P. The assembly operation involves putting together a purchased part that costs £5 
and putting together a few couple of manufactured parts. Those manufactured parts, of course, also are 
made from raw materials, and one particular part goes through department A, where the resource takes 
15 minutes to work on it, and then it goes on to department C, where 10 minutes are taken. Another part 
starts in department B, where 15 minutes are required, then it goes to department C, where 5 minutes 
are required. Finally our assembler puts them together, and we have a finished product.  
We have a second product, product Q, which sells for £100 per unit. It is priced higher, so we can sell 
only  50  of  them  per  week.  It  is  also  done  by  the  assembly  department,  but  the  assembly  only  takes  5 
143 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
minutes. It uses two parts, one made from raw material costing which goes through departments A and 
then B, and the other part is a type of part also used in product P.  
In  this  particular  plant,  we  have  one  A,  one  B,  one  C,  and  one  D,  and  they  are  all  working  2400 
minutes a day – a 40‐hour day. It costs us £6000 a week to run this plant. What is the maximum amount 
of money we can make in this plant?  
 
A,B,C,D: 1 each 
Available time: 
    2400 min/week 
Operating 
expenses: 
£6000/week

Q £100/unit
50 

P £90/unit
100 

D    5 

D    10 
Purcha
se part: 
£5/unit 

C    10 

C  5 min 

B    15 

A    15 

B    15 

A    10 

RM1 
£20/

RM2
£20/

RM3 
£20/
 

Figure 1: Simple plant example. 
 
How much profit can we make? Let us first calculate what net profit per week can be, i.e. what the 
potential of the plant would be if there were no capacity constraints. The results are shown in the Table 1 
below. 
 
Table 1: Net week profit potential for this plant
 
Product
Total 
 
P
Q
Market potential 
100
50
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Total contribution 
£4500 
£3000 
£7500 
Operating expenses 
£ (6000) 
Net profit per week 
£1500 
 
However,  we  cannot  be  sure  that  we  can  produce  everything.  Let  us  check  whether  what  the 
workload would be on all of our resources if we would indeed try to produce 100 P products and 50 Q 
products. These calculations are shown in the Table 2.  
 

144 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Table 2: Process load assuming full market demand can be produced
Reso
Process Load 
Available 
Workload 
urce 
/ week 
time / week 
/ week 

P: 15 x 100 = 1500 
2000
2400
83 %
Q: 10 x 50 = 500 
 

P: 15 x 100 = 1500 
3000
2400
125 %
Q: 15 x 50 + 15 x 50 = 1500 

P: 10 x 100 + 5 x 100 = 1500
1750
2400
73 %
Q: 5 x 50 = 250 

P: 10 x 100 = 1000 
1250
2400
52 %
Q: 5 x 50 = 250 
 
So there is a problem: we cannot make everything. Workloads are fine for A, C, and D, but resource B 
should be used more than 100 % and this is not possible.  
 
Now  we  have  a  different  kind  of  problem.  Because  we  cannot  make  everything,  what  should  we 
make?  Let  us  first  approach  this  from  an  accounting  perspective  in  which  we  wish  to  calculate  the 
profitability of a product, as shown in the Table 3.  
Table 3: Conventional approach based on product profitability
 
Product 
 
P

Market potential 
100 units
50 units 
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Direct labour time per unit
55 min
50 min 
Contribution per direct labour minute
£0.82 
£1.20 
 
=> Product Q is preferable 
 
As product Q is apparently the most profitable product, we will produce all 50 products Q on resource 
B, which leaves us with 900 min free on resource B which we will use to produce 900/15 = 60 products P. 
The net profits we can expect from the plant per week are therefore:  
Table 4: Net profit per week expected under the conventional approach
 
Product
Total 
 
P
Q
Quantity produced 
60
50
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Total contribution 
£2700 
£3000 
£5700 
Operating expenses 
£ (6000) 
Net profit per week 
£ (300) 
 
Unfortunately, we will make a loss of £300 per week. Is this really the best we can do?  
 
We now are going to apply the philosophy of TOC, and see if leads to better results. We know that 
resource B is the bottleneck of the plant. What would happen if we tried to establish how to make best 
use of this bottleneck resource; what would be the solution if we tried to make sure that every minute of 
processing  time  on  the  bottleneck  will  generate  us  the  most  profits?  Would  we  then  still  prefer  to 
produce Q? The type of calculations needed are displayed in the Table 5.  

145 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Table 5: TOC approach based on bottleneck profitability
 
Product 
 
P

Market potential 
100
50 
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Time on bottleneck per unit
15 min
30 min 
Contribution per bottleneck minute
£3.00 
£2.00 
 
=> Product P is preferable !
 
This time product P is preferable. If we would produce all 100 products of P, we would have 900 min 
left on resource B to make 900/30 = 30 products Q. The net profit expected is now: 
Table 6: Net profit per week expected under the TOC approach
 
Product
Total 
 
P
Q
Quantity produced 
100
30
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Total contribution 
£4500 
£1800 
£6300 
Operating expenses 
£ (6000) 
Net profit per week 
£ 300 
 
We would make a profit of £300 per week!  
 
Think  about  this:  with  the conventional  method,  we need  to  have  accurate  estimates  of  how  much 
processing  time  is  needed  on  all  work  stations  to  produce  a  unit  of  product  (i.e.  of  the  whole  supply 
chain).  With  the  TOC  method,  we  only  need  to  know  the  time  needed  on  the  bottleneck  resource.  It 
seems we can achieve better results with less effort.  
Efficiencies
As  a  result  of  the  plan  to  produce  100  products  P  and  30  products  Q,  we  can  calculate  the  actual 
workloads for each resource. The results are displayed in Table 7 below. 
 
Table 7: Process load under the TOC planning schedule
Reso
Process Load 
Available 
Workload 
urce 
/ week 
time / week 
/ week 

P: 15 x 100 = 1500 
1800
2400
75 %
Q: 10 x 30 = 300 
 

P: 15 x 100 = 1500 
2400
2400
100 %
Q: 15 x 30 + 15 x 30 = 900 

P: 10 x 100 + 5 x 100 = 1000
1150
2400
48 %
Q: 5 x 30 = 150 
1150
2400
48 %

P: 10 x 100 = 1000 
Q: 5 x 30 = 150 
 
We can see that these results are similar to the examples discussed in Section 1 on OPT. It is no use to 
run resources A, C, and D at 100% efficiency, as this would not allow us to sell anything more but would 
just build up inventory. 

146 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Elevate the system’s constraints
Suppose an engineer at the plant asks permission to spend £5000 in tooling and fixtures that will allow:  
 
 The process time at resource C to be increased from 5 to 7 minutes; 
 The process time at resource B to be decreased from 15 to 14 minutes.  
 
Would you say this is a good proposal, or do you think we need to fire the engineer?  
 
At first sight, the idea may seem strange. Remark that if we would implement this idea, the processing 
time  to  make  the  part  from  raw  material  RM1  goes  up  from  25  to  27  minutes,  the  processing  time  to 
make the part from raw material RM2 goes up from 20 to 21 minutes, and only the processing time to 
make the part from material RM3 goes down from 25 to 23 minutes. All in all, we do not seem to gain a 
lot in processing times, and we have to pay £5000 for it! 
 
Let’s examine the situation, however, from the viewpoint of TOC. The proposal has one good aspect: 
it reduces the time needed to produce on the bottleneck resource; processing time goes down from 15 to 
14 minutes for P and from 30 to 28 minutes for Q. This gives: 
Table 8: TOC approach based on bottleneck profitability
 
Product 
 
P

Market potential 
100
50 
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Time on bottleneck per unit
14 min
28 min 
Contribution per bottleneck minute
£3.21 
£2.14 
 
=> Product P is still preferable !
 
This time product P is still preferable. If we would produce all 100 products of P, we would have 1000 
min left on resource B to make 1000/28 = 35.7  35 products Q. The net profit expected is now: 
Table 9: Net profit per week expected under the TOC approach
 
Product
Total 
 
P
Q
Quantity produced 
100
35
Selling price 
£90 
£100 
Raw material costs 
£45 
£40 
Contribution per unit 
£45 
£60 
Total contribution 
£4500 
£2100 
£6600 
Operating expenses 
£ (6000) 
Net profit per week 
£ 600 
 
We  would  make  a  profit  of  £600  per  week,  an  extra  £300  per  week!  Therefore,  the  investment  of 
£5000 would pay itself back in less than 5000/300  17 weeks, or in less than 5 months.  
A new look at standard costing
OPT  and  TOC  provide  new  perspectives  on  the  standard  approaches  to  production  costing,  measuring 
production efficiency in work centres, make or buy decisions, and overall on how investors should invest 
their money.  

147 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Linear Programming
One of the most powerful  developments is the use of operational research methods. For example, the 
problem  of  the  simple  plant  presented  in  previous  section  can  be  easily  translated  into  a  Linear 
Programming problem:  
 
Let  xp  be  the  units  of  P  produced  per  week,  and  xq  be  the  units  Q  produced  per  week.  Then  our 
objective function, to maximise profits = revenues – costs, can be expressed as:  
 
Max z  90 x p  100 x q  6000  5 x p  20 x p  20 x p  20 x q  20 x q  
 
The constraints in the model are:  
  
1) Demand constraints for P and Q: 
 
x p  100
 
x q  50
 
2) Time constraints for A, B, C, and D:  
 
15 x p  10 x q  2400
15( x p  x q )  15 x q  2400
10 x p  5( x p  x q )  2400

 

10 x p  5 x q  2400

 
3) Sign restrictions 
 
x p , xq  0  
 
Exercise
 
1. A company produces two types of product: X and Y. The market potential for X is 50 units per week; 
the market potential for product Y is 100 units per week. One unit of X sells for $100, and one unit of Y 
sells for $80. The company has three expensive machines: A, B, and C. Each machine can be used for 2400 
minutes per week. The fixed costs per week are $4000.  
One unit of product X is made from one unit of raw material F and two units of raw material G; one 
unit  of  product  Y  is  made  from  one  unit  of  raw  material  G  and  one  unit  of  raw  material  H.  The  unit 
purchase price of  F is $20; of G is $20; and of H is $30. 
Raw materials F and H are first processed on machine B; to process one unit on B requires 10 minutes.  
Raw material G is first processed on machine C; it takes 15 minutes to process one unit. The processed 
raw materials then flow to machine A to make the final products X and Y. It takes 10 minutes on machine 
A to produce one unit of X and 15 minutes to produce one unit of Y.  
 
a) Use the Theory Of Constraints’ four step framework to propose a production plan for the company 
to maximise its weekly profits (=revenues – costs).  
b)  Suppose  it  takes  20  minutes  on  resource  B  to  process  one  unit.  Which  resource  is  now  the 
bottleneck? Write an LP model of this planning problem. 
c) Solve the LP problem constructed in b) with Excel Solver. 
 
Answers: 
a)

148 
 



Integrated Logistics

 
Table : Net week profit potential for this plant
 
 
X
Market potential 
50
Selling price 
$100 
Raw material costs 
$60 
Contribution per unit 
$40 
Total contribution 
$2000 
Operating expenses 
Net profit per week 
 
 

Product
Y
100
$80 
$50 
$30 
$3000 

Total 

$5000 
$(4000) 
$1000 

Table : Process load assuming full market demand can be produced
Resour
Process Load 
Available 
ce 
/ week 
time / week 

X: 10 x 50 = 500 
2000
2400
Y: 15 x 100 = 1500 
 

X: 10 x 50 = 500 
1500
2400
Y: 10 x 100 = 1000 

X: 2 x 15 x 50 = 1500 
3000
2400
Y: 15 x 100 = 1500 
 

Workload 
/ week 
83.3%
62.5%
125 %

Table : TOC approach based on bottleneck profitability
 
Product 
 
X

Market potential 
50
100 
Selling price 
$100 
$80 
Raw material costs 
$60 
$50 
Contribution per unit 
$40 
$30 
Time on bottleneck C per unit
30 min
15 min 
Contribution per bottleneck C minute
$1.33 
$2.00 
 
=> Product Y is preferable !
 
To produce 100 Y products corresponds with 1500 minutes on the bottleneck C, leaving 900 minutes 
on C to produce 900/30 = 30 units 
 
Table : Process load under the TOC planning schedule
Resour
Process Load 
ce 
/ week 

X: 10 x 3 = 30 
130
Y: 15 x 100 = 1500 
 

X: 10 x 3 = 30 
1300
Y: 10 x 100 = 1000 

X: 2 x 15 x 3 = 900 
2400
Y: 15 x 100 = 1500 
 
 
Table : Net week profit potential for this plant
 

Product

Available 
time / week 
2400

Workload 
/ week 
54.2%

2400

54.2%

2400

100%

Total 
149 

 



Integrated Logistics

 
 
Market potential 
Selling price 
Raw material costs 
Contribution per unit 
Total contribution 
Operating expenses 
Net profit per week 

X
30
$100 
$60 
$40 
$1200 

Y
100
$80 
$50 
$30 
$3000 

$4200 
$(4000) 
$200 

 
b)
Table : Process load assuming full market demand can be produced
Resour
Process Load 
Available 
ce 
/ week 
time / week 

X: 10 x 50 = 500 
2000
2400
Y: 15 x 100 = 1500 
 

X: 20 x 50 = 1000 
3000
2400
Y: 20 x 100 = 2000 

X: 2 x 15 x 50 = 1500 
3000
2400
Y: 15 x 100 = 1500 
 

Workload 
/ week 
83.3%
125%
125%

References
 
Goldratt, E., and J. Cox. 2004. The Goal: a Process  of  Ongoing Improvement. Gower Publishing Ltd., 
ISBN 0566086654. 
Goldratt,  E.M.,  E.  Schragenheim,  and  C.A.  Ptak.  2000.  Necessary  But  Not  Sufficient:  A  Theory  of 
Constraints Business Novel. North River Press. ISBN 0884271706. 
 

150 
 

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close