International Maritime Conventions

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INTERNATIONAL MARITIME
CONVENTIONS

PRESENTED BY : Assit.Prof. Dr.
Tevfik ARSLAN
Source: IMO webpage,
www.imo.org

INTRODUCTION
The industrial revolution of the
eighteenth and nineteenth centuries
and the upsurge in international
commerce which followed resulted in
the adoption of a number of
international
treaties
related
to
shipping,
including
safety.
The
subjects covered included tonnage
measurement,
the
prevention
of
collisions, signalling and others.

INTRODUCTION
By the end of the nineteenth century
suggestions had even been made for
the
creation
of
a
permanent
international maritime body to deal with
these and future measures. The plan
was
not
put
into
effect,
but
international co-operation continued in
the twentieth century, with the adoption
of still more internationally developed
treaties.

INTRODUCTION
By the time IMO came into existence in
1958, several important international
conventions
had
already
been
developed, including the International
Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea
of 1948, the International Convention
for the Prevention of Pollution of the
Sea by Oil of 1954 and treaties dealing
with load lines and the prevention of
collisions at sea.

INTRODUCTION

IMO was made responsible for ensuring
that the majority of these conventions
were kept up to date. It was also given
the task of developing new
conventions as and when the need
arose.

INTRODUCTION
The creation of IMO coincided with a
period of tremendous change in world
shipping and the Organization was kept
busy from the start developing new
conventions and ensuring that existing
instruments kept pace with changes in
shipping technology. It is now
responsible for more than 40
international conventions and
agreements and has adopted numerous
protocols and amendments.

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
A. Maritime safety
1.International Convention for the Safety
of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974
2.International Convention on Load
Lines (LL), 1966
3.International Convention for Safe
Containers (CSC), 1972

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
4.Convention on the International
Regulations for Preventing Collisions
at Sea (COLREG), 1972
5.Convention on the International
Maritime Satellite Organization (
INMARSAT), 1976
6.The Torremolinos International
Convention for the Safety of Fishing
Vessels (SFV), 1977

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
7.International Convention on Standards
of Training, Certification and
Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW),
1978
8.International Convention on Standards
of Training, Certification and
Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel
Personnel (STCW-F), 1995
9. International Convention on Maritime
Search and Rescue (SAR), 1979

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
B.Marine pollution
1.International Convention for the
Prevention of Pollution from Ships,
1973, as modified by the Protocol of
1978 relating thereto (MARPOL 73/78)
2.International Convention Relating to
Intervention on the High Seas in Cases
of Oil Pollution Casualties (
INTERVENTION), 1969

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
3.Convention on the Prevention of Marine
Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other
Matter (LDC), 1972
4.International Convention on Oil Pollution
Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (
OPRC), 1990
5.Protocol on Preparedness, Response and Cooperation to pollution Incidents by
Hazardous and Noxious Substances, 2000 (
HNS Protocol)

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
6.International Convention on the Control
of Harmful Anti-fouling Systems on
Ships (AFS), 2001
7.International Convention for the
Control and Management of Ships'
Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
C.Liability and compensation
1.International Convention on Civil
Liability for Oil Pollution Damage
(CLC), 1969
2.International Convention on the
Establishment of an International Fund
for Compensation for Oil Pollution
Damage (FUND), 1971

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
3.Convention relating to Civil Liability in
the Field of Maritime Carriage of
Nuclear Material (NUCLEAR), 1971
4.Athens Convention relating to the
Carriage of Passengers and their
Luggage by Sea (PAL), 1974
5.Convention on Limitation of Liability for
Maritime Claims (LLMC), 1976

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS

6.International Convention on Liability
and Compensation for Damage in
Connection with the Carriage of
Hazardous and Noxious Substances by
Sea (HNS), 1996
7.International Convention on Civil
Liability for Bunker Oil Pollution
Damage, 2001

LIST OF IMO CONVENTIONS
D. Other subjects
1.Convention on Facilitation of
International Maritime Traffic (FAL),
1965
2.International Convention on Tonnage
Measurement of Ships (TONNAGE),
1969
3.Convention for the Suppression of
Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of
Maritime Navigation (SUA), 1988
4.International Convention on Salvage
(SALVAGE), 1989

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE
SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA
Adoptation
: 1 November 1974
Entry into force :
25 May 1980
Parts of Convention:
Introduction and history
Amendment Procedure
Technical Provision
Chapter One- General Provisions

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE
SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA
• Chapter II-1-Construction-subdivision
and stability, machinery and electrical
installation.
• Chapter II-2 Fire protection, fire
detection and fire extinction.
• Chapter III- Life saving appliances and
arrangements.
• Chapter IV- Radio communication.

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE
SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA
• Chapter V- Safety of navigation.
• Chapter VI- Carriage of cargoes.
• Chapter VII- Carriage of dangerous
goods.
• Chapter VIII- Nuclear ships.
• Chapter IX- Management for the safe
operation of ships.
• Chapter X-Safety measures for high
speed craft

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR THE
SAFETY OF LIFE AT SEA
• Chapter XI-1- Special measures to
enhance maritime safety.
• Chapter XI-2-Special measures to
enhance maritime security.
• Chapter XII- Additional safety measures
for bulk carriers.

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION FOR
THE PREVENTION OF POLLUTION FROM
THE SHIPS,1973, AS MODIFIED BY THE
PROTOCOL OF 1978 RELATING
THERETO (MARPOL 73/78)

MARPOL 73/78
• Annex I- Prevention of pollution by oil.
• Annex II-Control of pollution by noxious
liquid substances.
• Annex III-Prevention of pollution by harmfull
substances in packaged form.
• Annex IV- Prevention of pollution by sewage
from ships.
• Annex V-Prevention pollution by garbage
from ship.
• Annex VI-Prevention of air pollution from
ships.

International Convention on Standards of
Training, Certification and Watchkeeping
for Seafarers, 1978
• Adoption : 7 July 1978
• Entry into force: 28 April 1984
• The 1995 amendments, which
completely revised the Convention,
entered into force on 1 February 1997

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS
• The 1995 amendments, adopted by a
Conference, represented a major
revision of the Convention, in response
to a recognized need to bring the
Convention up to date and to respond
to critics who pointed out the many
vague phrases, such as "to the
satisfaction of the Administration",
which resulted in different
interpretations being made.

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS
• One of the major features of the revision was
the division of the technical annex into
regulations, divided into Chapters as before,
and a new STCW Code, to which many
technical regulations have been transferred.
Part A of the Code is mandatory while Part B
is recommended.

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS





Chapter I- General Provisions.
Chapter II-Master and deck department
Chapter III-Engine department
Chapter IV- Radiocommunication and
radio personnel.
• Chapter V- Special training
requirements for personnel on certain
types of ships.

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS
Chapter VI- Emergency, occupational
safety, medical care and survival
functions.
Chapter VII-Alternative certification
Chapter VIII: Watchkeeping

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS
• The STCW Code
The regulations contained in the
Convention are supported by sections
in the STCW Code. Generally speaking,
the Convention contains basic
requirements which are then enlarged
upon and explained in the Code.

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS
• Part A of the Code is mandatory. The
minimum standards of competence
required for seagoing personnel are
given in detail in a series of tables.
Chapter II of the Code, for example,
deals with standards regarding the
master and deck department.

STCW 1995 AMENDMENTS
• Part B of the Code contains
recommended guidance which is
intended to help Parties implement the
Convention. The measures suggested
are not mandatory and the examples
given are only intended to illustrate
how certain Convention requirements
may be complied with. However, the
recommendations in general represent
an approach that has been harmonized
by discussions within IMO and
consultation with other international
organizations.

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