Island Connection - March 18, 2011

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I n s i d e t h e I s l a n d C o n n e c t i o n . . .
page 8 Kiawah Tour of homes page 19 ouTdoor burning page 5 geT cooKing!
Volume 4 Issue 24
March 18, 2011
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4
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M
ore than 90 runners arrived at Mullet Hall on
Johns Island this past March 5 for Charleston
Parks and Recreation’s inaugural Mullet Haul
Run, the frst trail run at the area’s only equestrian trail
park. While the opportunity to run on some of the area’s
most beautiful trails was enough to get a good crowd out
to the event, Charleston County Parks and Recreation
spiced up the occasion by asking runners to wear their
own mullet for the run. Mullets, a 1980s hair style
defned by long hair in the back and short hair up front,
were plentiful at the event, and ranged from simple hair
knots with long hair hanging down the back, to frizzy
mullets, multi-colored mullets and mullets tied into
place with festive bandanas. Some runners even added
their own facial hair accents, with thin moustaches being
a popular accoutrement.
Following the race, runners were treated to music by
popular local funk band, Uncle Funkle, and craft beer by
Charleston’s Coast Brewing Company.
In frst place for the fve mile run was Dawson Cherry,
47, with an overall time of 34:37, and in frst place for the
ten mile run was Ryan Tompson, 29, with an overall
time of 1:03:52. Te youngest runner at the event,
Brendon Healy, 10, participated in the fve mile run and
fnished with an overall time of 46:20.
Congratulations to all of the runners who participated
in the event, and special thanks to everyone who helped to
make the frst Mullet Haul Run a success! For the full results,
visit www.ccprc.com.
Mullets abound
at inaugural
Mullet Haul Run
Since May 2007
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Charitable Contributions request
Mayor Steve Orban opened the meeting
by asking the Council to approve
a list of donations to local charities
totaling $50,000. Orban noted that
Councilmember Charles Lipuma
recused himself from voting on the
Habitat for Humanity donation, and
Orban recused himself from voting
on the Barrier Island Free Medical
Clinic donation as both Lipuma and
Orban serve on their respective boards.
Charitable donations include $7500
to the Rural Mission, $10,000 to the
Barrier Islands Free Medical Clinic,
$5000 to Our Lady of Mercy Outreach,
$15,000 to Habitat for Humanity, $2500
to Coastal Crisis Chaplaincy, $2500 to
the St. Johns Rotary Club, $2500 to
Full Faith Ministries, $2500 to Respite
Care Ministries, and $2500 to Fields to
Families.
FY 2011 Budget Amendment
Treasurer Kenneth Gunnells read
changes to the FY 2010-2011 budget,
noting the $50,000 adjustment for
charitable donations, $25,000 toward the
KICA road consultant, and an amended
revenue of $75,000 for new AT&T
and Comcast franchise fees. Council
approved the changes, and a public
hearing will be held before the next
Kiawah Town Council meeting on April
5 at 1:30 p.m.
MASC Legislative Resolution
Town Administrator Tumiko Rucker
read through a resolution which the
Municipal Association of South Carolina
has asked all state municipalities to
support. Te resolution supports local
elected leaders making decisions based on
local needs and priorities; supports the
MASC legislative agenda which promotes
economic growth, enhancing a positive
quality of life, and encouraging local
accountability and fscal responsibility;
agrees that the four major legislative
issues that local leaders face are enclave
annexation, municipal capital project
sales tax, millage cap fexibility and codes
enforcement; and supports an agenda
focused on fscal, economic development,
infrastructure and public safety issues.
Council approved the resolution
unanimously.
Employee Benefts Expenditure
Mayor Orban stated that Ways and
Means recommended $29,000 for
employee compensation. Te issue was
discussed previously in executive session,
and Council voted approval of the
expenditure unanimously.
Greenbelt Project Engineering
Proposal
Although Council approved $30,000
during Ways and Means for the
cost of designing several Greenbelt
improvements around the island, the
company McSweeney Engineers was
able to revise their design proposal
in an amount totaling $14,200 with
any additional work performed on
a time and materials basis at $125/
hour. While Mayor Orban stated that
he felt they would use considerably
less than the proposed $30,000, he
recommended sticking with the $30,000
recommendation. Council approved the
amount unanimously.
Appointment of Planning Commission
member: Mr. Lauren Patch
Councilmember Al Burnaford
recommended Kiawah resident Lauren
Patch to replace Edward Dittmeier on
the Planning Commission as Dittmeier
will be moving to Winston-Salem. “He
[Lauren Patch] is very qualifed for this
type of job,” said Burnaford, pointing out
Patch’s impressive resume and noting his
leadership skills. “I know Patch myself
and he’s certainly a qualifed individual,”
said Mayor Orban. Council approved
Patch to replace Dittmeier on the
Planning Commission for a term which
expires in January 2012 unanimously.
Reappoint State ATAX chairman
Diana Permar
Council unanimously approved Kiawah
property owner Diana Permar as State
Accomodations Tax (ATAX) chairman.
Proclamation designating March 2011
American Red Cross Month
Town Administrator Rucker read
through a proclamation declaring March
2011 as Red Cross Month in the Town
of Kiawah, and Mayor Orban presented
Red Cross representative Nancy Olson
with a copy of the signed proclamation.
“We all know what great work the
American Red Cross does both here and
around the world, so we heartily support
them,” said the mayor.
External Afairs and roads
Councilmember Burnaford noted that
the steering committee for the inter-
island roads committee met for a meet
and greet with the new road consultant,
and discussed the format of future
meetings. Besides that, Burnaford stated
that not much has taken place in the way
of road improvements, though he did
note that the Johns Island Greenway is
still on the CHATS list of future projects.
Communications
Councilmember Fran Wermuth stated
that, as their committee was only just
formed during the last council meeting,
the Communications Committee has not
held their frst ofcial meeting. However,
she did report that she met with the
Kiawah Conservancy and noted that they
have several fun events coming up this
month. For more information, visit www.
kiawahconservancy.org.
Arts Council
It’s been an exciting couple of months for
the Arts Council, and Councilmember
Charles Lipuma was happy to report
that the frst Kiawah art event held on
Seabrook – the Planet D. Nonet Big
Band – was a wonderful success. Te
recent art flm on Maya Lin was also
well attended, and the Schubertiade
Kiawah Island Council – March 1, 2011
2 March 18, 2011
The Island
Connection
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
[email protected]
Kristin Hackler
managing editor
[email protected]

Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
[email protected]
Lori Dalton
sales manager
[email protected]
Meredith Powell
reporter
[email protected]
Blake Bunch
reporter
[email protected]

Contributors
Farmers’ Almanac
Stephanie Braswell
Charleston Jazz Orchestra
Captain James Ghi
Gibbes, etc.
Paul Hedden
Lisa Hillman
Bob Hooper
Jim Jordan
Lowcountry Red Cross
Erika Ludolf
Andrew B. McNeice
Ian Miller
Mike Saia
Suzanne Taylor
Published by
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Future deadlines: March 23
for submissions
Op-Ed articles and letters to the editor do not
necessarily refect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News or its writers.
Lucky Dog Publishing, LLC
Publishers of Island Eye News,
The Island Connection and
The Folly Current.
Ci v i c Cal endar
KIAWAH ISLAND TOWN HALL
21 Beachwalker Drive
Kiawah Island, SC 29455
Phone: 768-9166
Fax: 768-4764
SEABROOK ISLAND TOWN HALL
2001 Seabrook Island Road
Seabrook Island, SC 29455
Phone: 768-9121
Fax: 768-9830
Email:
[email protected]
JOHNS ISLAND COUNCIL
Meetings are held at the Berkeley
Electric Co-op located at 3351
Maybank Hwy, Johns Island.
Chairman Chris Cannon: 343-5113
CHARLESTON COUNTY COUNCIL
4045 Bridge View Dr, N Charleston
958-4700
CITY OF CHARLESTON
75 Calhoun St.
724-3745
KI Council continued on page 3
Monday, March 21
Kiawah Island Board of Zoning Appeals
4pm - 5pm
Town Hall Council Chambers
Tuesday, March 22
Seabrook Island Town Council
All Town Council meetings will be held
at 2:30pm at the Town Hall unless noted
otherwise on the Town bulletin board.
Tuesday, March 29
Kiawah Island Ways and Means
Committee meeting
9am
Kiawah Island Municipal Center’s 2nd
Floor Conference Room
Monday, April 4
Kiawah Island Environmental
Committee
3pm - 5pm
Town Hall - 2nd Floor Conference Rm
Tuesday, April 5
Kiawah Island Town Council
2pm - 4pm
Town Hall Council Chambers
Wednesday, April 6
Seabrook Island Planning
Commission - work session
All Planning Commission meetings will
be held at 2:30pm at the Town Hall
unless noted otherwise on the Town
bulletin board.
Kiawah Island Planning Commission
3pm - 5pm
Town Hall Council Chambers
Thursday, April 7
Kiawah Island Arts Council
3pm - 5pm
Town Hall - 2nd Floor Conference Rm
performance at the Johnson residence
welcomed more than 400 attendees.
“Yours truly and others brought more
than 100 chairs to that house,” Lipuma
smiled, noting that March is also a full
month of events. For more information
on upcoming Arts Council events, see
page 17.
“Tere seems to be no end to these
programs,” said Mayor Orban. “How
do you do it with the little that we give
you?” Lipuma replied that the credit goes
to the Arts Council, and the fact that the
island is now attracting more and more
requests from groups wishing to perform
as part of their series. “We’re becoming a
real place for the arts,” Lipuma remarked.
Environmental Committee
Council member Greg VanDerwerker
stated that their committee covered a
number of items during their last meeting,
with a focus on evaluating and controlling
invasive plants on the island; especially
tallow trees. Tey are currently working
on a comprehensive plan to monitor and
attack the problem, though VanDerwerker
noted that the problem will never be truly
eliminated, as seeds can live for up to
100 years. He also noted that the ad-hoc
Recycling Committee met and agreed to
meet on a quarterly basis as the majority
of their work has been accomplished and
they are now in the process of monitoring
the current programs and working with
the diferent regimes to improve and
increase recycling.
Lastly, VanDerwerker noted that
Charleston County Council passed a
ban on plastic bags for yard waste during
their last council meeting which will
go into efect on June 30. Paper bags,
VanDerwerker noted, may be purchased
at Lowes and Home Depot. “Te reason
is because they use the mulch from yard
waste as a top dressing for the landfll, and
the shredded plastic blows around and
becomes hazardous,” said VanDerwerker.
“Te alternative is to keep fnding holes to
dump stuf into, so it’s either pay now or
pay later.”
Town Administrator’s report
Town Administrator Tumiko Rucker
was happy to note that portion of the
County Accomodations Taxes sent back
to municipalities will hopefully soon be
restored, and she will continue to pursue
the issue regularly. Rucker also reported
that she is in the process of distributing
comprehensive plan report cards to the
various island committees, and once
approved, will distribute them to the
Council. In town staf news, Rucker
stated that the staf is in the process of
compiling ATAX funding applications
and will meet in mid-March to consider
them. Team building exercises for the
town staf are also coming up, with
Rucker noting that they are a “chance
to build employee moral.” Rucker was
also pleased to announce that the Town
of Kiawah Island was named the 2011
Municipal Association Acheivement
Award Winner in Communications
for their wildlife website, noting that
the town will be recognized during the
MASC regular meeting this summer.
Lastly, from the ad-hoc recycling
committee, Rucker stated that the town
will be sponsoring a roadway and river
cleanup on Friday, April 15. “We would
like to have a good showing [of residents]
and we’ll be doing debris removal on
the Kiawah Parkway and Beachwalker
drive,” said Rucker, asking that residents
arrive at Kiawah Town Hall at 9:30 that
morning for assignments and light snacks
before heading out at 10 a.m.
Mayor’s report
Mayor Orban, along with the newest
council members, Greg VanDerwerker
and Fran Wermuth, attended the
recent MASC meeting, as well as spent
some time visiting the state House of
Representatives and watching “legislation
in action.” Tat evening, they had dinner
with Kiawah’s house member, Leon
Stavrinakis.
During the last council meeting, Orban
reminded council that they had discussed
the Community Emergency Response
Team (CERT)’s request for funding, and
asked the council’s opinion on whether
the CERT program should be an afliate
of the town, and asked Town Attorney
Dennis Rhodes to look into the matter,
as well.
Councilmember Wermuth, as a
certifed member of CERT, read from
a letter from the Lowcountry CERT
Chief of Operations. Te letter basically
defned the purpose and goal of all
CERTs, noting that “CERTs are groups
of volunteer citizens who are trained
to assist their community in the event
of natural or man-made disasters when
emergency services may not be available.
CERT members are trained in disaster
preparedness, fre safety, disaster medical
operations, light search and rescue, team
organization, disaster psychology, and
basic terrorism awareness.” Wermuth
also stated that CERT is most involved
in situations where the island is cut
of in a quick manner, such as with an
earthquake or tornado. “Not immediately
following a hurricane because we should
all be of the island, but we will come
back to assist.”
Wermuth recommended that Kiawah
talk to Seabrook about how they fund
their CERT, and discuss what issues
they’ve come up against.
Citizen’s comments
Hal Fallon, Chief of the medical section
of the Kiawah CERT, stated that they
were informed while taking their
training course that all CERT members
are immune from liability anywhere in
the US, but he was unsure if the Town
would be liable if they supported CERT.
However, in most situations, Fallon
stated that it would probably be best if
the town supported CERT. In terms of
funding needed, Fallon stated that they
thought $30,000 would be enough, but
more advanced forms of communications
might be expensive, and the cost would
be above the essential basic supplies and
trailer needed to move them around.
“Cell phones are not useful during a
disaster, we need to have a better form of
communication,” said Fallon.
Kiawah resident Wendy Kulick also stood
to thank the council for posting all of
the paperwork for today’s meeting online
ahead of time, and asked that, in the
future, if positions become available on
commissions – such as with the Planning
Commission – that the town be notifed
in case another resident is interested in
applying for the position.
Council comments
Councilmember VanDerwerker reported
that the annual KPOG meeting
went well, with about 90 residents in
attendance. He also noted how impressed
he was by the MASC meeting that
he recently attended with the mayor
and councilmember Fran Wermuth,
and that he will be attending a trade
group meeting on recycling in North
Charleston this coming March 30.
In terms of the letter sent out by the
town supporting the building of I-526,
VanDerwerker stated that didn’t think
the “beneft would be worth the cost”
and hoped that the council didn’t say
they were unanimous in supporting the
extension. “I know it was unanimous last
year, but this is a new council and I’m
not for 526.”
Councilmember Wermuth agreed,
noting that she’s lived on the island for
a few years and never voted on the issue.
“I would like to see an opportunity for
people to speak on both sides,” she said.
Councilmember Burnaford replied,
noting that the letter concerning 526
is from the Town Council and island
at large. “Whenever there is a vote, the
majority of the island is for 526 and the
Greenway,” said Burnaford. “We have
the vote, and we are an at large group
nominated by our constituents. If our
constituents are for it, I feel we shouldn’t
go against it.”
Dear editor,
Tanks to the Kiawah and Seabrook
councils for their ongoing concern
for my welfare and that of other
Johns Island residents when driving
on our ‘congested’ roads. Mr. Harry
Poylchron posed 14 excellent questions
(Questioning our councils Mar. 4) of
which all will go unanswered, to leave
us instead berated with statistics. (Johns
Island roads: unsafe at any speed! By
Dr. Paul Roberts & Mr. Joe Croughwell
Mar. 4)
Have Dr. Paul Roberts & Mr. Joe
Croughwell driven on the roads in Mt.
Pleasant during 0700/0900 hrs and
1530/1900 hrs? Now there is congestion.
Best to remember that there are “lies,
damned lies and statistics!”
Please, Kiawah and Seabrook council,
you’re blowing smoke! Te underlying
objective for pushing the Greenway
is development. And not that there is
anything wrong with development.
Simply explain to the residents of Johns
Island, Kiawah and Seabrook the real
agenda, then we’ll take a vote!
As a start to try and win over the hearts
and minds of Johns Island residents,
kindly address the subject of breakfast,
lunch and dinner litter dropped each
day on the ‘congested’ roadsides of
Bohicket and River by workers on their
way to and from Kiawah or Seabrook.
Ignore this issue and your Greenway
will be axle-deep in discarded rubbish
within one week, thereby adding to
your accident statistics.
Yours.
Andrew B. McNeice
Cottage Plantation, Johns Island
Letter to the editor...
KI Council continued from pg 2
Mayor Orban presents Red Cross representative
Nancy Olson with the Red Cross Month
proclamation.
www.islandconnectionnews.com
March 18, 2011 3
N
adia Petrova and Sabine Lisicki
have ofcially entered the
Family Circle Cup. Petrova,
who received direct entry via her World
No. 20 ranking, was a singles champion
at this event in 2006, as well as doubles
champion in 2009 and 2010. Lisicki,
who accepted a main draw wild card
from the tournament, claimed the singles
title in 2009 and returns with an active
six-match win streak in progress. Tese
former champions join World No. 4 and
defending champion Samantha Stosur,
World No. 6 and 2007 Champion Jelena
Jankovic, Maria Sharapova, Shahar Peer,
Daniela Hantuchova, and Melanie Oudin
in a stellar player feld headed to Daniel
Island. Marking the tournament’s 39th
consecutive year, the Family Circle Cup is
scheduled for April 2 to 10 at the Family
Circle Tennis Center in the Best Tennis
Town in America, Charleston, SC.
“We’re thrilled to welcome Nadia
Petrova and Sabine Lisicki back to
Charleston,” commented Eleanor Adams,
Family Circle Cup Tournament Manager.
“Both of these athletes have enjoyed
tremendous success at this event, and I’m
sure our fans will look forward to seeing
them compete here once again. Teir
experience on Daniel Island will be a
valuable asset as they make their bids for
this year’s title.”
Troughout her 13-year WTA career,
28-year-old Petrova has notched nine
singles titles and nineteen doubles titles,
460 singles victories, and over nine
million in prize money. She has fnished in
the Top 20 for eight consecutive seasons,
ranking as high as No. 3 in 2006. Petrova’s
2010 season featured quarterfnalist
appearances at the Australian Open and
Roland Garros, a third round fnish at
Wimbledon, and a year-end World No.
15 ranking. Her 2011 campaign has been
highlighted by reaching the third round at
the Australian Open and her ofcial web
site is PetrovaDreamTeam.com.
Petrova, the 2006 Family Circle
Cup Champion, is making her seventh
appearance in Charleston. She has reached
the quarterfnals three times, holds a 12-5
record at the tournament, and owns a .706
winning percentage at this event. Petrova
won the doubles title in 2009 with
Bethanie Mattek-Sands, and again in
2010 with Liezel Huber.
“I always enjoy returning to the Family
Circle Cup,” said Petrova. “I really love
the fans and the atmosphere, and it’s just
an exciting place to play tennis.”
Lisicki has accumulated 144 singles
victories and nearly one million dollars
in prize money in her professional career,
which began in 2006, and posted a career-
high ranking at World No. 22 in August of
2009 on the strength of a quarterfnal run
at Wimbledon that year. She is currently
ranked as the World No. 218 player.
Her 2009 Charleston title resulted in
a 6-0 record and active winning streak at
this tournament, and a $187,815 payday
for defeating Caroline Wozniacki in the
fnal as she became the 19th Family Circle
Cup Champion. She also made an impact
on tournament record books by reaching
the fnals and winning the event in her
frst appearance, becoming the lowest-
ranked player to win the title at World No.
63, and, as the No. 16 seed, established
herself as the lowest seeded player to win
the Family Circle Cup.
Lisicki’s ofcial web site is SabineLisicki.
com, and her social media involvement can
be viewed at Facebook.com/sabinelisicki,
and Twitter.com/sabinelisicki.
“I’m so excited to compete in the
Family Circle Cup again,” said Lisicki.
“It was such a disappointment to miss this
event last year, but I’m looking forward to
picking up where I left of, and making
another run at this historic title.”
For tickets or more info, call 856-7900 or
visit familycirclecup.com.
Former champions
Petrova and Lisicki
enter Family Circle Cup
Petrova Looking for third ConseCutive
doubLes titLe in CharLeston
by Mike saia
Sabine Lisicki. Nadia Petrova.
8 March 18, 2011
www.islandconnectionnews.com
T
he 11
th
annual Kiawah Island Art
and House Tour, sponsored by the
member auxiliary group, Gibbes,
etc., will take place on Friday, April 8,
from 2 to 6 p.m. Tis year, fve stunning
Kiawah Island homes will be opened for
public viewing. Proceeds from the 2011
tour, along with dollars raised from the
past 10 tours, are expected to reach the
$1 million mark this year. Also this year,
an extensive online art auction has been
created to help the volunteer group meet
the cumulative $1 million goal.
“Every year, the women of Gibbes, etc.
strive to do more for the museum, and this
year is no exception,” explained Angela
Mack, Executive Director of the Gibbes
Museum of Art. “Te contributions of
Gibbes, etc. are key to the success of our
exhibition and educational programming
each year.”
Online Art AuctiOn
Tis year, Gibbes, etc. is ofering an
online art auction featuring the works of
both locally and nationally recognized
artists. Provided by more than twenty
artists, the works include paintings, blown
glass, woodcuts on handmade paper, and
photographs. Some of the auctioned objects
will be on view at the Gibbes, and all of the
objects can be viewed online. Te bidding
will take place from March 18 through
April 8 on the website BiddingforGood.
com. A link to the online auction can
be accessed at gibbesmuseum.org/events.
Artists contributing their works to the
auction include Daniela Astone, Sheldon
Cotler, Arie DeZanger, John Carroll
Doyle, Melissa Franklin, West Fraser,
Gloria Garfnkel, Johnson Hagood,
Mark Horton, Janet Howard-Fatta,
Anders Knutsson, Heidi Lanino, Jeanne
Moutassamy-Ashe, Rick Reinert, Betty
Anglin Smith, Stacy Lynn Waddell, David
Walters, David Wheatley, Mary Whyte,
and Mickey Williams. In addition to the
art being ofered in the online auction,
two vacation packages will be featured:
a two-night stay and golf package at the
Sanctuary Hotel on Kiawah Island, and a
four-night stay at Christophe Harbour in
St. Kitts that includes a dinner and daily
breakfast.

2011 Art And HOuse tOur HOmes
House 1 - Tis contemporary
house merges so beautifully with its
surrounding environment, there seems
to be a symbiotic relationship between it
and the majestic live oak standing sentry
in the front yard. Seamless windows
with views extending over Ibis Pond
to the ocean bring the outside, in. An
infnity pool overlooking the pond
refects the peacefulness and quiet beauty
of this stunning home. Te interior color
palette and materials include concrete
walls faux fnished to look like the
outside, leather wall tiles, a mirror with
falling water, and contemporary artwork
which further reinforce the home’s
connection with nature.
House 2 - Strategically situated in the
Preserve, this shingle style home has an
expansive marsh view. Because of its
exquisite interior design, the rooms—
although large in scale—convey a feeling
of intimacy. Te artwork principally
refects daily scenes of Lowcountry life.
Interior details, including brickwork in
the walls and ceilings, antique French
oak foors, and bead board walls, exude
a feeling of warmth and comfort. A
beautifully designed wood and iron
circular staircase leads to a crow’s nest
that has astounding views across the
marsh to Folly Beach, the Stono River,
and the distant Ravenel Bridge.
House 3 - Situated within the gated
community of Cassique, this lovely stucco
home was inspired by the architecture
of the British Arts and Crafts movement
of the late 1800s and early 1900s.
Exceptional antiques—predominantly
French but also some lovely English
and American pieces—are displayed
throughout the house. Te oval hallway
area with its stunning Czech chandelier,
small oil paintings, strategically-placed
antique book collection, and French
architectural pieces, is emblematic of the
charm of this home. Each room contains
antique treasures that create a soothing,
timeless feel.
House 4 - Located in the secluded
Summer Islands enclave, this shingle
style house creatively conforms to its
unique position on Bass Creek. Te
location afords stunning views of the
creek and surrounding marsh, and
provides routine dolphin sightings.
Beautiful materials such as travertine
in the hallways and stairs, tongue-in-
groove wainscoting, walnut foors and
trim, and unique ceiling treatments,
create a fowing harmony throughout the
home. An infnity pool on the travertine
deck melts into the marsh view and is
balanced on the other side of the house
with a cozy screened porch and freplace.
Te artwork, featuring scenes of the
Lowcountry, perfectly complements this
engaging home.
House 5 - Nestled in the midst of
old live oaks, this home in Kiawah’s
Settlement community also fanks
the Kiawah River. Te house, flled
with 18th-century English and French
antiques, uniquely blends its elegant feel
with its casual, open design. Because
of its location, the home receives an
incredible amount of light. Te delicate
color scheme—predominantly soft greens
and blues—plays of the sunlight which
softly radiates throughout the home. Te
screened porch has a 360 degree view
of the Kiawah River and Lowcountry
forest. Te beautiful views make it
appear as if Mother Nature has installed
her own works of art. Te cozy guest
house, virtually a small apartment, is so
welcoming that it’s difcult to leave.

tickets
Tickets are $55 per person and include
the fve house tour, light refreshments
throughout the afternoon at one of the
homes, and an admission pass to the
Gibbes Museum of Art valid through
December 30, 2011. All ticket proceeds
fund special exhibitions and art education
programs at the museum. Tickets may
be purchased downtown at the Gibbes
Museum Store at 135 Meeting Street,
online at www.gibbesmuseum.org/events,
at Kiawah Island Real Estate located at
the Kiawah Main Gate, the Sanctuary or
Freshfelds Village, or by calling 722-2706
(x22). For more information about the
house tour and art auction, visit www.
gibbesetc.org.
11
th
Annual Kiawah Island Art and House Tour
New this year: oNliNe art auctioN
Provided by Gibbes, etc.
6 March 18, 2011
T
his past month, several local communities came
out in support the Red Cross by proclaiming
March 2011 as Red Cross Month. During their
March 1 Council meeting, Mayor Steve Orban of
Kiawah Island awarded Red Cross representative Nancy
Olson with a copy of their proclamation, and Red Cross
board member, Louise Kohlheim, will be accepting
a copy of the Isle of Palms proclamation during their
meeting on March 22. Another representative accepted
the proclamation from Mayor Carl Smith during the
Sullivan’s Island Council meeting on March 15.
With March proclaimed as Red Cross Month by
President Barack Obama, the American Red Cross is
asking people to join them and help those in need by
volunteering their time, taking a lifesaving class, giving
blood or making a monetary contribution.
“Te Red Cross works tirelessly to be there with help
and hope when people need it most–and we are grateful
for the public support that enables us to continue our
work both here at home and abroad,” said Louise Welch
Williams, C.E.O of the Charleston, SC, region. “Our
community and our nation depend on the Red Cross in
times of need, and the Red Cross depends on the support
of people in America to achieve its mission.”
“Red Cross Month is a great time for people to get
involved with the Red Cross, such as donating blood;
signing up for a CPR, frst aid or another Red Cross
course; giving a fnancial gift that can really save the day
when the next disaster strikes, or getting involved as a
volunteer,” Welch Williams said.
Te Red Cross has been helping people for 130 years,
responding to disasters, assisting members of the military,
teaching lifesaving skills classes,
helping prepare communities for
emergencies, and serving as one of
the largest blood suppliers in the
United States.
Although major disasters such
as earthquakes, hurricanes and
wildfres capture national media
headlines, the day-to-day work of
the Red Cross often takes place
in local communities. Tis past
year, in the seven counties of
the Charleston region, the Red
Cross provided assistance to 1,097 individuals afected
by disasters. Te region processed 2,899 Military Case
Services, provided 5,683 “Get to Know Us” outreach to
service members and their families, and conducted 2,659
frst aid and water safety classes. Te Red Cross also
collected 36,42 units of blood.
Te Red Cross has a number of activities planned for
Red Cross Month in March, including:
Red Cross Volunteer Olympics. •
Tirteen local mayors presenting signed Red •
Cross Month proclamations during city and town
council meetings.
A disaster simulation exercise at Goose Creek •
High School and Jasper Country High School
on March 26 which will give Red Cross disaster-
trained volunteers the opportunity to practice
their learned skills.
Additional citizen’s (hands only) CPR classes. •
Te Red Cross is not a government agency and relies
on donations of time, money and blood to do its work.
A fnancial donation can be made by sending a check
to the American Red Cross, Charleston, SC Region, 8085
Rivers Ave., Suite F. North Charleston, SC 29406 or
by calling 764-2323 ext. 368. For more information
or to make a secure online donation, please visit www.
LowcountryRedCross.org.
The lifeblood of the Red Cross
Island mayors encourage partIcIpatIon In red cross month
provIded by the lowcountry red cross
March 18, 2011
7
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Seabrook steps it up
2011 Bohicket Marina 5k & 10k run
By kristin hackler
T
his past March 2, the Kiawah-
Seabrook Exchange Club was
proud to announce that they
have received the fnal approval for the
frst ever 2011 Bohicket Marina 5K &
10K Run to be held on April 23 at 8
a.m.
“Saying it was one thing, making it
happen was another,” smiled Exchange
Club events coordinator, Jim Shaw.
“What started out as hopefully another
event has become very popular. Te
POA, Club, Marina and Exchange Club
are all involved and we’re ready to move
ahead.”
Shaw encouraged all Exchange
Club members “who are in shape” to
participate, and stated that he hopes
this run will eventually become an
annual event for the Exchange, and
another means through which they can
raise funds for their annual charitable
donations.
As the prime sponsor for the event,
Pat Welsh of the Bohicket Marina and
Market gave a brief rundown of the race,
noting that both the 5K and 10K will
start and end at the Bohicket Marina.
Te 5K will follow a short route through
the Village and back to the Marina
along the bike path, and the 10K will
go through Haulover, around and back
to the starting point. Both courses were
certifed by Extra Mile during the week
of March 1, and Welsh was happy to
note that all of the t-shirts, posters,
maps, entry forms and other items are
already complete.
“It all came together pretty fast
during the last 60 days,” said Welsh,
stating that the Extra Mile will also take
care of providing runners with timer
chips for an accurate race time. Te cut
of number for participants is currently
set at 700, though Welsh noted that,
because of the late date, they only expect
between 300 and 400 runners for the
inaugural run.
“We do need volunteers at every
intersection, but they will only need to
be on duty for a maximum of two hours.
We need to make sure that any early
morning drivers don’t hit the runners,”
Welsh smiled.
Registration is $25/$30 before March
31 for the 5K and 10K respectively, and
$30/$35 before April 20. Registration
on the day of the race is $35/$40 and all
runners will receive a t-shirt. Participants
may register at www.active.com. For
more information, call 768-1280.
Sponsorships are still available for
the run. $1,000 sponsors will receive
their name on all advertising, entry
forms and on the sleeve of the t-shirt, as
well as their name on the banner at the
Marina and a promotional item for their
company will be included in the race
packets. $500 sponsors will receive their
name on the back of the race t-shirts, as
well as on the Marina banner and will
be able to include a promotional item
in the race packets. A $250 sponsor will
get their name on the back of the shirt
and will be able to include an item in the
race packet.
T
he Charleston Jazz Orchestra
(CJO), Charleston’s own resident
big band, continues its 2011 season
with Swing! Swing! Swing! Tis Saturday,
March 26, at 7 p.m. in the Charleston
Music Hall at 37 John St. in downtown
Charleston.
For the second
performance of this
season, maestro
Charlton Singleton
takes the stage to
lead Charleston’s fnest
musicians in a celebration
of the swing era and
the birth of big
band jazz. Swing,
the melodic, hard
driving category of jazz music delivered
by big bands in the 1930’s and 40’s, is a
sanctuary for CJO; and coming of the
smashing success of its sold-out season
opener, Jazz on the Screen, it is poised to
settle into the comfort and familiarity of
its signature style.
Always a crowd pleaser, the band’s
swing shows use vocalists, this time with
Leah Suárez, Singleton himself and a
couple of surprises. Evergreens such as
“Route 66,” “Stompin’ at the Savoy,” “All
of Me,” “Fever” and “Birth of the Blues”
will be featured. A Sammy Nestico
arrangement of Duke Ellington’s “Satin
Doll” is also on the program. CJO is
well versed in the swing vocabulary
of jazz and, as is his wont, Singleton has
come up with a program frmly ensconced
in the style.
Te Charleston Jazz Orchestra is a
twenty-piece band consisting of some of
the fnest jazz musicians in the Charleston
area. All have extensive resumes and have
performed with various groups around
the globe. Now in its third season,
CJO continues to refne its sound and
cohesion. It has become frmly established
in the Lowcountry, earning the moniker
‘Charleston’s Resident Big Band.’ Te
orchestra debuted in 2008 under the name
and direction of Charlton Singleton, the
band’s conductor and artistic director.
It has been expanding its audience ever
since. Te orchestra’s diverse members
and talent allow its programming to
encompass various styles of music from
blues to swing, pop, Afro-Cuban, Latin,
Great American Songbook, sacred, and of
course, straight ahead jazz.
Te Swing! Swing! Swing! show will be
performed in two sets with an intermission.
Adult admission is $30 advance, $40 day
of show. Senior admission is $25 advance,
$35 day of show. Student admission
is $20 advance, $30 day of with valid
student ID. Tickets are available online
at www.theJAC.org, and at www.etix.
org, or in person at the JAC Box Ofce,
185-C St. Philip St., Monday through
Friday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., and by telephone
at 641-0011.
2011 Season Passes are still available by
phone, and three-show passes are available
for purchase until September 24, 2011.
Tree-show passes are $81 for adults, $67.50
for seniors and $54 for students.
Photographs courtesy of Jazz Artists of Charleston. Photo credit for
Riviera photos: Alice Keeney. Photo credit for full CJO band photo:
Reese Moore.
It’s time to Swing! Swing! Swing!
charleston Jazz orchestra’s third season continues on March 26
Te Charleston Jazz Orchestra.
Photo by Reese MooRe
8 March 18, 2011
www.islandconnectionnews.com
T
he 11
th
annual Kiawah Island Art
and House Tour, sponsored by the
member auxiliary group, Gibbes,
etc., will take place on Friday, April 8,
from 2 to 6 p.m. Tis year, fve stunning
Kiawah Island homes will be opened for
public viewing. Proceeds from the 2011
tour, along with dollars raised from the
past 10 tours, are expected to reach the
$1 million mark this year. Also this year,
an extensive online art auction has been
created to help the volunteer group meet
the cumulative $1 million goal.
“Every year, the women of Gibbes, etc.
strive to do more for the museum, and this
year is no exception,” explained Angela
Mack, Executive Director of the Gibbes
Museum of Art. “Te contributions of
Gibbes, etc. are key to the success of our
exhibition and educational programming
each year.”
Online Art AuctiOn
Tis year, Gibbes, etc. is ofering an
online art auction featuring the works of
both locally and nationally recognized
artists. Provided by more than twenty
artists, the works include paintings, blown
glass, woodcuts on handmade paper, and
photographs. Some of the auctioned objects
will be on view at the Gibbes, and all of the
objects can be viewed online. Te bidding
will take place from March 18 through
April 8 on the website BiddingforGood.
com. A link to the online auction can
be accessed at gibbesmuseum.org/events.
Artists contributing their works to the
auction include Daniela Astone, Sheldon
Cotler, Arie DeZanger, John Carroll
Doyle, Melissa Franklin, West Fraser,
Gloria Garfnkel, Johnson Hagood,
Mark Horton, Janet Howard-Fatta,
Anders Knutsson, Heidi Lanino, Jeanne
Moutassamy-Ashe, Rick Reinert, Betty
Anglin Smith, Stacy Lynn Waddell, David
Walters, David Wheatley, Mary Whyte,
and Mickey Williams. In addition to the
art being ofered in the online auction,
two vacation packages will be featured:
a two-night stay and golf package at the
Sanctuary Hotel on Kiawah Island, and a
four-night stay at Christophe Harbour in
St. Kitts that includes a dinner and daily
breakfast.

2011 Art And HOuse tOur HOmes
House 1 - Tis contemporary
house merges so beautifully with its
surrounding environment, there seems
to be a symbiotic relationship between it
and the majestic live oak standing sentry
in the front yard. Seamless windows
with views extending over Ibis Pond
to the ocean bring the outside, in. An
infnity pool overlooking the pond
refects the peacefulness and quiet beauty
of this stunning home. Te interior color
palette and materials include concrete
walls faux fnished to look like the
outside, leather wall tiles, a mirror with
falling water, and contemporary artwork
which further reinforce the home’s
connection with nature.
House 2 - Strategically situated in the
Preserve, this shingle style home has an
expansive marsh view. Because of its
exquisite interior design, the rooms—
although large in scale—convey a feeling
of intimacy. Te artwork principally
refects daily scenes of Lowcountry life.
Interior details, including brickwork in
the walls and ceilings, antique French
oak foors, and bead board walls, exude
a feeling of warmth and comfort. A
beautifully designed wood and iron
circular staircase leads to a crow’s nest
that has astounding views across the
marsh to Folly Beach, the Stono River,
and the distant Ravenel Bridge.
House 3 - Situated within the gated
community of Cassique, this lovely stucco
home was inspired by the architecture
of the British Arts and Crafts movement
of the late 1800s and early 1900s.
Exceptional antiques—predominantly
French but also some lovely English
and American pieces—are displayed
throughout the house. Te oval hallway
area with its stunning Czech chandelier,
small oil paintings, strategically-placed
antique book collection, and French
architectural pieces, is emblematic of the
charm of this home. Each room contains
antique treasures that create a soothing,
timeless feel.
House 4 - Located in the secluded
Summer Islands enclave, this shingle
style house creatively conforms to its
unique position on Bass Creek. Te
location afords stunning views of the
creek and surrounding marsh, and
provides routine dolphin sightings.
Beautiful materials such as travertine
in the hallways and stairs, tongue-in-
groove wainscoting, walnut foors and
trim, and unique ceiling treatments,
create a fowing harmony throughout the
home. An infnity pool on the travertine
deck melts into the marsh view and is
balanced on the other side of the house
with a cozy screened porch and freplace.
Te artwork, featuring scenes of the
Lowcountry, perfectly complements this
engaging home.
House 5 - Nestled in the midst of
old live oaks, this home in Kiawah’s
Settlement community also fanks
the Kiawah River. Te house, flled
with 18th-century English and French
antiques, uniquely blends its elegant feel
with its casual, open design. Because
of its location, the home receives an
incredible amount of light. Te delicate
color scheme—predominantly soft greens
and blues—plays of the sunlight which
softly radiates throughout the home. Te
screened porch has a 360 degree view
of the Kiawah River and Lowcountry
forest. Te beautiful views make it
appear as if Mother Nature has installed
her own works of art. Te cozy guest
house, virtually a small apartment, is so
welcoming that it’s difcult to leave.

tickets
Tickets are $55 per person and include
the fve house tour, light refreshments
throughout the afternoon at one of the
homes, and an admission pass to the
Gibbes Museum of Art valid through
December 30, 2011. All ticket proceeds
fund special exhibitions and art education
programs at the museum. Tickets may
be purchased downtown at the Gibbes
Museum Store at 135 Meeting Street,
online at www.gibbesmuseum.org/events,
at Kiawah Island Real Estate located at
the Kiawah Main Gate, the Sanctuary or
Freshfelds Village, or by calling 722-2706
(x22). For more information about the
house tour and art auction, visit www.
gibbesetc.org.
11
th
Annual Kiawah Island Art and House Tour
New this year: oNliNe art auctioN
Provided by Gibbes, etc.
March 18, 2011 9
www.islandconnectionnews.com
T
he coldest winter (December
through February) in the last
140 years on Seabrook-Kiawah
was 1977/78 when the mean temperature
would have been 44.2 ⁰F (see chart).
Te mean temperature for winter
2010/2011 was 46.5 ⁰F. Tat made it
the 17th coldest winter in the last 140
and made it just slightly colder than
the 2009/2010 winter. Breaking winter
down into its components, we see that
the mean temperature for December
2010 was an extremely chilly 42.6 ⁰F
(the third coldest December) and that
its counterpart for January 2011 was
a very chilly 44.2 ⁰F (the 19th coldest
January) whereas the mean temperature
of February 2011 was a more typical
52.6 ⁰F. Tis past December was so cold
that we set two new daily low records of
26.6 ⁰F and 22 ⁰F for December 8 and
14, respectively.
However, we had plenty of company
being chilly! According to the records
it maintains back to 1895, NOAA (the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration) reported that the state
of South Carolina had its third coldest
December, as did North Carolina. Te
same report highlighted that the states
of Georgia and Florida had their coldest
Decembers on record.
With one eye on what next winter
may hold for us, it’s worth pointing out
that winter mean temperatures here can
vary signifcantly from year to year and
that the temperature history shows we
have not experienced more than two very
cold winters in a row (see chart). After
our experience of two very cold winters
in succession, it may be reasonable to
expect that next winter will be warmer.
Tese past two winters’ unusually
cold temperatures contrasted with our
2010 summer (June through August)
which we recorded as the second hottest
Seabrook-Kiawah summer in the last 140
(see chart). Only the summer of 1998 was
hotter. So what efect did an extremely
hot summer and an extremely chilly
January, February and December
have on the mean temperature for the
whole of 2010? Well, the annual mean
temperature turned out to be 65.1
⁰F (see chart) which was just slightly
below the 140 year average of 65.3 ⁰F.
In that context, it was a fairly normal
year. Remember, climate is what we
expect and weather is what we get.
Note: to establish the Seabrook-
Kiawah temperature history, we use
the data from three active weather
stations on the islands of Seabrook and
Kiawah. Tose data go back no further
than the year 2000. However, the
various temperature relationships for
each season and each month between
Seabrook-Kiawah and Charleston’s
downtown have proven to be consistent
over the last 11 years. We apply those
relationships to the Charleston City
weather station data to impute a history
for Seabrook/Kiawah temperatures
before the year 2000. Tis allows us to
take advantage of the Charleston City
weather data, some of which go back as
far as 1871.
Cold winter + hot summer + cold winter = “normal” 2010
By Ian MIllar
T
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e
Johns Island Regional Library
3531 Maybank Highway, 559-1945
Hours:
Monday – Tursday: 10 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday: 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Wee Reads (under 24 months with adult)
Mondays: March 21 & 28, at 10:30 a.m.

Time for Twos (2 – 3 years old with adult)
Tuesdays: March 22 &29, at 10:30 a.m.
Preschool Storytime (3 – 6 years)
Wednesdays: March 23 &30, at 10:30 a.m.
*PowerPoint 2007 Basics (adults/young
adults) Tuesday, March 22 from 10 a.m. –
12 p.m.

*All computer classes are free. For more
information please call 559-1945 and ask
for the Reference Department. Class space
is available for eight (8) participants per
session.
Early Literacy Station (up to 11 years)
Fun activities based on the South
Carolina Day by Day Family Literacy
Activity Calendar. Learn about the
Seasons in March!
Passport to Library Dollars (grades
6-12) March - May 2010. Earn Library
Dollars by participating in teen programs
at the John’s Island library. See the
Reference Desk staf to pick up your
passport and get started!
Women’s History Month Trivia (grades
6-12) In celebration of Women’s History
Month, stop by the Reference Desk and
answer a trivia question about famous
women for a candy prize!
Facebook focus (grades 6-12)
Wednesday, March 23, from 4:30 – 5:30
p.m. Answering your questions about
using Facebook.
AARP Free Income Tax Assistance
(adults) Saturdays: March 19 & 26 from
10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Free tax assistance
will be ofered by AARP volunteers
through April 9. Senior citizens will have
preference.
Wii Bowling (grades 6-12) Tuesdays,
March 29, from 4:30 – 6 p.m.
PLAY with Dad: Swashbuckling Pirates
(all ages) Saturday, March 19, at 11 a.m.
Join me portside as we read about some of the
meanest and toughest pirates of themall.
PLAY: Wii Mario Kart Extravaganza!
(ages 6 to 11) Saturday, March 19, at 3 p.m.
PLAY: Spring Fever! (all ages)
Tursday, March 24, at 6:30 p.m.
Spring is fnally here! Let’s celebrate
warmer weather with stories about birds
and butterfies.
PLAY: Book Explorers (up to 6 years
old) Friday, March 25, at 10:30 a.m.
Each month the Book Explorers read a
book and do activities to go along with
the book.
PLAY with Dad: Treasure Huntin’! (all
ages) Saturday, March 26, at 11 a.m.
Come sail the high seas with stories of
pirates in search Pirate Booty! Afterwards,
join us for a library treasure hunt.
Club Anime! (ages 12-19)
Saturday, March 26, from 3 to 4:30 p.m.
Tanks to the generous donation by Ms.
Andria from the Main Library. Titles
include Inuyasha, Kaze Hikari, Naruto,
Tail of the Moon, and a few others.
PLAY: Locomotion in the Ocean! (all
ages) Tursday, March 31, at 6:30 p.m.
It’s all about things that move in the water.
Displays
Photography Exhibit
March 1 - 31
Te Kiawah Island Photography Club will
showcase their photographs of people,
nature, landscapes, travel and more.
Book Display
March 1 - 31
To complement this month’s Sea Islands
Book Club selection of Jane Austen’s Pride
and Prejudice, Codie Poll will display
her collection of the novel’s literary
adaptations by modern authors.
Copyright Farmers’ Almanac 2011, www.farmersalmanac.com
Gardening by the Moon
From the Farmers’ almanac
March 2011
18th-19th A Most Barren Period, Best For Killing Plant Pests Or Doing Chores
Around Te Farm.
20th-21st Favorable Days For Planting Root, Fine For Sowing Hay, Fodder
Crops, And Grains. Plant Flowers.
22nd-23rd Excellent Time For Planting Root Crops Tat Can Be Planted Now,
And For Starting Seedbeds. Good Days For Transplanting.
24th-26th Poor Planting Days.
27th-28th Any Root Crops Tat Can Be Planted Now Will Do Well.
29th-31st A Barren Period, Best Suited For Killing Pests. Do Plowing And
Cultivating.
Fri day, March 18
Our World series: Te Song of Pumpkin
Brown with director, Brad Jayne
Showing of the flmfollowed with a
presentation by director, Brad Jayne. Tis flm
is “a fctionalized account of a true-life setting,
and homage to South Carolina’s considerable
infuence on the jazz community.” Presented
at Kiawah’s Sandcastle starting at 3 p.m. Light
selection of wine and cheese will be served.
Reservations are due by March 13. Free and
open to the public. For more info, call the
Sandcastle at 768-3875 or [email protected].
Saturday, March 19
Early Morning Bird Walks at Caw Caw
Our walk through many distinct habitats
will allow us to view and discuss a variety
of birds, butterfies, and other organisms.
Pre-registration is encouraged, but walk-in
registrations at Caw Caw are welcome. 8:30
a.m.-12 p.m. Course # 24896. Fee: $5. For
more information, call 795-4386 or visit
www.ccprc.com.
Master Naturalist (meets monthly)
Master Naturalist (MN) candidates
complete a 13 day feld study course led by
a variety of experts in some of the state’s
most beautiful natural areas as they learn
and practice skills naturalists use to ‘read’
the natural world. A detailed schedule
will be available at the frst meeting. Pre-
registration required. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Course
# 24610. Fee: $625. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.com.
Spring Fling Festival at Freshfelds Village
From noon until 4 p.m., guests can take
part in a variety of nature-based activities,
check out marine vendors, and enjoy live
music and interactive activities for the whole
family at Freshfelds Village. For more
information, visit www.FreshfeldsVillage.
com or call 768-6491.
Seabrook Open Air Art Show
Te Seabrook Art Guild will be holding
an open air art show at Freshfelds Market
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Tis is a great
opportunity to see and purchase some great
art, all produced by Seabrook’s talented
artists.
Oldies but Goodies Night
Hosted by the Wadmalaw Island
Citizens Improvement Committee at the
Community Center, 5605 Katy Hill Road
Wadmalaw Island. Entertainment by DJ
Sporty’s Entertainment with the return of
Daddy Soul (Raymond Mack). Join us and
Support the Community Seniors. Event
starts at 8 p.m. For more info, call Bertha
Smalls-Middleton at 557-8408.
Sunday, March 20
First day of spring
Visit your county parks for free!
Charleston County Park and Recreation
Commission says “thank you” by
ofering free gate admission to the Caw
Caw Interpretive Center in Ravenel,
Wannamaker Park in North Charleston,
Mount Pleasant’s Palmetto Islands and
James Island County Park, free parking at
Kiawah’s Beachwalker Park, Folly Beach
Park and Isle of Palms County Park, as well
as free fshing at the Folly Beach Edwin S.
Taylor Fishing Pier. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.com.
WedneSday, March 23
Piano Bar Series at the Sandcastle
Te Piano Bar Series at Kiawah’s Sandcastle
is back by popular demand! From5 to 6:30
p.m. island time. Bring your beverage of
choice and any snack to “tide” you over. No
tickets required. For more info, visit www.
kiawahisland.org or call 768-9166. Sponsored
by the Kiawah Island Arts Council.
Early Morning Bird Walks at Caw Caw
See Saturday, March 19.
thurSday, March 24
Our World series: Dr. Garrett Mitchener
Dr. W. Garrett Mitchener, professor of
mathematics at the College of Charleston,
will present Mathematics and Linguistics at
Kiawah’s Sandcastle starting at 3 p.m. Light
selection of wine and cheese will be served.
Reservations are due by March 19. Free and
open to the public. For more info, call the
Sandcastle at 768-3875 or [email protected].
Moments of Joy
Te Company Company, the Lowcountry’s
esteemed musical theatre group, is teaming
up with Ms. Vandervort-Cobb to bring
you this honest and revealing adventure of
one woman’s life in the one woman play,
Moments of Joy. 7:30 p.m. at Church of
Our Saviour. For tickets, call Kiawah Town
Hall at 768-9166. For more info, visit www.
kiawahisland.org. Sponsored by the Kiawah
Island Arts Council.
Fri day, March 25
Beachwalker Bird Walks
From Kiawah Beachwalker Park we will
hike nearly two miles of pristine beach
looking for a variety of birds including
raptors and songbirds. Te program is free,
however pre-registration is required. 8:30-11
a.m. Course # 24807. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.com.
Saturday, March 26
Early Morning Bird Walks at Caw Caw
See Saturday, March 19.
Charleston Jazz Orchestra presents
Swing, Swing, Swing!
See page 7 for full story.
Gardening with Tommy Blizard:
Gardening 101
Expand your knowledge gained from
Soil Structures and learn helpful hints
for successfully growing tomatoes, corn,
carrots, and other food garden staples.
Pre-registration required. 10 a.m.-12
p.m. Course # 24819 at the Caw Caw
Interpretive Center. Fee: $9. For more info,
call 795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.com.
March Madness Charity Oyster Roast
Benefting Florence Crittenton Programs of
SC at O’Malley’s Bar & Grille (549 King
Street, downtown) from 6 to 10 p.m. In
addition to the oyster roast, the evening
will feature a silent auction. Tickets: $10
in advance and $15 at the door. Include
all-you-can-eat oysters and other food
for the oyster-shy. Purchase at www.
forencecrittentonsc.org or email events@
forencecrittentonsc.org.
6th Annual Battle of Charleston
Te Battle of Charleston is a Civil War
re-enactment held at Legare Farms. Friday,
March 25, is Living History Day for school
children and battles will be held on March
26 and 27. Tickets are $5/children and
$10/adults. For more info, visit www.
legarefarms.org or call 559-0788.
Wadmalaw Island Vendors’ Fair
Hosted by the Wadmalaw Island Citizens
Improvement Committee at the Wadmalaw
Island Community Center, 5605
Katy Hill Road. Support the Seniors
and shop with vendors from all over
the Lowcountry and enjoy some
of the island’s best cuisine. Voter’s
Registration available. Vendor space
still available at $30. For more info, call
Bertha Smalls-Middleton at 557-8408.
Pet Helpers 10th Annual All-You-Can-
Eat Oyster Roast &Lowcountry Boil
Presented by Rosebank Farm Café and
Fatboy’s Lowcountry Cooking at the Visitor
Center Bus Shed (375 Meeting Street) to
beneft Charleston Pet Helpers. Live music
by Blue Spartina, hot dogs, chili, all-you-
can-eat oysters and a Lowcountry boil. Cash
bar and silent auction. 7 to 11 p.m. Tickets:
$30 in advance, $35 day of. Tickets are
available at www.pethelpers.org or at the
shelter: 1447 Folly Road.
WedneSday, March 30
Peter Pap Oriental Rugs, Inc. Exhibition
Peter Pap Oriental Rugs, Inc. will host
a unique rug exhibition and sale at
Freshfelds Village from March 30 to April
2. Te exhibit will be open from 11a.m.
to 7 p.m. daily. A portion of the proceeds
will beneft the Kiawah Conservancy. For
more info, visit www.peterpap.com or www.
freshfeldsvillage.com, or call Freshfelds
guest services at 768-6491.
Piano Bar Series at the Sandcastle
Te Piano Bar Series at Kiawah’s Sandcastle
is back by popular demand! Not meant
to be concerts, these concerts are to enjoy
with friends and the opportunity to meet
neighbors for some Island socializing.
From 5 to 6:30 p.m. island time. Bring the
beverage of choice and any snack to “tide”
you over. No tickets required. For more
info, visit www.kiawahisland.org or call
768-9166. Sponsored by the Kiawah Island
Arts Council.
Early Morning Bird Walks at Caw Caw
See Saturday, March 19.
March 18
Island Connection Calendar March 30
12 March 18, 2011
B
obcats are reputed to be shy, secretive animals that
avoid humans and development. Tey are often
found living on the fringe of development, but are
rarely if ever, found within it. Kiawah’s bobcats, however,
seem to follow their own set of rules and for this reason
they are very unique. Most residents have probably seen a
bobcat in their own yard and in some
cases on their porch or deck. How is
this possible?
Animals need four things to
survive: food, water, cover and
space. Tis is true of all animals
from snakes to bobcats to birds. Te
amount of land needed by an animal
to fnd these four requirements is
known as its home range. As a rule,
predatory species such as bobcats
have a much larger home range
than prey species such as deer and
rabbits.
Bobcats are common on Kiawah
Island because they can readily fnd
the food, water, cover and space that
they need to survive. In fact, food and water are probably
the easy part. Development on Kiawah has had the efect of
creating optimal habitat for prey species such as cotton rats,
squirrels, rabbits and deer. Yards, roads and golf courses
create gaps in the forest that allow sunlight to reach the
ground, promoting understory growth along edges which is
an ideal habitat for prey species. In addition, irrigation and
fertilization of native and landscaped shrubbery provides
high-quality food sources for these species, as well.
Te third requirement, cover, is also found throughout
the island in the form of undeveloped lots, bufer strips,
properties preserved by the Kiawah Conservancy and
vacant areas. Te fact that these undeveloped areas are
interspersed throughout the island is important. Because
of them, bobcats do not have to travel very far to fnd
the cover that they need. As development continues, the
amount of cover on the Island will decrease and eforts to
create, preserve and enhance areas of
dense cover will become much more
important.
Te fnal requirement for animals
is space. Because the amount of
space on Kiawah Island is fxed, it
limits the number of bobcats on the
island. Te easier it is for bobcats to
fnd the food, water and cover that
they need to survive, the less space
they need and the more bobcats the
island can support.
Why are bobcats so important to
Kiawah Island? Te answer is that
they are the only large, mammalian
predator remaining and as such they
play an essential role in the balance
of the ecosystem as they help to control rodent and deer
populations. Research on Kiawah has shown that bobcats
take approximately 50% of the deer fawns born each year.
Tis natural control helps regulate and maintain deer
numbers at acceptable levels, thereby reducing deer-vehicle
collisions and landscape shrubbery damage.
Kiawah Island has many rare qualities: a
spacious beach, frst class amenities and beautiful
homes. But don’t forget the bobcats - they may be
the most truly unique thing that Kiawah has to ofer.
The bobcats of Kiawah
by Jim Jordan, Town of Kiawah island wildlife biologisT
Juvenile bobcat.
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T
he Kiawah Conservancy welcomes spring
with celebrations of the natural world.
From the Conservation Matters series to the
eighth annual Bobcat Ball, the Conservancy invites
you to join the fun.
Te 2011 series of Conservation Matters kicked
of in February with South Carolina Department
of Natural Resources biologist Dr. Denise Sanger’s
presentation on “Tidal Creek Health,” and was
followed in March with photographer and biologist
Pamela Cohen’s “Avian Adventures.” On April 6,
it will be time to join the naturalists of the Kiawah
Island Golf Resort for a beachcombing and ocean
seining feld trip. Ten, on May 4, wildlife biologist
Wayne McFee of the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration will travel to Kiawah
to teach “Dolphin Basics.” Check your calendar
and make reservations now. All presentations
begin at 3 p.m. at the Kiawah Island Community
Association’s Sandcastle and are free and open to
the public as space permits. Make reservations by
calling 768-3875 or emailing [email protected].
Te Conservancy is pleased to announce the
plans for its annual Bobcat Ball on April 14
beginning at 6 p.m. at Beachwalker County Park,
Kiawah Island. Join us for cocktails, dinner and
dancing to the sounds of Te Joe Clarke Big Band.
Register and pay for your tickets online by April 1
through secure PayPal at www.kiawahconservancy.
org/2011bobcatballtickets.html. Proceeds will
beneft the Kiawah Conservancy.
Conservancy
by suzanne Taylor
An invitation
from the Kiawah
March 18, 2011
13
www.islandconnectionnews.com
T
he frst thing visitors see when
they walk in to the Charleston
Breast Center is a full room
mural by international watercolor artist,
Mary Whyte. Painted on a muted cream
background, long fronds of green fern
curl lazily in a captured breeze, and if you
look long enough, you’ll spot some of the
smaller details. Glistening inchworms
creep along thick blades, and butterfies
foat gently in the sky.
“Tey have a double meaning,” said
co-founder Dr. Lisa Baron, indicating one
of the delicate little butterfies. “It has to
do with metamorphosis.”
Tat concept – of regeneration and
becoming whole in a new form – is vitally
important to the dedicated staf at the
Charleston Breast Center.
“Te whole process can be nerve
wracking, so we do our best to relax
patients and tell them what to expect,”
said Dr. Lisa Baron. “We hold their hand
and help them through it.”
In fact, it was because the process of
diagnosing and treating breast cancer
amongst specialists that Drs. Lisa and
Paul Baron opened the Charleston Breast
Center in 2006. Based on the concept of
“everything under one roof,” the Barons
not only provide as many breast cancer
-related services at their center as possible,
they also do their best to provide their
patients with fast, accurate results, usually
returning biopsy results within two days.
“It’s critical that patients trust you,
and we do everything we can to earn that
trust,” said Dr. Lisa Baron, and along
with trust, comfort is very important to
the Breast Center team. Comfortable
patients are less-stressed patients, and
the calm, relaxing atmosphere begins
before you even walk in the door. From
the helpful guidance of medical assistant
Gigi Lewis to the gentle, intelligent MRI
team of Vanessa Smith, RTR, MRM; and
Jamie Burnett, MBA, RTR, MRCT; Te
Charleston Breast Center puts forth every
efort to make their patients feel as relaxed
as possible during an incredibly anxious
time.
Te state-of-the-art MRI machine is
a fne example of that efort, as medical
technologist Jamie Burnett pointed out
the diference between their machine
and a standard MRI. Typically, a patient
would have to hunch prostrate over a piece
of equipment roughly the size of a tackle
box for up to 45 minutes while the MRI
scanned their chest. With this machine,
the patient simply lies on the table and
their breast area is ftted in a section
below table height, allowing them to rest
comfortably during the roughly 25 minute-
long process. An additional feature allows
patients to enter the machine feet frst, an
essential aspect for those who sufer from
claustrophobia.
“Patients can become very anxious
during this process, and we help ease them
through it,” said Jamie, noting that she
and medical technologist Vanessa Smith
not only talk with the patients through
the whole process, they also play relaxing
music to help ease their tension.
Wheelchair-compatible mammogram
machines are also a thoughtful and much
appreciated addition to the Center, and
the wide, ADA approved corridors painted
a soothing sawgrass green with imitation
wood fooring are far more relaxing than
the stark white of hospital halls - even
though the Center’s services go well
beyond what one would fnd under one
hospital roof.
From digital mammograms to breast
ultrasounds, breast MRIs, breast biopsies,
bone density scans, high risk evaluations
and weekly multi-disciplinary breast
conferences, the Charleston Breast Center
makes everything from regular exams to
plastic surgery that much more easy to
handle.
Te multi-disciplinary conferences are
another unique aspect of the Breast Center.
For example, Dr.Baron pointed out that a
42 year old woman with no family history
of breast cancer was recently diagnosed
at the Center. In less than a week, a full
assembly of oncologists, radiologists, and
other specialists were studying her case
and less than an hour after the conference,
a doctor was meeting with her to discuss
her options.
It’s little wonder, then, that the
Charleston Breast Center was the frst
of its kind in Charleston to be awarded
the Breast Imaging Center of Excellence
by the ACR for their combination
of certifcations in mammography,
stereotactic, ultrasound and ultrasound-
guided biopsies. “It goes with our goal of
providing the best possible services to our
patients,” Dr. Baron smiled.
While most of the actual treatment
processes are handled in partnering
hospitals, another helpful aspect of the
Charleston Breast Center is their Nurse
Navigator, Janice Power, who works with
patients to coordinate services and provide
them with helpful information. Along
with guiding patients through the process,
Power also helps the Center by serving as
their spokesperson, attending educational
events to speak on breast cancer awareness
and advocating proactive prevention
practices.
“It’s important to have a liaison
between patients and doctors, especially
someone who can answer questions and
give informative lectures on prevention,”
said Dr. Baron.
In terms of prevention, Dr. Baron
pointed out that it’s important to do your
own self-examination once a month, not
only through the basic circular-motion
method, but also by checking in the mirror
both with your hands in the air and hands
on your hips. For instructional videos and
tips on accurate self-examinations, visit
www.komen.org. Annual medical exams
are also important to keep, and for those
with no family history of breast cancer
and normal exams, mammograms should
be performed annually beginning at age
40.
“Women who participate in regular
breast cancer screening have a 30% lower
death rate from breast cancer because of
earlier detection,” Dr. Baron pointed out.
“When a growth is detected by hand, it
can be about the size of a quarter before it
can be felt. With mammograms, however,
we can spot growths when their still small;
about half the size of a tic tac.”
Above all, Dr. Baron stressed the
importance of educating oneself on early
detection and breast cancer prevention.
“Knowledge is power,” she smiled. “Use
common sense, eat healthy food and
maintain a sensible weight, and no matter
what, don’t be afraid to ask questions.”
Te Charleston Breast Center is located
at 1930 Charlie Hall Blvd. in West Ashley,
between the Glenn McConnell Parkway and
Magwood Road. For more information, visit
www.CharlestonBreastCenter.com or call
the Charleston Breast Center at 556-0116.
Support for every breast
Charleston Breast Center provides Central loCation for
Breast CanCer sCreening, deteCtion and Coordinated Care
By Kristin haCKler
Dr. Lisa Baron, co-founder of the Charleston
Breast Center.
14 March 18, 2011
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Ti de Char t
March 18 - March 31
7:35am/8:06pm
8:27am/8:58pm
9:17am/9:49pm
10:06am/10:40pm
10:56am/11:33pm
11:48am
12:28am/12:42pm
1:26am/1:40pm
2:27am/2:41pm
3:30am/3:44pm
4:30am/4:45pm
5:25am/5:40pm
6:15am/6:29pm
7:00am/7:14pm
1:19am/1:45pm
2:13am/2:34pm
3:06am/3:22pm
3:58am/4:10pm
4:51am/4:59pm
5:44am/5:50pm
6:39am/6:44pm
7:36am/7:43pm
8:36am/8:46pm
9:36am/9:52pm
10:34am/10:54pm
11:27am/11:50pm
12:15pm
12:40am/12:57pm
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms, etc., are NOT included in the predictions.
Tidal current direction changes and tide time predictions can be
very diferent. Tide predictions are PREDICTIONS; they can be
wrong so use common sense.
Mar 18
Mar 19
Mar 20
Mar 21
Mar 22
Mar 23
Mar 24
Mar 25
Mar 26
Mar 27
Mar 28
Mar 29
Mar 30
Mar 31
Source: saltwatertides.com
golf
Computer Corner
S
pringtime is right around the corner and there’s a good chance that someone you
know wants a new computer for graduation. So what do you do?
To avoid making an expensive and awkward mistake, frst settle on a budget
and determine what the “precious little one” is going to do with the computer. Tere
are several categories, so here goes:
1) For a young kid just entering middle school, your best bet is going to be a “hand
me down” desktop, something that is not too fast and which can be easily disposed. A
desktop located where you can easily view what is happening online is a must. You can
get a desktop with a monitor for under $200.
2) For kids between the ages of middle school and high school, an upgraded desktop
is usually the best computer for them to have. Te cost can still be on the low end –
a new tower can be had for $300 or so – but make sure that it has more power than
the previous tower. Be ready to hear about how they need a laptop, and that might
be something to think about in a couple of years when they graduate, but for now a
desktop keeps them in one spot, helps to make a place for homework and allows you to
watch where they are going online.
3) If they are graduating from high school and are headed of to college, one of
the frst things you should do is check the requirements of the college. Some have
very specifc requirements that you need to follow. Check carefully whether the school
requires an Apple (Mac)- or Windows-based laptop. If there is no requirement, then
I would suggest a Windows-based computer for the frst one in college for monetary
reasons. You can get a nicely set up laptop for under $600 (even closer to $400 with a
little help, which I’m available to do) in a Windows- based computer, whereas $1000
is your base with an Apple. I will admit that an Apple is a sweet machine, but we are
talking about an 18-year-old on their own. Te last thing you want to hear about is an
incident with the courtyard fountain and a drowned Apple … and when can you ship
me a new one? In the same vein, I rarely suggest the extended warranty, but in this case
it might be worth it; just make sure it has accident replacement. Te minimum for the
laptop, regardless of the make or model, is at least 4 GBs of memory and a 500GB hard
drive. Don’t get Ofce or any other software because the graduate will be able to buy
software very cheap through the school.
4) Finally, when purchasing a computer for the college graduate, the best thing to do
is go to the store with them, or sit down together and get an idea of what they are going
to do now that school is done and their
real life is beginning. In some cases, they
might even want to go back to a desktop or
maybe just an IPAD.
I look forward to hearing your questions
and helping you out. Computer-related
questions can be emailed to rentabob@
bellsouth.net. I will respond with answers
here in this column or personally. I aim
to provide helpful information for your
computer ailments from meltdowns to simple
one button questions. If you need immediate
assistance, you can always call me, Rent A
Bob at 822-7794.
So you have a
graduation coming up
By BoB Hooper, a.k.a rent a BoB
Get crafty at Turtles’ Nest
provided By Heron park nature Center
T
urtles’ Nest is a great indoor area in the West Beach Straw Market on
Kiawah Island where you can take a break during rainy days or just plain
hot ones. We ofer at least 20 crafts and activities in the craft cove weekly,
and classes start at $30. We also partner with Knitft, a group which teaches
all sorts of crafts, from wood burning to jewelry making to knitting. You may
also rent bikes, beach boards or chairs, and sign up for nature tours and Kamp
Kiawah.
New! KilN ArT
Get fred up! New at the Turtles’ Nest is our state of the art kiln. We are excited
to ofer a wide variety of high-end crafts for guests of all ages. Tese crafts include
pottery painting and the unique art of glass fusing. Sign up for a class to create
your own personalized Kiawah Island keepsake. Firing typically takes between 24
to 48 hours. Space is limited and reservations are required. Prices vary depending
on the piece of art. For more information please contact the Heron Park Nature
Center at 768-6001.
TurTle’s NesT sChedule
All workshops and classes will be held at the Turtles’ Nest located in the West
Beach Straw Market. Prices vary per craft. To make a reservation, please call
768-6001
PoTTery PAiNTiNg
Tuesdays, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. Starting March 22
Come decorate your very own pottery. Crafts include designing your own tiles,
picture frames, ornaments, and more! Firing typically takes 24-48 hours, so
please plan accordingly.
glAss FusiNg
Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Starting March 23
Come learn how to create a colorful and unique craft that will last a lifetime.
Crafts include pendants, ornaments, and more. Firing typically takes 24-48
hours, so please plan accordingly.
KNiT FiT
Tursdays, Fridays, & Saturdays, 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. starting
Learn how to knit or do other fun crafts such as wood burning or jewelry
making!
March 18, 2011 15
www.islandconnectionnews.com
History
150 Years Ago: Recalling Charleston’s Civil War Past
By Paul Hedden, Historian/JandGtours.com
T
he sesquicentennial of the Civil War is now
underway, and our barrier islands played a
critical role throughout a war whose frst
shots rang out near our shores. Historian Paul
Hedden leads tours of war sites around James
Island, and ofers us this ongoing look at the events
occurring 150 years ago. Tese correspondences are
taken from ofcial transcripts and telegrams during
the confict.
Just following Lincoln’s inauguration, Charleston
and the Confederacy begin the move to ensure their
political, fnancial, and military independence.
March 3 - Pierre G. T. Beauregard arrives in
Charleston having been appointed by President
Davis to take command of the troops in the City.
His lodgings are at the Charleston Hotel.
March 4 - Abraham Lincoln is inaugurated two
weeks after Jeferson Davis’ inauguration. Lincoln
had arrived in Washington by a secret route to
avoid danger, and his movements were guarded
by General Winfeld Scott’s soldiers. Ignoring
advice to the contrary, the President-elect rode
with President Buchanan in an open carriage
to the Capitol, where he took the oath of ofce
on the East Portico. Chief Justice Roger Taney
administered the executive oath for the seventh
time.
Lincoln states that he has “no purpose, directly
or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of
slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have
no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination
to do so.” He closes his speech by stating: “We are
not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies.
Tough passion may have strained, it must not
break our bonds of afection. Te mystic chords
of memory, stretching from every battlefeld and
patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone
all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of
the Union when again touched, as surely they will
be, by the better angels of our nature.”
March 4 - Beauregard makes a preliminary
inspection of all Charleston harbor defenses.

March 4 - Te National Ensign of the
Confederate States is formally adopted by the
Confederate Congress.
March 5 - Te National Flag is displayed for the
frst time from the cupola of the Custom House in
Charleston.
March 7 - Te Sumter Guard, Montgomery
Guard, the Marion Artillery, Charleston Light
Dragoon and the Carolina Light Infantry are
busy drilling, meeting or being transferred from
Secessionville to Sullivan’s Island.
March 8 - Governor Pickens issues a proclamation
establishing Martial Law over that portion of
James Island known as “Fort Johnson” and
extending half a mile from the wharf of the island.
March 8 - Te State of South Carolina announces
a sale of $675,000 in Bonds, to be issued in $50,
$100 and $500 increments each. Te Bonds pay
an interest rate of 7%, payable annually, the
principle of which is redeemable in 1868, 1870
and 1872. Te loan is to appeal to the patriotism
of the people. Te interest is large “and the
Security superior.”
March 9 - In the early morning, gunners were
fring blank cartridges from the guns of the
Iron Battalion at Cummings Point when one of
the guns was loaded with ball. Te men of the
Brigade, being unaware of the fact, discharged
the loaded gun towards Fort Sumter. Te ball
struck the wharf of Fort Sumter, but no response
was made. A boat was sent to the Fort to explain
the error to Major Anderson, who accepted the
explanation in “good part” and thus the matter
was ended.
March 11 - ... a canoe arrived at Fort Sumter
carrying a “negro boy” who heard that the new
president intended to free the slaves. [Major
Anderson] turned him over to the authorities in
Charleston.
March 15 - POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT,
Washington, Te PRESIDENT: SIR... I believe
that Fort Sumter may be provisioned and relieved
by Captain Fox with little risk, and General Scott’s
opinion that, with its war complement, there is no
force in South Carolina which can take it. Tis
renders it almost certain that it will not then be
attempted. Tis would … demoralize the rebellion.
Te impotent rage of the rebels and the outburst of
patriotic feeling which would follow this achievement
would initiate a reactionary movement throughout
the South which would speedily overwhelm the
traitors. No expenses or care should therefore be
spared to achieve this success. very respectfully, your
obedient servant, M. BLAIR
March 16 - Defenses on Morris Island Battery
at Cummings Point: No. 1. Battery of sand and
palmetto logs, four 24-pounders. No. 2. Iron-
clad battery, three guns, 42-pounders or 8-inch
columbiads. No. 3. Battery of sand and palmetto
logs, three guns, 24-pounders or 32-pounders. No.
4. Battery of sand and palmetto logs, with one
8-inch columbiad or 8-inch sea-coast howitzer. No.
5. Star of the West battery, fve guns, 24-pounders
or 32-pounders. Tere were two guns at each round
fred from the light-house battery. Tree or four more
guns were landed yesterday with barbette carriages,
and most of them were carried around upon the
channel side. One, at least, was placed in battery No.
4, making four guns in that battery at present.
16 March 18, 2011
www.islandconnectionnews.com
KIAWAH ISLAND RECREATION
Open Daily frOm 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
For more details and reservations for the following activities, including times for Nature Tours, please visit www.kiawahrecreation.com or call the Heron Park Nature Center at 768-6001.
All activities are open to the public. Nature Tours, Fishing Trips and Motorboat Excursions available daily. Please remember that Night Heron Pool is for Resort Guests and Governors’ Club
Members only. Tank you for your cooperation. *Nature Tours available daily. Times are tide dependant.
Friday, March 18
Kamp Kiawah: Sports-a-palooza:
Ages 3-11, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Stepping Stones: 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Volleyball: 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah KNO: Kiawah
Kampout: Ages 5-11, 5 p.m.-8 p.m.
Saturday, March 19
Kamp Kiawah: Scales & Tails:
Ages 3-11, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Tye Dye: 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah KNO: Sanctuary Splash
Bash: Ages 5-11, 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Pickup Games: Soccer: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, March 20
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Pickup Games: Basketball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Monday, March 21
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Pickup Games: Volleyball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
tueSday, March 22
Kamp Kiawah: Pirate Trails & Tides:
Age 3-11, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Pottery Painting: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Tye Dye: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Basketball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
WedneSday, March 23
Kamp Kiawah: Mission Impossible:
Ages 3-11. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Glass Fusing: 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Stepping Stones: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Soccer: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
thurSday, March 24
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah: Kiawah Day:
Ages 3-11, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Tye Dye: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Basketball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Friday, March 25
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah: Sports-a-palooza:
Ages 3-11, 8:30 a.m. –12:30 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Stepping Stones: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah KNO: Kiawah
Kampout: Ages 5-11, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Pickup Games: Volleyball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Saturday, March 26
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah: Scales & Tails: Ages
3-11, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Suncatchers: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah KNO: Sanctuary Splash
Bash: Ages 5-11, 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Pickup Games: Soccer: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Sunday, March 27
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Pickup Games: Basketball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Monday, March 28
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Pickup Games: Volleyball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
tueSday, March 29
Kamp Kiawah: Pirate Trails & Tides:
Age 3-11, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Pottery Painting: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Tye Dye: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Basketball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
WedneSday, March 30
Kamp Kiawah: Mission Impossible:
Ages 3-11. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Glass Fusing: 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Stepping Stones: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Soccer: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
thurSday, March 31
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah: Kiawah Day:
Ages 3-11, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Tye Dye: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Pickup Games: Basketball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
Friday, april 1
Turtle Tracks: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah: Sports-a-palooza:
Ages 3-11, 8:30 a.m. –12:30 p.m.
Knit Fit: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Stepping Stones: 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
Kamp Kiawah KNO: Kiawah Kampout:
Ages 5-11, 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Pickup Games: Volleyball: 6 p.m. – 7 p.m.
www.islandconnectionnews.com
March 18, 2011 17
W
ith the coming spring comes new energy and life in the Kiawah Arts Council
already busy arts season. Two new events have been added to their March
calendar, so grab your tickets quick, because they are going to go fast! Please
note that tickets are limited to a maximum of two (2) tickets per person, and that if
you won’t be using a ticket, please return it to Town Hall or notify them accordingly.
As in the past, tickets must be picked up at Kiawah Island Town Hall, located at 21
Beachwalker Drive. For more information, call 768-9166.
MoMents of Joy
Tursday, March 24
7:30 p.m. at Church of Our Saviour
Moments of Joy is written and performed by Joy Vandervort-Cobb, one of
Charleston’s most creative, comedic minds. Te Company Company, the
Lowcountry’s esteemed musical theatre group, is teaming up with Ms. Vandervort-
Cobb to bring you this honest and revealing adventure of one woman’s life. Share her
experiences of redemption, grace, forgiveness and healing as she involves you in the
most precious moments of her life. According to Te City Paper, Moments of Joy “is
an autobiographical piece so universal that reviewers hailed it as ‘magic’ and ‘sure to
satisfy,’ saying it is full of ‘song, slapstick, and stories that will have you laughing so
hard that you’ll have a hard time staying in your seat.’” Te audience walks with joy
through her childhood days at the University of Southern California to her days with
touring theatrical companies, her local connection with the College of Charleston
and her family life. You will laugh, you will cry, and you will thoroughly enjoy this
comedienne, singer, actress and just plain entertaining woman. While in many
respects this is a one woman show, Joy is ably backed up by pianist Maida Lipkin, who
can turn the baby grand into a small orchestra while Joy sings her heart out. Tickets
are currently available at Kiawah Town Hall.
Piano Bar series at the sandcastle
Wednesdays, March 23 & March 30
5 to 6:30 p.m.
Te Piano Bar Series at the Sandcastle is back by popular demand! Not meant to be
concerts, these two additional Wednesdays are to enjoy with friends and provide the
opportunity to meet neighbors for some Island socializing. Relax outside on the patio
with the beverage of your choice or hang out inside with the music. Te Sandcastle
will be the happening place at 5 p.m., island time. Bring the beverage of choice and
any snack to “tide” you over. No tickets required.
civil War Portraits By story teller tiM loWry
Tursday, April 7
7:30 p.m. at the Turtlepoint Clubhouse
With the sharp focus of a camera lens, storyteller Tim Lowry presents compelling
portraits of Civil War fgures. Not unlike Civil War photographer Mathew Brady’s
portfolio, these stories provide insight and perspective from several diferent vantage
points into this infamous war. Te show presents the Civil War not so much as an
epic period of American History, but as an intimate portrait of the American soul.
Specializing in American history and folklore, storyteller Tim Lowry tells stories “of
the people, by the people, and for the people” with tales of the American Revolution,
the Western Frontier, and the Civil War. His personal narratives refect a Southern
heritage as he discusses topics like baseball, hotdogs, apple pie, and Chevrolet. Tickets
are available to Kiawah residents on March 21 and to the general public on March 24,
and may be picked up at Town Hall.
More art in March
By Stephanie BraSwell
A
s with most great ideas, the concept
for Te Point Is began over drinks.
“We [the Ambrose girls] wanted
to get a group of women together in order
to give back to the community,” said Te
Point Is co-founder, Becky Stallworth.
“Five years ago, over drinks and scribbling
on napkins, we came up with the basic
concept. All of us kept saying, ‘But the
point is …’ and the phrase just stuck.”
Today, Te Point Is has raised more
than $100,000 for local, women-focused
charities through several creative outlets.
From a cookbook packed full of wonderful
recipes to tervis tumblers, t-shirts, and a
very successful Trash to Treasure sale at
the shed next to the Stono Market last
year. Tis year, instead of gathering all of
their items under one roof, many of Te
Point Is members are selling things that
they no longer need through Craigslist and
donating the funds toward Te Point Is’
chosen charity. Tis year, these ambitious
women are donating their funds to the
Hollings Cancer Center.
“Te Hollings Cancer Center has
been very good to work with and they
have been very understanding about our
requirements,” said member Maggie
McKellips. “Tey are very transparent
about how the funds we donate are
disbursed.”
While the ladies will be donating their
time to women-based projects in the
area, including the annual Habitat for
Humanity Women Build at the beginning
of May, the biggest fundraiser of the year
for Te Point Is, is coming up this October.
Called Camp for the Cause, Te Point Is
invites between 80 and 100 women to
spend the night on a member’s property
on Wadmalaw Island, and all activities
are geared toward raising funds for that
year’s charity – and the charity is always
one that supports breast cancer research
and prevention.
“We have live music and activities,
but we also have mini-fundraisers in our
tents,” smiled McKellips. “Last year, we
sold jello shots and little cheesecakes in
our tent, and we had a Survivor Challenge
going on in another tent.”
Fundraising co-chair Patricia Bisceglia
also pointed out that members of Te Point
Is will be participating in the Dragon Boat
races this May 14 at Brittlebank Park.
“We reached out to established
non-profts our frst year, and the Susan
G. Komen foundation received our frst
camp donation, but now we specifcally
send our donations to local organizations,”
said Bisceglia.
For more information about Te Point Is,
and to fnd out about any of their upcoming
events, visit www.TePointIs.org, email
[email protected] or call 478-6959.
The Point Is ... women!
By KriStin hacKler
www.islandconnectionnews.com
18 March 18, 2011
Pol i ce Bl ot t er
BY MEREDITH POWELL
February 15: (Kiawah) Deputies
responded to a sunglasses theft at
Freshfelds. The two subjects were
looking at the glasses and asking
numerous questions. Subject one was
approximately 20 to 25 years old, 5’5”,
120 pounds and wearing khaki cargo
pants. Subject two was approximately
30 to 35 years old, 6’, 200 pounds and
had a shaved head. The complainant was
advised to contact the Sheriff’s Offce if
either man returned.
February 25: (Kiawah) An offcer
was dispatched to a residence on Green
Dolphin Way for a verbal disturbance.
The victim stated that her husband
came home from the bar and was hard
to control, refusing to go to sleep. She
did state, however, that he had never
physically harmed her and she did not
have any injuries. He also spoke with
the subject who admitted to drinking.
February 25: (Kiawah) A complainant
notifed authorities that a young
employee was inside her place of
business drinking a beer and already
highly intoxicated. By the time the
offcer arrived, he discovered that the
doors were locked, and the manager
came and let him in. They discovered
the subject had passed out on the foor
so they called EMS. She was placed in
the ambulance and woken up but not
taken to the hospital. The subject was
driven home by her manager after the
business was secured again.
February 26: (Kiawah) A victim
contacted offcers when she realized her
black leather wallet was missing from
her purse on Shipwatch Road. She had
already canceled her credit cards, fled a
report and gotten a new driver’s license.
Offcials gave her a case number and
numbers to contact fraud and social
security services.
February 26: (Kiawah) Kiawah Island
Security called offcers when they
observed a red Ford F-150 leaving the
Sanctuary swerving, and the driver
was obviously intoxicated. Deputies
followed the vehicle down River
Road, noticed its impaired driving and
conducted a traffc stop. The subject’s
speech was slurred and there was a
strong odor of alcohol. When he refused
a sobriety test, the truck was searched
but no contraband was found. He was
transported to the Detention Center and
given a court date.
February 26: (Kiawah) A patrol car
overheated at a traffc stop, so the offcer
called for a tow truck. Ravenel Towing
towed the car to Azalea Drive and a
spare vehicle was provided.
February 28: (Kiawah) Offcers
responded to a residential alarm on
Flyway Drive and noticed the basement
door was open. The residence was
checked and undisturbed, so after failing
to contact a keyholder, offcers secured
it and left.
March 2: (Kiawah) A victim noticed
$800 missing from her bedroom dresser
on Burroughs Hall after scheduling a
quarterly pest control appointment. The
suspect did not spray the residence,
but had walked through instead with a
syringe-type device. The victim did not
think anything of letting him do his job
unsupervised, but became suspicious
after the suspect offered her grandson
a fve dollar bill. After checking the
dresser where her cash was folded
neatly, she realized the money was
missing and authorities were contacted.
March 3: (Kiawah) An offcer
responded to a residential alarm on Blue
Heron Pond Road and noticed the back
kitchen door open. The residence was
checked and undisturbed, so the offcer
contacted a keyholder who stated he was
in-route. The offcer closed the door but
did not lock it and told the keyholder to
contact him if needed.
March 7: (Kiawah) A complainant
contacted authorities after being
tailgated by an erratic driver who also
passed her on a double yellow line.
The responding offcer located the car
at Seascope Villas and questioned him
about the incident only to discover an
odor of marijuana and alcohol. When
asked for his driver’s license, the subject
was reluctant, but the interrogation
continued after his father was contacted.
Both the complainant and subject gave
written statements.
March 7: (Kiawah) After leaving
the scene described above, offcers
noticed the subject was driving away
from the residence. They followed his
vehicle to observe his
driving and eventually
gave him a ticket for
reckless driving. His
father arrived and
took the subject and
the vehicle. Offcers
advised them of the
court date.
www.islandconnectionnews.com
March 18, 2011 19
What’s Hot
Learn before you burn
provided by the St. JohnS Fire & reScue department
I
n April 2009, the state of South Carolina sufered the most destructive fre loss in
its recorded history. Over 19,000 acres of land was burned, 76 homes destroyed,
97 damaged, and over 4,000 people were evacuated. On March 3, the St. Johns
Fire Department responded to a brush fre that was threatening nearby structures.
Te fre was extinguished quickly and only two acres were burned with slight damage
to a wooden fence. You may be wondering what these two fres had in common. Both
fres were started by residents burning debris outside during conditions that were ideal for
rapid fre spread: low humidity and high winds.
WHEN BURNING OUTSIDE:
Outdoor burning is prohibited in the Towns of Seabrook and Kiawah. •
County resident should contact the South Carolina Forestry Commission toll free at 1-800-968-3593 to •
obtain a residential burn permit.
Consider weather conditions before burning such as low humidity and wind conditions. •
Te South Carolina Forest Law Handbook, Title 48, Chapter 35, states the following requirements when •
burning outdoors:
“Proper notifcation shall be given to the State Forester…” (Call the toll free number) 1.
“Such persons shall have cleared around the area to be burned and have immediately available sufcient 2.
equipment and personnel to adequately secure the fre and prevent its spread.” (Make sure the area where
you are burning is clear from areas you do not want to burn).
“Te person starting the burning shall supervise carefully the fre started and have it under control prior 3.
to leaving the area.” (Do not leave the area and have a garden hose available to extinguisher the fre).
Tese simple steps will help ensure the beauty of the forested areas we enjoy each day and the safety of our
neighbors.
Tese fre safety tips are provided by the St. Johns Fire & Rescue Department and Captain James T. Ghi, St. John’s Fire
Prevention Specialist. For more information on fre safety tips, contact Captain Ghi at [email protected] or call 296-8392.
T
he sixth grade class at Haut Gap Middle School
spent three amazing days and two cold nights
from February 9 to 11 participating in the Barrier
Island Environmental Education program at Camp St.
Christopher on Seabrook Island. Principal Paul Padron
and his staf chaperoned the excited group, while David
Gardner and his crew educated and entertained the
children. Hands-on environmental activities included “It
Skinks”, “Scales and Tales”, “Pondering Life”, and ”Lets
Sea”. Students enjoyed the team building activity “Need a
Friend” as well as the “Moccasin Trail” nature hike. Te
children rotated through each experience, learning frst-
hand about our fascinating Lowcountry environment.
I arrived in time to chat with some students who were
fnishing their breakfast. Tey reported that the food was
great (especially the fried chicken from the night before)
and that they had fun sleeping in the cabins in bunk beds,
although there was a complaint about someone snoring.
With enthusiasm, and despite the cold drizzle outside,
they found their teacher and took of for their “Scales
and Tales” meeting to learn about fsh and reptiles.
Te Seabrook Island Natural History Group (SINHG)
was happy to help fund this remarkable adventure for local
school children and to welcome them to Seabrook Island.
Haut Gap delves
into natural history,
Seabrook-style
By Lisa HiLLman

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