Lat 20150614

Published on June 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 176 | Comments: 0 | Views: 13731
of x
Download PDF   Embed   Report

DIARIOS EEUU

Comments

Content

$2.00 DESIGNATED AREAS HIGHER

© 2015

latimes.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

On high
profile
events,
mayor
low key
Garcetti’s response to
police shootings irks
critics, but backers say
he’s focused on policy
reform, not the pulpit.
By Peter Jamison
Mayor Eric Garcetti met
with Ezell Ford’s mother at
First AME Church. It was a
historically resonant setting
for a talk about Ford, a mentally ill black man killed by
police. Founded in the late
19th century by some of Los
Angeles’ earliest black residents, the church stands
amid streets laid waste in riots that followed the 1992 acquittal of the officers who
beat Rodney King.
“It was a really beautiful
meeting between the two of
us, I think,” the mayor told
reporters on Tuesday after
speaking with Tritobia Ford.
“She was able to just talk
about what it felt like to have
lost her son and her quest for
justice for him.”
Ford later gave her own
verdict on her time with
L.A.’s top elected official:
While she was grateful for
the mayor’s effort, she said,
the meeting came “10
months late.” Her son was
shot to death by officers in
South L.A. last summer.
Only after she criticized
Garcetti on television last
weekend for his inattention
to the case had he personally
reached out to her.
The encounter inside
First AME was characteristic of Garcetti’s challenges in
recent weeks, as he has tried
to calibrate his reactions to
two
high-profile
police
shootings of young black
men.
The mayor is known for
using his bully pulpit as
leader of America’s secondlargest city with more restraint than some of his outspoken predecessors. His
supporters say he eschews
publicity for the more meaningful work of crafting policy
and back-channel coalition
building.
[See Garcetti, A24]

Photographs by

Francine Orr Los Angeles Times

MOTEL MANAGER Sam Maharaj, left, cleans out a room at the Country Inn while a renter rocks back and forth as she is being

evicted. Maharaj and his wife hope to one day buy the hotel, now owned by Caltrans, and offer clean and comfortable lodging.

A BROKEN CITY

San Bernardino, once solidly middle class, has become a distillation
of America’s urban woes as it struggles to recover from bankruptcy
By Joe Mozingo

W

ith a rake and a mask, the motel manager steps carefully
into Room 107.
This afternoon, Sam Maharaj will evict a couple and
their 4-month-old baby for not paying their bill.
The mother sits on the side of the bed, still
twitching from slamming methamphetamine
the night before.
Maharaj sinks the rake’s tines into an ankledeep thicket of dirty diapers, hypodermic needles, crusted food, hot sauce packets, broken
Tupperware and cockroaches, living and dead.
A South African immigrant of Indian descent,
he never expected that his piece of America
would look like this.
Four decades ago, this motel boasted a
cheery coffee shop, a heated pool, valet parking
and palm trees that swayed in the hard wind
coming over the Cajon Pass.
Now it’s a way station for broken people in a
broken city.
As other California cities lift themselves out
of the recession, San Bernardino, once a blue-

EX-MAYOR Patrick Morris remains

loyal to the city he’s lived in for 50 years.

collar town with a solid middle class, has become the poorest city of its size in the state and
a distillation of America’s urban woes.
Maharaj, who manages the Country Inn,
rents his rooms to copper wire thieves, prostitutes and the working poor. He does what he
can to help them, and often stands in the parking lot watching with sadness as their children
play between the freeway’s sound wall and a
swimming pool with just enough water for mosquitoes to breed.
He and his wife keep their own two children
locked away in their fortified apartment behind
the motel office. One day, they plan to buy the
motel from Caltrans — which purchased the
property as part of a freeway expansion project
— and turn it into clean and comfortable lodging. One day, they hope the Tripadvisor reviews
no longer begin: “Hookers, crack, blood and
bullet holes.” Maybe the motel will have charming postcards again.
As his rake claws at the debris of crumbling
lives, he keeps his expectations low. This is Berdoo, a city his friends at the Hindu temple in
nearby Riverside mock as “the ghetto.”
Look at the news, he says: the county assessor arrested on charges of [See Broken, A18]

War-shattered Aleppo, up close
A rare visit to the
Syrian city makes
clear the toll of nearly
three years of fighting.
By Patrick J.
McDonnell
ALEPPO, Syria — A series of checkpoints and barriers cobbled together from

tumbleweeds, discarded furniture and assorted urban
detritus mark the path to
one of the world’s most storied sites: Aleppo’s ancient
covered market, the heart of
the Old City.
Much of the magnificent
souk, with its vaulted ceilings, stone arches and hanging lamps, is now a charred
ruin. Labyrinthine corridors
trod upon for centuries in
this former Silk Road termi-

nus stand silent, abandoned
except for Syrian army special forces.
The troops are posted
about 30 yards away from
rebels who occupy the other
half of the bazaar, the core of
the Old City, a United Nations World Heritage site.
Below ground, the two sides
engage in tunnel warfare:
Rebels seek to blow up military positions from their
[See Syria, A6]

first-time World Cup teams. Ivory Coast lost its opener to Germany, 10-0.

©T&CO. 2015

Chris Roussakis European Pressphoto Agency

CYNTHIA DJOHORE of Ivory Coast reacts to a 3-2 loss to Thailand in a battle of

Bad losses for a good cause

Expansion of Women’s World Cup leads to mismatches
By David Wharton
OTTAWA — The players
from Ivory Coast had no
more frustration left in
them.
With only a few minutes
remaining on the clock, yet
another ball sailed into their
goal — this time on a free
kick, a gently curving shot
that slipped inside the far
post.
The goalkeeper lay on the
turf, her defenders turning
quietly,
trudging
back
toward midfield. Les Elephantes were headed for a
10-0 loss to Germany in their

first-ever game at the Women’s World Cup.
“Our girls discovered
something today,” their
coach, Clementine Toure,
said. “They discovered a
high level of competition.”
The final score underlined a lingering concern at
this monthlong event.

Soccer’s
international
governing body, FIFA, enlarged the field from 16 to 24
this time around, with eight
nations making their debut
on the sport’s biggest stage.
Critics doubt there are
enough quality women’s
teams in the world to fill an
[See World Cup, A26]

CLINTON KICKOFF: Presidential hopeful portrays self as a fighter for the middle class. A2, A10
Weather: Early clouds

will give way to sun.
L.A. Basin: 78/62. B10

7

85944 10200

2

Patek Philippe
NAUTILUS | REF. 5726/1A

A2

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

BACK STORY

Resting on her own laurels
As Clinton targets key voting blocs, she shows a lesser-known side
By Cathleen Decker

rainbow bouquet
magnum vase
h a n d cr a f t ed fr ench pât e de v er r e crysta l

numbered edition of 175, 13”H $16,080

for mor e a bou t Daum Visi t GE A RY S .c om

M I K IM O TO . C O M

3 5 1 N . B E V E R LY D R I V E | 8 0 0 . 7 9 3 . 6 67 0
GE A RYS .COM

BAROQUE WHITE SOUTH SEA

C U LT U R E D P E A R L

A N D O PA L P E N D A N T W I T H D I A M O N D S
SET IN

18K

WHITE GOLD.

WIL SH IRE AT R OD E O, B E V ERLY H ILLS • 310.205.8787
S O UT H C OA S T P L A ZA , CO STA MESA • 714.424.5440

Hillary Rodham Clinton
will never win the presidency on the sheer force of
lofty rhetoric, as her announcement speech demonstrated Saturday.
But if she does win the
White House, it will be because she accomplished
what her speech set out to
do: harness the demographic shifts afoot in the
country and deepen voters’
understanding of the bestknown woman in the world.
Clinton highlighted a
laundry list of proposals
attractive to ascendant
voting groups that formed
the political base for fellow
Democrat Barack Obama
and began to show their
strength under her husband, Bill Clinton. She
offered multiple indications
that she was prepared to
fight for those seeking a
foothold, even if that contradicted her simultaneous
pledge to usher in a new and
more collaborative political
future for the country.
Delivered in a park in
New York honoring Franklin D. Roosevelt, Clinton’s
speech was the first big
event of her presidential
campaign, which the candidate has thus far spent
fundraising and making
small if telegenic drop-bys
with people in key electoral
states.
She vowed Saturday to
sketch the details about her
policy platform soon, but it
was clear from what she did
say that most of it will echo
the desires of the last two
Democratic presidents.
Throughout, there was no
mistaking the importance
that women, the young and
minority voters — the latter
two being groups that largely eluded her in her 2008
presidential bid — play in
her political future.
In one passage she sequentially took on Republican presidential contenders on the issues of climate
change, inequality, healthcare, abortion and contraceptive rights, immigration
and gay rights. Those are
threshold issues for many of
the voters whose support
Clinton is seeking, and they
are areas in which the Republican presidential candidates’ positions are far more
conservative than the nation’s at large.
Clinton essentially
sketched the nation’s politics as divided between
aging conservative voters in
the GOP’s camp, and everyone else — the swelling
majority of America, assuming they vote — in hers.
“Ask many of these candidates about climate
change, one of the defining
threats of our time, and
they’ll say, ‘I’m not a scientist.’ Well, then, why don’t

John Moore Getty Images

HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON noted Saturday that she is the granddaughter

of a lace mill worker and daughter of a woman who was abandoned as a child.

Outlining an
expanded vision
Kicking off a new phase
of her campaign, Clinton
puts the focus on the
middle class. NATION, A10
they start listening to those
who are?
“They pledge to wipe out
tough rules on Wall Street,
rather than rein in the
banks that are still too risky,
courting future failures in a
case that can only be considered mass amnesia.
“They want to take away
health insurance from more
than 16 million Americans
without offering any credible alternative. They shame
and blame women, rather
than respect our right to
make our own reproductive
health decisions.
“They want to put immigrants, who work hard
and pay taxes, at risk of
deportation. And they turn
their backs on gay people
who love each other.”
Her reach for history was
a recurrent theme as well.
“I will be the youngest
woman president in the
history of the United
States,” she noted in a joking reference to how the
presidency had aged her
predecessors.
Part of Clinton’s challenge through 2016 will be to
navigate Obama’s positives
and negatives. The president, at his heights, inspired
far more passion in his
followers than Clinton has
in hers, but he also drew

antagonists with a fierceness that Clinton would like
to avoid. On Saturday, she
attempted to corral Obama’s voters while acknowledging the shortcomings of
his tenure.
“So we’re standing again,
but we all know we’re not yet
running the way America
should,” she said. “You see
corporations making record
profits, with CEOs making
record pay, but your paychecks have barely budged.
“While many of you are
working multiple jobs to
make ends meet, you see the
top 25 hedge fund managers
making more than all of
America’s kindergarten
teachers combined. And,
often paying a lower tax
rate. So, you have to wonder: ‘When does my hard
work pay off? When does my
family get ahead? When?’”
That was a refrain familiar to her husband’s 1992
campaign, which rested on
the notion that he would
stand up for Americans who
“work hard and play by the
rules.” But as much as she
hopes to benefit from positive views of his years in
office, she made clear that
she’s resting on her own
laurels.
In Saturday’s telling, she
was the granddaughter of a
man who worked for 50
years in a Pennsylvania lace
mill, the daughter of a smallbusiness man and of a
mother who had been abandoned as a child.
Clinton recounted her
life, from young attorney to
senator from New York. Her
years as first lady, a fraught

period personally and professionally, were skipped
over. Similarly, her term as
secretary of State received
little attention; foreign
policy, a subject of intense
interest to Republican
candidates, didn’t enter
into the speech until half an
hour into her 45-minute
remarks. Absent policy
specifics, the State Department job served simply as
further evidence of toughness.
“I’ve stood up to adversaries like [Vladimir]
Putin and reinforced allies
like Israel. I was in the Situation Room on the day we
got Bin Laden,” she said.
“But, I know — I know we
have to be smart as well as
strong.”
Clinton’s public life has
been marked by great
heights and perilous lows.
Her pledge to serve as president on behalf of “everyone
who’s ever been knocked
down, but refused to be
knocked out” seemed to
hold some resonance.
She has been respected
for her personal tenacity
and rebuked for what occasionally has appeared to be
a brittle public persona. To
some extent on Saturday,
she seemed to be saying —
particularly to women who
may feel more sympathetic
to her — that she hopes the
country simply takes her as
she is.
cathleen.decker
@latimes.com
Twitter: @cathleendecker
For more on politics, go to
latimes.com/decker.

T H E SH O PS AT CRY S TA L S ™ , LAS V EGAS • 702.730.4710

Consign Your Contemporary
Designer Jewels by July 10
Live Auction September 28

When It’s Time to Sell
Your Jewelry

Cartier Panther Brooch
Sold for $21,250

Boucheron Invisibly-Set Sapphire and Diamond Ring — Circa 1940

SEEKING QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS
BUCCELLATI | BVLGARI | CARTIER | CHOPARD
CIPULLO | DAVID WEBB | MARINA B. | POMELLATO
SCHLUMBERGER | VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

KNOWLEDGEABLE | PROFESSIONAL
IMMEDIATE PAYMENT

VERDURA | HARRY WINSTON

Inquiries 310.492.8600
[email protected] | HA.com/Jewelry

BEVERLY HILLS
9696 WILSHIRE BLVD
SUITE 200
CALL US TO SCHEDULE YOUR PRIVATE APPOINTMENT
OR GET STARTED ONLINE

(855) 743-2161 | circajewels.com
Always Accepting Quality Consignments in 40 Categories.
9478 W. Olympic Blvd | Beverly Hills, CA 90212 | HA.com
DALLAS | NEW YORK | BEVERLY HILLS | SAN FRANCISCO | CHICAGO | HOUSTON | PARIS | GENEVA
Paul R. Minshull #LSM0605473; Heritage Auctions #LSM0602703 & #LSM0624318.
BP 12-25%; see HA.com. 37748

BOCA RATON | CHICAGO | GREENWICH
LONG ISLAND | NEW YORK CITY | PALM BEACH
SAN FRANCISCO | SHORT HILLS | WASHINGTON D.C.
BARCELONA | MADRID | HONG KONG
FREE INSURED MAIL-IN SERVICE AVAILABLE

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

A3

THE WORLD

India’s child labor challenge
Proposal shows how a country reliant on young hands struggles to ensure rights
By Shashank Bengali
SURAT, India — Their
hands fly with the speed and
precision of veteran assembly-line workers, pausing
only to flick sweat from their
shiny-smooth foreheads.
They construct box after
cardboard box, designed for
sari shops in far-off cities,
stacking them into multihued towers that loom
above their small, hunched
bodies.
Many of the workers are
not yet teenagers, and they
fill the dimly lighted corridors of the textile mills and
warehouses of this industrial city in western India. Despite a law requiring every
child younger than 14 to be in
school full time, millions of
Indian boys and girls still
hold jobs, including more
than 50,000 in Surat alone,
according to estimates by
human rights groups.
India has declared that it
wants to end child labor, but
advocacy groups argue that
a new government proposal
could actually push more
youngsters into the workforce, jeopardizing their education and putting them at
greater risk of exploitation.
Prime Minister Narendra
Modi’s Cabinet last month
approved amendments to a
3-decade-old child labor law
that would make it legal to
employ children younger
than 14 in “family enterprises” not deemed hazardous.
Children would be barred
from mining, heavy industry,
manufacturing fireworks or
other dangerous professions, but could participate
in virtually any other sector
as long as the work was outside school hours in a business run by relatives, says a
government statement on
the legislation.
Modi’s conservative government said it was seeking
to strike “a balance between
the need for education for a
child and the reality of the
socioeconomic
condition
and social fabric in the country.”
In many poor Indian families, boys and girls assist
their parents from an early
age, and proponents say an
outright ban on child labor
could harm small farmers,
shopkeepers, cooks and others who rely on young hands
to help them scrape by.
The number of recognized child laborers in India
has fallen sharply, according
to census data, to 4.3 million
in 2011 from 12.6 million in
2001, although children
working in family businesses
are believed to be significantly undercounted. Child
rights advocates are concerned that the government
proposal could roll back
even those gains by carving
out a loophole that would be
abused by employers who already stretch the definition
of the word “family.”
In Surat, a fast-growing
city of 4.6 million, textile
bosses routinely tell labor inspectors that the boys em-

Altaf Qadr Associated Press

CHILDREN working as garbage collectors unload waste in New Delhi. A proposal to amend a child labor law

would make it legal to employ children younger than 14 in “family enterprises” not deemed hazardous.

Channi Anand Associated Press

LAWS meant to keep

children in school are
routinely flouted.

Channi Anand Associated Press

ON THE OUTSKIRTS of Jammu, India, children carry sacks of leftover vegeta-

bles collected from a wholesale market. The food will be sold in their shantytown.
broidering saris, folding garments
and
assembling
boxes are relatives.
Government
surveys,
however, indicate that many
child workers in Surat are
migrants
from
poorer
states. Experts say the children rarely dare contradict
their bosses and authorities
often lack the resources to
investigate further.
“Family business sounds
good, but what we have
found is that bosses say, ‘I’m
his uncle’ or ‘he’s my son,’
and law enforcement is not
very keen to verify the
claim,” said Chandrashekhar Deshmukh, head of the
nonprofit Pratham Council
for Vulnerable Children’s office in Surat.
“If this practice gets legal
cover, child labor might actually increase.”
Indian authorities are
trying to bring child labor
provisions in line with a

landmark 2009 law that
mandates free, full-time
schooling for every boy and
girl younger than14. The earlier labor legislation banned
children younger than 14
from working in only hazardous industries.
The amendments must
win approval of both houses
of Parliament and the president, but analysts say they
stand a good chance of becoming law.

Trade unions back the
initiative, saying it is in line
with International Labor
Organization conventions
that require countries to set
a minimum working age of at
least 14 and bar employment
that would damage children’s health or well-being.
“It’s a very progressive
amendment, and it is very
clear,” said Vrijesh Upadhyay, general secretary of
Bharatiya Mazdoor Sangh,

India’s largest labor union.
“Suppose I am a shopkeeper. My child comes after
school and sits with me, he
helps me — that’s allowed. If
in any way he earns money,
that is child labor and that
will be punished.”
The proposal stiffens
penalties for employers
found breaking the law to up
two years in prison and a fine
of about $800 for a first offense. But it scraps firsttime punishments for parents, a nod to the struggles
that prompt child labor to
begin with.
Educators say that any
regular work that takes
away from children’s time to
study or play outside of
school can be harmful to

their development and raise
dropout rates. Farm work
exposes children to harmful
pesticides, and in Surat’s
garment industry, which
manufactures saris and
other traditional clothing
sold across India, children
work all-day shifts for as little as $1.50.
One recent afternoon,
trooping through the corridors of Shiv Shakti Textile
Market in central Surat, social worker Meena Desale of
the Pratham organization
knelt and gently cupped the
chin of a worker who looked
no older than 10. His name
was Amar, he said, smiling
sheepishly as he folded a
stretch of bright red fabric.
“Are you in school?” Desale asked.
“Yes,” came the reply. But
when asked to name the
school, Amar hesitated. He
went silent and returned to
his work.
“They are told to say this
is only after-school work, to
conform to the laws,” Desale
said afterward. “But very
few of them can read.”
The day after Surat authorities raided a restaurant
last month, two teenage
workers from the northern
state of Rajasthan sat quietly in the administrator’s
office at a government-run
children’s home. One of
them, Mahinder Rajaram,
who is from a small village,
said he had served tea for
two months, earning about
$35 each month.
Ramesh Khadsalia, a
teacher at the home, said officials were trying to contact
the boy’s family to send him
home. But Khadsalia said
there was a good chance
that Mahinder, who said he
had dropped out of school in
fourth grade and did not
know his age, would leave to
find work elsewhere.
Critics say the amendments send the wrong signal
from Modi’s government,
which has been trying to revive India’s lumbering manufacturing sector and promote foreign investment
through a glossy campaign
dubbed “Make in India.”
“There is a feeling that if
children are blocked from
working, the garment industry or other industry might
suffer,” said Prabhat Kumarof Save the Children.
“But if you really look at
the issue, this won’t be the
case. No one would support
the idea of ‘Make in India’
meaning ‘Made by Children.’ ”
shashank.bengali
@latimes.com

Taliban claims
attack on police
At least 17 Afghan
officers are killed in a
nighttime assault on a
Helmand checkpoint.
By Ali M. Latifi
KABUL, Afghanistan —
An overnight attack on a
checkpoint in southern Afghanistan killed at least 17
members of the national police, officials said Saturday.
The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack,
which began late Friday in
Helmand province’s Musa
Qala district, long a stronghold of the insurgents.
“Antigovernment forces”
converged on the checkpoint, said Omar Zwak, a
spokesman for the provincial governor, with dozens of

fighters participating in an
assault that lasted until
early Saturday.
Zwak said two police officers were also wounded. An
Afghan official quoted by the
Associated Press in an early
report said at least 20 police
officers died and the Taliban
claimed that 21 died.
Musa Qala, in northeast
Helmand, has been the site
of some of the fiercest fighting of the Afghan conflict between the Taliban and
NATO forces, primarily U.S.
Marines and British soldiers.
The Afghan National Security Forces recorded more
than 2,300 dead and 4,500 injured in the first five months
of the year, according to figures released by NATO.
Latifi is a special
correspondent

FINAL SALE
BEVERLY HILLS | 220 RODEO DRIVE | 310 860 9045
CANOGA PARK | WESTFIELD TOPANGA | 818 340 7221
COSTA MESA | SOUTH COAST PLAZA | 714 327 0644
LOS ANGELES | BEVERLY CENTER | 310 855 9538
SAN DIEGO | FASHION VALLEY | 619 295 0303
SAN FRANCISCO | 164 GEARY STREET | 415 391 3300
JIMMYCHOO.COM

A4

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

WORLD BRIEFING

Do You Have One
Of The 7 Symptoms
Of Neuropathy?

888-877-8863
Call 24 Hour Recorded Message

Optimal Health Straw Chiropractic

LAA3354759-1

Do you
suffer from
numbness,
tingling,
burning,
sharp pains,
cramping, or
poor balance?
If you do then
please continue
reading.
Because
virtually every person who reads my controversial
Book “How To Relieve Numbness, Tingling,
Burning, and Cramping Without Drugs or Surgery”
tells me they were shocked that they haven’t heard
this vital information before. Drug Companies
hope you never read my book that reveals why
medication does nothing to reverse the cause
of your pain or numbness. And the safe drug
free treatment now available. Whether you have
suffered for years or just started feeling a little
numbness or pain you need to read my book and
watch my DVD.
To receive a free copy of this book and dvd
call toll-free 24 hour recorded message
888-877-8863

Binsar Bakkara Associated press

A FARMER TENDS to his field as Mt. Sinabung releases thick plumes of ash in North Sumatra province,

Indonesia. The volcano has erupted sporadically since 2010 after being dormant for about 400 years.
GREECE

Prime minister says no
elections or referendum
A government official said Greek Prime Minister Alexis
Tsipras has told senior aides to “forget about elections or a
referendum,” whatever the outcome of the country’s talks
with creditors.
The official said Tsipras told four senior ministers that
his government, elected in January, has a fresh popular
mandate and that “people have trusted us to take crucial
decisions and manage the difficulties.”
The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity due to
the sensitivity of the talks, quoted Tsipras as saying his government would deal with an agreement with creditors “however difficult the compromise.” Alternatively, “if Europe insists on a split and the continuation of subservience,” it
would fight “for dignity and national sovereignty.”

SPAIN

2 mayors signal
new direction
Spain’s biggest cities —
Madrid and Barcelona —
completed one of the nation’s biggest political upheavals in years by swearing
in far-left mayors. The new
leaders have promised to cut
their own salaries, halt
homeowner evictions and
eliminate perks enjoyed by
the rich and famous.
The landmark changes
came three weeks after
Spain’s two largest traditional parties were punished
in local elections by voters
suffering under austerity
measures and angered by
corruption scandals.
In Madrid, retired judge
Manuela Carmena was
sworn in to cheers from supporters who crowded the
streets to mark the end of
city rule by the conservative
Popular Party, which runs
the national government.
Carmena pledges include
taking on wealthy Madrilenos who enjoy exclusive use

LINEN & SUMMER
made for each other

SO
ST

of a city-owned country club,
opening it up to the masses.
“We’re creating a new kind of
politics that doesn’t fit within the conventions,” she
said. “Get ready.”
In Barcelona, anti-eviction activist Ada Colau was
sworn in as the city’s first female mayor. Colau has questioned whether it’s worth
spending $4.5 million of city
money to help host the glitzy
Formula 1 race every other
year. She thinks the funds
would be better spent on free
meals for needy children at
public schools.
INDONESIA

Mt. Sinabung
spews ash
A volcano in western Indonesia unleashed a new
burst high into the sky, sending hot ash far down the
slopes, an official said.
Authorities have been
closely monitoring 8,070foot Mt. Sinabung on Sumatra, one of Indonesia’s main
islands, since June 2, when

the alert was raised to the
highest level because of its
growing lava dome.
Hot ash tumbled down
the slopes of the mountain
as far as 2 miles, said an official at the monitoring post.
No injuries were reported
from the latest eruption.
Volcanologists
have
warned that smoldering
rocks mixed with hot gases
may tumble down at any
time. More than 2,700 people
have been evacuated from
villages in the danger zone.
IRAN

Smartphone ban
set for security
A senior Iranian official
says authorities with access
to classified information will
be banned from using
smartphones.
Gen. Gholam Reza Jalali,
who heads an Iranian military unit in charge of combating sabotage, was quoted
by the semiofficial ISNA
news agency as saying that
instructions for the ban
await ratification.
Jalali said the main danger is the possibility that
smartphone manufacturers
— all of whom are based in
Western countries — could
have access to data stored
on the phones.
Iran considers itself to
have been the target of a cyberwar since 2010, when a virus known as Stuxnet disrupted controls on some of
its nuclear centrifuges.

GERMANY

Walker killed by
circus elephant
A 65-year-old man taking
his regular morning stroll
was killed by an elephant
that had escaped from a
nearby circus, police said.

FDIC INSURED GUARANTEED

45
4.45

Home Delivery and
Membership Program

For questions about delivery,
billing and vacation holds, or
for information about our
Membership program, please
contact us at 1(800) 252-9141 or
[email protected]
latimes.com. You can also
manage your account at
myaccount.latimes.com.

FDIC Insured
6 Month Term

Letters to the Editor

Want to write a letter to be
published in the paper and
online? E-mail
[email protected]
For submission guidelines, see
latimes.com/letters.

Readers’ Representative

If you believe we have
made an error, or you have
questions about our
journalistic standards
and practices, our readers’
representative can be reached
at readers.representative
@latimes.com, or
(877)-554-4000, or online at
latimes.com/readersrep.

Safe & Secure 5 star Rated Banks Available

Su
un Cities Financial Grouup

Tours

5670 Wilshire Blvd 18th Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 648-6722
333 City Blvd West 17th Floor
Orange, CA 92868
(714) 937-2065
230046 Avenida De La Carlota Suite 600
Laguna Hills, CA 92653
(949) 282-5067
Monday-Friday 9am to 4pm

Schedule a tour of our
facilities. Call (213)-237-5757.

ww
ww.suncitiesfinancialgroup.co
om

Member for
15 Years

Hundreds of Syrian refugees poured into a TurkishSyrian border crossing, fleeing intense fighting between
Syrian Kurds and Islamic
State militants.
The mass exodus came
as Kurdish fighters said they
were
making
headway
toward Tal Abyad, a stronghold of the extremist group
near the Turkish border.
The YPG, the main Syrian Kurdish militia, said the
militants had “lost control”
over Suluk and it was advancing on Tal Abyad.
The loss of Tal Abyad
would be a major blow to the
Islamist extremist group.
— times wire reports

FOR THE RECORD
If you believe that we have
made an error, or you have
questions about The Times’
journalistic standards and
practices, you may contact
Deirdre Edgar, readers’
representative, by email at
readers.representative
@latimes.com, by phone at
(877) 554-4000, by fax at
(213) 237-3535 or by mail at
202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles,
CA 90012. The readers’
representative office is
online at latimes.com/ readersrep.

Advertising

For print and online
advertising information, go to
latimes.com/mediakit or call
(213)-237-6176.

Reprint Requests

For the rights to use articles,
photos, graphics and page
reproductions, e-mail
[email protected] or call
(213)-237-4565.

Times In Education

To get The Times, and our
newspaper-based teaching
materials, delivered to
your classroom at no cost,
contact us at latimes.com/tie
or call (213)-237-2915.

The Newsroom

Have a story tip or
suggestion? Go to a
newsroom directory at
latimes.com/mediacenter or
latimes.com/newstips or call
(213)-237-7001.

Media Relations

For outside media requests
and inquiries, e-mail
[email protected]

L.A. Times Store

Search archives, merchandise
and front pages at
latimes.com/store.

A Tribune Publishing Company Newspaper Daily Founded Dec. 4, 1881
Vol. CXXXIV No. 193

LAA3340457-1

5 South Street | Portland, ME | 774.234.7678
www.southstreetlinen.com

Kurds advancing
on Islamic State

(800)-LA TIMES

%

Advertissed yield consists of a 0.85% annual percentage yield plus 3.60%
interestt bonus which equals the above advertised yield. $15,000 deposit
requiredd and certain restrictions may apply. Penalty tor early withdrawal.
FDIC Inssured to $250,000 per institution. New customers only. Rates
availablle tor returning customers. Sun Cities is not a bank and checks
are not made payable to Sun Cities, only the FDIC Insured bank you select.
Sun Cities is a leader in locating superior insurance and banking products.

TURKEY

How to contact us:

linen

all in linen
made in maine

The man was walking in
the woods near Buchen, in
southwest Germany, when
the elephant attacked, Heidelberg police said.
The 34-year-old female
elephant, called Baby, was
captured and returned to
the circus. Police are investigating whether someone let
the elephant out of its secure
enclosure, and why the animal acted aggressively.

LOS ANGELES TIMES
(ISSN 0458-3035)
is published by the Los Angeles Times,
202 W. 1st Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90012
Periodicals postage is paid at Los
Angeles, CA, and additional cities.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes
to the above address.
Home Delivery Subscription Rates
(all rates include applicable CA sales
taxes)
Daily & Sunday:$12.00/week in most
areas, $624.00 annually.
Weekend Plus:
$6.50/week in most areas, $338.00

annually.
Sunday Plus: $4.00/week in most
areas, (includes 11/26, 12/25).
Daily Plus: $6.42/week in most areas,
$333.84 annually (includes selected
Sundays: 1/4, 1/11, 1/18, 1/25, 2/1, 2/8,
2/22, 3/1, 3/8, 3/15, 3/22, 3/29, 4/12,
4/19, 4/26, 5/3, 5/10, 5/17, 5/24, 5/31,
6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/12, 7/19, 7/26,
8/2, 8/9, 8/16, 8/23, 8/30, 9/6, 9/13,
9/20, 9/27, 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25,
11/1, 11/8, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29, 12/6, 12/13,
12/20)
Weekday Plus: $4.85/week in most
areas, $252.20 annually.

Printed with soy-based ink on recycled newsprint from wood byproducts.

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

NO INTEREST
SAVE up to $300

RT
SSTOPO
PAPHO
SAVINGS
TO

on Products, Prints & Services

$300
WORTH

SAVING

OF

FREE with any digital camera purchase.

S INSIDE!

SAVE ON PRINTS, ENLARGEMENTS & ACCESSORIES
FREE PHOTO CLASS • FREE PHOTO BOOK
FREE SENSOR CLEANING

United Storesera
of Samy’s Cam

POINT & SHOOTS
S7000
$

129

30x Optical Zoom and 24mm
Wide-Angle lens with Optical
Image Stabilizer

$229 - $100
instant rebate

NO TAX!

BUILT-IN

20X
ZOOM

$279 - $100
instant rebate

While supplies last, colors vary by location

Instant Film
Camera

$

249

NO TAX!

NO TAX!

NO TAX!

• DIGIC 4+ Image Processor
• ISO 3200, and a high speed burst
rate of 7.2 fps
• Intelligent IS image stabilization

$249 - $20
instant rebate

12.1
24X

MEGAPIXEL

16.2

• A full-size accessory shoe that’s
compatible with many exciting
Nikon accessories
• 1080p Full HD videos with stereo sound
• Full manual control and RAW (NEF)
• Sharp subjects and softly blurred
backgrounds

1X
ZOOM

Cube

Goriillapod
SLR
R Zoom
with
h Head

Mini Lifestyle
Action Camera

9999

$

SAVE $10
$

one
smartpho
or tablett

NO TAX!

• Instant credit card
sized prints
• Retractable
60mm Lens
• Built-In Flash

• 2.4” x 3.9" images
• Retractable 95mm f/14 Lens
• 0.37x Optical Viewfinder and Target Spot

229

Slim with a
Powerful Zoom

Instant Lab v2.0
0
Universal Instant film
prints
fro
$
95 your om

Mini 90

17999

$

12999

$

NO TAX!

Nikon DX-format CMOS sensor for the ultimate
COOLPIX image quality & low-light performance

• High Sensitivity MOS Sensor, noise-free shooting
• Fast. start-up time and 12fps with full res.
MEGAPIXEL
• 12-fps High-speed video in HD quality
• 3.0" Free Angle 460K-dot LCD Display
ZOOM
• 0.2" Electronic View Finder with 100%
field of view
$597.99 - $200
instant rebate • RAW and RAW+JPEG Recording Option

SAVE 20

Impossible Color or B&W 600

INSTAX Mini 2-10 pack film

INSTAX

Constant F2.8 camera

13255

FREE PACK OF FILM WITH PURCHASE

FREE PACK OF FILM WITH PURCHASE
INSTAX
Wide 300

ZOOM

$

• 20x optical zoom lens goes from wide-angle
to telephoto
• Nikon snapbridge quickly and easily sends
photos wirelessly
• Full HD 1080/60i videos with stereo sound
• Built-in Wi-Fi® and Near Field
Communication technology (NFC) to connect
to your camera to a compatible smartphone

16

MEGAPIXEL

MEGAPIXEL

PowerShot

399

$

20.2 18X

SX610 HS

Ultra-slim with 20X Zoom

• Canon DIGIC 4 Image Processor delivers
stunning quality images
• Capture impressive 720p HD video with a
dedicated movie button and zoom while
shooting
• High Speed AF greatly helps improve
focus speed

30X
ZOOM

179

39799

NO TAX!

NO TAX!

16

$

SAVE $100

SAVE $100
$

ON
NOW!

00
DMC-FZ20
SAVE $200

COOLPIX

SX400 IS

A5

6 Months* on purchases of any amount. 12 Months* on purchases of $199 or more with your Samy’s Camera credit card made
between June 14, 2015 to June 20, 2015. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the promotional purchase
is not paid in full within 6 or 12 Months or if you make a late payment. Minimum Monthly Payments Required. Subject to credit approval

EXCLUSIONS APPLY

New!

PowerShot

MEGAPIXEL

6 or 12 Months*

FATHER’S DAY

if paid in
full within

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

NO TAX!

Versatile miniNO TAX!
tripod or grip
that can be used with SLR cameras
with zoom lens atttached or with
camc
cord
derss ma
ax. load 6.6 lbs.

$79.99
- $10
instant
rebate

Works with Apple,
Android phones
and tablets

69

99

129

$
99
Zip Mobile
Printer
NO TAX!

• 35mm (1.4") Square Rubberized Body
• Capture 1080p Video and 6MP Photos
• Wide 124° FOV Lens
• Splashproof and Impact Resistant

2" x 3" smudge-proof color
photos on peel-back, sticky paper.

VIDEO

4

HC-X1000
$

2999

99

BLACK

39999

$

499

$

NO TAX!

99

FY-G4 3-Axis
Handheld Gimbal
for GoPro HERO4

R1

Live View Remote

119

$

SAVE $49

300

$

NO TAX!

NO TAX!

Shoots & records cinema
4K at a true 24p, & UHD
at broadcast compatible
frame rates

SILVER

4

NO TAX!
For GoPro HERO3,
HERO3+ & HERO4

NO TAX!
Extreme wireless control

Features 4K30, 2.7K50
& 1080p120 video

Features 2.7K50, 1080p120 & 1440p video
Waterproof to 131’/40m

Waterproof to 131’/40m

• High Bit Rate Quality
with
HC-X1000 • Built-in XLR Pro Audio Terminal
purchase • 20X Leica Lens
with Lens Mounted Control Rings
BATTERY
• Record Night Scenes Confidently
with 0 Lux

FREE

• 12MP photos up to 30 frames per second
• Built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth®
• Protune™ for photos and video
• GoPro App and Studio Software

• Features 1080p60 and 720p120 video
• 12MP photos up to 30 frames per second
• Built-in Wi-Fi & Bluetooth®, and Protune™ for photos & video
• Built-in touch screen LCD

Operate the camera & view a live image
through its 2" LCD display

• Works with GoPro HERO4, HERO
O3+,
HERO3
• Fixed Axes and Pan/Tilt following modes
• 320° Pan/Tilt Rotation
• 100° Roll Rotation
• Single-Button Operation

• Remote Monitoring and Operation
• 2" Live View LCD Display
• Wristband for Watch-Style Operation
• Water- and Shock-Resistant

$349.99 - $49 instant savings

INTERCHANGEABLE LENS

E-PL6

299

$

SAVE $80
$
95

SAVE $150

446

399

$

NO TAX!

NO TAX! Easy capture of movies & photos

Tilt and reverse LCD monitor
for fun self portraits

16

• TruePic VI Image Processor
• 3.0" 614k-Dot Tilting Touchscreen LCD
• Full HD 1080p Video Recording
• FAST 35-Point AF System, Face/Eye Detect
• ISO 100-25600, 8 fps Shooting
• 3-Axis In-Body VCM Image Stabilization

MEGAPIXEL

NO TAX!

• Scene Intelligent Auto mode
• Continuous shooting up to 3.0 fps
• Large, 3.0-inch LCD monitor
• ISO 100-6400 (expandable to H: 12800)
• 9-point AF system

18

24.2

$549 - $150 instant rebate

MEGAPIXEL

SAVE 200
$

499

SAVE $100

698

$

NO TAX!

MVP

Small in size,
enormous performance

1080p Full HD movie
recording with stereo sound

NO TAX!

18

MEGAPIXEL

ALL NIKON PRODUCTS INCLUDE NIKON INC. USA LIMITED WARRANTY.
AUTHORIZED NIKON DEALER, NIKON USA INC.

All the quality in half the size
and weight of other DSLRs

24

• ISO 100-12800 for stills &
ISO 100-6400 for videos
• Touch Screen Wide 3” Clear View
LCD monitor II
• 9-point AF system
• Touch Screen Wide 3.0-inch
Clear View LCD monitor II

$526.95 - $80 instant rebate

ALL CANON ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE INCLUDES CANON
USA 1 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY REGISTRATION CARD.

with 16-50mm

$

• 24.2 MP DX-format CMOS sensor
and EXPEED 3
• Guide Mode makes it easy
• 4 fps continuous shooting
• 100-6400 ISO Expandable to 12800

MEGAPIXEL

6000

with 18-55mm
STM lens

with
18-55mm VR

with 18-55mm
IS II

with 14-42mm

MEGAPIXEL

• Fastest auto focus with 179 AF points
and 11 frames per second
• Instant sharing via smartphone with
Wi-Fi® and NFC
• ISO range of 100-25600
for low light photos
• Record Full HD
1080/24/60P video

$798 - $100
instant rebate

$699 - $200 instant rebate

New!
with
18-55mm IS STM

MVP

SAVE $200

with 18-55mm II

499

$

E-M10

Touchscreen Vari-angle
3.2” LCD

with 14-42mm NO TAX!

16

4

• Premium Metal Build with Built-In Flash
• FAST 81-point AF plus Focus Peaking
• 8 fps Continuous Shooting
• 3 Axis Image Stabilization

MEGAPIXEL

24.2

MEGAPIXEL

$699 - $200 instant rebate

50mm F1.8
STM
$
99

189

Designed specifically for
EOS APS-C DSLRs, where it
provides a 35mm-equivalent
$299 - $50
focal length range of 16-28.8mm. instant rebate

25%
OFF!

Supports data transfer
rates of up to 500MB/s.

NO TAX!
$896.95 - $150
instant rebate

216

With built-in Wi-Fi for
instant photo sharing
• DX-Format CMOS Sensor
• EXPEED 4 Image Processor
• Full HD 1080p at 30/25/24p
• 100-12800 ISO
(Expandable to 25600)

SAVE $30
$

529

$

449

NO TAX!

NO TAX!

Perfect in low lighting situations
& great for producing images
with beautiful background blur

MEGAPIXEL

11-16mm F2.8 II

SAVE $100

95

An ultra-wide angle len
ns
ure
with a fast f/2.8 aperture
throughout the zoom range

Canon, Nikon & Sony Mounts
$629 - $100 mail-in rebate

$479 - $30
mail-in rebate

Canon, Nikon & Sony Mounts

$

$43.78 - $9.79 instant rebate

9995

SAVE $50

$

NO TAX!

645

Gives GoPro users the
freedom to shoot shake-free
video, as well as lock the
camera to frame for rock
solid stabilization on the
wildest of GoPro adventures.
Weighs in at a mere
half-pound.

curve-si

17999

NO TAX!

Handheld
Mechanical Stabilization

HD Digital
Art Projector™

• New increased contrast ratio of 15,000:1
• Aspect ratios of both 4:3 and 16:9 •Weighs only 1 lb
• Only 60w of power consumption
WHILE SUPPLIES
• HDMI Outlet for high-definition output LAST

99

P an end to
Put
hard to watch,
sh
haky camera
foootage

Handheld
Stabilizer

with a greater
NO TAX! Brighter,
contrast ratio

SAVE $9.79

33

746

95

16-300mm F3.5-6.3
Di II VC PZD MACRO

LED 500™
$

64GB Professional
1000x UHS-II SDXC
Memory Card

NO TAX!

SAVE $150

$

$899 - $50 instant rebate

COME CHECK OUT THE ARTIST CORNER
LOCATED AT THE FAIRFAX LOCATION!

$35.12 - $20.13 instant rebate

$

with 18-55mm

• Built-in Wi-Fi® allows you to wirelessly
transfer your images and videos with ease
• Built-in NFC allows quick and simple pairing to a compatible Android™ device and
the Canon Connect Station CS100 device
• DIGIC 6 Image Processor
• 3.0" 1.04M-dot Vari-Angle Touchscreen

SAVE $20

NO TAX!

95

Data Transfer Rate up to 165MB/s

24.2

50mm F1.8G

NO TAX!

24.2

Wireless takes EOS Rebel
to the next level

FATHER’S DAY GIFT IDEAS

NO TAX!

• Data Transfer Rate up to 165MB/s
• 7200 rpm •USB 3.0 Port
• Designed for Photo, Video, and Audio Use
• Apple Time Machine Compatible

$996.95 - $400 instant rebate

249

1499

NO TAX!

24.2

MEGAPIXEL

$

$

G-DRIVE G1 USB 3.0
Hard Drive

NO TAX!

$

SAVE $20.13

$

596

MVP

MEGAPIXEL

• New EXPEED 4 lets you shoot at
high speeds up to 5 frames per
second, shoot in low light with high
ISO sensitivity, create high-resolution
panoramas and much more.

95

SAVE $50

Pro USB 3.0
Dual-Slot Reader

4TB

SAVE $400

$

849

NO TAX!

Full HD videos with
tack-sharp details

10-18mm
F4.5-5.6 IS STM

Fast, lightweight f/1.8 prime DX-format
NIKKOR lens perfect for low-light conditions,
travel and general photography.

0G03594

2

LENS
KIT

with 18-55mm VR
& 55-200mm VR

$996.95 - $150 instant rebate

NO TAX!

ideal for both still and video shooting
due to its speedy and smooth operation

846

• A new Fn button gives you one-touch
access to important settings like aperture,
ISO sensitivity, AF mode and more
• Built-in Wi-Fi and smartphone compatibility
• Low-light sensitivity up to ISO 25600
and up to 5 fps
• 39-point autofocus system

196

NO TAX!

MVP

SAVE $150
$
95
NO TAX!

35mm F1.8G
$
95

125

SAVE $50
$

A lightweight stabilizer recommended for use with the
GoPro Hero and other small cameras weighing up to 1 lb.
shoot smooth shots even while going to extremes like
running up and down stairs or traveling over rugged terrain

$229.99 - $50 instant savings

ALL BONDHUS TOOLS
plus NO TAX!
uLite 2 Ligh
ht
0W
Octabox 200
Fluorescent Kit

PHA
ANTOM 3
Adva
anced

25990

999

$

$

444

NO TAX!

NO TAX!

A good choice for a lighting setup for ecommerce, small
or large products, groups and portraiture. The kit includes
two 26" diameter octagonal softboxes, uLite constant
light fixtures and 6.5' light stands.

1080p video at up to
60 frames per second

• Included 1080P HD / 12 MP Camera
• Integrated 3-Axis Stabilization Gimbal
• Easy to Fly, Intelligent Flight System
• Live HD View
• Dedicated Remote Controller
• Powerful Mobile App with
Auto Video Editor

BRING IN ANY TRIPOD FOR TRADE-IN AND
RECEIVE UP TO $100 OFF THE PURCHASE
OF A NEW MANFROTTO OR GITZO TRIPOD
IN STOCK!

PRO
O
Quadra Hybrid
d
Li-Ion Pro
2 Light Kit witth
s
S Flash Heads

PHANTOM 2
Quadcopter
SAVE $180
Flying time that lasts to

499

$

NO TAX!
$679 - $180
instant rebate

up to 22 minutes

Q500+

T phoon
Quadcopter

• Larger battery and improved prop design
• 6-channel, 2.4GHz Wi-Fi Transmitter
• Up to 3,280' Line-of-Sight Wi-Fi Range
• Up to 22 Minutes Flying Time

1099

$

NO TAX!

956064

ION Lithium
Inverter System
With spare battery and case

SAVE $50
$

NO TAX!

479

Allows you to take your studio strobes on the road or
off the road without electricity and without noisy
generators or inverters
$529 - $50 mail-in rebate

Trade-in
your old
equipment
for cash or
store credit!

224599

NO TAX!
$2495.99 - $250
instant rebate

A compact portable 400Ws battery flash
system for studio and outdoors use.
Complete with fast recycling times, wireless trigger and remote options via the
EL-Skyport, the Quadra Hybrid RX really
is a perfect system for anyone who likes
to work away from the mains.

NO TAX!

75 OFF ANY MANFROTTO PRODUCT
IN STOCK PRICED AT $150 OR MORE!
$
100 OFF ANY GITZO PRODUCT IN STOCK
PRICED AT $200 OR MORE!
$

CALL GEORGE (323) 938-2420 x1293

samys.
com
CULVER CITY PASADENA
(310) 450-4551 (626) 796-3300

(South of 3rd)

(South of Culver Blvd.)

4411 SEPULVEDA BL.

1759 E. COLORADO BL. 3309 S. BRISTOL ST.
(West of Allen Ave.)

(In Bristol Plaza, Santa Ana)

MONDAY - FRIDAY
RENTAL, FILM & PROCESSING 8am-6:30pm
ALL OTHER DEPTS. M-F 9:30am-6:30pm

MON. - FRI. 9:30am-6:30pm
SATURDAY 10am-6pm

MON. -FRI. 8am-6pm
SATURDAY 10am-6pm
SUNDAY 11am - 5pm

MON. - FRI. 9:30am-6:30pm

431 S. FAIRFAX AVE.

SATURDAY 10am-6pm
RENTAL, FILM & PROCESSING 9am-6pm
SUNDAY 11am - 5pm

SUNDAY 11am - 5pm

!
Now Open in SAN FRANCISCO
8400
621)
(415
St.
1090 Bryant

$624 - $136 instant rebate

MAIL ORDERS

(800) 321-4SAM (800) 321-4726

ORANGE COUNTY SANTA BARBARA
(714) 557-9400
(805)963-7269

LOS ANGELES
(323) 938-2420

SATURDAY 10am-6pm
SUNDAY 10am - 6pm

CASH PAID for
USED EQUIPMENT

(323) 938-2420 X1293 GEORGE

• Capture 1080p Video & 16MP Photos
• 3-Axis Gimbal Stabilizes Camera
• Includes 10-Channel, 2.4 GHz
Transmitter

WE BUY & SELL USED EQUIPMENT!

SAVE $250

$

Designed for Aerial Photo
and Video

530 STATE ST.

(Between Cota & Haley)
MONDAY - FRIDAY 9am-6pm
SATURDAY 9:30am-6pm
Rentals 9:30am - 3pm
SUNDAY 11am - 5pm

CORPORATE SALES:
(866) 726-9463

*Valid on any purchase of $199 or more for the
6-month offer and on any purchase of $499 or
more for the 12-month offer made on your Samy’s
account. On promo purchase balance, monthly
payments required, but no finance charges will be
assessed if (1) promo purchase balance paid in full
typographical errors. Quantities limited in 6 or 12 months, and (2) all minimum monthly
payments on account paid when due. Otherwise,
to stock on hand. First come, first
promo may be terminated and treated as a
served. No rainchecks and no holds.
non-promo balance. Finance Charges accrued at
Prices subject to change without
the Purchase APR will be assessed from the
notice. See store for details.
purchase date. Regular rates apply to non-promo
Special offers available on in stock
balances, including optional charges. Promo
items only. Colors vary by
purchases on existing accounts may not receive
location. Samy’s pays Sales Tax
full benefit of promo terms, including reduced APR
if appllicabble, if account is subbject to Penalltyy APR.
on sellect items. Maiil Ordder,
Payments over the minimum will be applied as
samys.com and all Used, Demo
required by applicable law. As of 1/1/10, APR:
or Refurbished purchases are
tyy APR
excluded from the “No Sales Tax” 28.99% & on all accounts in default, Penalty
Promotion. **Not valid on Nikon MVP 29.99%. Minimum finance charge $2.00. Subject
to approval by Synchrony Bank.

PRICES GOOD
UNTIL JUNE 20, 2015
EXCEPT WHERE
INDICATED. Not responsible for

A6

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

Long Beach BMW

L AT I ME S . CO M

Long Beach BMW

longbeachbmw.com

Ultimate machines
for the ultimate person

The Ultimate
Driving Machine®

2015 BMW X1 sDrive28i
MSRP: $33,165
Lease For:

249

$

A month
+ tax
1 at this lease (FV318948)
36 month lease on approved credit to qualified buyers through BMW Financial Services. Lease includes 10,000 miles per
year with $0.25 per additional mile. $3,999 total drive off. $0 security deposit required. Sell: $30,791. Cash Down: $2,314.86.

2015 BMW 328i
MSRP: $38,450
Lease For:

259

$

A month
+ tax
1 at this lease (FK123351)

Karam al-Masri AFP/Getty Images

SYRIAN RESCUE workers and others help people from a building after a re-

ported government bombing of a rebel-held neighborhood of Aleppo last week.

Lives somehow
go on in Aleppo

36 month lease on approved credit to qualified buyers through BMW Financial Services. Lease includes 10,000 miles per year with $0.25
$ per
additional mile. $3,999 total drive off. $0 security deposit required. Sell: $34,281. Cash Down: $2,283.88. BMW National Incentive: <$1,000>.

2015 BMW i3 Range Extender
MSRP: $47,200
Lease For:

$

329

A month
+ tax
1 at this lease (FV277902)
24 month lease on approved credit to qualified buyers through BMW Financial Services. Lease includes 10,000 miles per year with $0.25 per
additional mile. $3,999 total drive off. $0 security deposit required. Sell: $44,591. Cash Down: $1,534.17. BMW National Incentive: <$7,500>.

2015 BMW 428i Gran Coupe

MSRP: $46,100
Lease For:

$

349

A month
+ tax
1 at this lease (FG86834)
36 month lease on approved credit to qualified buyers through BMW Financial Services. Lease includes 10,000 miles per year with $0.25 per
additional mile. $3,999 total drive off. $0 security deposit required. Sell: $41,021. Cash Down: $2,153.21. BMW National Incentive: <$1,000>.

2015 BMW 528i
MSRP: $50,900
Lease For:

$

379

A month
+ tax
1 at this lease (FD519344)
36 month lease on approved credit to qualified buyers through BMW Financial Services. Lease includes 10,000 miles per year with $0.25 per
additional mile. $3,999 total drive off. $0 security deposit required. Sell: $44,791. Cash Down: $2,101.56. BMW National Incentive: <$1,500>.

2015 BMW 535i
MSRP: $58,200
Lease For:

$

469

A month
+ tax
1 at this lease (FGL126728)
36 month lease on approved credit to qualified buyers through BMW Financial Services. Lease includes 10,000 miles per year with $0.25 per
additional mile. $3,999 total drive off. $0 security deposit required. Sell: $52,021. Cash Down: $1,967.32. BMW National Incentive: <$1,500>.
*Limited Financing. On Approval of Credit. Prices plus government fees and taxes, any finance charges, any dealer
document processing charge, any electronic filing charge and any emissions testing charge. Expires 6/30/15.

877.704.8571 longbeachbmw.com

LAA3346567-1

Long Beach BMW

Drive with your heart. Buy with your head.
2998 Cherry Ave | Signal Hill, CA 90755

[Syria, from A1]
tunnels, while soldiers aim
to thwart subterranean assaults from their own
passageways.
At street level, the staccato of gunfire and thud of
mortar rounds sporadically
break the stillness. And then
there are the hellish improvised bombings, loud explosions followed by the cries of
anguished survivors.
“If we only had six
months of peace, people
would come back and this
could all be reconstructed,”
a Syrian army commander
said as he strolled through
the market, noting that
many of the centuries-old
stone walls were still intact,
albeit blackened by fire.
But a rare visit by a
Western correspondent to
the government-controlled
neighborhoods of Aleppo
makes clear the jarring toll
of nearly three years of warfare.
This historic city, once
Syria’s commercial hub, is
divided between government forces and various Islamist rebel groups, whose
brigades form a semicircle

around the town. A stalemate set in almost two years
ago, and shows no sign of
abating.
President Bashar Assad
has vowed not to withdraw
forces from the once-bustling city of about 3 million,
despite recent rebel gains
elsewhere in the north
against an overstretched
military.
Power and water shortages, along with daily mortar and sniper attacks, leave
the estimated 2 million who
remain here on edge. The Internet and other communications are spotty. Many of
the factories that made
Aleppo a thriving industrial
capital have been looted and
destroyed, the machinery
and wiring carted off to
neighboring Turkey, business leaders say.
In May 2014, rebels with
Al Nusra Front managed to
cut off most of the water supply to government-controlled areas for 13 days. The
Al Qaeda affiliate is one of
several opposition factions
in Aleppo. Islamic State, the
Al Qaeda offshoot that is a
rival of Al Nusra, was driven

out of Aleppo city in early
2014 by other rebel groups,
but maintains a presence in
the rural Aleppo region.
With the airport mostly
out of service, the army
keeps the city resupplied via
a circuitous eight-hour road
link to Damascus that skirts
rebel territory.
While human rights
groups deplore mass casualties from the military’s use of
so-called barrel bombs on
rebel-held territory here and
across the country, residents of government-controlled neighborhoods in
Aleppo speak with dread of
rebel
rockets,
mortar
rounds and sundry improvised weapons, such as the
hell cannon, a homemade
howitzer that indiscriminately fires repurposed gas
or oxygen cylinders packed
with explosives into the city.
In January 2013, a pair of
improvised missiles struck
outside the fine arts and
architecture buildings at
Aleppo University, killing
more than 150 students.
“Our students bled into their
examination papers,” said
[See Syria, A7]

L AT I M ES . C O M
[Syria, from A6]
Hassan Saudi, manager of
student activities.
The campus, home to
more than 100,000 students,
is hit weekly by ordnance
from the rebel side, according to university officials.
Another threat comes
from rebel snipers. Along the
city’s meandering dividing
line, which often cuts between densely populated
neighborhoods, authorities
have strung 30-foot-high
curtains in a low-tech bid to
deny targets. The military
also deploys snipers, whom
the opposition has accused
of targeting civilians on its
side.
The rebels generally control eastern Aleppo, while
the
government
holds
strong in the west, including
districts home to Christians
in this overwhelmingly
Sunni Muslim city.
The rebels were able to
advance three years ago in
working-class
neighborhoods where they initially
had civilian support. But
they were never able to take
the Citadel, the towering ancient fort complex that arises from the Old City and provides a panoramic view of
both opposition and government-held areas. On a visit
to the Citadel last week,
army troops manned gunnery positions atop the castle.
Since January, authorities say, more than 400 civilians on the government side
have been killed in sniper
and bombing attacks. The
opposition says hundreds in
rebel-held districts have
been killed in aerial bombardments.
Just the other day, an office worker at the heavily
damaged — and highly fortified — government center
near downtown ran hysterically from her office, crying,
“My boy has been shot!” Her
11-year-old son, Abdo, was
hit as he walked on the
street. She received a call
from the hospital about the
shooting, a co-worker said.
Still, life goes on with a
certain air of normality in
this hemmed-in city.
Open-air markets in government-held
neighborhoods feature ample supplies of fresh zucchini, tomatoes and potatoes. Residents chat in cafes day and
night, and children continue
to go to school. The city has,
to some degree, a jaunty, defiant feel, despite its isola-

S
tion and the prevalent sense
of uncertainty.
“This is where my shop is;
where else can I go?” asks
Ahmed Obeid, 42, a barber
in jeans and a green smock
whose establishment sits at
the government end of the
“passage of death” — a winding corridor through no
man’s land that long was the
only pedestrian link between the two parts of town.
The path closed eight
months ago, and each side
blames the other for the high
number of deaths by sniper
fire along the route.
Now residents seeking to
cross from one side to another — a five-minute walk in
peacetime — must take a 14hour bus ride past government and rebel checkpoints.
Government employees who
live on the rebel side must
pick up their paychecks on
the government side.
Legions of those displaced by the war have settled wherever there is accommodation.
Squatter
families have moved into a
series of bombed-out, onceelegant apartment buildings across the street from
the landmark clock tower
facing the Old City.
“I had no place else to go,
so I found this place and
took my family here,” said
Zahra Araaj, 42, as she sat in
the living area of a threebedroom flat housing her extended family of15. A car battery provides the only electricity.
Outside, children play on
the streets amid the rubble
in a district that was once a
hub for tourists; now it is
blocked off by checkpoints
and subject to mortar fire.
“A man was killed right
outside by a mortar yesterday,” says Araaj, a grandmother and exile from the
rebel side whose son is serving in the Syrian military.
“But we need a home somewhere.”
Many cram into flats in
the gritty Salahuddin district, scarred from fighting
almost three years ago in
which the army pushed the
rebels back during intense
urban combat.
“This is my home and I’m
staying here,” said Um
Hamad, 41, a mother of five
in Salahuddin who, like
some others, asked to be
identified by a nickname for
security reasons.
Since the battle for Aleppo began, she said, her family has been forced to move

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

A7

Nabih Bulos For The Times

A SOLDIER keeps watch from the Citadel of Aleppo, a towering ancient fort complex that arises from the

Old City and provides a panoramic view of both opposition and government-held areas.

Karam Al-Masri AFP/Getty Images

MEMBERS of the Syrian Red Crescent transport the bodies of soldiers from a

rebel-held area to a government-held area of Aleppo last week.
more than a dozen times.
She now has fixed up her
apartment and plans to remain, even though one bedroom was sheared off in a
mortar strike from the nearby rebel zone.
Electricity in Salahuddin
is mostly provided via webs
of multi-hued wires that
sprout from generators to

concrete apartment blocks
like elongated spaghetti
strands.
Over time, people have
become accustomed to the
risks and the shortages.
“It’s a strange feeling not
knowing if a shell will fall on
you next,” said Hagoup
Khoudesian, 35, an insurance salesman who was

showing a visitor a bombdamaged apartment building in the largely Christian
Sulaymaniya district.
The residence was struck
by a mortar round in April
on the evening of Good Friday, as celebrated in the
Eastern rite calendar. More
than a dozen people were
killed and scores were in-

jured. Many in Aleppo’s vibrant and diverse Christian
minority viewed the timing
as deliberate.
Though many have left
the city, Aleppo retains a
large Christian population,
including members of many
sects. No official numbers
are available, but it appears
that a larger number of civilians have fled from rebelheld areas, where damage
seems much more extensive.
In the front-line Midan
district, home to many Armenian Christians, St. Krikor Church has been hit by
mortar rounds half a dozen
times. But services continue. The shelling has forced
the shuttering of buildings
and schools just down the
street, including an Armenian college.
“We live in an area amid
wanton destruction,” said
Nersis Sarkisian, a father of
two who resides less than a
block from St. Krikor
Church. “But this is our
home, this is my church. We
are not leaving.”
patrick.mcdonnell
@latimes.com
Special correspondent
Nabih Bulos contributed to
this report.

FREE GIFT FROM LANCÔME
Create your own 6-piece gift from these Lancôme favorites—yours
with a Lancôme purchase of $39.50 or more (a $75–$113 value).*

• W E R E CO M M E N D •

1
CHOOSE

ADVANCED GÉNIFIQUE
AND ADVANCED GÉNIFIQUE
YEUX LIGHT PEARL

a cleanser.

2
CHOOSE
an anti-aging night
m oisturizer.

3
RECEIVE
a Bi-Facil Eye
Makeup Remover.

4
CHOOSE
a lip and cheek duo
in bronze or pink.

5
CHOOSE
an exclusive pink
or black train case.

L ANCÔME
Two formulas—one for a youthful radiance and the other
for an illuminated eye area. Advanced Génifique, 1.0 oz,
$78. Also in 1.7 oz, $105 and 2.5 oz, $135. Advanced
Génifique Yeux Light Pearl, 0.67 oz, $69. Cosmetics.

LOYALLISTS GET DOUBLE POINTS IN COSMETICS & FRAGRANCES—ALWAYS**

*Value will vary based on client’s selection of products. Offer valid now–June 21, 2015. One gift per customer, while supplies last. **Points are not earned at Nespresso shops, or on sales tax, store services, cash advances, restaurants in Bloomingdale’s stores, or when
redeeming Bloomingdale’s Gift and Reward Cards. On December 31 of each year, 75% of all remaining points on your account will be forfeited. U.S. stores only. Not at Bloomingdale’s Dubai. See bloomingdales.com/loyallist for complete details.

A8

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Court curbs power of
military commissions
Appellate panel ruling
revives debate over
terrorism trials at
Guantanamo Bay.

BUY OVER
200 SQUARE FEET
AND GET
$300 OFF

Vo

C

By Timothy M. Phelps

’ss Be t Sh

o

C

a

4Y

WASHINGTON — An
important federal appeals
court has reduced the powers of military commissions
to try terrorism suspects for
certain crimes, reopening
the debate over whether
such cases should instead be
handled by civilian courts.
The decision by the U.S.
Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
could have an impact on
many of the detainees at the
U.S. military prison at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, according to legal experts.
The D.C. Circuit Court
said that military commissions like those at Guantanamo do not have the power
to handle cases involving
lesser charges such as conspiracy or providing material support for terrorism,
which can also be prosecuted in U.S. civilian courts.
Their jurisdiction, said
two of three judges on the
panel, is limited to recognized international war
crimes.
The decision Friday immediately resurrected a
long-simmering debate over
whether people captured by
the U.S. in Afghanistan and
elsewhere on suspicion of
supporting Al Qaeda and
other
terrorist
groups
should be tried in civilian
courts rather than the military commissions at Guantanamo.
The decision “underscores what so many of us
have been saying for years,”
said Sen. Patrick J. Leahy of
Vermont, the top Democrat
on the Senate Judiciary
Committee.
“America
stands on stronger legal and
moral ground when we use
our federal courts to try terrorists for their crimes.”
The decision overturned
the last remaining convic-

Ru

“A” Rating With BBB

Best Shutter Company

Best Shutter Company
2011, 2012, 2013. 2014

Top Shutter Company
2012, 2013, 2014

Best of TrustLink
Award Winner
2011, 2012, 2013. 2014

Buy Direct From The MANUFACTURER & SAVE!
! Low Price Guarantee

FREE

We’ll Meet or Beat Any Big Box Store Bid

INSTALLATION

! No Hidden Charges
! Lifetime Warranty
! 100% Whole Basswood &
Acrylic Lacquer Construction
! Shutters For EVERY BUDGET

FREE

ESTIMATE

FREE

DELIVERY

! Huge Discounts on Shades & Blinds!

CALL TODAY FOR A FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION!

1.800.748.8377
ElizabethShutters.com

Made in the USA

Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

SEN. PATRICK J. LEAHY (D-Vt.), foreground,

hailed the ruling as an important step toward moving
trials for Guantanamo detainees to federal courts.

tion against Ali Hamza Bahlul, a Yemeni who allegedly
served as Osama bin Laden’s public relations director
and created videos glorifying Al Qaeda’s attacks
against the U.S.
Judge Karen Henderson,
who dissented from the ruling by Judges Judith Rogers
and David Tatel, likened
Bahlul to Hitler’s propagandist Joseph Goebbels and
said Bahlul had bragged
about his role in the Sept. 11
attacks.
Henderson warned that
the impact of the decision
would go far beyond Bahlul’s
case.
“My colleagues bar the
government from employing
military commissions to try
individuals who conspire to
commit war crimes against
the U.S.,” she said. In the future, she said, military commissions would not be able
to try any offense not “condoned” by the international
community.
“Their timing could not
be
worse,”
Henderson
warned, referring to the
mounting Islamic State
threat in Iraq and Syria.
Steve Vladeck, an expert
on national security law at
American University in
Washington, wrote in a blog
post that “this is a Very. Big.
Deal.” He said it would limit
the future of Guantanamo
commissions to the Sept. 11related trial of Khalid
Shaikh Mohammed and

perhaps one other prisoner
among the 122 detainees still
at the military prison.
Eugene
Fidell,
who
teaches military law at Yale
Law School, agreed with
Vladeck’s assessment and
said it was time to end the
use of military commissions.
“There is so little left to
the potential jurisdiction of
military commissions,” Fidell said. “This patient is dying on the operating people,
and it is time we said ‘do not
resuscitate.’ ”
Though the Supreme
Court has overturned decisions of the D.C. Circuit on
Guantanamo, it was not
clear whether the Obama
administration would appeal, given its preference for
using civilian courts.
“The Defense Department is studying the judges’
ruling and exploring all legal
options,” said Army Lt. Col.
Myles Caggins, the Defense
Department spokesman for
military commissions.
Former Atty. Gen. Eric H.
Holder Jr. said before leaving his post this year that the
Sept. 11 defendants would
have been convicted by now
and be facing execution if he
had been allowed to try them
in New York. But plans to do
that caused an uproar of
criticism from Democrats as
well as Republicans, and
Congress moved to block it.
[email protected]
Twitter: @timphelpsLAT

*On all new June 2015 orders only. 200 SF minimum. Offer expires on 6/30/15.

LIVING TRUST
SEMINARS
FREE AMENDMENTS FOR LIFE!

YOU WILL LEARN:

• WHO can sign for you if you are incapacitated?
• WHAT will happen if you can’t make medical decisions?
• WHEN is the right time to create your living trust?
• WHERE in a trust can you customize for your unique family dynamics?
• WHY does a Will require probate?
• HOW does the IRS calculate the death tax?
• HOW to restate an existing trust?
• HOW to avoid having your home go into probate?
Married couples are encouraged to attend together... Supportive children are welcome!

EL SEGUNDO

DOWNEY

CULVER CITY

Tuesday June 16th

Tuesday June 16th

Thursday June 18th

PROTECTING FAMILIES AND RESTATING TRUSTS FOR OVER 25 YEARS!

MONTEREY
PARK
Thursday June 18th

10 AM

6 PM

2 PM

NO HIDDEN FEES
FLAT RATE!

Courtyard Marriott

2 PM

NORTHRIDGE

VAN NUYS

Monday June 22nd

Monday June 22nd

9:30 AM

Hilton Garden In

Embassy Suites
Los Angeles/Downey

(Parking Validation Provided)

Langley Senior Center

Las Hadas Mexican Restaurant

GLENDORA

LAKEWOOD

LOS ANGELES

Tuesday June 23rd

Tuesday June 23rd

Tuesday June 23rd

THOUSAND
OAKS

9 AM

1:30 PM

OXNARD
Thursday June 25th
9:30 AM

Glendora Country Club

Weingart Senior Center

BALDWIN PARK

WHITTIER
Thursday July 9th
10AM
Marie Callender’s
Restaurant & Bakery

Tuesday July 7th
6PM
Courtyard Marriott
Baldwin Park Towne Center

CYPRESS
Tuesday July 14th
1:30PM
Courtyard Marriott
Katella Avenue

La Serna Drive

LA HABRA
Tuesday July 14th
6PM
La Habra Community Center

6 PM

2 PM
Hampton Inn & Suites
(Parking Validation Provided)

ALHAMBRA
Tuesday July 7th

Thursday June 25th

1:30PM

Japanese Cultural &
Community Center

Oxnard Public Library
(This event is a private reservation and
is not endorsed by the City of Oxnard)

Sunset Hills Country Club

Almansor Court

LOS ANGELES

BURBANK

SIMI VALLEY

Thursday July 9th

Monday July 13th

Monday July 13th

2PM

10AM

2PM

The Olympic Collection Banquet Center

Coast Anbelle Hotel

Courtyard Marriott

Capitol Room 2nd Floor - Parking Validation Provided

Between Buena Vista & Victory

E. Cochran St.

ROLLING HILLS
ESTATES
Tuesday July 14th
9:30AM
Peninsula Center Library

PASADENA
Wednesday July 15th
10AM
Courtyard Marriott

valet park validation provided
for direct access to hotel

2 PM

TORRANCE

SAN CLEMENTE

Wednesday July 15th

Thursday July 16th

2PM

9:30AM

Courtyard Marriott

Talega Golf Club

Sepulveda Blvd.

located left hand side shopping Ctr.

800-941-4171

ANAHEIM
Thursday July 16th
1:30PM
Marie Callender’s
Restaurant & Bakery
E. La Palma Avenue

Community Room 3rd fl.

LAGUNA NIGUEL
Thursday July 16th
6:30PM
Sea Country Community & Senior Ctr.

CRABRAMS.com
THE LAW OFFICES OF CR ABRAMS, P.C.

27281 Las Ramblas #150, Mission Viejo, CA 92691

LAA3316153-1

CALL NOW TO RESERVE YOUR FREE SEATS

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

Dear America,
Today, one-third of our kids are overweight or obese, and one-third of
adults are obese. Add them together and we are hardly a picture of health.
Diet-related diseases are striking in record numbers. For the first time in
history, our children are expected to live shorter lives than their parents.
As a father of two, I am both sobered and empowered by that fact.
Despite our challenges, there is good news. People care. More and more
consumers today care about how their food is made, sourced, handled and
prepared. They care about what is in it and what is not. And they care about
eating for both health and joy.
As a result, these consumers also are demanding more of the companies
that feed them. And they should.
At Panera, we have always sought to challenge the status quo. Ten years
ago, we set a new standard by offering chicken raised without antibiotics.
We now enforce that same standard with our roasted turkey, ham, breakfast
sausage and bacon. Five years ago, we voluntarily posted calories on our
menus because we believe transparency is a consumer’s right. And just last
month, we became the first national restaurant brand to publish a list of
artificial ingredients we will be removing from our menu by the end of 2016.
Our food will have no artificial colors, preservatives, sweeteners or flavors.
None whatsoever.
No other company is moving as aggressively to offer clean food. We want
to encourage suppliers and competitors to rethink the way that they do
business, too. We want to set an example for the change our food system
so desperately needs.
We all have a choice: Be part of the solution or be part of the problem. We at
Panera want to be part of the solution; that’s why I got into this business. I see no
better way to make a positive difference than by fueling the ten million people
we serve each week with food that’s simply good and is also good for you.
For me, this work is deeply personal. I want to serve you food that I want to
eat myself and serve to my own children. I want to wake up every morning
optimistic about the direction our food system is headed. I want to see our
country get healthier and stronger by experiencing the joy of good eating.
If you’d like to be part of the solution, please join us on our journey. We all
have a job to do. Yours is simple: Care. Ask questions. Demand transparency
and cleaner menus. Our Food Policy and No No List are available online as
inspiration. We invite you to help spread wellness in your own families and
communities. Come in, have a seat at our table, and enjoy food as it should be.
All my best,
Ron

Ron Shaich
Founder, Chairman and CEO

A9

A10

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

THE NATION
At campaign
rally, Clinton
expands on
her vision
By Michael A. Memoli
NEW YORK — Hillary
Rodham Clinton cast herself
as a fighter for Americans
who have yet to share in the
nation’s economic recovery,
drawing inspiration from a
Democratic icon as well as
her own roots in public service
Saturday
as
she
launched a new phase of her
second bid for the White
House.
Speaking in a park dedicated to Franklin D. Roosevelt, on an island in New
York’s East River that offered sweeping views of the
Manhattan skyline, Clinton
said FDR’s legacy had inspired the administrations
of both President Obama
and her husband, President
Clinton, and generations of
families including her own.
Today, while the nation is
“standing again” after the
Great Recession, “we all
know we’re not yet running
the way America should,”
she said, blaming the problems on Republicans’ “trickle-down” approach.
Clinton sought to tap into
the country’s still-nagging
economic anxieties and the
rising populism within her
own party, declaring that

the “time has come” for middle-class Americans who
have wondered when their
hard work would pay off.
“Prosperity can’t be just
for CEOs and hedge fund
managers. Democracy can’t
be just for billionaires and
corporations,” she said.
“You brought our country
back. Now it’s time, your
time, to secure our gains and
move ahead. And you know
what? America can’t succeed unless you succeed.”
The Republican “choir,”
she said, had some “new
voices,” but all of them were
“singing the same old song: a
song called ‘Yesterday.’ ”
The line served both as
an accusation that Republicans would return to the
policies Democrats blame
for bringing about the financial crisis of 2008 and as a rejoinder to those in the GOP
who have dubbed her a candidate of the past, seeking
to run for a third Obama
term.
On issues including climate change, economic fairness, immigration and equal
rights for gays and lesbians,
Clinton said it was Republicans who were out of step
with the public.
“Fundamentally they reject what it takes to build an

Andrew Gombert European Pressphoto Agency

SPEAKING in New York, Hillary Rodham Clinton invoked President Franklin D. Roosevelt and her own

roots in public service. “Prosperity can’t be just for CEOs and hedge fund managers,” she said.
inclusive economy,” she
said. “It takes an inclusive
society — what I once called
a village — that has a place
for everyone.”
She also offered a personal qualification, drawing
loud applause when she reminded the crowd that while
she might not be the youngest candidate in the race,
she would be “the youngest
woman president in the
history of the United
States.”
Clinton used the highprofile speech to highlight
other biographical details
her campaign advisors believe many Americans continue to be unfamiliar with.
Her vision of America
was not one she learned
from politics, she said, but

from her family, specifically
her late mother, Dorothy
Rodham. Abandoned as a
young child, her mother survived and was an example of
the importance of perseverance and hard work in
the face of adversity, Clinton
said.
“My mother taught me
that everyone needs a
chance and a champion. She
knew what it was like not to
have either one,” she said.
Clinton did not shy away
from those characteristics
that Americans are far more
familiar with, including her
status as a longtime target
of Republican attacks.
She promised to seek
partners in both parties to
advance her vision, but emphasized her reputation for

tenacity.
“I’ll also stand my ground
when I must,” she said. “I’ve
been called many things by
many people. ‘Quitter’ is not
one of them.”
Republicans
jabbed
back. Clinton’s speech was
“chock full of hypocritical attacks, partisan rhetoric and
ideas from the past,” said
Republican National Committee spokeswoman Allison Moore.
Clinton launched her
candidacy in April with an
online video, as she had done
when she began her first
campaign in 2007. But she
never did then what she did
Saturday: hold a formal public campaign rally in which
she could offer a more expansive rationale for her

presidency.
Her new campaign team
mostly includes people who
were not part of her 2008 run,
but who have closely studied
the mistakes that cost her
the nomination then, at a
time when she was also the
party’s presumed front-runner.
Her advisors bristle at
the notion that Saturday’s
rally was part of an effort to
reboot the still-young campaign; they said it was the
start of a new phase of the
campaign in which she’ll begin to offer more details on
the kind of presidency she
envisions.
michael.memoli
@latimes.com
Twitter: @mikememoli

Officer who shot Tamir Rice saw ‘no choice’
By James Queally
The white Cleveland
policeman who shot and
killed12-year-old Tamir Rice
told another officer he had
“no choice” but to shoot the
black boy as he clutched a
toy weapon last year, according to details of an investigation made public Saturday.
“He reached for the gun
and there was nothing I
could do,” the other officer
said Timothy Loehmann
told him at the scene.
The FBI agent who arrived moments after the
Nov. 22 shooting told investigators
that
Loehmann
looked
almost
shellshocked, according to the report.
“The officer seemed
pretty concerned,” the unidentified agent said, according to a transcript of an interview with Cuyahoga
County Sheriff ’s Department investigators. “Obviously very concerned and
uh, I don’t want to use the
word, like — almost like shell
shock; like they didn’t know
what to do.”
The report, released by
Cuyahoga County Prosecu-

Marvin Fong Plain Dealer

AN ATTORNEY for the family of Tamir Rice, 12, expresses their anger for the

time it has taken to investigate his Nov. 22 killing by a Cleveland police officer.
tor Timothy McGinty, contains hundreds of pages of
interview transcripts, police
emails, medical examiner’s
findings and ballistics reports. It makes no recommendation on whether criminal charges should be filed.
Loehmann shot Tamir
after responding to reports
of a person waving a gun. A
911 caller told police that the
person was probably a child
and that the gun was “probably fake,” but that information was not relayed to the
rookie officer.

The veteran police dispatcher who took the 911 call
has been subpoenaed to appear before a grand jury, but
refused to tell sheriff ’s investigators why she did not tell
the officers about the caller’s
comments, the report said.
Loehmann and his partner, Frank Garmback, did
not cooperate with the Sheriff ’s Department during its
investigation, according to
Steve Loomis, president of
the Cleveland Police Patrolmen’s Assn. The officers did
make statements to Cleve-

Do You Have One Of These
7 Symptoms
Of Neuropathy?
y p

If you suffer from relentless
burning, tingling, numb, sharp
pains, cramping, decreased
balance- Please continue reading.
Why? Because virtually every
person who reads my
controversial FREE report
“Natural Secrets Revealed” tells
me they were shocked that they
haven’t heard this vital
information before.
Drug Companies hope you never
read this FREE report that reveals
why medication does nothing to
reverse the cause of your pain or
numbness and often makes you
worse. Whether you have
suffered for years or just started
feeling a little numbness or pain
you need to read this FREE report
and watch this DVD. To have a
copy of this FREE DVD and
REPORT mailed to you
immediately, call toll-free

1-800-837-9351
24 Hour Recorded

www.NeuropathyReliefLongBeach.com

land police internal affairs
and homicide investigators
on the day of the shooting,
Loomis previously told The
Times.
Many of the documents
in the report were redacted
to “exclude personal information, confidential medical records and reports not
germane to the events of
Nov. 22,” McGinty said.
“Transparency (i.e., the
actual facts) is essential for
an intelligent discussion of
the important issues raised
by this case,” McGinty said

in a statement released with
the report. “If we wait years
for all litigation to be completed before the citizens are
allowed to know what actually happened, we will have
squandered our best opportunity to institute needed
changes in use-of-force policy, police training and leadership.”
McGinty’s office is conducting its own review of the
shooting and plans to
present the case to a grand
jury this year.
The release of the report
comes about a month after
Tamir’s family complained
that the investigation of the
boy’s death had taken far too
long. The Sheriff ’s Department turned its findings
over to McGinty’s office June
3, more than seven months
after Tamir was shot.
The FBI agent and others described a chaotic
scene in the park where Tamir was shot, according to
the report. Tamir’s brother
charged toward officers and
threatened them, according
to the FBI agent. His sister
was handcuffed and put in a
police car.
Several officials who were
at the park told detectives

Tamir’s mother was screaming at officers. A Police Department supervisor indicated her actions may have
slowed medical personnel in
treating her son.
Last week, a Cleveland
municipal judge found probable cause to charge Loehmann with murder and several other offenses, but the
decision
is
advisory;
whether to prosecute is
likely to rest with a county
grand jury. No charges have
yet been filed.
Police have said Loehmann warned the boy to
drop the weapon, and union
leaders said he had no
choice but to fire since he believed Tamir had a weapon.
Many of the officers who
saw the toy on the ground
told investigators it looked
real. One described it as an
“authentic firearm.”
In separate interviews
with investigators, the boy
who lent Tamir the toy gun
said he had disassembled it
earlier in the week and was
unable to reattach the orange tip to the barrel, which
made it more closely resemble a real firearm.
[email protected]

LOS ANGELES TIMES

S

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

We’re #1!

Ranked “Best” in California!
It’s an exclusive list that any child
dren’s hospital would
be thrilled to appear on just once—U.S. News &
World Report’s Honor Roll of America’s best children’s
hospitals. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has now
done it for seven consecutive ye
ears—and we are the
only children’s hospital in all of California to be named
to the prestigious Honor Roll for 2015-16. It’s one of
the many reasons why we think a grown-up hospital
is no place for a kid.

Find out more at CHLA.org/Just4Kids

A11

A12

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Dallas cops unscathed in attack

A single gunman with
an armored van and
explosives is shot to
death after assault on
police headquarters.
By Molly
Hennessy-Fiske
and Nigel Duara
DALLAS — An overnight
shooting
turned
police
headquarters here into a
crime scene on Saturday
with a detonated pipe-bomb
and bullet-riddled windows
and police cars, while miles
away a suspect was shot
dead by a police sniper after
a standoff in an armored van
carrying explosives.
“We were unbelievably
fortunate,” Dallas Police
Maj. Jeff Cotner said of the
brazen attack in which no
one was killed or injured.
More than 30 bullets tore
through the lobby’s front
windows and glass doors after the gunman, apparently
angry over losing his child in
a custody dispute, approached on foot and
opened fire on the building
with an assault-style weapon about 12:30 a.m.
“Officers were sitting
there at the time that the
shots were fired,” Cotner
said of the lobby damage.
“Those rounds went all the
way through and into records, the room at the back.”
Police found two satchels
containing pipe bombs near
the headquarters building
and evacuated a nearby
housing complex. A police
officer almost tripped on one
pipe bomb package planted
at the scene and rigged to explode when touched, said
Police Chief David Brown.
One explosive detonated in
front of a gray Toyota SUV,
destroying the front and
charring the pavement.
Cotner would not say
whether police detonated
the bomb, but investigators
found an electronic detonator in nearby trees.
Bullet holes penetrated
one police cruiser, passing
through the seat and the
seat belt on the driver’s side

Ashley Landis Dallas Morning News

POLICE SURROUNDED the suspect in the suburb of Hutchins for several hours after the initial attack and a

12-mile chase. The man, believed to be James Boulware, 35, was apparently upset about a custody dispute.
and the rear passenger window. But neither officer in
the car was hit — a “miracle,”
Cotner said.
“We barely survived the
intent of the suspect,”
Brown said.
The shooter, who later
identified himself to police
as James Boulware, 35, of
Paris, Texas, sprayed the
squad cars with bullets before peeling off in an armored van equipped with
gun ports, officials said. As
police chased him south, he
called them to say his van
was full of explosives, Brown
said.
The suspect, who investigators said has not yet been
identified by medical examiners, eventually stopped at
a Jack-in-the-Box parking
lot in the suburb of Hutchins, about 12 miles south,
and was surrounded by a
SWAT team. There the attacker exchanged gunfire
with police and told negotiators that he blamed police
for his loss of custody of his

son and “accusing him of being a terrorist,” Brown said.
During negotiations, the
man became increasingly
angry, and police grew concerned that they and nearby
residents could be shot at,
Brown said.
After
an
hours-long
standoff,
police
fired
through the windshield of
the van around 5 a.m. and
then used an “explosive water charge” to neutralize the
gunpowder in bombs inside
the vehicle, Brown said.
Shortly before noon, police
detonated the van, which
caught fire.
The name given by the
suspect matches that of a
Texas man, James Lance
Boulware, who was at the
center of a brief police manhunt two years ago after an
argument with his family in
which he made threats
about shooting at schools
and churches, said Bob
Hundley, the police chief in
Paris.
The incident in April 2013

CONSIDERING
CREMATION?
Come join the Neptune Society for a

FREE LUNCH &
INFORMATIONAL SEMINAR
MIMI’S CAFÉ

OLIVE GARDEN

4404 Candlewood St.
Lakewood, CA 90712
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:00pm

582 N Lone Hill
San Dimas, CA 91773
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:00pm

OLIVE GARDEN

MARIE CALLENDER’S

13500 Whittier Blvd
Whittier, CA 90605
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:00pm

1852 Montebello Town Center
Montebello, CA 90640
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:00pm

OLIVE GARDEN

CLAIM JUMPER

27003 Mcbean Pkwy
Santa Clarita, CA 91355
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:00pm

25740 The Old Road
Valencia, CA 91381
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:00pm

MARIE CALLENDER’S

MIMI'S CAFÉ

185 E. Daily Dr
Camarillo, CA 93010
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:30pm

400 N. Moorpark Road
Thousand Oaks, CA 91360
Wed. 6/17, Thurs. 6/18, Fri. 6/19
11:30am & 2:30pm

CALL TODAY TO RSVP

1.855.365.7526
RESERVATION REQUIRED. LIMITED SEATING AVAILABLE.
FIRST TIME ATTENDEES ONLY PLEASE.
FD 2031, FD 1359, FD 1309, FD 1289

www.NeptuneSeminar.com

began when Boulware reportedly made several aggressive statements about
religion. His mother told
him he was “going to hell,”
and Boulware then grabbed
her by the throat, Hundley
said. He also fought with an
uncle.
“He was coming to do
them some harm,” Hundley
said of the encounter with
family members.
When the confrontation
ended, according to the report, Boulware’s brother
said Boulware went home
and retrieved guns, ammunition and body armor.
Because Boulware had
reportedly made threats
about shootings, a multiagency manhunt followed
until a Lamar County sheriff ’s deputy stopped Boulware’s car. Police did not find
any weapons, armor or ammunition in the car, and he
was arrested on outstanding
warrants. It is unclear how
the arrest was resolved.
Kim Cooks, judge of the

255th Family District Court
in Dallas County, who said
she had been overseeing
Boulware’s custody arrangement, told CNN on
Saturday that she had been
concerned about Boulware,
especially after he missed a
custody hearing on Monday.
Someone using Boulware’s
name had left rants on a
Facebook page for Cooks’
election claiming she was
against him.
“I never did think [the
Dallas police] would be the
target,” Cooks said in a televised interview. “I always
thought that I was going to
be the target.”
The attack shook not just
Dallas, the ninth-largest city
in the country, but other
Texas cities. In Harris
County, which includes
Houston, the Sheriff ’s Department issued a message
to residents saying that although the shooting appeared to be isolated, they
would “maintain a sense of
security to ensure officer

and
community
safety
alike.”
In Austin, Texas Atty.
Gen. Ken Paxton called the
shooting “a dangerous reminder of the unpredictable
threats our men and women
in law enforcement face every day.”
Later Saturday near Dallas police headquarters,
Navy veteran Ruben Watley,
48, said he had been walking
in the early morning hours to
a light-rail station and heard
what sounded like semiautomatic gunfire — about a
hundred rounds in 15 minutes.
“I heard a car screech,
and then the cops didn’t get
a chance to get in front of
him,” Watley said. “That’s
what led to the chase.”
Nearby residents Ladarrick Alexander and his fiancee, Laquita Davis, said they
were driving to their apartment when they heard 15 to
20 gunshots in quick succession.
Seconds later, police
could be seen swarming an
unmarked van, apparently
the suspect’s, which appeared to have crashed into
a police car, they said.
The
couple
turned
around and parked outside
the police perimeter about
two blocks away, where they
heard the sound of one detonation about 4:30 a.m. and
saw smoke rising.
Police headquarters is in
a former warehouse district
called the Cedars at the edge
of downtown, where a boutique hotel and several new
apartment buildings have
opened.
The shooting is similar to
one in Austin the day after
last Thanksgiving, in which
a gunman fired at least 100
rounds at government buildings, including police headquarters, before a police officer shot and killed him. The
shooter, Larry McQuilliams,
49, had multiple weapons
and hundreds of rounds of
ammunition.
molly.hennessy-fiske
@latimes.com
[email protected]
Hennessy-Fiske reported
from Dallas and Duara from
Phoenix.

LOS ANGELES TIMES

S

Red or Green
Seedless Grapes

Sale prices valid through
June 17, 2015

98

¢

s
Blueberri
Red or Bosc Pe

2 1
$

c l

lb..

d Bel
Bell
ell Pe
Peppers
eppers

98

lbs.
for

Tr

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

M n s

.................

Ripe Has

..........
..................
os ............

21

rY l w
N ct r n

ch s

for

$

Ju

21
$

lbs.
for

It l an oor Y
Yellow
elllow Squas
uas

uss t

t t s

C nt l u s

98

23

¢

¢

$

lb.

for

Organic
On-the-Vine
Cluster Tomatoes
t

l
n
t t Ch s

Cucum rs, Gr n n ns
r
sh s

¢
77 /ea.

2 3

for

98

for

s Avocad

Wh t

$

21
$

¢eaa.

sn

tr

1.5
5 ltr.

98
h

m

n

¢

eaa.

lb..

G r n fLf

Sele
ect varieties, 5 oz.
All Items

99

¢

ea..

99

¢

+CCRV

5

$ 99

Sliced and pre-package
ed
for your convenience.

30

lb.

Chicken Breasts or Thighs
Fresh, never frozen, with no enhancers,
solutions or broth added.

1

offf

regullar retaill

%

All Items

$ 99
Fresh Boneless Skinless

25

Amy’s Brand Sale

Halves and
Pieces.

4

lb.

%

off

regular retail

Wild Center-Cut
Ahi Tuna or Swordfish Steaks

$ 99
lb.

Valid in all Los Angeles area locations.
For store hours or to find a location near you,
visit sprouts.com.

Thick-cut, savory favorites. Easy to prepare
and great on the grill! Previously frozen.

6

$ 99
lb.

OPEN DAILY
Y
7AM-10 PM

Prices may vary in
other locations. 6916

A13

A14

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Battle for reputation endures
A Marine unit
was cleared of
slaughtering
Afghan civilians
in 2007, but
stigma lingers.

By David Zucchino
KANSAS CITY, Kan. —
The capstone to Maj. Fred
Galvin’s career was the command of the Marine Corps’
first-ever special operations
unit. He led the elite company into Afghanistan in
February 2007.
But less than a month after Fox Company arrived in
eastern Afghanistan, Galvin
was engulfed in scandal. His
unit was accused of firing indiscriminately after a car
bomb attack on March 4,
killing as many as 19 Afghan
civilians and wounding 50
more.
Galvin and his men were
cleared in court a year later
of any responsibility after
testimony by more than 50
witnesses. The three-officer
jury concluded that the two
officers and their Marines
“acted appropriately and in
accordance with the rules of
engagement … in response
to a complex attack.”
The court noted “unsubstantiated allegations” by
military commanders about
civilian casualties.
But Galvin says his and
the unit’s reputation remains stained by accusations that they killed innocent civilians. He has struggled over the last eight years
to clear the names of the 29
Marines on the 2007 patrol.
Galvin, who retired from
active duty last year, says he
is speaking out now to make
sure another unit doesn’t experience what he said was
the military’s rush to judgment in response to intense
political pressure to reduce
civilian casualties.
The Marines were called
into an office one at a time
and interrogated for hours,
with no Miranda warnings

MEMBERS OF 1st Platoon, Fox Company, were hit by a suicide bomber in 2007 and returned fire, but were accused of indiscriminately

killing civilians, prompting condemnation from military commanders. A court cleared them after testimony from more than 50 witnesses.
and no access to lawyers,
Galvin says. They were held
incommunicado for days.
They were publicly condemned by top military
commanders.
“We weren’t just abandoned — they tried to destroy us,” he said recently
near his Kansas City home,
his hand resting on a file box
containing thousands of
pages of documents from
the case.
“To this day, I encounter
people, including Marines,
who say we got away with
murder,” he said. “We’ll take
this to the grave.”

Career-ending day

Galvin, 45, still maintains
a rigid military bearing as he
builds a new life, working
toward an MBA. He has become obsessed with the
case, filing Freedom of Information requests, assembling thousands of pages of
documents and writing a
bitter, book-length account.
The accusations of civilian casualties essentially
ended Galvin’s career. He
was never promoted and
said he was steered into
dead-end jobs until he decided to retire after 27 years.
In Galvin’s view, Fox
Company is a case study in
the consequences of political pressures in an unpopular war. The U.S. military in
2007 was committed to a
counterinsurgency strategy
that emphasized protecting
Afghan civilians. Building

David Zucchino Los Angeles Times

Chuck Beckley Associated Press

MAJ. FRED GALVIN , shown at left in 2008 and more recently at home, says the military rushed to judgment

amid political pressure to reduce civilian casualties. “We weren’t just abandoned — they tried to destroy us.”
trust and confidence with local Afghans was viewed as
more important than killing
insurgents.
The incident began when
a platoon convoy from Galvin’s unit was hit by a suicide
bomber. Galvin was riding in
a Humvee at the rear and
saw an orange fireball rise
hundreds of feet into the air.
In an instant, gunshots
rang out from both sides of
the road, he recalled. Galvin
said his Marines opened fire,
disabling a Toyota SUV
speeding toward them. In
five minutes, Galvin said, his

DENTAL2000

Call 866-307-1316

men had killed six to 10 combatants.
The Marines drove back
to their base in Jalalabad.
Thankful to be alive, Galvin
received the shock of his career: The BBC was reporting
that the Marines had just
killed 10 Afghan civilians.
By the end of the day,
news reports quoting Afghan officials and villagers
said some Marines were
drunk and had shot wildly at
civilians. They were accused
of barging into homes to
shoot inhabitants.
A month after the attack,

Galvin was relieved of command. He and six other Marines on the convoy were investigated for negligent homicide and dereliction of
duty.
“After that, we were radioactive,” Galvin said.
“These traditions — never
leave a Marine behind —
well, they left us behind.”
Retired Marine Col. Steven Morgan, one of the three
officers on the Marine jury
that exonerated the unit,
said in an interview: “These
Marines still have this black
mark on them that never

should have been there. It’s
an ugly story and it makes
me angry.”
Lt. Gen. Frank Kearney,
head of U.S. Special Operations Command-Central
Command, said six weeks after the shootings that there
was no evidence of insurgents among 10 dead and 33
wounded Afghans. Kearney
had ordered Fox Company
removed from Afghanistan
six days after the attack.
Kearney, now retired, declined to comment for this
article.
[See Marines, A15]

Closet Organizers

Specials!

As Featured On:

Surgeries are Performed by Diplomate of
American Board of Oral Implantology

All the Titanium in the Implants are FDA approved and are made in
the USA!! Over 2500 successful implant surgeries performed.

ENTIRE $
DENTAL
IMPLANT

THIS
T
HIS WEEK

799!

PLUS WHITENING PEN

FOR SINGLE IMPLANT
*Expires June 21, 2015.
Other fees may apply
*First 20 callers.

INCLUDES Implant,
Abutment & Crown

599

LASER GUM
THERAPY

$

Our Designers Will Create
Your Organizers in 3D

Done in a Day

3 Week Projects Completed in
Just 4 Hours or Less.

199

*Expires June 21, 2015. *First 20 callers.
Other fees may apply.

(Full Mouth)

PORCELAIN CROWNS

DEEP CLEANING

499

*

(Scaling and Root Planing)

99

$

PER
QUAD
*Expires June 21, 2015. *First 20 callers.

FOR

*Expires June 21, 2015. *First 20 callers.

Cannot be combined with insurance fees. New Patients Only. Others fees may apply.

FOR
2 IMPLANTS

Cannot be combined with insurance fees. New Patients Only. Others fees may apply.

Cannot be combined with insurance fees. New Patients Only. Others fees may apply.

ONLY

Garage Organizers

1500

$

Includes Abutment and Crown
*Expires June 21, 2015. *First 20 callers.

Digitally Designed

$

VENEERS

$

50% LOWER

than Home Improvement Stores,
Contractors or Handyman Services.

*

Please call Vineeta today!
Book your FREE consult now!
(Includes Panoramic X-Ray, Exam & Treatment Plan)

STATE OF THE ART SAMSUNG
3D IMAGING AVAILABLE

866-307-1316

Interior

DOOR & CLOSET

NOW SERVING YOU IN TWO LOCATIONS!

Hi, I am Vineeta.
Call me Sunday - Friday
from 9am-7pm for flexible
financing options.

33 Creek Rd.
Ste. 210 B, CA 92604

LAGUNA NIGUEL
30012 Crown Valley Pkwy.
Ste. B, CA 92677

www.dental2000.com

C O M P A N Y

LAA3360335-1

IRVINE

310-341-4478
InteriorDoorCo.com/Promo36

Showroom Consultations By Appointment

FREE Estimate By Appt.
FREE 3D Design
FREE Installation
*Showroom special for new orders only. Minimum quantities apply.
Must present ad at time of estimate. May not be combined with other offers or discounts. Offer Expires 6/30/15. Contractor’s License
#958313. A dba of Casablanca Design Centers, Inc.

L AT I M ES . C O M
[Marines, from A14]
Two months after the attack — with a military investigation still underway — the
top U.S. Army commander
in the region, Col. John Nicholson, told Afghan elders
that he was “deeply, deeply
ashamed and terribly sorry
that Americans have killed
and wounded innocent Afghan people.” He called the
killings a “terrible, terrible
mistake” and “a stain on our
honor.”
Nicholson said he paid up
to $2,000 each in condolence
payments to families of17 Afghan civilians he said were
among 19 killed by the Marines.

Cracks in the case

Retired Marine Capt.
Vince Noble, Galvin’s deputy
and the commander of the
patrol, said the military
command buckled to political pressures and abandoned its own men.
“I still ask myself: How
could the military turn
against its own like that?”
said Noble, who now works
in law enforcement in New
York.
The unit was denied combat ribbons. Sgt. Joshua
Henderson,
a
Marine
wounded in the car bombing, was denied a Purple
Heart.
Galvin and the six other
Marines were hauled before
a Court of Inquiry at Camp
Lejeune, N.C., in early 2008
— the first such Marine
court since 1956. During the
trial, cracks appeared in the
case against them.
A U.S. military police patrol that arrived on the scene
about 30 minutes after the
incident found no dead or
wounded Afghans. And
Navy investigators didn’t
reach the scene until two
months later, spending only
about an hour there.
Among the most damning witness testimony was
that of Haji Liwani Qumandan, who said he was driving
a blue Toyota SUV — which
the Marines said carried
armed men who fired at
them. Qumandan testified
that everyone in the vehicle
was an unarmed civilian.
He said “thousands of
bullets” fired by Marines
killed his father and 12-yearold nephew, and wounded
him in the back. Qumandan
received a condolence payment after his name did not
turn up on U.S. intelligence
terrorist lists.

S
But in a classified court
session closed to the media,
a U.S. intelligence report described Qumandan as an active Taliban participant, according to Morgan, the jury
member.
“He was bad news — we
were dealing with the devil,”
said Morgan, who had
served as a Marine intelligence officer.
Several other intelligence
reports also said Qumandan
actively supported Taliban
efforts, retired Marine Master Sgt. James Crawford, the
signals intelligence chief for
Fox Company in 2007, said in
an interview.
After 17 days of testimony, the three-officer jury
cleared Galvin and the others. The court noted “unsubstantiated allegations” by

‘To this day, I
encounter people,
including
Marines, who say
we got away with
murder. We’ll take
this to the grave.’
— Former Maj.
Fred Galvin,

Fox Company commander

military commanders about
civilian casualties. It cited
the undue influence of a
“high level of command, media and governmental attention focused” on the incident.
Testimony by the Marines was “consistent, truthful and credible,” the court
concluded. Afghans, on the
other hand, were known to
“fabricate statements and
evidence” in hopes of receiving U.S. condolence payments, the court said.
Morgan said he and two
other jury members concluded that senior military
commanders panicked after
hearing reports of civilian
casualties and accepted Afghan accounts at face value.
“The duplicity by the
command — by the senior
leadership in our military —
well, they showed some very
weak leadership,” Morgan
said.
Nicholson, now a threestar general, said through a
spokesman
that
his
“thoughts
have
not

S U NDAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

changed” since his testimony at the 2008 court hearing.
The panel’s findings were
forwarded to a Marine threestar general, who issued a report in 2008 that the convoy
responded properly to the
car bomb and ambush. A
short statement was released late on the Friday before Memorial Day weekend
in 2008.

‘We were ambushed’

Still, the ruling did not restore the unit’s reputation.
Galvin says the Marine
Corps should have done
more to emphasize that his
men had not fired wildly and
killed civilians — and to correct earlier statements by
military commanders to
that effect. A Marine Corps
spokesman declined to comment.
“We were ambushed, and
we fought on the battlefield
with honor,” Galvin said.
“There were allegations of
homicide, and we’re living
with that to this day. This
haunts us.”
Galvin says he’s not asking for damages or reinstatement, only redemption. “I
want them to acknowledge
that we were falsely accused,” he said.
Among the court’s 2008
recommendations were that
Fox Company receive combat action ribbons and that
Sgt. Henderson be awarded
a Purple Heart. The ribbons
were approved in May 2008.
That July, Sgt. Henderson
received his Purple Heart.
The officer who pinned it on
his uniform was Fred Galvin.
On Tuesday, Rep. Walter
B. Jones (R-N.C.) demanded a public apology
from the Marine Corps commandant, Gen. Joseph F.
Dunford, President Obama’s nominee to head the
Joint Chiefs of Staff.
Jones, whose district includes Camp Lejeune, said
Fox Company had been the
victim of “a witch hunt” in
which “senior leaders of our
Armed Forces publicly denounced Maj. Galvin and his
Marines before an investigation of the matter was
made.”
Jones demanded that the
Marines’ service records be
corrected “to remove the
stains of being wrongly accused of homicide.”
david.zucchino
@latimes.com
Twitter: @davidzucchino

Want Great Rates + Safety?
It’s a day at the beach.
Great ways to save
with award-winning products.

%
%
1.25 1.05
12-Month CD

APY 1

on balances of $2,000 or more

High Yield Savings

on all balances

Annual Percentage Yields (APYs) are accurate as of 6/3/15 and subject to change at any time without notice.
Fees may reduce earnings. Visit synchronybank.com for current rates, terms and account requirements.
Offers apply to personal accounts only. Funds must come from a source outside Synchrony Bank.
1
The minimum balance required to earn the advertised APY is $2,000 and must be deposited in a single
transaction. Accounts with balances of $2,000 or more earn 1.25% APY. The minimum balance to open a CD
is $2,000. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawals. After maturity, if you choose to roll over your CD,
you will earn the base rate of interest in effect at that time.
2
For High Yield Savings Accounts, rates are variable and subject to change any time without notice after the
account is opened. There is no minimum balance required to earn the advertised APY, but a
minimum of $30 is required to open an account and avoid a $5 monthly service charge.
© 2015 Synchrony Bank
1, 2

YOU MAY HAVE VARICOSE VEINS IF YOU HAVE THESE SYMPTOMS:

Tiredness
Swelling

Itching
Dry skin

Discoloration
Skin ulcers

FREE SCREENING

CONSULTATION
Covered by most PPO
No hospitalization
Local anesthesia
No down time
Hablamos Español
The patient shown underwent endovenous laser ablation and
phlebectomy. Results vary for each individual, and it may take
more than one treatment to achieve the desired result.

APY2

Visit us at synchronybank.com or call 1-800-753-6870 to
get started using promo code NEWS15.

VARICOSE VEIN
TREATMENT
Aching
Numbness

A15

AFTER

RE
BEFO

CALL NOW TO LEARN MORE

(855) 843- 9556
WestMedical.com/Varicose-Veins

Model shown

A16

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

S

LOS ANGELES TIMES

WE CAN TAKE
THE OTHER AIRLINES

LYING DOWN.
Delta is the only U.S. airline with flat-bed seats with direct aisle access on every long-haul international flight
in Delta One™ out of LAX, as well as flat-bed seats on every flight to New York-JFK. It’s time to lay out and stretch out,
and see all the ways Delta is setting a new standard at LAX.
LAXTOLUX.COM

Delta One is available on all long-haul international flights lasting 6.5+ hours and domestic flights between JFK and LAX and JFK and SFO.

LOS ANGELES TIMES

S

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

A17

A18

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

L AT I M E S. C O M

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

A19

A BOY races his scooter past an abandoned house. When the recession hit, San

Bernardino’s foreclosure rate was 3.5 times the national average.

THE METROLINK station in San Bernardino. Distribution centers have

opened on the old Norton Air Force Base, which cost 12,500 jobs when it closed.

JESSE LOPEZ heads for work at a warehouse. Lopez, an Army veteran whose

GI Bill expired, makes $12 an hour, but some weeks, he gets only a single shift.

Photographs by

A WOMAN and her 4-month-old baby await eviction from the Country Inn in San

Francine Orr Los Angeles Times

Bernardino. Four decades ago, the motel boasted a cheery coffee shop, a heated pool, valet parking and palm trees. The city has become the poorest of its size in the state.

HARD TIMES FOR A ONCE-PROUD CITY

[Broken, from A1]
meth possession, the city attorney
challenging the police chief to fight
at City Hall, one City Council member arrested on charges of perjury,
another on charges of stalking, and
a federal indictment of the developer who was supposed to transform the airport into a source of
civic pride.
Of the 100 biggest cities in the
U.S., San Bernardino, 60 miles east
of Los Angeles, was ranked the second-poorest in the nation in the
2010 census, behind Detroit. Two
years later, it filed for bankruptcy.
Last month the City Council approved a 77-page plan that it hopes
will move the city toward solvency,
in part by making residents pay
higher taxes and fees while further
cutting their services.

d
Former Mayor Patrick Morris
has seen the people living in San
Bernardino’s motels, squatting in
abandoned houses and sleeping in
its parks and vacant lots. To him
the bankruptcy is the culmination
of what happens when forces internal and external conspire to bring a
city down.
On a recent afternoon Morris,
77, and Sally, his wife of 54 years,
pull bags of mulch out of their old
Toyota pickup at Wildwood Park,
on the city’s middle-class northern
edge.
A nonstop volunteer now, Morris sinks a shovel into the small garden at the park’s entrance, replacing plants that gophers killed.
Morris grew up in the desert
town of Needles. After graduating
from Stanford Law School, he decided that he wanted to live in the
California city closest to his hometown, one with a similarly scrappy,
working-class soul.
He bought his modest ranchstyle home on Maywood Avenue for
$25,000 in 1964. Realtors tried to
lure him into a bigger house as his
stature in the city rose. He said no.
Nor did he join the many professionals moving next door to Redlands, with its outdoor amphitheater, manicured streets and solvent economy.
In a place that many middleclass children leave as soon as they

LIZ GONZALES and Tim Wilburn bathe in a culvert near the 2nd Street bridge. Homeless residents of nearby Meadowbrook Park
have created a subterranean spa fed by 90-degree water from the city’s geothermal heating system.

are adults, Morris’ children went to
the public schools, then settled in
San Bernardino, and his grandchildren are doing the same.
“I believe that membership in a
community is an essential feature
of a prosperous life,” he says. “We
need to take care of where we are.”
In his 50 years in the city, Morris
has been a prosecutor, a civil litigator, a Juvenile Court judge, the
chairman of the school board and
the presiding judge of the Superior
Court. He founded and led the local Habitat for Humanity chapter
and the San Bernardino Boys and
Girls Club. He started one of the
state’s first drug courts to keep
nonviolent offenders out of jail and

headed the Juvenile Court. And
last year, he finished his second
and last term as mayor.
The San Bernardino to which
Morris has such loyalty is one of
California’s oldest cities, founded
in 1851 by Mormon missionaries. It
was the birthplace of McDonald’s
and the earliest incarnation of
Taco Bell. The Rolling Stones
played their first U.S. concert at
the Orange Show Fairgrounds. Little League picked the city for its
Western region headquarters. And
in 1976, the National Civic League
designated it an All-America City.
San Bernardino also had its
curses. This rail and highway
crossroads at the edge of the Los

Angeles metropolis attracted hobos, misfits and con men selling
cheap land. The Hells Angels
roared to life in the area in the
1950s. As the valley became the region’s downwind cul-de-sac for
some of the worst smog in the nation. The looming mountains disappeared and lungs burned.
Over the last three decades, the
economy imploded. The rail shops
and the nearby steel plant closed.
So did Norton Air Force Base, costing the city 12,500 jobs. Downtown
businesses vacated. Law offices
decamped to Riverside when the
federal bankruptcy and state appellate courts moved.
But there are still middle-class

neighborhoods and amenities: a
symphony, a country club, the
Starbucks and El Torito along
Hospitality Lane.
At least some members of the
San Manuel Band of Mission Indians, descendants of the original
Serranos who had been segregated
in an impoverished reservation,
now live in mansions in the hills
above their casino. It’s one of the
area’s biggest employers, providing 2,500 jobs catering to gamblers
from all over Southern California.
In the southeast part of the city,
Morris shows off the new headquarters and distribution center
for Stater Bros., which he helped
lure to the closed air base. It em-

ploys 1,800 people. Giant new warehouses for Amazon.com, Pep Boys
and Kohl’s are nearby, among vacant fields with scattered clumps
of eucalyptus and collapsing clapboard homes.
On the city’s northwest edge,
Morris drives past the latest developments of large Spanish-style
homes on curving, smooth-black
streets with banners reading “New
Frontier” and “The Colony.” It’s
suburbia at a fraction of what it
would cost closer to Los Angeles.
Median income in this area is
above $65,000, nearly five times
what it is in the bleaker parts of
town. Stay very close to home and
you might imagine you’re in Irvine
or Santa Clarita.
Yet even this relative upper
crust lives with the problems of a
city gone broke: subpar schools
and potholed streets just outside
their immediate neighborhoods;
high crime, slow police and fire response times; and trash and tumbleweeds that pile up against rusty
chain-link fences.
During several boom-and-bust
waves, homeowners sold or lost
their homes to investors and
speculators. Some landlords see
little return in keeping their properties well-maintained.
“They’ll bleed the property until
it’s blighted and then desert it,”
Morris says.
When the recession hit, San
Bernardino’s foreclosure rate was
3.5 times the national average. It
was inevitable: Only 46% of San
Bernardino’s working-age residents have jobs — the lowest figure
in the state for cities anywhere
near its size. And so the statistical
landslide built momentum as
property and sales taxes fell by
more than a third in recent years.
As the economy unspooled, the
police and fire unions kept shoveling money into council members’
campaigns. In 2008, over Morris’
objections, the council gave them a
generous gift. Employees of the Police and Fire Departments could
retire at 50 years old and their pensions would give them 3% of their
final pay for every year they had
worked. A fire battalion chief making $148,000 could retire at that age
and collect $133,000 a year for life —
with increases for cost of living.

A long decline
San Bernardino, once a middle-class city, has seen its median income drop
by a third since 1969. Now it is the poorest city of its size in California.
Median household income (2013 inflation-adjusted dollars)
California
$70,000

San Bernardino County

San Bernardino City

$56,278

60,000

and Edison shuts off their electricity as summer’s 110-degree days approach. Lopez needs a steady job.
The couple had been sleeping on
the couches of family and friends
for months and fear eviction.
In San Bernardino, the typical
trajectory for someone in their
spot is not to those “New Frontier”
developments in the better part of
town but to places such as the
Country Inn.

d

50,000
40,000
30,000
1970

$37,440
1980

1990

2000

’2013

Sources: U.S. Census, American Community Survey, Management Partners.
Los Angeles Times

By 2012 the city was spending
72% of its general fund on the Police
and Fire Departments, mostly on
salaries and pensions — compared
to Los Angeles, which spends 59%
of its general fund on those services. More than half the sworn fire
personnel earn more than $150,000
a year according to city records.
The city downsized, cutting 350
employees, but that wasn’t nearly
enough. Many municipalities faced
pension problems, but the trajectories here were extreme. Facing a
budget deficit of $45.8 million that
year, with little more to cut, officials
filed for bankruptcy.
By 2013, the median family income, adjusted for inflation, had
dropped to $37,440, the lowest in
the state for a city its size. In some
parts of the city, it’s about $15,000.

d
Jesse Lopez hopes to make that
much this year. He is one of the San
Bernardino residents who have
tied their ambitions to the distribution centers.
One afternoon, the 42-year-old
Army veteran smokes, paces and
watches the spider-cracked screen
of his Samsung cellphone, still
bleary from the 5 a.m. warehouse
shift he just finished.
Many of the warehouses send
texts to announce what shifts are
open the next day. Workers usually
have seconds to claim one by typ-

ing in a code. Lopez still berates
himself for mistyping a few weeks
back, losing a day of work.
The phone chirps.
“There it is,” his wife, Sherri, exults. “Is that it?”
“No, that’s not it,” he says.
He yawns.
Unlike the explosive push driving people from hollowed-out Rust
Belt cities, San Bernardino’s economic implosion is sucking people
in: immigrants, parolees, Los Angeles gang members and those like
the Lopezes, who can’t afford to
live anywhere else in California.
Between 1979 and today, the city
has almost doubled in population,
from 117,000 to 214,000, and it’s still
growing, with more than half of its
residents — 54.3% — on public assistance.
Lopez makes $12 an hour. But
some weeks, he gets only a single
shift. He recently looked at his pay
stub and realized he made $1,352
between Jan. 1 and March 20.
He had gone to college to get out
of this cycle of temporary warehouse jobs. But his GI Bill expired
in October.
At 4:30 p.m., Lopez looks at his
wife and puts the phone in his
pocket. “Nothing.”
A few weeks later in April, the
Lopezes move into a $595-a-month
apartment with help from Sherri’s
daughter, who paid the first and
last month’s rent.
By May, they can’t pay their bill,

It could be worse. Liz Gonzales,
50, looks forward to the rare days
when she somehow pulls together
enough money to stay in one of the
city’s low-rent motels.
She grew up in motels, where,
she says, she was sexually abused.
Her own children also grew up in
motels and chaos. One is in prison
now, the other won’t talk to her.
Today, she lives in Meadowbrook Park, where a sliver of
stream gurgles through a cluster of
tents and lean-tos. The water reflects the new marble and blue
glass courthouse that Morris
helped get the state to build.
Liz has bright green eyes and
sporadic teeth, and is slowly dying
of lung cancer and emphysema.
On a warm afternoon, she wanders to where the stream becomes
a concrete flood control channel
and settles in under the 2nd Street
bridge.
As she looks for her syringe, a
teenage boy looking for turtles
crouches in the mud with an aquarium net.
Ten yards away, a man slips into
a tunnel in the wall of the channel.
Inside, the park’s residents have
created a subterranean “spa” fed
by 90-degree water from the city’s
geothermal heating system. It’s
marked with street art, including
the grim reaper drawn in colored
chalk.
Among the people who soak in
the tunnel is a friend who was hit in
the gut by a stray bullet as she sat
in her tent. Doctors fitted her with
a colostomy bag, but it was too
much trouble and she abandoned
it. It comforts her to sit in the tubular concrete tunnel, letting the
warm water flow over the puckered
hole in her abdomen.

Gonzales, too, appreciates the
spa. In her raspy voice, she quips
that the city has the cleanest
homeless people in America.
But like most people in the
park, her main source of comfort is
the methamphetamine that has
settled into San Bernardino so
deeply that downtown doughnut
shops sell glass pipes and torches.
She pokes her finger at a vein on
the inside of her elbow.
“It’s not a good vein,” she says.
“But it’s the only vein I could pick
right now.”
She sticks the needle in and lifts
the stopper a bit to pull out blood.
She doesn’t see it. Then a spot of
red swirls into the clear solution.
“Oh, there it is.”
She plunges it into her arm.
She waits, leaning back against
the redwood bridge’s bracing,
charred into black scales. She
doesn’t feel much. The crystal
wasn’t pure.
She heads off in hopes that
someone has a better batch.
Wisps of hope are what the city
gets by on.
Lopez hopes that he will land a
steady job.
Maharaj hopes that someday
the Country Inn attracts a less
troublesome clientele.
Morris hopes for a city that offers its people better lives.
He quotes author Wallace
Stegner, who wrote that a place
“forms like a coral reef, by slow accrual.”
It takes the contributions of
generations for a city to succeed,
Morris says. “I think to be rooted is
one of the most important and
least recognized needs of our human soul.”
“We leave a Detroit. We leave a
Stockton. We leave a San Bernardino. That’s a great sadness to me,”
Morris says.
And so he stays.
[email protected]
Times data analyst Sandra
Poindexter contributed to this
report.

Read more online
For an additional article and an
extended photo report, visit
www.latimes.com/sanbernardino

A20

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

SS

L AT I ME S . CO M

Depression is often
traced to bullying

THE ONLINE AUCTION HOUSE

By Karen Kaplan

Wondering
what it’s worth?

Fine Art

Design

Jewelry

Furniture

Consigning art and design works
from your collection with us is swift,
simple, and satisfying. Share details
today and receive a complimentary
auction estimate within five
business days.

Get started today at
PADDLE8.COM/SELL

Bullying may be responsible for nearly 30% of cases
of depression among adults,
a new study suggests.
By tracking 2,668 people
from
early
childhood
through adulthood, researchers found that 13year-olds who were frequent
targets of bullies were three
times more likely than their
non-victimized peers to be
depressed as adults.
Even when the researchers accounted for factors
such as a teen’s record of behavioral problems, social
class, child abuse and family
history of depression, those
who were bullied at least
once a week were more than
twice as likely to be depressed when they grew up.
“Depression is a major
public
health
problem
worldwide, with high social
and economic costs,” the researchers wrote in the study,
published in the medical
journal BMJ. “Interventions
during adolescence could
help to reduce the burden of
depression later in life.”
Previous studies that examined the link between
bullying and depression
have determined that the
two are related. For instance, adults who are depressed are more likely to recall being bullied as kids.
However, it’s possible that
adults without depression
were bullied as well but have
put the abuse out of their
minds.
To get around that problem, a group of researchers
from four universities in
England turned to data from
the
Avon
Longitudinal
Study of Parents and Children.
Some of the study participants were recruited before
they were even born; others
joined when they were about
7 years old. The administrators kept track of various information about the kids
and their families, and they
asked questions about bullying multiple times while

‘These findings
lead us to
conclude that
peer victimization
during
adolescence may
contribute
significantly to
the overall public
health burden of
clinical
depression.’
— From study in journal BMJ

the children were between
the ages of 8 and 13.
For the new study, the researchers focused on peer
victimization at age 13. At
the time, the teens were
asked about nine types of
bullying and whether they
experienced them “frequently” (at least once a
week), “repeatedly” (at least
four
times
altogether),
“sometimes” (fewer than
four times) or not at all.
Name-calling was the
most common type of bullying, with 36% of teens saying
they had been on the receiving end of this behavior, including 9% who were victimized frequently. Twenty-two
percent of the teens said bullies had taken things from
them.
Beyond that, 16% of the
teens said bullies had spread
lies about them, 11% said
they had been hit or beaten
up, 10% were shunned by
their peers, 9% said they had
been blackmailed, 8% said
bullies tried to get them to
do something they didn’t
want to do, 8% said they had
been tricked, and 5% said
bullies had spoiled a game to
upset them.
Most of this bullying was
never reported to teachers,
and the 13-year-olds didn’t
tell their families about onethird of the time.

Not only did the researchers confirm that victims of bullying were at
greater risk for depression
as adults, they also found a
dose-response relationship
between the two. In other
words, the more bullying
that a 13-year-old had to endure, the greater the odds
that he or she would be depressed years later.
Among teens who said
they weren’t bullied at all, 5%
went on to suffer depression.
But among the teens who
were frequent victims, 15%
were depressed as adults.
What’s more, 10% of the
frequently bullied teens had
been depressed for more
than two years, compared
with 4% of their counterparts who weren’t bullied.
The results support the
idea that bullying during
childhood leads to depression in adulthood, but they
don’t prove that one causes
the other.
Nailing down causation
would require an experiment that randomly assigned some people to be
bullied and others to be left
alone. But the results imply
that “approximately 29% of
the burden or depression at
age 18 years could be attributed to peer victimization,”
the study authors wrote.
“These findings lead us to
conclude that peer victimization during adolescence
may contribute significantly
to the overall public health
burden of clinical depression,” they said.
In an editorial that accompanied the study, University of Cambridge bullying prevention expert Maria
Ttofi wrote that the study results should prompt school
authorities and health officials to think seriously about
ways to stop bullying by
teens. If they do, they will
reap the benefits for years.
“Effective antibullying
programs can be seen as a
form of public health promotion,” she wrote.
[email protected]
Twitter: @LATkarenkaplan

#"!--!&/

(03 %!40.

213/1)!0

+03*"1 ',*0413$0

Mimi’s Café
15436 E. Whittier Blvd.
June 16th @ 4:30pm

Olive Garden
582 N. Lone Hill Ave.
June 17th @ 4:30pm

Mimi’s Café
500 W. Huntington Dr.
June 22nd @ 4:30pm

Mimi’s Café
10909 Foothill Blvd.
June 24th @ 4:30pm

LOS ANGELES TIMES

S

OVER 8,000 WINES

AMERICA’S

WINE, SPIRITS
& BEER
SUPERSTORE

AMERICA’S BEST
VALUE WINE

2

PaciSc Peak Chardonnay,
Cabernet, Merlot
750ml

$1.97
Menage a
Trois
Rouge

Santa
Margherita
Pinot Grigio

$6.97

$17.97

750ml

750ml

Wine Favorites 750ml

14 Hands-Cabernet........................
t
8.97
7-Deadly Zins ................................11.47
Alamos-Malbec...............................7.47
Apothic-Red ....................................7.47
Barefoot Cellars-Chard,Mosc,Cab,Mer..
r 4.97
Beringer Fndrs-Cab,Chard,Merlot....6.47
Beringer-White Zinfandel................ 3.57
Blackstone-Cabernet California.......6.47
Blackstone-Chardonnay California...6.47
Blackstone-Merlot California ...........6.47
Bogle-Cabernet,Zin OV,Petite Sirah.7.47
Bogle-Merlot,Chardonnay...............
y
6.97
BV Coastal-Cabernet.......................
t
7.47
BV Coastal-Chardonnay,Merlot........7.47
BV Coastal-Pinot Noir......................
r
7.47
Cambria-Chard Katherine's Vineyard. 15.99
Cavit-Pinot Grigio.............................5.47
Ch St Jean-Chardonnayy ................. 8.97
Ch Ste Michelle-Cab,Merlot............ 9.97
Ch Ste Michelle-Chardonnayy ...........8.47
Ch Ste Michelle-Riesling................. 5.97
Clos du Bois-Cab,Merlot.................
t
9.97
Clos du Bois-Chardonnayy ................ 7.47
Columbia Crest GrEst-Cab,Chard,Merr .8.47
Coppola Diamond-Clarett ...............13.47
Coppola Diamond-Merlott .............. 11.97
Coppola Diamond-Pinot Noirr .........13.47
Cupcake-Cabernet Central Coast....
t 7.97
Cupcake-Chardonnay Central Coast.t 6.97
Cupcake-Merlot Central Coastt ........ 7.97
Cupcake-Red Velvet........................
t
7.97
Cupcake-Sauv Blanc Marlborough ..7.97
Edna Valley-Chardonnay.................
y
8.97
Erath Vineyards-Pinot Noir.............
r
12.97
Estancia-Cabernet...........................
t
9.47
Estancia-Pinot Noir..........................
r
9.47
Far Niente-Chardonnayy ................ 49.97
Ferrari-Carano Fume Blanc ...........10.97
Fetzer-Gewurztraminer....................
r
6.47
Fetzer-Vlly Oaks-Chard,Cab,Merlot..
t 6.97
Franciscan-Cabernet.....................
t
17.47
Frei Brothers-Chardonnay Reserve .11.97
Gnarly Head-Old Vine Zinfandel.......7.97
Guigal-Cote du Rhone Rouge ........12.97
Hess Select-Chardonnay Monterey.
y 8.97
J Lohr-Cabernet Seven Oaks.........11.47
J Lohr-Chardonnay Riverstone........ 9.97
Jordan-Cabernet..........................
t
43.97
Jordan-Chardonnay.......................
y
27.97
Kendall Jackson-Cab,Mer,Pinot Noir..
r 14.97
Kendall Jackson-Chardonnay.........
y
9.97
Kendall Jackson-Chard Grand Res..12.47
Kendall Jackson-Sauvignon Blanc.. 8.97
Liberty School-Cab Paso Robles....11.97
Lindeman's-Cabernet Bin 45...........4.97
Lindeman's-Chardonnay Bin 65 ......4.97
Lindeman's-Merlot Bin 40...............4.97
Marietta-Old Vine Red...................11.97
Mark West-Pinot Noirr ...................... 7.97
Menage a Trois Blanc ......................7.97
Meridian-Cabernet, Chardonnay......5.47
Mirassou-Pinot Noir.........................
r
6.47
Mondavi Pr Sel-Cab,Chard,Merlott ...6.47
Mondavi-Cabernet Napa................18.97
Nobilo-Sauvignon Blanc ..................7.97
Ravenswood-Vintner's Zin,Cab,Mer..
r 6.97

GRAND OPENING

Red Diamond-Cabernet,Merlot........
t
6.47
Rodney Strong-Cabernet Sonoma .12.97
Rodney Strong-Chard Sonoma ....... 9.97
Rodney Strong-Merlot Sonoma......12.97
Rosemount-Shiraz.......................... 5.97
Rosemount-Shiraz/Cabernet..........
t
5.97
Ruffino-Chianti Ris Ducale Tan......18.97
Sebastiani-Cabernet Sonoma........11.97
Simi-Cabernet Alexander Valley.....
y 12.47
Simi-Chardonnay Sonoma.............11.97
Smoking Loon-Cab,Chard ...............5.47
Smoking Loon-Merlot......................
t
5.47
Sterling Vintner's-Cabernett ...........12.97
Sterling Vintner's-Chardonnay........
y
8.97
Sterling Vintner's-Merlott ...............12.97
Sterling-Cabernet Napa.................19.97
Sterling-Chardonnay Napa ............12.97
Sterling-Merlot Napa.....................17.97
Sutter Home-Moscato .................... 3.97
Sutter Home-White Zinfandel ......... 3.97
Toasted Head-Chardonnayy ............. 8.97
Wente-Chardonnay Morning Fog...10.97
Yellow Tail-Chard,Cab,Mer,Mosc,Shz..
z 4.97

ALL STORES CELEBR ATE
Join
n the
he Lon
ng Be
Beac
ach
h Gr
Ga
an
nd Op
Openiin
ng

MEET WINEMAKERS & WINE/SPIRITS/BEER
EXPERTS, WITH COOL GIVEAWAYS AND MORE!

Wine Events:
• Terlato Family Wines featuring Two Hands,
Sanford and Lapostolle
• Tom Gore Wines

Andre-Brut,Extra Dry......................
y
3.97
Chandon-Brut Classic................... 15.97
Dom Perignon.............................142.97
Freixenet-Cordon Negro Brut,Extra Dry.. 8.47
Korbel-Brut..................................... 9.47
Korbel-Extra Dry.............................
y
9.47
Martini & Rossi-Asti...................... 10.97
Moet & Chandon-Imperial Brut.....
t 36.97
Veuve Clicquot-Brut NVV ................ 43.97

LIMITED-TIME ONLY

Whiskey/Whisky

Black Velvet 1.75L ..................... 13.99
Bulleit-Rye Whiskey 750ml ........ 20.99
Canadian-Club 1.75L................. 16.49
Canadian-LTD 1.75L...................11.99
Canadian-Mist 1.75L ................. 12.99
Crown Royal 1.75L..................... 29.99
Crown Royal-Black 1.75L...........43.99
Crown Royal-Black 750ml.......... 20.99

Prices valid 6//14/
14/201
20155 - 6/21/2015.
201

SAVE 2

$9.99

Corona Extra

$

$9.99
w/coupon

11.99

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

PLU #1468

PLU #1467

PLU #1469

$9.99
w/coupon

12.99

14.99

Bud Light, Budweiser
24-12oz loose btls
Limit 2 cases.

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

PLU #1471

PLU #1465

PLU #1470

SAVE $3

SAVE $3

$12.99

$18.99

$20.99

1.75L
Limit 2 btls.

1.75L
Limit 2 btls.

1.75L
Limit 2 btls.

w/coupon

w/coupon

15.99

Svedka Vodka

Gin

w/coupon

12-12oz btls
Limit 2 packs.

SAVE $3

Beefeater 1.75L......................... 19.99
Bombay 1.75L............................ 21.99
Bombay Sapphire 1.75L............. 28.49
Bombay Sapphire 750ml.............17.99
Burnett's-Gin 1.75L ................... 12.49
Fleischmann's-Gin 1.75L ............11.99
Gilbey's-Gin 1.75L ..................... 13.49
Gordon's-Gin 1.75L ................... 13.99
Hendrick's 1.75L........................ 59.99
Hendrick's 750ml ......................26.99
Seagram's-Gin 1.75L................. 13.99

$12.99

11.99

Modelo Especial

12-12oz btls
Limit 2 packs.

Cabo Wabo-Reposado 750ml.........31.99
Jose Cuervo-Especial Silver 1.75LL .. 18.99
Jose Cuervo-Gold 1.75L...................
L
17.99
Patron-Silver 1.75LL .......................... 72.99

SAVE $2

SAVE $2

Sierra Nevada Pale Ale

Tequila

12-12oz btls
Limit 2 packs.

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

w/coupon

Balvenie-Dbl Wood 12 Yr 750ml....42.99
Chivas-Regal 12 Yr 1.75LL .............. 48.99
Chivas-Regal 12 Yr 750ml............. 18.99
Chivas-Regal 18 Yr 750ml.............56.99
Clan MacGregor 1.75L...................
L
14.99
Dewar's 1.75L................................ 24.99
Famous Grouse 1.75L.................... 24.99
Glenfiddich 12 Yr 750ml................26.99
Glenlivet 12 Yr 1.75L......................
L
64.99
Glenlivet 12 Yr 750ml.....................23.99
Glenmorangie-The Original 750ml.28.99
House of Stuart 1.75L.....................
L
17.99
J&B 1.75LL ..................................... 27.99
Johnnie Walker-Black 1.75L..........
L
48.99
Johnnie Walker-Blue 750ml ........140.99
Johnnie Walker-Red 1.75L............. 24.99
Scoresby 1.75L..............................
L
16.49

12.99

Blue Moon Belgian
White

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

$9.99

Scotch

w/coupon

12-11.2oz btls
Limit 2 packs.

SAVE $3

Jameson 12 Yr 750ml................ 39.99
Kessler 1.75L............................. 13.99
Seagram's-7 1.75L .................... 14.49
Windsor Canadian 1.75L............ 12.99

$9.99

12.99

Stella Artois

12-12oz btls
Limit 2 packs.

1.75L

SAVE $3

SAVE 3

$

w/coupon

w/coupon Reg. $23.99

21.99

Seagram's VO

Tanqueray Gin

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

Valid 6/14/2015-6/21/2015 in
Southern CA only. In-store only.

PLU # 1489

PLU #1490

PLU #1479

GREAT SELECTION OF WINES

Cordials, etc.

Bailey's-Irish Cream 1.75L.........35.99
Bailey's-Irish Cream 1L.............. 29.99
Bailey's-Irish Cream 750ml.........17.99
Cointreau 750ml........................ 27.99
Courvoisier-VS 750ml................ 20.99
Di Saronno-Orig Amaretto 750ml..16.99
Grand Marnier 750ml.................26.99
Jagermeister 1.75L....................33.99
Jagermeister 750ml................... 15.49
Kahlua 1.75L ............................. 32.99
Kahlua 750ml ............................ 14.49
Licor-43 750ml ......................... 21.99
Remy Martin-VSOP 750ml......... 32.99
St Germain-Elderflower Liqr 750ml 27.99

OVER 2,500 BEERS
Coors Light

30-12oz cans

$18.49

Gazela Vinho
Verde

Italy. 750ml

Portugal. 750ml

$6.37

$6.79

Gumdale
Shiraz/
Cabernet

Coastline
Merlot Paso
Robles

Radius
Cabernet

Australia. 750ml

California. 750ml

Washington.
750ml

$6.79

$6.79

$8.49

Ropiteau
Chardonnay

Cloud Break
Zinfandel

2012 California.
750ml

a a a a a a a a a

Australia. 750ml

2013 California.
750ml

$5.94

$5.94

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$6.99

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE $6.99

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$7.49

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$7.99

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$7.99

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$7.99

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$9.99

France. 750ml

$8.49

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$9.99

$8.49

w/Coupon
SINGLE BOTTLE
$9.99

WINE
E SAV
VINGS
S COUP
PON
N | Valid 6/14/2015 - 6/21/2015

Carson St

Long Beach Towne Center
(Next to Ashley Furniture)
7400 Carson Blvd.,
Long Beach, CA 90808
(562) 420-2018

605

EDWARDS
CINEMAS

River

Southbound 605: Take Carson St. exit
then go straight through the light.

LONG BEACH
TOWNE CENTER

Total
Wine

SAM’S
CLUB

15

% OFF

GRAND OPENING! LONG BEACH

WALMART

CoronaExtra,CoronaLt24-12ozloosebtls. 21.99
DosEquisSpecialLager,Amber12-12ozbtls. 11.99
Fat Tire Amber 12-12oz btls ........ 12.99
Fat Tire Amber 24-12oz loose btls ..23.99
Guinness Draught 12-11.2oz btls. 12.99
Guinness Extra Stout 6-12oz btls...6.99
Heineken Lt 24-12oz loose btls....22.99
Heineken, Heineken Lt 12-12oz btls. 11.99
Landshark Lager 12-12oz btls ..... 11.99
Michelob Ultra 24-12oz loose btls 17.99
Miller High Life 12-12oz btls..........6.99
Newcastle Brown Ale 12-12oz btls. 12.99
NewcastleBrownAle24-12ozloosebtls.s22.99
Pacifico Clara 24-12oz loose btls.20.49
Rolling Rock 12-12oz btls..............6.99
SamAdamsBostonLgr,Lt12-12ozbtls.
s 12.99
ShockTopBelgianWhtAle12-12ozbtls.
s 10.99
Sierra NV Pale Ale 24-12oz loose btls.
s 22.99
SierraNVTorpedoExtraIPA12-12ozbtls. 12.99
St Pauli Girl 12-12oz btls............. 10.99
Stella Artois 24-11.2oz loose btls.. 24.99
Stone IPA 12-12oz btls................16.99
Stone IPA 6-12oz btls.................... 7.99
Victoria 12-12oz btls ................... 12.99
Widmer Hefeweizen 12-12oz btls. 11.99
Kegs
Coors Light 1/2 Keg..................109.99

Conte Priola
Pinot Grigio

Oak Grove
Chardonnay
Reserve

Mallee Point
Shiraz

San Gabriel

12oz. Cans
Bud Lt, Budweiser 12-12oz cans ...... 8.49
Bud Lt, Budweiser 36-12oz cans....19.99
Budweiser, Bud Ltt 18-12oz cans ... 11.99
Budweiser, Select 55 12-12oz cans..9.99
Budweiser, Select 55 18-12oz cans. 11.99
Bud Lt, Budweiser 30-12oz cans.... 18.49
Coors Light 36-12oz cans...............19.99
Coors Light, Coors 18-12oz cans.... 11.99
Coors, Coors Light 12-12oz cans...... 8.49
Corona Extra, Corona Lt 12-12oz cans.
s 11.99
Heineken, Heineken Lt 12-12oz cans.
s 11.99
Keystone Light 30-12oz cans..........14.99
Miller 64, MGD 30-12oz cans......... 18.49
Modelo Especial 24-12oz cans .......22.99
Natural Light, Ice 30-12oz cans......15.99
Tecate, Tecate Lt 30-12oz cans......18.99
12oz. Bottles
Amstel Light 12-12oz btls............ 12.99
Ballast Point Sculpin IPA 6-12oz btls.
s 13.99
Bass Ale 12-12oz btls....................9.99
Bear Republic Racer 5 12-12oz btls. 14.99
Bear Republic, Racer 5 6-12oz btls..7.99
Beck's 12-12oz btls.......................9.99
Beck's Premier Light 12-12oz btls .9.99
Beck's 24-12oz loose btls ........... 18.99
BlueMoonBelgianWht24-12ozloosebtls. 23.99
Bud Light Platinum 12-12oz btls....9.99
Bud Lt, Budweiser 12-12oz btls..... 8.49
Bud Lt, Budweiser 20-12oz btls... 13.99
Budweiser, Select 55 12-12oz btls. 8.49
Coors Light 20-12oz btls............. 13.99
Coors Light, Coors 12-12oz btls .... 8.49

®

Value Wines

$29.99

Bourbon

Spirit Events:
• Brown Forman engraving including Jack Daniels,
Woodford Reserve, Herradura and Collingwood
• Chivas

Beer Events:
• Golden Road
• Figueroa Mountain

Black Box-Cab,Chard,Mer,PG 3L.. 14.99
Carlo Rossi-Cab,Chard,Mer,WhtZin 4L..
L 9.49
Carlo Rossi-Paisano,Burg,Chabl 4LL . 8.49
Corbett Canyon-Chardonnay 3L ......6.79
Franzia-Blush,Chillable Red 5L........9.49
Franzia-Chard,Cab,Merlot 5L ........11.99
Franzia-Crisp White 5L....................9.49
Livingston Clr-RdRose,Chab,Rhine 3L.
L 7.49
Pacific Peak-Cab,Chard,Mer,PG 3LL . 6.99
Peter Vella-Blush 5L Boxx ................ 8.99
Peter Vella-Chablis,Burg 5L...........10.49
Peter Vella-Chard,Cab,Mer 5L Boxx . 10.49
Peter Vella-White Zinfandel 5L Box...
x 10.49

$14.49

Basil Hayden-8 Yr 750ml ...........40.99
Bulleit-Bourbon 1.75L................34.99
Bulleit-Bourbon 750ml............... 20.99
Early Times 1.75L ...................... 15.49
Evan Williams 1.75L................... 14.99
Jack Daniel's-Gent Jack 1.75L... 39.99
Jack Daniel's-Gent Jack 750ml . 20.49
Jack Daniel's-Single Barrel 750ml .44.99
Jack Daniel's-TN Honey 1.75L ...33.99
Jack Daniel's-TN Honey 750ml .. 15.99
Jim Beam 1.75L......................... 20.99
Maker's 46 750ml .....................26.99
Old Crow 1.75L.......................... 14.49
Old Grand Dad 86 1.75L ............22.99
Southern Comfort 1.75L..............17.99
Ten High 1.75L............................11.49

For more details, visit
www.totalwine.com/
LongBeach or scan code

SUNDAY 6/21, 1-4PM

Wine Events:
• River Road Russian River Valley Wine Tasting
• Terlato Family Wines featuring Two Hands,
Sanford and Lapostolle
• Vintage Wine Estates featuring Clos Pegase
and Cartlidge & Browne

Arbor Mist--All Flavors...........................
s
5.47
Barefoot Cellars--Chard,Mosc,PG........7.97
Barefoot Cellars--Cab,Mer,PN..............7.97
Beringer--White Zinfandel.....................7.27
Bolla--Pinot Grigio,Valpolicella...............
a
9.57
Cavit--Pinot Grigio..................................9.97
Clos du Bois--Chardonnay..................
y
17.97
Concannon--Chard,Merlot,Cab............
b
5.47
Corbett Canyon--Chard,Cab,Merlot.....
t 5.97
Gallo Family Vineyards--Chard,Cab,Mer.r 5.47
Sutter Home--Moscato.........................
o
7.47
Sutter Home--White Zinfandel.............. 7.47
Vendange--Chard,Cab,Merlot,SB.........5.47
Woodbridge--Cab,Merlot,Pinot Noir.....
r 8.97
Woodbridge--Sauvignon Blanc.............
c
7.97

1.75L

Bacardi-Gold 1.75L.....................17.99
Bacardi-Gold 750ml .................... 9.49
Bacardi-Superior 1.75L...............14.79
Bacardi-Superior 750ml............... 9.49
Malibu-Coconut Rum 1.75L ....... 15.99
Ron Zacapa 23 Yr Cent 750ml ... 34.99
Ronrico-Silver 1.75L .................. 12.49
Sailor Jerry-Spiced Rum 1.75L... 21.99

EVERY FRI-SUN
THRU JULY 26TH

Wine Events:
• River Road Russian River Valley Wine Tasting
• Banfi wines featuring Concha Y Toro and
Little Black Dress

SATURDAY 6/20, 12-6PM

1.5L Wines

SmirnoT

Rum

(Next to Ashley Furniture)

Spirit Events:
• Patron
• Tomatin SScotch and engraving event
• Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey and Tin Cup
American Whiskey

Beer Events:
• Tap It Brewery
Spirit Events:
• Patrida Tequila

Sparkling 750ml

Jack
Daniel's
Black

Vodka

Long Beach
Towne Center

FRIDAY 6/19, 4-7PM

OVER 3,000 SPIRITS

Absolut 1.75L ............................ 25.49
Absolut 750ml ........................... 14.99
Barton-Vodka 1.75L..................... 9.99
Belvedere 1.75L......................... 39.99
Belvedere 750ml ....................... 18.99
Burnett's-Vodka 1.75L............... 10.99
Ciroc 750ml...............................23.99
Ciroc-Coconut,Red Berry 750ml . 23.99
Firefly-Sweet Tea Vodka 1.75L... 27.99
Fleischmann's-Vodka 1.75L ....... 10.99
Gordon's-Vodka 1.75L ............... 10.99
Grey Goose 1.75L ......................44.99
Grey Goose 1L ...........................35.99
Grey Goose 750ml..................... 24.49
Luksusowa 1.75L....................... 18.99
McCormick-Vodka 1.75L............ 10.99
Platinum Vodka 7X 1.75L........... 13.99
Popov 1.75L................................11.99
Stolichnaya 80 1.75L .................26.99
Tito's Handmade Vodka 1.75L.... 27.99
Wolfschmidt 1.75L..................... 10.99

LONG BEACH

!

Northbound 605: Take Carson St. exit then left
at the light. Take next left into shopping center.
Pass Edwards Cinemas, in the back
next to Ashley Furniture.

Mix and Match 6
or More bottles of
750ml and/or 1.5L
WINE and SAVE 15%.

Excludes items with prices ending in 7. Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More WINE
Coupon or in combination with the Mix 6 Discount. Coupon valid in Southern CA only. Not valid on previous
purchases. Offer valid 6/14/2015 - 6/21/2015. Valid in-store only. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Offer
intended for people of legal drinking age only.

Mon-Sun 9am-10pm

ALSO VISIT US IN

Brea | Huntington Beach | Laguna Hills | Northridge
Rancho Cucamonga | Redondo Beach | Thousand Oaks | Tustin
Enjoy the Total Wine & More Experience in 16 States.
Find them at TotalWine.com

Prices and coupons good thru 6/21/2015. All beer prices + CRV. Total Wine & More is
not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while
supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of
Retail Services & Systems, Inc. © 2015 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please
drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.
Total Wine believes in helping preserve our
T
natural forests and sources paper with a minimum
m of 80%
8
recycled Rber.
TWMSoCal

TotalWineSoCal

LAX-15-0614GO-1113-BS-FP
0614GO-1113

1

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

THELARGEST SELECTION OF BEER IN TOWN
FRESH • LOCAL BREWS • SEASONAL BREWS • SPECIAL RELEASES
COLD KEGS ALWAYS AVAILABLE • BUILD YOUR OWN SIX PACK

A21

A22

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Recruiting now for 2016 Senate races
The GOP seeks strong
nominees in Colorado
and Nevada to offset
other expected losses.
By Kurtis Lee
The latest battle for control of the Senate won’t end
until November 2016, but decisions made this year in several key states could go a
long way toward deciding
the outcome.

In contests where open
seats can be won or a vulnerable incumbent toppled,
this is when parties focus on
a single issue: recruiting
candidates.
Currently, Republicans
are searching for candidates
in two states — Colorado
and Nevada — where they
have hopes of picking up
seats.
Democrats lost control of
the Senate in last year’s midterm election but have an
edge in regaining control in
2016. They’re set to defend 10

seats this time around compared with 24 for Republicans.
Seven of the seats Republicans must defend are
in states that President
Obama won twice. In a presidential election year, in
which turnout will be larger
and include more minorities
and young people, who tilt
Democratic, several of those
races will probably be difficult for the GOP.
To offset potential losses
in blue states — GOP incumbents in Illinois and Wiscon-

Legal Notice

If You Worked Around Gaskets or
Packing Containing Asbestos
The Garlock Bankruptcy May Affect Your Rights.
Certain Personal Injury Claims Must be Filed by October 6, 2015
There is a bankruptcy involving claims
about exposure to asbestos-containing gasket
and packing products.
Garlock Sealing
Technologies LLC, The Anchor Packing
Company, and Garrison Litigation Management
Group, Ltd. (“Debtors”) have filed a plan of
reorganization to restructure their business and
pay claims.
The products were used in places where steam,
hot liquid or acids moved through pipes,
including industrial and maritime settings.
Who is Affected by the Garlock Bankruptcy?
Your rights may be affected if you:
• Worked with or around Garlock asbestoscontaining gaskets or packing, or any other
asbestos-containing product for which
Debtors are responsible, or
• Have a claim now or in the future against
the Debtors for asbestos-related disease
caused by any person’s exposure to asbestoscontaining products.
Even if you have not yet been diagnosed with
any disease or experienced any symptoms,
your rights may be affected. The Court has
appointed a Future Claimants’ Representative
(“FCR”) to represent the rights of these future
claimants. Future claimants do not need to file
a claim at this time.
What Does the Plan Provide?
The Plan is the result of a settlement agreement
between the FCR, the Debtors, and the Debtors’
parent company. The Plan proposes to use
$357.5 million to pay, in full, all pending and
future asbestos claims against Garlock and
Garrison. If necessary, up to $132 million in
additional funding will be provided. If the
Plan is approved, you will no longer be able
to file claims directly against the Debtors or
affiliated companies. If you have claims only
against Anchor, you are not expected to recover

For Information:

anything, as that company has no assets and will
be dissolved.
Who Must File a Personal Injury Claim?
You must file a claim by October 6, 2015, if
you:
• Have a claim against Garlock or Garrison
based on an asbestos-related injury
diagnosed on or before August 1, 2014,
• Have not settled with the Debtors, and
• Filed a lawsuit against any other defendant
or a claim against any asbestos trust as of
August 1, 2014.
If you do not file a claim, you may lose your
right to bring your claim in the future.
Individuals diagnosed with disease after August
1, 2014 do not have to file a claim at this time,
but may be able to vote or object to the Plan.
Who Can Vote on or Object to the Plan?
All identifiable asbestos claimants or their
attorneys will receive the “Solicitation
Package”. This includes the Plan, Voting
Ballot, and other information. If you have not
filed a claim yet, you can vote on the Plan by
providing certified information about your
claim, or making a motion to vote as described
in the Solicitation Package available online or
by calling the toll-free number.
You will need to vote on the Plan by October 6,
2015. The FCR will support and vote to accept
the Plan on behalf of the future claimants. You
may also object to the Plan and the adequacy
of the FCR’s representation of future
claimants by October 6, 2015.
When will the Court Decide on the Plan?
A hearing to consider confirmation of the Plan
will begin at 10:00 a.m. ET on June 20, 2016,
at the US Bankruptcy Court, Western District
of North Carolina, 401 West Trade Street,
Charlotte, NC 28202.

www.GarlockNotice.com 1-844-Garlock

sin are particularly vulnerable — Republicans hope to
pick up Democratic seats in
Colorado, where they defeated incumbent Sen. Mark
Udall in 2014, and Nevada,
where Senate Minority
Leader Harry Reid will be retiring.
But recruitment problems could limit those efforts.
In Colorado, GOP Rep.
Mike Coffman’s recent announcement that he will not
challenge incumbent Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet
has left Republicans scrambling.
Coffman, who hails from
a diverse suburban Denver
district and has won statewide office in the past, is a
strong fundraiser and wellknown within the state
party. Now Republicans
must consider several lowerprofile and untested candidates.
The list includes state
Sen. Ellen Roberts, who represents a rural swath of
southwestern Colorado, and
Coffman’s wife, Cynthia, the
state’s attorney general.
In 2014, Cynthia Coffman
was the top Republican
vote-getter of any candidate
in Colorado, but many of the
state’s top strategists believe she will run for governor in 2018.
Roberts could be a strong
pick for a state that has never elected a female senator,
but her support of abortion
rights would be a hurdle to
overcome in a GOP primary.
“The big question is: Can
she make it out of a primary
where there will certainly be
really conservative candidates who hammer her on
the issue?” said Eric Sondermann, a Denver-based political analyst.
Roberts said in an interview that if she decides to
run, the theme for her candidacy would resemble a slogan used by Sen. Rand Paul
of Kentucky: a “different
kind of Republican.”
“We as a party need to
find solutions and bring people together,” Roberts said,
describing herself as “modestly libertarian.”
In Nevada, where Reid
has held his seat since 1987,
Democrats have coalesced

J. Scott Applewhite Associated Press

REPUBLICAN Ron Johnson of Wisconsin, one of the

most conservative senators, is seen as vulnerable.

Joe Koshollek Associated Press

DEMOCRAT Russ Feingold is ready for a rematch

after losing his Wisconsin seat to Johnson in 2010.
around his protege, former
state Atty. Gen. Catherine
Cortez Masto.
Many Republicans had
hoped that Gov. Brian Sandoval, who won reelection
last year, would run for the
seat. But Sandoval said last
week he would not do so.
Republican officials have
been trying to persuade
Rep. Joe Heck, a retired general, to enter the race, al-

though he has said he will
not run.
Florida Republicans will
look to defend the seat of
Sen. Marco Rubio as he
seeks the Republican presidential nomination. The
race, which is ranked a “pure
toss-up” by the nonpartisan
Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report, is shaping up
to have competitive prima[See Senate, A23]

Don’t Live With Your Teeth In A Glass!!

Finally Your Chance At Affordable Dental Implants
Dentures

n
h a es
T
fic
ss
Le r O f
he
Ot

– Covers Palate
– Blocks Taste
– Weak Bite
– Gagging
– Fake Smile
– Gooey Adhesive

Summer Special!!!

F R EE

Ray
X
,
Exam Scan
& CT

Complete Dental Implant
Includes Abutment & Crown

$

– All P.P.O. Insurances Accepted
– All Major Credit Cards Accepted
– No Interest Financing OAC

Porcelain
Veneers

$

699
Reg. $1,400

– Open Palate
– Fresh Taste
– Strong Bite
– No Gagging
– Natural Smile
– No Denture Glue

849
Reg. $3,999

Crowns

Deep
Cleaning

599 $99/mo. $99

$

Reg. $1,200

866 887 2887

8500 Wilshire Blvd. #505, Los Angeles, CA 90211

/quad

Call J
oann
s ch e d a t o
right ule
now!!

Cash Prices Listed. Veneer special for full case. Implant must be ready site for special offer. In office savings plan needed for specials. All on 6
special for ready case. Can’t combine specials with Insurance. Expires 6/20/15.

LAA3357284-1

%
0
5

Implant Bridge

L AT I M ES . C O M

[Senate, from A22]
ries on both sides.
Rep. Patrick Murphy
represents a South Florida
district and has been endorsed by the Democratic
Senatorial Campaign Committee. The endorsement,
however, hasn’t deterred a
challenge from Rep. Alan
Grayson, who is notorious
for making controversial
comments.
On the GOP side, state
Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera, who is of Cuban and
Jewish descent, is the favorite of establishment Republicans. He’s set to be challenged by tea party favorite
Rep. Ron DeSantis, whose
district is in the northern
part of the state.
“I firmly believe — firmly
— that a Floridian will be the
Republican nominee for
president,” said Rick Wilson,
a Florida GOP strategist
who is working for LopezCantera. In addition to Rubio, former Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush is seeking the nomination.
“That only helps the Republican Senate candidate
in Florida, because it bumps
up Republican turnout,”
Wilson said.
In Wisconsin, the decision by former Sen. Russ
Feingold to seek a rematch
with Sen. Ron Johnson, who
beat him in 2010, has created
a race that both sides will
watch closely.
Johnson is one of the
most conservative members
of the Senate, and almost
certainly will have a harder
road in a presidential election year.
“This is one of the premier races,” said Nathan L.
Gonzales, editor of the
Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report. “And one
where both sides have their
top recruit.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @kurtisalee

NATIONAL BRIEFING
ALABAMA

Combat ship christened,
named for Giffords
Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle “Gabby” Giffords of Arizona
had a Navy vessel named in her honor during a ceremony at
a Mobile, Ala., shipyard.
Giffords joined others including Jill Biden, wife of Vice
President Joe Biden, as the Gabrielle Giffords was christened in coastal Alabama.
The 419-foot ship was built at the Austal shipyard and is
the Navy’s 10th littoral combat ship designed to operate in
shallow waters near the coast.
Giffords was badly wounded in a 2011 shooting that left
six dead and 13 injured in Tucson. The Democrat left Congress and later founded an organization that supports gun
control.
— associated press

GUANTANAMO BAY

6 Yemenis are
moved to Oman
A pause in prisoner
transfers from Guantanamo
Bay has ended with the arrival in Oman of six Yemenis
long held at the U.S. prison
for suspected terrorists.
It was the first movement
of detainees out of the Guantanamo prison in five
months as Congress considers new restrictions on
transfers.
The six men boarded a
flight Friday from the U.S.
facility in Cuba. Their transfer reduced Guantanamo’s
prison population to 116.
President Obama has
now transferred more than
half the 242 detainees who
were at Guantanamo when
he was sworn into office in
2009 after campaigning to
close it.
— associated press

HAWAII

Team completes
Mars simulation
Six scientists who lived
under a dome on the slopes
of a dormant Hawaii volcano
for eight months to simulate
life on Mars have emerged
from isolation.
The crew stepped outside the dome that’s 8,000
feet up the slopes of Mauna
Loa to feel fresh air on their

skin. It was their first time to
leave without wearing a
spacesuit.
The scientists are part
of a human-performance
study funded by NASA that
tracked how they worked together as a team. They were
monitored by surveillance
cameras, body movement
trackers and electronic surveys.
Crew member Jocelyn
Dunn said it felt great to
have the sensation of wind
on her skin. She said the first
thing she wanted to do was
go for a swim.
— associated press

CONNECTICUT

City settles over
Ebola scare suit
The insurance carrier for
a Connecticut city paid
$30,000 to settle a lawsuit
filed by the family of a thirdgrader who was barred from
school for several days because of Ebola fear.
School officials in Milford
initially told 7-year-old Ikeoluwa Opayemi to stay out
of school for three weeks
in October after she attended a family wedding in
Nigeria.
The girl showed no symptoms of Ebola, and Nigeria
had no known cases of the virus.
She was allowed to return
to school after her father
filed a federal lawsuit.
— associated press

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

A23

Do you want to Walk,
Work, Play and Run?
Without the pain? Get rid
of that leg, back, knee,
hip and foot pain today.
You ca
can purchase a pair of shoes + orthotics
For
Only

199.95!**+tax

$

SO CALL TODAY!

**exclusions apply not all shoe models and does not include leather covers.

Are you tired of buying those off the
shelf insoles that cost so much but
only works a while or not even at all?
A machine and prefabricated supports
will not work for everyone. Our feet
are like our fingerprints , no two are alike. So how will a
machine that tells you to buy a support that cost over $50
help you if it’s not made for you?
Well, the end to your frustration is here.
We here at The Foot Group hand make your
custom orthotics from your own foot molds.
Well, some may say “I’ve already tried that!”
What is so different about us? Well we are
the only ones that offer a lifetime warranty.
We offer free adjustments as long as you own
them and you receive them in 5 business days!
Most of you know that custom made
orthotics can cost well over $250.00 +.
Here at The Foot Group our price is only
$149.95 + tax.**

The Foot Group

15685 Hawthorne Blvd STE. F, Lawndale, CA. 90260
Hours: Closed on Mondays • Tuesday - Sat 10:00 - 6:30pm • Sunday : 11:00 - 5:00pm

(310)-676-FOOT (3668)
Opening Soon Our New Anaheim Location

Offer expires 6/30/15 no rain checks, not valid with any other offer, exclusions do apply.

We are looking for franchisees to open in other cities. We are rapidly
growing and need to be able to offer locations closer to our clients.
If you care about others and want to help people walk, run and work
without pain. Please call us. We are taking applications now.

LAA3361397-1

Florida
Senate
race is a
toss-up

S

A24

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

You’re invited to join us at a Novartis
MS Education Link Event
Hear Leo Maher, MD share information
about multiple sclerosis (MS), learn about a
prescription treatment option, and connect
with people in your community
living with MS.
6/19/15 at 12:00 pm
Seasons 52
1501 Ocean Avenue
Santa Monica, CA 90401
Tell or bring a friend!
Accessible to people with disabilities.
Light meal served.
Parking will be validated. Space is limited.

LAA3353481-1

Please RSVP by calling
1-866-682-7491

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
East Hanover, New Jersey 07936-1080
©2013 Novartis
1/13

T-XMG-1234308

Opening of the will
EL150301-L. Having had Zurich as his last domicile, the following person passed away on
19.02.2015:
Vladimir Ficnar, born 23.01.1931 in Stredocesky,
Novy Malin, Czech Republic, citizen of the Czech
Republic and United States of America, son of
Josef Ficnar and Vlastimila née Vondracek.
This call for heirs is addressed to the non-appointed statutory heirs of the deceased person.
The appointed testamentary heirs have the right to
request a certificate of inheritance before the court
and to dispose of the rights of the estate, provided
the statutory heirs of the deceased person do not
oppose to it by filing a written objection to the
court within a period of one month commencing on
the date of publication of this announcement (Article 559 of the Swiss Civil Code). Upon filing their
objection, the statutory heirs must provide proof of
their kinship with the deceased person. They have
the right to consult and to request a copy of the
testament before court.
District Court of Zurich Court of first instance composed of one single judge - Inheritance matters
P.O. Box
CH-8026 Zurich

Some
want
more of
mayor
[Garcetti, from A1]
But at a time when officers’ killings of young black
men have tested big-city
mayors across the country,
some question how well Garcetti’s low-key style can be
adapted to the combustible
politics of race and policing.
Last month, one of the
city’s top homeless services
officials faulted the mayor,
along with LAPD Chief
Charlie Beck, for not showing up at an emotionally
charged community meeting called in response to the
fatal police shooting of Brendon Glenn, an unarmed 29year-old who lived on the
streets in Venice.
“Where is the mayor?
Where is the chief of police?”
Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Commissioner Mike Neely said at the
meeting. “I don’t think they
realize this person was
someone people really cared
about.”
Last week, on the eve of
the city Police Commission’s
ruling on whether deadly
force was justified in the
Ford case, the mayor flew to
Washington, D.C. With a
small group of demonstrators encamped outside
Getty House, the mayoral
residence, Garcetti tried to
leave through a back entrance. He was confronted
by activists who shouted at
him as he peered out the
passenger window of a black
SUV.
“You always run,” one
protester said. The episode
was caught on video and
broadcast on the nightly
news.
Other urban leaders
haven’t necessarily fared
well with a more hands-on
approach.
New York City Mayor Bill
de Blasio alienated his police force with his forceful expressions of sympathy for

Rick Loomis Los Angeles Times

MAYOR ERIC GARCETTI is known for showing more restraint in the use of his

bully pulpit as leader of Los Angeles than some of his outspoken predecessors.

Eric Garner, an unarmed
black man who died after an
officer put him in a chokehold. Baltimore State’s Atty.
Marilyn Mosby was attacked
for political opportunism
when she swiftly filed
charges against six officers
allegedly involved in the
death of Freddie Gray.
Garcetti, according to
some longtime observers of
L.A.’s political scene, risks
erring in the opposite direction.
In a city with a smoldering legacy of civil unrest,
voters prefer mayors who
can summon a commanding
presence in times of trouble,
said veteran Democratic
strategist Darry Sragow.
Former Mayors Antonio
Villaraigosa and Richard
Riordan were sometimes
chided for hogging the spotlight, but were rewarded
with second terms in office.
“It’s obvious that L.A. is a
very big and complicated
place, and there’s an expectation on the part of the people who live in the city that
the mayor is going to play a
visible role and have a guiding hand,” Sragow said.
“This is a city with a lot of
underlying tensions and
problems that could rise to
the surface without that
kind of strong hand.”
Arnie Steinberg, a former
Riordan advisor, said Garcetti’s on-camera encounter
with the protesters outside
his home showed that he
had not yet mastered the art

of projecting strength in moments of controversy.
“It’s a counterproductive
visual to be seen as evasive
and not confronting things
forthrightly,”
Steinberg
said.
Fernando Guerra, a registered lobbyist and director
of the Center for the Study of
Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University, took a different view of the mayor’s
low profile. He said he didn’t
think Garcetti was too detached from the Glenn and
Ford shootings, but had
wisely focused on policy reforms — such as equipping
all officers with body cameras and increasing funding
for community policing programs — to address the police department’s underlying problems.
“You could spend all four
years, every single day, reacting to events in Los Angeles, and not get a single thing
done,” Guerra said. “I think
he’s got a systematic approach to public safety. He’s
way ahead of most police departments with body cameras. He’s way ahead of most
police departments with
community relations.”
On Tuesday, after the police commission ruled that
one of the two officers who
shot Ezell Ford was not justified in using deadly force,
Garcetti addressed criticism of his perceived lack of
focus on the case.
The mayor, whose father
served for eight years as

L.A.’s elected district attorney, said he had not wanted
to exert inappropriate influence over the civilian panel’s
decision-making process.
“Short of an explosive situation in this city where I
think it is my responsibility
to speak out,” he said, “I’m
the son of a prosecutor, and
I’m going to let that system
work and make sure that it is
as clean as possible.”
Garcetti has sometimes
taken an active role in the
city’s responses to police
shootings. When LAPD officials were accused of dragging their feet on releasing
Ford’s
autopsy
several
months after the August
shooting, the mayor ordered
them to disclose the report
by the end of the year.
He has also cited the
other inevitable demands —
both professional and personal — on a mayor’s time.
When he was asked on
KNX-1070 radio why he had
been a no-show at the May 7
Venice community meeting
on Glenn’s death, which began at 6 p.m. and lasted
about three hours, Garcetti
said he had “previous commitments, and a family engagement that I could not
break.”
He added, “That’s something as a father I won’t do in
certain situations.”
His calendar, released by
the mayor’s office in response to a request from the
Los Angeles Times, pro[See Garcetti, A25]

LAA3353433-1

INTERIOR DOORS
WHOLE HOME SALE

“Installed in a Day!”

BUY 10
GET 10 *

FREE

BUY
Y 10 DOORS AND GET 10
FREE DO
OORS OR MATCHING
CLOSET DOORS
Expires June 30, 2015

Lic. 574304

So.Cal’s #1Choice

Buy O
B
One G
Gett O
One

For 12 Mon
Months

Shutters . Blinds . Shades

Door Style: Continental

Interior

DOOR & CLOSET
www.danmer.com/LATimes

C O M P A N Y

Free Estimates Byy Apppt.

310-986-2695

InteriorDoorCo.com/Promo13

2675 Skypark Drive, Torrance 90505
In-Home Estimates Available in Service Areas.
Showroom Consultations By Appointment.

Promo Code: LAT. Valid thru 6/30/15. *50% Off every 2nd window covering. Retail value of the 2nd window covering must not exceed the
retail value of the 1st window covering. +Financing for 12 months with min. payments. Cannot be combined w/other offers. Ask for details.

of Southern California
TThe #1 Door Installation Company in the U.S.
• Largest selection of doors in California.
•M
Made
d b
by lleading
di A
American
i
made
d manufacturers.
f
• Digitally measured and cut to fit 1,000 times more accurately.
• Installed by factory trained employees in less than ONE DAY.
• No cutting, sanding or painting at your home.

Buy 10 Get 10 FREE Sale is good for 10 or more standard weight raised panel doors. Paint and hardware sold
separately. New orders only. Must present ad at time of estimate. May not be combined with other offers or
discounts. Offer expires 6/30/15. Contractor’s license #958313. A dba of Casablanca Design Centers inc.

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

A25

PICK POCKET
PROOF PANTS


The Ideal Gift for Any Guy on the Go this Father’s Day!
“Go ahead, just try to pick the pocket of these pants.” - LA Times

Mark Boster Los Angeles Times

CARRIE LEILAM LOVE places a rose on an altar set up outside Mayor Eric

Garcetti’s residence during a protest over the case of Ezell Ford.

[Garcetti, from A24]
vided more details about his
activities that night. As residents and activists were
shouting down a deputy police chief in Venice, Garcetti
was holding a cocktail reception for the Los Angeles Consular Corps at Getty House,
then attending the opening
of Riot Games, an online
gaming company that had
relocated to L.A.
Officials who were at
both events confirmed that
the mayor attended. A
spokesman for Riot Games
said Garcetti arrived just before 8 p.m. and stayed for
about an hour. The town hall
meeting in Venice concluded
shortly after 9 p.m.
In a brief interview last
week, Garcetti said he had “a
real, truthful obligation” related to his family, but acknowledged that it fell later
in the night. He declined to
specify on the record what it
was, citing his family’s privacy. (The mayor and his
wife, Amy Wakeland, have a
young daughter and in the
past have cared for foster
children.)
Asked why he cited a family commitment that did not
appear to take place at the
same time as the Venice
meeting as a reason for his
absence, the mayor said the
family obligation was “the final piece” of his scheduling
conflict and that the reception for diplomats and the
video-game company event
were “commitments that I

could not miss and would
not have missed.”
He said he might not
have chosen to attend the
town hall gathering on
Glenn’s killing anyway.
“I don’t know that I necessarily would have gone to
that meeting,” Garcetti said.
“In retrospect, and talking
to folks that were at that
meeting, it wasn’t necessarily a productive or listening
meeting.”
The mayor has also encountered concerns about
his level of involvement in
the Ford shooting.
Last Sunday, with the
Police Commission’s determination on the case two
days away, Ford’s mother expressed exasperation with
Garcetti’s disengagement in
an interview with KABC-TV.
That night, the mayor telephoned her. His staff said he
was unable to reach her, but
left messages. (Mayoral
aides did not finalize his
meeting with Ford until
Tuesday afternoon.)
Garcetti spent Monday
in Washington, where he
said he met with White
House officials about potential federal funding for city
programs. He returned to
L.A. on an overnight flight.
While he was gone, mayoral
staffers tried to reach out to
community leaders in South
L.A.
Earl Ofari Hutchinson,
president of the Los Angeles
Urban Policy Roundtable,
said one of the mayor’s aides

called him Monday to ask
whether he could participate in a meeting with Garcetti and other black community leaders the next day
in advance of the Police
Commission’s
ruling.
Hutchinson said he agreed
and was told the mayor’s office would follow up with details.
Hutchinson said he never
heard back, and the meeting
never materialized. Instead,
he said, Garcetti called him
Tuesday morning and expressed his confidence that
the panel would reach an appropriate decision.
Hutchinson said the
mayor has regularly been in
contact with him during the
last two years about issues of
importance to the city’s
black leaders, an effort for
which he said Garcetti deserves “a lot of credit.”
He also said phone calls
are no substitute for face-toface reassurance.
“It’s almost like a general:
The good ones, they’re out
front. They’re not in the line
of fire, but the troops can see
them,” Hutchinson said. “It
cannot be done on the telephone. It cannot be done on
the Internet. It cannot be
done by carrier pigeon. You
have to be there.”
[email protected]
Times staff writers Kate
Mather, Gale Holland,
Angel Jennings and Christi
Parsons contributed to this
report.

15 & 16 th
Stopped
Pick-Pockets
Athens,
Greece
2/16/15
Adventure
Pants
A
dventure P
ants
Multi-Secure
Pockets
7M
ulti-Secure P
ockets
“You'll feel so emboldened, you'll want to wander through
t
g "Foil
Foil pickpockets: Wear Clothing
g
a crowd of grabby street urchins.” - Chicago Tribune Arts' Pick-Pocket Proof Pants
and thieves won't get their sticky
“Great for places where pickpocketing is a real concern.
fingers on your travel essentials.”
Since they're wrinkle resistant and quick drying, they're
- USA Today
ideal for the rigors of travel.”
- Smarter Travel

New
N
ew P
P^cubed®
^cubed® T
Travel
ravel S
Shirts
hirts
2H
Hidden
idden S
Secure
ecure P
Pockets
ockets

Business
B
usiness P
Pants
ants
7M
Multi-Secure
ulti-Secure P
Pockets
ockets

Available
ilable Now at ClothingA
ClothingArts.com | 646.422.9222

$

Largest Window

Install
Per Window

Energy Efficient Windows
Contractors Welcome!
New Construction & Replacement

75

Showroom in So. Cal

Lifetime Warranty
and
Free Glass Breakage

THE WINDOW GUYS

WINDOW AND DOOR SPECIALISTS

251 Dupont St, Ste. 107 Corona
(right off 91 Fwy @ Mckinley)
Lic. #899269

951-273-9055

Owner John Myerly • Family Owned & Operated • Call now for a free No Hassle phone quote or in home estimate

LAA1730086-1
LAA858018-1

French Doors • Bay Windows • Entry Doors Interior Doors - Wood, Vinyl, Aluminum

A26

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

DENTAL IMPLANTS

39500

$

Reg. $1500

FREE EXAMINATION & XRAYS
USC Grad - 25 years experience

Whittier Dental Group 14564 E. Whittier Bl., Whittier
Must present coupon at time of service
Coupon Expires 30 days from publication.

(562) 693-8202

LAA751438-1

New Patients Only

Restoration must be done at this office

(.' ) +./,2!"!%$#2*1'3
& )0--

Teams seek money, publicity
and a look at top competition
[World Cup, from A1]
expanded bracket. They say
lopsided scores could tarnish the World Cup’s reputation.
That has put pressure on
newcomers such as Thailand, Ecuador and Cameroon to prove they belong.
Ivory Coast has come under
scrutiny as the 67th-ranked
team in the world, reaching
the draw by way of upset victories in regional qualifying.
Asked if her squad deserved to be in Canada,
Toure answered sharply —
“We earned our place here”
— then added: “Of course
there have been some worries.”

cials and each other. Two
days later, at a recreation
center in the suburbs, they
began practice with a mood
every bit as gloomy as the
gray skies overhead.
The team formed a circle
at midfield, joining hands,
bowing heads to pray. Then
came warmup drills, with
only the thump of kicked
balls to break the silence.
When a reporter asked to
speak with players afterward, the team representative shook his head, saying:
“Right now, we work, work,
work.”
::

::

75-%+3 4#) <$'% $' .-% '-<, $% $' -.</ #'+, 8/ %&+ "-#.,;%$-.63

4** %&+ )+(#<;) ;,#<% ;,:$''$-. -* 190300

#("!%" '&*)$

Women made their World
Cup debut in 1991 with a dozen teams gathering to play in
China.
Michelle
Akers
scored in the 78th minute to
give the United States a 2-1
championship win over Norway.
It took eight more years
before officials became convinced the women — so long
in the shadow of the men —
had progressed sufficiently
to support a 16-team field.
That number remained constant until embattled FIFA
President Sepp Blatter announced an expansion after
the 2011 tournament.
“That’ll open up new
markets for women’s football,” Blatter said at the
time. “The final will now be
played to an audience on
both sides of the world, from
the East where the sun rises,
all the way to the West.”
To that point, his most
noteworthy pronouncement
on the women’s game had
been a 2004 comment in
which he suggested the players wear tighter shorts.
The decision to expand
triggered a chicken-and-egg

5;:+2!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

%$"'!&# !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

/,$*,. +$(& "% !,+*-%&%' &, )%!%0#% '0(!,$.&

You’re invited to join us at a Novartis
MS Education Link Event
Hear Leo Maher, MD share
information about multiple sclerosis (MS),
learn about a prescription treatment
option, and connect with people in your
community living with MS.
6/18/15 at 6:30PM
Roy’s Restaurant
6363 Topanga Canyon Boulevard
Woodland Hills, CA 91367
Tell or bring a friend!
Accessible to people with disabilities.
Light meal served.
Parking will be validated. Space is limited.

LAA3333826-1

Please RSVP by calling
1-866-682-7491

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation
East Hanover, New Jersey 07936-1080
©2013 Novartis
1/13

T-XMG-1234308

BE A HOST TO AN
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT

Per Month
Earn UpTo
Up To$750.00
$850 Per
GLOBAL STUDENT SERVICES, USA
424-204-5128

Before they step on
the red carpet, they
step up to our mic.

John Woods Associated Press

TEAMS SUCH AS the U.S. and Sweden, who bat-

tled to a scoreless tie Friday, don’t figure to get much
of a challenge from the eight World Cup newcomers.
debate.
Critics insist that lowerranked soccer programs will
never reach a high level of
play unless their governments devote more money
to coaching, facilities and
travel. While established
teams arrived in Canada
more than a week in advance
to acclimate to conditions
and the time change, the
Ivory Coast squad landed
only four days before play
began.
Supporters of a larger
bracket argue that inviting
additional teams to the
World Cup might be part of
the solution.
“This is like a transfer period where the difference between the teams will be big,”
said Nora Holstad Berge, a
veteran defender for Norway. “But the new teams get
some more publicity back
home and that will bring the
resources.”
An infusion of money
wouldn’t be the only potential benefit. There is another
argument in favor of a larger
tournament.
This World Cup is giving
newcomers a chance to face
powerhouse
opponents
who, under normal circumstances, might not even
grant them an exhibition
game.
::

Join us for a free event, featuring highlight clips from
the hit show and a conversation with the creator and star.

A new practice field
stands on the outskirts of
Ottawa, a sparkling rectangle of synthetic turf plopped
down amid trees and brush.

In late afternoon, a bus pulls
up and the Thai players spill
out,
smiling,
chatting,
laughing.
Their first World Cup
game ended in a 4-0 loss to
Norway, but they had reason
to feel upbeat.
The Thais were physically overmatched against
an opponent that outran
them to loose balls and muscled them aside in the box.
Still, they maintained their
technique and played hard
through the final whistle.
The crowd at Lansdowne
Stadium warmed to them as
underdogs, cheering every
save, every dash down the
field.
“The goal is to enjoy ourselves and try our best,”
goalkeeper
Waraporn
Boonsing said through an
interpreter. “If we play that
way, we don’t worry about
the result.”
Their coach, Nuengrutai
Srathongvian, has preached
this message from the start.
Her players need to see what
top-flight soccer looks and
feels like, she said. They need
to endure tough losses for
the greater good.
“The most important
thing is to transfer that experience back to younger
generations back in Thailand,” Srathongvian said.
The Ivorians headed for
Canada with a similar attitude, but have found it harder to remain cheerful.
During the loss to topseeded Germany, players
threw their hands in the air
after mistakes, yelling at offi-

BRICKFIX

The other teams making
their debut at this World
Cup are Switzerland, Spain,
Costa Rica and the Netherlands. Through the first five
days of competition, the
newcomers combined for a
respectable record of two
wins, four losses and two ties
— though one of the victories
and both ties came against
one another.
Things got out of hand,
however, when Switzerland
pounded Ecuador, 10-1, on
Friday.
With Ivory Coast facing
Thailand on Thursday, at
least one more fledgling
squad would record its first
World Cup victory.
The Ivorians scored
quickly on a scramble in
front of the net, bodies flying. Their fans, dressed in
bright orange, banged on
drums and gyrated in celebration, but things went
south after that.
Thailand answered with
three goals over the next 70
minutes, twice on plays that
appeared to be offside.
Though the Thais gave up a
late score, Boonsing made a
scrambling save in the final
seconds to preserve a 3-2 victory.
“We feel that we are really
lucky,” Srathongvian said.
For Ivory Coast, the
match ended with forward
Ange Nguessan sprawled
before the opposing goal,
slamming her fist on the turf.
Not only had the team from
West Africa suffered another
disappointment, but more
trouble lay ahead.
Next comes a Monday
game against the Norwegians, who managed a surprising 1-1 tie against Germany. Once again, the Ivorian coach will remind her
players to stay positive.
At this Women’s World
Cup, with so many young
teams getting their first
taste of elite soccer, winning
isn’t the only measure of success.
“We’ve played against big
teams, we are going back
with big lessons,” Toure
said. “We believe that we will
be able to use those lessons.”
david.wharton
@latimes.com
Twitter:
@LATimesWharton

KITCHEN BATHS FLOORING in 3 DAYS!

.COM

Smallest Repairs with Pride
Brick

Fireplace

Stucco

Concrete

Block

Tile

818-953-7489
Scott Whiting

Whiting Masonry Inc.

Fine Print? NONE!
We treat you how we’d like to be
treated, Our success depends on you
being a happy customer. Call us today!

1-800-405-9697

Since 1972
Lic#636900

3 Day Flooring & Kitchen
Mon - Sat: 9am - 6pm - Lic.#938884

THE SMART WAY
TO SELL DIAMONDS
& JEWELRY

Tuesday, June 16 | 7:30 p.m.

Younger
(TV Land)

Q&A with creator/executive producer Darren Star and
leading actress Sutton Foster.
Moderated by Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times writer.

DEAL WITH THE PROFESSIONALS!
IT’S TO YOUR FINANCIAL ADVANTAGE!
Our highly skilled experts see value that others miss
We are prepared to pay you above market
No one pays more than we do. No one.

IMMEDIATE CASH FOR DIAMONDS - JEWELRY - GOLD
STERLING SILVER - WATCHES & COINS

15301 Ventura Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403
arclightcinemas.com

latimes.com/ScreeningSeries
@envelope

AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

BARON AND ASSOCIATES
(760) 748-0100

(714) 756-1000

74333 Highway 111, Suite 204
Palm Desert, CA 92260

4570 Campus Drive
Newport Beach, CA 92660

PALM DESERT, CA NEWPORT BEACH, CA

Seating is not guaranteed.

“Our Reputation Speaks For Itself”
We will come to you or your bank. - No minimums required - Estates purchased

LAA3355405-1

RSVP TODAY

*SERVING CLIENTS FOR OVER 49 YEARS * CONFIDENTIALITY ASSURED
*GRADUATE GEMOLOGIST ON STAFF * G. I. A. TRAINED DIAMOND EXPERTS
*COIN AND NUMISMATIC PROFESSIONALS

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

A27

Loaded weapons, sleepless nights

the knowledge that two killers are on the loose alter his
routine. He still jogs by himself in the morning, but
Myatt, who normally does
not watch TV, has begun following the local news for
search updates. He planned
to take another paddling
trip Saturday evening, and
he hoped he would not find
himself alone again.
Dana Harnish, a customer in the Kayak Shack,
where Myatt and Ali Harpp
were tending customers,
speculated that Matt and
Sweat were long gone from
the area. Harnish, who lives
on a dead-end road in an isolated camp that has not yet
begun to see summer visitors, said they might have
jumped on a train passing on
the nearby tracks.
Even if they haven’t fled
by train, Harnish noted, the
pair have been on the loose
for plenty of time to have
gone far on foot. “I could’ve
gone 70 miles by now,” said
Harnish, who nevertheless
is keeping his shotgun close
at hand. “Better safe than
sorry,” he said.
Harpp agreed. The prison escape, she said, was a
wake-up call to people who
for decades had lived nearby, assuming they were safe
from a breakout.
“I don’t think anyone
really thought it could happen,” Harpp said. “But now
they realize it can, and it’s
not as if these guys just killed
someone. One guy chopped
someone up.” Richard Matt,
48, had been serving 25 years
to life for the 1997 killing and
dismemberment of his boss.
David Sweat, 34, was
serving life without parole
for killing a sheriff ’s deputy
in 2002.
The pair have defied the
odds in remaining free this
long, according to prison escape data compiled by the
New York State Department
of Corrections and Community Supervision.
Of 29 inmates who escaped from New York state
prisons from 2002 to 2012,
none were loose for more
than three days before being
recaptured.

More than a week
after two inmates
escape prison, fear
and vigilance pervade
a New York town.
By Tina Susman
DANNEMORA, N.Y. —
Richard Matt and David
Sweat are everywhere.
They are at highway rest
stops, where the killers’
faces
peer
out
from
“wanted” posters. They are
at checkpoints dotting the
winding, forested roads,
where troopers stand guard
with rifles ready.
They are in the loaded
weapons that locals place
beside their beds at night,
and they are in the porch
lights that shine until dawn,
when daylight brings a
measure of relief to people
living near the prison that
Matt and Sweat fled more
than a week ago.
The pair remain out of
sight, but everyone knows
they are out there, and if police are right, they haven’t
gone far. That’s no comfort
to people living in and
around Dannemora, where
the hulking Clinton Correctional Facility seems to devour the quiet village of clapboard houses and small
businesses.
“I wish it could just be
over. I haven’t been able to
sleep,” said Amy Daust, who
lives down the block from
the manhole through which
the prisoners emerged after
cutting their way out of their
cells and tunneling out of the
prison. They were discovered missing during a 5:30
a.m. bed check on June 6.
Since then, it seems life has
turned upside down in tiny
Dannemora, whose population of 4,000 includes the
nearly 3,000 prison inmates.
“You feel like the roles are
reversed. It’s like we’re in
prison now,” said Daust, who
has a clear view of the correctional center and can hear
the announcements blasted
to prisoners through its
speaker system.
People avoid going out-

Mike Groll Associated Press

LAW ENFORCEMENT officers walk a field near Dannemora, N.Y. Police think David Sweat and Richard

Matt haven’t gone far — little comfort to locals, who avoid going out at night and keep their doors locked.

Gabe Dickens Press-Republican

JOYCE MITCHELL , a prison worker, is charged

with providing contraband to the escapees.
side at night. They lock their
doors and windows, a
change of habit in a town
where many residents used
to think nothing of leaving
keys in their cars. Since the
escape, nobody has been
able to drive through town
without stopping at checkpoints and opening their car
trunks for troopers to peer
inside. Daust, her fiance and
their three young boys keep

the house lights on during
the night.
It has always been a bit
creepy, knowing the kinds of
people living behind the
walls at the maximum-security prison, said Daust, who
grew up in the region. But
with so many correctional
officers living nearby, and
with the prison looking so
impenetrable, it seemed
plenty safe.

On the morning of the escape, Daust woke up unaware that anything unusual had occurred at the fortress up the hill. She looked
out a window and was startled to see someone looking
back at her. It was an investigator, one of hundreds
searching for Matt and
Sweat.
On Saturday, searchers
were out again, combing the
thick woods, fields and
swampy areas of rural
northeastern New York.
Officials say a civilian
prison worker named Joyce
Mitchell provided some contraband to the men weeks
before the escape. A criminal complaint says Mitchell,
51, brought them hacksaw
blades, a screwdriver bit and
chisels.
Mitchell pleaded not
guilty Friday to a felony and
a misdemeanor in connection with the escape and was
jailed in lieu of $110,000 cash
bail. Clinton County Dist.
Atty. Andrew Wylie says the
investigation into Mitchell’s
involvement continues, and
he has not ruled out additional charges.
Officials have not explained how the prisoners

Payless Kitchen Cabinets Presents:

YOUR DREAM KITCHEN NOW!

7,999

[email protected]

DIAMOND

BLOWOUT
CERTIFIED

With SOLID WOOD KITCHEN CABINETS & GRANITE COUNTERTOPS that offer
LUXURY and QUALITY at AFFORDABLE pre-Manufactured prices starting at:

$

managed to cut through
thick brick walls and a steel
pipe. They have said Matt
and Sweat used power tools
but have not said where they
got those tools or how they
were able to use them without the noise drawing attention.
Police said they had no
reason to believe the men
had fled to Canada, about 20
miles north, or to neighboring Vermont. The checkpoints are centered on a
tight circle around Dannemora, and most of the intensive ground searches have
occurred in the immediate
vicinity.
Despite the manpower,
the search dogs and a
$50,000 reward for information leading to either man,
there have been no confirmed sightings, leaving
even people who do not live
in Dannemora on edge.
In Plattsburgh, about 15
miles to the east, Dan Myatt
said he had loaded his rifles,
just in case, and he admitted
to having felt a bit uneasy
Friday night as he emerged
from an evening kayak trip
to find himself alone in neardarkness.
Myatt has tried not to let

PLUS YOUR CHOICE OF*
1. 0% Interest 24 months
2. Free tile flooring*
3. 9.99% For 60 months

OUR BIGGEST SALE IN 41 YEARS

(After our 20% coupon. Includes installation*)

78% OFF

A kitchen remodel is one of the most important renovations you can make. New cabinets, granite
countertops, backsplash and flooring will enhance the heart of your home, spice up your space and
add value to your house. To help you bring your dream to reality we have put an incredible money
saving packages for you.
But we’re not just about the great packages we offer, call now and one of our experienced kitchen
specialists will come out to your home, at your convenience, do a complimentary 28 point design
analysis which is much more than just a free quote...it’s a diagnostic tool that allows us to help you
choose the right products for your decorating taste and lifestyle. We’ll walk you through a series of
questions that will help narrow down the thousands of options to the options that exactly match your
unique situation and help design and put together the kitchen of your dreams.

+NO TAX

Buy with confidence,
30 years of serving
So Cal, from Ventura to
Riverside to San Diego

1000 Rings

I guarantee the lowest
prices in America!*

in stock

*In writing - Odet, Owner

Here’s what our package includes

• For a standard 10 x 10 kitchen
• All wood construction. No particle board.
No crushed wood.
• 1/2” plywood all side & back
• 5/8” plywood full-depth shelf
• Solid wood drawer box
• 6-way adjustable concealed hinges
• Includes Granite Countertops with basic
installation. Choose from 5 popular colors.
• Upgrade your cabinets to premium colors and
features starting at $9,999 installed
• Check out our latest cabinet
styles starting at $11,999 installed

If you like or want to:
• Deal with a 30 year old established local
family business.
• Have a one stop shop “done for you” convenience,
with a fast turnaround.
• Have an experienced specialist help you design
within your budget.
• Have all of the elements of a kitchen design
brought directly to you.
• Save time by not running all over town trying to
coordinate a remodel by yourself.
• Have a dedicated project manager assigned to
your project to move your project forward.
• Have a team that makes the remodel process an
enjoyable and hassle-free experience.

Since we are upfront about our pricing it’s never
been easier to buy, just prorate the package
price according to the size of your kitchen.

Then we are the right company to call. But don’t delay,
remember our team is hand selected and we can only
take on a limited number of projects.
projects

CALL 24/7 FOR A FREE ESTIMATE NOW!

866-375-0507

600 Bands
to Choose

“We did not
ot believe
either ... Butt theyy did
d
it!Our new
w kitchen
ulous!”
looks fabulous!”

300 Studs to Choose

SHOP AT HOME! FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATIONS.
S.
Day, Evening and Weekend Appointments Available.

Your
Set Up &
Appointment

··········

OUR PROCESS

We’ll Load Up Our Truck With
Hundreds of Product Selections

··········

We’ll Bring Them
To Your Home

··········

We’ll Help
n
You Design

LAA3319557-1

www.paylesskitchencabinets.com

LAA3326302-1

LOOKING FOR CAREER OPPORTUNITY CALL
LL U
US
S

*Financing OAC minimums may apply, tax not included in financing. Free floor up to 10 x 10 kitchen, materials only. $5999
is for industry standard 10x10 kitchen. includes 42 square feet granite countertops, select from 5 colors. Pictures are for
illustration only. Not responsible for misprints. *20% off available on our first visit. 1 hour complimentary consultation. A division
of Carpet Wagon. Lic. #913187 2015

A28

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Monday, June 15, 2015
6:30 PM Pacific
Maggiano's Little Italy
6100 Topanga Canyon Boulevard
Woodland Hills, CA 91367

Kelley McCall Associated Press

THE RISE in calls to poison control centers related to synthetic cannabinoids

appears to contradict claims that they are a safe alternative to marijuana.

Staley Brod, MD
The University of Texas Medical School at Houston

Synthetic cannabinoid
data point to high risk

TR292867

Poison control centers
report a surge in calls,
prompting a new push
for tighter regulation.

Ohkim’s Dental
Over 20 Years of Experience

1,099

$

By Amina Khan

Dental Implant

(including Abutment and Crown)

Customized implant procedures using patient’s own blood
“Growth Factor ( CGF ) & Autologous Fibrin Glue ( AFG )!!!!”

• Complimentary Implant Consultation & X-Ray ($350 Worth)
• Most accurate diagnosis using 3D ICAT X-Ray
• Performed Over 10,000 Implant Surgeries.

Cerritos Office:

562-860-7999

Rowland Height Office:

909-594-7999

LAA3072563-1

We urge you to
shop around & compare!!!!

Synthetic cannabinoids
have been marketed as safe,
legal, herbal alternatives to
marijuana, but the data
from U.S. poison control
centers say otherwise.
Poison center calls linked
to synthetic cannabinoids
surged roughly fourfold in
just the first few months of
2015, according to a report
from the national Centers
for Disease Control and Prevention.
The sudden rise shows
that tighter regulation of
such substances is sorely
needed, according to the authors of the CDC report.
“Multiple other recent
outbreaks suggest a need for
greater public health surveillance and awareness,
targeted public health messaging and enhanced efforts
to remove these products
from the market,” the researchers, led by CDC epide-

miologist Royal Law, wrote
in the center’s Morbidity and
Mortality Weekly Report.
Synthetic cannabinoids
(whose aliases include synthetic marijuana, Spice, K2
and Black Mamba) are
made by spraying synthetic
psychoactive
chemicals
onto plant matter, which can
then be smoked or consumed.
Because the producers of
the psychoactive chemicals
can continually tweak their
formulas, it can be hard for
government regulators to
keep up.
The researchers analyzed the numbers from the
National Poison Data System, which tracks the
monthly calls to all U.S. poison centers. The number of
calls in April had shot up to
1,501, a 330% increase from
the 349 calls made in January.
From January to May,
poison centers received
3,572 calls linked to synthetic
cannabinoid use, a 229%
jump from the 1,085 calls received during the same period in 2014.
A total of 626 calls reported that the synthetic
cannabinoids had been used

with multiple substances;
the top two were alcohol
(144) and plant-based marijuana (103).
Negative effects seemed
to hit older users harder;
those in their 30s and older
than 40 were more likely
than those ages 10 to 19 to
suffer “severe” outcomes,
the authors wrote. The median age of users was 26.
Among the commonly reported health effects: agitation (1,262), rapid heart rate
(1,035) and vomiting (585).
And for the 2,961 with a
reported medical outcome,
335 (11.3%) suffered either
highly dangerous or potentially deadly effects; 15
deaths were reported, up
from five during the same
period in 2014.
“The increasing number
of synthetic cannabinoid
variants available, higher
toxicity of new variants, and
the potentially increased
use as indicated by calls to
poison centers might suggest that synthetic cannabinoids pose an emerging public health threat,” the study
authors wrote.
[email protected]
Twitter: @aminawrite

Drain & Plumbing Problems

GO AWAY!

WEST HOLLYWOOD

888-872-4957

I NDI E F O C U S
SCREENING

SERIES

www.RooterHero.com
R
H

WHERE INDEPENDENCE IS APPLAUDED
Free admission • Advance preview screening only
90+ Years Of Plumbing Heritage

License #973014

Prompt, Professional & Clean
•You make an appointment that fits your schedule
•We shot up on-time with company identification
•We listen to your concerns and diagnose your situation
•We fully explain what we will do
•Our techs are fully trained and use the best equipment
•We protect your home with drop cloths and use shoe covers
•We do a thorough cleanup of the work area
•Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed

THE OVERNIGHT
(The Orchard)

We’ll Beat ANY Competitor’s Coupon!

June 15 • 7:15 p.m.
Sundance Cinemas
in West Hollywood

Q&A to follow with actors Adam Scott, Jason Schwartzman and Judith Godrèche,
writer/director Patrick Brice and producer Naomi Scott. Moderated by Mark Olsen,
Los Angeles Times writer.
Alex, Emily, and their son, RJ, have recently moved to Los Angeles’ Eastside from
Seattle. Feeling lost in a new city, they are desperate to find their first new friends.
After a chance meeting with Kurt at the neighborhood park, they gladly agree to
join family pizza night at their home. But as it gets later and the kids go to bed, the
family “playdate” becomes increasingly more revealing and bizarre as the couples
begin to open up.

IN THEATERS ON JUNE 19.

latimes.com/IndieSeries

LA Times members are given priority access at each event.
/LATimesEnt

00

Clear Any Drain
Any Time
With proper access, first 75 ft.
Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/27/15

Sewer Camera
Inspection
WITH ANY STANDARD DRAIN CLEANING

Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/27/15

Senior Discount
Regular Price 10%
Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/27/15

Clear Main
Sewer Line
From Roof Vent

Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/27/15

RSVP

@IndieFocus

77
FREE
15%
$
00
179
$
OFF
50
$

Must be 21 or older to attend.

Any Plumbing Repair
of $400 or more.
Ask for details.
Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 6/27/15

L AT I M ES . C O M / O PI N I O N

S

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

A29

SUNDAY OPINION
EDITORIALS

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

LETTERS

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

How many supervisors?
A bill to expand the county board
to seven members from five might
only expand the dysfunction.

W

hen he was a Los Angeles
County supervisor, Zev
Yaroslavsky had a quip
about county government
that his successor, Sheila
Kuehl, likes to quote: A county of 10 million
people run by a five-member Board of Supervisors is absurd. Unless you’re one of the
five.
The point is that one supervisor with jurisdiction over 2 million people and a fifth of
a $27-billion budget has a lot of power. Who,
once he or she gets that kind of clout, would
willingly give any of it up?
California’s default form of county government was designed in the middle of the
19th century and may well have been workable, or at least passable, when Los Angeles
County was populated mostly by cows, a
handful of vaqueros and some transients
whose luck ran out in the gold fields up
north. It may suffice even today in counties
such as Siskiyou, with 45,000 or so residents.
In Los Angeles County though, Yaroslavsky was right: A five-member Board of Supervisors — with no separation between
executive and legislative functions, few
checks and balances and a population bigger than most states — is absurd.
It is a form of government that would
have given Montesquieu, Madison and all
the other democratic theorists and constitutional framers fits. It diminishes the
voices and voting power of individual residents. It provides for inadequate oversight
of public spending and public services. It
confounds people who just want to know —
who’s in charge here?
It’s certainly true that a governing body
with fewer people stands a better chance of
getting things done than a bigger one. But it
also stands a better chance, if no one has the
power to say “no,” of making costly mistakes.
Democratic state Sen. Tony Mendoza of
Artesia has introduced a bill to ask California voters to expand boards of supervisors
in counties of 2 million or more people to at
least seven supervisors. (It would currently
apply to L.A., San Diego, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties.) L.A.
County’s supervisors will take an advisory
position on the bill Tuesday and are likely to
turn thumbs down. More on that in a bit.
First, though, it’s important to remember that a majority of the previous board reluctantly agreed with Yaroslavsky in 2007
that regardless of the number of supervisors, Los Angeles County needed a stronger
executive. Not a fully empowered elected official, like an independently elected mayor,
but merely an individual like a city manager
who was responsible for running the county
on a day-to-day basis, leaving the Board of
Supervisors to focus on policy and over-

sight. On paper, it was a more rational system, comparable to the governance model
in San Diego and other large counties, not to
mention many small and medium-sized
counties as well.
It was an interim step, to be followed by a
countywide vote ratifying the new system
and making it a permanent part of the government’s structure. William T Fujioka, a
former county hospital official who also had
been the chief administrator of the city of
L.A., got the job.
It worked imperfectly. It may be that the
supervisors were too unwilling to surrender
power. It may be that they were unable to
change their method of operating, moving
from micromanagement or public humiliation of department directors — something
at which Supervisor Gloria Molina specialized — to bigger-picture policymaking and
oversight. It may be that Fujioka was simply
the wrong fit for the job. For whatever reason, the supervisors never moved past the
interim phase toward more rational and responsible government.
The new board, instead of finally completing that step forward, is instead taking a
big step in the other direction. In February,
with Fujioka, Yaroslavsky and Molina gone,
the supervisors moved to repeal the 2007 ordinance and called for recommendations
that would delete “unnecessary layers of
management.”
The recommendations have not yet
come up for a vote, but drafts circulating
around the Hall of Administration lay out a
return to the old ways, with a five-headed,
sometimes-bickering executive attempting
to direct the affairs of some 40 departments.
It’s cause for concern. To its credit, the
new board has sought creative workarounds that get departments to work together more seamlessly. But it still needs
someone with clout, confidence and policy
experience, especially at budget time, to say
“no.” It needs someone to tell the big five
when they are spending too much or thinking too little. But elected officials with the
power that county supervisors have aren’t
likely to share that power with an executive
or with anyone else absent a crisis — or unless voters force them to.
So should voters force them to? That
brings us back to the Mendoza measure to
expand the board to at least seven. Proponents assert that such a reconfigured board
would be far more representative, and it
might; but it would still leave Los Angeles
County with districts of 1.4 million people
and, this time, a seven-headed body with
few checks or balances. Without a strong
executive, that sounds more like a way of enlarging the dysfunction than correcting it.
Mendoza says he also supports an independently elected executive, and that his
measure might be seen as just the first of
several steps toward better county government. Perhaps. Or expansion without an independent executive may turn out just like
the term limits that finally kicked in last
year: Good for shuffling the deck, not so
good for improving the game.

Keeping the pill affordable

I

n the 50 years since Griswold vs. Connecticut — in which the U.S. Supreme
Court struck down a Connecticut law
banning contraception for married
couples — the right to birth control for
all has become a cornerstone of women’s
healthcare and reproductive freedom. But
making it affordable to all women has not
been easy. It wasn’t until 2000 that employers who offered prescription drug coverage were compelled to cover prescription
birth control as well. More recently, despite
protests from Republicans and religious
groups, the contraceptive mandate in the
Affordable Care Act was enacted, requiring
all insurers to cover birth control with no copay.
Now there are new efforts to make it easier for some oral contraceptives to be to be
sold over the counter, like aspirin, rather
than by prescription only. Wouldn’t that
guarantee the most accessibility? Theoretically, yes, but not if women are stuck buying
it without benefit of insurance. Consider
Senate Bill 1438, introduced by U.S. Sens.
Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) and Cory Gardner (RColo.). That bill would incentivize drug
companies to apply to the Food and Drug
Administration for permission to make
their prescription contraceptives available
over the counter by giving the drugs priority
review and waiving the fee to apply. The bill
would also repeal the Affordable Care Act’s
ban on using a flexible spending account for
over the counter medications.
All that sounds great. There’s just one
big problem. Only prescription drugs must
be covered by insurers under the Affordable
Care Act. There is no such requirement for

over-the-counter medications. Many women — if not all — would find themselves paying out of pocket for contraception after not
having to pay anything for it under the Affordable Care Act.
Opponents of the bill, including the
Planned Parenthood Action Fund and the
American Congress of Obstetricians and
Gynecologists, have pointed out that birth
control isn’t really accessible unless it’s affordable. And without insurance, oral contraceptives can cost as much as $600 a year.
Furthermore, the bill would bar anyone
younger than 18 from purchasing the pills
over the counter (although they could still
get them with a doctor’s prescription).
The better alternative is Senate Bill 1532,
just introduced by Sen. Patty Murray (DWash.). It calls for the continuation of complete insurance coverage of any oral contraceptive after it goes from prescription to
over the counter. It would not set an age requirement for purchase.
The American College of Obstetricians
and Gynecologists said in 2012 that oral contraceptives are safe enough to be available
over the counter. Not only are they likely to
decrease unintended pregnancy rates, but
they carry lower medical risks than pregnancy and have fewer side effects than many
medicines already available over the counter at grocery stores. The group does not believe the drugs should be kept from users
younger than 18.
The Senate would be smart to pass the
Murray bill. If the FDA approves making
oral contraceptives available over the counter, Congress should continue to require insurers to cover its cost.

Austin Beutner PUBLISHER AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER
News
EDITOR

Davan Maharaj
MANAGING EDITORS

Marc Duvoisin, Lawrence Ingrassia, S. Mitra Kalita
DEPUTY MANAGING EDITORS

Colin Crawford, Megan Garvey, Scott Kraft
ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITORS

John Corrigan, Henry Fuhrmann, Shelby Grad,
Kim Murphy, Alice Short, Michael Whitley
FOUNDED DECEMBER 4, 1881

Opinion
Nicholas Goldberg EDITOR OF THE EDITORIAL PAGES
Juliet Lapidos OP-ED AND SUNDAY OPINION EDITOR

Given Los Angeles
Police Department Chief
Charlie Beck’s attitude
toward the issue of police
officers stopping citizens
without objectively reasonable suspicion that they
are going about their lives
in a unlawful manner, more
homicides by police officers are certain to occur.
A citizen walking on the
sidewalk near his home at
night with his hands in his
pockets, who refuses to
engage consensually with
Beck’s officers, now must
stop and put his hands in
the air or take the considerable risk of being killed —
especially if he is black.
Joe Ryan
Palos Verdes
Al Seib Los Angeles Times

LANCASTER teacher Jamie Goodreau and veteran

Jerral Hancock at the site of his family’s new home.

Lifelong lessons

Re “Bishops to be judged in
abuse cases,” June 11

Re “A war vet’s struggles hit home,” Column One, June 11
I want to commend Jamie Goodreau, a most unusual
and dedicated history teacher at Lancaster High School.
She encourages her students to understand and get
involved in living history rather than lecture or assign
questions to answer at the end of textbook chapters.
Her students give back to the community and learn
lifelong lessons, exemplified by their work for Jerral
Hancock, a wounded veteran of the Iraq war, who was
able to acquire a home for himself and his family.
Goodreau encouraged students to raise money; they
collected $350,000 over two years.
The young people learned how to read blueprints
from architects, how to take out a mortgage and many
other components of building homes. This is true
hands-on learning.
Thanks to all involved, and thank you, Hancock, for
your service to our country.
Robbin Close
Newbury Park
If one wrote a book or
made a film in which every
character were a hero, no
one would buy it.
But your Column One
about the history teacher
and her students building
a home for an injured Iraq
war veteran was all true.
It’s hard to imagine a more
inspiring story than the
service of veteran Jerral
Hancock, the dedication of
teacher Jamie Goodreau
and the selflessness of her
students.
Thank you so much for
sharing their journey.
Peggy Jo Abraham
Santa Monica

Government’s
pot deception
Re “What happened to the
pot stigma?,” Opinion,
June 12
Seth Leibsohn and
former U.S. drug czar
William J. Bennett give the
“marijuana lobby” far too
much credit for the growing support for marijuana
law reform.
It’s really simple: Most
young adults have personally tried marijuana. In
doing so, they could not
help but realize that our
government has been lying
about marijuana for decades. Marijuana is not
nearly as dangerous (or
exciting) as government
propaganda suggests.
The so-called marijuana lobby is a recent development resulting from
successful state ballot
initiatives to tax and regulate marijuana. Legal
businesses that pay taxes
and take profits away from
violent drug cartels are the
end result.
It’s personal experience
that has led a majority of
Americans to rightly conclude that marijuana is
safer than alcohol and does
not merit a criminal justice
response.
Robert Sharpe
Washington
The writer is a policy
analyst for Common Sense
for Drug Policy.
::
After reading the op-ed
article on the ills of marijuana legalization, I took
away something entirely
different than Bennett and
Leibsohn intended.
They point out that
arrests for alcohol-related
offenses exceed that of all
drug offenses by half a
million. That would lead
one to believe that rather
than coming down on
marijuana, as Bennett and
Leibsohn want, we should
criminalize alcohol.
I’m not naive. I know
what happened the last
time we tried that, but I

Waiting for the
pope’s move

can’t help but feel that one
person’s vice is no better or
worse than another’s. Of all
the social issues, this is the
only one that perplexes me.
While I don’t advocate
legalizing marijuana, I
don’t see how it is right for
it to not have the same
status as alcohol.
Ron Garber
Duarte
::
Pot smoking is no longer deemed unacceptable
because many upstanding
citizens are pursuing the
practice. Society sets the
standards for acceptable
behavior and times
change; witness the abandonment of the persecution of “witches” or public
humiliation in the stocks.
We have bigger fish to
fry than seeking out pot
smokers for punishment.
Louis H. Nevell
Los Angeles

The ripple effect
of police ruling
Re “Chief ’s video upsets
police panel,” June 12
As the former executive
director of the Los Angeles
Police Commission, I am
disappointed in the current commission’s decision
to find the use of force in
the Ezell Ford case “out of
policy.” Its decision is
based solely on the tactics
employed by the officers
and, in the members’ opinion, the lack of probable
cause to stop Ford in the
first place.
Officers in the field
must make immediate
decisions as to probable
cause. Most of the time
they are right, and on few
occasions they are wrong.
The whole field of probable
cause is always shifting,
with prosecutors and
judges continually changing the rules.
To say that an officer
who makes a mistake in
stopping a suspect must
then be found “out of policy” for his use of force is
ludicrous. What should
that officer do? Not defend
himself because someone
might second-guess him?
This decision could
result in two possible outcomes. Officers will stop
initiating field contacts as
they have doubts as to
whether they will be held
liable for a bad decision, as
is now happening in Baltimore, or an officer will put
himself in jeopardy as he
hesitates when his life is in
danger because he is concerned about his tactics.
Either outcome would
be disastrous to the safety
of the city and officers.
Joseph Gunn
Burbank

If and when Pope Francis removes the first bishop
who moved predator
priests from parish to
parish to rape again and
again, I will celebrate the
forming of his tribunal and
the pope’s step to hold
Bishops accountable.
Though I want to be
hopeful, I am skeptical that
institutions can police
themselves. So far, popes
and bishops have failed at
this just to keep priests
and avoid scandal.
It must not be forgotten
that sexual abuse and rape
of children is a crime. Several bishops have been an
accomplice to these crimes
against children and must
be subject to the judicial
process as all citizens.
Never in the history of
the Roman Catholic
Church has a bishop been
expelled, defrocked, imprisoned or named as an
accomplice to these terrible crimes. Maybe this
time will be different.
Mary Dispenza
Bellevue, Wash.

What’s the allure
of communism?
Re “Putin warms to Stalin’s
tactics,” June 11
Is there nothing that
will finally drive a stake
through the hearts of
monsters such as Karl
Marx, Vladimir Lenin,
Josef Stalin and Mao Zedong? Communism has
brought more misery to
more people than any
other bad idea in human
history, and yet the apparently infinitely clueless
keep begging for more,
presumably hoping it will
work this time.
I can see why a wouldbe dictator such as Russian President Vladimir
Putin would warm to the
memory of Stalin, but
ordinary people? Especially those who once lived
under communism?
What a grim commentary on human nature.
Patrick M. Dempsey
Granada Hills

His look isn’t
tricking voters
Re “Rick Perry’s optics,”
Opinion, June 11
Wearing elevator shoes
doesn’t make a man taller.
Wearing a padded bra
doesn’t make a woman
buxom. These simple facts
are evident to most anyone
bright enough to fill out
and turn in a general election ballot.
Yet former Texas Gov.
Rick Perry apparently feels
that wearing nerdy eyeglasses will cause voters to
think he’s smarter than he
was in 2012.
Oh, well, let him affect
the professorial look. If
nothing else, Perry’s newfound confidence will lead
him to resume making
half-baked remarks on
which late-night comics
will eagerly feast. We’ll
need a lot of laughs to
endure the 2016 campaign.
Robin Groves
Pacific Palisades

HOW TO WRITE TO US

Please send letters to
[email protected] For
submission guidelines, see
latimes.com/letters or call
1-800-LA TIMES, ext. 74511.

A30

S U NDAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

OP-ED

It’s the majority, stupid
By Jamelle Bouie

I

magine three presidents.
The first sold a moderate
message to win a three-way
race with 49% of the vote. The
second sold a conservative
one and won with just under 51% of
the vote. And the third ran a liberal
campaign and won with just over
51% of the vote.
Of the three presidents, who
had the “broad” campaign of wide
appeal? And who had the narrow
one of partisan mobilization?
If you know your politics, you
know these campaigns. The first is
Bill Clinton’s 1996 run, the second is
George W. Bush’s in 2004, and the
third is Barack Obama’s 2012 reelection bid. And of them, Obama’s
was the most successful: Not only
did he win an outright majority, but
he won the most votes — as a share
of the total — in a presidential
election since George H.W. Bush,
and became the first Democratic
president since Franklin Roosevelt
to win two national majorities.
Looking to 2016, Hillary Rodham
Clinton wants to achieve what
Obama did, and so she’s running a

Doyle McManus
is on vacation.

version of his campaign, openly
appealing to the groups that supported him. In the last two months,
she’s endorsed criminal justice
reform, pushed expansive immigration reform and called for an
overhaul of voting laws to improve
access.
But Washington pundits, and
mainstream reporters, are disturbed. “Hillary Rodham Clinton
appears to be dispensing with the
nationwide electoral strategy that
won her husband two terms in the
White House and brought white
working-class voters and great
stretches of what is now red-state
America back to Democrats,”
wrote Jonathan Martin and Maggie
Haberman of the New York Times.
“My problem with this approach,” wrote Ron Fournier of
National Journal, of Clinton’s strategy, “is that it works only until
election day, when a polarizing,
opportunistic candidate assumes
the presidency with no standing to
convert campaign promises into
results.”
Likewise, again in the New York
Times, David Brooks bemoaned
the Clinton approach as “bad” for
the country. “If Clinton decides to
be just another unimaginative
base-mobilizing politician, she will
make our broken politics even
worse,” he argued.
Each critique comes to the same

place: Mobilizing individual groups,
instead of using a broad message,
will polarize the country, make it
harder to win, and make it harder
to govern. But this argument has a
problem: reality.
Despite his inclusive, centrist
message, Bill Clinton never won a
majority of the vote. And when he
entered office in 1993, he faced a
polarized Republican minority that
blocked his core programs, from a
small stimulus package to healthcare reform.
At no point did this change;
instead, Clinton abandoned liberal
legislation and co-opted Republican ideas, softening them for
Democrats. Arguably, Republicans
never accepted Clinton’s presidency; it’s why a sex
scandal culminated in the first
impeachment proceedings since
the 1860s.
This same dynamic was at work
in 2009, after Barack Obama won
53% of the vote with an inspirational campaign of post-partisan
change. Despite his huge vote
totals, Republicans refused to work
with him, rejecting the stimulus
package (and any negotiations over
its substance), abstaining from the
healthcare debate (and any negotiations over its substance), and
openly pledging constant opposition.
“The single most important

I put
words
in their
mouths

Hillary Clinton’s
campaign understands
that the political
center isn’t what it
used to be.
thing we want to achieve is for
President Obama to be a one-term
president,” said Sen. Mitch McConnell, ahead of the midterm election
in 2010. In 2011, after the GOP landslide, McConnell — and John A.
Boehner in the House of Representatives — would try to make
good on the promise, slowing Congress to a halt and forcing confrontations over routine measures,
such as lifting the debt ceiling.
Obama was only able to accomplish what he did in his first two
years because of the large Democratic majorities in the House and
Senate.
Liberal mobilization, part of
Obama’s strategy, had worked.
Indeed, it worked again in 2012 and
2013, when Democrats energized
their voters, reelected Obama,
elected a larger Senate majority,
and made headway on appointments and executive branch actions the following year.
Beyond the facts of this Democratic administration and the last

one, the biggest blow to the argument over Hillary Clinton’s “narrow” campaign comes from public
opinion.
Since 2000, Americans have
moved to the left on gay rights,
immigration, climate change, and
criminal justice — issues on which
Clinton is allegedly “polarizing” the
public.
If Washington pundits can’t see
that, it’s because they’re looking in
the wrong place. The rural and
suburban whites who brought Bill
Clinton to victory in 1992 and 1996
aren’t the center of American politics anymore. That belongs to the
Latinos, African Americans, Asian
Americans, single women, union
members, young people and college
students who gave Obama his
victories.
The electorate is younger and
browner, and more liberal as a
result. Put differently, Clinton is
mobilizing the base, but she’s also
speaking to the center. It just looks
different than it did.
To insist otherwise, to describe
this as “narrow,” is to delegitimize
the Democratic majorities of 2008
and 2012 and suggest, openly, that a
presidential candidate isn’t “broad”
unless he (or she) is focused on
white Americans.
Jamelle Bouie is a staff writer for
Slate.

The incentives
made her do it
Rachel Donezal’s black
identity isn’t a shock to
anyone who understands
activist culture.
By Fredrik deBoer

I

By David J. Peterson

I

n the first season of HBO’s
“Game of Thrones,” Illyrio
Mopatis introduces Drogo,
the ruler of the Dothraki, to
Daenerys Targaryen, the
descendant of a deposed royal
family. It’s not a particularly
noteworthy scene, except in that
it was the first to include an invented or constructed language.
When Drogo appears on screen,
Illyrio greets him in Dothraki.
“Athchomar chomakaan, khal
vezhven!” he says, meaning: “Respect to one that is respectful,
great king.”
“Game of Thrones” would go
on to feature more “conlang” material than any other television
show in history by a wide margin,
with sustained dialogue in Dothraki as well as High Valyrian and
Low Valyrian. I’m the lucky one
who got to create those languages.
When I sat down to compose
what would become Dothraki, I
knew where I had to start: the
words that George R.R. Martin
had invented. Martin is, of
course, the man who wrote the
wildly imaginative, sprawling
fantasy novels that D.B. Weiss
and David Benioff adapted for
HBO. Any Dothraki word or
name that he’d put to paper was
considered sacrosanct, not to be
ignored or altered.
The first step, then, was to figure out what words I had to work
with and how I could use them as
a guide to fleshing out the rest of
the language.
In the first three books of the
“Song of Ice and Fire” series,
there are 56 words from the
Dothraki language. Of those, 24
are proper names. The other 32
are nouns, verbs and adjectives
with various meanings. Ignoring
the meanings at first, I set to
work analyzing the syllables.
All languages operate according to rules regarding syllable
and word formation. By looking
at just about any word in a given
language, you can deduce some
of these.
If, for instance, a linguist
stumbled across the word “star,”
she’d guess — even without
knowing English — that there
were other words with the same
structure: two consonants followed by a vowel followed by another consonant. And in fact
there are many English words
with the same structure: spar,
stat, trim, clip, prom, etc.
Looking at Martin’s words, I
noticed patterns such as the following (“kh” and “sh” are treated
as single consonants):
Consonant-vowel-consonant:
khal, dosh, haj, rakh, qoy, khas
Consonant-consonant-vowel-consonant: mhar, rhan
Consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel: qiya, rakhi
Having identified these patterns, I created more roots, giving HBO’s Dothraki a vocabulary

Helen Sloan HBO

JASON MOMOA and Emilia Clarke speak the made-up

language Dothraki in the HBO series “Game of Thrones.”

The Dothraki
language sounds
harsh and operates
according to strict
grammatical rules.
that would look similar to Martin’s:
Consonant-vowel-consonant:
lekh, ren, haf, san, mil
Consonant-consonant-vowel-consonant: nhazh, rhal, qwil,
krol, gref
Consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel: qora, gosi, thima, zemo, lofi
Beyond replicating patterns, I
wanted to meet the producers’
expectations that Dothraki seem
“harsh,” since the Dothraki are a
rough, warlike people. That actually wasn’t much of a challenge.
There is no such thing as a
harsh-sounding language per se
— there are only languages that
sound harsh to the ears of those
who speak a different-sounding
language.
Knowing that English speakers were our primary audience,
the inclusion of the throaty fricative “kh” was enough to satisfy
the producer’s request. It didn’t
hurt that the actor who played
Drogo, Jason Momoa, has a rumbly bass voice.
Once I’d worked out a logically consistent sound for Dothraki, I could turn to the grammar.
Although Martin claimed he
made up phrases on the spot, I
was delighted to find that his language examples were grammatically consistent.
The most easily analyzed
multi-word sample of Dothraki
in the text is “Rakh! Rakh! Rakh
haj!,” which is translated as “A
boy! A boy! A strong boy!” Based
on the translation, rakh must be
“boy,” which means that haj
must be “strong” — suggesting
that, in Dothraki, adjectives and
other modifiers follow nouns.
Other examples supported

my theory. Daenerys’ hated
brother Viserys is referred to by
the Dothraki as Khal Rhaggat,
“Cart King,” and Khal Rhae
Mhar, “Sore Foot King.” We know
that khal is translated as “king,”
which means that the words following it in each of these epithets
are the modifiers, preserving the
order seen in “strong boy.”
Looking at the rest of the utterances, I noticed other evident
orderings (objects following
verbs, prepositions preceding
nouns), and soon I had a fair typological description of the language. After that, it was up to me
to decide how I wanted the rest of
the grammar to work — verb
tense and aspect, nominal number and case inflection, adjectival agreement, etc.
For Dothraki, I really wanted
to employ nominal cases —
meaning the form of a noun
changes depending on its grammatical role in the sentence. If
chomak means “respectful one,”
it must change to chomakes if it’s
used as the object of a verb, or
chomaki if it possesses another
noun (e.g. vezh chomaki, “the respectful one’s stallion”). This is
something I hadn’t seen other
Hollywood languages do, so I
wanted to seize the opportunity
to try something novel.
Ultimately, the language had
to match fan expectations and
work on screen. Returning to the
first sentence of Dothraki: Athchomar chomakaan, khal vezhven!
The word khal is from Martin;
the rest are my creations. The
highest compliment I receive is
when fans of the literary series
tell me they can’t tell the difference between the words I created
and the ones Martin did.
David J. Peterson is a
professional conlanger who’s
worked on productions such as
HBO’s “Game of Thrones,”
Syfy’s “Defiance” and
“Dominion,” and the CW’s “The
100.” His book. “The Art of
Language Invention.” comes out
in September.

t’s hard to think of a more bizarre story, or one more representative of contemporary
America, than that of Rachel
Dolezal. Dolezal is an academic
and activist who represented herself
as African American for many years,
earning a degree in Africana studies,
even ascending to the position of
president of the Spokane, Wash.,
chapter of the NAACP.
Dolezal’s parents, however, have
recently made matters uncomfortable for her, telling the media that she
is in fact Caucasian and showing
photos of her as a younger woman
with blond hair and blue eyes. The
NAACP is standing behind Dolezal,
stressing that “racial identity is not a
qualifying criteria or disqualifying
criteria for NAACP leadership.” But
there are additional questions regarding, among other things, her position on a local police council. When
applying to the Spokane police ombudsman commission, she indicated
a racial category of black, which if untrue would violate the city ethics
code.
Dolezal, for her part, acknowledged that her biological parents are
two self-identified Caucasians, but
has thus far refused to elaborate.
The story has predictably been
catnip to our pundit class, provoking
commentary ranging from the outraged to the sympathetic to the
amused. Almost everyone, however,
has been shocked — shocked that
someone would act this way and
shocked that someone could pull it
off. I am shocked that people are
shocked. Rachel Dolezal was inevitable. We made her.
Human behaviors are the product
of incentives. We repeat behaviors
that are rewarded. And clearly, Dolezal believed she would find rewards in
representing herself as a black woman. That statement might seem
strange, given the continuing destructive power of racism in America.
In material terms, the condition of
the average black American has actually gotten worse in the last 35
years, post-racial rhetoric to the contrary. Racism and white supremacy
are real and powerful in America in
2015.
Why, then, would someone try to
occupy that position of oppression?
The answer has a lot to do with the
spaces that Dolezal had advanced in:
political activism and academia.
It happens that I’ve spent most of
my life in those spaces. And in those
spaces, a set of social norms have created direct incentives for Dolezal’s
behavior — and forbidden anyone
from checking up on her story.
First, there is a series of dubious
and problematic presumptions
made about black people that, while
ultimately unhealthy, might have appeared attractive to Dolezal. The notion of black people generally and
black women specifically as inherently more authentic, more wise, or
more connected to nature are alive
and well in many academic and activist contexts.
Though many race theorists have
convincingly argued that such
stereotypes are actually connected to

Tyler Tjomsland Associated Press

RACHEL DOLEZAL heads the

NAACP in Spokane, Wash.

the most noxious attitudes about
race, and ultimately perpetuate racial inequality rather than combat it,
for an individual white person working in those spaces, blackness might
appear to be the kind of thing you
might want to borrow — particularly
given that you wouldn’t have experienced a lifetime of petty bigotry and
major discrimination. Indeed, part of
what makes this story so offensive to
many lies in the fact that Dolezal has
borrowed a racial identity without
suffering from the harsh consequences of American racism.
She might not have attempted
such a deception if not for another aspect of academic and activist culture:
the notion that race does not equate
to skin color, complexion or other
physiological markers. I have attended many academic conferences
where speakers have passionately argued against the notion of someone
“looking black,” that you can ever tell
by looking at someone what their racial identity might be.
I have no opinion on this issue; it’s
not my question to answer. But with
that kind of social taboo in place,
there was little to fear for Dolezal in
representing herself as black; only
the belated attention of her parents
brought the truth to light. Nor did
she have to worry that anyone would
dig into her claims that she’d received hate mail and was the victim
of hate crimes — which are also now
in doubt.
Who, exactly, would feel confident
in questioning the claims of a selfidentified victim of a hate crime?
Particularly when that person was
serving as the head of a regional
NAACP branch? The outraged
tweets write themselves. Dolezal was
no dummy. She knew how these cultures operate. She knew she was protected.
In the end, perhaps Dolezal simply believed the convictions of her academic culture a little too much. After all, we on the left have insisted for
years that the various demographic
categories we are placed into are
merely social constructs, the creation of human assumption and human prejudice. That race is a social
construct is a stance that brooks no
disagreement in left-wing spaces.
It should not surprise us, then,
when an individual chooses to create
a different racial identity for herself.
I’m not saying that’s a legitimate
reading of social construct arguments. I’m not saying I condone her
behavior; like most people, I find it offensive. I’m simply saying that this
behavior is inevitable given the current social and linguistic codes of the
worlds in which Dolezal lives. We created those incentives and so we’ve
created this behavior.
Fredrik deBoer is a writer and
academic. He lives in Indiana.

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

A31

OP-ED

Drought panic and
rebates incentivize too
many quick and dirty
solutions for our
water crisis.
conditioning for L.A., which is only
getting hotter with climate change.
Plants and trees provide shade and
transpire moisture to cool the air;
gravel and artificial turf don’t. In
fact, they create the opposite of a
virtuous cycle: Fewer plants means
more heat, and more heat means
faster evaporation from watering,
swimming pools and vegetation.
More heat also means more water
to support the same landscape.
Replacing lawn with plastic
grass in particular can block oxygen from entering the soil and tree
roots; it may suffocate what trees
and plants are left after turf removal. We can’t afford that; we need to
protect and add trees and plants
that shelter pollinators, hold water,
absorb C02 and cool us down.

Make the right change

Wes Bausmith Los Angeles Times

Don’t gravelscape L.A.

P

By Mia Lehrer, Claire Latané and Margot Jacobs

eople are starting to panic about their lawns. The Metropolitan Water District is adding $350 million to
its lawn removal rebate program and homeowners are scrambling to rip out grass and replace it with
something easy and oh-so drought tolerant — gravel or artificial turf. At least one lawn removal contractor
promises to do it for free (the company cashes in the rebate).
Drought panic and rebates incentivize too many quick and dirty solutions for our water crisis. All over
the city — and especially in park-poor areas, where postage-stamp lawns may be the only relief from pavement — we
have to think before we act. Will exchanging a living, breathing yard for a bleak gravelscape save water? Some. But is
it the only way? Is it the right way?
Before you call the gravel truck, here are a few things to consider.
Hold on to water
Los Angeles was designed to
shed water. As early as the1920s, we
started engineering our landscape
to take rainwater to the ocean as
quickly as possible, so it wouldn’t
cause flooding. That means rain
washes off rooftops and pavement,
into gutters and storm drains, and
then into concrete-lined rivers and
out to sea. Because we’ve paved so
much of the landscape, our aquifers
don’t recharge when it rains — the
water can’t sink in.
That has to change. Almost 90%
of our water is imported from unreliable sources, and state and local
authorities are mandating a decrease in imported water of as

much as 50% by 2024. As we prepare
to rely on local water, we need to refill our aquifers.
The best way to do it is with a
planted landscape. Gravel is permeable, and OK in small doses, but
it doesn’t absorb and hold water as
trees and plants do. And just tearing up grass and laying on gravel
does nothing to keep water on a
site. Reshaping and planting the
land to hold and infiltrate water
can increase our water supply.

Rebate better
The water supply itself needs reshaping too. Rainwater harvesting,
gray water reuse and recycling water from sewage treatment plants

can drastically reduce or eliminate
our need to water the landscape
with potable water. Laws and policy have to change to ease reuse,
and water agencies and cities have
to educate and even reward the
public for doing so. Incentivizing
turf removal and not reuse is shortsighted.

plants kills them.
Establishing plants, trees and
yes, even turf, with less frequent,
deep waterings will develop deep
roots and a landscape that withstands long periods of drought. If
everyone watered only as much as
needed, we could make a big dent in
water use.

Water smarter

Conserve the ecosystem,
not just water

Our lawns and gardens are often
overwatered by two to three times
what they need. Turfgrass companies recommend watering lawns
with only 1 inch of water once a
week. (Put out a can to measure
how much you’re watering.) Overwatering (or fertilizing) native

Living landscapes aren’t just
about aesthetics; they are beneficial in multiple ways. Birds, bees
and insects (pollinators all) need
what trees and plants provide. Humans do too.
Gardens and lawns act as air

Los Angeles would no doubt be
better off with less turf. But not if we
replace it with gravel or plastic. Almost anything grows in L.A. if you
just add water. But so much will
grow even if you don’t.
A shady garden filled with flowers and trees native to Southern
California, or populated with
plants from southwest Australia,
South Africa’s cape and the lands
around the Mediterranean Sea
needs little to no water in the summer — maybe once a month.
Your landscape can also borrow
from L.A.’s past, when majestic
California oaks offered oases of
shade on golden grassy summer
hillsides; lupines, poppies, sages
and buckwheat punctuated spring
and fall with bursts of purples, oranges, pinks and rusty reds; and
ribbons of willows and sycamore
shaded roses, rushes and grasses
along creek beds and riverbanks.
These plants survive long summer
dry spells with deep roots that hold
soil in place during winter rains.
And they’re beautiful.
————
The drought is sparking longneeded action toward water independence. Los Angeles can be a city
of landscapes that collect rain, give
shade and provide food for the pollinators that help feed us. If you
have acres of green grass or grass
you don’t use, a new design is a
good idea. If you have a tiny or wellused yard, make smaller adjustments and water with care. Educate yourself. By all means take advantage of rebates, but don’t fall
victim to dead landscapes that
aren’t worth the money or the water saved in the long run.
Los Angeles can build a framework of deep roots and deep understanding of the multiple benefits of
ecological design. Despite its reputation for superficiality, the city can
shed its thin skin, do a little reshaping and root-strengthening and
capture and conserve water. Even
“shallow” L.A. can become known
for a beauty that goes beyond skin
deep.
Mia Lehrer, Claire Latané and
Margot Jacobs design and
advocate for multiple-benefit
landscapes, including schoolyards,
urban parks and forests, and
projects along the Los Angeles
River.

Time to get rid of the Bear Flag
By Alex Abella

O

ne hundred and sixty
nine years ago in a frontier town, a band of
thieves, drunks and
murderers hoisted a
home-made flag and declared
themselves in revolt from a government that had welcomed them. Instigated by an expansionist neighboring power, the rebels aimed to
take over completely and impose
their language, culture and mores
on the land. The revolt succeeded
beyond anyone’s expectations.
That frontier town was Sonoma,
the land was California, and the
rebels, American settlers spurred
on by promises of help from U.S.
Army Captain John Fremont. The
rebel standard, the flag of the socalled California Republic, became
the California State Flag. It’s time
California dump that flag, a symbol
of blatant illegality and racial prejudice. Like the Confederate cross of
St. Andrew, the Bear Flag is a symbol whose time has come and gone.
When the Legislature voted to
adopt the rebel standard as the
state flag in 1911, California was in
the grip of a racist, jingoistic fever.
The measure was sponsored by
Sen. James Holohan from Watsonville, a member of the Native Sons
of the Golden West. This was an organization whose magazine, the
Grizzly Bear, declared in the very
issue in which it announced the introduction of the bill, “Close the
public school doors to Japanese
and other undesirables NOW!
Close the doors through which
aliens can legally own or lease the
soil of California NOW!”

THE FLAG is a salute to an unsavory bunch who led a revolt.

The obvious intent of the measure was to glorify the Bear Flaggers,
who were hailed as wholesome
patriots. But that was far from the
truth.
Its leader, Ezekiel Merrit, was
described by historian H.H. Bancroft as “an unprincipled, whiskey
drinking, quarrelsome fellow.”
Known as Stuttering Merrit, he was
a thief who in 1848 reportedly stole
200 pounds of gold from his business partner. William Todd, who
designed the flag, came from a family of Kentucky slave owners (his
aunt was Mary Todd, Abraham
Lincoln’s wife). The group’s first
lieutenant, Henry L. Ford, was a
U.S. Army deserter who had impersonated his brother to escape detection. Sam Kelsey, the second
lieutenant, along with his brother
Ben, was a genocidal maniac who
killed hundreds of Pomo Indians in

Clear Lake. Americans visiting
their ranch reported that “it was
not an uncommon thing for them to
shoot an Indian just for the fun of
seeing him jump.”
Why did the Bear Flag revolt occur? Because these rogues were
also illegal immigrants who feared
they might be deported by the Mexican government. They despised
the native, Spanish-speaking Californios, whom they called greasers.
Refusing to become citizens, a
move that would have granted
them voting rights and land, they
looked to the American takeover of
Texas as an example.
Encouraged by Fremont, the
Bear Flaggers kidnapped the military commander of Sonoma, stole
hundreds of horses and proclaimed
a republic that at best represented
a few hundred Americans out of a
population of 10,000 in California.

Although the California Republic was short-lived — it lasted from
only June to July 1846 — the Bear
Flaggers were partially responsible
for how the state ultimately entered the union.
Tensions between Mexico and
the United States had been growing for years and already an American Pacific squadron was anchored
off California’s Central Coast.
When U.S. Commodore John
Drake Sloat was informed of the
Bear Flag revolt, he felt his hand
had been forced. Saying he’d rather
be accused of doing too much than
too little, he began the U.S. occupation of California, landing 250 sailors and Marines and hoisting the
Stars and Stripes over Monterey.
With few weapons, little ammunition and no organized military, the
Californio government was unable
to put up much resistance.
Ironically, the commodore
chose to invade right when U.S.
Consul John Larkin was bringing
him a Californio plan to declare independence from Mexico as a prelude to annexation by the United
States. Had California entered the
Union voluntarily, it might have
been able to import its own laws
and customs, much like Louisiana
had done with its jurisprudence of
Spanish and French origin. Instead, as a conquered territory, California was subject to American
laws.
Californios had instituted a
democratic government, paternalistic and often beset by political
conflicts, yet multi-ethnic and racially integrated, whereas the
Americans, among other things,
denied civil rights to blacks and Indians.

Native Americans were the first
victims of the violent conquest provoked by the Bear Flaggers. In 1846,
there were about 150,000 Native
Americans in California. While
many of them had integrated into
Californio society, about 75% continued to live as they always had in
the state’s central valleys and
mountains.
Once subject to the U.S. government, however, they faced mass extermination. At the slightest provocation miners and settlers would
burn entire rancherias, or Native
American villages, slaughtering all
the inhabitants, men, women and
children. By the late 1850s, after
years of murder and virtual slavery,
only about 30,000 were left alive in
California.
Californios did not fare well either. They saw their lands, the main
engine of their cattle raising economy, taken over by squatters.
Americans would descend on a
property, build homes, put up fences and till the fields without paying
rent or compensating the owner in
any way. Among them was William
Ide, once president of the California Republic, who squatted and
then filed a preemption claim for
property in what is now the southern part of the city of Red Bluff. By
the 1880s, Californios were broken,
politically and financially.
So — slave owners, murderers,
thieves, drunks and squatters.
These are the people we want to remember with their standard as our
state symbol?
Alex Abella is a journalist and
novelist. His latest book, “Under
the Burning Sunset,” will be
available this fall.

A32

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

MACY’S
ONLY ONE STAR
IS YOUR DESTINATION
FOR BEAUTY

ESTÉE LAUDER

ADVANCED NIGHT REPAIR

No matter what keeps you up, Advanced Night Repair helps keep you beautiful.
Advanced Night Repair for Eyes - re-ignite the youthful light of your eyes. This
breakthrough eye treatment helps return a more youthful, brighter and vibrant
look to your eyes. Serum, 0.5 oz. $65. ! 1505
5119. Gel Creme, 0.5 oz. $58. ! 1505118.
Advanced Night Repair Serum, Estée Laude
er’s #1 repair serum, helps skin look
significantly smoother, radiant, more hydrated
d and even toned. 1 oz. $62 (! 916090);
1.7 oz. $92 (! 916091); 2.5 oz. $120 (! 1187924); 3.4 oz. $155 (! 1764501).

FREE 7-PC. GIFT

EXCLUSIVE
LISA PERRY
DESIGNER
TOTE

EACH GIFT
INCLUDES

With any Estée Lauder skincare or foundation
purchase of $35 or more, receive everything you
need for a perfect summer getaway. ! 2139956.
One free gift per customer, while supplies last.

CHOOSE YOUR
MOISTURIZER
OR BB CREME

PICK YOUR
LIPSTICK
& GLOSS
IN SUBTLE
OR BOLD
A new way to get
rewards at Macy’s and
lots of other places!

Join for free

Start earning
Double Points on
Beauty & Fragrances!
For details visit
macys.com/plenti

FREE SHIPPING & FREE RETURNS AT MACYS.COM Free shipping with $50 fragrance or beauty purchase. Free returns by mail or in-store. U.S. only. Exclusions apply.

Details at macys.com/freereturns " Advertised merchandise may not be carried at your local Macy’s and selection may vary by store. Prices & merchandise may differ on
macys.com. 5050386

CALIFORNIA

B

S U N D A Y , J U N E 1 4 , 2 0 1 5 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L I F O R N I A

Minimum wage hike: Mayor Eric Garcetti
signs ambitious L.A. measure into law. 3

Obituaries: French chef Roger Vergé, a
nouvelle cuisine leader, dies at 85. 7

LOTTERY 2 :: OBITUARIES 7 :: WAR CASUALTIES 7:: WEATHER 10

Accidental
gunshots by
deputies rise

E NVIRO N MENT

The increase has
coincided with L.A.
County agency’s
move to a new pistol.
By Cindy Chang

Change
Accidental discharges by
L.A. County sheriff’s
deputies since the
introduction of the Smith
& Wesson M&P, which
lacks a safety lever.
Total accidental discharges

Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times

OXNARD PARENTS are concerned that chemicals used on nearby strawberry fields may be harming Rio

Mesa High School students. Agriculture industry officials say existing rules keep communities safe.

CULTIVATING
CONTROVERSY
Pesticide use near schools spurs push for statewide regulation

By Tony Barboza
Rio Mesa High School sits just outside the strawberry growing hub of Oxnard and is surrounded by vast
fields of the juicy red fruit.
Jeff Elliott’s twin daughters, in 11th grade, are on the
school’s track and cross-country teams, and they practice alongside neat rows of squat, green plants. But he
worries that the chemicals that help protect the fruit
might be hurting his girls. Elliott said his daughters
told him at least twice that they sprinted through foulsmelling fumigation operations during runs near the
campus.
“They’re looking at workers in the fields with masks
on, but they’re just running right through it,” Elliott
said.
After a flurry of concern in recent months from parents such as Elliott, school administrators and local
leaders, California regulators are developing the first
statewide restrictions on pesticide use near schools.
The move has reignited a debate about how to protect
children from potentially dangerous chemicals used to
grow strawberries, almonds, lettuce and other crops in
the nation’s top agricultural-producing state.
By the end of 2015, the Department of Pesticide
Regulation plans to propose new rules that could require growers to implement buffer zones, notify parents
and school administrators of nearby pesticide use or
limit their use of certain application methods.
The action comes after government reports and
news articles detailing heavy pesticide use near California schools. In some cases, growers were allowed to exceed state pesticide application limits, even as air quality monitors in nearby communities detected the
chemicals at levels above the state’s health targets.
Oxnard, in Ventura County, has been a flashpoint in
the pesticide debate. Growers and representatives of
California’s $2.3-billion-a-year strawberry industry are
resisting the push for more regulation, which they say is
based on unfounded fears. They say that extensive pesticide rules already ensure safety in surrounding communities.
Local activists, however, are demanding strict new
protections from authorities, who they say have been
slow or unwilling to act.
“This should have been addressed years ago,” said
Lucy Cartagena Martinez, who [See Pesticides, B5]

Curbing pesticide
use near schools
California environmental
regulators are considering
the first statewide regulations
governing the application of
agricultural pesticides near
schools. Ventura County, a
strawberry-growing hub, has
the most children in the state
attending schools near the
heaviest pesticide use.

Ventura Co.

Students attending schools* within a quarter mile of the
highest pesticide use, top five counties, 2010:
Ventura

13,045

Monterey

9,820

Fresno

4,890

Stanislaus
Merced

2,220
1,597

0

13045

*Top 5% of schools, ranked by pounds of pesticides applied within a quarter mile.
The 15 counties in California where pesticides are used most for agriculture:
Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Kings, Madera, Merced, Monterey, Sacramento, San
Joaquin, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Stanislaus, Tulare, Ventura, and Yolo.

Amounts of selected fumigants used in
Ventura Co., 2003-2013 (in millions of pounds)

2013:
2.2 million

3

2

2003:
1.0 million

CHLOROPICRIN

2013:
544,720

1

2003:
187,792

0
’03

’05

1,3-DICHLOROPROPENE
’07

’09

’11

’13

Sources: California Departments of Health and Pesticide Regulation
Graphics research by Tony B arbo za
Doug S te ven s Los Angeles Times

One sheriff ’s deputy shot
himself in the leg while pulling out his gun to confront a
suspect.
Another
accidentally
fired a bullet in a restroom
stall. A third deputy stumbled over a stroller in a closet
as he was searching for a suspect, squeezing off a round
that went through a wall and
lodged in a piece of furniture
in the next room.
Accidental gunshots by
Los Angeles County sheriff ’s
deputies have more than
doubled in two years, endangering bystanders and occasionally injuring deputies.
The jump coincides with the
department’s move to a new
handgun that lacks a safety
lever and requires less pressure to pull the trigger.
Sheriff ’s officials say that
the increase in accidental
discharges — from 12 in 2012
to 30 last year — occurred because deputies were adjusting to the new gun. They expect the numbers to fall in
the years ahead. So far this
year, the department has recorded seven accidental discharges, five of which involved the new weapon.
But the problems may
not be over, as more deputies switch to the Smith &
Wesson M&P9. In response,
department officials have
imposed extra training requirements.
The M&P has obvious
benefits. It is easier to shoot
accurately, can be fired more
reliably under stress and is a
better fit for people with
small hands. The switch was
prompted in part by the
threat of a lawsuit by women
who had failed the Sheriff ’s
Academy. More recruits —
including more women —
are now passing the firearms
test, and veteran deputies
are also logging better
scores at the firing range.
But the sharp increase in
accidental discharges has
prompted an investigation
by the Sheriff ’s Department’s new inspector general. Critics say this type of
semiautomatic, which is
widespread in law enforcement and includes the Glock
used by many agencies, is
too easy to misfire.
At the New York Police
Department, a rookie officer
is facing criminal charges,
including negligent homicide, in a fatal shooting in a
housing project stairwell.
An attorney for the officer

Ex-aide admits lie about San Diego candidate
By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO — In 2014,
the national Republican
Party was confident that it
could defeat a Democratic
congressman from San Diego.
Registration in the 52nd
District is closely split. The
incumbent, Scott Peters, an
environmental lawyer and
former City Council member, was in his first term after
narrowly defeating the Republican incumbent, Brian
Bilbray, in 2012.
The GOP challenger in
2014 was former Councilman
Carl DeMaio, who enjoyed
high
name
recognition
through his hard-charging

style and his pledge to “fix
Congress first” by making it
more efficient and responsive to taxpayers.
But the final weeks of the
campaign focused to a large
degree on allegations made
by a former DeMaio staff
member that the candidate
sexually harassed him.
DeMaio’s campaign seemingly never recovered, and
he later blamed his defeat on
the charges.
On Friday, the ex-staffer
admitted in federal court
that he lied when he claimed
to have gotten an anonymous email threatening that
he would never work again in
politics if he revealed that he
had been sexually harassed
[See DeMaio, B8]

Don Bartletti Los Angeles Times

REPUBLICAN Carl DeMaio, left, was challenging Democratic Rep. Scott Peters,

right, when a former campaign consultant accused DeMaio of sexual misconduct.

30

18
12

2012

2013

2014

Source: Los Angeles County Sheriff’s
Department
Los Angeles Times

says he accidentally fired his
department-issued Glock.
A former Los Angeles Police Department officer who
was paralyzed when his 3year-old son shot him with a
Glock has sued the gun
manufacturer and others,
alleging that the light trigger
pull and lack of a safety
mechanism contributed to
the accident.
Bob Owens, editor of
BearingArms.com, says the
design of the Glock and the
M&P makes such tragedies
more likely. “I don’t think,
[See Guns, B8]

Readers
send
widow
a flood
of aid
STEVE LOPEZ
The great
state of
California
remains
nearly as
dry as an
Interstate
5 tumbleweed, but
the
drought has come to a glorious end under the roof of
71-year-old widow Doris
Tillman of South Los Angeles.
The Scripture-quoting
Tillman endured nine
months without running
water after she lost a job, fell
behind in her payments and
had her service cut off by the
Los Angeles Department of
Water and Power.
But now the water is
flowing again, thanks to the
generosity of readers who
saw Tillman’s story and sent
donations to her. A down
payment on the unpaid
balance did the trick, and
DWP is investigating Tillman’s claim that her high
water bills were partly due
to rotting pipes that cost her
$7,000 to fix.
“The first thing I did was
take a bath,” said Tillman,
who had resorted to sponge
baths and taking yoga and
swimming classes so she
could use the shower facilities.
“I was so relaxed and so
comfortable, I felt myself
going to sleep,” added Till[See Lopez, B10]

B2

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

CALIFORNIA POLITICS

Labor looks to punish Democrats

Members of Congress
who support President
Obama’s trade deal
could face retaliation
come election time.
CATHLEEN DECKER

Organized labor suffered
an embarrassing loss in
California last month when
a defiant Democrat it had
targeted for years easily won
a state Senate seat over a
union-preferred candidate.
So it reveled in Friday’s
victory over President Obama on a trade measure that
inspired a battle for the
votes of Democratic House
members.
The trade fight was an
epic intraparty mudfest.
Unions, the party’s biggest
source of pavement-pounders and money, barraged
undecided House members
with phone calls, ads and
protests. Obama gathered
local television newscasters
to the White House to praise
the members he hoped
would side with him and
traveled to Capitol Hill for
some last-minute, and
ultimately unsuccessful,
arm-twisting.
The ferocity was still
being felt post-vote by the
few California Democrats
who thwarted labor amid
clear threats of retribution.
“It’s disappointing that
we had a few members vote
in a way that we would say
was against the interests of
working people in California,” said Steve Smith of the
state labor federation. “And
this is something we’re
going to remember.”
Retaliation is always
difficult to game out, but in
California it would come
with a twist: The members
labor is angriest at are
Democrats who barely won
their seats against strong
Republican challenges.
Damaging a candidate who
disagreed on one issue —
even a big one — runs a real
risk of turning a seat over to
a party labor disagrees with

Michael Reynolds European Pressphoto Agency

PRESIDENT OBAMA and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi caucus before

Friday’s vote on trade legislation. The trade fight was an epic intraparty mudfest.
almost all the time.
In theory, labor could
back candidacies by competing Democrats, but
they’d have to run against
incumbents who have spent
years building fundraising
networks and potentially
alienate fellow Democrats
for whom the trade bill is
not the most important
marker.
The tough decisions
ahead will come at a dicey
time for unions. Historically,
their fights have been waged
with Republicans, but in
recent years Democrats
have taken them on as
well.
In Los Angeles, former
Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa
earned enmity with his
budget proposals; current

Mayor Eric Garcetti won
election in 2013 by slaying his
opponent for her ties to a
public employee union. A
statewide Field Poll taken at
the end of 2013 found labor’s
popularity slumping, with
45% of Californians saying
unions were a force for harm
more than good, to 40%
defending them.
More trouble lies ahead:
Unions anticipate a 2016
ballot measure that would
give decision-making power
on new employee pensions
to voters, not the elected
officials who have remained
more loyal to labor than
have rank-and-file residents.
The fight between labor
and Obama was in one way
lopsided. Trade rarely in-

spires rapt supporters;
those who care about it are
more apt to be those threatened by labor agreements,
like the North American
Free Trade Agreement of
the 1990s. It is blamed by
unions today for the loss of
almost 90,000 California
jobs.
Echoing the argument
made then, Obama insisted
that new and better-paying
jobs would follow if he was
given authority to craft a
Pacific Rim trade deal.
California, he said, would
see its exports skyrocket
and its ports grow flush
with business. But his
party’s leaders did not fall
into line.
State Democratic Party
Chairman John Burton said

the notion of the treaty
“stinks to high heaven.”
Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris
asked supporters to add
their names to a list of those
objecting to “a reckless
rubber stamp” for Obama —
a list that she presumably
can use for her U.S. Senate
campaign.
In the end, only seven
California Democrats out of
32 in the House agreed to a
preliminary vote that was
part of the trade deal. Only
five — Reps. Ami Bera of the
Sacramento suburbs, Scott
Peters and Susan Davis of
San Diego, Jim Costa of the
Central Valley and the Central Coast’s Sam Farr —
voted to give the president
swift authority to make a
trade deal. The first one
failed and the second one
passed, and the House will
take the matter up again
this week.
The members of Congress who flouted labor’s
wishes said they were voting
their districts’ needs.
“I came to Congress to
put people before politics,”
Bera said in a statement,
adding that the trade act
will include labor and environmental protections “not
seen in any previous trade
authority bills.”
Peters emphasized that
Friday’s votes were on procedural matters, not on a
treaty itself.
“Our biotech and hi-tech
companies depend on exporting their goods, and as a
port city, San Diego depends on access to foreign
markets,” his statement
said. “But trade only works
if we set the rules. If we don’t
step up, someone else like
China will.”
Both men won narrowly
in 2014 and are targeted by
Republicans in 2016. Now
Democrats will have to
decide whether to aim at
them as well.
Smith, the labor federation spokesman, said
unions understand that
they need to persuade Californians about their heft on
issues like minimum wage
increases and sick-day pay
that accrue to “millions of

$

people across the state.”
And at the same time,
labor wants to remind politicians that they need to toe
the line.
“Look, we’re again
pleased that the vast majority of congressional Democrats did the right thing
today,” Smith said, just after
Friday’s vote. “We’ll worry
about the others later.”
cathleen.decker
@latimes.com
Twitter: @cathleendecker
For more on politics, go to
www.latimes.com/decker.

Lottery results
For Friday, June 12, 2015
Mega Millions
Mega number is bold

1-40-42-56-62—Mega 2
Jackpot: $26 million
California winners per category:
5 + Mega
5
4 + Mega
4
3 + Mega
3
2 + Mega
1 + Mega
Mega only

No. of
winners
0
0
1
22
165
2,548
4,071
36,784
99,319

Winning jackpot ticket(s) sold in other
states: None

For Saturday, June 13, 2015
Super Lotto Plus
Mega number is bold

14-15-33-38-41—Mega 27
Jackpot: $43 million
Powerball

Powerball number is bold

29-41-48-52-54—Powerball 29
Jackpot: $60 million
Fantasy Five: 2-14-24-30-35
Daily Four: 6-5-6-9
Daily Three (midday): 7-7-4
Daily Three (evening): 1-1-1
Daily Derby:
(12) Lucky Charms
(7) Eureka
(4) Big Ben
Race time: 1:43.81
Results on the Internet:
www.latimes.com/lottery
General information:
(800) 568-8379

(Results not available at this number)

COUPON FOR IN STORES OR ONLINE USE!

e Item at Regular Pric e
On

Offer good for one item at regular price only.
Limit one coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase.
Excludes Heidi Swapp™ Minc.™ Foil Applicator, CRICUT® products, Tim Holtz® Vagabond™ Machine,
Silhouette CAMEO® Machine, candy & snack products, gum & mints, helium tanks, gift cards,
custom orders, special orders, labor, rentals and class fees. A single cut of fabric or trim
“by the yard”equals one item. Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut.

$

$

Coupon

Coupon

Coupon
Code:

Amount
of prize(s)
----$15,384
$976
$64
$9
$7
$2
$1

Cash Value 1/10¢.

$

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U NDAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

B3

LOS ANGELES
Film divides
neighbors
‘Lowriders’ shooting on Eastside
block draws criticism from some
who call movie’s plot exploitative
By Brittny Mejia

Photographs by

Gina Ferazzi Los Angeles Times

A TRIUMPHANT Mayor Eric Garcetti, left, raises arms with City Council President Herb Wesson, center,

and Councilman Curren Price before signing into law L.A.’s plan to raise its minimum wage to $15 by 2020.

Mayor’s signature marks
end of wage hike battle

By David Zahniser
Promising to provide relief for families enduring
“back-breaking
poverty,”
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Saturday signed
into law a measure raising
the citywide minimum wage
to $15 by 2020.
A crowd of more than 500
joined Garcetti in South Los
Angeles, where he predicted
the measure would help
more than 600,000 Angelenos pay their rent, provide
for their children and build
their savings accounts. The
measure, he said, would
serve as a national model.
“This is about the idea,
that American ideal, that
when someone works hard,
they should be able to support themselves, and they
should be able to support
their families,” he told the
crowd.
The wage ordinance is
the most ambitious policy
initiative of Garcetti’s first
term, which reaches the halfway mark July 1. The signing
ceremony, which featured
speeches from council members, labor leaders and lowwage workers, sounded at
some moments like a reelection campaign event. Garcetti also boasted of the
city’s rising employment
numbers, growing tourism
activity and construction of
five new rail lines.
Laphonza Butler, president of the Service Em-

AUDIENCE MEMBERS cheer at the signing cere-

mony at Martin Luther King Jr. Park in South L.A.
ployees International Union
chapter that represents
home care employees, called
Garcetti “a champion for
workers” and said the wage
increase showed the city is
experiencing a “revolution of
values” and putting workers
first.
“For every young person
that has watched your
mother struggle to put food
on the table ... welcome to
the revolution,” she told the
audience.
The measure will take effect next month. But the
first increase won’t come until July 2016, when the citywide
hourly
minimum

moves to $10.50. The state’s
minimum wage is set to
reach $10 in January 2016, up
from the current $9.
The measure Garcetti
signed is somewhat different
from the one he unveiled
nine months ago. The mayor’s original plan called for
the minimum wage to reach
$13.25 in 2017. But the council
reworked the plan, ensuring
it will hit that amount in 2018
for businesses with 26 or
more employees and in 2019
for companies with 25 or
fewer workers.
It remains unclear how
many cities in Southern California will follow L.A.’s lead.

Of the 87 other cities in Los
Angeles County, only a few —
West Hollywood and Santa
Monica, for example — have
signaled their intent to pursue a similar wage increase.
Because the move to $15
will be phased in, businesses
won’t initially experience
major change, said researcher
Christopher
Thornberg. As the hourly
minimum approaches $15,
companies will start to consider moving to communities with lower minimum
wages that surround L.A., he
said. Thornberg analyzed
the potential effects of the
wage increase for the Los
Angeles Area Chamber of
Commerce, which opposed
the measure.
“This is a city that’s already behind, that’s already
fighting an uphill battle” in
the competition for jobs,
said Thornberg, founding
partner of the firm Beacon
Economics.
Garcetti attempted to
answer critics during the
signing ceremony, saying
that increasing the minimum wage had drawn support from business leaders
like Rick Caruso, the developer of the Grove shopping
center, and billionaire Eli
Broad.
“We would not have done
this,” Garcetti told the
crowd, “if we believed this
would hurt our economy.”
david.zahniser
@latimes.com

Socorro Arredondo was
thrilled when a film location
scout
approached
him
about two months ago asking to shoot scenes for a new
movie called “Lowriders” in
his El Sereno auto shop.
A film crew member described the movie as a tale
about a man, his traditionalist Latino father and his
gang-banger brother. Arredondo said he ended up
bonding with the film crew
and was paid for the days
they spent filming in his
shop, 3 C’s Car Automotive.
The shoot brought a slice of
Hollywood to Arredondo’s
Eastside neighborhood, and
he and his mechanics got to
snap photos with the movie’s stars, including actress
Eva Longoria.
Then, earlier this month,
a sign went up at the Eastside Cafe — a cultural and
educational space next door
— blasting the film for perpetuating stereotypes and
exploiting the mostly Latino
community.
“Eastside Cafe does not
support Low Rider exploitation film,” the sign read.
On Facebook, the cafe
criticized the film production for taking up parking
spaces and blocking traffic
and for painting “over a memorial mural that mourned
the death of a young boy of
our community.”
“We’re fighting on high
moral ground for respect for
the community,” said Roberto Flores, a coordinator
with Eastside Cafe. “They’re
selling our culture and they
never give anything back.”
But the conflict underscores how complicated labels like “community” can
be in working-class neighborhoods where aspiring
spokespeople are not always
in short supply.
“This was an opportunity
for El Sereno to be up there
in Hollywood, that’s the way
I looked at it,” Arredondo
said. “I just hope we don’t get
a bad impression of El Sereno and hopefully there’s a
part two of ‘Lowrider’ and
they won’t get scared away
from this controversy.”
The memorial mural that
was painted over had been
on a wall belonging to his
shop, he said, and the film
crew gave him money to pay
the artists who painted it
and other murals, and they
will be able to restore the art.
Next door to the Eastside
Cafe, at Mundo’s Upholstery
Shop, owner Porfirio Cantero said the film’s plot never
crossed his mind. But the

CHAT & SELFIE NAOMI HIRAHARA

On ramen noodles, Hello Kitty and gardeners

The main character in
many of Naomi Hirahara’s
mystery novels is a 70-something Japanese American
gardener who sleuths about
solving crimes in places like
downtown Los Angeles’
flower mart. The California
section’s Jason Song interrogated the author and
former editor of Rafu Shimpo at the Mitsuru Grill on
1st Street. We later emailed
her a few questions and
crunched the conversation
into this:
Rafu Shimpo? Did that
confuse people when you
called?
I introduced myself as
being from the Japanese
American daily newspaper
in L.A. Sometimes we got
mail addressed to Mr.
Shrimpo.
There weren’t many skater
shops or places called Ice
Cream Lab or Popkiller in
Little Tokyo when you were
at the paper in the ’90s.
What do you miss?
Running into the old
bachelors who lived in lowincome hotels like the Chetwood that were sprinkled
throughout Little Tokyo.

These men always had good
juicy stories to share and
were like my outrageous,
sweet uncles. The Japanese
American places of worship
and cultural/historic/social
service centers are still
there. The devoted community leaders and troublemakers, both old and young,
are still very emotionally
invested in Little Tokyo.

dener with his adolescent
daughter. I came close to
saying to her, “Hey, I was
you a long time ago,” but I
smiled instead. The girl said
that she liked my dog.
Do you think Mas Arai, the
gardener hero of one of
your series, could spruce
up downtown?
Mas has been into rock
gardens lately, so I think
that would be a nice addition to downtown.

Better ramen: S.F. or L.A.?
L.A., definitely. I’m more
of a Hakata Shin-Sen-Gumi
fan for both its noodles and
welcoming “irrashaimase”
when you walk through the
door. Old-school Kouraku
has my go-to mabo ramen.
Raymond Chandler described a Japanese man
starting a lawn “the way
Jap gardeners do.” What
else don’t you like about
Los Angeles’ iconic noir
novelist?
That he was the lone
white knight who was supposed to save us from the
frightening “other.” Look, I
get it — the 1940s was a
paranoid and uncertain
time, politically speaking.
But when people you know
and love are on the other

Another of your protagonists is a bike cop. More
lanes for cyclists?
Downtown L.A. has
become very bike friendly.
But gridlock, even on the
weekends, or maybe especially then, has been hideous. We need more local
buses and other parking
alternatives.

NAOMI HIRAHARA

Selfie taken at her home in Pasadena.
side of that paranoia, it
smarts. That I can never
forget.
Do you employ a Japanese
American gardener?
Our complex has two
wonderful older female
Spanish-speaking gar-

deners. My own father was a
gardener; his favorite celebrity customer was actor
Robert Reed of the Brady
Bunch. I definitely have a
heart for gardeners — no
matter their ethnicity. One
day when I was walking the
dog, I passed a Latino gar-

Hello Kitty isn’t a cat?
That’s what we’ve been
told by the Japanese American National Museum, and I
think it may be true. A cat
that doesn’t open its mouth,
and sits there without getting into the papers on your
desk? That’s no cat. That’s
why I have a dog.

SOCORRO Arredondo

allowed filming to take
place at his repair shop.
shoot did cost him business,
he said, because it created a
parking crunch.
Cantero said he was
grateful when Flores told
him he was negotiating with
the film crew on compensating business owners for the
parking inconvenience.
“Roberto is a person who
did this for the rights of the
people,” Cantero said. “I see
him as a leader of the area.”
Flores said that the cafe
was taking “a stand against
the disrespect. Part of the
demand was compensation
for all small businesses.” But
Eastside Cafe ultimately decided to “refuse any compensation to emphasize that
our struggle was for respect
and justice.”
“People thought we were
trying to get money,” Flores
said. “We decided as a group
that we’re going to fight this
from a very firm, moral position. Even if offered, we are
not taking any money.”
But at Aguilera’s Barbershop around the corner, the
debate mirrored what happened last month when hiphop artist Pusha T spent a
day shooting a music video
at the business and used a
backyard.
The backyard is rarely
used by businesses, said
Juan Landeros, manager of
the barbershop, but Eastside Cafe asked the crew for
compensation for the inconvenience. They, along with a
few other businesses, received money.
Early this month, he said,
Flores came by the barbershop and asked if staff supported asking for $200 for every day of filming for businesses on the block. Landeros said the movie’s plot
didn’t come up.
“I don’t believe for a minute that they don’t want
money,” Landeros said.
“Idealistically I would have
liked to believe they were going for the social movement,
but the way they went about
it was not the right way....
For them to claim to be the
voice for us is offensive.”
Shortly after Eastside
Cafe went public with its
grievances, someone used
the Twitter account @filmcrewLA to tweet: “The Eastside Cafe apparently doesn’t
like Eva Longoria and her
film ‘Low Rider’ ... there
greedy.” The account has
since been shut down.
The Eastside Cafe and
the production have declined to go into details
about the conflict.
On Thursday, the nonprofit FilmL.A. spoke with
representatives for Eastside
Cafe and Here and Now, a
neighborhood shop, during
a meeting coordinated in
conjunction with Councilman Jose Huizar’s office.
“Now we know who to
reach out to when filming
comes to the area,” said Philip Sokoloski, a spokesman
for FilmL.A, an organization
that coordinates the on-location filming permit process. “We always try to make
sure we connect with business owners in the area. The
next time filming visits the
area, we’ll know the right
people to reach out to.”
But some business owners and residents said they
wonder if film crews will
think twice about coming.
“I don’t think they’ll come
back,” said Elaine Fermin,
who lives near where the
filming occurred. “Who
wants to be around people
who are so outrageous? It’s
ridiculous.”
[email protected]

B4

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

THE STATE
Court records
might have
been falsified
O.C. judge is revisiting
cases that appear to
have been ‘resolved’
through tampering.
By Emily Foxhall and
Christopher Goffard

Photographs by

Kent Nishimura Los Angeles Times

A CROWD watches as one of the newly freed pelicans tests its wings at Goleta Beach. The birds were rehabili-

tated at the Los Angeles Oiled Bird Care and Education Center in San Pedro.

Rehabbed pelicans freed
after Santa Barbara spill

Birds treated in L.A.
take flight in Goleta,
the first rescued
animals to return.
By Javier Panzar
The rehabilitated brown
pelicans waddled out of their
cages and into the surf at
Goleta
Beach,
slowly
stretching their wings after a
three-hour car ride from a
Los Angeles care center.
A large crowd of scientists, reporters and beachgoers gathered Friday to
watch the 10 pelicans return
to the wild, the first rescued
animals to be released after
thousands of gallons of oil
spilled along the Santa Barbara County coast last
month.
The pelicans began flapping their wings and took
flight over the ocean.
“They are home again,”

IN COMING weeks, the rest of more than 100 birds

and mammals rescued from the spill will be released.

veterinarian Christine Fiorello said.
The birds were among
hundreds of animals whose
coats, skin, beaks or appendages were damaged by
thick crude after a pipe
owned by Plains All American Pipeline ruptured on
May 19, spilling more than
100,000 gallons of oil into the

ocean and along the coastline.
In the coming weeks, the
remainder of the more than
100 birds and mammals rescued from the spill will be returned to the wild.
Another 260 dead birds
and mammals were found in
the spill area.
In all, 10 adult pelicans

were released after a team of
scientists from UC Davis’
Oiled Wildlife Care Network
spent three weeks cleaning
and nursing them back to
health in Los Angeles.
Five of the released pelicans were outfitted with
small solar-powered satellite trackers. The birds could
fly to the Channel Islands
or as far away as Baja Mexico, said Michael Ziccardi,
the director of the care network.
Ziccardi, who has responded to more than 50 oil
spills, said releasing healthy
animals “feels remarkable,
every time.”
The 10 birds flew about
100 yards off the beach and
gathered in a bunch on the
water.
The crowd, full of young
children and families celebrating with new graduates
from UC Santa Barbara,
cheered.
[email protected]

Attorney
Charmaine
Druyor said she was puzzled
when she received a notice
two weeks ago ordering her
to appear Friday in the
Westminster courtroom of
Judge Thomas Borris. It
concerned a man whose
charge of driving on a suspended license had been dismissed in 2012.
Druyor, a criminal defense attorney in Orange,
was listed in court files as the
attorney of record. But she
didn’t remember the supposed client’s name and
couldn’t find in her computer any sign that she had represented him.
The man, who was also
summoned to court Friday,
seemed confused as well.
“When he saw me he knew
for sure I wasn’t his attorney,” Druyor said.
It is one of scores of cases
Borris examined Friday as
part of a probe into recordtampering at the courthouse. The irregularities apparently included the use of
real lawyers’ names in cases
they never handled, with the
aim of making the charges
go away.
Borris told defendants
— who believed their cases
had been settled — to
show why their resolutions
shouldn’t be vacated. FBI
agents were at the courthouse interviewing defend-

Lawmakers omit from
their state budget plan
a bill to defray costs
for property owners.
By Rong-Gong Lin II
and Rosanna Xia
A proposed state tax
credit to ease the burden of
seismically retrofitting vulnerable buildings failed to
make it out of a key committee in Sacramento this week,
calling its prospects into
question.
Senators on the Legislature’s Conference Committee, which reconciles Assembly and Senate budget proposals, chose not to include
the earthquake retrofit tax
credit in the budget they will
send to the governor, said
Dan Savage, chief of staff
to Assemblyman Adrin Nazarian (D-Sherman Oaks),
who introduced the legislation.
State Sen. Mark Leno (DSan Francisco), who chairs
the Senate Budget Committee, declined to comment on
the decision.
Nazarian’s
proposal
would give property owners
a 30% tax break on the cost
of the seismic retrofitting.
His staff insisted that, despite the setback, the proposal is not dead.
The Assembly version of
the tax break proposal, AB
428, passed last week, 78 to 0.
To reach a vote in the
Senate, it would need to get
through the Senate’s Governance and Finance Committee, chaired by Sen. Bob
Hertzberg (D-Van Nuys),
and then the Appropriations Committee, chaired by
Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell
Gardens).
Nazarian said he plans to

Katie Falkenberg For The Times

THE MEASURE would give owners a 30% tax break on the cost of seismically

retrofitting their property. Above, Pablo Coc retrofits a house in Los Angeles.
keep fighting.
“We’re protecting life,”
he said. “We’re helping
strengthen property and,
third, we’re actually helping
incentivize at least a modicum amount of job growth in
the building industry.”
The tax credit idea has
been endorsed by the
mayors of Los Angeles, San
Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and Santa Monica. In Los
Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti has proposed new city
rules that would require the
retrofits of thousands of
concrete and wooden buildings.
“The physical threat of
death or injury from vulnerable buildings is real,” the
five mayors wrote to Leno.
Many apartments in Los
Angeles are in “soft-story
buildings” — wood-frame
structures that have flimsy
columns atop carports on
the ground floor. These
weak supports have col-

lapsed in previous earthquakes, sometimes killing
residents on the bottom
floor.
Under the bill, the tax
credit would be given to an
owner over a period of five
years after the retrofitting
was completed. For every
$100 owners spent on a qualified retrofit, they would receive a $30 break on income
or corporations taxes.
Work eligible for the tax
break would include retrofitting wood-frame apartment
buildings and concrete residential buildings, installing
automatic
gas
shut-off
valves, anchoring singlefamily homes to foundations
and installing quake-resistant bracing systems for mobile homes.
The tax credit would be
in effect from 2016 through
2020.
Nazarian has also separately asked budget negotiators to expand a program

that gives California homeowners grants of up to $3,000
to seismically retrofit singlefamily homes.
The Legislature’s Conference Committee approved a
$3-million-a-year increase
for two years.
The program, called
Brace and Bolt, is expected
to spend nearly $2 million on
grants that would help pay
for 650 homes to be retrofitted this year.
The program is available
in 28 ZIP Codes in the San
Francisco and Los Angeles
areas, and there are plans to
expand into additional
areas.
Single-family
homes
built before 1979 that have a
handful of above-ground
steps sometimes are not
bolted to their foundations
and can slide off during
quakes.
[email protected]
[email protected]

emily.foxhall
@latimes.com
christopher.goffard
@latimes.com

Newport Beach
sewer fee may rise
By Hannah Fry

Quake retrofit tax credit stalls

ants. The FBI, the Orange
County district attorney’s
office and court officials
would not discuss the
case.
“I’ve never seen anything
like this,” Druyor said.
“Someone falsified records.
We don’t know how many
[defendants] were victims
and how many were part of
the fraud.”
She said her supposed
client’s dismissal was vacated, and he was allowed to
plead guilty and pay a fine.
In some cases, the judge ordered warrants for the defendants’ arrest.
Lolita Kirk, a Santa Ana
criminal defense attorney,
received a notice to appear
before Borris concerning
three different defendants.
Court records indicated
they had been her clients,
but she told the judge she
had
never
represented
them.
In one case, she said,
court records indicated a
defendant had served time
in jail, but on Friday the
court called the jail and
found the defendant had
not. So the judge had the
defendant taken into custody.
Kirk speculated that
someone had been paid to
fix the records. “I don’t know
whether there’s a fraud being perpetrated against defendants,” she said. “It’s all
speculative.”
For the next two Fridays,
she said, Borris’ docket is
dominated by similarly recalled cases.

The drought is driving
down water use in Newport
Beach.
But a consequence of reduced use is a decline in revenue that would help fund
necessary improvements to
the municipal water system,
such as replacing aging
pipelines and sewer stations.
Ratepayers may be asked
to help close the gap.
City staff presented a
proposal to nearly double
wastewater rates for customers over the next five
years during a study session
last week. If approved, it
would be the first rate increase in nearly a decade.
Homes and businesses
that use water in Newport
Beach are charged in their
regular bills for wastewater
removal and treatment,
which includes sewage and
water from sinks and showers, known as “gray water.”
Newport Beach has been
identified as one of the
heaviest per-capita waterusing cities in the state.
Because customers are
using less water to comply
with standards set by the
State Water Resources Control Board, which recently
mandated that Newport reduce use by 28%, they are
also using less wastewater.
Reduced use means
lower bills for ratepayers but
a decline in revenue for the
city. And those declines are
expected to affect the city’s
wastewater enterprise fund,
which finances various improvements to the city’s water system, over the next several years.
In 2013, the city contracted with HF&H, an Irvine consulting firm, to
study wastewater and recycled water rates. Based on
the firm’s findings, the City
Council decided in June 2014
to halve the cost of recycled
water to ratepayers.
However, the study indicated that the city needs to
bulk up its wastewater fund
if it wants to pay for neces-

sary improvements to an aging system.
The projects are expected to cost roughly $30
million over the next 30
years.
The city is contributing
half a million dollars each
year to the improvements,
said George Murdoch, the
city’s utilities general manager.
HF&H projected that
the city will have to dip into
reserve money to fund the
projects, which are expected
to deplete $900,000 that the
city has in wastewater reserves by 2017.
“You can see where we’re
a little bit short,” Murdoch
said. “We’ve had an aggressive program, but we need to
step it up a bit.”
If the council eventually
approves the rate hike, it
would be the first increase
seen by ratepayers in nine
years, he said.
A typical single-family
home pays about $9.75 a
month for wastewater. The
proposal to increase the rate
structure would mean that
the same home would pay
$13.79 a month by the first
year, $16.27 by the third year
and $18.04 by the fifth.
Wastewater rates for
homes and businesses are
composed of a fixed fee, a
sewer charge and two additional surcharges of $2 a
month for each additional
house on the property and
$10 a month for customers
with larger water meters.
The proposal would
eliminate the surcharges
and move the cost to a
monthly fixed price for
sewer service based on the
size of the water connection
and sewer use charge, which
is a monthly fee for all customers based on water use.
Councilmen Scott Peotter and Kevin Muldoon
asked city staff to look into
the possibility of cutting
costs by outsourcing portions of the city’s wastewater
service. Thirteen employees
currently manage the city’s
wastewater.
[email protected]

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

Concerns rise over pesticide use
‘My biggest
concern is about
the excessive use
of dangerous
fumigants and the
safety of our
children, teachers
and families.’
— John Zaragoza,
Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times

CALIFORNIA’S STRAWBERRY industry is resist-

ing the push for more pesticide regulation, which
growers say is based on unfounded fears about safety.
years of air quality measurements in six communities
and school sites near agricultural fields, including Rio
Mesa High School, Shafter
High School in Kern County
and Ohlone Elementary
School in the Santa Cruz
County city of Watsonville.
Officials say they have on
only a few occasions detected concentrations of

APPRAISAL SERVICES

BRICK CHIMNEYS
INSPECTION OR CLEANING
SPECIALTY & OUT OF AREA
FIREPLACES $129 .00

818-CHIMNEY (818.244.6639)

ATTORNEYS

OF CALIFORNIA

WORKPLACE
RIGHTS

ASSET PROTECTIONS

Medi-Cal

• Discrimination
• Harassment
• Wrongful Termination
• Retaliation • Disability
• Pregnancy Leave

NO RECOVERY=NO FEE

Avoid
Spend
Down and
Recovery

Call for FREE Consultation

310-273-3180

Attorney Joe Girard can help!

9255 Sunset Blvd. #411, LA 90069
www.californialaborlawattorney.com

TERMINATED
WITHOUT CAUSE?

WEARENO#1CALLUSFIRST!!!
Elder Abuse/Nursing Home Neglect

Harassment DiscriminaQon
Retaliation Unpaid Wages
Unemployment & Workplace Injuries

Bed Sores

Serious Personal Injury

Based on disability, gender/sex,
age, race, pregnancy, religion,
whistleblowing

• Bed Sores
• Dehydration
• Malnutrition
• Birth Injuries

• Serious Personal Injury
• Wrongful Death
• Brain Injury
• Truck & Auto

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE TODAY! 877-348-5605

VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT WWW.SOCALAUCTIONS.ORG 800.352.5572
Wednesday, June 17th @10:00am • 265 W Allen Ave, San Dimas, CA

60 STRYKER GURNEYS • BACKBOARDS • SPLINTS
STRETCHERS • INVENTORY • 40 HAND HELD RADIOS

(14) Stryker Power Pro & XPS Gurneys; (20) Stryker Performance Pro Gurneys; (19) Stryker
Stair Chairs; (5) Ferno Proflexx 28x Gurneys; (130+) Long & Short Back Boards & Break
Away Stretchers; (33) Traction Splints; (48) Motorola Hand Held & Base Radios, XPR 6550
Wednesday, June 24th @10:00am • 7959 S. Paramount Blvd, Pico Rivera, California

52,000 SQ/FT WHOLESALE USED CLOTHING
(1000’S) BALES OF CLOTHING • CARTS
LIKE NEW CLOTHING • COMPRESSORS

(818)981-0901

www.thepecklawgroup.com

We Will Help You

www.terminatedwithoutcause.com
www.reisnerking.com

Elder
Abuse/Nursing Home RNeglect
WEARENO#1CALLUSFI
ST!!!
Bed
Sores
Elder Abuse/Nursing
Home Neglect
Sexual
Assault
Bed Sores
MultipleFalls/Fractures/BrainInjury
Serious Personal Injury

SERIOUS
INJURIES?
SERIOUS INJURY LAWYERS

INSPECTION: Morning of Sale 8:00 am to Sale Time!

$500.00 Cash Refundable
13% Buyers
Deposit Due upon Entry
Premium
SCOTT VAN HORN, AUCTIONEER • TEL: (949) 206-25225 • FA (949) 831-1975 • CALIF. BOND NO. SLR119293741

TIMED ON-LINE AUCTION

ALL OVENS 2007– 2010
(63) OVENS Available for Preview

2-DAY AUCTION: June 24 & 25 at 9am MDT
INSPECTION: June 22 & 23, 8am to 4pm MDT
8301 Broadway Blvd SE, Albuquerque, NM

1400 Glenn Curtiss St, Carson, CA

FOR QUESTIONS, CONTACT: Burdette (314) 616-8422
Auctioneers Lic. Kathleen Parker,
ILL 441.002001
847.499.7049 hyperams.com
Sale in Conjunction with: Cincinnati Industrial Auctioneers

Bidding Starts Closing: June 25 at 10am

For Catalog or to Register go to:

www.gaauction.com
Preview by Appointment Only

www.gaauction.com 818-340-3134
Lic. 2000023-105/2000026-846

PUBLIC ONLINE AUCTION

We specialize in the following

BRICKELL
BRICKELL&&ASSOC.
MEZA

• Bed
BedSores
Sores • Serious
Personal
• Serious
PersonalInjury
Injury
• Catastrophic
DehydrationInjury
• Wrongful
• WrongfulDeath
Death
• Sexual
Malnutrition
Injury
Assault • Brain
• Brain
Injury
• Birth
BirthInjuries
Injuries • Truck
& Auto
• Truck
& Auto

FAST ANSWERS
(310) 858-3555
34 YEARS EXPERIENCE
33
FREE CONSULTATION

HELPING VICTIMS
FOR OVER 30 YEARS
twitter.com/latimes

1-800-882-5464

www.bathtubkingsocal.com
Lic.#775121

DO BUSINESS WITH A
LICENSED CONTRACTOR

KITCHENS & BATHS

DULL
BATHTUB?
TUBS,SINKS,COUNTERS&TILEWALLS
TILE
FORMICA
PORCELAIN
FIBERGLASS

239
249
REG. TUB $299

$$

TOP REFINISHING

Satisfaction Contractor
Lic.
Lic Contractor
Guaranteed #978667

FREE
TES

LAA3300462-1

PAINTING
Sanoran Painting

www.sanoranpainting.com
License # 1001932

• Insured
• In business for
• Quality work
15 years
• No job too
at a fare price
• Free estimates
big or too small
JUNE SPECIAL 20% OFF

951-442-7502

WINDOWS

Real Estate Litigation
• Title Transfer Disputes/Forged Deeds/Fraud Claims
• Major Lease Disputes/Mortgage Disputes
• Business Litigation Focused on Real Estate Issues
• Experienced Representation/Flat Rate or Hourly Rate

Law Offices of John V. Grienauer
310-373-5944
[email protected]

CALL 4 FREE QUOTE
626-448-8321
HUGE SHOWROOM

Styleline Special
8 vinyl
windows
installed.

CONCRETE
CONCRETE &
MASONRY
N o J o b To o Sma ll!
S t amped C oncrete.
Driveways, Foundations.
Repair. S t ain / S eal.
Draining Systems.
Lic.#739171.
Ken (714) 879-0814

DOORS

MAIN OFFICE BEVERLY HILLS
seriousinjurycases.com
www.brickellmeza.com

NO RECOVERY - ABSOLUTELY NO FEE
CALL DIRECT 818.908.0509
TOLL FREE 1.866.999.9085
5894104

(go to auctions & liquidations – current auctions)
Terms: 15% buyer's premium; cash, cashier's check
ASSET RELIANCE, INC. Auctioneers
909.944.5959, CA Bond #MS348-33-000

Scott Brickell, ESQ.

• Auto Accidents • Wrongful Death
• Rear End Crashes
• DUI Victims • Brain Injuries
• All Types of Cases • Se Habla Español
• No Recovery, No Fees

Free Case Evaluation

SHEET METAL FAB SHOP: SHEARS,
PRESS BRAKE, WELDERS, SAWS & MORE!

Tub Only
OnlyReg.
Reg.$309
$299

2899

$

See Store for Details.

DOOR & WINDOW PLUS
2110 Tyler Ave.
S. El Monte
M-F 8am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 3pm

www.doorandwindowplus.com

[email protected]

www.thepecklawgroup.com
Please visit our facebook page

Baby Boomers and Elder Law Issues
We
Will
and
ask for Help
approval toYou
join.

LAA3181579-4
LAA1594071-1

MAJOR PUBLIC AUCTION
OF 300+ TURBOCHEF
NGC TORNADO OVENS
FROM MAJOR U.S. CHAIN

6/30/15

Promo Code: LATPD

800 833-8060

“We will compassionately
& aggressively fight
for your rights”

www.vanhornauctions.com for info • Cash or Cashier's Check Required for Full Payment!!

BIDDING CLOSES: Tues., June 16, 3:00pm PST
PREVIEW: Mon., June 15, 9:00am – 4:00pm PST
8420 Red Oak Street, Rancho Cucamonga, CA
Register/Bid at: www.assetreliance.com

Callfor
forFree
Free Consultation
Consultation
Call

818-990-8590
818-990-8590

Adam Reisner, Esq. &
Tessa King, Esq.

Call for free consultaQon

NO RECOVERY - ABSOLUTELY NO FEE
CALL DIRECT 818.908.0509
TOLL FREE 1.866.999.9085

259
249

$

Valid Until

Lic#801964

SO. CALIFORNIA AUCTIONEERS
|

33 YEARS EXPERIENCE
FREE CONSULTATION

LAA1594071-1

THESE ADVERTISERS ARE MEMBERS OF THE

REFINISHING OF:

TUBS • TILES • SINKS • FIBERGLASS

PROFESSIONAL REGLAZING

Avoid Junior Liens, Discharge Taxes,
Stop Levies,Garnishments & Foreclosures,
Offers In Compromise/Tax Resolution

We specialize in the following

CCOOUUPPOONN

Valid until
7/31/15
Valid
until
12A51

DOOR & WINDOW PLUS

626-448-8321

• 300+ Doors in stock
• BBB Rated “A+”
• Certified Installation
Masters
• Fully Bonded &
Insured
2110 Tyler Ave.
So. El Monte, CA 91733
Lic #801964

8am - 6pm
5pm M-F • 10 - 3pm Sat.
www.doorandwindowplus.com

facebook.com/latimes
334534-1

It’s easy and tax-deductible. Pick-up is free and we’ll even handle all
the paperwork.

FEATURING: Mobile Cranes, Trucks, Trailers, Rolling
Stock, Forklifts, Angle Roll, Plate Bending Rolls, Plasma
Shape Cutting System, Shears, Ironworker, Band Saw,
Press Brake, Beveling Machine/Flanger, Apron Brake,
VTL, Drills/Saw/Sander, Welding Manipulator, Welders,
Wire Feeders, Tank Turning Roll Sets, Plasma Cutters,
Welder Generators, Air Compressors and Much More!

with 30 yrs. exp. specializing in

• BREACH OF CONTRACT
& FRAUD LAWSUITS
• PARTNER & SHAREHOLDER
DISPUTES
• EMPLOYMENT LAWSUITS
• LEASE DISPUTES
• PREP OF AGREEMENTS

$$BANKRUPTCY$$

LAA462082-1

Your vehicle, running or not, will help Goodwill transform thousands of
lives by providing education, training and employment assistance.

COMPLETE SHUT DOWN OF
LARGE TANK MFG. COMPANY

BUSINESS & LITIGATION
ATTORNEY

15303 Ventura Blvd., Suite 900
Sherman Oaks, CA 91403

A CAR,
CREATE JOBS!

500

$5

$

Steve

DONATE

BMT – Brown Minneapolis Tank

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

CASH ALWAYS
(800) 508-1080

WWW.CHIMNEYSAFETYEXPERTS.COM

LIVE/WEBCAST AUCTION

To advertise in this directory,
go to www.latimes.com/placebpsdad,
or call 1.800.528.4637, ext. 72769

ALL Old Jewelry Fine & Costume
Watches, Cufflinks, Gold, Silver & Art
Old: China, Dishes, Glass, Nicnacs
Antique Furniture, Cameras

ATTORNEYS

69 .00 FOR TRADITIONAL

ATTORNEYS

[email protected]
Twitter: @tonybarboza

WANTED TO BUY

310.823.3943

LAA2992382-1

$

sessments are not thorough
enough to conclude that
there are few health risks.
Last year, the Center for
Investigative Reporting, a
nonprofit news organization, detailed how the Department of Pesticide Regulation had for years been
granting exemptions that
let growers apply more 1,3Dichloropropene than allowed under the state’s limits. The department said
early last year it would stop

BUSINESS &
PROFESSIONAL
SERVICES DIRECTORY

www.LAElderLaw.com

CHIMNEY SAFETY EXPERTS

pesticides
that
exceed
health screening level standards and that their assessments have found that the
risk to children from fields
near schools is low for most
chemicals monitored.
But advocacy groups say
the department’s testing results confirm that pesticides
drift onto school grounds
and contend its scientific as-

Ventura County supervisor

issuing those exemptions.
State Sen. Hannah-Beth
Jackson (D-Santa Barbara)
had introduced legislation
that would require notification of schools and residents
in advance of pesticide applications, but it died in
committee last April amid
opposition from agricultural
interests.
In Ventura County, where
the agricultural industry is
one of the top employers,
some local officials are stopping short of endorsing such
changes.
Ventura County Supervisor John Zaragoza said, “My
biggest concern is about the
excessive use of dangerous
fumigants and the safety of
our children, teachers and
families.” But he is not convinced that additional restrictions are needed.
“What is safe for the
community without unfairly
regulating the industry?” he
said. “We need to create a
balance.”

LAA3341196-1

sors and other local officials
were incensed that they
didn’t find out until a few
months ago.
After receiving complaints from politicians and
school district officials, the
department held public
meetings in agricultural
communities around the
state to gather input for the
new regulations.
Growers and pesticide
applicators say that new restrictions will place expensive burdens on operations
already constrained by encroaching urban development and the most stringent
pesticide rules in the
nation.
“Today’s regulations are
working,” strawberry grower Bobby Jones said at a
hearing earlier this month in
the library of Rio Mesa High
School, where his family has
farmed the bulk of the surrounding land for three generations. There is not
enough evidence, he said,
“to support more regulations or restrictions based
on probability or potential
harm.”
Many counties have informal notification or userestriction agreements that
have been worked out
among local agricultural
commissioners,
growers
and school officials, according to the Department of
Pesticide Regulation. Some
individual pesticides are
also subject to state and
federal restrictions on use
near schools.
“We need a standardized,
minimum set of rules,” Department of Pesticide Regulation spokeswoman Charlotte Fadipe said.
Parents and community
groups, citing increased risk
of cancer, reproductive and
developmental
problems
that scientific studies have
associated with chronic pesticide exposure, are urging
the department to adopt
strict, comprehensive rules
that will bolster protections
for schoolchildren. They
want buffer zones of up to
one mile around schools and
48-hour advance notice of
pesticide applications.
Pesticide regulators have
downplayed
potential
health impacts and aren’t
indicating they intend to
craft such sweeping restrictions.
Pesticide regulators and
the state Air Resources
Board have collected four

LAA858707-1

[Pesticides, from B1]
grew up in a family of migrant farmworkers and now
handles campus security for
more than 2,000 students at
Rio Mesa High School.
Like most states, California has no comprehensive
restrictions on pesticide use
near schools and does not
require growers to notify
school officials and parents
when they are applied. For
decades, the state Department of Pesticide Regulation has left such decisions
up to county agricultural
commissioners, resulting in
a patchwork of informal
agreements that vary dramatically from county to
county.
Last
year,
Ventura
topped a California Department of Public Health list as
the county with the most
children attending schools
within a quarter mile of the
heaviest pesticide use.
The county has, for years,
been a hot spot for environmental justice concerns,
among them federal civil
rights complaints from local
families alleging that the
state discriminated against
Latino schoolchildren, exposing them to disproportionately high levels of pesticides. According to the public health department report, Latino children in
California were 91% more
likely than white children to
go to schools near the highest pesticide use.
The agricultural pesticides used most near
schools, and most likely to
be affected by new regulations, are fumigants, gases
that are injected into the soil
before planting to protect
strawberries,
almonds,
sweet potatoes and other
crops from pests and disease. The two main fumigants of concern are cancercausing
1,3-Dichloropropene and chloropicrin, a
tear-gas-like
compound
that causes skin irritation,
coughing and headaches.
In 2011, the Department
of Pesticide Regulation began conducting year-round
air quality monitoring to assess chronic health risks
posed by agricultural pesticides drifting into surrounding communities. Starting
that year, a monitor stationed at Rio Mesa High
School detected levels of 1,3Dichloropropene above the
department’s standards for
cancer risk. County supervi-

B5

B6

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

S

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Join the Conversation
Last week we began The California Conversation, a new way to discuss
some of the complex issues we face in California. Governor Jerry Brown
and Publisher Austin Beutner had an hour-long talk on water in the West.
Stay tuned for more of The California Conversation.

PHOTOS / LA Times: Lawrence K. Ho

SPONSORED BY

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

• Read coverage, watch the video:
latimes.com/TheCaliforniaConversation
• Stay informed on the topic of water; subscribe
to the newsletter latimes.com/WaterandPower


#TalkCA

The story begins here

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

B7

OBITUARIES
ROGER VERGÉ , 1930 - 2015

Led the nouvelle cuisine movement
By Elaine Woo

R

oger Vergé, one of
the first superstar chefs whose
light, fresh and
artfully
plated
food turned his restaurant
near Cannes, France, into a
landmark of French gastronomy and a beacon of
nouvelle cuisine, has died.
He was 85.
Vergé, whose Le Moulin
de Mougins earned three
Michelin stars within five
years of its 1969 opening,
died June 5 in Mougins, according to the Associated
Press. The cause was not
given.
With his thick mustache
and matinee idol charm,
Vergé was, as the influential
restaurant guide Gault-Millau described him, “the very
incarnation of the great
French chef for foreigners.”
Along with Paul Bocuse,
Michel Guerard and the
Troisgrois brothers, Vergé
freed French cuisine from
the rules that had defined it
for a hundred years, abandoning heavy sauces, strong
marinades and long cooking
times for a simpler approach
that emphasized the natural
flavors of food.
Strongly influenced by
the herbs, spices and sunripened vegetables of Provence and his extensive travels in Africa and Jamaica, he
called his approach “Cuisine
of the Sun,” which was also
the name of his first cookbook.
His culinary style, he
wrote, was “the antithesis of
cooking to impress — rich
and pretentious. It is a lighthearted, healthy and natural way of cooking which
combines the products of
the earth like a bouquet of
wild flowers from the gar-

Gilberte Tourte Associated Press

DEDICATED CUISINIER

John Travolta tastes a meal prepared by Chef Roger Vergé at Le Moulin de
Mougins restaurant near Cannes, France, in 1987.
den.”
His kitchen was a training ground for a number of
celebrated chefs who later
brought their talents to this
country, among them David
Bouley, Hubert Keller, Alain
Ducasse and Daniel Boulud.
“What did I learn with
Vergé? Better to ask, What
didn’t I learn? Every one of
my cooking skills was
honed,” the New York-based
Boulud wrote in his memoir,
“Letters to a Young Chef.”
Vergé brought his ideas
to America in the mid-1970s
when he and other leading
practitioners of the new
French gastronomy gave
classes in Napa Valley as
California cuisine was evolving along similar lines. Later,
with his friends Bocuse and
Gaston Lenotre, he operated restaurants in the French
Pavilion at Disney World in
Orlando, Fla.
Le Moulin de Mougins,
however, remained the

touchstone. Located in a
converted 16th-century olive
oil mill across the road from
one of Pablo Picasso’s
homes, it quickly became a
pilgrimage spot for gourmands and a favorite of celebrities visiting the annual
Cannes Film Festival. It
earned three Michelin stars
in rapid succession, in 1970,
1972 and 1974. In 1977, with his
wife, Denise, he opened a
second restaurant, L’Amandier de Mougins, and a cooking school.
The son of a blacksmith,
Vergé was born on April 7,
1930, in Commentry, a village
in central France. He was
one of nine children in a family that loved food.
“One of my grandfathers
would wake up at 4 a.m.,
drink a cup of black coffee,
and eat a whole roast chicken,” he once told Julia Child
who recounted her conversation with the chef in “My
Life in France,” her 2006 au-

tobiography. “Then he’d
drink a second cup of coffee
and eat a second chicken.
Mind you, this was before
breakfast, just to start the
day right … and every day,
too!”
Vergé’s first and most influential teachers in the
kitchen were his mother and

especially his aunt, who
spent the whole day Sunday
preparing food. His book
“Roger Verge’s Vegetables in
the French Style” (1994), is
an homage to the two women, whose fricassee of spring
vegetables, he wrote, “represents all the happiness that
life can afford.”
At 17, Vergé was apprenticed to a local chef, then
continued his culinary education at two of Paris’ temples of haute cuisine, La
Tour D’Argent and Plaza
Athenee. Eager to explore
other cuisines, he spent
more than a decade cooking
his way through the Caribbean and Africa.
When he returned to
France, he fused the flavors
of the countries he visited
with those of his own. Boulud recalled making Vergé’s
lamb shoulder with Provencal herbs and Middle Eastern accents of star anise,
cinnamon and orange peel.
His travels abroad also inspired him to use fresh fruits
in savory dishes, such as his
appetizer of hot oysters with
orange pieces and orange

butter.
Still, Vergé “could not
have come from anywhere
but France,” wrote Child,
who became a close friend.
He was “a quintessential example of what a true chef
should be ... the kind of dedicated cuisinier that had so
inspired my love of France
and its food.”
He offended American
chefs in 1985 when, at a benefit in New York, he said new
American cooking “looks
Japanese: large dishes,
small portions, no taste, but
very expensive.”
He later explained that
his remarks were aimed at
the excesses of nouvelle cuisine on both sides of the Atlantic. “Everywhere, people
just want to make something new,” he said in Nation’s Restaurant News.
“But some places just don’t
do it correctly.”
Vergé, who ran Le Moulin
for three decades, retired in
2003. His survivors include
his wife, three daughters and
three grandchildren.
[email protected]

DONATE YOUR CAR

Wheels For
Wishes

War casualties

Benefiting

TOTAL U.S. DEATHS*
In and around Iraq: 4,491
Afghanistan: 2,215
Other locations: 140

Make-A-Wish®
Greater Los Angeles

*Includes military and
Department of
Defense-employed civilian
personnel killed in action and
in nonhostile circumstances
as of Friday.

*Free Vehicle Pickup ANYWHERE
*We Accept All Vehicles Running or Not
*We Also Accept Boats, Motorcycles & RVs
*Fully Tax Deductible

Source: Department of Defense

WheelsForWishes.org

Call: (213) 465-3770

* Wheels For Wishes is a DBA of Car Donation Foundation.

ROBERT SHERWOOD MORS E , 192 4 - 2015

Dissident Episcopalian That’s Us. The Tall,
broke away from church Good-Looking Rate
On The Right.

By Steve Chawkins

R

Now you don’t have to move your money around to get the
best rate in town. Our Money Market rate stacks up as one
of the heftiest around.
MONEY MARKET RATE COMPARISON - % APY*
$100k

.70%
Source: Informa Research Services, Inc. as of 3/9/15

obert Sherwood
Morse, a dissident clergyman
who objected to
changes in traditional Episcopalian practice
and urged fellow religious
conservatives to leave a
mainstream he likened to
the Biblical “fleshpots of
Egypt,” has died. He was 91.
Morse, who helped found
and was selected as archbishop of what became
known as the Anglican Province of Christ the King, died
of pancreatic cancer May 28
at his home in Berkeley, according to Monty Stanford, a
spokesman for the San
Francisco-based organization.
Though small next to the
mainstream
Episcopal
Church of the USA, the province has 46 parishes across
the U.S., including 16 in California.
One of a number of
breakaway groups, it had its
roots in dissatisfaction expressed by Morse and other
clergymen over what they
saw as unsettling theological changes in the church to
which they had committed
themselves. In 1976, Morse
told The Times that a million congregants had left
Episcopalianism in the previous 10 years, upset by prospective revisions in the 1928
Book of Common Prayer
and the possibility of ordaining women as priests.
The church approved female priesthood at a Minneapolis conclave in September 1976. The following year,
Morse and other outraged
Episcopalian leaders gathered more than 1,700 followers in St. Louis to lay the
groundwork for a new
church.
In a fiery sermon titled
“The Long March into the
Desert,” Morse told the
group that the mainstream
church had “abandoned the
family and given its people
stones and scorpions in-

Anglican Province of Christ the King

RELIGIOUS CONSERVATIVE

Robert Sherwood Morse was selected as archbishop
of the Anglican Province of Christ the King.
stead of bread to strengthen
men’s hearts.”
“Our Church has been
stripped over the years, in
general convention following general convention, of
any and all moral standards
with which we can deal with
the gamut of modern moral
issues running from divorce
to demonology!”
Morse faced discipline in
ecclesiastical courts for his
opposition to women priests
— a position, he said in interviews, that did not reflect his
views on women’s rights.
“What
people
don’t
understand about the whole
concept of the ordination of
women is that it was never
a question of equality but of
theology,” he told Insight
magazine in 1992. “The notion has always been of Jesus
as the bridegroom and the
church as his bride. You simply cannot have Jesus as the
bride.”
Born April 10, 1924, in San
Francisco, Morse grew up in
the suburb of Burlingame
and served in the Army Signal Corps in World War II.
A graduate of Pacific College (now University of the
Pacific) in Stockton, he attended
Seabury-Western
Theological Seminary in
Chicago and was ordained a
priest in 1951.
As a student, he got to
know Alan Watts, an Episco-

pal priest who left the
church and later became a
popular author and lecturer
on Zen Buddhism.
In his1972 memoir, “In My
Own Way,” Watts praised
Morse for his “irrepressible
and perfectly unmalicious
humor” and described him
as “one of the few people
who genuinely believe that
God is exuberant love.”
Morse held posts at
churches in the Bay Area,
and established Episcopal
chaplaincies at both Stanford and UC Berkeley. He
also helped found the York
School, an Episcopal prep
school for boys in Monterey,
and from 1966 to 1984, was
rector of St. Peter’s Church
in Oakland.
He also established a
seminary in Berkeley and
rented rooms to members of
the university’s crew team.
Five weeks before his death,
he ceremonially poured
champagne over the team’s
new boat, which was named
in his honor.
Morse is survived by his
wife, Nancy Burkett Nickel,
whom he married in 1957;
children Nina Gladish and
John Nickel; nine grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.
steve.chawkins
@latimes.com
Twitter: @schawkins

.10%

.05%

.03%
Bank of
America

Chase

Citibank

.01%
Wells
Fargo

Logix

Say goodbye to short-term specials and enjoy the peace
of mind of steady returns. Learn more about all the ways
Logix is smarter banking.

Call Today!

(866) 775.5328
RTH
SWO
T
A
H
C
NCH
BRA EN!
OP
NOW

or visit www.lfcu.com

Logix Federal Credit Union, proudly serving members since 1937.
There’s a Logix Branch in Your Neighborhood
Burbank
(855) 564.4914

Chatsworth
(866) 740.5328

Golden Valley
(866) 786.5328

Newbury Park
(877) 944.5328

Palmdale
(855) 564.4915

Pasadena
(855) 564.4920

Simi-Cochran St
(888) 738.5328

Simi -Tapo Cyn
(877) 974.5328

Stevenson Ranch
(855) 564.4918

Thousand Oaks
(877) 964.5328

Valencia Bouquet Cyn
(855) 564.4919

Valencia Promenade
(855) 564.4917

Westlake Village
(866) 400.5328

Woodland Hills
(855) 564.4916

*Minimum balance required to earn 0.70% APY (Annual Percentage Yield) is $100,000. The APY is variable, is accurate as of 3/9/15,
and is subject to change after the account is opened. The Money Market Account is a tiered-rate account and rates on each balance
tier are currently: 0.35% APY thru $7,499.99; 0.40% APY thru $9,999.99; 0.45% APY thru $24,999.99; 0.50% APY thru $49,999.99;
and, 0.55% APY thru $99,999.99. Fees may reduce earnings. Logix membership and eligibility criteria apply.

Federally
Insured by NCUA

B8

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Accidental gunfire by deputies rises
[Guns, from B1]
with the amount of training
most agencies have, that a
gun that has so few tolerances for mistakes is the
best choice,” he said.

cidental discharges is training, Berns said. The LAPD
requires officers to pass six
firearms tests a year, including one with a shotgun and
one that simulates real-life
scenarios.
“It seems as if the sheriffs
are having a problem with
training,” Berns said. “What
you do subconsciously is a
matter of training.”

An adjustment

For two decades, L.A.
County sheriff ’s deputies
carried the Beretta 92F, a
heavy metal gun with a large
grip.
People with small hands
often have trouble flipping
up the Beretta’s safety as
they prepare to fire. The first
shot requires 12 to 15 pounds
of pressure on the trigger,
forcing some to use two fingers and reducing shooting
accuracy for many. Subsequent shots take about 4
pounds of pressure.
The M&P is made of
lightweight polymer, with a
hand grip that comes in
three sizes. Firing a round is
as simple as pulling the trigger with a consistent 6 to 8
pounds of pressure.
Sheriff ’s deputies have
the option of sticking with
the Beretta, and some have,
saying they are used to it.
But many who have switched to the M&P say their
shooting has improved.
“At first, I thought, ‘No
way, I’m keeping my Beretta
forever,’ ” said Sgt. Mike
Rafter, a firearms instructor.
“Then I started shooting,
and it’s a lot nicer. I can
shoot better, and I’m more
confident.”
Academy trainees began
receiving M&Ps in 2011 and
the rest of the department
began gradually switching
to the new gun soon after.
About half of sworn personnel are now using the M&P
and more are changing over.
As more deputies converted
to the M&P, accidental discharges rose.
In 2012, there were 12 accidental discharges, none involving the M&P. In 2013,
there were 18, eight of which
were M&Ps. Of the 30 incidents in 2014, 22 involved
M&Ps.
Assistant Sheriff Todd
Rogers attributed the increase to deputies still adjusting to the lack of a safety
on the new gun.
“The vast majority were
people trained on the Beretta,” Rogers said. “There
is a correlation, no doubt
about it.”
A Beretta spokesperson
did not return a phone call
seeking comment. A spokesperson for Smith & Wesson
said the company does not
speak publicly about the
weapons it supplies to law
enforcement.

Accidents on duty

Many of the accidental
M&P discharges in 2014 occurred while deputies were
on duty, often on the street
or in homes during searches.
In one December incident, a
sheriff ’s deputy in Compton
approached a car he
thought might have been
stolen. The occupants had

Better test results

Photographs by

M&P9. For two decades, deputies used the Beretta 92F. The department began converting to the M&P in 2011.
ments that the design of the
Glock made it too easy for a
small child to fire. A trial is
scheduled for October.

‘Training scars’

THE TRAINING version of the M&P in red. Unlike

the Beretta, the M&P has no safety lever.
already run off. As he walked
up with his M&P drawn to
make sure there was no one
else inside, he accidentally
pulled the trigger.
The bullet hit the driver’s
side door. There were bystanders nearby, but no one
was injured.
A month earlier, a Lancaster deputy was following
a driver he suspected of having a gun. When the man got
out and walked toward the
patrol car, the deputy took
off his seat belt and was pulling out his M&P when he
fired it into his own thigh. He
was the only person injured
that year, but in other cases,
civilians or other deputies
were nearby and could have
been hit.
In a Walnut-area house in
January 2014, a deputy accidentally fired a round into
the ceiling when a golf bag
fell on his hand. Another
deputy was in the room at
the time.
When a deputy tripped
over a stroller and fired a
round through a wall in October 2014, there was another
deputy nearby, with more
deputies and a civilian else-

where in the Huntington
Park house.
The NYPD custom-rigs
its handguns with a heavier
trigger pull to reduce the risk
of accidents. Prosecutors argue that rookie Officer Peter
Liang broke a key safety rule
by resting his finger on the
trigger of his Glock while patrolling a Brooklyn housing
project on Nov. 20. As Liang
pushed open a stairwell
door, he fired a bullet that fatally struck Akai Gurley, 28,
who was walking down the
stairs. Liang’s attorney has
said that his client shot the
gun accidentally.
Shortly after the LAPD
switched from Berettas to
Glocks a decade ago, Officer
Enrique Herrera Chavez
was shot in the back by his
3-year-old son. Chavez was
driving on July 10, 2006, when
the boy found his father’s
Glock under the vehicle’s
center console and discharged a round, rendering
Chavez a paraplegic.
Chavez’s lawsuit was dismissed in 2010, but an appeals court ruled that a jury
should hear many of the former police officer’s argu-

L.A. County sheriff ’s deputies learning to shoot the
Beretta were taught to rest a
finger on the trigger as soon
as they took aim. The mantra was “on target, on trigger.”
With M&Ps and Glocks,
the trigger finger should stay
on the side of the gun until
the last moment.
To combat the rise in accidental discharges, deputies are now required to pass
a marksmanship test four
times a year instead of three
and to take a course designed to break old Beretta
habits. Those who have accidentally discharged their
weapons are typically required to repeat training.
“We call them training
scars,” Rogers said. “It’s
muscle memory. And especially in stressful situations,
people revert to their training.”
Richard Fairburn, a firearms expert who works for
a law enforcement agency in
Illinois, called the M&P a
“more modern weapon” that
enables more officers to
shoot well. But, he said, the
lighter trigger pull and lack
of a safety could result in
more accidental discharges
if the new habits aren’t
drummed into deputies
through rigorous training.
“If you still have your finger on the trigger when you
put it in your holster, you’ll
end up with a stripe on your
leg,” Fairburn said.
The LAPD recently began issuing M&Ps after using Glocks since 2005, said
Lt. Dana Berns, who heads

Candidate’s accuser admits lie
[DeMaio, from B1]
by DeMaio.
Todd Bosnich, 29, pleaded guilty to a felony charge of
obstruction of justice by lying to the FBI about the
email.
During the campaign,
Bosnich had told reporters
that he was ’’positive” that
the email came from DeMaio
or someone close to him. He
told federal investigators
that DeMaio would often
send emails and Twitter
messages “using alias accounts.”
But in his guilty plea,
Bosnich admitted that he
sent the email himself
through a dummy Yahoo account and then took the
email to the Peters campaign, which turned it over
to the San Diego Police Department.
Bosnich’s actions “had
the potential to affect a national election,” said Assistant U.S. Atty. Phil Halpern.
“Mr. Bosnich, for whatever
reason, had a great deal of
hostility and personal animus toward Mr. DeMaio. As
a result of his feeling aggrieved, Bosnich wanted to
get back at Mr. DeMaio.”
A plea bargain signed by
Bosnich and federal prosecutors states that the email
was meant to support Bosnich’s
allegation
that
DeMaio had touched him inappropriately and masturbated in front of him.
Bosnich claimed he left
as the campaign’s policy director because of DeMaio’s
alleged sexual misconduct

Mark Boster Los Angeles Times

SGT. MARK BRANDRIFF , a firearms instructor for the Sheriff’s Department, fires a Smith & Wesson

‘As a result of his feeling aggrieved,
[Todd] Bosnich wanted to get back at
Mr. DeMaio.’
— Phil Halpern,

assistant U.S. attorney

and that DeMaio had offered
him $50,000 to keep quiet.
After the allegations were
made public, DeMaio said
Bosnich had been fired after
sending out an inaccurate
and plagiarized piece of
campaign
literature.
DeMaio denied any sexual
misconduct or offering to
buy Bosnich’s silence.
The federal investigation
that resulted in the obstruction of justice charge did not
involve
determining
whether the sexual allegations were factual.
Bosnich’s
attorney,
Frank Vecchione, said that
his client “is accepting responsibility and wants to
move on with his life.”
The race to represent the
52nd District, which includes a northern slice of
San Diego and the cities of
Poway and Coronado, was
costly and nasty.
Peters,
56,
stressed
DeMaio’s reputation for divisiveness and blasted him
as a tea party follower;
DeMaio said Peters was too
liberal for San Diego and
had proven ineffective in
Congress. Peters won by a
margin of 3.2%.
DeMaio, 40, who lost a

race for mayor in 2012, is now
a radio talk-show host in San
Diego. He is also attempting
to lead a statewide campaign in favor of reforming
pensions for public employees, his signature issue
while serving on the City
Council.
After Bosnich pleaded
guilty, DeMaio issued a
statement that said that
“Bosnich’s lies were incredibly painful, smeared my
reputation and derailed our
congressional campaign.... I
also want to thank the thousands of supporters who
stood by me and saw this disgusting smear for what it
was.”
Peters, DeMaio said,
“shares responsibility for
promoting Bosnich’s smears
and lies for political gain.”
In response, Peters said,
“Someone came to us alleging sexual harassment by
Mr. DeMaio; we took everything to the police and they
thanked us for it. [DeMaio]
was accused by two people
from his own operation. He’s
the one who needs to take
some responsibility.” Peters
was citing a second sexual
misconduct allegation by a
former staff member that

was made two days before
the election.
Bosnich could face a
maximum sentence of 20
years in prison and a
$250,000 fine when he is sentenced Aug. 31. As part of the
plea bargain, the U.S. attorney’s office has agreed not to
recommend that the judge
sentence Bosnich to prison.
Richard Grenell, media
advisor to the DeMaio campaign, criticized the media,
including the Los Angeles
Times and CNN, for reporting on the allegations:
“These same reporters
should now hold Team Peters accountable for their
dirty tricks or risk encouraging more ugly politics because a campaign gets away
with it.”
Carl Luna, political science professor at San Diego
Mesa College, called the incident “another tawdry chapter in San Diego politics.
Sometimes I think this town
is trying out for a recurring
role on ‘Scandal,’ ” the television series about hardball
politicking in Washington.
The Peters campaign
“tarnished itself by becoming part of the narrative for
unproven allegations,” Luna
said. But he doubted that
the allegations cost DeMaio
the election.
“In our polarized elections, it takes a lot more than
allegations and innuendo to
get someone not to vote for
their side,” he said.
[email protected]
Twitter: @LATSanDiego

the firearms and tactics section. The department did
not provide accidental discharge statistics in response
to requests by The Times.
But Berns said he did not believe the department had a
problem when officers made
the transition to the Glock,
and none is expected with
the M&P because it is similar to the Glock.
Unlike sheriff ’s deputies,
LAPD officers were trained
to carry the Beretta with the
safety off because flipping it
was cumbersome and could
result in the gun firing too
late, or not firing at all, in
dangerous situations.
The key to preventing ac-

The M&P appears to
have fulfilled its promise
on one front: More women
are making it into the department. The percentage
of female recruits who failed
the firearms test has
plunged from 6.4% to less
than 1%.
Pass rates are up across
the board, not just for women. With the Beretta, more
than 60% of trainees in one
academy class needed extra
firearms training. Ten out of
80 or so trainees in another
class flunked because of the
shooting test.
With the M&P, the class
with the worst shooting results sent only 17% of trainees to remediation, and only
three failed.
Susan Paolino, whose
1980 gender discrimination
lawsuit against the Sheriff ’s
Department resulted in a
landmark consent decree,
said female deputies should
be held to the same standards as men. But she supports new equipment that
can help them meet those
standards.
About 18% of sheriff ’s
deputies are women.
“If it’s something that’s
not going to let them lower
the standards, where they
still have to have the skill but
shoot better with a gun that
fits their hand, that’s great,”
Paolino said.
[email protected]

obituarY
notices

Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes

Blanco, Jack Martel

Gomez, maria Guadalupe

Jack M. Blanco, 70, passed away
June 9, 2015, in San Rafael, CA. Mass
of Christian Burial will be celebrated
at 11am on Monday, June 15th, at St.
Bruno Church, 15740 Citrustree Rd.,
Whittier, CA.
Jack was born March 13, 1945, in
Los Angeles, CA and raised in East LA.
In 1963, he graduated from El Rancho
High School, in Pico Rivera, CA. Jack
was POST certified as an LA County
Marshal.
Jack married Elizabeth Jeanne
Cedano on June 25, 1987, and his
family was his life. He is survived
by his wife, Elizabeth; children, Jack
Blanco, Lisa Lopez, Jeff Blanco, Lori
Gomes, Jacqueline Blanco, and Jacob
Blanco; 12 grandchildren; 2 greatgrandchildren; and 6 siblings.

Lupita, 67, was long time resident
and business owner in Bell, CA. After
a brave struggle with cancer, she
passed peacefully surrounded by the
love of her family. Her humble spirit,
unconditional love touched the lives
of all that knew her. She will always
be remembered as a blessing to her
community, family, and friends.

March 13, 1945 - June 9, 2015

ClanCy, Bernardine
lorraine

April 5, 1920 - June 6, 2015

“Binnie” Clancy, 95, died peacefully
after a life of care for others. Born in
Vancouver, Canada, she immigrated
to the US, and lived in New York, Los
Angeles, and then Santa Barbara.
A faithful Catholic and active in the
Republican Party, she is survived by
sisters Eileen Clancy and Josephine
“Dody” Seyer, and many nephews and
nieces who will miss her dearly.
Funeral mass and burial on June 18,
at 9:30 a.m., at Holy Cross Cemetery in
Culver City. Memorial contributions can
be sent to Our Savior Parish/USC Caruso
Catholic Center, 844 W. Thirty Second
St., Los Angeles, CA 90007.

Freedman, marshall S.

September 1, 1940 - June 3, 2015

Resident of Corona Del Mar, CA;
attorney and real estate investor,
passed away on June 3, 2015 after a
long illness. Marshall was beloved by
all due to his kindness, generosity, and
open heart.
Celebration of Life shall be on Friday,
June 19, 2015 from 3 PM to 5 PM in the
Garden Room of the Marriott Hotel Fashion Island (Newport Beach).

To place
an obituary ad
please go
online to:

April 27, 1948 - June 10, 2015

Goth, JoAnn

June 13, 1931 - May 7, 2015

JoAnn Goth, born June
13, 1931 in Portland, OR.
She died at home May
7, 2015. She graduated
from Punahou High School, HI then
Marlhurst Catholic Girls College near
Portland. She married William Goth on
March 2,1957 and had four children.
They lived in La Cañada-Flintridge
for 18 years then moved to Camarillo
in 1982. In addition to her husband
and four children, JoAnn leaves 5
grandchildren.

Halloran, Catherine
1927 - May 24, 2015

Catherine
Halloran
passed away in Arcadia on
May 24, 2015. Catherine
was preceded in death
by her loving husband, William, and
her brother Patrick. She is survived by
her 10 children and 15 grandchildren.
Catherine is also survived by her sisters
Eileen and Babe as well as numerous
nieces and nephews.
Catherine was born in Ireland in
1927. She was a beautiful Irish rose
who stole the heart of everyone she
met, especially our Dad when he first
saw her big blue eyes and wonderful
soul. She was an engaging and
captivating conversationalist, and she
treated everyone she met with respect
and kindness. She had tremendous
warmth, kindness, and deep faith.
She became a nurse in her late
teens. She was an incredibly talented
and respected nurse and mid-wife.
As an operating room nurse, she
worked side by side with the world’s
most prominent heart surgeons of
the time, Dr. DeBakey and Dr. Cooley.
She was devoted to her patients for 10
years and then turned that devotion
into her growing family. Catherine
was very adventurous and enjoyed
traveling to different parts of the world
with her husband. Her children and
grandchildren were her life’s work and
her supreme accomplishment.
Mom, enjoy your reunion with Dad.
You are in our hearts now and always.

latimes.com/placeobituary

Hsu, Gretchen Chi

February 3, 1933 - May 29, 2015

or call
1-800-234-4444

Beloved wife of Robert Y. Hsu passed
away on the evening of May 29th in
Thousand Oaks, California. She is
survived by her husband Robert, and
two sons David and Hanson.
Memorial service to be held at Pierce
Brothers Griffin Chapel at 101 Wilbur
Road, Thousand Oaks, California 91360
on June 27th at 2:00 PM.

L AT I M ES . C O M

S

obituary NotiCES
Mahler, emily

Sandra Steele Fastnow, Sandi to her
friends, Bam to her beloved grandkids,
and Sunshine to generations of local
Girl Scouts, passed peacefully away on
June 11, 2015.
Sandra Marie Steele was born in
1940 to Horace and Evelyn Steele of
Long Beach, CA. She attended Pomona
College where she met her husband
to be, Jeff Fastnow, over a dissected
frog in Biology. Sandi withdrew from
college to marry Jeff in 1960. Sandi
returned to Pomona to finish her
Bachelor of Science degree in 1990,
and continued studying, graduating
in 1996 with a Masters of Science
in Botany from Claremont Graduate
School.
Sandi spent much of her adult
life raising her four daughters, and
was very involved in the Girl Scout
organization. She served as troop
leader for her girls, Service Unit
Chairman for thousands of San Marino
Scouts, and in many other capacities.
She was awarded numerous Volunteer
Recognition awards, including the
Thanks Badge, the “highest award an
adult Girl Scout Volunteer can earn”
in 2005 and the Thanks II Badge in
2007 for her lifelong devotion to Girl
Scouting. “Sunshine” loved SongFests
and SongShares and remained active
in Scouting until illness prevented her.
Sandi was also active in San Marino
schools, supported IORG (Rainbow
Girls) and was a member of Las
Marianas auxiliary of the Assistance
League of Pasadena. She worked
as manager of Treasure Fair Thrift
Shop for several years and also at
PARAID, precursor to the Pasadena
Community Fund. She enjoyed many
creative hobbies, including sewing,
gardening and quilting, and cared for
a menagerie of animals over the years.
Her most notable contribution to
her community was her caretaking of
the San Marino Girl Scout House, with
her dear friend and mentor, Sylvia
Wikle. Under their leadership, the
Hill-Harbison House (re-named for
its 1930s founders) was incorporated
into a non-profit, retrofitted to meet
current codes and will serve the
community for decades to come. The
main meeting room was dedicated
as the Fastnow Room in her honor. In
2001, Sandi and Sylvia were honored
as Paul Harris Fellows by the Rotary
Club of San Marino, in recognition of
their “outstanding commitment to
the community” for their efforts at
Hill-Harbison House.
Sandi and Jeff found a retreat in
Lake Arrowhead in 1979. There they
created a warm, welcoming home for
family and friends for the last 35 years.
“There’s Always Room for One More” is
the guiding principle of the cabin. Our
annual Thanksgiving weekends with
our growing families are some of our
most cherished memories.
Sandi is survived by her devoted
husband of over 54 years, Jeff,
daughters Kathi Fastnow-Dirkse
(Mark), Beth DuVall, Peggy Chase
(Brent), Chris Fastnow (Greg Adams)
and grandchildren Wyatt and Claire
DuVall, Lindsey and Holly Chase,
Elizabeth and Cammie Dirkse, and
Miles and Quinn Fastnow. Also, brother
Stan Steele, sister-in-law Janet and
their family, and nephew Brien Cook
and family. We will profoundly miss
her generosity of spirit, wisdom and
boundless love, all of which she shared
with us unsparingly.
We would like to thank the staff at
Villa Gardens for their outstanding care
for the past five years. A memorial
to Sandi will be held Saturday, June
20, 2015 at 1:30 PM at San Marino
Congregational Church with a
reception following at Hill-Harbison
House (1841 Alhambra Rd, San
Marino.) In lieu of flowers, a donation
to the Hill-Harbison Foundation (2275
Huntington Dr. PMB 807, San Marino
CA 91108) or your favorite charity
benefitting children or animals is
suggested.

Emily Ortega Mahler, of Brea,
California, formerly of Huntington Park
and Los Angeles, CA, died peacefully in
her sleep on June 3, 2015. Born June
27, 1927, she is predeceased by her
parents Emilio C. and Mary Magdalene
(Bustamante) Ortega of Huntington
Park, CA and her late husband of 56
years, Robert A. Mahler of Los Angeles,
CA. Emily is survived by her sister
Evelyn (Ortega) Sheppard of Placentia,
CA; son Robert Mahler of Moscow, ID;
son Blake Mahler of Rancho Santa
Margarita, CA; son Lance (Kerry)
Mahler of La Habra, CA; daughter
Vicke (Tom) Helmer of Greenwood
Village, CO; six grandchildren; and
three great-grandchildren. Emily went
to St. Matthias elementary school in
Huntington Park and to Huntington
Park High School. She graduated from
the University of Southern California
in 1949. After completing her degree
and while Bob was in the service she
taught school in small California towns
including Maricopa and Susanville.
Later she taught in several junior
high and high schools in the Los
Angeles School District. After many
years in the classroom her energies
were spent raising four children that
included involvement in supporting
organizations such as the PTA, Boy
Scouts and Girl Scouts. As her children
matured she changed emphasis and
became a professional volunteer. Emily
was especially proud of being a Trojan
(USC). She always supported her alma
mater. She was a charter member of
Trojan Guild, an important support
group for USC, and served on many
committees within the University.
She has been a USC football season
ticket holder since 1967. She will
miss tail-gating, traveling to South
Bend for the great rivalry between
USC and Notre Dame, and going to
all of the home football games at the
Coliseum. She is especially proud that
two of her children, Vicke and Blake
are USC graduates along with her
son-in-law Tom. Over the past 20+
years she has volunteered one day a
week at the USC Norris Cancer Center.
Many of her best friends were met
either in school at USC or at events that
supported the institution. Emily was
a professional volunteer and always
a member of “something.” The more
important “somethings” included
the Mother Goose Guild support
organization to Children’s Hospital
of Orange County (CHOC), several
chapters of the American Association
of University Women (AAUW), and
Friends of California State University,
Fullerton. Over the years she received
dozens of awards for her efforts. In
1984 she received Brea’s first “Woman
of the Year” award. Emily and her
husband Bob were world travelers.
They were able to visit all seven
continents. She took tens of thousands
of pictures to document her travels.
Some of her favorite trips took her
China, Antarctica, safaris in Africa, the
Andes of South America and to Spain.
Her last trip in 2014 was a Panama
Canal cruise. Emily was always proud
of her California family history. The
Ortega’s, originally from northern
Spain, have been in California for
eight generations. Her great, great,
great grandfather discovered San
Francisco Bay as a scout for the Portola
Expedition. She had relatives who are
buried at 17 of California’s 21 missions.
The Ortega Highway in Orange County
is named for her family and her father,
Emilio, founded the California-based
Ortega Chili Company in the 1920’s.
Many of those original products
including Snap-E-Tom and canned
green chilies are still on the market
today. In college she wrote a history
of this distinguished family. Being
a catholic was always an important
part of Emily’s identity. After marrying
Bob she became a parishioner of St.
Raphael’s in south-central Los Angeles
where her children attended school. In
addition to being active at St. Raphael
she served as the school’s kindergarten
teacher twice. She was a member of St.
Angela Merici parish in Brea, California
for the last 48 years. Her faith has
allowed her to look forward to again
seeing her husband Bob, parents
Emilio and Mary, nephew Michael and
many good friends who left before her
on the other side of life, as we know
it. Emily’s life will be celebrated with
a funeral mass on Tuesday June 16th
at St. Angela Merici Catholic Church in
Brea, California at 11:00 am. A rosary
will precede this service at 10:30 am.
Any inquiries about Emily should be
addressed to her oldest son, Robert, at
[email protected]

October 29, 1940 - June 11, 2015

Imamura, Hideo

IMAMURA, Hideo (89) a Ventura,
California-born Nisei resident of Los
Angeles and former internee of Tule
Lake Relocation Camp, who proudly
served his country in the United
States Army during WWII, passed
away peacefully on April 27, 2015. A
longtime employee of the historic
Southern California Flower Market, he
acted in numerous films and television
shows. Mr. Imamura was predeceased
by his beloved wife, Takako “Taxie”;
daughter, Marise “Cookie”; parents,
Masao and Suya Imamura; and
brother, Masatoshi. He is survived by
nieces, nephews and their families,
and is greatly missed. A private
Service of Committal was held June
1 at Ivy Lawn Cemetery in Ventura.
Remembrances may be made to the
charity of your choice.
www.fukuimortuary.com
(213) 626-0441

Loomis, Debra Jan

July 9, 1953 - March 24, 2015

After a life of creativity, deep
friendships and laughter, Debra Loomis
died peacefully on March 24, 2015, in
her Middletown, CA, home with her
beloved husband Davis and daughter
Zoe, by her side. Born in Tarrytown, NY,
Debra co-founded the adventure travel
company Journeys East with husband
Davis in 1985, leading small group
backcountry trips to Japan for the next
27 years. To read Debra’s full story, go
to http://www.debrajloomis.com

Share a
memory
To sign a guest book
please go to
latimes.com/guestbooks

LoveLace, capt. Paul
chaffee , USN (ret.)

June 18, 1915 - May 27, 2015

Last of the great
Southern gentlemen,
Paul was born in Marion,
Alabama (just 16
miles from Selma) to Ruby and Paul
Lovelace. He won an appointment
to the United State Naval Academy
graduating in the class of 1938 at the
beginning of World War II.
Paul served on ships on both
coasts until entering Naval Aviation
in 1944. He commanded a Carrier
Attack Squadron of Torpedo planes
till 1950, moving to jet fighters flying
off Japan, Korea, and Taiwan. From
1958 he worked on Atomic Weapons
plans for the US Pacific Fleet, retiring
in 1962 after 28 years in the Navy to
earn his MBA at George Washington
University. At Northrop Corporation he
continued with air-to-ground missile
development till leaving to gain his
certifications in real estate, mutual
and stock funds and taxes.
In 1949 Paul married Ann
Blake Graves of Spokane. Her first
husband had been killed in the war
so Paul and Ann raised her son Bruce
who served as a Marine Captain in
Vietnam. Working in real estate for
23 years with properties in several
states, they settled in their Westwood
home apartment cooperative in 1972
where Paul became Chairman and
President of the Wilshire Ardmore
Corp. overseeing a full sellout and
revitalizing operations. He continued
to serve 15 more years on the Board.
Paul and Ann enjoyed travels to Italy,
he joined the early PLATO Society of
UCLA, and took up golfing.
Paul’s main church was
Brentwood Presbyterian where he
taught 6th grade Sunday School
(an “experience!”), and served as
Elder, Deacon, Usher, education
Superintendent over 44 years. His
passion was Judaic, Christian and
Islamic Studies with both the San
Francisco Theological Seminary and
the UCLA Academy.
In 2003 their son Bruce died and
Ann died the next year after 55 years
of marriage. Recuperating from these
serious losses Paul met Zenaida Luna in
2005 and they married in 2013 adding
immense joy to Paul’s ninth decade.
He was famous for baking brownies
as a gift to friends, staff, taxi and bus
drivers, waiters... He died just 3 weeks
before a planned gala on his 100th
Birthday where he had planned to sing
a duet with his wife Zenny.
He is survived by his nephews
Charlie and Paul W. Lovelace of GA
and AL, niece Sheard McCulley and
grand nephew Mason McCulley of CA,
Charles Howard of CA and his parents
and many many friends and admirers.
Inurnment at Holy Cross Cemetery
11AM June 18th, Memorial at
Brentwood Presbyterian Church 2PM
June 20th. In lieu of flowers donations
may be made to Boys and Girls Clubs of
Los Angeles.

PINTARELLI, JR., JOHN C

Self, James Marion

SunSeri, Steve A.

John C Pintarelli, Jr died at home
on June12, 2015. He is survived by 7
sisters and 3 brothers. A Memorial will
be held on June 17, 2015 at 3:30 PM
at the Brookside Golf Clubhouse, 1133
Rosemont Ave. Pasadena. CA 91103.
In lieu of flowers please donate
to the Convalescent Aid Society of
Pasadena; 3255 E. Foothill Blvd.,
Pasadena, CA 91107.

James M. Self, 78, of La Crescenta, CA
passed away at his residence from lung
cancer. Jim, also known as Sonny, was
born August 9, 1936 in Blountsville, AL
to the late Ralph and Willie Mae Self.
After joining the Marine Corps while
still a teen, and serving his country
during the Korean War, he moved
permanently to California. While
attending college in the late ‘50s, he
met and married Barbara Self (Cline)
and they raised their two daughters
in the Echo Park/Silverlake area. In
the mid ‘80s he married Nancie Self
(Tom) and they moved to their ranch in
Mendocino County (Piercy, CA) where
they lived for many years. He leaves
behind his loving daughters, Lori Vella,
Shari Cimmarusti, and Leanne Muleiro
and 5 grandsons, all of California. He
was preceded in death by his brother,
Terry Self. He is also survived by
his beloved sister, Mrs. David Blaich
(Mary), of Cottonwood, Alabama and
former wives Barbara Self-Lewis and
Nancie Self. A memorial will be held at
a later date. Semper Fi.

A much-loved husband, father,
grandfather, son, and brother, Steve
Anthony Sunseri, of North Hills,
CA, passed away at Grand Valley
Health Care Center in Van Nuys at
7:32 AM while under hospice care
for Alzheimer’s disease. He was
surrounded by family members and
caregivers throughout the night and
morning of his passing.
Steve was born in San Jose, CA
on Nov. 15, 1929. Raised by parents
Mariano and Anna Sunseri, he
attended San Jose Tech High School
before moving to Los Angeles. On Jan.
20, 1951, he married his beautiful wife
Ester Dorcas Carr in Los Angeles, CA.
Steve and Esther were married until
the passing of Esther on Sep. 21, 2005.
Steve worked hard, providing for his
family as a salesman during his 20s and
30s and then as a painting contractor
thereafter until his retirement. Steve
enjoyed spending time with family
and friends. He was also a scout master
for the Boy Scouts of America when his
sons were young.
Steve leaves his sons Steve, Donald,
Dennis, and Robert; sister Mary
Ann Moore and brother Salvador;
daughters-in-law Debbie, Bethann,
and Sharon; son-in-law Robert
Moon; brother-in-law Ralph Moore;
sister-in-law Yolanda; 7 grandchildren;
2 great-grandchildren; caregivers
Amy Concepcion, Fernando Delacruz,
Josefina Barrados; and many close
friends.
There will be a service and scattering
of Steve’s ashes at sea by the Neptune
Society on July 18, 2015 for close
friends and family.

Quinn, Susan Agnes Taylor
January 31, 1943 - March 22, 2015

Beloved mother and grandmother
Susan “Suzie” Taylor Quinn, formerly
Susan Edelson of Arcadia, CA, passed
away in Dover, DE surrounded by her
family. A registered nurse, Susan also
had a masters in family counseling
from Cal State LA. She is survived by
five children and two grandchildren.
Funeral mass on June 19, 10 am at
St. Bede the Venerable, La Canada
Flintridge. Memorial contributions
can be sent to the Myasthenia Gravis
Foundation, 355 Lexington Avenue,
15th Floor New York, New York 10017
or www.myasthenia.org.

RichteR, Judy e.

September 13, 1938 - June 7, 2015

Judith E. Bowlan was born to Ruth
and Woods Bowlan in Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma. At the age of two she
moved with her family to Alhambra
and later to South San Gabriel where
she grew up. She graduated from
Mark Keppel High School in 1956.
Following graduation from Mount
SAC she worked at JPL where she
met and married her husband Hans
and was his loving and loyal wife and
partner for 53 years. After being a
homemaker and raising her son and
daughter she worked for 23 years
at Person’s pharmacy in Glendale.
During her school-mom years she
was active in the Cubs, Brownies,
and school activities. Judy travelled
with her husband on car trips, cruises
and tours, and visited many parts
of the US and the world. She is
survived by her husband, son Dan
Richter and daughter Elise Langdon,
son-in-law Jeff Langdon, grandsons
Hayden, Colin and Morgan Richter
and granddaughters Ashley and Taylor
Langdon. She is also survived by her
sister Ruth McCord and brother Max
Bowlan.
Judy is remembered for her
radiant smile, infectious laugh,
happy personality, enthusiasm and
love of people. She doted on her
grandchildren and was intensely
interested in their sports, education
and life activities. She was an active
bowler and participated in several
bowling leagues and tournaments.
She loved flowers particularly roses,
phalaenopsis and cymbidiums. She
loved sports and was a dedicated fan
of the Angels and Bruins.
May she forever rest in peace.

Schellkopf, John Darrell

Mills, edith

November 29, 1916 - June 10, 2015

Beloved mother of Nancy Dias;
Great Grandmother to Nathan and
Camilla; Grandmother to Matthew
and Lisa Diaz and Lori Ferm. Loving
wife to Irving and brother Carl Kent.
She will be missed greatly! In lieu of
flowers, get dressed up and go out and
celebrate in her memory. We love you
Grandma Edie!

John Darrell Schellkopf. Born
November 27, 1934 and passed away
June 5, 2015. John was a long time
resident of Pacific Palisades and was
a professor at LA City College for over
30 years. He is survived by his wife
Nancy. A memorial service will be
held on July 1st at 11:00 AM at the
Pacific Palisades Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints 575 Los Liones Dr,
Pacific Palisades, 90272.

Sylvia S. Plotkin
September 10, 1922 - May 29, 2015
Our beautiful, loving Mother was laid to rest
beside the love of her life, Bernard Plotkin, on
Sunday, May 31st. Sylvia was mother to Tim Plotkin
(Diana), Tom Plotkin (Alyse) and Carol Jacobson.
Grandmother to Stacey Susser (Ron), Marcey
Utter (Duke), Andrea Kuehnert (Shel), Meredith
Plotkin, Jennifer Baker (Trevor), Lauren Plotkin,
and Erin Plotkin. Great-grandmother to Kyle, Ben,
Devyn, Cameron, Ryan, Brayden, Corynn, Arden,
and Haven.

latimes.com/placeobituary

or call
1-800-234-4444

schweitzer iii, conrad
August 11, 1928 - June 1, 2015

Conrad Schweitzer III, passed
peacefully at home on June 1, 2015,
in Newport Beach, California, at the
age of 86.
A native Californian, Conrad was
born in Beverly Hills, on August 11,
1928. He graduated from Beverly Hills
High School. He kept in close contact
with friends from Beverly Hills High,
his Vintage Group Friends.
After high school, in 1948, he
enlisted in the United States Marine
Corps and proudly served two tours of
duty, including active duty during the
Korean War. Forever proud of serving
his country, Con was discharged, with
the rank of Sergeant, in 1954.
Between tours of duty, Con attended
Pasadena College, where he played
football. He completed his education
on the GI Bill at the University of
Southern California, graduating in
1954, with a degree in Business. While
at USC he affiliated with the Phi Kappa
Psi Fraternity and Skull and Dagger, a
men’s honor society.
During his time at USC, he met Diane
on a blind date. They were married
in Pasadena in 1954. Last August
they joyously celebrated their 60th
wedding anniversary with family and
friends.
The Pulp and Paper industry was
where Con spent his entire career, first
with International Paper Company and
then with Georgia Pacific Corporation.
Con began his employment with
G.P. in 1961 as a Sales Manager in
Olympia, Washington. In 1963, he was
promoted and transferred to Southern
California and the family settled in
Newport Beach. When the company
moved their headquarters to Atlanta,
Georgia, he and Diane moved as well.
He retired from G.P. in 1989, as the
Executive Vice President of the Pulp
and Paper Division, which included
responsibility for International Sales.
He was grateful for the worldwide
friends and associates with whom he
worked throughout his career.
Following his retirement, he and
Diane moved back to Newport Beach
where he was active with USC alumni
groups, and was an enthusiastic
supporter of USC athletics including
the Scholarship Club. Con and Diane
loved to travel and were fortunate to
travel to many parts of the world.
Con was a generous, big-hearted
man who believed strongly in
giving back and helping others in
need. Con served on the Orange
County YMCA Board of Directors, and
was Past President, USC Associated
Alumni Clubs, Past President, St. Mark
Church Board of Trustees, Chairman,
USC Athletic Department Board of
Counselors, and Board of Directors, The
Newport Sports Museum.
Con was happiest when surrounded
by friends and family. He was known
as the planner and organizer of many
gatherings, celebrations and trips
with his family and good friends. He
is lovingly survived by his wife Diane
Schweitzer, nee Shank, and their
three children, Karen Sidney (Mike),
Kathy Lee (Bill), and David Schweitzer
(Renee), four grandchildren, Michael
and John Lee and Tanna and Beau
Schweitzer, and brother David
Schweitzer (Patsy).
A celebration of Con’s life is planned
for June 20th in the Newport Beach
area.
In lieu of flowers, contributions in
Con’s memory maybe made to USC
Swim with Mike which supports
the Physically Challenged Athletes
Scholarship fund. Send to:
Swim with Mike
C/O Ron Orr
USC Heritage Hall
3501 Watt Way
LA, CA 90089-0602

Steinhardt, raymond

August 29, 1930-May 31, 2015.
Born in Brooklyn, New York, Raymond
entered West Point upon graduation
from high school. Raymond served
in the Korean War between 1952 and
1954, and he retired with the rank
of Major to settle in California. He
completedgraduatestudiesatStanford
University, was a clothing model,
successful businessman, and served
in the Los Angeles County Assessor’s
Office before retiring in Hollywood
Hills with his wife, Juanita Fleur
Walton Steinhardt. He was preceded
in death by his father Samuel, mother
Leonora, brother Charles, sister Emily
Steinhardt Waxberg, and wife Fleur.
Raymond and Fleur were married 43
years. Fleur passed away on March
15, 2010. A victim of Parkinson’s
Disease, Raymond suffered severe
memory loss and became a ward of
the Los Angeles Superior Court with his
nephew/son of sister Emily, Dr.Ronald
D. Kelton appointed as Conservator.
Raymond lived in the Hollywood
Kingsley Manor until the time came
for relocation for more restricted care
at the Belmont Village in Burbank.
Raymond is survived by his nieces
and nephews: Alice Steinhardt, Paul
Joseph Steinhardt, Nancy Steinhardt,
Charles Sidney Steinhardt, and Ronald
Kelton. Raymond and Fleur will be
joined to rest together in Riverside
National Cemetery. Honor ceremonies
are schedule for 1:00 on June 19, 2015.

November 15, 1929 - June 10, 2015

Yamada, Henry Takashi

Age 93 passed away on May 15,
2015. He was beloved husband of
Emiko Kato Yamada; father of Merilynn
& Ron (Emiko) Yamada; grandfather of
Donji T. Yamada-Dessert & J.T. Yamada;
brother of Jean Tomiko Urushima;
brother-in-law of Akiko Kato. He is also
survived by many nieces, nephews and
other relatives.
Memorial services will be held
on Saturday, June 27, 11:00 AM at
Centenary United Methodist Church,
300 S. Central Ave, Los Angeles, CA
90013.
www.fukuimortuary.com
(213) 626-0441

In Memoriam

Jonathan Christopher Theis
December 6, 1981 - June 14, 2013

We Miss You

Cemetery Lots/Crypts

To place
an obituary ad
please go
online to:

Pacific View N.B.1-4 plots
Bay View Terr. nr. John Wayne
Ocn.vw. w/Catalina, Palos Verdes
Ngtiable; blw.mrkt $;949-387-0149
Companion Lawn Crypt - Forest
Lawn, Hollywood Hills, Tenderness
Section - $9000 (cost $11,500 new)
- 310-451-5392
Green Hills Memorial Park, Rancho
Palos Verdes -Two side by side $7,500
each. Memory Lawn; Plot 517. Contact
(714)891-5026

latimes.com/placeobituary

Cremation Services

or call
1-800-234-4444

Total $620
$619 • Free Literature
Total
Literature
Los Angeles
Angeles
Los
#FD 380

1-800-286-6789

Share a
memory
To sign a guest book
please go to
latimes.com/guestbooks

March 2, 1922 - May 22, 2015

March 3, 1924 - May 31, 2015

To place
an obituary ad
please go online to:

August 9, 1936 - June 6, 2015

Ingrid Mitchell

McFall, Barbara Sheedy
Barbara had a long accomplished
life. She graduated Beverly Hills High
School and UCLA, where she was a
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Her
sorority sisters became her lifelong
friends. Her intellect, wit and sense of
humor were enjoyed by all.
Barbara was a devoted elementary
school teacher, licensed interior
designer, accomplished cook, avid
bridge player and loyal to family and
friends.
She was predeceased by her
parents, Grace “Dolly” and Frank
Sheedy, sister Elizabeth Sheedy
Doheny, husbands Joe Luder and
Robert McFall. She is survived by her
son John Luder (Nancy), daughter
Amy, granddaughters Elizabeth,
Emily and Hailey, and stepson David
McFall (Wanda), their children and
grandchildren. She is dearly missed.

B9

Place a paid Notice: latimes.com/placeobituary
Search obituary notice archives: legacy.com/obituaries/latimes

August 8, 1947 - June 12, 2015

Fastnow, sandra steele

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

Kenneth A Tye
June 23, 1930 - June 7, 2015
Professor
Orange, CA

Emeritus,

Chapman

University,

Lifelong educator Ken Tye (EdD 1968, UCLA)
began his career teaching in the San Diego
County schools and for the Dept of Defense
schools in Germany, and ended as Professor of
Education at Chapman University (1984-1993).
He was nationally and internationally known for his
work in educational leadership and organization
development; comparative education; and K-12
global education. From 1970-80, he was Program
Director of John Goodlad’s seminal research
project, A Study of Schooling.
A prolific writer, Professor Tye was author, coauthor, or editor of seven books and scores of
professional articles. He also gained statewide and
national recognition in 2013 with the publication of
his first novel, At the Point of the Bay, set in the
Suisun Bay community of Port Chicago, where he
grew up.
There will be no memorial service. Ken asked
that his friends raise a glass of wine to a life well
and happily lived. For those who wish to do so,
donations may be made to the Ken and Barbara
Tye International Student Travel Fund, College of
Educational Studies, Chapman University: Please
contact (714)628-2740 for information.

To place an obituary ad please go online to:

latimes.com/placeobituary

Ingrid Vallo Mitchell was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota raised by
her mother Barbara who immigrated from Norway.
The former Miss Minnesota just celebrated her 71st wedding
anniversary with her husband Paul. Theirs was a storybook marriage.
Paul wants everyone to know how much he loves Ingrid. The couple met on a
lake in Minnesota and were both students of University of Minnesota. Paul was
an All American football player and captain of the team and Ingrid became one
of the first female cheerleaders at UM.
Ingrid went to New York and signed with the John Powers model agency and
became a pin up girl overnight after her pictures appeared in Newsweek in 1942.
In response to scores of requests from servicemen, the New York newspaper PM
reprinted the pictures of Ingrid. The Minneapolis Star Journal and Tribune did a
follow up story of Ingrid with even more pictures.
Ingrid traveled with Paul around the states during his 8 years playing pro
football for the New York Yankees, the Yanks, the LA Dons and the Washington
Redskins. After football.. Paul worked for many years with the Garrett corporation
as their Vice President. Ingrid enjoyed raising three children in the Palos Verdes
area.
She was involved in a variety of organizations. She was on the board of
Vesterheim Museum and the Scandinavian Art foundation. She was a member
of the National Charity League and part of the Blue Ribbon Committee of the
music center and the founder of the Pet Protectors league.
For many years Ingrid shared her beautiful flowers and orchids while working
on the flower committee at her Christian Science church.
Paul and Ingrid enjoyed getting back to Minnesota when Paul was honored
as a member of the University’s Hall of Fame and Ingrid received an honorary
Varsity letter.
Ingrid was very proud of her Norwegian Heritage and sponsored several
bronze busts of the late King Olav V of Norway. She and Paul donated one
to Concordia College in Moorhead, MN and another to Vesterheim NorwegianAmerican museum in Decorah, Iowa.
They were honored to have met the King several times including a private
audience with him in Norway.
Ingrid and Paul had the pleasure of meeting several presidents including
President Reagan, President Bush and President Clinton.
Ingrid is survived by her 94 year old husband Paul, her sons Paul Jr. and Eric.
Her daughter and son in law Heidi and Dan Springer of the Seattle area. Five
grandchildren Matt Battcheldor, Erika Springer, Britta Springer, Katrina Springer
and Mitchell Springer. Her niece Lisa Verlo and great nephew Turner. Her
Norwegian relatives, Austri Hatlehol and Birgit Hatlehol and Chris Verlo. Also,
Melanie Eardley Browoleit, Dr. Ulrika Skansen Saphir, and Lisa Wilson.

B10

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I ME S . CO M

Today in Southern California

Today in North America

5-day forecasts

Pressure:

Afternoon clearing: Widespread morning low clouds and fog will clear for afternoon sun in most places.
The marine layer will shrink in coming days as high pressure builds, leading to a warming trend,
especially inland. Tuesday and Wednesday will be the warmest days. But a developing marine
inversion is likely to maintain a “June gloom” pattern at the immediate coast through midweek.

High/low temperatures are average forecasts for entire zone.

Today

L.A. Basin
78/62

Valleys
83/62

Low clouds, then sun
Clearing
80/63
Monday
Mostly sunny 83/65
Tuesday
Wednesday Mostly sunny 83/63
Thursday Mostly sunny 81/63

Los Angeles Basin:
Morning low clouds at the
beaches and in the inland
valleys, then clearing to
afternoon sun.
Valleys/canyons: Morning
low clouds, then mostly
sunny this afternoon.
Mostly clear early tonight,
then low clouds late.

Air quality

Mostly sunny
Turning sunny
Sunny, warm
Mostly sunny
Mostly sunny

Beaches
70/60

Gradual clearing
Afternoon sun 72/61
Mostly sunny 77/62
Mostly sunny 77/62
Mostly sunny 75/62

85/63
87/63
85/62
83/62

Orange County: Low clouds
and a chance of drizzle,
clearing to mostly sunny
skies. Coastal low clouds
return tonight.
Ventura/Santa Barbara:
Morning coastal clouds,
then mostly sunny this
afternoon. Low clouds
return later tonight.

Good

Moderate

Mountains
77/47
Mostly sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny
Sunny

San Diego County: Low
clouds will clear gradually,
especially at the beaches.
Then it will be mostly sunny
and mild.
Local mountains: Sun and
clouds. Mostly clear tonight
and mild on Monday.
High desert: Sunny and hot
this afternoon. Clear and

Unhealthful for:

Sensitive people

Temps

Deserts
108/79

–0

High



Warm Front

Cold Front

0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100+

mild tonight. Sunny and hot
Monday.
Low desert: Partly cloudy
and hot. Mostly clear and
mild tonight. Hot and sunny
Monday.
San Francisco Bay Area:
Low clouds and fog, then
sun. Clear early, then
clouds later tonight.
All

H

Low

Jet Stream

Rain T-storm Snow Ice

Seattle
79/55

Los Angeles
78/62

New York
82/67

Chicago
79/67

Denver
80/55
Las Vegas
105/81

Houston
85/74

Not Available

Miami
89/79

South Coast Air Quality Management District forecasts air quality

SANTA
BARBARA CO.

Santa Clarita
Hesperia
85/62
Santa Paula
LOS ANGELES CO.
99/66
76/59
Santa
Simi Valley
Barbara
Chatsworth
SAN BERNARDINO CO.
Burbank Monrovia
79/61
69/56
81/61
Camarillo
Ventura
83/62
84/62
72/59
69/60
Yucca Valley
Pomona/
UCLA
107/65
Fairplex
Oxnard
San Bernardino
Westlake
Ontario
71/61 LA Downtown 85/62
69/59
Woodland
91/59
78/62
Village
88/63
Hills
Whittier
Santa Barbara Co.
74/60
Chino
92/62
Height
Period
Direction
Santa Monica Hills
Riverside
89/61
RIVERSIDE CO.
Fullerton
81/63
1-2’
13 sec SW
70/60
91/61
81/64
Torrance
Santa Ana
Ventura Co.
75/62
ORANGE CO.
Palm
Hemet
Long
Height
Period
Direction
75/64
Springs
90/61
Irvine
Beach Newport
1-3’
13 sec SW
70/62
108/79
76/63 Beach
Mission Viejo
Los Angeles Co.
71/61
Temecula
Height
Period
Direction
78/61
Laguna
82/61
1-3’
13 sec SW
Beach
San
73/61
Clemente
Orange Co.
Surf and sea
74/62
SAN DIEGO CO.
Height
Period
Direction
POINT CONCEPTION TO MEXICO
Oceanside
1-2’
13 sec S
Inner waters: Variable winds 5-10 knots.
75/63
Wind waves 1-3 feet with west and south
San
Diego
Co.
swells 1-2 feet.
Ramona
Escondido
Height
Period
Direction
85/57
78/63
Surf zone: The potential for strong rip
1-2’
13 sec SW
currents is low, although rip currents
Poway
are almost always possible.
76/64
VENTURA CO.

Ojai
89/59

Tides

UV index

L.A. Outer Harbor, in feet.
Station
Morro Bay
Santa Barbara
Ventura
Zuma Beach
Marina del Rey
Hermosa Beach
Cabrillo Beach
Hunt’n. Beach
Newport Beach
Dana Point
San Clemente
Oceanside
Solana Beach
Mission Beach
Avalon

Time
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p
4p

Wind
W6
WSW4
WSW3
WSW6
SW6
WSW7
W7
SW6
SW4
WSW5
WSW5
W4
W4
W5
WNW4

Waves
2/13
1/13
1/13
2/13
2/13
1/13
1/13
1/13
2/13
2/13
1/13
1/12
1/12
1/12
2/13

Temp
57/65
62/67
63/68
65/64
65/67
65/69
64/73
64/70
65/70
65/70
64/72
65/69
65/72
65/70
66/69

Wind speed in knots; wave heights in feet/intervals in seconds;
temperatures for sea/air

Today 9:03a
8:24p
Mon. 9:52a
9:03p

4.0 Hi
6.5 Hi
4.1 Hi
6.6 Hi

Saturday
Today Monday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo

Anaheim
74
Avalon/Catalina
70
Bakersfield
104
Barstow
107
Beaumont
85
Big Bear Lake
76
Bishop
100
Burbank
75
Camarillo
69
Chatsworth
77
Chino
82
Dana Point
66
Death Valley
119
Del Mar
68
Escondido
74
Eureka
63
Fallbrook
74
Fillmore
74
Fresno
106
Fullerton
75
Hemet
84
Hesperia
98
Huntington Beach 71
Idyllwild
79
Irvine
70
L.A. D’ntown/USC 72
L.A. Int’l. Airport 68

63
61
76
76
58
50
55
63
62
61
62
61
83
60
60
48
60
60
76
64
60
68
62
62
64
63
62

-----.55
-------.01
.01
-.03
----.13
----Tr

80
69
103
107
91
77
99
83
72
81
89
72
115
74
78
58
76
80
102
81
90
99
70
87
70
78
70

61
56
70
75
59
47
57
62
59
61
61
62
82
63
63
48
63
61
67
64
61
66
61
55
62
62
60

83
73
102
108
94
80
100
87
75
83
94
73
116
75
79
57
78
81
101
84
93
100
72
88
73
80
71

61
59
69
74
56
44
57
63
61
63
61
61
80
62
61
48
61
61
65
64
58
65
61
52
62
63
61

2:47a
2:05p
3:30a
2:48p

-0.7 Lo
1.5 Lo
-1.0 Lo
1.6 Lo

Almanac

Minutes to burn for
sensitive people
Las Vegas, 25
Los Angeles, 25
Phoenix, 25
San Francisco, 25

Saturday Downtown readings
Temperature
Los Angeles Fullerton
Ventura
High/low
71/63
75/64
74/62
High/low a year ago
73/60
78/63
68/60
Normal high/low for date 77/60
78/61
71/55
Record high/date
99/1896 90/2007 81/1972
Record low/date
46/1894 58/1999 46/1952
Precipitation
24-hour total (as of 4 p.m.) 0.00
0.00
0.00
Season total (since July 1)
8.52
6.47
8.01
Last season (July 1 to date) 6.08
4.77
5.52
Season norm (July 1 to date) 14.88
13.85
16.47
Humidity (high/low)
90/65
84/59
90/72

California cities
City

Trough

Anchorage
73/58

Sunny and hot
Sunny
111/77
Sunny
110/76
Sunny
110/74
Sunny
108/76

80/44
80/46
80/45
79/46

L



Ohio Valley storms: Thunderstorms will produce strong winds and
heavy rain from Chicago to Pittsburgh. Severe thunderstorms will
develop from western Texas to southwest Kansas. The upper
Midwest will be cooler while the Southeast remains steamy.

Saturday
Today Monday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo

City
Laguna Beach
Lancaster
Long Beach
Mammoth Lakes
Mission Viejo
Monrovia
Monterey
Mt. Wilson
Needles
Newport Beach
Northridge
Oakland
Oceanside
Ojai
Ontario
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Paso Robles
Pomona/Fairplex
Poway
Redding
Rialto
Riverside

67
101
73
81
71
77
68
87
110
67
77
72
72
78
80
69
106
77
87
78
73
105
83
81

63
70
62
45
60
62
55
64
85
62
61
57
62
58
61
62
77
62
59
61
60
72
61
62

-Tr
Tr
-----.19
----------.01
.02
----

73
99
76
81
78
84
66
76
111
71
95
70
75
89
88
69
108
82
91
85
76
101
92
91

61 75 61
65 99 65
63 79 64
45 82 44
61 81 60
62 87 62
53 65 52
58 79 58
85 113 84
61 73 61
61 100 62
54 68 54
63 77 60
59 91 59
63 93 62
59 71 60
79 111 77
63 85 63
51 97 52
62 89 60
64 77 62
68 99 68
61 95 59
61 95 59

Forecasts provided by

AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015

San Diego
72/64

Sun and moon
Today’s rise/set

New Moon
June 16

Los Angeles County
Sun 5:41a/8:06p
Moon 4:20a/6:20p

First Quarter
June 24

Orange County
Sun 5:40a/8:04p
Moon 4:19a/6:18p

Full Moon
July 1

Ventura County
Sun 5:45a/8:10p
Moon 4:23a/6:25p

Last Quarter
July 8

City

Saturday
Today Monday
Hi Lo Prcp. Hi Lo Hi Lo

Sacramento
San Bernardino
San Clemente Pier
San Diego
San Francisco
San Gabriel
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Clarita
Santa Monica Pier
Santa Paula
Santa Rosa
Simi Valley
Tahoe Valley
Temecula
Thousand Oaks
Torrance
UCLA
Van Nuys
Ventura
Whittier Hills
Woodland Hills
Wrightwood
Yorba Linda
Yosemite Valley

94
81
65
70
77
74
85
75
70
72
81
67
72
80
75
85
78
70
70
70
78
74
75
79
80
75
99

66
62
62
63
56
62
59
56
63
59
58
60
60
53
60
46
61
61
62
62
62
62
66
61
56
62
61

---Tr
----Tr
--Tr
--------Tr
---.36
---

90
91
74
72
70
87
80
74
75
69
85
70
76
80
79
82
82
76
75
71
86
69
81
92
92
82
94

57
59
62
64
54
62
55
52
64
56
62
60
59
51
61
42
61
60
62
61
62
60
63
62
61
61
59

91
95
75
73
68
91
78
77
76
72
88
72
78
87
82
81
84
78
77
76
90
70
84
96
94
86
93

57
58
61
63
54
64
55
52
63
57
62
61
60
50
61
40
58
61
63
62
62
60
63
63
58
61
56

U.S. cities
High 119 in Death Valley, Calif.
Low 31 in Deer Park, Wash.
City

Saturday
Hi Lo Prcp.

Albuquerque
81 63 .29
Amarillo
79 60 1.02
Anchorage
72 48 -Atlanta
89 69 -Atlantic City
85 71 -Austin
94 73 -Baltimore
89 73 -Billings
75 54 -Birmingham
90 70 -Boise
83 52 -Boston
85 64 Tr
Brownsville
93 79 Tr
Buffalo
77 59 Tr
Burlington, Vt.
81 60 1.03
Casper
79 51 -Charleston, S.C.
95 74 Tr
Charleston, W.Va. 84 72 .70
Charlotte
94 72 -Chicago
86 56 .09
Cincinnati
89 68 .10
Cleveland
78 60 .95
Colo. Springs
80 52 .08
Columbia, S.C.
94 73 -Columbus
90 69 .16
Concord, N.H.
83 64 .21
Dallas/Ft.Worth
89 78 Tr
Denver
85 54 -Des Moines
77 65 .07
Detroit
71 58 .46
Duluth
69 52 -El Paso
99 68 -Eugene
78 41 -Fairbanks
66 37 -Fargo
82 60 -Flagstaff
75 48 .02
Grand Junction
85 53 .08
Grand Rapids
75 57 Tr
Green Bay
64 56 .01
Hartford
85 69 .08
Helena
79 47 -Honolulu
86 72 -Houston
86 74 .29
Indianapolis
88 71 -Jacksonville, Fla. 93 71 -Kansas City
79 66 .08
Las Vegas
104 81 -Little Rock
87 74 .20
Louisville
90 75 .01
Medford
89 53 -Memphis
91 74 .02
Miami
89 82 .02
Milwaukee
69 52 .16
Minneapolis
71 60 .07
Nashville
90 70 -New Orleans
90 75 .43
New York
86 77 -Oklahoma City
83 66 3.52
Omaha
77 64 Tr
Orlando
93 77 Tr
Philadelphia
88 77 -Phoenix
105 80 -Pittsburgh
85 69 .08
Portland, Maine
85 59 .07
Portland, Ore.
77 51 -Providence
85 67 -Pueblo
85 58 -Raleigh
95 74 -Rapid City
80 54 -Reno
94 62 -Richmond
96 76 -St. Louis
90 75 .02
Salt Lake City
88 61 -San Antonio
93 77 .01
San Juan, P.R.
91 79 .12
Santa Fe
71 57 Tr
Seattle
74 49 --

Today
Hi Lo Sky
86
77
73
93
82
87
88
68
92
84
73
91
76
78
77
96
88
96
79
87
81
75
99
85
83
89
80
82
81
75
99
83
77
75
76
87
77
78
86
72
86
85
83
95
80
105
85
90
90
89
89
76
83
90
86
84
82
83
93
87
106
81
75
85
83
82
94
69
92
90
85
88
88
90
81
79

64
62
58
75
67
71
71
51
72
56
55
77
66
62
50
75
69
71
67
70
69
54
74
70
55
72
55
69
69
56
72
47
52
54
49
59
65
61
62
48
73
74
70
70
67
81
74
75
55
75
79
64
66
72
77
67
69
67
73
70
83
69
53
56
57
57
73
53
56
72
74
66
75
79
54
55

Ts
Ts
Su
Su
Pc
Ts
Ts
Pc
Su
Su
Pc
Pc
Ts
Pc
Su
Su
Ts
Su
Ts
Pc
Ts
Ts
Su
Ts
Pc
Ts
Ts
Ts
Ts
Pc
Su
Su
Pc
Pc
Pc
Ts
Ts
Cy
Pc
Pc
Pc
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Su
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Pc
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Pc
Ts
Ts
Ts
Pc
Su
Ts
Su
Su
Pc
Ts
Ts
Ts
Su
Pc
Ts
Su
Ts
Pc
Ts
Pc

Taken at 3 p.m. Saturday

Spokane
72 43 -Springfield, Mo.
85 69 .11
Tallahassee
93 73 -Tampa
93 76 Tr
Tucson
101 70 -Tulsa
86 68 1.20
Washington, D.C. 92 75 -Wichita
79 68 .10
Yuma
102 76 --

World

Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cabo San Lucas
Cairo
Calgary
Cancun
Copenhagen
Dublin
Edinburgh
Frankfurt
Geneva
Havana
Ho Chi Minh City
Hong Kong
Istanbul
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kingston
London
Madrid
Manila
Mecca
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Mumbai
New Delhi
Oslo
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome
Seoul
Stockholm
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Winnipeg
Zurich

86
66
91
106
95
87
82
86
61
95
86
57
77
70
63
54
77
80
88
95
91
84
79
63
92
90
68
73
95
108
76
81
79
90
103
66
77
81
86
82
73
65
91
97
81
73
66
86
81
77

79 .80
63 .31
70 -78 -77 .12
78 .12
65 .02
59 .04
43 -72 -67 -41 .02
75 1.12
52 .31
50 -50 .04
64 .04
59 .37
72 .17
79 .42
82 .05
68 -60 -38 -52 -84 -59 .02
59 -79 .06
87 -57 .10
55 -50 -77 .62
91 .28
46 .03
59 -70 .03
68 .02
63 .28
57 .02
54 -79 .08
73 -70 .37
59 -50 -63 .09
61 Tr
57 .15

79
83
95
91
102
87
91
82
105

54
69
72
76
74
72
75
68
78

Su
Ts
Pc
Ts
Su
Ts
Ts
Ts
Su

84
67
87
109
98
86
89
73
60
94
90
57
84
64
59
56
80
72
88
91
91
80
84
67
89
90
68
72
94
110
75
77
81
86
101
56
79
86
79
79
65
65
90
97
75
68
72
88
76
76

76
50
69
79
79
76
67
53
43
68
69
39
76
47
46
42
58
58
74
77
83
66
57
40
54
79
51
52
80
84
58
57
64
79
82
45
59
70
64
64
45
53
80
79
68
62
54
66
50
57

Ts
Cy
Pc
Su
Ts
Pc
Su
Pc
Su
Su
Su
Sh
R
Pc
Cy
Cy
Pc
Ts
Ts
Ts
Pc
Su
Su
Su
Su
W
Cy
Pc
Cy
Su
Ts
Pc
Pc
R
Pc
Sh
Pc
Su
Pc
Ts
Cy
Pc
Ts
Su
R
Ts
Pc
Ts
Cy
Ts

Key: Su sunny; Pc partly cloudy; Cy cloudy; Fg

foggy; Prcp precipitation; Dr drizzle; Hz;hazy
Sh showers; Ts thunderstorms; R rain; Sn snow;
Sf snow flurries; I ice; Rs rain/snow; W windy;
Tr trace. Notes: National extremes are for NWS
stations; excludes Alaska and Hawaii.
Missing data indicated by “xx”.

Readers’ help makes the water flow

[Lopez, from B1]
man, who cut the bath short
fearing she’d nod off and
drown, and my follow-up column would have to be an
obituary.
Tillman had recently
strained her back lugging 5gallon jugs of water through
her house for cooking and
cleaning, so the good Samaritans brought welcome
relief.
“Oh my gosh, it’s unbelievable,” said Tillman during one of my visits to deliver
donations. “For people to be
so touched by someone
else’s plight and want to
help, that’s amazing.”
Two of those people, Tom
and Betsy Coleman of the
Palos Verdes Peninsula, sent
a donation and an observation. They had studied their
own water bill and determined that their cost for water was less than one cent
per gallon. (DWP puts the
first-tier cost at six-tenths of
a penny.) So the Colemans
encouraged Mrs. Tillman to
fill her jugs at a neighbor’s
home rather than pay $1.25,
or 25 cents a gallon, at the
vending machine she’d been
using.
Mrs. Tillman told me she
had tried that very thing, but
a neighbor wasn’t very cooperative, and she didn’t want
to impose on others. So she
kept refining her conservation methods, learning how
to get by on just under 50 gallons a week, and vowing never to waste a drop of water if
her service was restored.
The Colemans do their
own part to conserve. Even
though water is cheap —
unless DWP screws up your

Mel Melcon Los Angeles Times

AFTER NINE MONTHS WITHOUT, Doris Tillman has running water again thanks to donations from

readers. “For people to be so touched by someone else’s plight and want to help, that’s amazing,” she said.

bill, as it has for many customers — the Colemans
treat it like every drop is precious, very much aware of
the drought and the fact
that millions of people in the
world have no access to safe
running water.
“My husband and I are
very, very water conscious.
He puts huge trash barrels
out when it rains,” said Betsy, who uses recycled water
for irrigation and flushing
toilets. “We’ve been recycleconscious for all our married
lives, and we’ve been mar-

ried 53 years. ... We feel like
that’s our responsibility as
people.”
There may soon be even
more of a financial incentive
to conserve, too. The DWP is
talking about raising rates
to pay for the repair of rupturing water lines and other
needs, and greater forces in
California and beyond might
also jack up the cost of water.
“To me, it’s inevitable in a
world with a growing population that we’re going to
have to start thinking about
water more and more the

way we look at every other
good — that it’s a valuable
commodity and we need to
pay more for it,” said Frank
Wolak, professor of commodity price studies at
Stanford University.
If you’re looking for ways
to beat higher costs and get
by on less water, check out
GreywaterAction.org
for
tips on how to green your
house.
“We use the same quality
water for everything, and
that doesn’t make any
sense,” said Greywater’s

Laura Allen.
She’s right. We use the
same highly purified water
to drink, flush the toilet,
wash the car and water the
bougainvillea. Allen gave
one example of how to avoid
that. For about $200, she
said, and without taking out
permits, a homeowner can
legally rig a system that uses
washing machine water to irrigate a garden with a drip
line instead of letting all that
water go down the drain.
But don’t try this if you
don’t know what you’re do-

ing. Marty Adams of DWP
said he’s all for taking a
bucket into the shower and
then using it to water the
garden, but when you mess
with plumbing, you have to
make sure non-potable water doesn’t get sucked into
the potable water lines and
present a health hazard.
Doris Tillman, whose
misfortune has turned her
into an accidental authority
on conservation, shared a
few pointers:
8 After boiling an egg, add
bleach and soap to the water
and make your own cleaning
agent.
8 Use a dish pan instead
of filling the sink, and preclean dishes and cookware
with towels so food particles
don’t dirty the pan. Then use
the water again in the garden.
8 If you make pasta or boil
potatoes, reuse the water for
steaming vegetables, and
then reuse it again for watering plants.
Mrs. Tillman, a volunteer
at her church, is still trying
to get a clothing and crafts
business established to keep
up with her bills. Readers
who have asked me about
purchasing goods can contact her at dorisjtillman596
@gmail.com.
She’ll be busy for a while,
though, making shoulder
sling water bottle carriers
for all the readers who sent
her a donation.
“That’s what I’m going to
do,” she said. “A ‘thank you’
is not enough. It’s just not
enough.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @LATstevelopez

BuSINESS

C

S U N D A Y , J U N E 1 4 , 2 0 1 5 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / B U S I N E S S

Real Estate: Sun and surf along PCH in Malibu. 11
HOW I MADE IT 7 :: ON LEADERSHIP 7 :: HOT PROPERTY 10 :: TEAR-DOWNS 11

Captrade’s
smooth
start
MICHAEL HILTZIK

Peter DaSilva For The Times

“WHAT WE DO is more like a smartphone with wings rather than a pilot and a plane,” says Chris Anderson, CEO of 3D Robotics.

DRONE ZONE

California firms are jumping into the commercial drone business, but
the small unmanned planes are mostly being built outside the country

A

By W.J. Hennigan and Melody Petersen

s the largest American
maker of consumer
drones, 3D Robotics
Inc. sees big opportunities in selling minihelicopters with cameras, sensors and
whirling propellers that buzz like angry hornets.
The Berkeley company expects to
sell thousands of the pizza-sized
drones — for about $1,000 each — at
home and abroad this year. Tech-savvy
customers want them for capturing
wave-shredding surfing runs in the Pacific, monitoring oil and gas pipelines
in remote regions, and other uses.
3D Robotics is out in front of dozens
of California companies jumping into
the nascent business of selling drones
to consumers and commercial enterprises, just as companies in the state
did earlier when the drone market consisted largely of one customer: the Pentagon.
Although military drones were born
in Southern California and are still
built here, 3D’s drones will be built outside the country.
So far, many commercial and civilian drones are being designed here but
made abroad, creating high-tech engineering jobs in the U.S. while the manufacturing is in low-cost countries like
China and Mexico — underscoring the
challenge of creating U.S. manufacturing jobs.
The epicenter of the fast-growing
commercial drone business is in Silicon Valley, not Southern California,
and the new players are quite different
from the giant contractors that dominate the military drone market, such as

Al Seib Los Angeles Times

THE WASP is held by Cynthia Singleton-Nichols of

AeroVironment, which makes drones in Simi Valley.

Al Seib Los Angeles Times

THE RAVEN, top, and the Global Observer are some of

the other small drones made by AeroVironment.

Northrop Grumman Corp. or General
Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc.
They’re more like the classic Silicon
Valley stereotype: geeks working in garages.
“The aerospace industry isn’t relevant here,” said Chris Anderson, 3D
Robotics’ chief executive. “What we do
is more like a smartphone with wings
rather than a pilot and a plane.”
Many of the commercial drone companies are so new that it’s hard to predict where they will locate manufacturing operations, but they are unlikely to
create thousands of well-paying factory jobs, like the aerospace industry of
a bygone era.
Competition from Chinese manufacturers has already pushed 3D Robotics and some other American drone
companies to make their hardware in
other countries. Anderson’s company
has an engineering center in San Diego, but manufactures its drones in Tijuana and Shenzhen, China, where
there is cheap labor.
The strategy mirrors that of Apple,
which designs its iPhones in California
but manufactures them in China and
other countries.
3D Robotics’ main competition is
Chinese company SZ DJI Technology
Co., the largest commercial drone
manufacturer in the world. The firm
makes the red-and-white quadcopter
called the Phantom, which recently
gained fame when one landed on the
White House lawn.
“We’re California. We’re a high-cost
state,” said Colin Snow, a drone industry analyst in Redwood City. “Capital
goes where it gets the highest return.”
[See Drones, C8]

CUTTING EDGE

Easing income volatility with an app

By Tracey Lien
OAKLAND — Mobile
apps are often hailed as a solution to many of life’s most
mundane problems. Need to
order a pizza? Hail a ride?
Get someone to do your
laundry?
But when it comes to the
social and economic problems that plague millions of
Americans, the app world
hasn’t been as quick to offer
help.
One company, Even, is
bucking the trend of flapping birds and candy waiting to be crushed by creating

an app that aims to improve
the lives of some of America’s least-privileged. Its mission: to solve income volatility.
Millions of Americans
who freelance or work hourly
jobs experience income fluctuations: They don’t know
how many hours they’ll work
each week, and they don’t
know how much they’ll get
paid. They include fast-food
workers, nail salon technicians, maids, gardeners and
retail employees.
The Even app, currently
by invitation-only, eases
users’ income volatility by
stabilizing their take-home

pay. That goes a step further
than the slew of budgeting
apps out there that simply
show users how much money they have and how much
they should spend and save.
Here’s how it works: The
app connects to people’s
bank accounts and sees
when the person is paid. It
then calculates an average
for what the person would be
paid if his or her income were
stable, and pays them that
amount each payday.
If a person gets paid less
than the calculated average,
Even automatically boosts
his or her pay by giving an interest-free advance. If a per-

son gets paid more than the
average, Even puts aside
that bonus cash to pay back
past advances and for future
advances.
Even plans on reaching
those who need the service
the most by partnering with
companies with hourly
workers. Although no partnerships have been announced yet, a service like
Even could benefit workers
at companies like Starbucks, Best Buy and Whole
Foods, with the promise of
reducing worker attrition
caused by financial stress,
co-founder Jon Schlossberg
said.

The Oakland company
charges users $3 a week for
the service, which can be
suspended at any time.
If it sounds like the company is taking on a big risk,
that’s because it is. One of
the biggest challenges the
company will face is when a
user loses his or her job or is
unable to pay back the advances.
Jake Fuentes, founder
and chief executive of budgeting app Level Money, said
Even could play an important role in filling a market
niche, but it may find itself
in the difficult position of
[See App, C9]

The climate
change debate may
seem mostly
to be about
science, but
it’s really
driven by
dollars and
cents — what
will it take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and
how much will that cost? Of
all U.S. states, California
has taken the most direct
approach to settling those
questions through a pioneering cap-and-trade
program.
More than two years into
the program — which aims
to reduce the state’s overall
greenhouse gas emissions
to 1990 levels by 2020 — it’s
working very well, but it may
not be doing as much as its
biggest fans say.
“We think we do have a
good story to tell,” says
Mary D. Nichols, chairwoman of the California Air
Resources Board, which
administers cap-andtrade.
The program’s quarterly
auctions of emissions allowances have gone on largely
without a hitch. The program has fit in, as was expected, with other emissions reduction programs
implemented under AB 32,
the state’s landmark greenhouse gas legislation, including mandates for renewable-fuel sources for
electrical utilities and emissions standards for new cars
and trucks.
It has done so without a
measurable drag on economic growth. The program
generated $969 million in
revenue for the state
through the end of 2014, and
is expected to generate
$2 billion a year or more in
the future. The money must
be spent on efforts to reduce
carbon emissions.
“What we’ve learned is
that a cap-and-trade system will not kill the California economy,” says Stanford
economist Lawrence H.
Goulder, who advised the
ARB on the program’s
design. “The economy has
continued to flourish.”
The state’s greenhouse
gas emissions have declined
since cap-and-trade was
introduced in 2013, but “the
jury’s really out on whether
we’ve seen a lot of reductions caused by cap-andtrade,” says James Bushnell, an energy economist at
UC Davis who follows the
program closely.
That’s important, because finding the right
incentives for industries
and consumers to reduce
their carbon footprint may
be the key to fighting climate change. All the options, including cap-andtrade, direct caps, and a
carbon tax, are controversial, though some are
more politically palatable
[See Hiltzik, C12]

Representing

MID-CENTURY
MODERN
in Southern California.

C2

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

Bankruptcy

S

L AT I M E S. CO M / B U SI N E SS

THE WEEK

AUCTION

56 Properties - Vacant Land






Lancaster/Palmdale area
Ranging in size from .5 – 40 acres
To be sold in 37 groups
Residential and agricultural zoning
Live and online bidding available

THE WEEK AHEAD...
Coming Monday

Auction Date: June 25th | 12:00 PM
Information Session: June 16th | 2:00 - 6:00 PM
Held at: Hilton Garden Inn, 1309 W. Rancho Vista Blvd., Palmdale
Tranzon Asset Strategies in association with Tiger Group
10% Buyer’s Premium | 2% Broker Co-Op | BRE Lic 01850659
See Website for Terms and List of Properties | Property #TAS150625

TRANZON.COM

888.314.1314

GRAND OPENING

EXPERIENCE DIM-SUM IN ITS RAREST AUTHENTICITY
DIM-SUM 40% OFF MONDAY TO FRIDAY SAT, SUN AND HOLIDAYS 20% OFF
DINNER AND LOBSTER SPECIAL: Lobster $6.99 per lb. • Crab $6.99 per lb.
R.S.V.P. for LARGER PARTIES + PRIVATE BANQUET V.I.P. ROOMS

Monday’s Business section explains the ins and outs of the federal funds rate. That’s the name for the
benchmark rate that the Federal Reserve manipulates to try to keep the economy under control. We look
at how it works, why it’s important and how it affects other interest rates — from mortgages to certificates
of deposit. The central bank has kept the fed funds rate near zero since late 2008 to help spur a sluggish
recovery from the Great Recession. With a stronger economy now, the rate is ripe to rise.

Fed to meet
on rate hike

Gaming show Blocking
opens in L.A. robocalls

A tax break
for Tesla?

Federal Reserve policymakers will meet Tuesday and Wednesday to
consider the first increase of the central
bank’s key short-term
interest rate since 2006.
The Fed has set the
stage to raise its benchmark rate at any time,
but many analysts think
that despite an improving economy, the Fed
won’t act until later this
year. A decision will be
announced at 11 a.m.
Pacific time Wednesday.

North America’s largest video game trade
show, the Electronic
Entertainment Expo,
opens a three-day run at
the Los Angeles Convention Center on Tuesday — and you can go.
E3, as it’s known, typically attracts more than
40,000 industry-only
attendees. For the first
time, the show is open to
5,000 members of the
public for an early look
at new games and products.

A state committee is
scheduled to vote
Thursday on whether
to give automaker Tesla
a $15-million tax credit.
If the California Competes Tax Credit Committee approves, Tesla
would get the full
amount by creating
4,426 jobs in California
by 2019. The jobs must
offer workers at least
$35,000 a year and,
overall, must provide an
average salary of at least
$55,000 a year.

A proposal to make it
easier for consumers to
block robocalls will be
taken up Thursday by
the Federal Communications Commission. A
key change would allow
phone companies to
offer customers products that automatically
block robocalls and
spam text messages.
The FCC received
215,000 complaints
about robocalls and
texts last year, more
than any other issue.

THE WEEK THAT WAS...

1412 S Garfield Ave. • Alhambra, CA 91801

(626) 282-3888

LAA3356866-1

Trade bill is
dealt a blow

Fox transition Turnover at
Net neutrality
in the works
top of Twitter rules in effect

President Obama’s
trade agenda unraveled
Friday as the U.S. House
of Representatives rejected an important
part of a package aimed
at fast-tracking a controversial trade pact
he’s pursuing with 11
other Pacific Rim nations. The Trans-Pacific
Partnership would be
one of the world’s largest and most ambitious
free-trade efforts.

It’s one of the world’s
biggest media companies, but Rupert Murdoch reminded everyone that it’s still a family
business — and his sons,
James and Lachlan, will
be running it soon. Murdoch, 84, plans this week
to ask the 21st Century
Fox board to name
James as the company’s
new chief executive and
Lachlan as executive
co-chairman.

Dick Costolo is stepping
down as chief executive
of Twitter, effective July
1. Twitter shares had
fallen more than 25% in
the last three months as
Costolo struggled to
boost growth and profits and deal with management dysfunction.
Co-founder Jack Dorsey
said he won’t be changing its direction as he
takes over as the interim chief.

Tough new regulations
for Internet traffic went
into effect Friday after
federal judges declined
to stop them, beginning
a new era of oversight
that already has reverberated through the
online ecosystem. Average users won’t notice
much of a difference at
first, but broadband
network owners are
scrambling to come to
grips with the rules.

twitter.com/latimes

LA Times

Check rates daily at http://latimes.interest.com
Institution

APR

Rate / Fees

Rate: 4.125

Water and Power Community Credit Union

4.165%

Points: 0.000

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

Fees: $795

Rate: 3.750

America One Mortgage Group

3.914%

Points: 1.500

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

Fees: $799

Rate: 4.125

Cal Fed Mortgage

4.128%

Points: 0.000

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

Fees: $50

Rate: 4.125

Farmers & Merchants Bank

4.196%

Points: 0.000

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

4.035%

Points: 0.000

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

Fees: $895

Rate: 3.875

Kinecta Federal Credit Union

4.092%

Points: 1.500

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

3.915%
Linear Home Loans

30yr Fixed APR

Points: 0.000
Fees: $795
% Down: 20%
Rate: 3.875

Mount Diablo Lending

3.895%

Points: 0.000

30yr Fixed APR

% Down: 20%

Fees: $0

Points

Fees

% Down

APR
3.930
3.320
3.090
3.191

30 yr fixed
3.875
0.500
$799
20%
7/1 jumbo ARM
3.250
1.000
$875
20%
5/1 jumbo ARM
2.750
1.000
$875
20%
5/1 jumbo ARM
3.250
0.000
$875
20%
15 yr fixed
3.250
0.000
$799
20%
Inquire about our Stated Income self employed program
0.25% off rate on purchases (5/1 & 7/1 programs only)

3.957
3.211
3.008
3.102
3.320

15 yr fixed
15 yr jumbo
7/1 jumbo ARM

3.375
0.000
$1392
20%
3.498
4.000
0.000
$1392
20%
4.047
3.750
0.000
$1392
20%
3.374
Loans up to $5MM. 24 Offices throughout LA/OC.
Flexible Loan Options. Local decision-making for fast answers.
Competitive Rate and Terms. Interest Only Payment Options.
Alternative Documentation Programs Available.

30 yr Jumbo Conforming
4.000
0.000
$895
20%
4.045
30 yr fixed refi
4.125
0.000
$895
5%
4.170
15 yr fixed
3.000
0.000
$895
20%
3.080
15 yr Jumbo Conforming
3.250
0.000
$895
20%
3.290
5/1 jumbo ARM
3.000
0.000
$995
20%
3.050
10/1 jumbo ARM (interest only)
Call for Rates
30yr fixed with only 3% down & NO mtg insurance. Better than FHA!
Jumbo 5, 7 & 10yr ARMs with I/O option available up to $10 mil
15 yr fixed
30 yr Jumbo Conforming
5/1 jumbo ARM

3.125
0.625
$1800
20%
3.375
4.000
1.250
$1800
20%
4.140
2.750
0.625
$1800
20%
2.995
Rates are for purchase transactions only.
NOT-FOR-PROFIT member CO-OP. Over 250,000 members, Easy to join.
Loans to $3mil. Ask about our 3% down payment program!
HARP Solution: You may finally be able to refinance & save.
Contact us for a free rate quote and mortgage checkup.

30
15
10
20
30

yr
yr
yr
yr
yr

Jumbo Conforming
Call for Rates
fixed
2.875
0.000
$795
20%
fixed
2.875
0.000
$795
20%
fixed
3.750
0.000
$795
20%
jumbo
Call for Rates
No Application Fees! No Lock Fees! No Cancellation Fees!
Fast Closing and Great Rates
Transparent / Up-Front Direct Lender

Phone Number / Website

888-883-2268

NMLS # / License

NMLS# 525600

http://www.wpcu.org

30 yr fixed
4.000
0.000
$799
20%
4.040
15 yr fixed
2.750
2.000
$945
20%
3.124
30 yr Jumbo Conforming
4.125
0.000
$799
20%
4.140
30 yr Jumbo Conforming
3.875
2.000
$799
20%
4.057
7/1 ARM
2.875
1.000
$899
20%
3.064
10 yr fixed
2.750
1.000
$799
20%
3.062
30 yr jumbo
4.000
1.500
$899
30%
4.143
Call Sat/[email protected] about Reverse Mortgages

Fees: $1800

Rate: 3.875

Rate

20 yr fixed
3.875
0.000
$795
20%
15 yr fixed
3.250
0.000
$795
20%
5/1 ARM
2.875
0.000
$795
20%
5/1 jumbo ARM
3.000
0.000
$795
20%
Receive a rebate of $795 loan origination fee at loan funding.
Apply online 24/7.
A $25 share deposit is required for membership.
Other restrictions apply.

Fees: $1392

Rate: 3.990

IPL Mortgage

Product

2.944
2.976
3.805

20 yr fixed
3.750
0.000
$0
20%
3.785
15 yr fixed
3.000
0.000
$0
20%
3.001
7/1 ARM
2.875
0.000
$0
20%
2.955
5/1 ARM
2.750
0.000
$0
20%
2.759
30 yr jumbo
4.000
0.000
$0
20%
4.205
LIVE PERSON IS AVAILABLE NOW TO ANSWER QUESTIONS
5-Star Review Rating on Yelp
Go to www.MDLquote.com for instant quote & GFE

888-942-LOAN (5626)

NMLS# 79460
CA BRE 1323980

http://www.loanrhino.com

866-605-1653/866-484-9357

NMLS# 290315
BRE# 01380851

http://www.calfedmortgage.com

866-237-4290

NMLS# 537388

http://www.fmb.com/homeloans

866-570-6139

NMLS #1218971
CA BRE#01736620

http://www.iplmortgage.com

866-701-5539
http://www.kinecta.org

800-967-3020

CA DRE#01840960

http://www.linearhomeloans.com

888-327-7255

NMLS# 1065732

http://www.MDLquote.com/

Legend: The rate and annual percentage rate (APR) are effective as of 6/10/15. © 2015 Bankrate, Inc. http://www.interest.com. The APR may increase after consummation and may vary. Payments do not include amounts for taxes and insurance. The fees set forth for each advertisement above may be charged to open the plan (A) Mortgage Banker, (B) Mortgage Broker, (C) Bank, (D) S & L, (E) Credit Union, (F)
Real Estate Broker, California Bureau of Real Estate, (G) Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act, (BA) indicates Licensed Mortgage Banker, NYS Banking Dept., (BR) indicates Registered Mortgage Broker, NYS Banking Dept., (loans arranged through third parties). “Call for Rates” means actual rates were not available at press time. All rates are quoted
on a minimum FICO score of 740. Conventional loans are based on loan amounts of $165,000. Jumbo loans are based on loan amounts of $435,000. Points quoted include discount and/or origination. Lock Days: 30-60. Annual percentage rates (APRs) are based on fully indexed rates for adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). The APR on your specific loan may differ from the sample used. Fees reflect charges relative to
the APR. If your down payment is less than 20% of the home’s value, you will be subject to private mortgage insurance, or PMI. FHA Mortgages include both UFMIP and MIP fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. VA Mortgages include funding fees based on a loan amount of $165,000 with 5% down payment. Bankrate, Inc. does not guarantee the accuracy of the information
appearing above or the availability of rates and fees in this table. All rates, fees and other information are subject to change without notice. Bankrate, Inc. does not own any financial institutions. Some or all of the companies appearing in this table pay a fee to appear in this table. If you are seeking a mortgage in excess of $417,000, recent legislation may enable lenders in certain locations to provide rates that are
different from those shown in the table above. Sample Repayment Terms – ex. 360 monthly payments of $5.29 per $1,000 borrowed ex. 180 monthly payments of $7.56 per $1,000 borrowed. We recommend that you contact your lender directly to determine what rates may be available to you. To appear in this table, call 800-509-4636. To report any inaccuracies, call 888-509-4636. • http://latimes.interest.com

LOS ANGELES TIMES

BUSINESS

S

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

Can our
humanity
save
humanity?
It’s a human truth: Tragedy brings us together. After an earthquake or
flood, we forget our incidental differences and act for each other in ways
we don’t on a day-to-day basis. Our skin color, gender, sexual orientation,
and politics fall to the wayside. Our reflex to care kicks in and becomes
unstoppable. But can we come together without a crisis?

Every day in our communities, research validates what we’ve all intuitively
felt: simple humankindness—real, genuine connection—heals us
from the inside out. Even those who care for our patients have noticed
the health benefits circling back. And we each carry this power.
What if each of us could reach out in our own lives to help someone new?
To offer a meal, or a shoulder? What would happen on a larger scale?
How many of us would it take to turn the tide?
So I ask you, as I ask myself, our entire organization, and community
leaders—could we actually change the world? This is bigger than health
care. So let’s unite and see what our collective humankindness can do.
Let’s try. It would be inhuman not to.

Lloyd H. Dean
President/CEO of Dignity Health

Learn more at dignityhealth.org.
California Hospital Medical Center – Downtown LA | Community Hospital of San Bernardino | Dignity Health Medical Foundation
Dignity Health Urgent Care Fontana & Highland | Glendale Memorial Hospital and Health Center | Northridge Hospital Medical Center
St. Bernardine Medical Center | St. Mary Medical Center – Long Beach | St. John’s Pleasant Valley Hospital | St. John’s Regional Medical Center

C3

C4

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

WS T

S

L AT I M E S. CO M / B U SI N E SS

Advertising Supplement

Vocational Schools
AVIATION GRADS work
with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta
and others . Start here with
hands on training for FAA
certification. Financial aid if
qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. (877)
804-5293 (CDCN)

PHLEBOTOMY
CLASS

Allied Prof. 562-808-2152

EMPLOYMENT
WANTED
CAREGIVER
Caregiver/Housekeeper
Seeking work. Live-in or out.
Can work 5-7 days. $1,000/
mo. Ask for Sue 310-6714668

DOMESTIC
EMPLOYMENT

“People looking for jobs are … more likely to run into a manager in need of a
specific skill or a specific strength, and that’s where that experience comes in.”

In the know

Experience can be an older job-seeker’s best friend

T

im O’Brien likes to tell friends that
he’s on the “better side of 50.” What
does he mean by that? Well, that’s a
good question.
“I have to be honest, I used to just
think it meant how you looked, like
when people say their right profile is better than their
left profile,” O’Brien says. “I thought it was just some
goofy expression.” Today, the 58-year-old accountant
from Arlington, Texas, feels a bit differently.

SEARCH ADVICE
“It means I’m on the right side of the age
spectrum,” he says. “I’m the guy who’s on the right
side of the game.”
That game, O’Brien says, is today’s job market.
Once convinced he had to cloak his age at all costs,
O’Brien says he now leads with it any time he heads
into a job interview.
“I want them to know up front that I’m the guy with
experience,” he says.
After working more than 30 years for a “top-shelf”
accounting firm, as he puts it, O’Brien abruptly found
himself out of a job in 2010.
“It was a purge, essentially,” he says. “They got rid
of people who had put in enough time to earn the top
end of the scale. Nothing scientific about it. They just
cut the people who made the most money.” O’Brien
says he found himself scrambling for work.
“I had two kids in college and a house that was in
need of about $50,000 in repairs,” he says. “I was
desperate.”
So desperate, in fact, that O’Brien said he would lie
about his age on applications and during interviews.
“Everyone I spoke with told me no one hires people
older than 50,” he says. “I figured I’d say what I had
to say.”
That is, until he got caught. O’Brien is quick to
point out that he never lied on forms or when asked to
clarify his age, but his resume bumped up his college
graduation date by 15 years.
“My wife was the one who busted me,” he
says. “She said ‘If you think someone’s going to
believe that mug of yours isn’t even 40 yet, you’re
delusional.’”
O’Brien says he revised his resume, worked with
an outplacement firm and rebranded himself as
an experienced money man, “the guy who knew
where the bodies were buried,” he says. The strategy
immediately paid off. O’Brien says he was hired by an
insurance firm in Dallas for a six-month assignment to
clean up their financial books. It took him 10 weeks,
thanks to relying more on face-to-face discussions
with those responsible for the financial decisions and
a multi-level approach to finding the right answer. He
was the right hire.

Don’t run from your experience

Career consultant Edward Bracks, who specializes
in placing executives in financial firms in New York
and New Jersey, says O’Brien’s decision to play up
his experience should be a strong example to anyone
over the age of 50 who’s looking for a job.
“People looking for jobs are always going to run
into interviewers and managers who won’t be able to
get past their age,” Bracks says. “Let’s just admit that
up-front. But they’re more likely to run into a manager
in need of a specific skill or a specific strength, and
that’s where that experience comes in.”
Delta Wilson, a former trainer for United Airlines in
Chicago, says when used correctly, experience trumps
all other attributes and can be used to secure most
jobs.
“Anyone can be enthusiastic. Anyone can be
aggressive. Anyone can say they work well with
others,” Wilson says. “How many people can say
they’ve been there and done that? You add that
experience to any other trait, whether it’s confidence,
creativity — whatever — and you’re looking at the
ideal candidate.

Look the part

Wilson says older applicants often work too hard
to fit in with their younger competitive counterparts.
She recalls “seeing guys come in with ridiculous shirts
and women come in wearing borderline inappropriate
clothing, just so they could look young. It didn’t work.
They looked ridiculous.”
At the same time, some older applicants looked,
according to Wilson, like they “just stepped off a bus
on their way to a free dinner.” In other words, “iron
your pants, wear a simple tie, look professional,” she
says. “You know those cliches about how older people
dress? Rumbled clothes, lots of layers, gigantic shoes,
thick scarves? Avoid those cliches.

On the hunt

Although he likes taking project-based assignments,
O’Brien says he’s now looking for a full-time job.
“I like going in and fixing up a company’s books,
but I also like stability and routines. Maybe that’s the
older guy in me coming out,” he says. “Now, I’m
looking for a full-time job because I know I can help
out more if I have a chance to really dig in.”
O’Brien says he’s already received two offers but
turned down both.
“One was a brutal commute and the other just didn’t
seem like the right fit, at least for my last full-time
job ever, I hope,” he says. “But if it’s not, I’ll survive.
I’ll just be the 65-year-old guy who comes in and
fixes everything you’ve been doing wrong the past 10
years.”
— Marco Buscaglia, Tribune Content Agency

Housekeeper/Nanny
Needed
Live in. 5 days/week Beverly
Hills 310-429-1212

Employment
ACCOUNTING
ACCOUNTING MGR.
2 yr exp reqd. Send resume
to Karrs, 2318 Pico Blvd,
Santa Monica, CA 90405
ACCOUNTING
Senior Accountant sought
by SingerLewak in Los Angeles, CA: Perform diversified
acctg, auditing & tax assignments under the direction of
supervisor, manager or partner. Bach in Acctg, Finance,
Econ or foreign eq or rel &
3 yrs. exp. req. 50% travel
req. Send resume to: SingerLewak/Penny Auterson, HR,
2050 Main St, 7th Fl., Irvine,
CA 92614. REF. JOB TITLE.
Tax Senior (Real Estate Tax
Services) for Deloitte Tax LLP
in Los Angeles, CA to assist
companies w/ national, state
& local & int’l tax structures
& align the tax function
w/ business objectives.
Req’s: Bachelor’s degree in
Acctng., Fin., Tax., Bus. Admin. or related field (willing
to accept foreign education
equivalent) & 18 mos. of exp.
preparing federal & state/
local income tax returns for
partnerships, corps. & REITs.
Position requires approx.
5% travel. To apply, visit
http://www.careers.deloitte.
com/jobs/eng-US.
Scroll
down and enter XSFH15FT0515LOS1 as the “Keyword”
and click “Search jobs.” No
calls please.“Deloitte”means
Deloitte LLP and its subsidiaries. Please see www.
deloitte.com/us/about for a
detailed description of the
legal structure of Deloitte
LLP and its subsidiaries. Deloitte LLP & its subsidiaries
are equal opportunity employers.
ADMINISTRATION
Assistant Full time Benefits.
Mfg. San Fernando Valley.
Exp in Excel. E-commerce.
Internet savvy. Email resume
to: [email protected]
ADMINISTRATION
Property
Management
& Devel. Bi-lingual - good
computer skills required.
310-532-2111 ext 339.
ANALYST
Market Research Analyst
for Soho Apparel Group Inc.,
Master in Business Administration. Rsm to H.R. at 15736
E. Valley Blvd, City of Industry, CA 91744

ARCHITECT / AUTO
CAD OPERATOR

Architect w/Experience
in production drawings
and Construction Contracts
Administration.
Licensed in CA preferred.
Good salary. ADVANCED
AUTOCAD SKILLS AND
EXPERIENCED IN MULTIFAMILY AND CITY OF LA
CODE NEEDED.
[email protected]
Project Consultant (Architect) Trimble Navigation
Limited currently has an
opening for Project Consultant (Architect) in our Los
Angeles, CA location. Provide web-based 3D project
collaboration and building information modeling
(BIM) technology as well as
advanced project delivery
services to, architects, engineers and builders. Send
resume to [email protected]
trimble.com. Reference Job
Code XXPC-5575. EOE

Your exclusive
guide to SoCal
real estate
listings.
Advertise Today

Art Cataloguer (Decorative
& Fine Arts) - Review & categorize artwork & art assets
for auctions. Req: Bach’s of
Art History w/exp in preappraisal of fine & decorative arts & customer service.
Apply to: Julien’s Auctions,
Attn: Megan Miller 9665
Wilshire Blvd. #150, Beverly
Hills, CA 90210.
Art Director to coord dev &
prod of ad materials across
media
(tv/film/dig/print)
and suppt Copywriter &
Creative Dir for innovative
brand campaigns. Reqs BA/
BS in design +1 yr exp as Art
Director in mixed media advertising. Exp must incl: dig
social media; broadcast/video; print media; experiential
mktg; brand identity dsgn;
editing; fashion advertising;
In Design; & After Effects. Interview/Jobsite: Culver City,
CA. To apply mail resume
to: Omelet LLC, Attn: Dir
Recruiting, 3540 Hayden Avenue, Culver City CA 90232.
Principals only/No Calls/EOE

Easy on thre Joe, bro

Who’s doing what?

t’s perfectly fine to have a cup of coffee or tea to wake
you up, both in the morning and afternoon. But as with
most things, moderation is key. Too much caffeine can
disrupt sleep patterns, so
limit yourself to two or
three cups a day. Also, a
lack of physical activity
can lead to poor sleep and
exacerbate an afternoon
slump. Even if you
exercise regularly and get
adequate sleep, getting
up and moving around an hour or so after lunch can help
prevent mid-afternoon drowsiness. A brisk 10- to 15-minute
walk outside is an ideal way to feel energized.

n anticipation of a big client meeting, you
delegate tasks to various team members
in order to prepare the various collateral
needed. But one week before the meeting,
you aren’t sure which tasks have been
accomplished or even started. Cue panic.
Collaboration is one of the biggest benefits
of working within a team, but as a leader,
it can be difficult to keep track of who is
doing what and the status of current projects.
Project management tools like Taskworld
help you stay organized by letting you view
project metrics in real time. Taskworld also
lets you store and view all documents and
assignments and provide instant feedback.

I

Employment

Employment

BUSINESS
Business Analyst (Long
Beach, CA) Conduct market/
product studies & research
on client engagements to
provide solutions/improvements; Evaluate business
investment & development
opportunities; Analyze data
for company’s action plans
for improvement / implementations. 40hrs/wk, Bachelor in Economics or Related
Reqd. Resume to Turbo Air
Inc, Attn. Dan Cho, 4184 E
Conant St, Long Beach, CA
90808

COMPUTER
Senior Business Analyst
working with IT for healthcare/managed care systems.
Need Bachelor’s + 4 yrs exp.
as a System Owner of IT
systems and applications;
different Business Units and
IS/IT organization; Business
Analysis skills (understanding business requirements,
documenting
business
process and system requirements); and Project Management skills (project planning
and execution, handling
cross functional teams and
assignments). Send resume
to: HR, March Vision Care,
6701 Center Drive West,
Suite 790, LA, CA 90045. No
phone calls please. We are
an EEO Employer.

Business Solution Specialist, Material Handling (Nestle
Regional Globe Office North
America, Inc. – Glendale,
CA) Prov tech guidance w/
regard to the application of
GLOBE Solutions. F/T. Reqs
Master’s deg in CS, Eng, Ind
Mgmt or rel fld & 5 yrs’ exp in
job offered or in complet’g
full life cycle implementations of SAP/MH in a consumer goods env w/remote
mnfg locations. All stated
exp must incl: using SAP
ECC & MH, incl master data,
batch jobs, idoc failures, &
configs; post-implem support, incl troubleshoot’g,
ticket resolution, & on-call
duty; SAP integration & supply chain func (purchas’g,
customer service, demand
& supply plann’g, & quality); reqs gather’g, syst dsgn
doc, writ’g tech specs, & root
cause analysis; & exp w/ MH/
transportation & cross-func
integration impacts. Mail
resumes: Mary Lou Simo at
Nestlé USA, Inc. in Glendale,
CA at 800 N Brand Blvd,
Glendale, CA 91203. Ref Job
ID: BSS-GP.

Audit Senior @ BDO USA,
LLP (Los Angeles, CA) F/T.
Resolve accounting issues.
Apply Generally Accepted
Accounting
Principles
(GAAP) & Generally Accepted Auditing Stndrds (GAAS).
Assist mngr in gathering
info about bus & accounting
sys to prep audit strategy.
Engage in financial audits
& quarterly reviews. Review
results of audit plan. Draft
financial statemnts w/disclosures. Travel to various
unanticipated client sites in
LA metro area. Position reqs
Bachelor’s deg (or foreign
equiv) in Accounting or rltd
& 2 yrs exp in job off’d, as a
CASHIER
Snr Auditor, Snr Audit Associate, Auditor, or rltd. Exp
CASHIER/
must include: GAAP; GAAS;
CUSTOMER SERVICE
applying accounting prinHoward’s TV & Appliance
ciples to client trnsactions;
in Long Beach. Full-Time
drafting financial statemnts
position. No experience
w/disclosures; & researching
required, data entry, Filintrmdiate areas of accounting. Friendly. Call Derek
ing & providing support for
or at (562)427-0984 or
conclusions w/authoritative
Apply within: 3300 E. Willit. Emp will accept any suitlow St., Signal Hill CA.
able combo of education,
Email resume:
training or exp. Send resume
[email protected]
to: T. Brown, HR, BDO USA,
LLP; 1001 Morehead Square
Drive, Suite 300, Charlotte,
NC 28203. Indicate job title CHEMIST
& code “BDO-EQ” in cvr ltr. Head Research Chemist
EOE.
with PTP Group Americas,
Inc. in Studio City to oversee a team of scientists and
Internal Audit Manager researchers
conducting
(Multiple Positions), Ernst & qualitative and quantitaYoung U.S. LLP, Los Angeles, tive chemical analyses and
CA. Examine and analyze experiments relating to the
business processes and mechanical properties of
transactional records to PET-M resin. Fax resume
identify areas of risk, process to Alex Delnik at (323) 537and controls improvement, 8376.
and prepare internal audit
reports. Travel required ap- COMPUTER
proximately 50%, of which Principal IT Technologist
20% is international. Em- (Basis Admin - BI Portals) for
ployer will accept any suit- Medtronic, Inc. at its facilities
able combination of educa- located in Northridge, CA.
tion, training, or experience. Duties: Deliver solutions on
For complete job descrip- SAP platforms. Requires a
tion, list of requirements, Bachelor’s Degree or foreign
and to apply, go to: ey.com/ equivalent in Computer Scius/jobsearch (Job Number – ence, Information TechnolLOS0022P).
ogy, Electrical Engineering
or related field. Experience
must include six (6) years
AUTOMOTIVE
post-bachelors progressive
in all of the folAsst. Sales Manager experience
lowing: SAP BASIS AdminisRARE OPPORTUNITY tration in UNIX, Linux, and
Rare opening for an exWindows
environments
perienced assistant sales
running Oracle; Configuring
manager. Great dealerand maintaining single signship to work for, freeway
on module, LDAP group and
location in LA metro area.
EP role assignments includLots of benefits, high voling assessing portal pages in
ume dealer.
SAP and all related components; Federated Enterprise
If you are better than
Portals 7.3 and BI 7.3 Basis
good, this will be the
systems; BI/Portals ABAP
place for you.
and JAVA stacks with BOBJ;
SAP EP 7.3 in a cross doAsk for Honda Sales Mgr
main (UNIX and Windows);
(626) 359-8291 or
SAP platform migration
fax res: (626) 932-5627
experience including [email protected]
version of code page from
non-Unicode to Unicode;
SAP Upgrading experience;
AUTOMOTIVE
Installing and supporting
USED CAR SALES
TREX, Precalc servers and
SAP webdispatcher.
MANAGER/

SALES MANAGERS

Multi Volume Dealership
is currently looking for
Used Car Sales Mgrs &
Sales Mgrs with 5+ years
of experience to assist
us with our increasing
volume in Sales Department.
We offer excellent Salary, bonus, benefits &
compensation package
including medical, dental, vision, & 401K.
Email Resume to:
[email protected]
BAKER Filipino Specialty
Baker in Cerritos, CA: For Filipino Bakery and Restaurant;
Filipino Specialty Baker is responsible for in-house production of Filipino specialty
baked goods that are Goldilocks’ signature product.
Reqs: 24 months experience
as a Baker, must be wellversed in the recipes, formulation, and manufacture
of Filipino specialty baked
goods and native products.
Mail resumes: Milson Corporation, 35455 Dumbarton
Court, Newark, CA 94560,
Attn: Linda Rose
BUSINESS

ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT

To CEO. College Grad,
Good Admin & Computer
skills needed. Knowledge
in Real Estate Development a plus. Good Salary.
[email protected]

LA Times
Classified
(800) 234-4444

careeradvice

I

Aide Companion
Glendale. Rent free in lieu of
assistance for ambulatory
female. Parking, own bedroom, 1 bathroom. Some
English. Car? 818-484-8287

Employment

Apply at www.medtronic.
com/careers, Req. 99584.
Must have legal authority to
work in the US. Medtronic is
an equal opportunity employer committed to cultural
diversity in the workplace.
All individuals are encouraged to apply.

COMPUTER
Solutions Engineer needed
by Verizon in Los Angeles,
CA to provide pre-sales support for the sales of content
delivery/web streaming solutions. Requires travel in the
U.S. for up to 25% of work
time. To apply, mail resume
to Tino Lucente, Recruiting
Manager, Verizon, 13031 W.
Jefferson Blvd., Ste 300, Los
Angeles, CA 90094. Refer to
Job #KSS1-N.
COMPUTER
SR. APPLICATIONS DEVELOPER Req’d: BS, Comp.
Science or closely related, &
48 Month exp. in web applications development involving ASP.net, C#, & VB.net.
Create custom computer applications software for client
use to optimize user interface & efficiency. Full-time.
Precision Development Services, Inc. Hermosa Beach,
CA 90254. Email resume to P.
Zimny, Principal at [email protected]
precisiondev.net.
Sr. Architect NetWeaver
(Culver City, CA). Support
tech aspects of dvlpmnt
proj to meet reqs, on time
& budget. Assist apps
teams in dvlpmnt of SAP
NetWeaver Suite. Train on/
offshore resources. Prepare
tech assessment/architecture rpts. Create/maintain
data extract btw BW & other
systems. 24/7 ops support of
global BW system. Perform
competitive & gap analysis/vendor selection. Contribute to dvlpmnt of best
practice methods for FI, CO,
IM & Strategic Planning in
Media/Entertain. Develop/
maintain/publish tech stds.
Reqs: BS (or equiv) Comp
Eng or Comp Sci +5 yrs postBS exp in job offd or in SAP
NetWeaver dvlpmnt. 40 hrs/
wk. Contact: Sony Pictures
Entertainment, 10202 W.
Washington Blvd, SPP 3831,
REF #SRNETW05, Culver City,
CA 90232. Principals only.
US work auth req’d if hired.
EOE.
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing Estimator/Salesmen Min. 10yrs exp. 714968-8754
CONTRACTOR
Commercial
Electrical
seeks: Project Managers, Estimators, Purchasing Agent,
Foreman,Journeyman,
&Trainees.Foreman/Journeyman/Trainee REQUIRE:
State Cert. FAX Resume:
562.907.4156 or email: [email protected]
com
CUSTOMER

Service
Phone Agents

Woodland Hills, CA
Caine & Weiner has openings for energetic phone
agents to work PT or FT
in its Woodland Hills location. All shifts available.
Must have solid communication skills. Competitive wages and flexible
hours.
Please contact HR
Department at Caine &
Weiner E-mail [email protected] or call 818
251-1733

STUDENT JOBS
You Can Earn

$200 to$500
Per Week!

Are you Responsible, AmbiTous,
and Outgoing?
Does earning Money and winning
Prizes moTvate you?
Want to be part of a Successful
Team represenTng the Los
Angeles Times?
If so, we want to hire YOU!

Robinson Helicopter Company
Is Accepting Applications For:
ACCOUNTANT / ACCOUNTS PAYABLE
Robinson Helicopter Company in Torrance, CA
is looking for a staff accountant responsible
for Accounts Payable and various accounting
related duties.
Required: Bachelor’s degree with proficiency
in Microsoft Excel and 4 years of relatable
experience.
Excellent salary and benefits

!

Must Be At Least 16 yrs of Age

!

Must Enjoy Talking to People

!

Transportation & Training Provided

!

Live in the SAN GABRIEL VALLEY

Please apply in person or by email

Call Today!

2901 Airport Drive, Torrance CA 90505 • [email protected]
Applications Accepted 8:00 am. To 10:00 am. & 1:00 pm. To 3:00 pm.
www.robinsonheli.com

(562) 313-0951

L AT I M ES . C O M / B US I N E S S

Employment

S

Employment

Employment

DENTIST

Childrens Dentist

Route Supervisor /
Foodservice Industry

Moreno Valley, must have
oral sedation certificate,
excellent pay $500-$1500
contact 951-242-2600 or
fax resume to 951-243-8970
email [email protected]

A successful foodservice
distribution company in
Los Angeles, CA has an immediate opening for an experienced Route Supervisor
to manage and direct the
driver team.

DESIGNER
Pet Product Designer
Inafiction USA, Inc. in LA.
Develop ideas, drawings, illustration for pet products.
Evaluate design concepts
& its feasibility. Modify designs. Research product
spec, costs & materials. Send
resume to HR at 1458 S. San
Pedro St. #320 LA, CA 90015.

Ability to interface and work
with all branch employees,
customers and support the
Branch Manager in the daily
operation of the branch.
Serves as a route relief driver
in an emergency.
Must be detail oriented with
strong communication, organizational skills and analytical ability.

DESIGNER
Skyrocket Toys, LLC., in LA,
CA, seeks Product Designer:
Duties: Design interactive
toy prod. focus on new &
existing brands & pckg. Create concept sketch & renderings. Comp. 3D design/
modeling. Research mrkt.
trends. Dev. & doc. all aspects of design incl. product
ID, design concept, & content generation. Confer w/
Asian counterparts re: various parts of design process.
Prep. reports to superiors &
verify that project goals are
met. BS in Product Design
req. Mail resumes to HR,
Skyrocket Toys LLC., 12910
Culver Blvd., Suite F, Los Angeles, CA 90066.

Drivers: LOCAL – Home
Nightly! Container Port
Hauls Los Angeles, Long
Beach, LaMirada, CA Great
Pay & Benefits! CDL-A, 1yr
Diamond Sales (Los Ange- Exp. Req. w/TWIC preferred.
les) Examine diamonds for Estenson Logistics. 1-866genuineness, quality and 336-9642
value. Grade and estimate
value to negotiate price for
DRIVER
sale. 2 yrs exp req. Send
resume to Yerushalmi Bros
FedEx Class A CDL
Diamonds USA, 550 S Hill,
Truck Driver
Los Angeles, CA 90013.

Director, China Research
(Los Angeles, CA) Analyze
China’s econ cond & relationship to U.S. econ & the
world. Supervise collection
& maintenance of comprehensive statl databases on
intl econ & finl markets.
Check & back-test data ensuring validity, suitability, &
continuity in statl analysis.
Focus on key sectors & ind in
China & relationship to those
in the U.S. & implications of
rel. Forecast major Chinese
econ indicators. Review Chinese bus, fin’l market, & econ
policy reports as related to
U.S. & global econ. Track key
Chinese econ policy bodies
& their writings & materials
as related to U.S. & global
cond, & provide guidance &
instruction to jr staff in translating this material. Comm
interpretations & findings
through daily & real-time
reports. Draft sections of
major research pub & daily
internal reports. Initiate &
lead research projects. Collaborate w/ the firm & comm
with VIP clients. Utilize: CEIC,
DataInsight,
Bloomberg,
Excel, PowerPoint, Word.
REQ: Master’s deg in Applied
Finance. 1 yr exp in job offd
or related role w/ similar job
duties. Full term of exp must
incl researching economic
conditions in China. CFA
designation. Proficiency in
Excel, PowerPoint, finanl
toolsets ie CEIC, DataInsight,
& Bloomberg. Any suitable
combo of edu, exp or training will be accepted. RES:
Evercore Partners Services
East, LLC 55 East 52nd St,
New York, NY 10055 Attn:
Anne Spoto

Employment

DRIVER

Home Weekly
$1,000/wk

*$0.42-0.48/mile
*No loadning/unloading
just drop/hook
*Terminal stops, all highway
*Year-round work
*Team driving OTR 5 days
out 2 days home
REQUIREMENTS
*Doubles Endorsements
*6 Months and over experience (ICE & SNOW)
*5 yrs no DUI
*1 truck ticket max in 3
yrs
*5yrs no felony/misde
meanor
Ardian Marina
951-552-4760
DRIVER

Now Hiring
All CDL Drivers
Attn: Veterans
We Want You!
Truck Drivers
New Pay &
Bonus Plans!
Immed Openings
Team OTR Class A
CALL 818-376-6962

FAST TURNS
& BENEFITS
818-376-6962
"Thank You Veterans"
www.wolfe-trucking.com

Engineering: Senior Mechanical Engineer sought
by Buro Happold Consulting
Engineers, Inc. in Los Angeles, CA. Resp for conducting
HVAC design of mech engnrng sys w/in bldgs. Reqs
Master’s degree in Engnrng
or rltd field w/ min 3 yrs
of mech engnrng exp incl
project planning, delivery
of construction projs, drawing prod using AutoCAD &
Revit MEP, using calc sftwr
(IES & Trace 700) & calcs for
energy modeling, & exp in
HVAC design of mech sys &
sustainable sys for educational, cultural, & commercial bldgs. Reqs exp wrkg
on int’l construction projs,
complying w/ international
codes, & wrkg & designing
in both Imperial (IP) & metric
(SI) units. Res to Buro Happold Consulting Engineers,
Inc. ATTN: Rebeca MartinezBarrett, 800 Wilshire Blvd, FL
16, Los Angeles, CA 90017.

Employment

Employment

Financial Analyst sought
by Leon Chien Corp. dba
Re/Max 2000 Realty in City
of Industry, CA. Duties:
Maintain & dvlp various financial models & standard
templates distributed for
use by all of Finance during the planning processes,
ensuring quality, accuracy
& focused analytic review.
Identify financial status
by comparing & analyzing
actual results with plans &
forecasts. Provide timely, re
levant & accurate reporting
& analysis of the results of
the division’s performance
against historical, budgeted,
forecasted & strategic planning results to facilitate
decision-making toward the
achievement of the budget
& strategic plan. Respond to
ad-hoc projects related to incentive compensation prgm.
Research & resolve Business
Unit(s) inquiries for assigned
functional areas. Assist with
the new business process &
working with Finance & Business Mgrs. Support Financial
Planning & Analysis (FP&A)
business unit analysts by
being first point of contact
for issues & questions. Responsible for performing
special projects to improve
process efficiency & performance Projects as assigned
by Mgmt. Provide financial
& analytical support for the
incentive compensation accounting & forecasting processes . Reqs Bachelor’s Deg
in Bus Admin of Finance or
Accounting. 6 mos exp with
Lone Wolf/ Broker Wolf &
Quickbooks s/ware. Coursework in Business Finance,
Advanced Accounting &
Cost Accounting, Auditing,
Quantitative Business Analysis, Organizational Behavior,
Strategic Mgmt. Ability to
perform complex financial
analysis, forecasting, financial modeling & data mining
for financial analysis. Exp
in analyzing compensation
mgmt & in making comparative analyses & recommending actions to upper
mgmt. Exp conducting mkt
research, business intelligence, & valuation comps,
exp with business processes
to provide practical clear
financial analysis. Mail resume to Re/Max 2000 Realty
17843 Colima Rd, City of Industry, CA 91748

HEALTH CARE
Manager of Health Services: Bachelors in Nursing
or health admin +5 yrs exp.
Mail res. to: Golden Years
Services Inc, 60 E Live Oak
Ave, Arcadia, CA 91006

The ideal candidate must
have a valid Class A and
computer skills. The ability
to lift up to 60 lbs. Full-time
position with excellent salary and health benefits.
Closed weekends & holidays. ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING MANAGER
Respond only if qualified. Mgr, Product Integration
Send cover letter & resume – Manage R&D team to
to [email protected] dev audio integration for
or fax cover letter & resume cochlear implant systems.
Job site: Valencia, CA. MS
to: 323-724-4519
+ 4 yrs exp. Must have
EOE
exp w/ research, evaluation, design, and testing
DRIVER
algorithms in field of hearSame-day Messenger ing aid applications; DSP
Work available immediately technology and binaural
for Independent Contractors signal processing; acoustical
with own small car or van. measurement instruments;
Commission based work acoustic analysis using FEM;
24/7 in all So Calif. For info;
adaptive multi-microphone
Email [email protected]
(beam-former), wind noise
Dynamex.com or visit
cancellation, and wireless
www.dynamex.com
transmission technologies;
one full product dev cycle
EDUCATION
for hearing aid/cochlear imElementary Bilingual plant product from conceptTwo-Way Immersion >commercialization->post
commercial support. Resume to Advanced Bionics,
Teacher
Teach elem level multiple Attn: R. Hall/Re:MPI, 28515
subjects in Spanish and Eng- Westinghouse Pl, Valencia,
lish. Valid OR Elem Teaching CA 91355.
License with ESOL/Bilingual
endorsement. Must be bilin- ENGINEERING
gual in Spanish and English. Project Manager: manage
Phoenix-Talent Schools-Find Integrated Project Schedule,
apps and complete job desc analyze & escalate project
online at www.phoenix.k12. issues/risk, etc. MS in Elecor.us. Send app materials to tronics & Comm. Engrng,
Personnel Office at PO Box or related, OR BS in Electronics& Comm Engrng, or
698 Phoenix, OR 97535 or
email to [email protected] related (foreign equiv ok)
plus 5 yrs of progrssv exp
phoenix.k12.or.us.
as Project Manager. Jobsite:
Long Beach, CA 90802. Mail
Electrical Technician: 1 yr resume to:Logic House Ltd.,
exp. as Electrical Tech. req. Attn: HR- 49950 Jefferson St.
GRAPHIC
Mail Resume to: NRG Heat- #130-391, Indio, CA 92201.
Computer game studio
ing & Air Conditioning, Inc.,
seeks Environment Tex7012 Owensmouth Ave., Cature Artist/Hi-Res Surface
noga Park, CA 91303
Sculptor to sculpt & paint
textures req’d for rendering
physically based game enE l e c t r i ci a n / H a nd y m a n
vironments. Reqs: 4 yrs. exp.
Electrician with general
as environment or texture
handyman skills needed imartist, or related, or in altermediately. Should perform
native, bachelor’s in comp.
various scopes of work and
graphic art, or related, plus
manage smaller projects.
(2) yrs. exp. as environment
Pay DOE. Send Resumes and
or
texture artist, or related.
cover letter to [email protected]
Exp. in sculpt & paint 3D &
profoundsystems.com
2D images, sculpt surface
details & control shader features to variety of material
types, ability to create proper UV layout & tiling textures
for games, working exp.
with shader networks & with
banking textures from high
res meshes, & Maya & Brush
skills req’d. Job site: Santa
Monica, CA. Work Auth. req’d
if hired. Send resume to:
Naughty Dog, 2425 Olympic
Blvd, Ste. 3000 West, Santa
Monica, CA 90404. Principals only.
GRAPHIC
Graphic Designer, home
furnishings retailer. Send resume to Duarm Corp, 169 N.
La Brea Ave. #C, Los Angeles,
CA 90036

Advertising Supplement

Use company tech
for this, not that

T

echnology has blurred the lines between work
and our personal lives, with cell phones that
are capable of staying “always connected”
and “always working.” Maybe that’s why there’s
always the additional temptation to use technology for
personal entertainment, like browsing social media or
using your own email or banking information while
on the clock.
You’re sure HR would have something to say about
your use of company technology, but are there really
any risks to playing Sims on your computer at lunch?
Does it really matter if you pay your credit card bill
online between client phone calls?
According to a recent LawInfo article on company
technology, “While many employers have developed
written policies regarding computer usage by
employees that may give some guidance in this area,
employers generally have the discretion to monitor
and restrict employees’ personal computer usage
as they see fit. As a result, you may be subject to
discipline, or even discharge, as an employee if you
violate your employer’s policies regarding personal
computer usage.”
Consult your employee manual or speak to your
HR or IT department about your company’s specific
rules for proper use of company technology, but here
are some general guidelines which might help you
stay under the radar:

Internet browsing

If Internet access temporarily goes down at your
company, plenty of people will joke that there’s no
way they can complete their work. It’s true that the
Internet plays a central role in many people’s jobs
today, but it’s also true that the Internet helps pass the
time between tasks at work.
And while you may rely on celebrity gossip sites
and sports updates to get you through the day, assume
that your employer is watching everything you
access—and use your good judgment before exploring
all of the Internet at your desk. “Employers generally
can track employees’ Internet usage, in terms of time
spent online, websites visited, and engagement in
other online activities,” according to LawInfo. “An
employer also may restrict an employee’s access to
the Internet or access to certain websites, or prohibit
personal usage of workplace computers altogether.”

Instant messaging and chatting

Many instant messengers have an “off the record”
setting that prevents the program from saving any
record of the conversation. But don’t think that will
stop employers from seeing your conversation with
another co-worker about your annoying manager’s
meeting requests. LawInfo writes that “even if your
employer permits you to use your computer for your

personal matters, you should have no expectation
of privacy as to the contents of your computer or
your email accessed via that computer. Generally,
an employer has the right to monitor your computer
usage, whether it is for business or personal purposes,
including your email, any websites that you frequent,
chat history, and any other personal information
stored on your computer.” If you’re accessing
personal materials from a work device, there’s likely a
way for your employer to view those materials, too.

Email

Company emails shouldn’t be used for personal
use, and they certainly shouldn’t be used in any
job searching capacity. This may seem like basic
information, but it’s important to understand the logic
behind monitoring your work email. LawInfo explains
that employers are generally free to monitor and read
employees’ email messages, with no restrictions.
“The theory in this situation is that emails sent using a
workplace computer are the property of the employer,
regardless of whether the sender or recipient of the
email message intended to keep its contents private.
Whether an employer is monitoring email messages to
and from employees in order to ensure that employees
are productive, to guarantee that employees are not
disclosing confidential information, or simply to
decrease the possibility of any employee misconduct
or wrongdoing, employers typically are well within
their rights to monitor employee email.”

Social media

You’ve heard stories of employees getting fired
over social media rants about their employer, but
what about free speech? According to LawInfo,
“While negative postings about your employer may
be legal and permissible under the First Amendment,
your employer may be able to discipline and even
discharge you if you are openly critical about your
employer. Many states consider most employees to
be at will, which means that you can be discharged
for any reason other than an illegally discriminatory
reason. Another reason for discipline or discharge
by your employer in this situation is if you divulge
confidential information from your workplace in
your web page or blog. If an employer finds that you
have violated a stated workplace policy regarding
confidentiality of information, you are likely to be
subject to discipline or discharge.”
It may seem like you can’t really use your work
computer for anything other than work. Keeping your
work and personal devices separate will most likely
keep your work life and personal matters separate,
all while preventing you from oversharing to the
company, and preventing the company from losing
important business information or security.

BI Developer Advisor for
Anthem Inc. in Woodland
Hills, CA to interface w/ developers, business analysts,
system analysts, architects,
DBA’s, Lights On Team, Production Control team, Date
Integration Services, & data
architects for completing
activities related to assigned
projects. Bach’s deg in CS,
Eng’g or related field (will
accept for. educ. equiv.) and
6 yrs of exp. in BI ETL analysis & reporting. Exp. must
include: Teradata, Oracle &
SQL Server coding & performance tuning/optimization;
implementing ETL features/
functions in Informatica;
full SDLC, including one or
more of Agile, Waterfall or
Lean; presentation of design documents to both IT &
business stakeholders; data
warehouse/data modeling;
and healthcare/insurance
domain. Must be certified
in one of the following: Informatica (Architect level),
Oracle or SQL. If interested
in this role/for immediate
consideration, visit
www.careers.anthem.com
and apply online to position
number 103827.
Business Intelligence &
Reporting Analyst. Master
deg or fgn equiv in Comp
Sci, MIS, Engr or rel field +
5yrs exp w/ C#, Unix C++ or
C++ & SQL. Exp to include
3yrs w/ Visual Basic & exp w/
Secondary Marketing (trading, hedging, pricing, best
execution, optimization &
pooling), mortgage banking
& correspondent lending &
mortgage fin. Job location
is Woodland Hills, CA. Send
resume to Sara Khatchatourian, AmeriHome Mortgage
Company, LLC, 21300 Victory Blvd, # 900, Woodland
Hills, CA 91367. EOE.
HEAD OF INTEGRATION
sought by Xsolla (USA) Inc.
in Sherman Oaks, CA to dvlp
target architecture of online
billing systems, payment
methods, and financial tools
for video game company clientele. Reqs Master’s or foreign equiv in Actng, Finance,
Applied
Mathematics
or related, 1 yr progressive
exp in related ocptn & reqs
only little domestic & intnl
travel. Resume to HR Dept.
(Job No. 18593), Xsolla (USA)
Inc., 15301 Ventura Blvd.,
Bldg E, Rm 100, Sherman
Oaks, CA 91403.

WST

Employment
Medical Receptionist. Req.
High School Deg./Equivalent. 40 hrs/wk. Resume:
Health N Joy Corp. 13422
San Antonio Dr., Norwalk,
CA 90650
MODEL
Photogenic People Needed Presently seeking goodlooking/photogenic men,
women, & kids, all ages, all
ethnicities for photo shoots
for Bride & Groom US Magazine/LA edition. No exp. necessary. For appt. call 1-844784-1212
Office Clerk: Apply by mail
only to Style In USA, Inc.,
800 E. 12th St., #433, Los
Angeles, CA 90021, attn.
President.
Order Clerks - Obtain
customer’s names, billing
information & items to be
purchased; & prepare invoices, shipping documents, &
contracts. Send resume: Systor Systems, Inc. 4010 Valley
Blvd #105, Walnut, CA 91789
(job site)

PRESSMAN

Experienced Pressman for
Focus machine (Flexo) is
needed. Health ins, 401K.
Good pay, Full time. email:
[email protected] Tel:
213 746-7772
PROPERTY

ON-SITE RESIDENT
MANAGER

(Sun Valley) Min 5 yrs exp
w/ min 100 unit Bldg.
Good credit, no bankruptcy & no eviction
record. Computer & Communication skills needed.
Section 8 exp a plus!
[email protected]
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Red Lorry Yellow Lorry
Communications, Inc., located in Hermosa Bch, CA,
seeks an Account Director
to oversee the planning and
presentation of strategic
Public Relations plans for
the company’s US clients.
Appropriate education and
experience req’d. MAIL resumes to: RLYL Inc., Attn: HR,
727 2nd St., Unit 108, Hermosa Bch, CA 90254.
Receptionists - Greet,
answer calls, schedule appointments, & transmit information & documents to
customers. Send resume:
Cooking & More, Inc. 266 S.
Harvard Blvd #303, Los Angeles, CA 90004 (job site)

SHIPPING
Shipping / Receiving
LAX South Bay Co, FT ShipPROJECT ENGINEER sought ping Rec Clerk, MUST HAVE
by Xsolla (USA) Inc. in SherUPS Worldwide & Fed Ex
man Oaks, CA to implement
software exp.
IT project lifecycles from
planning, design, developForklift exp NOT NEEDED
ment, & testing to deployment. Reqs Master’s or Competitve salary\benefits,
foreign equiv in Computer
2 yrs exp
Science or related & 6 mos
Email resumes:
exp as a Project Engineer,
[email protected]
Software Developer, or related ocptn using algorithSOCIAL SERVICES
mic languages to develop
Clinical Supervisor
& improve online payment
technologies and services
LMFT/LCSW
for worldwide online game
Needed to provide clinimarkets. Resume to HR
cal supervision for TheraDept. (Job No. 18594), Xsolla
pists. LMFT or LCSW and
(USA) Inc., 15301 Ventura
3 years post licensure
Blvd., Bldg E, Rm 100, Sherexp. required. Certificaman Oaks, CA 91403.
tion in either TF-CBT,
Seeking Safety or MAP.
Email resume: [email protected]
Housekeeping Day Porters,
amanecerla.org.
Lead porters need luxury
Email resume: [email protected]
property Playa Vista pay
amanecerla.org.
porter $15.50 hr lead $17 hr,.
Benefits medical. Exper hotel, health luxury properties SOFTWARE
great presence language ALE USA, Inc. seeks Software
QA Engineer in Calabasas,
skills.
CA to test & provide QA for
Send resume [email protected]
ALE Switches & dvlp autoserviceconnection.net
mation scripts. Req. MS or
call:(310)-819-8289
for equiv in Elctrl Eng, CS,
Comp Eng or rel. +2 yrs of
Maintenance Residential exp. Mail resume to ALE
Hotel. Plumbing experience USA, Inc., Attn: HR, 26801
necessary. Starting $12 per W Agoura Road, Calabasas,
hour Close to downtown CA 91301. Include job code
71748 in reply. EOE.
213-484-8086
MANUFACTURING

Immediate
Openings!!!

Aerospace Mfg. Company
hiring for multiple jobs.
General Mfg. workers for
composites and metals,
Production
Manager,
CMM/Tooling
Inspectors, NDT Techs, Planner/Scheduler. Previous
union mfg exp preferred.
Benes offered. Apply:
arrowheadproducts.net
or M-F/10a-12p,
4411 Katella,
Los Alamitos, CA EOE
M/F/D/V.
MANUFACTURING
Job Fair-Aerospace Manufacturing in Brea
Esterline Technologies
June 9th and June 17th
9:00AM- 12:00PM
Brea Community Center
Art Studio Room
695 Madison Ave. Brea
Pay starts at $10/hr
Requirements needed
please contact for details.
Aerotek in Santa Ana at
(714) 729-3631
Select Staffing in La Habra
at (714) 269-9544
EOE/M/F/D/PV
MARKETING
Business
Development
Analyst in Rancho Palos
Verdes, CA; conduct market research for Chinese
fast-food chain restaurants;
Require Bachelor Degree in
Marketing or Business Admin. & 2-yr exp. in market
analysis & business dvlpmnt
for chain restaurants or
Master Degree in Marketing
or Business Admin. & zero
month exp.; Mail resume to
HR Mgr, Chinese Gourmet
Group, Inc., 430 Silver Spur
Rd., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA
90275
Marketing Manager/International sought by a company actively engaged in
selling to retailers innovative
travel pillows, comfort products accessories and on-thego gear on a Global basis.
Work site: Woodland Hills,
CA. Bachelors degree req.
in Business Management
or, Marketing + 1 yrs. post
degree exp. in same job or, 1
yrs. post exp. in a Sales Management environment or,
closely related. International
travel req. Mail resume to:
Mr. David B. Sternlight, CEO.
Cabeau. Inc., 5850 Canoga
Ave, Suite #100, Woodland
Hills, CA 91367.

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

C5

Employment

Employment

Tax Manager Compliance
and Reporting (Multiple Positions), Ernst & Young U.S.
LLP, Los Angeles, CA. Examine, analyze, and interpret
accounting records to give
advice and assessments
of potential risk areas, and
development of operating
blueprints to implement
more effective management, control and visibility
over the global compliance
and reporting function. Travel to meet client needs, up
to 30% nationally. Employer
will accept any suitable combination of education, training, or experience. For complete job description, list of
requirements, and to apply,
go to: ey.com/us/jobsearch
(Job # - LOS0022S).

TECHNOLOGY
Help build the next generation of systems behind
Facebook’s products. Facebook, Inc. currently has
the following openings in
Woodland Hills, CA (various
levels/types): Systems Engineer (5116N) Lead systems
engineering of future novel
optical
communications
technologies. Mail resume
to: Facebook, Inc. Attn: SBGIM, 1 Hacker Way, Menlo
Park, CA 94025. Must reference job title & job# shown
above, when applying.

TECHNICAL
Cisco Systems, Inc. is accepting resumes for the following position in Los Angeles,
CA:
Network Consulting
Engineer (Ref.#: LA3):
Responsible for the support
and delivery of Advanced
Services to company’s major
accounts. Telecommuting
permitted and travel may be
required to various unanticipated locations throughout
the United States. Please
mail resumes with reference
number to Cisco Systems,
Inc., Attn: M51H, 170 W. Tasman Drive, Mail Stop: SJC
5/1/4, San Jose, CA 95134.
No phone calls please.
Must be legally authorized
to work in the U.S. without
sponsorship.
EOE. www.
cisco.com
Special Process Technician
sought by FTG Circuits, Inc.,
Chatsworth, CA. Rqrs. Deg’d
&/or exp. w/in the mil-spec
& specialty printed circuit
boards manuf industry. Resume to [email protected]
com.
TECHNOLOGY
Deloitte Consulting LLP
seeks an AMS Manager in
Los Angeles, CA & various
unanticipated Deloitte office
locations & client sites nationally to expand or modify
SAP sys to serve new purposes or improve bus work flow.
Test, maintain, & monitor
SAP jobs & sys’s, including
coordinating the installation
of upgrades & SAP patches.
Reqts: Bach deg or equiv in
Engg (any), Comp Sci, MIS,
CIS or rel + 5 yrs exp providing IT consulting svcs to
clients. Employer will accept
Master’s deg in stated areas
+ 3 yrs exp. 80% travel req.
To apply, visit http://careers.
deloitte.com/jobs/eng-US
& search for the “Keyword”
XTSI16FC0615LOS2.
“Deloitte” means Deloitte LLP &
its subsidiaries. Please see
www.deloitte.com/us/about
for a detailed description
of the legal structure of Deloitte LLP & its subsidiaries.
Deloitte LLP & its subsidiaries are equal opportunity
employers.

TELEMARKETING

Home
Improvement
Appointment
Setters,
Telemarketers
& Canvassers
Needed
Urgently!

High Hourly Pay Up to
$1,000 Weekly!
Commission + Bonuses!
FT/PT shifts avail.

We are now hiring
hardworking, high energy
conversation starters with
motivation to make top$$$!
All Telemarketing
Experience Welcomed
Call to Set an Interview

(323) 979-4019
Los Angeles Location
TELEMARKETING

Immediately
Hiring Apply
Today Start
Today!

Paid Weekly Hourly Plus
Commission and Bonuses!

Morning Interviews
8-10 a.m.
Seats are limited.
Home Improvement
Exp. Helpful

Call Now!
213-905-0179 or
213-905-0180
TRANSPORTATION

Class A Driver W/TWIC

Class A drivers w/ TWIC card
needed for port work. Top
pay.
ESI Express (562)408-4559
TRAVEL

TRAVEL
TECHNOLOGY
Deloitte Consulting LLP
COUNSELORS
seeks a Consultant, TechnolNEEDED
ogy, Deloitte Digital, Oracle
** Will Train **
Customer in Los Angeles,
SALES & CUSTOMER
CA & various unanticipated
SERVICE BACKGROUND
Deloitte office locations
PREFERRED
& client sites nationally to
www.ptsla.com
function as an integrator
btwn bus needs & tech solutions. Interact w/ end users
to identify front end soultion
TRUCKING
needs; create visual dsgn,
color scheme & layouts to
TEAM & SOLO
prvde the most intuitive
DRIVERS
user exp; & implmnt Oracle
“ NOW HIRING “
CRM tech-enabled bus soCLASS “A” DRIVERS,
lutions. Reqts: Bach deg or
WEEKLY PAY, DIRECT DEequiv in Engg (any), Info Sys,
POSIT, CA. TO MIDWEST,
Dgtl Media, Comp Sci or rel
HOME WEEKLY.
+ 1 yr exp prvdg IT cnsltg
GREAT PAY!
svcs. Emplyr will accept
Solo at $.42 /mile
Mstrs deg in stated field as
Team
at $.50 /mile
mtg Bach deg req. 80% trvl
req. To apply, visit http://
Call
(909)
452-6301
careers.deloitte.com/jobs/
Email: [email protected]
eng-US & search for “Keyskyinctrucking.com
word” XTSI16FC0615LOS1.
“Deloitte” means Deloitte
LLP & its subsidiaries. Please
see www.deloitte.com/us/ TRUCKING
about for a detailed descrip- Truck Driver Superior Tank
tion of the legal structure of Lines $20.00/Per Hr. OverDeloitte LLP & its subsidiar- time Pay after 40 hrs. Earn
ies. Deloitte LLP & its subsid- $81,000 / year 2 yr Class A
SOFTWARE
Oracle America, Inc. has iaries are equal opportunity exper. Haz + Tanker Endorse.
Will train Hazmat. All local
openings for Software De- employers.
work in Paramount. Rotatveloper positions in Culver
ing days off. Call MaryAnn
City, CA. Job duties include: TECHNOLOGY
Design, develop, trouble- Graphic Designer should 909 512-6121. [email protected]
shoot and/or test/QA soft- create and design visual superiortanklines.com
ware. Apply online at oracle. concepts; develop graphics TRUCKING
com (req # 15000SSD). Or e- & layouts for product demail resume to [email protected] sign. Associate’s degree in Truck Driving Delivery
oracle.com, referencing req industrial design or related
Position
# 15000SSD. Oracle sup- field plus 2 year Exp. Req’d.
Class A Lic. and Food Distr.
ports workforce diversity.
Resume to Royal Imex, Inc. Exper. Req’d. Local Routes.
12605 E. Clark St. Santa Fe Apply: 2021 East 52nd St.
Software Engineer sought Springs, CA 90670
Vernon, CA 90058
by Teradyne, Inc., manuFax Resume: 323-589-1996
facturer of automatic test
equipment, to write softWAREHOUSE
ware that presents programmatic interface to software &
Warehouse Security
hardware that control ATE,
PT/FT $10.00+/hour
& interface to databases &
Unarmed, L.A. area, PM
class structures that will be
weekends must. Will train
loaded to ATE. Position in
& help you w/guard card.
Agoura Hills, CA. Req. BachCall Daily 8am-6pm.
elor’s degree or equiv. in
(323) 889-1922
Electrical Eng., Comp. Sci.,
Comp. Eng. or related field &
2 yrs. wk. exp. in job offered
or related field of software
development for testing; alternatively, Master’s degree
or equiv. & no wk. exp. Apply at www.teradyne.com
or send resume to Wayne
LOOKING FOR WORK?
Grout, HR, Teradyne, Inc.,
Now Hiring Experienced:
700 Riverpark Drive MS: NR7001 North Reading, MA
Pressroom
Operator: Leadperson
01864. Ref. 10476BR
SOFTWARE
Interested candidates send
resume to: Google Inc., PO
Box 26184 San Francisco,
CA 94126 Attn: D. Racherla.
Please reference job # below:
Software Engineer (Venice,
CA) Design, develop, modify,
and/or test software needed
for various Google projects.
#1615.17536 Exp Incl: C++
&/or Java; Multithreaded
programming;
Advanced
algorithms; SQL; & distrib
systems.

SOFTWARE
Software Engineer 2
X.Commerce, Inc., an eBay
co., seeks Software Engineer
2 in Culver City: Dvlp & implmnt software, interfaces
& integration modules to external sys. by dvlping technical solutions. Deliver consulting services to Magento
pltfrm merchants & solution
partners. Share technical
knowledge subject matter
expertise w/the Magento
community. Req’s: BS(or
equiv.)+1 yr. exp. Must be
legally authorized to work
in US w/o sponsorship. Submit resume w/ ref. to: Req.
#: OZ881(LAT) to: HR (Cube
4120B), eBay Inc. HQ, 2065
Hamilton Ave., San Jose, CA
95125. EOE

responsible for the overall direcaon and
operaaon of the assigned press and crew
members. Responsible for the efficient
use of available ame and staff to meet
make ready producaon requirements.
Monitor and adjust the folder assembly,
and instruct, direct and work with crew
members in the press operaaon to
produce a quality product to meet the
distribuaon schedules. 3+ years
experience as a Press Operator,
leadership ability, and excellent
communicaaon skills.

Pressperson: Performs all duaes
required to operate the web presses
which include webbing, plaang,
color balance, compensaaon, supplying
newsprint, cleaning and maintenance
of equipment, etc. as directed by the
Operator. 4+ years experience as a
Pressperson. Able to li_ up to 75lbs,
and stand up to 8 hours. Requires
frequent bending, squa\ng and
twisang. Mechanical apatude and
experience in prinang required. Must
have excellent communicaaon skills.
• Great Benefits (Medical,
Dental, Vision, 401K, Credit
Union, Paid Vacaaon, Paid
Holidays and more!)
• Growth Opportuniaes
• Great Environment

Will Train for:
Part-Time Packagers:

MANUFACTURING

**Manufacturing Management**

Growing Los Angeles based OEM of mailboxes and lockers is
seeking experienced manufacturing management for production and plant operations.
Familiarity with robotic and manual welding, sheet metal, milling,
punch presses, machine shops, powder coating, riveting, stamping, metal sawing, forklifts, deburring, aluminum extrusions,
assembly and maintenance are helpful. Competitive salary and
benefits package including medical, dental, vision and 401K.
Visit our website at www.mailboxes.com
E-mail resume to [email protected]
Fax resume to 323-232-7789

Set-up and
feed newspaper product into inserang
machines. Maintain a feeding pace to
sustain uninterrupted operaaon of the
inserang machines. Able to li_ up to
50lbs, and stand up to 8 hours. Requires
frequent bending and twisang.

Apply at:

h]p://www.tribpub.com/
career-opportuniaes/ or send resume to
[email protected]
(No Phone Calls Please)
An equal opportunity employer, offers compeaave
compensaaon, benefit package and the opportunity
for professional development.

C6

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

WST

S

L AT I M E S. CO M / B U SI N E SS

Online powered by

To advertise in this directory, please contact 1.800.234.444, ext 76394

Health & Fitness
PREGNANT? CONSIDERING
ADOPTION? Call us first.
Living expenses, housing,
medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose
adoptive family of your
choice. Call 24/7. 866-9293567 (CDCN)

Don’t let the
phone stop
ringing

Lowest Prices on Health &
Dental Insurance. We have
the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 855-7886539 (CDCN)

Advertise with
LA Times Classified
LA Times Classified
(800) 234-4444

General
Announcements
Collectibles and
Memorabilia

Jukebox

Original 1960s Seeburg
Jukebox-Good condition &
plays fine. Comes with 100
45 RPM records from the
1950s-60s. Price: $4,500.
Phone: 805-630-8537

WANTED

TOP $ PAID FOR RECORDS
45'S LP'S AND 78'S
ROCK JAZZ R&B SOUL BLUES
323 799 5280

Antiques

Antiques,Collectibles,Rugs
Dealers welcome
www.butterfly-galleries.com

SALES EVENTS
Estate Sales
Lange Foundation
Annual Estate Sale

Continues with new
donations of
designer furniture
and accessories
11 am to 5:00 pm
Wednesday thru Sunday
11318 Santa Monica Blvd
Los Angeles 90025

Mr. Beckett’s 3rd
Birthday

Mr. Beckett, you are such a
wonderful gift to the family. Your guitar skills are over
the top. You tease everyone.
Your smile lights up any
room. Your sister was born
in March. You are a wonderful big brother! You hold
her. You share your things
with her. You share your
pool with her. Enjoy your
birthday!
DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is
King? Your doorway to statewide Public Notices, California Newspaper Publishers
Association Smart Search
Feature. Sign-up, Enter keywords and sit back and let
public notices come to you
on your mobile, desktop,
and tablet. For more information call Cecelia @ (916)
288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com (CDCN)

DID YOU KNOW Newspapergenerated content is so
valuable it’s taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed,
posted, copied, edited, and
emailed countless times
throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of
Beverly Hills
Newspaper Advertising. For
Sat. 6/13, Sun. 6/14 10a-3p a free brochure call 916-288627 North Palm Dr. 90210 6011 or email [email protected]
Knabe Baby Grand Piano & com (CDCN)
vintage & contemporary furnishings. 310-550-7968
DID YOU KNOW that not
only does newspaper media reach a HUGE Audience,
they also reach an ENGAGED
AUDIENCE. Discover the
Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure
call 916-288-6011 or email
[email protected] (CDCN)
Garage and

Yard Sales

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK
OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR
THE BLIND. Free 3 Day VaCulver City
3945 Globe Ave 11am-5pm cation, Tax Deductible, Free
Towing, All Paperwork Taken
6/13, 6/14 & 6/20, 6/21.
Care Of. CALL 1-800-267EVERYTHING MUST GO!
5473 (CDCN)

Playa Del Rey $3,000 per month. Vacation lifestyle in
this 2 Bedroom 1 3/4 Bath Condo blocks to the beach. 8162 SANTA BARBARA RARE FIND! BEACH COTTAGE.
Manitoba Street. New wood floors, fireplace,central a/c and FURNISHED 2-BDRM 2 BATH, FIREPLACE. GATED PRIVATE
with Carpet,Secured Pkg,Laundry,A/C,Gated Entry and
heat, washer/dryer. Many amenities. 24 hr. gate guarded
PARKING. 1 YEAR LEASE $7,000 MO.
DID YOU KNOW Informa- Utilities Included. Great Location! Must See! (818)785-1876 security.
Agt Teri Stanaway (310) 821-8120 BRE NORMAN 805 350-0407
tion is power and content
01109950
is King? Do you need timely
access to public notices and
remain relevant in today’s
hostile business climate?
Gain the edge with CaliforBusiness
Commercial Property Real Estate Auctions HOMES FOR SALE
nia Newspaper Publishers FINANCIAL
HOMES FOR SALE
Association new innovative
Opportunities
for Lease
RURAL
website capublicnotice.com SERVICES
and check out the FREE OnePROPERTY
Restaurant/South
Lease by Owner-Coml
Month Trial Smart Search REDUCE YOUR PAST TAX BILL
PROBATE AUCTION
Feature. For more informa- by as much as 75 Percent. Orange County Pizza
10 PROPERTIES
Property- 9979 Cherry
La Habra Heights
tion call Cecelia @ (916) 288- Stop Levies, Liens and Wage Asking 225k open MondayWoodland Hills, Northridge,
LA County .96 rural ac. PriAve-Fontana, CA
6011 or www.capublicno- Garnishments. Call The Tax Sunday. Net profit 18k/mo.
North Hills, Los Feliz,
vate/gated, View home w/ 3
APPROX
4.86
ACRES,
APtice.com (Cal-SCAN)
South
El
Monte,
Lakewood,
DR Now to see if you Qualify In business over 18 years
OWNER MUST SELL Master BDs + guest BD, lots
Long Beach, Los Angeles
1-800-390-2549 (CDCN)
same location. 2700 sq. ft. PROX 5000 SQ FT METAL
of storage, RV parking, room
Social Media Strategist: Digi$129,000
June 27th & 28th
Beer & wine license. $4.00/ BUILDING-APPOINTMENT
ONLY 831-234-1131
tal Marketing Campaigns/ Sell your structured settle- sq. ft. 949-474-2201 Brian
Home is 3/4 remodeled. for horses, barn/worshop
Call 310.887.6225
Branding/SEO. Take your ment or annuity payments
Need cash buyer to fin- Asking $799K 562-400-0720
WWW.BIDKW.COM
business to higher levels! for CASH NOW. You don’t
Investor/ Loan $100K-500K
ish. 4Bd 2Ba 2469 sq.ft. Yr
BROKER CO-OP
48
units
Apt
Complex
Bakersfield
San Diego
Call 323.493.1002 or email
have to wait for your future
For OktoberFest musical/
1945 Barstow, Calif. Owner
CalBRE# 00746768
[email protected] payments any longer! Call cabaret in all US major cities. $4,185,0000 661-599-5043 By Order of the Los Angeles may carry at Higher price. 5 lots, house, water, power.
[email protected]
com (CDCN)
1-800-914-0942 (CDCN)
Music/script finished, top
Call 760-912-2328 for info. Total 178 acres, beautiful.
Public Administrator
$633,000. 619.807.8580
team, top brewery sponsor,
Lic#01767120.
52 units Apt Complex Bakersfield
mechandising. Excellent
Real Estate Loans
$2,990,000
661-599-5043
return. Info: 310-745-1677
[email protected]
General
or email: oktoberfest.ent.
PRIVATE PARTY $$$$ Fast
[email protected]
Announcements
Cash!! See V.I.P Trust Deed
Residential Income
Ad in the Business Section
Loma Linda 3br/2ba. Totally
Vineyard - Winery Property
DIRECTV Starting at $19.99/
remodeled. Large kitchen,
Seeking business partner(s)
mo. FREE Installation. FREE 3 Antiques
family room, large backyard. Legal Notices
developing Vineyard Winery
months of HBO SHOWTIME
Walking distance to hospital,
$918,744
Minimum
in
Central
Coast
Minimum
CINEMAX, STARZ. FREE HD/
Old
Oriental
Rugs
FOR
SALE
university & busline. 7.5% NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
$1 Million - 818-674-8555
DVR Upgrade! 2015 NFL
Net
Annual
Rent
California P.E.O.
down payment. BY OWNER. that
Wanted
Sunday Ticket Included (SeSingle
Tenant
Home d/b/a Navigage
$411,900 562-686-8769
Laundromats Coin- op Oxnard
lect Packages) New Custom- & Antiques * 800-531-7233
Los Angeles, CA
will be closing its skilled
Buy 1 or both, must see,
ers Only. CALL 1-800-71243+Acres
nursing facility at Marowner moving, motivated
9873 (CDCN)
socalincomeland.com
HOMES FOR SALE
HOMES FOR SALE
agt, 818-889-6166, philmo
guerite Gardens, located
[email protected]
at 700 N. Stoneman
SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILOut Of State Lots/
Avenue, Alhambra, CA,
ITY BENEFITS. Unable to
Restaurant for Sale. Clean,
work? Denied benefits? We
91801, effective July 1,
busy corner, next to new Acreage
Can Help! WIN or Pay Noth2015. As of that date, all
7-11, 36 seats, fully equipped
ing! Contact Bill Gordon &
NORTHERN
ARIZONA
1)
Eastvale
Road,
Palos
$69K 818-940-6172
SANTA BARBARA 48 Acres skilled nursing services at
Associates at 1-800-276- Investment
WILDERNESS RANCH $219 Verdes Barn, Stable on 2/3
Marguerite Gardens will
Gaviota, All Ocean View
7931 to start your applicaRESTAURANT FOR SALE
MONTH! Quiet & secluded Acres, 3bd/2.5ba $1,795,000.
$1,850,000
be discontinued.
Opportunities
tion today! (CDCN)
Well established located in
36 acre off grid ranch at
Circular driveway, great
(808) 280-0720 Pp
Fresno Interested
cool clear 6,400’ elevation
value 2) Buggywhip Drive,
Dish Network – Get MORE
Call 559-349-1140
near historic pioneer town & Rolling Hills. Executive
for LESS! Starting $19.99/
fishing lake. No urban noise home in 2 acres, 5bd/5-1/2 Out of State
month (for 12 months.) PLUS
*Real estate secured fund
& dark sky nights. Blend of ba $5,500,000 Pool, BBQ,
Bundle & SAVE (Fast Inter*1st TDs only - 60% LTV
mature evergreens & grassy approx. 5,000 sqft 310-994GOLF COURSE HOME
net for $15 more/month.)
*Interest paid monthly
meadows with sweeping
7400 Owner
CALL Now 1-800-266-6143
*44 month track record
views across surrounding
NO HOA! $279,900
(CDCN)
*29.33% ROI since inception
wilderness mountains and
90 min So. of Las Vegas in
*Fully audited & IRA eligible
valleys. Borders 640 acres
Kingman, AZ. Cerbat Cliffs
Hot Flashes? Women 40-65
HOMES FOR SALE
of State Trust. Abundant
Golf Course. 2 bdrm + ofc, 2
with frequent hot flashes,
For a prospectus contact:
Commercial Property groundwater, loam garden
ba, 2271 sqft. Open Flr plan
may qualify for the REPLENWilshire Quinn Capital
soil
&
maintained
road
ac+ Great Room, Frml Dining &
for Sale
ISH Trial - a free medical
619-858-4732 or
cess. Camping and
Bar. Spa, Fire Pit. 3 car + Golf
research study for [email protected]
RV ok. $25,500, $2,550 dn.
Cart garages. Realty One Grp
menopausal women. Call
www.wilshirequinn.com
Free brochure with photos/ Southeast including
CA BRE lic 01907928 + AZ lic.
855-680-5866. (CDCN)
Long
Beach
topo map/ weather/ area
Mike Wagner
CA accredited investors only.
info 1st United Realty
Donate Your Car to Veterans
This investment involves
800.966.6690. sierrahigh714 262-8733
PROBATE “As-Is” Sale
Today! Help and Support
risk of loss. The Commislandsranch.com. (CDCN)
3516 E. 8th St. LA
our Veterans in need. Fast
sioner of Corporations of
Boyle Heights- 4 Bed/2 Ba
- FREE pick up. 100% tax
the State of CA does not
Open House 6/14
Real
Estate
Real
Estate
Opportunities
deductible. Call 1-855-385recommend or endorse the
Wilson Ruiz 562.869.4111
3641 (CDCN)
Miscellaneous Offers
purchase of these securities.
Valley
Village
40%
of
an
CFL#603J060
acre, C2 zone, perfect for
We
hereby
announce
HOMES FOR SALE
Two Early 20th Century
mixed use/retail/etc. 16,775
that the name of Andia
Houses
sq. ft., $2,750,000
Moftakhari Sokhan Sanj is
Located in Santa Barbara.
changed to Andia Sokhan
Gorgeous Spanish 10 unit Available free for relocation.
SOUTHERN OREGON
Sanj
Both Vernacular type cotbuilding with no rent contages with fireplaces, one is
RURAL PROPERTIES
trol. 7,474 sq. ft., $1,395,000
I have a short-sale agreeOJAI 37 wildnerness acres.
636sf., the other is 1353sf.
Introduction Services
Klamath Falls...Sunshine &
ment with my bank to sell
$950k
MountainOffering.
Contact
Dick
Drew
at
805Blue
Skies! EQUESTRIAN
Office Bldg. for Sale near
for 70% of value of a 3-unit
blogspot.com 805-766-1466
448-2999 or [email protected]
PROPERTY, WATERFRONT,
MEET SINGLES RIGHT NOW!
Van Nuys Metro Area. Built
property. Need buyer with
org
for
details.
FARM
&
RANCH & RURAL
No paid operators, just real
in 1991. Excellent upside
cash to purchase and hold
HOMES! Call now for availpeople like you. Browse
in rents. 8 Units, Building
for
31
days.
I
have
final
buyer.
able properties! Licensed OR
greetings, exchange mes10,190 sq. ft. Lot 13,600 sq. Real Estate Services
626-791-1477 or 310-804sages and connect live. Try
Broker
ft., $2,050,000.
3313
it free. Call now 1-800-932DID YOU KNOW InformaJoanne Isaac
9320. (CDCN)
Retail property in heart of tion is power and content
(541) 531-5284
Mission district in San Ga- is King? Do you need timely
briel; may include liquor access to public notices and
[email protected]
FINANCIAL
Investors Wanted
license; great space for win- remain relevant in today’s
for
residential
flipping.
(L.A.
windermere.com
ery, tasting room or brewery, highly competitive market?
SERVICES
Gain an edge with California
Area) inventory available.
$2,588,000.
Newspaper Publishers Asso562.254.5471
ciation new innovative webNeed a Loan?
1.877.778.8811
site capublicnotice.com and
Banks say no, we say yes! Get Maui, Hawaii 180 Unit
check out the Smart Search
up to $2.5million business
Feature. For more informaor personal loan with rates
Condo Project
tion call Cecelia @ (916)
starting at 1.99%. Bad credit 50% JV Partner Wanted, PerAdvertise Today
288-6011 or www.capublicor bankruptcy ok. Call 212- fect location, tremendous
notice.com (CDCN)
465-3325
returns. 403-246-1697
(800) 234-4444
Sherman Oaks 14314 Burbank Bl. $1195 1 Bed+1 Bath

SAN
BERNARDINO
COUNTY

LA COUNTY
SOUTH BAY

latimes.com/placead

Contact us by phone:

800-234-4444
ADVERTISING POLICIES
The Times reserves the right to refuse to publish any
advertisement, to correctly classify any advertisement
and to delete objectionable words or phrases. Submission
of an advertisement does not constitute a commitment
by The Times to publish the advertisement. To
maintain quality customer service, The Times randomly
monitors telephone transactions. Publication of an
advertisement does not constitute an agreement for
continued publication. The Times will not be liable
for failure to publish an ad as requested or for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement.
In the event of an error, or omission in printing or
publication of an advertisement, The Times’ liability
shall be limited to an adjustment for the cost of
the space occupied by the error, with maximum
liability being cancellation of the cost of the first
incorrect advertisement or republication of the correct
advertisement. Under no circumstances shall The
Times be liable for consequential damages of any
kind. For additional ad policies and standards contact
213-237-6148. To place an ad, please call 800-234-4444
or go to latimes.com/placead.

From
brokers
to buyers.
In one
place.

LA COUNTY
SOUTHEAST

VENTURA
COUNTY

Investor
Needed

LA Times

House Flipping

Real Estate
Classified

To advertise your pets, log on to
latimes.com/placead or latimes.com/pets

Cats

Self-service 24/7:

SANTA BARBARA
COUNTY

8.00% Return

Got an older car, boat or
RV? Do the humane thing.
Donate it to the Humane
Society. Call 1- 800-341-0153
(CDCN)

HOW TO PLACE AN AD

Rentals Other Areas

Dogs
belgian Malinois

Male 6 mo. Philippine K9 Club
registered. Tan, black face. Inc. leashes, carrier, pen. $975.
805-987-7069

briard 3,7wk males left,4 generation pedigree for dam
from Czech Rep, plus DNA test
through AKC, 3 generation
pedigree for sire. Dam, sire
and litter are all AKC registered.These are unusual, large
dogs with long hair, no shedding & hypoallergenic. Happy,
healthy&home raised. 619
992 5329
english bulldog WRINKLES GALORE,

AKC, Shots, Vet Checkd, 30
yrs exp. Short, Big Heads. 2
yr health warranty. Several
Adults also available, Come
visit our 2 acre Bully Paradise.
See pics @ BigBulldogs.com
(760) 580-6084

Crate Trained,

German Shepherd Beautiful Black & Tan and Solid

Black Purebred German Shepherd Puppies. Born on Mar-14
with Excellent Pedigree, Temperament, and Socialization.
AKC Registered. Sire imported
from Czech Republic and Dam
also has Czech background
with legendary bloodline
of Tom Z Pohranicni Straze.
www.smartsheppy.com 707-758-5580

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these six Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form six ordinary words.

Dogs

other Cat-a-Pallooza, June 13 & 14, all 6 LA City Shelters,
www.laanimalservices.com, reduced fees for all cats & kittens! (888) 452-7381

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

Giant Schnauzer AKC pure breed puppy 5 mo.
old FOR ADOPTION. Elegant
non shedding. House bread
Microchip Tail docked Hypoallergenic Parents present
Wormed Wonderful personality Vaccines current. Adoption
fee $300 626-327-6526
labradoodle MINI, non-shedding, M/F, various colors.
Home-raised. CKC reg. Mom is
service dog. PayPal accepted.
$1,900 707.441.4913

LOTUWA
©2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

TOVMIE
PABUTE
KYSCIL

Presa Canario Pure Breed Presa Canario, puppies
born April 15, 2015 5 females
and 3 males with papers, first
shots and dewormed. Parents
on site. Excellent dogs and
great blood line. Price rang is
$950.00 to $1,500.00 OBO GO
TO NOHOPETS.COM for more
pictures. 818-939-9292

SPIMAH
TOARET

Pug puppies $1475+ w/ 35 AKC champs! 805-320-4834
Wolfdog Pups. Hand raised, bottle fed, high percentage,
rare arctic, will ship. $3,000 704-846-3197
Yorkipoo YorkiePoos ready to go 6/14/15.

ents, Dam Cream Toy Poodle,
Sire AKC Red Yorkie. We have
2/Blk Females, 1/Blk & 1Red
Male. They all weigh between
1.6# to 2.1#. They are $650.00
each. Puppy location, 26 miles
NE of Palm Springs.
760-228-3171

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Repairs & Re-Roofs
Residential & Comm’l
Reasonable rates. Free Est.
Lic#679543 Ace Roofing
System Company. 888831-8843

Miscellaneous
Services

Rentals LA Westside

Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

PRINT YOUR ANSWER IN THE CIRCLES BELOW



AKC par-



Answers to Sunday jumbles will be
included with each Sunday’s puzzle
OUTLAW MOTIVE UPBEAT SICKLY MISHAP ROTATE
With the hairpiece on sale at 70% off, he considered his
purchase to be a - SMALL PRICE “TOUPEE”

Home Improvement

Rentals San Fernando/Antelope Valley

HATE DRAMA?
GO TO CARS.COM.

Research. Price. Find. Only Cars.com helps
you get the right car without all the drama.

PRICE
RESEARCH

FIND

L AT I M ES . C O M / B US I N E S S

S

S U N DAY , J U N E 14, 2 015

C7

WORK LIFE
Anxiety is a
good attribute
for leaders
By Tom Fox

Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

PRESIDENT OBAMA nominated Maria Contreras-Sweet, the founding chairwoman of ProAmerica

Bank, to head the Small Business Administration in January 2014. The Senate confirmed her in April 2014.

HOW I MADE IT: MARIA CONTRERAS-SWEET

SBA chief is striving
to lift entrepreneurs

By Ronald D. White
The gig: Since April 2014, Maria Contreras-Sweet, 59, has been running
the U.S. Small Business Administration as a member of President
Obama’s Cabinet. She was born in
Guadalajara, Mexico, and came to
America with her mother, Guadalupe
Contreras, and five siblings when she
was 5.
Abuela’s example: Grandmother
Emilia was “very resourceful,” Contreras-Sweet said. “If one of us
needed a dress, she would say, ‘Let’s
make it.’ Even though she didn’t have
much, she was always very generous
with what she had.” Emilia provided
insights that have proved valuable in
business and public service. “She
believed there was more power in
winning people over, by saying yes, by
focusing on what we have in common.”
Everybody works: The family settled
in Baldwin Park, and Guadalupe
Contreras, who spoke no English,
found work at a small poultry processing plant in El Monte. “We all
cleaned houses when we got here,
just to make our way,” ContrerasSweet said. “I was the furniture duster. One of my sisters ran the vacuum
cleaner.”

Charles Dharapak Associated Press

‘I learned about
the struggles an
entrepreneur faces.’
— M ARIA C ONTRERAS -S WEET

discussing a consulting firm she
started in 1995 that specialized
in Latino marketing

Cal State Los Angeles, ContrerasSweet worked for Assemblyman Joe
Montoya and then the U.S. Census
Bureau. “This was the kind of thing I
loved,” she said.

Staying positive: Contreras-Sweet
remembers the positive attitude her
mother taught her by appreciating
even the small things in an otherwise
challenging work environment. Her
mother would bring several layers of
clothing with her for her job on the
swing shift at the poultry plant,
where she had to spend time in a cold
refrigerator unit. “She never complained about anything. She always
recognized the positive things, sometimes it was just ‘Gosh, we are so
lucky. They let me bring home some
chicken today.’ ”

Going private: Contreras-Sweet
landed a marketing and government
relations job with 7Up-RC Bottling
Co., rising to public affairs vice president in 1986 and becoming an equity
partner when Westinghouse sold the
company in 1990. In 1995, she headed
out on her own but found it’s not easy
starting a business. “I remember just
trying to work off the credit cards and
how hard it was to manage my own
business, to get business,” she said
about Contreras-Sweet Co., a consulting firm that specialized in Latino
marketing. “You spend all day long
getting the business and then all
night long getting the business done,”
she recalled. “So I learned about the
struggles an entrepreneur faces.”

Seeing public life: During her college
years, she volunteered in Jimmy
Carter’s 1976 presidential campaign.
After earning a degree in political
science and public administration at

Public again: In 1999, ContrerasSweet became the state’s first Latina
Cabinet official, serving Gov. Gray
Davis as secretary of the Business,
Transportation and Housing Agency.

During her five years there, she managed a $14-billion budget for 13 departments with 42,000 employees.
“I brought in help so that we could
determine, agencywide, how we could
help small businesses,” ContrerasSweet said. “I met with banks to find
out what kind of accommodations
there were for women-owned and
minority-owned businesses and
found that there weren’t that many....
We tried to break barriers, for example, on the number of contracts
awarded to people like disabled veterans.”
Back in business: She was co-founder and president of the private equity
firm Fortius Holdings, which funded
small California companies. In 2006,
she was the founding chairwoman of
ProAmerica Bank, which was developed to serve small- and mediumsize businesses, mostly in the Latino
community. “ProAmerica stood for
‘the promise of America.’ People
didn’t have collateral and needed a
new way to find institutions to invest
in them,” she said.
SBA goals: When trying to start her
first business, Contreras-Sweet said
she was unaware of all the SBA could
have done to help through grants,
loan guarantees, counseling, contracting assistance and other programs. “We have to be branded, because people just don’t know about
us. Then we need to lift entrepreneurs and have them feel more emboldened.... They are looking for
inspiration, what sort of path should
they take?”
Personal: Contreras-Sweet and her
husband, Ray Sweet, have three
children and one grandchild. During
rare free time, she likes hiking on the
weekends with her husband. Inspiration for her work is easy to find,
she said, living in the Colonial-style
tourist city of Alexandria, just south
and west of Washington, D.C., “which
provides me the opportunity to visit
small businesses whenever I am out
and about in the community.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @RonWLATimes

Cass Sunstein is a professor and legal scholar at Harvard Law School, the author
of numerous books and the
former administrator of the
White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He spoke about his experiences in the Obama administration, his views on
regulatory policy and leadership, his favorite sport
(squash) and being married
to a powerful woman.
The interview was edited
for length and clarity.
In your new book, “Wiser:
Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups
Smarter,” you divide leaders into two categories:
those who are complacent
and easygoing and those
who are anxious. Which
type makes a better
leader?
A complacent leader is
someone who is upbeat,
optimistic, who has a clear
sense of direction, who is
confident that things will be
fine and who has a degree of
sunniness. An anxious
leader is someone who may
be easy to get along with but
also is thinking about all the
things that could go wrong
and always seeing the
worst-case scenario.
There is no question that
the anxious leader is much
better than the complacent
leader. The anxious leader is
able to redirect energies,
listen to information from
employees and won’t continue the course of action if
it’s failing. The anxious
leader also will be flexible
and inventive and will foresee things that could go
wrong. There’s a saying that
goes, “If you make a plan,
God laughs. If you make two
plans, God smiles.” The
anxious leaders are making
two plans.
Can you give me an example of someone who fits the
anxious leader model?
Jeff Zients, who is now
the head of the National
Economic Council, was
brought in by the president
to fix HealthCare.gov. I’m
sure he was always thinking
about what could go wrong.
And more specifically, saying, “This could be a catastrophe. If that’s a risk, then
what will we do about it?”
Having a constant productive anxiety doesn’t
mean that people are miserable and wailing but that
people know they will be
held accountable if things
do not go right.
What was one of the most
surprising lessons you
learned about government
during your time as the
president’s regulatory
chief?
That the public comment process for federal
regulations is immensely
important and very substantive. I taught administrative law for many years,
and many teachers of the
subject think that the public
comment process is a TV

show, and what actually is
determined happens behind closed doors. That
view is completely wrong.
When you set a rule out
for public comment, you will
often get comments saying,
“This section is going to
hurt small business,” or,
“This provision could be
changed in a way to get the
public safety impact
doubled.” Those are phenomenally helpful. You
learn that you miss some
things.
Sometimes what was
missed was not huge but, if
fixed, would save hundreds
of millions of dollars for
people who deserved those
savings. And sometimes you
learn the whole proposal
was misdirected or wrong.
In your role overseeing
federal regulations, you
were involved in a lot of
hot-button issues. You had
your fans and your critics
on the left and right. How
did you approach this job?
Economic growth was
the top priority, and we were
not going to be doing a lot of
the regulations by historical
standards. If we have benefits that exceed costs,
that’s a good reason to go
forward; if the costs were
too high for those benefits, it
was a good reason not to go
forward. If there was a rule
that would save dozens or
hundreds of lives and it
wouldn’t cost all that much,
then I’d be for that, even if
the people who bore those
costs didn’t like it very
much. If there was a rule
favored by environmentalists or the progressive community that was going to
hammer the economy and
have modest benefits, then
I’d be very cautious about
that. The focus was on the
consequences and not on
background noise from the
political actors.
What would people be
surprised to know about
you?
I am a professional
squash player and I recently
played badly, but as well as I
could, in a professional
squash tournament. I recently played in the Charlotte Open, where I got
crushed by the 105th best
player in the world. Being
crushed was an honor.
What’s it like to be married
to Samantha Power, the
U.S. ambassador to the
United Nations?
She’s completely amazing. Being married to her is
sometimes poignant, when
things aren’t going so great
in some parts of the world.
Being married to her is
sometimes hilarious, because she is really funny.
The least good part is when
I get called in my place of
residence “Mr. Power.” The
best part is when the two of
us go out to dinner.
Fox is a vice president at the
nonprofit Partnership for
Public Service. He is guest
contributor to the
Washington Post’s On
Leadership section.

ON LEADERSHIP

‘Queen bees’ may have hive minds after all

Study casts doubt on
the idea that female
executives don’t help
women below them.
By Jena McGregor
One of the most enduring
stereotypes in the American
workplace is that of the
“queen bee”: the executive
who, at best, doesn’t help the
women below her get ahead
and, at worst, actively hinders them. This supposed
species has been analyzed in
newspaper
essays,
described in surveys and caricatured in Hollywood.
But a recent study casts
doubt on the idea. Researchers at Columbia Business
School and the University of

Maryland’s business school
looked at what happens after a woman gets one of the
five highest-paying executive jobs at an S&P 1500 firm.
They found that it decreased
the probability of another
woman also getting a top position 51% — though not for
the reason often cited.
Given the “queen bee”
stereotype, people have
often posited that the woman at the top might be trying
to hold other women back
from joining her. Yet the researchers say that their findings instead suggest the culprit is “implicit quotas,” in
which companies feel pressure to add women to their
upper ranks to improve their
public image — but once
they’ve added one, they believe they’ve done their job.
“They try pretty hard to

get a woman on their top
management team, but then
they will stop,” said David
Ross, a coauthor of the
study. “What I think our paper shows is that it’s going to
be harder for the low number of women in top management to be a problem that
solves itself.”
Part of what supported
their finding was that in
companies in which a woman was the chief executive,
rather than just a senior
member of the team, women
had better chances of gaining other top positions. “[If]
women are doing each other
in,” Ross said, “you’d expect
to see it the most when women are CEO.”
The paper, which is set to
be published in Strategic
Management Journal, first
got attention a few months

ago but resurfaced this
month since its findings will
be presented at a conference
of girls’ schools in Britain.
Some headlines have said
this research shows the
queen bee syndrome is a
myth, but Ross says the idea
of implicit quotas doesn’t exactly disprove the other argument but just weakens it.
“We don’t know if the
queen bee syndrome exists,
but if it exists it could well exist because of sexism,” Ross
said. If women are competitively vying for top positions,
it’s “not arising from some
kind of innate female quality,
but from the behavior of the
men and their colleagues.”
Meanwhile, there’s other
evidence that women may
“pay it forward” to the next
generation even more than
men do. A 2012 study from

the research firm Catalyst
found, for instance, that 73%
of the female mentors it
studied were helping develop other women, whereas
only 30% of the male mentors were doing the same.
But women, although
perhaps more likely to help
other women, aren’t necessarily more likely to be in
mentorship positions to begin with. A survey last year
from the human resources
consulting firm Development Dimensions International found that as many as
20% of the women it surveyed had never been asked
to be mentors and more
than 50% had been asked
only a few times.
Sharon Mavin, director of
the business school at University of Roehampton in
London, has also found in

her research that women are
readily open to helping and
mentoring other women.
The problem isn’t an unwillingness to help, she said in
an interview, but that when
there are only one or two
women at the top, “there’s
not enough momentum for
the culture that’s already
been established to change.”
Mavin, who has also written about the queen bee phenomenon, added: “For a
woman to survive in that
context, there’s a lot of strategies she can take. But a lot
of them mean assimilating
into that culture rather than
changing it.”
Jena McGregor writes a
daily column analyzing
leadership in the news for
the Washington Post’s On
Leadership section.

C8

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

WST

S

L AT I M E S. CO M / B U SI N E SS

Commercial drone sales growing

[Drones, from C1]
The makers of military
drones also see huge potential in commercial sales.
“We think the commercial market has a chance to
be much larger,” said Steven
Gitlin, a spokesman for
AeroVironment Inc., the
largest supplier of small
drones to the military.
The company, which
makes drones in its Simi Valley facilities, has seen sales
decline as the military withdrew from Iraq and Afghanistan and is looking to commercial drones for growth.
How fast the drone business will grow could depend
on when and how regulations are loosened.
It is still illegal to fly a
drone for commercial purposes without a permit. Almost daily, pilots have reported drones flying dangerously close to their aircraft,
and the Federal Aviation
Administration has said its
priority is keeping the nation’s skies safe.
While the FAA continues
to debate new rules for the
operation of commercial
drones that it proposed in
February, the agency is issuing an increasing number of
permits to companies that
have shown regulators they
can fly safely. So far, the FAA
has issued 548 permits, including to companies using
drones to film commercials
and movies, along with more
industrial tasks.
San Diego Gas & Electric
Co. flies drones to help inspect high-voltage power
lines throughout its network. U.S. farmers can now
use 207-pound Yamaha helicopter drones to spray crops
with pesticides — the same
aerial spraying system that
Japanese farmers have used
for years.
Sales are already climbing among hobbyists, foreign users and companies
that have gained exemptions to fly. Global sales of
drones to consumers and
companies are estimated to
be $4.5 billion this year, up
from $3.3 billion last year, according to Frost & Sullivan,
a market research firm.
Commercial sales are expected to increase so fast
that they could surpass
those to the military in
about five years, according
to the firm’s analysis. By
2020, global consumer and
commercial sales could be
$11 billion, it said.
Silicon Valley’s deeppocketed venture capitalists
are pouring cash into drone
start-ups. So far this year,
venture capitalists have invested $172 million in drone
companies, according to CB
Insights. That’s up from $107
million for all of 2014.
Jon Callaghan, CEO of
True Ventures, an investment firm in San Francisco,
said his company has provided more than $100 million
in early capital for companies involved with drones.
“Once you see a larger
number of these vehicles allowed into U.S. airspace,
that will unlock a huge wave
of investment,” Callaghan
said.
Northern California is
the headquarters of six of
the 10 American commercial

Photographs by Al Seib Los Angeles Times

OSCAR GONZALEZ, a test technician at AeroVironment in Simi Valley, inspects parts during assembly of the Puma AE drone.

Commercial
waivers take off
It is currently illegal to fly a
drone for commercial
purposes unless the
company receives a waiver
from federal regulators.
186

N

D

J

15
F

29
M

A

2015

50 100 150

Film/
cinematography

AEROVIRONMENT spokesman Steven Gitlin holds the Qube drone, designed for first responders. The com-

pany is the largest supplier of small drones to the military but is looking to commercial drones for growth.
drone companies that have
attracted the most venture
capital, according to CB Insights. They are creating
high-paying work for engineers, including those designing ever more sophisticated software to operate
the machines.
Computer engineers are
also working on applications
in which drones gather data
through cameras and sensors and turn those data into
information that farmers
and other businesses can
use to improve their operations.

Broker

For example, San Francisco start-up DroneDeploy
has created software designed to enable farmers to
spray or water their crops
more efficiently. The system
collects data that are used to
generate real-time maps
showing where fields may be
too wet or dry.
Airware, another startup in San Francisco, develops drone operating systems so customers can mix
and match software to carry
out various jobs, such as forestry and agriculture or surveying and mapping. Airware was founded in Newport Beach but moved to
San Francisco after seeing
where the industry was
headed.
“Think of us like an Intel
or Windows for the industry,” said Airware Chief Exe-

Company Seeks
Individuals to Finance
Multiple Short Term
Trust Deeds.
Minimum Investment
$500,000
949-449-4310
ADVERTISEMENT

Los AngeLes times CD & DePosit gUiDe
Yields Available to Los Angeles Area Residents

Address/Internet

Int Chking Money
Acct
Mkt Acct
Min
Min

http://latimes.interest.com
3 mo
CD
Min

6 mo
CD
Min

12 mo
CD
Min

Community Commerce Bank Claremont, Monterey Park & Woodland Hills NA
NA
0.10 0.30 0.50
www.ccombank.com
NA
NA 10,000 10,000 10,000
909-625-7891
Specials: Member FDIC, Penalty for Early Withdrawl, APY’s accurate as of 06-14-15.

18 mo
CD
Min

NA
NA

24 mo
CD
Min

36 mo
CD
Min

60 mo
CD
Min

0.60 0.70 1.11
10,000 10,000 10,000

visibility, response, results Call 800-509-4636 for information regading advertising opportunities
1-Year CD National Trend

0.30

CheCk out our Mortgage guide

0.25

in the saturday hoMes &

0.15

sunday real estate seCtion

0.05

8.5–12%
Preferred Return

Real estate secured fund

5-Year CD National Trend

0.4

0.88

0.3

0.86

0.2

0.84

0.1

0.82

8.5-12% fixed preferred return
NO stock or bond market exposure

0.80

Development
Real estate
Mapping
Research
Monitoring
Television
Utilities
Source: FAA
Los Angeles Times

in the hands of customers,”
Anderson said.
william.hennigan
@latimes.com
Twitter: @wjhenn
melody.petersen
@latimes.com
Twitter: @melodypetersen

3 Major Auctions
PUBLIC WELCOME!

Professional Video Gear;
Digital SLR Cameras;
Medical, Dental &
Massage Equipment of
Career Training Colleges
Over 300,000 sq ft of Facility Equip.,
Including: Dental, Pharmacy, Massage
Therapy, Nursing, Medical Assistant
and Criminal Justice Programs
Online Only Auction

Investor Relations

Upcoming Seminars

A+
RATING
bbb.org

Call (805) 764-5128 for info/RSVP

25-Mar 1-Apr 8-Apr 15-Apr 22-Apr 29-Apr 6-May 13-May 20-May 27-May 3-Jun 10-Jun
Source: Bankrate.com 2015

Agriculture

Bid Online thru: June 23 | 10:30am
Location: 1175 E. Edna Pl, Covina, CA

Great for IRAs

Palos Verdes June 20th
Newport Beach July 18th
Calabasas August 1st

Legend: Rates effective as of 6/10/15 and may change without notice. All institutions are FDIC or NCUA insured. Rates may change after the
account is opened. N/A means rates are not available or not offered at press time. Yields represent annual percentage yield (APY) paid by participating institutions. Fees may reduce the earnings on the account. A penalty may be imposed for early withdrawal. Banks, Thrifts and credit
unions pay to advertise in this guide which is compiled by Bankrate.com®, a publication of Bankrate, Inc. © 2015. • http://latimes.interest.com

Videography

(7) EVEREST COLLEGE CAREER
TRAINING CAMPUSES

[email protected]

0.90

Surveying

Online Only Auction

Interest paid monthly

11-Mar 18-Mar 25-Mar 1-Apr 8-Apr 15-Apr 22-Apr 29-Apr 6-May 13-May20-May27-May 3-Jun 10-Jun

0.5

18-Mar25-Mar 1-Apr 8-Apr 15-Apr 22-Apr 29-Apr 6-May 13-May 20-May 27-May 3-Jun 10-Jun

started an online community called DIYdrones.com.
The company has grown
to about 200 employees.
Many are engineers who
work on software, writing
computer code and solving
mechanical problems in a
workplace familiar to other
Silicon Valley start-ups: an
open floor plan, free of cubicles or offices.
3D Robotics’ drones can
fly on pre-programmed
routes and stream back video to users’ smartphones or
other devices.
The company uses opensource hardware and software, meaning it doesn’t
patent its technology and
welcomes garage tinkerers.
Customers often offer recommendations on how to
improve the technology.
“Innovation often comes

www.StrategicHoldings.com

0.10

0.00

cutive Jonathan Downey.
“Drones are used for a wide
variety of applications, and
we want to enable this diversification.”
Developers already have
created hundreds of kinds of
drones in a variety of sizes,
ranging from pocket-sized
to one that Facebook is designing to have a wingspan
greater than a Boeing 737.
3D Robotics is among the
leaders in the fast-growing
industry. Since Anderson
co-founded the company in
2009, its four-propeller and
six-propeller
helicopters
have gone from kids’ toys to
high-tech tools.
Before Anderson was
CEO of 3D Robotics, he was
editor in chief of Wired magazine. He began building
drones with his children in
the mid-2000s and soon

(805) 764-5128

0.20

Source: Bankrate.com 2015

2.5-Year CD National trend

Source: Bankrate.com 2015

O

4

Inspections

Real Estate License #01041073 CA Dept. of Real Estate, NMLS #339217
Private Party loans generally have higher interest rates, points & fees than conventional documented loans

0.0

S

Photography

V.I.P. TRUST DEED COMPANY

Institution/Phone

4

The most common use
categories appearing in
waiver mission descriptions.

OVER 35 YEARS OF FAST FUNDING

(818) 248-0000

0

What drones are doing

Has $$$$ to lend on
California Real Estate*

*Sufficient equity
required- noloans
consumer loans
*No consumer

1

2014

RETIRED COUPLE
Principal

4

PROFESSIONAL AV PRODUCTION/
POST-PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT
Over $3 Million Value
Plus... Security & Video Conference
Cameras & HD Projectors, from Sony,
Panasonic, JVC, Apple, AVID and More

Bid Online thru: June 30 | 10:30am
Location: 13545 Larwin Cir, Santa Fe Springs, CA
Online Only Auction

PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY &
TECHNOLOGY COMPANY
Over (260) Cameras Plus Lighting,
Photo Printers, Servers,
Computers, Laptops and More

Bid Online thru: July 9 | 10:30am
Location: 13545 Larwin Cir, Santa Fe Springs, CA
8 0 0- 7 5 8- T I G E R ( 8 44 3 )
w ww . So l dT i ge r . c o m
Auctioneer, Jeff Tanenbaum, CAI • Bond #FS294-36-28

or for a private meeting with Investor Relations
©2015 Strategic Diversified Real Estate Holdings, LLC. The interests
are being offered to accredited investors only – persons or entities
that meet certain income and/or net worth requirements.
201406-100-3

twitter.com/latimes

L AT I M ES . C O M / B US I N E S S

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

C9

App aims to stabilize take-home pay
[App, from C1]
having to cut people off if
they’re deemed too risky a
customer.
The founders are aware
of these potential hurdles.
Even isn’t a bank. It doesn’t
dole out loans or charge interest. It makes money when
customers subscribe to the
service but don’t need
Even’s advances.
Schlossberg
acknowledged that the business
model may not immediately
look profitable when compared with payday loan
companies, which make
money off charging people
interest when they are in
financially desperate situations.
“But with a mission like
this, I ask you: Because we
might fail, does that mean
we should not try?” he said
when the service was first
announced in January.
Schlossberg is particularly determined to make
Even work because he sees it
as a solution to a problem
that he said he’s been fascinated by since he was a teenager. He recalls watching
“Cops” when he was 16 and
noticing the same perpetrator in two separate episodes.
“That was remarkable to
me,” he said. “Appearing on
‘Cops’ once is bad enough
because it means you’ve
made some bad decisions.
But to be on ‘Cops’ more
than once, you have to be
seriously making some bad
decisions in your life. That
was just unfathomable to
me.”
So began what he described as a “casual obsession” with finding out why
people make objectively bad
decisions, and what can be
done about it.
His research pointed him
to an area of neuropsychology that looked at the effect of
poverty on cognitive function. Dozens of scientific
journals have detailed how
the stress of living in poverty
can affect brain chemistry,

which can lead people to
make poor decisions.
Schlossberg and his fellow Even co-founders Ryan
Gomba, Cem Kent and
Quinten Farmer saw an opportunity to do for poverty
what Silicon Valley entrepreneurs have tried to do in
any field they’ve entered:
cause disruption.
A 2015 report by the Economic Policy Institute found
that more than 30% of working Americans experience
significant spikes and dips
in their incomes, and the
lowest income workers tend
to be the most adversely affected. A report published
by the JPMorgan Chase Institute this year called on
government and corporations to develop tools that
could help people manage
their bottom line.
Other tech companies
are also stepping up.
Mint is one such app that
has risen to the occasion,
helping customers track
their spending. Level Money
recently updated its app to
detect nuances in transactions and help people
budget for bills, loan repayments and other recurring
expenses. Even gets more involved by managing people’s
money for them.
The app is already seeing
results among the small
group of hourly wage workers who received early access to the service. The company says people whose
take-home pay was once
tied to unpredictable work
schedules or client numbers
have reported feeling less
stressed and being better
able to plan their spending
and loan repayments.
“I feel like I have more security behind me,” Heather
Jacobs, 28, a massage therapist whose pay is determined by how many clients
she massages in a day, said
in a video the company put
together. “I’m not stressing
completely over paychecks
anymore.”

Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times

THE EVEN APP is targeting the millions of Americans who freelance or work hourly jobs and experience

income fluctuations, such as retail employees and nail salon technicians. Above, a nail salon in Beverly Hills.

But even if the company
offers a compelling solution
to income volatility, it still
faces hurdles, said Ariel Michaeli, chief executive of analytics firm AppFigure.
“It’s an intriguing idea,
but for them, the challenge is

going to be how do they sell
this kind of concept?” Michaeli said. “How do you educate the market and get everyone to use it? For them,
it’s all about the big numbers, and they have to hit a
critical mass. It could be an

uphill battle.”
There’s also an existential problem: If Even succeeds, isn’t it helping its customers not need a service
like Even down the line?
“That’s a valid point,”
Schlossberg said. “What

that means is as a business
we need to offer more products that are valuable to
people when they achieve
the next level.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @traceylien

C
alifornia’s S
trongest,
California’s
Strongest,
s
ince 1
907.
since
1907.
J
oin u
s.
Join
us.

ASSOCIATIONS

Board fines owner
for not watering
lawn amid drought

By Donie Vanitzian
Question: My homeowner
association board won’t let
me plant drought-resistant
vegetation, saying it’s not in
keeping with a “theme of
luxury homes” and is contrary to architectural and
landscape rules. Because of
California’s severe drought I
stopped watering my front
lawn and removed all flowers. Once my grass turned
brown the board ordered me
to replant flowers and water
the lawn.
Management sent me a
letter saying that I violated
the covenants, conditions
and restrictions and that I
will continue to be fined until
the flowers are replanted
and the lawn turns green
through sufficient watering.
Today I got a letter and
invoice indicating additional
fees and interest charges for
“noncompliance” of maintaining my property. The
board also is threatening to
place a lien on my home if I
don’t pay and if I disobey
their orders. Is this right?
Answer: It’s not right, and
the board cannot order you
to water the lawn. Under
these circumstances, additional fees and interest
charges for noncompliance
of maintaining your property should be removed.
The excuse for watering
in keeping with a “theme of
luxury homes” is nonsense.
Under Civil Code section
4735(a), a provision of the
governing documents or
architectural or landscaping
guidelines or policies shall
be void and unenforceable if
it prohibits the use of lowwater-using plants or as a
replacement of existing turf.
An association’s governing documents cannot have
the effect of prohibiting or
restricting compliance with
a water-efficient landscape
ordinance adopted or in
effect pursuant to Government Code section 65595(c),
or any regulation or restriction on the use of water
adopted pursuant to the
Water Code sections 353, 375.
Associations are not
prohibited from applying
landscaping rules established in the governing documents, as long as those rules

fully conform with Civil Code
section 4735(a). The Legislature has recognized and
affirmed the right of an
association to regulate
aesthetics. However, water
conservation, especially in a
severe drought, takes precedence over that right.
The law is clear: A homeowners association shall not
impose a fine or assessment
against an owner for reducing or eliminating watering
vegetation or lawns during a
period for which the governor or local government has
declared a local or state
emergency because of
drought.
The California Governor’s Executive Order mandates water use restrictions.
Your association is acting in
direct contradiction of this
edict, and the resulting fines,
assessments and penalties
are void and unenforceable.
Placing a lien on your
home for what the association deems as noncompliance violates the law. Should
you be forced to take legal
action to obtain a stay or
remove a pending lien, the
association will be subjecting members to liability.
A board’s duty to uphold
laws and policies pertaining
to the association clearly
include enforcement of
government-mandated
water-reduction programs.
The board cannot place you
in a position in which you
must decide whether to
violate the association’s
architectural and landscape
rules, risking a cloud on your
title, or to violate the government’s emergency water
control regulations and face
consequences imposed by
the state.
As a titleholder, it is
much better for you to follow
the law and then pursue
reimbursement of your costs
from the association and/or
the management company
that unlawfully fined you.
Zachary Levine, a partner
at Wolk & Levine, a business
and intellectual property
law firm, co-wrote this
column. Vanitzian is an
arbitrator and mediator.
Send questions to Donie
Vanitzian, JD, P.O. Box
10490, Marina del Rey, CA
90295 or
[email protected]

1.46% APY
F&M 60-month Certificate of Deposit
$1,000 minimum opening balance1

LOOk hOw we COMPAre
60-month Certificate of Deposit

F&M Bank

APY2

1.46%

Bank of America

0.15%

Chase

0.25%

Citibank

0.50%

Union Bank

1.01%

Wells Fargo Bank

0.35%

60-month term too long?
Call us at (888) 646-6079 to find the F&M
Office nearest you, and to learn more about
all of our great CD rates & terms.
Visit fmb.com to see all of our 24 offices throughout Los Angeles and Orange Counties.

1. Farmers & Merchants Bank annual percentage yield (APY) is accurate as of 06/08/2015. Terms and the APY may change at any time without
prior notice. Fees could reduce earnings on the account. The APY assumes that interest remains on deposit until maturity. A withdrawal of interest
will reduce earnings. An Early Withdrawal Penalty will be imposed for withdrawals before maturity. Please contact your local F&M office for more
details and review your Truth-in-Savings disclosure for additional terms and conditions that may apply.
2. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) for each institution is provided by Informa Research Services, Inc., Calabasas, CA, www.informars.com. Although
the information has been obtained from the various institutions themselves, the accuracy cannot be guaranteed by Informa Research Services
or Farmers & Merchants Bank. Data provided as of 06/08/2015 and may change at any time. All APYs in the comparison table are applicable for a
certificate of deposit with a term equal to 60 months and based on a balance of $2,500.

Member FDIC | fmb.com

C10

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I M E S. CO M / B U SI N E SS

HOT PROPERTY

‘New Girl’ parts with old house
several solo albums, including his bluegrass album
“The Great Divide.”
He bought the property
in 2011 for $1.09 million and
had listed it for $1.95 million.
Rose Ware and Terry
Canfield Schmidt of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties
were the listing agents.
Sarah Blanchard of Teles
Properties represented the
buyer.

By Lauren Beale
and Neal J. Leitereg
Zooey Deschanel got top
dollar for her home in Hollywood Hills. The actresssinger-songwriter, who
bought a house in Manhattan Beach this year, sold her
old place for $2.33 million —
a little more than 6% over
the asking price.
Set on half an acre, the
single-story Traditional was
built in 1933 and features
formal living and dining
rooms, a den, a breakfast
nook and two wood-burning
fireplaces. The remodeled
kitchen, awash in blue tile
and cabinetry, has marble
counter tops and a farmhouse sink, while the breakfast area looks out onto
surrounding gardens.
There are three bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms in
about 3,000 square feet.
Outdoors, a brick patio,
various gardens and large
expanses of grass make up
the tree-topped grounds.
Separate guest quarters
with another bedroom sit
across from the main house.
The home came on the
market in April for $2.195
million, records show. Deschanel bought the house
from Oscar-nominated
actor Mark Ruffalo in 2009
for $1.65 million.
Sara Berger of Westside
Estate Agency was the
listing agent, according to
the Multiple Listing Service.
Cari Field of ACME Real
Estate represented the
buyer.
Deschanel, 35, stars in
the Fox comedy “New Girl,”
now in its fifth season.
Among her film credits is
“Elf ” (2003), “Failure to
Launch” (2006) and “(500)
Days of Summer” (2009).

Moving on from
‘Simple Life’
Fashion designer/reality
star Nicole Richie and
singer Joel Madden listed
their place in Hollywood
Hills for sale at $3.495 million and in about 10 days
they had a buyer.
The duo bought a contemporary home in the
Beverly Crest area this year
for $6.7 million.
Their Hollywood Hills
compound sits behind gates
on close to half an acre.
Although dating to 1914, the
house has been extensively
remodeled over the last
century and today is topped
by a massive skylight dome.
The 6,300 square feet of
living space include a gym,
an attached guesthouse, a
den and a family room.
There are five bedrooms

Open
Address

Bd/ba+½ba

Web ID
Price

Open Sunday 2-5
5734 Fairview
3/4
Laura Getzoff / Remax Olson & Associates

Web ID HIJX1
$1,285,000
818-539-7339

Alhambra
By Appt
309 La France
4/4
Matthew N. Bryant / BHHS Cal Prop

Web ID HIQU1
$1,050,000
626-695-7807

Bel Air
Open Sunday 2-5
10733 Stradella Ct
6/8
Michele Hall / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HIVO1
$4,999,000
310-850-1357
Web ID HHOW1
$3,475,000
310-968-8828

Belmont Shore
Open Sat & Sun 2-5
160 Roycroft
Daniel Perlstein / Danco, INC

Realtor.com

ZOOEY DESCHANEL sold this single-story Traditional in Hollywood Hills for $2.33 million. Built in 1933,

the house features formal living and dining rooms, a den, a breakfast nook and two wood-burning fireplaces.

Realtor.com

3/2

Web ID HHPI1
$999,000
310-842-8234

Beverly Hills
Open Sunday 2PM-5PM
273 S Swall Drive
4/3
Jodi Ticknor / Coldwell Banker-BHN

Web ID HJCE1
$2,350,000
310-424-7724

Beverly Hills PO
New X - Open Sun 2-5!
1846 Franklin Canyon Dr
3/4+1
Michael Libow / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HIRZ1
$2,395,000
310-285-7509

Open Sunday 2-5pm
1658 San Ysidro Dr
3/2
Jim Bremner / Gibson International

Web ID HJDV1
$1,849,000
310-622-7445

Beverlywood
NEW X - By Appt Only!
2021 Roxbury Dr
4/3+1
Michael J. Libow / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HJCO1
$5,295,000
310-285-7509

New X - Open Sun 2-5!
9752 Castello Pl
5/4+1
Michael J. Libow / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HIVB1
$2,380,000
310-285-7509

By Appointment Only
2250 Guthrie Drive
3/3
Jeremy Ives / Teles Properties

Web ID HIXY1
$1,895,000
310-858-1902

Open House Sunday 2-5 pm
1133 S La Peer
Multi-family
Yossi Mayberg / The RFC Group

Web ID HIQF1
$1,850,000
310-489-2395

Maccollum.com

TOMMY SHAW of Styx sold this Midcentury Mod-

JULIO CESAR CHAVEZ JR. bought a new con-

and five bathrooms.
The kitchen opens to a
barbecue area. A lagoonstyle pool with a beach entry
and a waterfall spa sits in
the backyard.
Richie, 33, is executive
producer and appears in the
series “Candidly Nicole.”
She was on the reality series
“The Simple Life” (2003-07).
Madden, 36, sings with
Good Charlotte and the
Madden Brothers.
The property last
changed hands in 2009 for
$1.912 million.
Thomas Atamian of
Dilbeck Real Estate is the
listing agent.

2013, records show.
Eric Lieberman of John
Aaroe Group was the listing
agent, according to the
Multiple Listing Service.
Collette Canepa of Keller
Williams Realty represented
the boxer in the purchase.
Chavez, 29, is the son of
six-time boxing champion
Julio Cesar Chavez. He
recently returned to the ring
in April after a year layoff,
losing to light heavyweight
contender Andrzej Fonfara
in nine rounds.

ern-style house in Hollywood Hills for $2.114 million.

Boxer’s home
is a knockout
Former middleweight
boxing champion Julio
Cesar Chavez Jr. has
landed in Studio City, buying a new house for $2.8 million.

Open
Address

Bd/ba+½ba

Web ID
Price

Brentwood

Agoura Hills

Open Sunday 2pm - 5pm
10828 Via Verona Street
5/4+1
Rochelle Maize / Nourmand & Associates

Courting interest
in the Valley

NEW! Open Sat & Sun2-5pm
529 N Kenter Avenue
4/3+1
Gwen Fritzinger / Gibson International

Web ID HJCZ1
$3,395,000
310-749-8821

Open Sunday 2-5pm!
428 Greencraig Rd
4/2+2
Eiko Nobel / Coldwell Banker - Brentwood

Web ID HJEC1
$2,495,000
310-713-0725

Open Sunday 2-5!!!
Web ID HJDL1
11351 Burnham St.
4/3
$1,729,000
Lisa Mansfield / Sotheby’s International Realty 310-481-4313
By Appointment
Web ID HIML1
11606 Chenault Street #301 4/4+1
$1,599,000
Gary Limjap / Coldwell Banker/ www.garylimjap.com 310-586-0339
Open Sunday 2-5
11952 Montana Ave 102
Sacha Radford / The Agency

Web ID HJBI1
$995,000
310-617-4464

3/2

Open Sunday 2-5pm!
1176 Wellesley Ave #201
3/1+2
Eiko Nobel / Coldwell Banker - Brentwood

Web ID HJED1
$975,000
310-713-0725

Open Sunday 2-5pm
Web ID GYXD1
12254 Montana Avenue #A 5/4+2
$949,000
Gary Limjap / Coldwell Banker/ www.garylimjap.com 310-586-0339

Burbank
Open Sat/Sun 2-5
310 S Orchard
Geri Spira / GESP Realty

Web ID HJCX1
$1,795,000
310-463-4403

4/4

Calabasas Park
By Appt
26306 W Plata Ln.
2/2+1
William Dorich / Keller-Williams

Web ID HIUE1
$445,000
310-923-2157

Century City
Huge Sunny Patio
10101 Galaxy Way
2/2
Rick Brucker / Brucker Real Estate

Web ID HJDX1
$899,000
310-557-1900

Web ID HJEO1
$1,795,000
323-656-1800

Web ID HHQK1
$475,000
909-376-8972

Culver City
Open Sunday 2-5
4139 Vinton Ave
5/4+1
Ron Wynn / Coldwell Banker - Montana

Web ID
Price

Bd/ba+½ba

Open House Sunday 2-5pm
10830 Pickford Way
4/3
Todd Miller / Keller Williams SM

Web ID HIXX1
$1,925,000
310-923-5353

Encino
By Appointment
16122 Valley Meadow Pl
4/4+1
Sally Forster Jones / John Aaroe Group

Web ID HJEY1
$3,895,000
310-691-7888

Web ID HJDH1
$2,365,000
310-963-9944

Rocking out of
rental property
An investment home
owned by rocker Tommy
Shaw of Styx has sold in
Hollywood Hills for $2.114
million.
The chic Midcentury
Modern-style house, built
on a quarter of an acre in the
hills of the Beachwood
Canyon area, sits behind

Open
Address

Web ID
Price

Bd/ba+½ba

Open Sunday 2-5p
Web ID HJEB1
2235 San Marco Dr.
3/3 $1,299,000/$6,450-Mo
Bryant | Reichling, Sotheby’s International Realty 310-266-1689
Open Sunday 2-5
6382 W. 77th Street
3/2
Stephanie Younger / Teles Properties

Web ID HJDR1
$1,249,000
424-203-1828

0pen Sunday 2-5
6657 W. 82nd Street
4/2
Stephanie Younger / Teles Properties

Web ID HJDQ1
$1,129,000
424-203-1828

Open Sun Jun 14th | 2-5pm
Web ID HIKQ1
17829 Valley Vista Blvd
5/5+1
$2,985,000
Joel & Dorit Cooper / Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices CA Prop 310-968-2401

Open Sun Jun 14th | 2-5pm
Web ID HIYW1
6528 San Vicente
3/2+1
$1,079,000
Joel Cooper / Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices CA Prop 310-968-2401

Open House Sunday 2pm-5pm
Web ID HHAM1
5117 Rubio Avenue
4/3
$1,999,999
Jenia Cohenrad / Pinnacle Estate Properties 818-613-3829

Open Sunday 2-5
8815 Airlane Avenue
2/1
Stephanie Younger / Teles Properties

Web ID HJDP1
$689,000
424-203-1828

Open Sunday 2-5PM
Web ID HJDZ1
17953 Collins St.
3/2
$615,000
Elizabeth Marquart / RE/MAX Estate Properties L.A. 818-784-8892

Open Sunday 2:00 to 5:00
1634 Blue Jay Way
3/3+1
Renee Avedon / John Aaroe Group

Web ID HISD1
$34,500-Mo
310-801-5400

Hancock Park
By Appt
355 S Rimpau Blvd
6/6+1
Lisa Hutchins / Coldwell Banker

Los Feliz

a steel and frosted-glass
gate.
Among features are
polished concrete floors, a
glassed-in foyer, a highceiling living room and a
chipped-glass fireplace. The
2,207 square feet of openplan space include an updated kitchen with stainless
steel appliances.
The master suite has a
fireplace, walk-in closet and
transom windows for a total
of three bedrooms, three full
bathrooms and a powder
room.
Glass doors open to a
swimming pool and expansive deck that take in views
of the cityscape, mountains
and canyons. There’s carport parking.
Shaw, 61, has worked
with Damn Yankees and
Shaw Blades as well as the
big-hair band Styx, which
had such 1970s hits as “Fooling Yourself (The Angry
Young Man)” and “Renegade.”
The guitarist-singersongwriter has also released

Open
Address

Bd/ba+½ba

Web ID
Price

Open Sunday 2-5
Web ID HJEP1
644 Bienveneda
4/3
$1,899,000
Dan Urbach / Berkshire Hathaway Home Services 310-230-3757

Palms
Open Sunday 2-5
3568 Veteran Ave
5/5+1
Ron Wynn / Coldwell Banker - Westside

Web ID HIAT1
$1,795,000
310-963-9944

Open Sunday 2-5
1511 Mackay Lane
2/2+1
Amber Kristin / Westside Estate Agency

Web ID HJER1
$619,000
310-663-5224

Santa Monica
Open Sunday 2-5
369 22nd Street
5/4+1
John Hathorn / Pence Hathorn Silver

Web ID HIVY1
$3,995,000
310-458-4024

Open Sunday 2 - 5
3756 Effingham
4/3+1
Karen Lower / Coldwell Banker BH North

Web ID HEFS1
$2,500,000
323-804-8043

Open Sunday 2-5
238 19th Street
4/4
John Hathorn / Pence Hathorn Silver

Web ID HIPC1
$3,649,000
310-458-4024

Developers - Open Sun 2-5
Web ID HJEK1
344 S Rimpau Blvd
6/7+1
$3,999,995
Linda Hindley / Coldwell Banker www.hancockparktoday.com323-610-6070

Open Sunday 2 - 5
3360 Ley Drive
4/3+1
Karen Lower / Coldwell Banker BH North

Web ID HJFA1
$1,928,000
323-804-8043

Open Sunday 2-5
918 9th Street D
4/3
Brett Silver/ Pence Hathorn Silver

Web ID HJEL1
$1,595,000
310-458-4024

OPEN Sat and Sun 2-5PM!!
2325 Kansas Avenue 1
1/1
Paul Czako / Gussman Czako Estates

Web ID HJEZ1
$399,000
310-995-1963

By Appt
160 S Van Ness Ave
6/6+1
Lisa Hutchins / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HIVI1
$3,495,000
323-460-7626

By Appt
325 S McCadden Pl.
Loveland Carr Properties

3/2+1

Web ID HIUU1
$3,290,000
323-460-7606

Open Sunday 2-5
157 S Lucerne
Sue Carr / Coldwell Banker

4/3

Web ID HIGP1
$1,675,000
323-460-7606

By Appt
928 S Tremaine
Loveland Carr Properties

3/2+1

Web ID HIUW1
$1,499,000
323-460-7606

Hollywood Hills West
2/2

Web ID HEWW1
$1,925,000
310-273-0331

Open Sunday 2-5pm
7300 Franklin Ave. 656
1/1
Peter Whyte / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HJDD1
$399,500
310-777-6327

Malibu
Open Sat & Sunday 2-5
20552 Pacific Coast Highway 3/3+1
Shirley Sherman / Westside Estate Agency

Web ID HJDY1
$2,795,000
310-849-8834

Mar Vista

Web ID
Price

Upland
Open House: Sat/Sun 1 ñ 4
237 E Buffington
3/3+1
Arabella Perez / Tarbell, Realtors

Web ID HITR1
$599,000
909-753-9789

Open Saturday 1-4
1422 Gabriella Court
3/2
Nancy Zepeda / First Team SnS

Web ID HJET1
$565,000
909-455-8600

Open Tuesday 11 to 2PM
731 Superba
3/3
Jennifer Hughes / Bulldog Realtors

Web ID HIYK1
$2,595,000
310-383-7299

Call for Private Showing
Web ID HJEW1
821 Nowita3/2
$2,495,000
Jennifer Hughes / Bulldog Realtors
310-383-7299
Open Sunday 2-5
30 23rd Avenue
2/1+1
John Hathorn / Pence Hathorn Silver

Web ID HIUA1
$1,695,000
310-458-4024

Open Sunday 2-5PM
Web ID HJEH1
1089 Palms Blvd
3/2
$1,379,000
Laurie Woolner / Power Brokers International 310-699-0980
OPEN House Sunday 2-5PM
Web ID HFAN1
1046 Princeton Drive
0/1
$779,000
Lee Johnson / West Realty Group Sotheby’s Int. Realty 310-892-2244

Westchester
Web ID HJDM1
$1,399,000
424-203-1828

Open Sun 2-5 & Tues 11-2
Web ID HJEV1
3669 Berry Drive
3/3+1
$1,895,000
Sevak Kachadurian / Westside Estate Agency 310-560-1688

Open Sunday 2-5
7521 W. 91st Street
5/3
Stephanie Younger / Teles Properties

Web ID HJES1
$1,399,000
424-203-1828

Open Sunday 2-5
6447 W. 83rd Street
3/1
Stephanie Younger / Teles Properties

Web ID HJDJ1
$839,000
424-203-1828

Web ID HIRX1
$2,265,000
310-963-9944

Open Sat & Sun 2pm - 5pm
3775 Stewart Ave
3/2
Brian Selem / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HJCF1
$1,249,000
310-442-1644

Sunset Strip

Open House Sunday 2-5pm
3783 Redwood ave
3/1+1
Michelle Pine / KW Realty Marina Del Rey

Web ID HJEF1
$910,000
310-210-8504

Open Sunday 2-5pm
Web ID HJDS1
1637 N Stanley Ave
5/4+5
$2,149,000
Christelle Masi / Keller Williams Santa Monica 310-429-6861

Just Listed! Open Sun 2-5
3608 Avenida Del Sol
2/2
Dave & Jeff Kaptain - Keller Williams Realty

Web ID HJEG1
$825,000
310-432-6500

Westwood

Topanga

Open Sunday 2 - 5
1717 Comstock Avenue
Michael Cassell

4/4+1

Web ID HICD1
$2,850,000
310-470-0948

Open Sunday 2-5pm
10463 Ilona
4/3+5
David Elston / elstonandelston

Web ID HJEX1
$1,795,000
310-704-3451
Web ID HIWB1
$925,000
310-777-6371

Open Sat & Sun 2-5
770 Amalfi Drive
6/6+1
Charles Pence / Pence Hathorn Silver

Web ID HJBV1
$6,000,000
310-458-4024

Call for Private Showing!
1710 Topanga Skyline Drive Multi-family
Jane St John / RE/MAX Estate Properties

Web ID HJDN1
$1,165,000
310-567-5971

Open Saturday 1pm-4pm
10830 Lindbrook Drive #1
2/2+1
J.Siegal/J.Hancock / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HJDT1
$3,895,000
310-652-6600

Sunday 1-4
2545 Burson Road
2/2
Eric Nelson / Topanga Properties

Web ID HGYB1
$745,000
310-455-1344

Open Sun Jun 14th | 2-5pm
Web ID HIYZ1
10650 Kinnard Ave 311
2/2
$699,000
Joel & Dorit Cooper / Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices CA 310-990-4655

310-899-3584

*Open Sunday 2-5*
1239 Las Pulgas Road
4/4+1
Timothy Enright / The Enright Company

By Appt
317 N Van Ness Ave
3/2+1
Lisa Hutchins / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HJEE1
$1,849,000
323-460-7626

By Appointment Only
1436 Calle del Jonella
5/6+1
Jacqui Bell / Gibson International

Web ID HJCV1
$3,049,000
310-266-8520

Torrance

Open Sunday 2 - 5
3123 La Suvida Dr
North Real Estate Services

Web ID HJEU1
$1,599,000
310-271-8068

By Appt
1402 El Bosque Ct
5/5+2
Marc Krief / Virtual Real Estate

Web ID HJBC1
$2,796,000
310-459-5599

Open Saturday 1-5
Web ID HJDU1
1741 Fern Ave.
3/2
$699,000
Joanna Bowling / Keller Williams Palos Verdes Realty 310-594-1730

4/4

Bd/ba+½ba

Studio City

Open Sunday 2-5PM
636 hanley 5/5
$3,250,000
Steve Sawaii / Coldwell Banker

Web ID HJEA1

Open
Address

Open Sunday 2-5
7524 Cowan Avenue
3/3
Stephanie Younger / Teles Properties

Open Sunday 2-5
3557 Stoner
5/4+1
Ron Wynn / Coldwell Banker - Montana

Pacific Palisades

[email protected]
[email protected]

Venice

Redondo Beach

Web ID HILY1
$8,425,000
323-460-7626

Los Angeles

Claremont
Open House Sunday 1-4
844 Trinity Lane
3/2+1
Carol Wiese/ Curtis Real Estate

Open
Address

By Appointment Only
7904 Woodrow Wilson Drive
Ronna Brand / Brand Realty

Cheviot Hills
Just Listed! Open Sun 2-5
10443 Cheviot Drive
3/3
Jason Reitz / Rock Realty Group

The wood-and-concrete
contemporary, completed
this year, features a lounge
with a wet bar, mirrors with
built-in televisions and a
three-sided fireplace that
divides the main floor.
A modern kitchen with a
large center island, a formal
living room, dining room
and a master suite with an
en suite yoga studio are
within the 4,788 square feet
of space. Light oak flooring,
pendant lighting and a
floating steel-and-wood
staircase lend a modern
vibe to the interiors of the
six-bedroom, 4.5-bathroom
home.
Outdoors, grounds lined
with artificial turf contain a
swimming pool and spa, a
detached recreation room
and an outdoor kitchen. A
fire pit and sitting area are
adjacent to the pool.
The property came on
the market in April for
$2.88 million and was
featured as an L.A. Times
Home of the Day. It previously sold for $899,000 in

temporary house in Studio City for $2.8 million.

Professional basketball
player Jordan Farmar,
most recently of the L.A.
Clippers, has put his home
court in Tarzana up for sale
at $3.495 million.
Set on more than half an
acre, the Spanish-style
house was built in 2004 and
features a saltwater wave
pool, a hookah lounge, two
wine cellars and lighted
basketball court.
The main house includes
a two-story entry with a
wrought-iron staircase and
a formal living room that
opens to the kitchen. Dark
wood and tile floors,
beamed ceilings, wroughtiron accents and a custom
wall aquarium are among
the interior details.
Amenities include seven
fireplaces, a family room
with a projection screen, a
home theater, a game room,
a climate-controlled doghouse and a dog run. The
master suite has a steam
shower and soaking tub.
There are a total of five
bedrooms and 5.75 bathrooms in 7,500 square feet of
space.
Outdoors, the landscaped grounds center on
the swimming pool, which
has a beach entry, a grottostyle spa and a waterfall
feature. Adjacent to the pool
is a 1,500-square-foot pool
house with a kitchen and a
wet bar.
Farmar bought the property in 2011 for $1,866,500.
Josh and Matthew Altman, the Altman brothers,
of Douglas Elliman Real
Estate are the listing agents.
Farmar, 28, has deep ties
to Southern California,
having played for both the
Lakers and Clippers. He
also played at UCLA in
college and before that at
William Howard Taft High
School in Woodland Hills.
He was released by the
Clippers in January and in
February signed with Turkish club Dogus Darussafaka
through the end of the season.

Winnetka
Open Sunday 2-5pm
20134 Leadwell Street 253
3/2
Skyler Hynes and Emilia Arau

Web ID HIUP1
$319,000
310-800-5111

L AT I M ES . C O M / B US I N E S S

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

C11

HOT PROPERTY
HOME OF
THE WEEK

Sun,
surf
along
PCH

By Lauren Beale
Three stories with oceanfacing balconies take in
panoramic views from this
beachfront contemporary
near Topanga Point, a popular Malibu surf spot. A
rounded chimney at the side
of the house resembles the
smokestack on a steamer.

The details
Location: 18860 Pacific
Coast Highway, Malibu
90265
Asking price: $6.299 million
Year built: 2000
House size: Four bedrooms,
3.5 bathrooms, 3,896 square
feet
Lot size: 5,686 square feet
Features: Open floor plan,
den, office, bar, breakfast
area, two fireplaces, elevator,
glass-enclosed porch, grassy
motor court, two-car garage,
steps leading to the sand
About the area: Last year,
245 single-family homes sold
in the 90265 ZIP Code at a
median price of $2.304 million, according to CoreLogic.
That was a 15.2% price increase from 2013.
Agent: Oliver Fries, Paloma
Group, (310) 562-4944
To submit a candidate for
Home of the Week, send
high-resolution color
photos via Dropbox.com,
permission from the
photographer to publish the
images and a description of
the house to homeofthe
[email protected]

Photographs by

Joshua Targownik

PRICED AT $6.299 MILLION, this 3,896-square-foot contemporary offers ocean-facing balconies to take in the panoramic views.

THE HOME, which has an open floor plan, features a den, office,

BUILT ON a 5,686-square-foot lot, the three-story home near
Topanga Point includes a grassy motor court and a two-car garage.

bar, breakfast area, granite kitchen island and two fireplaces.

TEAR-DOWNS

Development has star past

By Neal J. Leitereg
A piece of Old Hollywood has given way to
a top sale in Sherman Oaks.
On Longview Avenue, where the home of
Oscar-winning actress Susan Hayward
once stood, a newly built Traditional sold
last month for $6.85 million — one of the most
expensive single-family-home sales to date
in the San Fernando Valley neighborhood.
The new development replaced a ranchstyle house formerly owned by Hayward and
her first husband, actor Jess Barker, in the
1940s and 1950s.
The original home came on the market
last year for the first time in more than half a
century and sold for $2.52 million. The singlestory structure was built in 1940 and had four
bedrooms and four bathrooms in 2,884
square feet.
The rebuilt 8,786-square-foot house sold
last month. The master suite has a two-way
fireplace and a soaking tub. There are a total
of seven bedrooms and nine bathrooms.
Oren Mordkowitz of Pinnacle Estate
Properties was the listing agent. Howard
Zuckerman of Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties represented
the buyer.

Realtor.com

SUSAN HAYWARD once owned this

ranch-style house in Sherman Oaks.

Realtor.com

IT WAS REPLACED by a newly built

Traditional that sold for $6.85 million

[email protected]

Open Sunday 2-5

Agoura Hills

Open Sat/Sun 2-5

Open House Sunday 2-5 pm

5734 Fairview

Beverlywood

1133 S La Peer

Fabulous Tri-Level home on almost an acre of Horse Property with incredible 360
degree views. Wood floors, granite counter tops, guest suite, dual master, roof top
deck in Agoura
Web# HIJX1

Rare, Charming Duplex - plus in Fantastic Beverly Hills / Beverlywood adjacent
location. Lower unit with newer kitchen and bathrooms flowing out to great back
yard area. Large bonus room
Web# HIQF1

Laura Getzoff / Remax Olson & Associates 818-539-7339 $1,285,000

Yossi Mayberg / The RFC Group

Open Sun Jun 14th | 2-5pm

Los Angeles

6528 San Vicente

Charming home in Carthay Circle! Traditional 3BD/2.5BA on spacious 7,500sqft
lot, prime Beverly Hills Adj. location. Property zoned LAR2 w/ room to expand.
Trust-Sale, no court confirmation. In HPOZ
Web# HIYW1

Joel Cooper / Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices CA Prop 310-968-2401 $1,079,000

310-489-2395

$1,850,000

Open Sunday 2 - 5

Burbank

Open Sun Jun 14th | 2-5pm

310 S Orchard

Brand new construction!Exquisitely designed 2 story 4 bdr 4 bth Cape Cod
w/exceptional finishes.Open island gourmet kitchen/ family rm.Luxurious Master
ste.Close to studios.Rancho adj.Walk to schools
Web# HJCX1

Geri Spira / GESP Realty

310-463-4403

$1,795,000

Encino

17829 Valley Vista Blvd

Newer 5BD/5.5BA Contemporary luxe estate (+/-4,971sqft home) on appx 1⁄4
acre in Encino, S. of Ventura Blvd. Designer master suite, grand living rm w/ 25ft
ceiling, wd flrs, pool. Motivated Seller
Web# HIKQ1

Joel&DoritCooper/BerkshireHathawayHomeServicesCAProp 310-968-2401 $2,985,000

Open House Sunday 2pm-5pm

Open Sun 2-5 & Tues 11-2

3756 Effingham

Majestic Luxury Estates 5117 Rubio Avenue, Encino

Studio City

Karen Lower / Coldwell Banker BH North 323-804-8043 $2,500,000

Jenia Cohenrad / Pinnacle Estate Properties 818-613-3829 $1,999,999

Sevak Kachadurian / Westside Estate Agency 310-560-1688 $1,895,000

Los Feliz

Designer done 4bds+3.5bas 3,100 sqft Tudor blends old world charm w/modern
day conveniences. Salt water pool,spa&yard . Master w/frpl& terrace. Home
theater system. 2-car gar www.3756Effingham.com
Web# HEFS1

Magnificent Mediterrean Estate. Stunning Chandelier leads to frl liv rm. Marble
flrs, state of art kit, flr to ceil win, marble/wrought iron staircase. Upstrs feat huge
lib/ofc. Mstr ste has priv balcony. Pool/raised Spa
Web# HHAM1

3669 Berry Drive

Spectacular Brand New Architectural Home w/city & canyon views. Open floor plan
w/3 bed, 3.5 bath, play/media room. Abundance of natural light. Will satisfy the
most discerning architectural buyer.
Web# HJEV1

C12

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I M E S. CO M / B U SI N E SS

Are drops in emissions
due to cap-and-trade?

Free seminar for
small businesses.

Los Angeles Times Chandler Auditorium

Tuesday, June 30 • 6-9 pm
Presented in Spanish

JOIN US FOR EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS
DESIGNED FOR SMALL BUSINESSES.
• How to plan for the future of your business
• Gain valuable financing, marketing/public relations and legal insights
• Reception with networking opportunities, complimentary appetizers and cocktails
• Hear from industry professionals:

Alejandro Maciel
Hoy Editor-in-Chief

Patricia Pérez
State President, AARP

Brian Pacheco
Communications
Consultant

One lucky attendee will win $10,000 worth
of advertising space in Hoy.
RSVP TODAY: hoylosangeles.com/abriendopuertas
PRESENTED BY

SUPPORTING SPONSOR

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. Sweepstakes runs on 6/30/15 & is
open to legal U.S. residents residing in following CA counties: Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside or San Bernardino who are 18+ & own (in whole or in part)
small business (less than $100,000,000 in annual sales) as of 6/8/15. Void where prohibited & outside listed counties. Enter at event (attendance is
free) via entry form. Full rules hoylosangeles.com/abriendopuertas. Limit 1 entry per person, per event. Odds depend on # of elig. entries. 1 Grand Prize/
Event: $10,000 Hoy ad campaign. Sponsor: Hoy Pubs., LLC, 202 W. 1st St., Los Angeles, CA 90012. 15HOY182

Ask Laz

Can a utility ‘estimate’ my bill?
David Lazarus answers your consumer questions.

latimes.com/AskLaz

Los Angeles County
AZUSA

>> Colony At Azusa
Far West Industries

New townhomes up to 4 bdrms, 3 baths, pool/spa,
2 car garages. From the $300,000’s

ColonyAtAzusa.com

626-804-7322

Los Angeles County
CERRITOS

>> Plaza Walk
The Olson Company

Brand New Townhomes. Up to 4 bedrooms, 3.5
baths and 1821 sq.ft. Priced from the mid $400’s.
Few Homes Remaining.

www.PlazaWalkHomes.com

562.370.9501

Los Angeles County

EAGLE ROCK

>> PRISM
Planet Home Living

Coming Soon! x(15) Modern Single Family Homes.
Starting from the low $600,000’s.

www.planethomeliving.com

323-386-4620

Los Angeles County

HOLLYWOOD

>> The Gatsby
Far West Industries

Grand Opening! 15 new single family homes, roof
decks, 2 car garage. From the high $700’s.

GatsbyHollywood.com

323-770-4807

Los Angeles County
Los Angeles

>> RiverPark
LA Urban Homes

Phase One 75% Sold! 3&4 Bdrm Homes Up To
2000 SF + Views From Hi $500s

www.liveriverpark.com

323-222-0501

Los Angeles County
Pasadena

>> District Walk
The Olson Company

New Townhomes Now Selling. Up to 3 beds plus
loft, 2.5 baths, up to 1,766 sq.ft. Priced from the
low $600’s.

www.districtwalk.com

562-370-9506

[Hiltzik, from C1]
than others.
California’s cap-andtrade experiment is being
widely watched because it
covers the broadest range of
industries of any such program in North America in
the largest state economy in
the region. It’s also, as the
Legislative Analyst’s Office
declared in 2012, “one of the
most wide-ranging and
complex regulatory efforts
in the history of the state.” If
cap-and-trade can work
here, it could work anywhere.
“California has provided
a very good signal to other
states and the federal government that significant
reductions can be achieved
through a market-based
system,” Goulder says. One
positive aspect of the state’s
lengthening experience is
that it has “drained away
some of the fear-mongering” about cap-and-trade,
says Severin Borenstein, an
energy expert at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. For example, the
state’s oil and gas industry,
which last year unsuccessfully lobbied to defer the
Jan. 1, 2015, deadline for
imposing cap-and-trade
rules on gasoline suppliers,
predicted that the regulation would drive up gas
prices by 16 to 76 cents per
gallon.
Borenstein and other
experts accurately put the
increase at closer to nine to
10 cents, and argued that
cap-and-trade would be
meaningless if the largest
source of greenhouse gases,
transportation fuel, was left
out of the program.
To meet 1990 level goals,
emissions must be cut by
almost 16% — from 507
million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent to
427 million. Every year, ARB
hands out or auctions allowances covering that year’s
emission cap, which is reduced year by year as 2020
draws near. Factories and
other sources of greenhouse
gases can buy the allowances they need or sell any
they don’t need. ARB forbids speculators to hoard
allowances — to avoid the
sort of manipulation that
fouled the state’s electricity
market during the deregulation era of 2000-01 — and
sets a floor price, which will
rise slightly every year, to
signal that emissions have
some real cost.
The goal is to prompt
emitters to become more
efficient users of energy. But

Los Angeles County
San Gabriel

>> Mission Walk
The Olson Company

New homes now selling to San Gabriel. Up to 4
beds, 3 baths, up to 2,245 sq.ft. From the high
$400’s.

www.missionwalkhomes.com

562-370-9507

Los Angeles County

TEMPLE CITY

>> Linden Walk
The Olson Company

Brand New Detached & Paired Homes. Up to 5
bedrooms, 3 baths and 2160 sq.ft. From the low
$500’s.

www.LindenWalk.com

562.370.9504

Orange County

COSTA MESA
>> Palmilla
Melia Homes

NOW OPEN! 3-4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths.
1,631-1,747 sq.ft. From $703,900.

www.Melia-Homes.com

714.323.9899

Orange County

COSTA MESA

>> Seabright
Brandywine Homes

Spacious Townhomes in Gated Community.
2 bdrms, 2.5 baths. From the low $600,000s.

www.seabrightcostamesa.com

866-372-6030

Orange County

Huntington Beach
>> Coastal Walk
The Olson Company

Brand New townhomes. Up to 4 bedrooms, 3.5
baths. Priced from the low $600,000’s.

www.CoastalWalkHomes.com

562.370.9505

Christina House For The Times

THE CAP-AND-TRADE program is working very

well, but it may not be doing as much as its biggest
fans say. Above is Valero’s Wilmington refinery.

the pressure is more of a
nudge than a cudgel because of fears of imposing
emissions limits so tight or
costs so high that businesses would flee the state.
“Although we were moving
forward ahead of others, we
weren’t moving so far ahead
that it became destabilizing
to current businesses in
California,” Nichols observes.
Energy experts expect
the auction price of allowances to stay close to the
minimum through 2020,
largely because the emission caps have turned out to
be higher than what the
state’s covered industries
are actually producing.
The state’s other emissions mandates already
have done much to bring
emissions down. Another
big factor was the recession:
The state’s greenhouse gas
emissions fell 4.4% from
2008 to 2009, tracking the
slowdown in economic
activity, and didn’t return to
pre-crash levels until 2012,
ARB statistics show.
“Current emissions are
below what we would have
seen even without the program,” Bushnell says.
“When we came out of the
recession, everybody was a
bit more efficient, and those
efficiencies have persisted.”
Auction prices may begin to
rise, however, if the state
enacts more stringent targets for 2020-30, as Gov.
Brown advocates.
A larger question, Borenstein says, is whether emis-

sions regulations such as
cap-and-trade do enough to
drive technological change.
“California produces 1% of
world greenhouse gases,” he
says, “so it’s not going to
solve the problem on its
own. Making a difference
means developing new
technologies that can be
used in the developing
world. If California meets
our greenhouse gas goals by
taking expensive measures
no one else is willing to do,
that’s not doing it in a way
that drives technology
forward.”
ARB’s Nichols maintains
that cap-and-trade is
achieving that goal merely
by establishing a predictable benchmark price for
carbon emissions. Even at a
modest $12 per ton, she
says, “that’s enough of a
signal for industries to make
dramatic investments in
clean energy.”
But it’s also just one
piece of a broad strategy to
fight climate change. By
itself, cap-and-trade doesn’t
answer the one most important question on climate
change: Just how much are
we willing to do to win the
fight?
Michael Hiltzik’s column
appears every Sunday.
Read his blog, the Economy
Hub, every day at
latimes.com/business
/hiltzik, reach him at
[email protected],
check out
facebook.com/hiltzik and
follow @hiltzikm on Twitter.

Orange County

YORBA LINDA
>> Covington
Brandywine Homes

New Townhomes Now Selling! 3 to 5 bedrooms,
up to 2,081 s.f. Starting in the low $600,000’s.

covingtonyorbalinda.com

866-298-7771

San Bernardino County

Rancho Cucamonga
>> Etiwanda Classics
Manning Homes

1/2 Acre Lots! Models Now Selling! 5 Bed/4.5
Bath/3,850 - 4,900 s.f. Low $1 Millions

www.manninghomes.com

714.928.8870

San Bernardino County
REDLANDS

>> Charleston Estates
Melia Homes

Only 15 Homes. 5 BD/5.5 BA. Up to 4,463 SF.
Brokers Full 3%. From the High $800Ks.

www.Melia-Homes.com

909.307.8400

Ventura County

CAMARILLO

>> Somerset at Village at
the Park
D.R. Horton
New luxury homes with gourmet kitchens.
Up to 7 bedrooms. From mid $700s!

www.DRHorton.com/Ventura

805-484-4272

Ventura County
OXNARD

>> The Axis & The District
at RiverPark
elacora
Six model homes now showing! Up to 2,299 sq.
ft., 5 bd, 3 ba. From the high $300,000s

www.elacoraRiverPark.com

805.351.1102

Your Ad Here
Visit latimes.com/PlaceAd

D

SPORTS

DD

S U N D A Y , J U N E 1 4 , 2 0 1 5 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / S P O R T S

San Diego 2, Dodgers 1: Greinke’s solid
night is ruined by Upton’s homer. D3

Angels 1, Oakland 0: Wilson is sharp for
seven and Pujols homers again. D3

GOLF D2 :: MLB D3-6 :: COLLEGE WORLD SERIES D6 :: HORSE RACING D7 :: THE DAY IN SPORTS D7 :: WOMEN’S WORLD CUP D8-9 :: GALAXY D9

Habit
that’s
tough
to truly
snuff

STANLEY CUP FINAL
GAME 5

Chicago 2
Tampa Bay 1
Blackhawks lead series, 3-2
Game 6: Monday, 5 PDT
TV: Channel 4

’HAWKS
ALMOST
ABLE TO
FEEL IT
Vermette scores in
third period and
Crawford is tough
when it counts.

Smokeless tobacco
remains ingrained
in baseball, despite
bans, warnings and
Gwynn’s death

HELENE ELLIOTT

BY GARY KLEIN
Rick Vanderhook played for Cal
State Fullerton’s 1984 College World Series championship team and was a Titans assistant when they won two more.
So he remembers the days when cans
and pouches of smokeless tobacco were
omnipresent in the uniform pockets of
the participants.
Not anymore. The NCAA banned tobacco use on the field in the early 1990s.
“It’s probably cut back, I’ll say, almost 90% compared to what it was 25
years ago,” said Vanderhook, who in his
fourth season as head coach has guided
the Titans back to Omaha, where they
will open against defending national
champion Vanderbilt on Sunday at 5
p.m.
Smokeless tobacco remains ingrained in baseball culture, however, including the college and high school
levels, where it is banned.
“It sounds bad, but it’s part of the
game,” said Fullerton pitcher Thomas
Eshelman, echoing nearly every coach
and player interviewed for this article.
Minor league players can be fined for
having tobacco products in their locker
or partaking on the field. Major leaguers are prohibited from using tobacco
during televised interviews and player
appearances. But they are otherwise
not prohibited from using it on the field.
Before he died of salivary gland cancer last year, baseball Hall of Famer
Tony Gwynn said he believed his habit
of using smokeless tobacco caused the
disease
that
[See Tobacco, D6]

Jeff Roberson Associated Press

A CAN OF chewing tobacco is outlined in the pocket of a St. Louis Cardinals player in 2011;

major league players are not prohibited from using it on the field but college players are.

Chris Park Associated Press

TONY GWYNN believed his chewing habit

caused the cancer that took his life at age 54.

Winslow Townson Associated Press

CURT SCHILLING wrote an open letter to

his younger self warning of dip’s dangers.

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES FULLERTON VS. VANDERBILT | TODAY: GAME 1 IN OMAHA, TV: ESPN2, 5 P.M. PDT
The Titans will be underdogs against the defending champion Commodores and could garner support from the hometown fans. D6

NBA FINALS | GOLDEN STATE VS. CLEVELAND
BEST-OF-SEVEN SERIES TIED, 2-2 | GAME 5: TODAY AT GOLDEN STATE | TV: CH. 7, 5 P.M.

Warriors
have the
momentum

John Raoux Associated Press

ANTOINE Vermette,

right, celebrates with
Teuvo Teravainen.

WO M E N ’S WO R L D CU P

Unlevel playing field
Double standard on display with female athletes
BILL PLASCHKE

James has stitches, needs
teammates to step up
By Mike Bresnahan
OAKLAND — Meanwhile, there are the
Golden State Warriors.
The scorching-hot limelight can’t leave
LeBron James — Is he fatigued? Can he win
with this ragtag bunch? How’s his head? —
but Golden State tiptoed back into the NBA
Finals with a smooth, very Warrior-like
Game 4.
Stephen Curry is fine, thank you, and the
Warriors’ new small-ball lineup might mark
the tipping point in the series that resumes
Sunday with Game 5 at Golden State.
[See NBA, D2]

TAMPA, Fla.
— The Stanley Cup will
be in the
house Monday at the
United Center, and the
Chicago
Blackhawks will have a
chance to make the hallowed trophy feel at home
there for a while.
Center Antoine Vermette, a late-season acquisition who was a healthy
scratch early in the Western
Conference final, converted
a rebound two minutes into
the third period Saturday
and Chicago goaltender
Corey Crawford held off a
furious late push by the
Tampa Bay Lightning as
the Blackhawks clawed out
a 2-1 victory at Amalie
Arena. With a 3-2 series lead
they’re in position to win the
Cup on Monday for the third
time in six seasons.
“It’s great. We’re excited
about the opportunity,”
Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews said. “It’s what
we’ve worked for.”
[See Stanley Cup, D9]

Ronald Martinez Getty Images

ANDRE IGUODALA has been an

unexpected boost for the Warriors, as
he scored 22 points in Game 4.

The Women’s
World Cup
has only been
kicking
around for a
week, yet it
seems all the
requirements
for a major
American
female sports competition
have already been fulfilled.
Sexist comment by a
national sports commentator? Check.
Athletes negatively
impacted by playing in
substandard conditions
that would never be forced
upon men? Check.
Pandering television
coverage? Check.
Double standards in-

They suffer
for the cause
There was much concern
about the expanded field,
but it could turn out all
right for the women’s
game in the long run. A1

UP NEXT

USA vs. Nigeria
Tuesday at Vancouver
TV: Channel 11, 5 p.m.
volving off-field behavior?
Check.
The U.S. women’s na-

tional soccer team is one of
the most powerful and
enduring athletic operations in this country. It
has brought home two
World Cup championships,
four Olympic gold medals,
and was ranked No. 1 in the
world for nearly seven consecutive years. It has created national celebrities
such as Mia Hamm, media
stars such as Julie Foudy,
and empowered millions of
young women to punch
through ceilings and break
down barriers.
Yet its biggest victory
still awaits, that being the
day it can compete on a
worldwide stage and be
viewed with the same respect — and scrutiny — as
the men.
[See Plaschke, D8]

D2

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I M E S. C O M /S P O RT S

GOLF ROUNDUP

Park leads in bid for third title in a row in major

associated press

Two-time
defending
champion Inbee Park shot a
seven-under-par 66 on Saturday to overtake fellow
South Korean Sei Young
Kim for the lead after three
rounds of the KPMG Women’s PGA championship at
Harrison, N.Y.
Kim, a rookie who came
into the round with a onestroke lead, shot a 69. The
two had battled all afternoon at Westchester Coun-

try Club and went into the final hole tied at 13 under. But
Park made her seventh birdie of the day on 18, and Kim
missed a four-foot putt for
par.
Suzann Pettersen and 17year-old Canadian Brooke
Henderson each shot a 71.
They ended tied with Hall of
Famer Karrie Webb for third
place, six strokes back, in
the second LPGA major of
the year.
Webb was in second place
to start the day, but had to
overcome bogeys on her first

two holes to shoot a 72.

St. Jude Classic

Englishman Greg Owen
and Fabian Gomez of Argentina each shot a three-under
67 to share a one-stroke lead
after 54 holes at the St. Jude
Classic at Memphis, Tenn.
Swirling wind and tough
pins kept everyone guessing
on a hectic day at TPC
Southwind, where as many
as six players had a piece of
the lead at some point.
But Owen, looking for his
first PGA Tour title in his

214th event, had four birdies
and one bogey in the third
round. Gomez opened with
the first of his three bogeys
and finished with six birdies.
Owen, 43, who lives in
Florida, has struggled this
season, missing five of 12
cuts on tour. His best career
finish is second at the 2006
Arnold Palmer Invitational,
but his best result this season is a tie for 22nd last November at the Sanderson
Farms Championship.
Brooks Koepka, who had
at least a piece of the lead

through the first two rounds,
finished with a 71 and is tied
with Scott Brown (68) for
second at 202.
Phil Mickelson, tuning up
for what he hopes is his first
U.S. Open victory, shot a 70
and is in a group at 207.

Senior Players

Defending
champion
Bernhard Langer shot a
four-under 67 in the third
round of the Senior Players
Championship at Belmont,
Mass., to open an eightstroke lead heading into the

final day.
Langer, who won last
year at Fox Chapel in Pittsburgh, is trying to become
the first golfer to win two
years in a row in this event
since Arnold Palmer in 1984.
Russ Cochran was even
for the day and is the closest
competitor to Langer at
eight under. Scott Verplank
shot a 66 in the third round
to move into a four-way tie
for third at Belmont Country Club with Colin Montgomerie, Jeff Hart and Guy Boros.

PRO CALENDAR

DODGERS

ANGELS

SUN.
14

MON.
15

TUE.
16

WED.
17

THU.
18

at
San Diego
1
SNLA

at
Texas
5
SNLA

at
Texas
5
SNLA

TEXAS
7
SNLA

TEXAS
7
SNLA

OAKLAND ARIZONA
12:30
7
FSW
FSW

ARIZONA at Arizona at Arizona
12:30
6:30
7
FSW
FSW
FSW
PSA ELITE
7
(U.S. Open
Cup)

GALAXY
Shade denotes home game
SPARKS: Today, Seattle, 2, TWCSN, TWC Deportes

TODAY ON THE AIR

1 p.m.

Dodgers at San Diego

5 p.m.
Cincinnati at Chicago Cubs
COLLEGE BASEBALL, COLLEGE WORLD SERIES
Noon
Louisiana State vs. Texas Christian
5 p.m.
Cal State Fullerton vs. Vanderbilt
CYCLING
7:30 a.m. Swiss Tour
GOLF
10 a.m.
PGA, FedEx St. Jude Classic
Noon
PGA, FedEx St. Jude Classic
Noon
Women’s PGA Championship
Noon
Senior Players Championship
HORSE RACING
Noon
Trackside Live, Santa Anita
2 p.m.
Woodbine Oaks
5 p.m.
The Quarters from Los Alamitos
PRO BASKETBALL
10 a.m.
WNBA, Chicago at Indiana
Noon
WNBA, Minnesota at Phoenix
2 p.m.
WNBA, Seattle at Sparks
5 p.m.
NBA Finals, Game 5, Cleveland at Golden State
SOCCER
9 a.m.

ON THE AIR
TV: FS1
TV: NBC Sports
TV: ESPN2
TV: MLB
TV: FS West
R: 830, 1330
TV: SNLA
R: 570, 1020
TV: ESPN R: 1220
TV: ESPN
TV: ESPN2
TV: USN
TV: Golf
TV: 2
TV: 4
TV: Golf
TV: Prime
TV: TVG
TV: Prime
TV: ESPN2
TV: ESPN2
TV: TWCSN, TWCD
TV: 7, ESPND
R: 980

Euro 2016 qualifier, Slovenia vs. England

TV: ESPN, ESPND
R: 1330
TV: FS2
Euro 2016 qualifier, Ukraine vs. Luxembourg
TV: GolTV
Uruguay, Nacional vs. Penarol
TV: ESPND R: 1330
Euro 2016 qualifier, Switzerland vs. Lithuania
TV: FS2, FOXD
Euro 2016 qualifier, Belarus vs. Spain
TV: beIN Net
Copa America, Colombia vs. Venezuela
Euro 2016 qualifier, Russia vs. Austria (delayed) TV: ESPND
TV: beIN Net
Copa America, Brazil vs. Peru
TV: FS1, FOXD
MLS, D.C. United at Orlando

9 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
11:30 a.m.
11:45 a.m.
1:45 p.m.
2:15 p.m.
4 p.m.
WRESTLING
3:30 p.m. World Team Trials
TV: NBC Sports
TV programming subject to blackout. For TV channel questions and availability please
contact your cable or satellite provider; Note: Times may be different for satellite TV users.

Ronald Martinez Getty Images

KLAY THOMPSON of Golden State drives against Cleveland’s Iman Shumpert. Thompson has been quiet

lately, scoring nine points on nine shots in Game 4, but has created opportunities for his teammates.

James knows he has to be
productive for Cavaliers
[NBA, from D1]
Warriors Coach Steve
Kerr doesn’t have to lie
about this: Even though the
series is tied, the Warriors
are back in control, two victories from their first championship since 1975.
Curry has found his
stroke, scoring 39 points in
the last five quarters, and
veteran Andre Iguodala has
been an unexpected boost,
joining the starting lineup
for Game 4 and scoring 22
points.
It seems pretty obvious
Draymond Green will start
again in place of nonexistent
7-footer Andrew Bogut,
though Kerr wouldn’t con-

firm it.
“Yeah, unfortunately, the
dynamics are pretty tricky,”
Kerr said Saturday. “I’ll just
say that I’ve established my
penchant for lying. So however I answer right now, you
shouldn’t believe me anyway.”
It wouldn’t be fibbing if
Kerr said he wanted more
from Warriors All-Star Klay
Thompson. He’s been quiet
lately, scoring nine points on
nine shots in Game 4 and 14
points on 16 attempts in
Game 3.
If Thompson and Curry
string something together in
the same game, Cleveland
would be more than hard-

NBA FINALS
Golden State vs. Cleveland
Series is tied, 2-2
Gm 1
Gm 2
Gm 3
Gm 4
Gm 5
Gm 6
Gm 7

at G.S. 108, Cleve. 100 (OT)
Cleve. 95, at G.S. 93 (OT)
at Cleveland 96, G.S. 91
G.S. 103, at Cleveland 82
Today at Golden State, 5
Tuesday at Cleveland, 6
Friday at Golden State, 6*

All times p.m. PDT

* if necessary

pressed to match them on
offense. Not that Curry is
stressing out.
“[Thompson]
creates
shots for others just by his

www.americanmalemedical.com
Los Angeles

A GREAT SEX LIFE!

Men, regardless of
your age or medical
history our doctors
can offer you a safe,
effective solution
for your Erectile
Dysfunction or
Premature Ejaculation!

WITH JUST
ONE VISIT.
If you do not respond to our medication on your first
visit, you will not be charged! It’s that simple. You
have nothing to lose and everything to gain.

$99 CONSULATION! This Month Only!

($199 Value!)
Has Viagra, Cialis or Levitra let you down?

Guaranteed* positive results from our medication.
It’s easy, safe and works for 97% of all men
regardless of their medical history.
(*or your visit is FREE)

Also helping men with Low Testosterone
Call today for information

310-300-9334

1125 S. Beverly Drive Suite #500,
Los Angeles, CA 90035

(Other locations in Studio City, Inland Empire, Irvine & Rancho Mirage)

100 OFF

$

*

*Off purchase of treatment package. Good until Father’s Day June 21 ONLY

LAA3364833-1

TIME
EVENT
AUTO RACING
10 a.m.
NASCAR Sprint Cup, Quicken Loans 400
Noon
IndyCar, Honda Indy Toronto
2 p.m.
NHRA, New England Nationals (tape)
BASEBALL
11 a.m.
Kansas City at St. Louis
12:30 p.m. Oakland at Angels

presence on the floor. And
that’s what makes our team
great, is you have threats everywhere and you have to
choose your poison,” Curry
said.
After
malfunctioning
badly at home in Game 4,
Cleveland got the maximum
amount of rest in this round,
three days to lick wounds
and pine for damaged AllStars Kevin Love and Kyrie
Irving.
James has said he’s fine
despite needing stitches
from his head-on collision
with a TV camera. He’ll
surely improve upon his 20point, seven-for-22 effort in
Game 4, won’t he?
The extra day of rest was
like a “lifeline,” he said, trying to size up his need to take
a lot of shots to score a lot of
points.
“Well, I’m in a spot where
I have to be very productive,
and that’s just the spot I’ve
always been in,” he said. “For
me, it’s a lose-lose when it
comes to, OK, well, in the
first three games I score 40,
but I shoot a lot of shots.
Last game I scored 20, I don’t
shoot as many shots, and we
lose. So it’s like, what do you
want?
“All I care about is how I
can produce for our team.”
The bigger questions orbit James’ teammates.
Will Matthew Dellavedova score 20 points (Game 3
output) or miss nine of 12
shots (Game 4 stats)? Can
Timofey Mozgov and Tristan Thompson plunder the
Warriors’ teeny lineup just a
little bit more? Will J.R.
Smith do anything this series besides miss a ton of
shots from his typically, uh,
unique selection?
Smith seems the most
down on himself and, at the
same time, apt to punch out
of his slump at any time. He’s
the one who scored 28 points
against Atlanta in the Eastern Conference finals, making eight of 12 three-point attempts.
“The best part about it, I
can’t play no worse,” Smith
said Saturday, cognizant he
was shooting poorly in the
series (29.8% to be exact).
The Warriors own the
momentum and are 47-4 at
Oracle Arena. A victory Sunday puts them in very good
shape. And that’s no lie.
[email protected]

L AT I M ES . C O M / S P O RT S

SS

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

D3

BASEBALL

Gonzalez has
success with
new approach
Dodgers first baseman
makes changes at the plate
and continues to be highly
productive.

San Diego 2,
Dodgers 1
KEY MOMENT: Padres outfielder
Justin Upton blasted a solo home
run off Zack Greinke with two
outs in the bottom of the eighth
inning to break a 1-1 stalemate.
The home run was the 13th of the
season for Upton and seventh
given up this season by Greinke.

By Dylan Hernandez

Mark J. Terrill Associated Press

OAKLAND’S Josh Phegley is doubled off second base by Angels shortstop Erick Aybar to end the

seventh inning after first baseman Efren Navarro snagged a line drive by Stephen Vogt.

Joyce has hit bottom
Former cleanup hitter falls
to ninth in lineup, and
Angels are considering
other options in left field.

Angels 1, Oakland 0
KEY MOMENT: Shortstop Erick Aybar couldn’t handle Brett Lawrie’s
sharp grounder in the seventh inning, committing the Angels’ first error in
11 games this month and putting runners on first and second with one out.
But first baseman Efren Navarro made a lunging, backhand grab of
Stephen Vogt’s liner and threw to second to complete an inning-double
play and preserve a 1-0 lead.

By Mike DiGiovanna
Matt Joyce might have reached
the proverbial last house on the
block, and there does not appear to
be unlimited parking out front.
After opening 2015 in the cleanup spot and hitting sixth or seventh for most of the season, the Angels left fielder was dropped to
ninth Saturday night against the
Oakland Athletics. Joyce went 0 for
3, but C.J. Wilson threw two-hit ball
over seven innings and the Angels
won, 1-0.
“I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t
frustrated and disappointed,”
Joyce said of his descent to the bottom of the order. “But I’m still in
the lineup. I’m still getting a chance
to play and make the most of it.”
Those chances could dry up
very soon if Joyce, 30, doesn’t shake
a season-long slump and give the
Angels something close to the production they expected when they
traded reliever Kevin Jepsen to
Tampa Bay for Joyce last winter.
Joyce entered Saturday with a
.181 average, .266 on-base percentage, .316 slugging percentage, four
homers, 17 runs batted in, 46 strikeouts and 18 walks. His wins-abovereplacement mark of -1.3 was the
second-lowest
among
major
league qualifiers.
As a comparison, Raul Ibanez
had a .157/.258/.265 slash line with
three homers and 21RBIs when the
Angels released him last June 21.
General Manager Jerry Dipoto
is pursuing left-handed-hitting
outfielders in trades, and Efren
Navarro, who has a knack for
stringing together quality at-bats,
could cut into Joyce’s playing time.
The Angels even began working
out third baseman Kyle Kubitza,
who was called up from triple-A
Salt Lake on Wednesday, in left
field Saturday to give them another possible left-handed-hitting option in the outfield. Kubitza has
played all of two minor league
games in left field in five years.
“I remember Gene Mauch saying something that always stuck
with me, that hitters will hit,” Angels hitting coach Don Baylor said.
“It might take two weeks, three
weeks, a month, but hitters will hit.
“So I keep thinking that will
happen with Matt, where something clicks, he gets a couple of hits,
he comes back the next day feeling
good about himself and gets a couple more hits. He’s just trying to figure his swing out.”
Joyce, who had a .250 career average with 88 homers in six seasons
entering 2015, improved during a
23-game stretch from May 12
through last Tuesday, compiling a
.254/.361/.479 slash line with three
homers, seven doubles, 10 RBIs

AT THE PLATE: Albert Pujols hit a solo homer in the first, his 10th homer
in 15 games and the 538th of his career. The shot to left field gave Pujols
1,636 career runs batted in, tying him with Ernie Banks for 29th on
baseball’s all-time list. Pujols became the sixth player in Angels history
and the first since Mo Vaughn in May of 2000 to hit 10 homers in a
15-game span. Third baseman David Freese, who did not start the
previous three games because of right hamstring tightness, had two hits
in three at-bats. Mike Trout fouled a ball hard off his right foot in the fifth
inning and crumpled to the ground, but he remained in the game.
ON THE MOUND: C.J. Wilson, 1-3 with a 6.00 earned-run average and six
homers given up in his previous five starts, was superb, giving up two hits
in seven shutout innings, striking out eight and walking three to improve
to 4-5 with a 3.60 ERA. The left-hander escaped a second-and-third,
two-out jam in the fifth by striking out Sam Fuld with a breaking ball in the
dirt and struck out two of three in the sixth. Joe Smith retired the side in
order with one strikeout in the eighth. Huston Street, who threw 26
high-stress pitches Friday night, walked Billy Butler with two outs in the
ninth but got pinch-hitter Josh Reddick to pop to short for his 19th save.
A’s right-hander Kendall Graveman gave up eight hits and struck out
seven in an eight-inning complete game.
LESS COWGILL: Collin Cowgill has hit what Manager Mike Scioscia called
“a plateau” in his recovery from a right wrist sprain, and the reserve
outfielder will travel to Arizona on Monday to be examined by a specialist.
“It hasn’t progressed the way we anticipated,” Scioscia said. “No doubt,
there’s a level of concern. Collin is one of those guys you don’t really
appreciate until he’s not there. He does so many things for us.”
ROSTER MOVE: The Angels added another strong-armed rookie to the
bullpen when they called up 22-year-old right-hander Trevor Gott, who
was acquired from San Diego in last July’s deal for Street. Gott had a
combined ERA of 2.25 in 25 games for double-A Arkansas and triple-A
Salt Lake, striking out 30 and walking 12 in 28 innings. His fastball has
jumped from the 93-mph range last summer to the 96-mph range, and he
has good command of a curve.
UP NEXT: Right-hander Matt Shoemaker (4-4, 4.86 ERA) will oppose
Oakland right-hander Sonny Gray (7-3, 1.74) at Angel Stadium on Sunday
at 12:30 p.m. TV: FS West; Radio: 830.
— Mike DiGiovanna
and 10 walks. But he has no RBIs in
his last 11 games.
“I’m nowhere near where I’d like
to be,” Joyce said. “It’s a daily grind.
Nobody’s going to lay pitches over
the heart of the plate. Defenses
aren’t going to let balls go by them.
I’m trying to get good pitches and
square them up.”
That has been a challenge.
Joyce’s hard-hit rate, the percentage of balls he puts in play that are
classified as hard hit, is a careerlow 23.6% according to Fangraphs,
far below his career rate of 30.7%.
According to Brooks Baseball,
the majority of Joyce’s strikeouts
are on off-speed and breaking
pitches, not fastballs.
“Just imagine if he wasn’t taking
his walks,” Baylor said. “A lot of
times when you’re not swinging
good, you’re swinging at everything.”
Joyce’s improved OBP is one of
the reasons he was moved to the
ninth spot.
“The one thing Matt has been
doing is getting on base,” Manager

RIVALRY S E RI E S
BEG I NS FRI DAY

Mike Scioscia said. “Though it’s
not ideal for any player to say I’m
hitting ninth, it’s important to the
structure of our lineup with Mike
[Trout] hitting second and Albert
[Pujols] third.”
The majority of Joyce’s ground
balls are hit to the right side, and
with opponents heavily shifting
against Joyce, most are outs.
Joyce said he works on hitting to
the opposite field in batting practice, “but you can’t really force it to
happen,” he said. “If they throw it
outside, try to stay on it and hit it
that way. It’s a lot easier said than
done.”
Baylor had some pointed words
for Joyce and Pujols about extreme
defensive alignments.
“I told them a month ago,
‘Screw the shift,’ ” Baylor said.
“Just hit the ball and let it go where
it’s going to go. You might hit into
the shift. And you might elevate a
ball and hit it out of the park.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @MikeDiGiovanna

W E D N E S DAY
6/17
7:10 P M

T H U R S DAY
6/18
7:10 P M

BE AC H BAG

C Y YOU NG
COLLE C TORS’
PI NS SE RI E S:
MI KE M ARSHALL

First 40,000 fans in att tendance
P R E S E N T E D BY

SAN DIEGO — Returning this
weekend to the stadium that was
once his home, Adrian Gonzalez
reflected on his evolution as a player.
Thinking about his days
playing for the San Diego Padres,
Gonzalez said wistfully, “Back
then, I could mishit home runs.”
And now?
“I don’t mishit home runs,” he
said with a laugh. “I have to hit it.”
Gonzalez nonetheless remains
a middle-of-the-lineup fixture at
33. On Saturday night, he batted
third for the Dodgers in the second
game of their three-game series
against the San Diego Padres at
Petco Park. The Dodgers lost, 2-1.
The four-time All-Star went
into the game batting .317 with 11
home runs and 40 runs batted in.
He was 0 for 4 on Saturday.
Gonzalez credits his continued
production on a change that was
recommended to him by Dodgers
hitting coach Mark McGwire.
When the left-handed-hitting
Gonzalez was selected to his first
All-Star teams with the Padres, he
often looked to drive the ball to leftcenter field. That was the case for
his first couple of seasons with the
Dodgers.
Some time last season, the first
baseman started looking to drive
the ball to right-center field.
“You have to evolve as a player,
as a hitter, as you get older,” Gonzalez said. “When I was in my early
20s, I could sit up there, wait for a
fastball away and hit it out to left. If
I hit it to left good, it was a home
run. You had more kid’s strength. If
I do the same thing now, it’s probably caught at the wall. Even
though you get stronger as you get
older, your swing isn’t as quick or
there’s not as much thump behind
it.”
McGwire said he was aware of
Gonzalez’s reputation as an opposite-field hitter. But McGwire was
also aware Gonzalez underwent a
major shoulder operation leading
up to the 2011 season.
There were also changes in the
sport to consider.
McGwire said there are significantly more hard-throwing pitchers now than when he played.
“You’d get maybe a handful of
guys that threw 95-plus throughout the division,” McGwire said.
“Now, it seems like you get a handful of guys per team.”
But these same pitchers often
lack refinement and are prone to
making mistakes.
By looking more for fastballs on
the inside half of the plate, Gonzalez believes he can take advantage
of the conditions.
“If you’re thinking left center,
you might be thinking fastball
away, let it get deep and stay on the
off-speed stuff,” he said. “If you’re
thinking more right center, if he
throws a fastball in the strike zone,
I’m going to hit it in front.”
The new approach worked.
Gonzalez finished last season
with 27 home runs. The last time he
hit more was in 2010.
He has stuck with the plan.
Of his 11 home runs this season,
only one was to left field, according
to ESPN’s home run tracker. That
marks a radical shift from his 2009
season with the Padres, when 24 of
his career-high 40 home runs were
to left field.
The recovered power, however,
comes at a cost.
“Looking middle-in to drive the
ball, I don’t see it as a hit-for-average mentality,” he said. “I see it
more as a .280 with 25 to 35 [home
runs]. If I had more of a singles upthe-middle-or-other-way
approach, I’d be more of a .300 hitter
but more of a 20-home run guy.”

F R I DAY
6/19
7:10 P M

ON THE MOUND: Greinke’s
personal winless streak extended
to seven starts, as the
right-hander was failed again by
the Dodgers offense. Greinke was
charged with two runs and eight
hits over eight innings. He struck
out seven and walked one.
Greinke has posted a 2.28
earned-run average over his
current winless streak.
AT THE PLATE: Padres starter
Ian Kennedy limited the Dodgers
to a run and four hits over the
first seven innings of the game.
The Dodgers scored their only
run on a leadoff home run by
Yasmani Grandal in the top of the
third inning. That tied the score,
1-1. The Dodgers finished the
game with five hits. Yasiel Puig
led off the ninth inning with a
single off Padres closer Craig
Kimbrel, but Adrian Gonzalez
followed that up by grounding
into a double play. Howie
Kendrick struck out to end the
game.
EXTRA BASES: Hector Olivera
was hitless in four at-bats in his
first game with triple-A
Oklahoma City. Promoted from
double A the previous day,
Olivera started at second base
and batted seventh. … Sidelined
outfielder Scott Van Slyke started
a minor league rehabilitation
assignment with Class-A Rancho
Cucamonga.
DISCIPLINARY REPORT:
Gonzalez was unapologetic about
his seventh-inning ejection in the
series opener Friday night.
Gonzalez maintained that his
at-bats in the fifth and seventh
innings of the 4-3 victory were
compromised by errant strike
calls by home plate umpire Doug
Eddings. Gonzalez said that when
he protested a called first strike
in his seventh-inning at-bat, he
was told by Eddings, “You know
what? Now, you have to swing at
that pitch.” Gonzalez said he
became enraged. “At that point,
that’s when I lost it,” he said.
“There’s no way I was staying in
the game if I made an out.”
Gonzalez grounded into an
inning-ending double play, after
which he exchanged words with
Eddings and was thrown out.
UP NEXT: Mike Bolsinger (4-1,
2.08 ERA) will face the Padres
and James Shields (7-0, 3.79) at
Petco Park on Sunday at 1 p.m.
TV: SportsNet LA; Radio: 570,
1020.
— Dylan Hernandez
In what he believes was the best
season of his career, he batted a
relatively modest .276.
Gonzalez attributes the decrease in batting average to the defensive shifts he often faces.
“You know that if you hit the ball
on the ground, you’re out,” he said.
“You’re going to hit balls hard into
the shifts and there’s nothing you
can do about it. People always go,
‘Hit the ball the other way for a hit.’
Well, yeah, I could, but I’m not going to hit home runs. I can hit for
average that way, but do you want
your first baseman to be a .300 hitter with 10 homers? Don’t tell me to
hit the ball the other way but still
ask me to hit home runs. You’re not
going to get both.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @dylanohernandez

SAT U R DAY
6/2 0
4 :15 P M

FAT H E R’S DAY
S U N DAY 6/21
5: 08 PM
FATH E R’S DAY
BBQ SE T &
POSTGA ME C ATC H
BBQ set for the f irs t 40,0
0 0 0 f ans in a t tendance

#4 IN A SERIES OF 8 PINS

P R ES E N T E D BY
P R E S E N T E D BY

First 40,000 fans
in attendance
P R E S E N T E D BY

J U N E 19 -21
8 6 6 - D O D G E R S | D O D G E R S .C O M / T I C K E T S
Go Metro!

VS

VS

SIT ON THE FIELD
A N D E N J OY
THE SHOW!

T H E L E G O M OV I E

Musical Set by
Jeremy Blacklow

Stay after the game and
watch the movie!

VS

VS

PLAYY CATCH
ON TH
H E F IELD
AFTER T HE GAME!

DODGEERS.COM/FATHERSDAY
VS

D4

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

SS

L AT I M E S. C O M /S P O RT S

BASEBALL
PADRES
DODGERS

NL STANDINGS
GB

L10

DODGERS

West

36 26 .581

W

L

Pct.



5-5

San Francisco

34 29 .540

2 ⁄2

4-6

San Diego

32 32 .500

5

6-4
5-5

1

Arizona

29 32 .475

61⁄2

Colorado

27 34 .443

81⁄2

4-6

GB

L10

Central

W

L

Pct.

St. Louis

41 21 .661



7-3

Pittsburgh

34 27 .557

61⁄2

7-3

Chicago

33 27 .550

7

6-4

Cincinnati

28 33 .459

121⁄2

6-4

Milwaukee

24 39 .381

171⁄2

6-4

GB

L10

East

W

L

Pct.

New York

33 30 .524



4-6

Washington

32 30 .516

1

⁄2

3-7

Atlanta

30 32 .484

21⁄2

4-6

Miami

27 36 .429

6

6-4

Philadelphia

22 41 .349

11

2-8

Saturday’s results
at San Diego 2, DODGERS 1
at Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 3
Atlanta 5, at New York 3, 11 innings
at Miami 4, Colorado 1
at St. Louis 3, Kansas City 2
Washington 7, at Milwaukee 2
Arizona 4, at San Francisco 2
at Chicago 4, Cincinnati 3

Streak
Lost 1 This month
Home
25-10 Road
Division
25-17 Interleague
Next: Today at San Diego, 1 p.m.
TV/Radio: SportsNet LA/570, 1020

W

L

Pct.

GB

L10

35 28 .556



2-8

Texas

33 29 .532

11⁄2

6-4

ANGELS

32 30 .516

21⁄2

4-6

Seattle

28 34 .452

6 ⁄2

4-6

Oakland

25 39 .391

101⁄2

4-6

GB

L10

1

a-popped out for Phegley in the 9th. 1-ran for B.Butler in the 9th.
Walks—Oakland 4: B.Butler 2, Lawrie 1, Fuld 1.
Strikeouts—Oakland 10: Burns 2, Canha 2, B.Butler 2, Phegley 1,
Vogt 2, Fuld 1. Angels 7: Pujols 1, Calhoun 1, Giavotella 2, E.Navarro
1, C.Perez 1, Joyce 1.
E—Aybar (6). LOB—Oakland 5, Angels 5. 2B—Semien (10).
HR—Pujols (18), off Graveman. RBIs—Pujols (33). CS—Pujols (2),
Freese (1).
Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (B.Butler, Fuld 2);
Angels 1 (C.Perez). RISP—Oakland 0 for 3; Angels 0 for 3.
Runners moved up—Zobrist. GIDP—Burns.
DP—Oakland 1 (Phegley, Phegley, Semien); Angels 2 (Freese,
Giavotella, E.Navarro), (E.Navarro, Aybar).
Oakland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Graveman L, 3-3...........8 8 1 1 0 7
111 4.22
Angels
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
C.Wilson W, 4-5............7 2 0 0 3 8
106 3.60
J.Smith H, 17 ...............1 0 0 0 0 1
13 3.16
Street S, 19-21 ............1 0 0 0 1 1
15 2.42
U—Chris Conroy, Angel Hernandez, Scott Barry, Ted Barrett.
T—2:27. Tickets sold—43,540 (45,957).

001 000 000 —1
100 000 01x —2

34 25 .576
2

3-7

Detroit

32 30 .516

31⁄2

4-6

Cleveland

29 32 .475

6

4-6

Chicago

28 32 .467

61⁄2

5-5

GB

L10



7-3

Philadelphia
Pittsburgh

East

New York

W

L

Pct.



33 28 .541

5-5

Tampa Bay

34 29 .540

Toronto

33 30 .524

1

10-0

Baltimore

31 30 .508

2

8-2

Boston

27 36 .429



7-3

7

3-7

Saturday’s results
at ANGELS 1, Oakland 0
Toronto 5, at Boston 4, 11 innings
at Texas 11, Minnesota 7
Cleveland 5, at Detroit 4
at Tampa Bay 5, Chicago 4
at St. Louis 3, Kansas City 2
Seattle 8, at Houston 1
at Baltimore 9, New York 4

AB
5
3
1
3
3
4
4
4
4
2
1
0
1
35

R
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

H
3
0
1
1
0
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
9

BI
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
3

Avg.
.275
.250
.267
.187
.236
.292
.229
.262
.236
.067
.277
--.235

ERA
TIME
2.08
1 p.m.
3.79
SNLA
4.72
10 a.m.
4.50
5.53
10 a.m.
3.12
3.19 10:30 a.m.
2.11
2.13
11 a.m.
1.29
5.84
1 p.m.
3.77
3.53
5 p.m.
4.25
ESPN

W-L
7-3
4-4
3-7
6-3
6-2
3-3
4-4
2-1
3-3
2-0
3-3
2-1
4-6
5-2

ERA
TIME
1.74 12:30 p.m.
4.86
FSW
3.53
10 a.m.
2.76
3.04
10 a.m.
3.86
3.64 10:30 a.m.
2.96
3.78 10:30 a.m.
0.44
2.79
11 a.m.
2.32
4.81
Noon
2.65

W-L
5-2
4-4

ERA
TIME
2.25 11:15 a.m.
3.74
MLB

AMERICAN LEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
OAK/Gray (R)
Angels/Shoemaker (R)
CLE/Kluber (R)
DET/Simon (R)
CHI/Sale (L)
TB/Karns (R)
NY/Warren (R)
BAL/Wright (R)
TOR/Estrada (R)
BOS/Rodriguez (L)
SEA/Elias (L)
HOU/McCullers (R)
MIN/Hughes (R)
TEX/Martinez (R)
INTERLEAGUE >>>
MATCHUP
KC/Young (R)
STL/Lackey (R)

AROUND THE LEAGUE

Hunter drops
appeal of ban
Minnesota outfielder Torii
Hunter dropped the appeal of his
two-game suspension and started
serving it Saturday.
Hunter was in the original lineup for Saturday’s game at Texas.
His decision was announced by the
Twins about an hour before the
scheduled first pitch in the middle
game of a three-game series.
After sitting out consecutive
day games Saturday and Sunday,
Hunter will be reinstated before
Monday’s game at St. Louis.
Major League Baseball on Friday suspended Hunter and also
fined him an undisclosed amount
for his equipment-throwing tantrum during Wednesday’s home
game against Kansas City.
Hunter said Friday that he was
appealing, calling the two-game
suspension a “little harsh” before
playing in the game.

Etc.

The Kansas City Royals placed
left-hander Jason Vargas, who has
a strained left forearm, on the 15day disabled list, backdated to
June 9. . . . The New York Mets have
reacquired Kirk Nieuwenhuis.
— associated press

Pittsburgh
G.Polanco rf
S.Marte lf
McCthn cf
N.Walker 2b
J.Harrison 3b
P.Alvarez 1b
S.Rdrgz 1b
Kang ss
Stewart c
G.Cole p
a-Tabata
Caminero p
Watson p
Totals

AB
4
4
3
3
4
3
1
3
3
1
1
0
0
30

R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
4

H
2
3
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
8

BI
0
1
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

Avg.
.251
.265
.284
.254
.266
.235
.264
.281
.290
.185
.292
-----

9
8

0
1

a-grounded out for G.Cole in the 6th. b-flied out for O’Sullivan in
the 7th. c-singled for O.Herrera in the 8th. d-grounded out for
J.Gomez in the 9th.
Walks—Philadelphia 1: Howard 1. Pittsburgh 4: McCutchen 1,
N.Walker 1, Kang 1, Stewart 1. Strikeouts—Philadelphia 8: Revere 1,
O.Herrera 2, Howard 3, Ruiz 1, O’Sullivan 1. Pittsburgh 3: N.Walker 1,
Stewart 1, G.Cole 1. E—Stewart (3). LOB—Philadelphia 7, Pittsburgh
7. 2B—Revere (10), Franco (7), Galvis (4), G.Polanco (12).
RBIs—Francoeur (21), Utley (25), Galvis (13), S.Marte (43),
McCutchen 2 (39), J.Harrison (19). SB—Revere 2 (14), G.Polanco
(17). CS—S.Marte (4). S—G.Cole. SF—Utley. RISP—Philadelphia 1
for 13; Pittsburgh 4 for 10. Runners moved up—Asche, Galvis, Ruiz.
GIDP—N.Walker. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Utley, Galvis, Howard).
Philadelphia
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
O’Sullivan L, 1-5...........6 8 4 4 4 1
104 5.08
De Fratus ....................1 0 0 0 0 1
14 3.38
J.Gomez ......................1 0 0 0 0 1
17 2.12
Pittsburgh
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
G.Cole W, 10-2.............6 5 2 1 0 7
93 1.71
Caminero H, 9..............1 1 0 0 0 0
21 3.18
Watson H, 15...............1 3 1 1 1 0
25 1.89
Melancon S, 20-21 .......1 0 0 0 0 1
14 2.05
U—Jeff Nelson, Cory Blaser, Laz Diaz, Chris Guccione. T—3:05.
Tickets sold—37,516 (38,362).

BRAVES
METS

NATIONAL LEAGUE >>>
W-L
4-1
7-0
3-2
0-3
3-2
6-2
5-5
6-2
6-5
1-0
4-3
6-4
5-4
4-5

R
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

H
0
1
2
1
2
0
1
1
0
8

000 000 000 —0
100 000 00x —1

BI
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Avg.
.258
.300
.271
.277
.244
.277
.303
.267
.178

2
8

0
1

4
3

100 100 010 —3
220 000 00x —4

TODAY’S GAMES
MATCHUP
Dodgers/Bolsinger (R)
SD/Shields (R)
ATL/Foltynewicz (R)
NY/Gee (R)
COL/De La Rosa (L)
MIA/Haren (R)
PHI/Hamels (L)
PIT/Burnett (R)
WAS/Scherzer (R)
MIL/Jungmann (R)
ARI/De La Rosa (R)
SF/Heston (R)
CIN/DeSclafani (R)
CHI/Lester (L)

1
0

Oakland
Angels

AB
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
30

5
3

Cameron Maybin had a two-run single
in the 11th inning against Carlos Torres
(2-3) to lift Atlanta, which rallied for two
runs in the ninth. New York had defeated Atlanta five consecutive times.
Atlanta
J.Ptrsn 2b
Maybin cf
F.Frmn 1b
Markakis rf
K.Johnsn lf
b-J.Goms lf
Pierzynski c
C.Jhnsn 3b
d-Cnnghm
A.Smns ss
S.Miller p
c-Uribe 3b
Totals

AB
5
6
6
5
3
3
5
3
1
4
1
2
44

R
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
5

H
1
3
2
1
0
1
0
0
0
4
0
1
13

BI
0
3
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5

Atlanta
New York

Avg.
.277
.303
.307
.296
.261
.214
.273
.254
.243
.276
.043
.252

New York AB R H BI Avg.
Grdrsn rf
5 1 2 0 .241
d’Arnaud c 5 1 1 1 .315
Duda 1b
4 0 2 1 .275
Cuddyer lf
4 0 0 0 .265
Cmpbll 3b 1 0 0 0 .181
W.Flores ss 5 0 1 0 .248
Ceciliani lf 5 0 2 0 .265
D.Herra 2b 5 0 2 0 .250
Muno 3b
3 0 0 0 .083
e-Mybry Jr. 1 0 0 0 .222
deGrom p
2 0 0 0 .167
a-Lgres cf
3 1 1 0 .271
Totals
43 3 11 2

100 000 002 02 —5
000 000 300 00 —3

13
11

1
3

a-singled for deGrom in the 7th. b-singled for K.Johnson in the
8th. c-struck out for Avilan in the 9th. d-grounded out for Ji.Johnson
in the 10th. e-lined into a double play for C.Torres in the 11th.
Walks—Atlanta 3: Markakis 1, C.Johnson 1, A.Simmons 1. New
York 2: Duda 1, Muno 1. Strikeouts—Atlanta 12: J.Peterson 2,
Maybin 1, F.Freeman 1, Markakis 1, K.Johnson 1, Pierzynski 2,
C.Johnson 2, S.Miller 1, Uribe 1. New York 8: d’Arnaud 2, Duda 1,
Cuddyer 2, Ceciliani 1, D.Herrera 2. E—Maybin (1), Muno 3 (3).
LOB—Atlanta 12, New York 9. 2B—J.Peterson (7), Maybin (6),
Granderson (9), Duda 2 (19), W.Flores (8). HR—F.Freeman (12), off
deGrom. RBIs—Maybin 3 (32), F.Freeman 2 (39), d’Arnaud (12),
Duda (28). SB—Maybin (11). S—J.Peterson, S.Miller 2. DP—Atlanta 1
(A.Simmons, J.Peterson); New York 2 (W.Flores, D.Herrera, Duda),
(Ceciliani, Ceciliani, d’Arnaud).
Atlanta
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
S.Miller .....................61⁄3 8 3 3 2 4
102 2.02
Eveland.......................0 1 0 0 0 0
4
Masset ....................... 2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
10 3.26
Avilan .........................1 0 0 0 0 1
17 2.96
Ji.Johnson....................1 0 0 0 0 1
11 3.07
Grilli W, 2-2 .................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 3.22
W.Perez S, 1-1..............1 2 0 0 0 0
9 2.70
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
deGrom.......................7 5 1 1 1 9
102 2.33
Leathersich H, 1...........2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
15 1.86
Parnell H, 1 .................1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
4 0.00
Robles H, 4 .................2⁄3 2 2 2 1 1
17 6.08
A.Torres BS, 1-2 ........... 1⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
11 2.78
C.Torres L, 2-3..............2 3 2 2 1 1
31 3.95
Eveland pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
IBB—by C.Torres (Markakis). WP—Eveland, deGrom.
T—3:39. Tickets sold—37,734 (41,922).

CUBS
REDS

4
3

Starlin Castro’s single drove in Kris
Bryant, who led off the bottom of the
ninth inning with a double.
Cincinnati
Schmkr lf
Suarez ss
Votto 1b
Frazier 3b
Bruce rf
Negron 2b
Barnhart c
Leake p
a-Phillips
c-C.Dmngz
B.Hmiltn cf
Totals
Cincinnati
Chicago

AB
5
4
4
3
3
4
4
2
1
1
4
35

R
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

H
1
1
2
1
0
2
0
0
0
1
1
9

BI
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3

Avg.
.227
.273
.296
.291
.215
.152
.218
.161
.305
.250
.217

Chicago
Fowler cf
Coghlan lf
Rizzo 1b
Bryant 3b
M.Mntro c
S.Castro ss
Baxter rf
Hendricks p
b-Denorfia
A.Rssll 2b
Totals

AB
4
3
4
4
3
4
3
1
1
3
30

R
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
4

H
1
1
0
3
2
1
2
0
0
1
11

000 102 000 —3
020 100 001 —4

BI
0
0
0
0
2
2
0
0
0
0
4

Avg.
.247
.243
.314
.297
.252
.261
.286
.077
.421
.245

9
11

0
1

No outs when winning run scored. a-lined out for M.Parra in the
7th. b-grounded into a double play for T.Wood in the 7th. c-singled
for Mattheus in the 9th.
Walks—Cincinnati 1: Bruce 1. Strikeouts—Cincinnati 11: Suarez
1, Votto 2, Frazier 1, Bruce 1, Barnhart 3, Leake 2, B.Hamilton 1.
Chicago 2: Bryant 1, A.Russell 1. E—Grimm (1). LOB—Cincinnati 7,
Chicago 5. 2B—Frazier (18), Fowler (9), Bryant 2 (11), A.Russell (14).
HR—Votto (14), off Hendricks; Suarez (1), off J.Russell; M.Montero
(9), off Leake. RBIs—Suarez 2 (3), Votto (36), M.Montero 2 (25),
S.Castro 2 (31). SB—B.Hamilton (26). S—Hendricks. DP—Cincinnati
4 (Suarez, Votto), (Negron, Suarez, Votto), (Frazier, Negron, Votto),
(Negron, Suarez, Votto).
Cincinnati
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Leake .........................5 5 3 3 0 1
61 4.35
M.Parra .......................1 0 0 0 0 1
18 0.96
Mattheus.....................2 4 0 0 0 0
21 3.55
Cingrani L, 0-3 .............0 2 1 1 0 0
6 3.47
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Hendricks ....................5 4 1 1 0 7
57 3.80
J.Russell BS, 1-1...........0 3 2 2 0 0
15 2.57
Grimm ........................1 0 0 0 1 2
16 1.26
T.Wood........................1 0 0 0 0 0
13 4.72
Strop ..........................1 0 0 0 0 1
21 3.10
Motte W, 3-1................1 2 0 0 0 1
18 3.47
J.Russell pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Cingrani pitched to 3
batters in the 9th.
HBP—by Leake (Coghlan), by Cingrani (M.Montero), by Strop
(Frazier).
T—2:39 (Delay: 2:48). Tickets sold—40,693 (40,929).

5
4

Toronto
Reyes ss
Dnldsn 3b
Bautista rf
Encrncn dh
Colabello lf
1-Carrera lf
Ru.Martin c
Smoak 1b
2-Vlncia 1b
Pillar cf
Goins 2b
Totals

Minnesota AB R H BI Avg. Texas
AB R H BI
Dozier 2b
4 1 1 1 .262 DShlds lf 4 3 2 1
E.Rosario rf 4 1 1 2 .287 Choo rf
4 1 3 3
Mauer dh
4 0 1 1 .260 Fielder dh 5 1 2 1
Plouffe 3b
4 0 1 0 .251 Mrlnd 1b 5 1 2 4
K.Vargas 1b 4 0 0 0 .234 Gallo 3b 1 2 1 1
Nunez ss
4 1 1 0 .296 Andrus ss 4 0 1 0
Herrmann c 3 1 1 1 .184 Rosls 2b 0 0 0 0
Ed.Escbr lf
4 1 1 1 .233 L.Mrtin cf 4 0 1 1
S.Robnsn cf 4 2 2 1 .239 Chirinos c 4 2 2 0
Totals
35 7 9 7
Albrto 2b 4 1 1 0
Totals
35 11 15 11

AB
5
5
4
5
4
1
5
4
1
5
5
44

R
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
1
0
5

H
1
0
0
2
2
0
2
1
0
2
2
12

BI
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
2
5

Toronto
Boston

Avg.
.296
.316
.247
.232
.341
.280
.275
.274
.321
.248
.230

Boston
AB R H BI Avg.
Pedroia 2b
5 0 1 0 .306
B.Holt 1b
5 0 1 0 .293
H.Ramirez lf 5 1 2 0 .275
Ortiz dh
4 2 1 1 .226
Bogaerts ss 5 1 1 1 .295
Sandoval 3b 3 0 2 2 .251
Bianchi 3b
2 0 0 0 .000
De Aza rf
5 0 1 0 .217
R.Castillo cf 5 0 0 0 .242
S.Leon c
3 0 0 0 .170
a-Swihart c 1 0 0 0 .218
Totals
43 4 9 4

030 100 000 01 —5
000 301 000 00 —4

12
9

1
1

a-fouled out for S.Leon in the 9th. 1-ran for Colabello in the 8th.
2-ran for Smoak in the 9th.
Walks—Toronto 1: Bautista 1. Boston 1: Ortiz 1.
Strikeouts—Toronto 9: Reyes 1, Donaldson 2, Encarnacion 2,
Ru.Martin 1, Smoak 3. Boston 10: B.Holt 3, H.Ramirez 1, Ortiz 2,
Bogaerts 2, Sandoval 1, De Aza 1. E—Donaldson (9), S.Leon (1).
LOB—Toronto 7, Boston 7. 2B—Sandoval (7), De Aza (5).
HR—Ru.Martin (10), off M.Barnes; Ortiz (8), off Dickey. RBIs—Reyes
(20), Ru.Martin (32), Pillar (28), Goins 2 (17), Ortiz (25), Bogaerts
(24), Sandoval 2 (23). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3
(Donaldson 3); Boston 5 (De Aza, S.Leon, R.Castillo, Bogaerts 2).
Runners moved up—R.Castillo. GIDP—Colabello. DP—Boston 1
(Bogaerts, Pedroia, B.Holt).
Toronto
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Dickey.........................6 6 4 3 1 5
96 5.29
Hendriks......................2 3 0 0 0 2
32 3.07
Delabar.....................11⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
21 1.42
Loup W, 2-3 ................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
6 4.07
Cecil S, 4-5 .................1 0 0 0 0 1
10 3.10
Boston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Buchholz .....................6 8 4 4 1 7
105 4.22
Layne .........................2⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
4 2.66
Ogando.....................11⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
20 3.81
Uehara........................1 1 0 0 0 1
11 2.25
M.Barnes L, 2-2 ...........2 2 1 1 0 1
24 4.24
PB—Ru.Martin 3.
U—Brian O’Nora, Alan Porter, Mark Ripperger, Jeff Kellogg.
T—3:26. Tickets sold—37,158 (37,221).

New York
Gardner cf
Headley 3b
A.Rdrgz dh
Teixeira 1b
B.McCnn c
Beltran rf
Grgrius ss
Drew 2b
M.Willms cf
a-C.Young lf
c-G.Jones
Totals

AB
4
5
5
4
4
4
4
3
2
1
1
37

New York
Baltimore

OUCH !
Washington’s Anthony
Rendon is hit by a pitch by
Milwaukee’s Jimmy Nelson
during the sixth inning of the
Nationals’ victory.

CARDINALS
ROYALS

3
2

Mark Reynolds hit a go-ahead home
run in the fifth inning, and Matt Carpenter and Jason Heyward each drove
in a run to help St. Louis win for the
second time in the three-game series.
Kansas City
A.Escobar ss
L.Cain cf
Rios rf
K.Mrals 1b
S.Perez c
1-J.Dyson
Butera c
A.Gordon lf
C.Colon 3b
a-Hosmer
Infante 2b
Guthrie p
Mstakas 3b
Totals
Kansas City
St. Louis

AB
4
4
4
4
4
0
0
3
2
1
4
1
2
33

R
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2

H
0
2
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5

BI
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
2

Avg.
.255
.284
.197
.281
.285
.254
.167
.259
.261
.298
.204
.000
.318

St. Louis AB R H BI Avg.
Wong 2b
4 1 2 0 .300
M.Crptr 3b 4 0 1 1 .290
Jh.Prlta ss 4 0 0 0 .317
Rynlds 1b 4 2 2 1 .258
Molina c
4 0 2 0 .278
Heyward rf 4 0 2 1 .257
Grichuk lf
3 0 0 0 .263
Kozma ss
1 0 0 0 .102
Jay cf-lf
2 0 0 0 .226
Lyons p
2 0 1 0 .167
Bourjos cf 0 0 0 0 .253
Totals
32 3 10 3
010 100 000 —2
002 010 00x —3

5
10

2
2

a-grounded out for W.Davis in the 9th. 1-ran for S.Perez in the 8th.
Walks—Kansas City 2: A.Gordon 1, C.Colon 1. St. Louis 2: Jay 2.
Strikeouts—Kansas City 10: A.Escobar 1, L.Cain 1, Rios 2, K.Morales
1, S.Perez1, C.Colon 1, Infante 2, Moustakas 1. St. Louis 7: Jh.Peralta
1, Reynolds 2, Grichuk 1, Kozma 1, Jay 1, Lyons 1. E—Rios (1),
C.Colon (3), Wong (9), M.Carpenter (6). LOB—Kansas City 7, St.
Louis 8. 2B—L.Cain (11). 3B—Wong (2). HR—A.Gordon (8), off
Lyons; S.Perez (10), off Lyons; Reynolds (4), off Guthrie.
RBIs—S.Perez (29), A.Gordon (29), M.Carpenter (32), Reynolds
(19), Heyward (18). SB—L.Cain (11), Wong (5). S—Guthrie, Bourjos.
Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 5 (K.Morales,
A.Escobar 2, C.Colon, A.Gordon); St. Louis 5 (Reynolds, Lyons,
Grichuk 2, M.Carpenter). RISP—Kansas City 0 for 7; St. Louis 2 for
11. Runners moved up—K.Morales, M.Carpenter.
Kansas City
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Guthrie L, 4-4 ..............5 10 3 3 1 4
102 5.79
F.Morales.....................1 0 0 0 1 0
16 2.81
K.Herrera.....................1 0 0 0 0 1
8 1.96
W.Davis .......................1 0 0 0 0 2
13 0.33
St. Louis
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lyons W, 1-0................5 3 2 2 1 6
79 5.00
Belisle H, 7 ...............11⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
17 2.05
Choate H, 6.................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
2 3.18
Maness H, 7................2⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
13 3.52
Siegrist H, 12 ..............1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
5 1.63
Rosenthal S, 21-22 ....11⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
23 0.59
IBB—by Guthrie (Jay), by Belisle (A.Gordon).
U—Will Little, Phil Cuzzi, Gerry Davis, Tony Randazzo. T—2:46
(Delay: 0:24). Tickets sold—45,981 (45,399).

INDIANS
TIGERS

5
4

Carlos Santana homered and Carlos
Carrasco shook off a bad history in
Detroit, as Cleveland disappointed a
sellout crowd that turned out for starter Justin Verlander’s season debut.
Cleveland AB R H BI Avg. Detroit
AB
Kipnis 2b
4 0 1 1 .331 R.Davis dh 5
C.Sntna 1b 4 1 1 1 .222 Kinsler 2b 5
Brantley lf
4 1 1 0 .307 Mi.Cbra 1b 4
Moss rf
5 0 0 0 .250 Cespedes lf 5
Dv.Mphy dh 3 2 2 1 .339 J.Martnz rf 4
Y.Gomes c
3 0 1 2 .221 Cstllnos 3b 4
Urshela 3b
2 1 0 0 .231 J.McCann c 4
Bourn cf
4 0 2 0 .249 J.Iglesias ss 3
Aviles ss
3 0 0 0 .277 Gose cf
4
Totals
32 5 8 5
Totals
38
Cleveland
Detroit

R
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
4

H
2
0
2
3
2
0
0
2
1
12

000 112 010 —5
101 100 010 —4

BI
1
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
4

Avg.
.281
.275
.333
.308
.262
.223
.264
.335
.288

8
12

1
0

Walks—Cleveland 5: C.Santana 1, Brantley 1, Urshela 2, Aviles 1.
Detroit 2: Mi.Cabrera 1, J.Martinez 1. Strikeouts—Cleveland 4:
C.Santana 2, Moss 2. Detroit 12: R.Davis 2, Kinsler 1, Mi.Cabrera 1,
Castellanos 2, J.McCann 3, J.Iglesias 1, Gose 2. E—Urshela (1).
LOB—Cleveland 8, Detroit 10. 2B—Y.Gomes (3), R.Davis (7),
J.Martinez (13). 3B—Dav.Murphy (1), R.Davis (6). HR—C.Santana
(7), off Verlander; J.Martinez (11), off B.Shaw. RBIs—Kipnis (28),
C.Santana (29), Dav.Murphy (17), Y.Gomes 2 (5), R.Davis (11),
Mi.Cabrera (44), J.Martinez 2 (29). SB—J.Iglesias (8). CS—J.Iglesias
(4). SF—Kipnis, Y.Gomes. Runners left in scoring
position—Cleveland 3 (C.Santana, Brantley, Moss); Detroit 6
(J.McCann 2, Castellanos, Kinsler, R.Davis, J.Martinez).
RISP—Cleveland 0 for 5; Detroit 2 for 9. GIDP—J.Martinez.
DP—Cleveland 2 (Y.Gomes, Y.Gomes, Kipnis), (Aviles, Kipnis,
C.Santana); Detroit 1 (Cespedes, Kinsler).
Cleveland
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Carrasco W, 8-5 .........52⁄3 7 3 3 1 8
99 4.38
Rzepczynski H, 9 ..........1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
4 3.14
B.Shaw H, 9 ..............12⁄3 3 1 1 0 1
31 2.53
Allen S, 14-15 ...........11⁄3 2 0 0 1 2
18 4.39
Detroit
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Verlander.....................5 3 2 2 2 2
87 3.60
B.Hardy L, 2-1 BS, 1-1 ..1⁄3 2 2 2 0 0
5 3.33
A.Wilson......................1 1 0 0 0 0
12 1.80
Krol ............................1 1 1 1 0 2
16 5.40
Alburquerque .............11⁄3 1 0 0 2 0
30 3.55
Gorzelanny ..................1⁄3 0 0 0 1 0
7 6.38
IBB—by Gorzelanny (Brantley). HBP—by Carrasco (J.Iglesias), by
Krol (Dav.Murphy). WP—Gorzelanny.
U—Rob Drake, Joe West, Chris Segal, Kerwin Danley. T—3:34.
Tickets sold—41,620 (41,574).

11
7

Mitch Moreland and Joey Gallo hit
back-to-back, impressive home runs in
Colby Lewis’ first career victory over
Minnesota. Gallo hit a 461-foot drive
into the upper deck in the fourth.

R
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

H
0
3
1
2
2
1
1
1
0
0
0
11

BI
0
0
2
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

Avg.
.271
.254
.273
.255
.264
.244
.229
.172
.250
.225
.250

Baltimore
M.Mcdo 3b
Reimld rf
A.Jones cf
D.Young rf
b-Lough lf
C.Davis dh
Wieters c
J.Hardy ss
Pearce 1b
Flaherty 2b
Totals

Minnesota
Texas

003 000 004 — 7
012 620 00x —11

AB
5
5
5
3
1
4
4
4
4
4
39

R
2
1
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
2
9

H
3
2
1
0
1
1
2
1
2
2
15

200 002 000 —4
002 023 20x —9

BI
4
2
0
0
1
0
0
1
1
0
9

Avg.
.285
.286
.306
.285
.237
.231
.348
.212
.212
.261

11
15

0
0

a-flied out for M.Williams in the 6th. b-homered for D.Young in the
7th. c-struck out for C.Young in the 9th.
Walks—New York 2: Gardner 1, Drew 1. Strikeouts—New York 9:
Gardner 2, A.Rodriguez 2, Teixeira 1, Gregorius 1, M.Williams 2,
G.Jones 1. Baltimore 4: Reimold 1, C.Davis 2, Flaherty 1. LOB—New
York 8, Baltimore 6. 2B—Headley (9), Teixeira (12), B.McCann (9),
Gregorius (7), Drew (9), Wieters 2 (3), Pearce (3). 3B—Reimold (1).
HR—A.Rodriguez (12), off B.Norris; Reimold (2), off Sabathia;
M.Machado (11), off Sabathia; Lough (2), off Santos.
RBIs—A.Rodriguez 2 (32), Teixeira (46), B.McCann (39),
M.Machado 4 (30), Reimold 2 (3), Lough (3), J.Hardy (10), Pearce
(22). Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Beltran,
Gardner, C.Young 2, Drew); Baltimore 4 (Flaherty 2, C.Davis,
A.Jones). RISP—New York 1 for 9; Baltimore 4 for 12. Runners moved
up—J.Hardy. DP—Baltimore 1 (Flaherty, Pearce).
New York
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Sabathia .....................5 8 4 4 0 3
93 5.38
Ch.Martin L, 0-2 ...........1 4 3 3 0 0
30 5.27
Santos ........................2 3 2 2 0 1
31 9.00
Baltimore
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
B.Norris.....................52⁄3 8 4 4 0 5
86 8.29
McFarland ...................0 0 0 0 1 0
5 1.93
Roe W, 2-0................21⁄3 3 0 0 0 2
36 1.17
O’Day..........................1 0 0 0 1 2
16 1.08
McFarland pitched to 1 batter in the 6th.
WP—Ch.Martin 3.
U—Jerry Meals, Andy Fletcher, Jordan Baker, Paul Emmel.
T—3:14. Tickets sold—38,909 (45,971).

NATIONALS
BREWERS

Avg.
.268
.248
.347
.310
.306
.239
.228
.250
.202
.265

9
15

0
0

Walks—Minnesota 2: Dozier 1, E.Rosario 1. Texas 5: DeShields 1,
Choo 1, Gallo 3. Strikeouts—Minnesota 7: Dozier 2, E.Rosario 1,
Mauer 1, Plouffe 1, K.Vargas 1, Nunez 1. Texas 2: DeShields 1,
Moreland 1. LOB—Minnesota 4, Texas 5. 2B—Dozier (19), E.Rosario
(4), Mauer (12), Plouffe (11), Nunez (6), Herrmann (3), S.Robinson
(3), DeShields 2 (9), Choo (12), Moreland (12), Chirinos (10).
HR—Moreland (8), off Pelfrey; Gallo (3), off Graham. RBIs—Dozier
(30), E.Rosario 2 (14), Mauer (35), Herrmann (8), Edu.Escobar
(22), S.Robinson (10), DeShields (12), Choo 3 (32), Fielder (43),
Moreland 4 (30), Gallo (6), L.Martin (20). Runners left in scoring
position—Minnesota 3 (Edu.Escobar, Nunez, E.Rosario); Texas 4
(Moreland, Andrus, Fielder, L.Martin). RISP—Minnesota 6 for 13;
Texas 6 for 12. DP—Minnesota 4 (Dozier, Nunez, K.Vargas), (Pelfrey,
Nunez, K.Vargas), (Plouffe, K.Vargas), (Duensing, Nunez, K.Vargas);
Texas 1 (Rosales, Alberto, Moreland).
Minnesota
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Pelfrey L, 5-3 .............32⁄3 11 8 8 3 0
65 3.18
Graham ....................11⁄3 3 3 3 1 0
26 3.45
Duensing.....................1 1 0 0 1 1
15 9.69
Tonkin .........................1 0 0 0 0 1
11 4.82
A.Thompson.................1 0 0 0 0 0
13 4.05
Texas
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Lewis W, 6-3 ................7 4 3 3 1 6
85 4.37
Bass.........................12⁄3 5 4 4 1 1
45 4.71
Edwards......................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
6 6.35
Inherited runners-scored—Edwards 1-0. IBB—off Pelfrey (Gallo).
HBP—by Lewis (Herrmann). WP—Lewis.
U—Bob Davidson, David Rackley, Clint Fagan, Hunter
Wendelstedt. T—4:03 (Delay: 1:19). Tickets sold—28,661 (48,114).

9
4

Manny Machado homered and had
four RBIs, and Nolan Reimold hit a
two-run drive. Alex Rodriguez hit a
two-run homer to join Hank Aaron as
members of the 2,000-RBI club.

Morry Gash Associated Press

RANGERS
TWINS

Once again, Russell Martin got the
go-ahead hit for Toronto, with a leadoff
home run in the 11th inning. It was his
10th of the season. Brett Cecil pitched
a perfect 11th for his fourth save.

ORIOLES
YANKEES

Gerrit Cole (10-2) gave up two runs and
struck out seven batters in six innings
to win his fifth consecutive start and
improve to 14-2 in 18 starts dating to
September.

33 28 .541

Pct.

5
8

a-flied out for Kennedy in the 7th.
Walks—Dodgers 1: Ju.Turner 1. San Diego 1: Spangenberg
1.Strikeouts—Dodgers 6: Pederson 1, H.Kendrick 2, Ju.Turner 1,
Grandal 1, Rollins 1. San Diego 7: Myers 1, Venable 1, Upton 1,
Alonso 2, Kennedy 2. E—Greinke (1). LOB—Dodgers 3, San Diego 5.
2B—Venable (5). HR—Grandal (7), off Kennedy; Upton (13), off
Greinke. RBIs—Grandal (22), Upton (39), Kemp (33). SB—Amarista
(3). Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 3 (Alonso, Myers,
Solarte). RISP—Dodgers 0 for 0; San Diego 1 for 7. Runners moved
up—Upton. GIDP—A.Gonzalez 2, Kemp. DP—Dodgers 1 (Rollins,
H.Kendrick, A.Gonzalez); San Diego 2 (Myers, Amarista), (Kimbrel,
Amarista, Alonso).
Dodgers
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Greinke L, 5-2 ..............8 8 2 2 1 7
100 1.95
San Diego
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Kennedy......................7 4 1 1 1 4
96 5.84
Maurer W, 4-0 ..............1 0 0 0 0 1
12 1.69
Kimbrel S, 16-17 ..........1 1 0 0 0 1
16 3.75
HBP—by Kennedy (Pederson).
U—Jim Wolf, Adrian Johnson, Bill Miller, Doug Eddings. T—2:30.
Tickets sold—43,525 (41,164).

Kansas City

L

Streak
Won 3 This month
5-6
Home
18-13 Road
14-17
Division
17-11 Interleague
3-5
Next: Today vs. Oakland, Angel Stadium, 12:30 p.m.
TV/Radio: FS West/830, 1330

Dodgers
San Diego

Minnesota

W

BLUE JAYS
RED SOX

1
0

Oakland
AB R H BI Avg. Angels
Burns cf
4 0 1 0 .310 Aybar ss
Canha lf
4 0 0 0 .247 Trout cf
Zobrist 2b
4 0 0 0 .202 Pujols dh
B.Butler dh
2 0 0 0 .244 Calhoun rf
1-Sogard
0 0 0 0 .251 Freese 3b
Phegley c
3 0 0 0 .295 Givotlla 2b
a-Reddick
1 0 0 0 .308 E.Navarro 1b
Lawrie 3b
2 0 0 0 .272 C.Perez c
Vogt 1b
3 0 0 0 .279 Joyce lf
Semien ss
3 0 1 0 .273 Totals
Fuld rf
2 0 0 0 .205
Totals
28 0 2 0

Philadelphia
Revere rf-cf
O.Herrera cf
c-Francur rf
Utley 2b
Howard 1b
Franco 3b
Asche lf
Galvis ss
Ruiz c
O’Sullivan p
b-A.Blanco
De Fratus p
d-Ruf
Totals

Central

7-6
11-16
3-0

PIRATES
PHILLIES

Houston

ANGELS
ATHLETICS

Dodgers
AB R H BI Avg. San Diego AB R H BI Avg.
Pederson cf 3 0 1 0 .248 Myers 1b
4 0 1 0 .277
Puig rf
4 0 2 0 .364 Kimbrel p
0 0 0 0 --A.Gonlz 1b
4 0 0 0 .311 Venable cf
4 1 2 0 .264
H.Kndrk 2b 4 0 0 0 .288 Upton lf
4 1 1 1 .289
Ju.Turner 3b 2 0 1 0 .319 Kemp rf
4 0 1 1 .246
Ethier lf
3 0 0 0 .287 Alonso 1b
3 0 0 0 .331
Grandal c
3 1 1 1 .278 De.Norris c
3 0 1 0 .271
Rollins ss
3 0 0 0 .197 Spngbrg 2b 2 0 1 0 .259
Greinke p
3 0 0 0 .185 Amarista ss 3 0 1 0 .208
Totals
29 1 5 1
Kennedy p
2 0 0 0 .063
a-Solarte
1 0 0 0 .251
Maurer p
0 0 0 0 --Mdlbrks 3b 0 0 0 0 .228
Totals
30 2 8 2

AL STANDINGS
West

2
1

RAYS
WHITE SOX

5
4

Steve Souza Jr. hit a tying RBI single,
stole second on a replay challenge and
scored the winning run on an error. His
two-out single off Zach Putnam (1-2)
drove in David DeJesus in the eighth.
Chicago
AB R H BI Avg. Tampa Bay
Shuck cf
4 0 1 0 .286 Kiermaier cf
Flowers c
1 0 0 0 .202 J.Butler dh
Al.Rmirz ss
4 1 2 0 .235 Longoria 3b
Abreu dh
4 1 2 1 .291 DeJesus lf
LaRoche 1b 4 0 1 0 .241 Souza Jr. rf
Av.Garcia rf 4 0 0 0 .290 A.Cabrera ss
Me.Cbrra lf
4 0 1 1 .235 Elmore 1b
G.Bckhm 2b 3 0 0 0 .230 Franklin 2b
C.Snchz 2b 2 0 0 0 .146 Casali c
b-Eaton cf
1 1 1 0 .240 a-Forsythe
Soto c
2 0 0 0 .214 Rivera c
cGillspi 3b
1 1 1 2 .258 Totals
d-Bonifacio 1 0 0 0 .175
Totals
35 4 9 4
Chicago
Tampa Bay

AB
3
4
4
3
4
3
4
4
2
1
0
32

R
2
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
5

H
2
2
1
1
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
9

100 100 020 —4
101 000 12x —5

BI
0
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
4

Avg.
.251
.347
.266
.301
.220
.205
.286
.143
.000
.264
.156

9
9

1
0

a-grounded out for Casali in the 7th. b-walked for C.Sanchez in
the 8th. c-homered for Soto in the 8th. d-struck out for Gillaspie in
the 9th.
Walks—Chicago 2: G.Beckham 1, Eaton 1. Tampa Bay 2: DeJesus
1, A.Cabrera 1. Strikeouts—Chicago 9: Abreu 1, Av.Garcia 2,
Me.Cabrera 1, G.Beckham 2, C.Sanchez 1, Soto 1, Bonifacio 1.
Tampa Bay 8: Kiermaier 1, J.Butler 1, Longoria 2, Souza Jr. 1, Elmore
1, Franklin 1, Casali 1. E—Al.Ramirez (6). LOB—Chicago 6, Tampa
Bay 6. 2B—J.Butler (10). 3B—Kiermaier (5), Franklin (1).
HR—Gillaspie (3), off Boxberger. RBIs—Abreu (40), Me.Cabrera
(21), Gillaspie 2 (14), Longoria 2 (28), Souza Jr. (29), Forsythe (28).
SB—DeJesus (2), Souza Jr. (8). DP—Tampa Bay 1 (A.Cabrera,
Longoria, Elmore).
Chicago
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Samardzija ..................7 6 3 3 1 7
96 4.84
Putnam L, 1-2 BS, 1-1 ..2⁄3 2 2 1 1 1
27 3.98
Petricka ......................1⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
6 3.60
Tampa Bay
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Archer.........................7 5 3 3 1 5
93 2.00
Boxbrgr W, 4-3 BS, 2-17 1 3 1 1 0 2
28 3.04
McGee S, 3-4...............1 1 0 0 1 2
16 2.45
Archer pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
IBB—by Putnam (A.Cabrera). HBP—by Samardzija (Kiermaier).
WP—Archer.T—2:46. Tickets sold—20,248 (31,042).

7
2

MARLINS
ROCKIES

4
1

Yunel Escobar hit a two-run home run
in the third inning and Wilson Ramos
hit a two-run shot in the fifth, and
starter Joe Ross (1-1) won for the first
time in his major league career.

Mat Latos (2-4) struck out a seasonhigh 11 over seven innings in his first
start since May 21, and Giancarlo
Stanton hit a two-run home run and a
two-run double.

Wash.
AB R H BI Avg. Milwaukee AB R H BI Avg.
Span cf
5 1 1 0 .294 C.Gomez cf 4 0 0 0 .270
Rendon 2b 3 2 1 0 .212 Lucroy c
4 0 2 0 .206
Y.Escbr 3b 5 1 2 2 .319 Braun rf
4 0 0 0 .265
Harper rf
3 1 3 2 .343 Lind 1b
3 1 1 0 .294
1-denDkr rf 0 0 0 0 .000 Ar.Rmrz 3b
4 0 0 0 .218
W.Ramos c 5 1 2 2 .262 G.Parra lf
4 0 1 0 .284
Espnsa 1b 5 1 1 0 .253 Segura ss
4 1 2 1 .289
Dsmnd ss
4 0 0 0 .230 Gennett 2b 4 0 2 1 .195
M.Taylor lf
4 0 1 1 .221 Nelson p
2 0 0 0 .143
J.Ross p
4 0 0 0 .000 a-S.Peterson 1 0 0 0 .182
Janssen p 0 0 0 0 --- b-J.Rogers
1 0 0 0 .270
Totals
38 7 11 7
Totals
35 2 8 2

Colorado
LeMahieu 2b
Dickerson lf
Blackmon cf
Tulowitzki ss
Ca.Gnzlz rf
Arenado 3b
Paulsen 1b
McKenry c
B.Barnes lf
Hale p
a-Ynoa
B.Brown p
Hawkins p
Totals

Washington
Milwaukee

102 031 000 —7
020 000 000 —2

11
8

0
1

a-struck out for Cotts in the 7th. b-grounded out for Blazek in the
9th. 1-ran for Harper in the 9th.
Walks—Washington 2: Rendon 1, Harper 1. Milwaukee 1: Lind 1.
Strikeouts—Washington 7: Y.Escobar 1, W.Ramos 1, Espinosa 1,
Desmond 3, J.Ross 1. Milwaukee 8: C.Gomez 2, Braun 3, Nelson 2,
S.Peterson 1. E—Gennett (4). LOB—Washington 9, Milwaukee 7.
2B—Espinosa (11), Gennett 2 (3). HR—Y.Escobar (3), off Nelson;
W.Ramos (5), off Nelson. RBIs—Y.Escobar 2 (17), Harper 2 (51),
W.Ramos 2 (27), M.Taylor (22), Segura (17), Gennett (5). SB—Span
(5). Runners left in scoring position—Washington 5 (Espinosa,
Desmond 2, J.Ross, W.Ramos); Milwaukee 3 (Nelson 3).
RISP—Washington 3 for 12; Milwaukee 1 for 4. Runners moved
up—G.Parra. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Gennett, Segura, Lind).
Washington
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
J.Ross W, 1-1 ...............8 7 2 2 1 8
108 3.46
Janssen.......................1 1 0 0 0 0
14 4.00
Milwaukee
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Nelson L, 3-7...............5 10 7 7 2 3
89 4.60
Cotts ..........................2 1 0 0 0 3
25 4.10
W.Smith ......................1 0 0 0 0 0
9 1.66
Blazek.........................1 0 0 0 0 1
18 1.08
Nelson pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Inherited runners-scored—Cotts 2-1. HBP—by Blazek (Harper),
by Nelson (Desmond, Rendon). WP—J.Ross.
U—Tim Timmons, Todd Tichenor, Tim Welke, Mike Everitt. T—2:52.
Tickets sold—36,800 (41,900).

AB
4
3
1
4
4
4
4
2
3
2
1
0
0
32

R
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

H
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
5

BI
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1

Avg.
.347
.306
.265
.307
.242
.270
.311
.277
.304
.000
.258
-----

Colorado
Miami

Miami
D.Gordon 2b
Prado 3b
Yelich lf
Stanton rf
Ozuna cf
Bour 1b
Mathis c
Hehvrria ss
Latos p
b-I.Suzuki
S.Dyson p
Dunn p
A.Ramos p
Totals

AB
4
3
4
3
4
2
3
3
2
0
0
0
0
28

R
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

000 001 000 —1
200 002 00x —4

H
1
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

BI
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4

Avg.
.353
.273
.228
.260
.284
.286
.188
.300
.364
.276
-------

5
4

1
0

a-struck out for Hale in the 7th. b-walked for Latos in the 7th.
Walks—Colorado 2: McKenry 2. Miami 4: Prado 1, Stanton 1,
Bour 1, I.Suzuki 1. Strikeouts—Colorado 15: LeMahieu 1, Dickerson
2, Tulowitzki 2, Ca.Gonzalez 2, Arenado 1, Paulsen 3, B.Barnes 1,
Hale 2, Ynoa 1. Miami 6: D.Gordon 2, Prado 1, Yelich 1, Bour 1, Latos
1. E—McKenry (3). LOB—Colorado 6, Miami 4. 2B—LeMahieu (9),
Stanton (12). 3B—McKenry (2). HR—Stanton (23), off Hale.
RBIs—Tulowitzki (33), Stanton 4 (59). SB—LeMahieu (6), Blackmon
(14), D.Gordon (22), I.Suzuki (5). Runners left in scoring
position—Colorado 3 (B.Barnes, Ynoa, Ca.Gonzalez); Miami 2
(Mathis, Prado). RISP—Colorado 1 for 7; Miami 1 for 6. Runners
moved up—Ozuna.
Colorado
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Hale L, 2-1 ..................6 4 4 4 3 5
100 4.56
B.Brown ......................1 0 0 0 1 1
22 3.63
Hawkins ......................1 0 0 0 0 0
5 7.88
Miami
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Latos W, 2-4 ................7 4 1 1 2 11
101 5.44
S.Dyson H, 6 ...............2⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
9 3.03
Dunn H, 11 .................1⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
4 4.43
A.Ramos S, 8-11 ..........1 0 0 0 0 2
15 1.47
Inherited runners-scored—Dunn 1-0. IBB—off Hale (Bour).
U—Paul Schrieber, Fieldin Culbreth, Jim Reynolds, Manny
Gonzalez. T—2:43. Tickets sold—26,647 (37,442).

DIAMONDBACKS 4
GIANTS
2

MARINERS
ASTROS

8
1

Allen Webster, who spent the first two
months in the minors after starting 11
games for Boston last season, didn’t
give up a hit until the sixth inning in his
Arizona debut. He pitched 52⁄3 innings.

Logan Morrison homered twice and
tied a career high with five RBIs. Seattle jumped on Collin McHugh (6-3) for
five runs in the first inning, a day after
Houston roughed up Felix Hernandez.

Arizona
AB R H BI Avg. S. Francisco
Pollock cf
5 0 2 0 .325 Aoki lf
Lamb 3b
4 0 0 0 .304 Panik 2b
Gldsmdt 1b 4 1 2 1 .355 Pagan cf
Tomas rf
3 1 1 0 .329 Posey c
Delgado p
0 0 0 0 .000 Belt 1b
D.Peralta lf
4 1 2 1 .264 B.Crwrd ss
A.Hill 2b
3 0 0 0 .234 M.Duffy 2b
S’mcchia c
3 0 0 1 .131 Jre.Prkr rf
Ahmed ss
2 1 0 1 .217 Vogelsong p
Webster p
3 0 0 0 .000 a-Arias
Inciarte rf
1 0 0 0 .289 b-MGehe 3b
Totals
32 4 7 4
Totals

Seattle
S.Smith lf-rf
A.Jcksn cf
Cano 2b
N.Cruz rf
Ackley lf
Seager 3b
Trumbo dh
Mrrisn 1b
B.Miller ss
Zunino c
Totals

Arizona
San Francisco

AB
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
3
1
1
1
30

R
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

300 100 000 —4
000 002 000 —2

H
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
4

BI
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2

Avg.
.326
.317
.270
.295
.289
.278
.280
.000
.130
.171
.202

7
4

0
0

a-popped out for Y.Petit in the 6th. b-singled for Affeldt in the 8th.
Walks—Arizona 5: Tomas 1, A.Hill 1, Saltalamacchia 1, Ahmed 2.
San Francisco 3: Aoki 1, Panik 1, Posey 1. Strikeouts—Arizona 6:
Lamb 1, Tomas 1, Saltalamacchia 2, Ahmed 1, Webster 1. San
Francisco 4: B.Crawford 1, Jarre.Parker 2, Vogelsong 1. LOB—Arizona
6, San Francisco 5. 2B—Panik (14), Posey (10), Belt (17).
RBIs—Goldschmidt (50), D.Peralta (28), Saltalamacchia (4),
Ahmed (12), Pagan (15), Posey (36). SB—D.Peralta (3). CS—Tomas
(1). SF—Pagan. RISP—Arizona 2 for 5; San Francisco 1 for 7.
Runners moved up—Pagan, B.Crawford. GIDP—Goldschmidt.
DP—San Francisco 1 (M.Duffy, Panik, Belt).
Arizona
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Webster W, 1-0 ..........52⁄3 2 2 2 3 2
81 3.18
Chafin H, 5................11⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
19 3.34
Delgado H, 3 ...............1 1 0 0 0 0
18 2.93
Ziegler S, 8-10 .............1 1 0 0 0 0
16 1.61
San Francisco
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Vogelsong L, 4-5.........32⁄3 6 4 4 5 1
81 4.81
Y.Petit .......................21⁄3 0 0 0 0 4
23 3.50
Broadway ....................1 1 0 0 0 1
14 0.00
Affeldt.........................1 0 0 0 0 0
10 4.74
Kontos ........................1 0 0 0 0 0
7 1.64
Inherited runners-scored—Chafin 1-0, Y.Petit 2-0. WP—Delgado.
U—Brian Gorman, Adam Hamari, Mike DiMuro, Mark Carlson.
T—2:50. Tickets sold—42,006 (41,915).

Seattle
Houston

AB
4
5
4
5
0
4
5
5
4
3
39

R
0
1
1
1
0
0
2
2
0
1
8

H
2
2
1
2
0
1
2
2
1
0
13

BI
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
5
0
0
8

Avg.
.266
.266
.240
.328
.194
.271
.162
.258
.232
.159

Houston
AB R H BI Avg.
Springer rf
4 0 2 1 .260
Correa ss
3 0 0 0 .263
Gattis dh
4 0 0 0 .223
Carter 1b
3 0 1 0 .208
Cl.Rsms lf
3 0 1 0 .242
Marisnick cf 4 0 0 0 .244
Valbuena 3b 3 0 0 0 .179
Ma.Gnzlz 2b 4 0 0 0 .212
J.Castro c
3 1 2 0 .224
Totals
31 1 6 1
503 000 000 —8
000 010 000 —1

13
6

1
1

Walks—Seattle 2: Cano 1, Zunino 1. Houston 5: Correa 1, Carter 1,
Col.Rasmus 1, Valbuena 1, J.Castro 1.Strikeouts—Seattle 7: S.Smith
1, A.Jackson 1, N.Cruz 1, Trumbo 2, Morrison 1, Zunino 1. Houston 7:
Correa 2, Gattis 1, Col.Rasmus 1, Marisnick 1, Valbuena 1, J.Castro 1.
E—Seager (6), Correa (1). LOB—Seattle 8, Houston 8. 2B—S.Smith
(17), Cano (16), B.Miller (9), Springer (14), Col.Rasmus (13),
J.Castro (8). HR—Morrison 2 (8), off McHugh 2. RBIs—A.Jackson
(9), N.Cruz (40), Seager (35), Morrison 5 (22), Springer (21).
SF—Seager. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 4 (N.Cruz,
Cano, Morrison, Zunino); Houston 3 (Ma.Gonzalez, Valbuena,
Carter). RISP—Seattle 3 for 9; Houston 1 for 7. GIDP—Morrison,
Springer, Correa. DP—Seattle 3 (B.Miller, Morrison), (Cano, B.Miller,
Morrison), (B.Miller, Cano, Morrison); Houston 1 (Ma.Gonzalez,
Correa, Carter).
Seattle
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
Montgomery W, 1-1.......6 6 1 1 3 4
98 1.89
Farquhar......................2 0 0 0 2 2
25 5.96
Nuno ..........................1 0 0 0 0 1
10 1.80
Houston
IP H R ER BB SO
NP ERA
McHugh L, 6-3 .............3 9 8 8 2 1
74 5.08
R.Hernandez ................4 4 0 0 0 5
63 4.89
Qualls .........................1 0 0 0 0 0
11 5.06
Gregerson....................1 0 0 0 0 1
14 4.32
HBP—by McHugh (S.Smith). WP—Montgomery 3.
U— Dana DeMuth, Paul Nauert, Ed Hickox, Mike Estabrook.
T—2:47. Tickets sold—36,762 (41,574).

L AT I M ES . C O M / S P O RT S

S

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

D5

INSIDE BASEBALL
From D.C. to N.Y. or L.A.?

TOP OF THE ORDER
Zach Helfand ranks the 30 teams.
Last week’s ranking in parentheses,
statistics are through Friday’s games:

1. ST. LOUIS: Best record but
the best fans in baseball? Judging by All-Star voting, same
state, but look west. (1)
2. DODGERS: A Clayton Kershaw advisory is in effect for the
National League West. (5)
3. KANSAS CITY: Had them
ranked ninth, but then the Royals fans stuffed the ballot box.
(6)
4. PITTSBURGH: A.J. Burnett
says this will be his last season.
Right now, it’s also his best. (4)
5. CHICAGO CUBS: Need an
ace but it hasn’t been Jon Lester.
He’s 4-5 with a 4.25 earned-run
average. (10)
6. NEW YORK YANKEES:
Mason Williams’ first major
league hit was a home run. (12)
7. HOUSTON: How will the
Astros react to their first snag of
the season, a seven-game losing
streak? (3)
8. MINNESOTA: Torii Hunter
just made Twins games NSFW.
(2)
9. SAN FRANCISCO: Chris
Heston went from a 47th-round
selection in the draft to a nohitter. Not bad. (9)
10. NEW YORK METS: Get
no-hit, then take over first place
two games later. The 2015 Mets,
everybody. (8)
11. TAMPA BAY: Paula Abdul
threw out the first pitch at the
Rays game — from four feet
away. (14)
12. TORONTO: After nine
straight wins, the Blue Jays
owned the second best run differential in the majors. (21)
13. TEXAS: Raise your hand if
you had the Astros and the
Rangers at Nos. 1 and 2 in the
division in June. (11)
14. WASHINGTON: The Nationals have had three threegame losing streaks since May
30. (7)
15. ANGELS: Hey, at least the
losing streak ended at five
games. (13)
16. BALTIMORE: And, hey, look
at the Orioles. Lost five games in
a row, then won five in a row. (20)
17. SAN DIEGO: Nothing’s going
right for Matt Kemp. He got hit
by a pitch, then tackled by an
umpire. (15)
18. DETROIT: The Tigers’ best
pitcher after David Price is Alfredo Simon. That’s a problem.
(18)
19. CINCINNATI: Somewhat
quietly, Todd Frazier has been
the best third baseman in the
majors this season. (26)

had a tough run before last year.
They’re really eating it up.”
Kansas City advanced to the
World Series last season, its first
postseason appearance in 29
years, and home attendance is
up 44% this season. The last
Royals player elected to start an
All-Star game: outfielder Jermaine Dye, 15 years ago.
The All-Star game should be
about giving the fans what they
want to see, and Royals fans
have spoken the loudest.
But the voting offers the
latest reminder of how Major
League Baseball tries to have it
both ways — a giddy celebration
of baseball’s most popular players, and a serious game infused
with trumped-up importance,
with the winning league rewarded with home-field advantage in the World Series.
If you truly are playing to
win, Trout plays the whole
game.
When the National League
won the All-Star game 50 years
ago, the majority of the lineup
played the whole game: Hank
Aaron, Ernie Banks, Willie
Mays, Pete Rose and Joe Torre.
Willie Stargell, the left fielder,
yielded his final two at-bats — to
Roberto Clemente.

BILL SHAIKIN
ON BASEBALL

The last few years have not
been kind to fans of the New
York Yankees, at least not to the
ones conditioned to believe
every great young player is
destined to be seduced by the
Yankees’ wallets, er, tradition.
Clayton Kershaw shrugged
off free agency and stayed with
the Dodgers. Mike Trout did the
same with the Angels. So did
Buster Posey with the San
Francisco Giants, Felix Hernandez with the Seattle Mariners
and Giancarlo Stanton with the
Miami Marlins.
Bryce Harper showed up at
Yankee Stadium last week, and
the faithful showered him with
chants. “FU-TURE YAN-KEE”
was one. So was “2019,” in reference to the first year he could
play for the Yankees, or any
other team. The Washington
Nationals control their star
outfielder through 2018.
Harper said all the right
things about enjoying his time
with the Nationals, how ownership has treated him well, and
how he wants to bring a championship to Washington. But it is
difficult to imagine Harper
passing up a chance at free
agency; clients of agent Scott
Boras almost always test the
market.
It has been suggested it
would be a surprise if Harper
did not sign with the Yankees.
The argument is that Harper
would be extraordinarily marketable in New York, and that
the Yankees have several massive contracts expiring before
2019 and could afford whatever it
took to sign him.
All true of the Dodgers too.
And Harper might well judge
the Dodgers as the team that
gives him the best chance to
win.
The Nationals never have
won a postseason series. Although they were projected as
the best team in the National
League this season, they are two
games over .500.
The Yankees are old. Their
only starting position player
under 30 is shortstop Didi
Gregorius, whose on-base percentage and slugging percentage were both under .300 before
the weekend. Of Baseball
America’s top 30 prospects, the
Yankees have none. Baseball
America ranks their organizational talent 18th among the 30
major league clubs.
The Dodgers rank third, and
their minor league system is
about to get much deeper, after
they conduct an expensive raid
on Latin American talent when
the signing period opens July 2.
The Yankees have spent heavily
there, and baseball rules preclude them from doing it again

Dollars and sense

Kathy Willens Associated Press

BRYCE HARPER of Washington, who will become a free

agent in 2019, could be coveted by the Yankees and Dodgers.
this year.
If the Dodgers’ top prospects
pan out, imagine a franchise
foundation of Harper, outfielder
Joc Pederson, infielder Corey
Seager and pitcher Julio Urias.
Harper and Pederson would
turn 27 in 2019. Seager would be
25. Urias would be 23.
The Dodgers would be wary
of investing so much money in
one player, and team President
Stan Kasten has said he would
be reluctant to acquire a player
whose contract extended beyond age 36. But even a 10-year
contract for Harper would
expire before he turned 36.
Harper grew up a Yankees
fan, idolizing Mickey Mantle.
And his swing is all but designed
for Yankee Stadium. But maybe
Harper wants to play close to his
Las Vegas home, leading a cast
of young stars. He grew up
idolizing Vin Scully too.
It has been a long time since
the Dodgers and Yankees had a
bidding war. The Dodgers were
not interested in Masahiro
Tanaka. The Yankees were not
interested in Zack Greinke or
Manny Ramirez. The Dodgers,
under previous ownership,
could not afford to make a run
at Alex Rodriguez or CC
Sabathia.

26. SEATTLE: The American
League West is essentially the
inverse of the prevailing preseason predictions. (27)
27. BOSTON: The worst defensive player in the league by runs
given up? That’s Hanley Ramirez. (28)
28. OAKLAND: The Athletics
are still outscoring opponents.
But they still have the worst
record in the AL. (22)
29. MILWAUKEE: Congrats,
Brewers. You no longer have the
league’s worst record. (29)
30. PHILADELPHIA: The Phillies overtake Milwaukee for the
worst record in the NL. (30)

[email protected]
Twitter: @BillShaikin

AL LEADERS

— D AVID O RTIZ ,

Boston Red Sox designated hitter.
Ortiz, 39, hit a home run Saturday
but entered play with a batting
average of .225 overall, .114 against
left-handed pitching, and a -0.2
WAR (wins above replacement),
one of the six lowest WAR figures
among American League regulars.

22. CLEVELAND: Can Matthew
Dellavedova play baseball? The
Indians can use some defensive
help. (17)

25. MIAMI: Giancarlo Stanton
has 22 home runs. The rest of the
team combined has 29. (25)

Billy Butler played eight
seasons with the Kansas City
Royals, most of them good ones.
He was selected to one All-Star
team, as a reserve. Little did he
know that, in his first year
playing for another team, Royals fans would turn the All-Star
game into the Kansas City Invitational.
Of the nine elected starters
for the American League team,
the only non-Royals players
among voting leaders are Trout
and Houston Astros second
baseman Jose Altuve.
“You can see what a little bit
of winning does,” said Butler
while in Anaheim with the Oakland Athletics. “I would have
liked to have had that a few
more times. I made All-Star in
2012, but I had some definitely
worthy years other times. The
teams I was on weren’t very
good. I just kind of got overlooked.
“That town has been a baseball town for a long time. They

“Everybody’s time is up at
some point. I don’t think
that’s my problem,
though.”

21. ATLANTA: Juan Uribe is in a
better place now. He has started
in all but two games with the
Braves. (16)

24. COLORADO: The Rockies
actually have a winning record in
games outside the division. (23)

Royals feeling the love

THEY SAID IT

NL LEADERS

20. CHICAGO WHITE SOX: In
his last four starts, Chris Sale
has given up four runs and
struck out 49 batters. (24)

23. ARIZONA: Paul Goldschmidt is second in the NL in home
runs, runs, average, RBIs and
wins above replacement. (19)

If Harper maintains his
excellence, his next deal could
approach $500 million no matter
whether his cap has a curly W,
an interlocking NY, or an interlocking LA.

In 2013, in his first season as
an everyday player, infielder
Jedd Gyorko hit 23 home runs
for the San Diego Padres. In
2013, in his first season as an
everyday player, infielder Matt
Dominguez hit 21 home runs for
the Houston Astros.
The Padres signed Gyorko
for six years and $36 million. The
Astros offered long-term contracts to several young players,
including a reported five years
and $14.5 million to Dominguez.
He was not the only player to
say no to an Astros offer, and
not unjustifiably.
If he continued to hit, Dominguez might have made as
much in one year alone at the
back end of his contract as the
Astros proposed to guarantee
for all five years.
But such bargains are the
price of security for a young
player, when the team takes the
risk of non-performance. That is
worth remembering when
agents criticize teams for trying
to take advantage of a young
player with a below-market
contract.
The Padres demoted Gyorko
to the minor leagues last week,
but he has $33 million guaranteed beyond this year, even if he
never makes it back to the big
leagues.
The Astros designated Dominguez for assignment last
week, and he has zero dollars
guaranteed beyond this year.

John Minchillo Associated Press

BILLY HAMILTON of the Cincinnati

Reds leads the National League in steals.
Through Friday
BATTING AVERAGE
Gordon, Miami .......... .355
Goldschmidt, Arizona ...352
LeMahieu, Colorado ....349
Harper, Washington .....333
Aoki, San Francisco ....330
Pollock, Arizona ..........323
Peralta, St. Louis ........323
Rizzo, Chicago ............319
Escobar, Washington ...318
Panik, San Francisco ...317
HOME RUNS
Stanton, Miami............. 22
Harper, Washington........21
Frazier, Cincinnati ..........18
Goldschmidt, Arizona .....17
Pederson, DODGERS......17
Arenado, Colorado.........15
Braun, Milwaukee..........13
Votto, Cincinnati ............13
Upton, San Diego ..........12
Marte, Pittsburgh...........12
RUNS BATTED IN
Stanton, Miami............. 55
Harper, Washington........49
Goldschmidt, Arizona .....49
Arenado, Colorado.........47
Marte, Pittsburgh...........42
Braun, Milwaukee..........41
Gonzalez, DODGERS ......40
Crawford, San Fran. .......40
Frazier, Cincinnati ..........39
Norris, San Diego ..........39

Stanton, Miami ...........595
Rizzo, Chicago.............579
Gonzalez, DODGERS.....564
Pederson, DODGERS ....552
Arenado, Colorado .......545
Votto, Cincinnati ..........543
Freeman, Atlanta .........530
ON-BASE PERCENTAGE
Goldschmidt, Arizona .. .472
Harper, Washington......469
Rizzo, Chicago.............438
Holliday, St. Louis ........417
Aoki, San Francisco .....398
Gonzalez, DODGERS.....398
LeMahieu, Colorado .....397
Votto, Cincinnati ..........397
Bryant, Chicago...........396
RUNS
Harper, Washington ....... 47
Goldschmidt, Arizona .....46
Frazier, Cincinnati ..........44
Fowler, Chicago .............42
Pollock, Arizona.............42
Stanton, Miami .............40
HITS
Gordon, Miami.............. 89
Aoki, San Francisco .......77
Goldschmidt, Arizona .....76
Pollock, Arizona.............74
LeMahieu, Colorado.......74
Peralta, St. Louis ...........73

STOLEN BASES
Hamilton, Cincinnati ...... 25
Gordon, Miami..............21
Polanco, Pittsburgh........16
Pollock, Arizona.............14
Upton, San Diego ..........13
Blackmon, Colorado.......13
Aoki, San Francisco .......12
Revere, Philadelphia ......12

BASES ON BALLS
Harper, Washington ....... 51
Goldschmidt, Arizona .....49
Pederson, DODGERS......41
Votto, Cincinnati ............37
Markakis, Atlanta ..........34
DOUBLES
Gonzalez, DODGERS ...... 21
Freeman, Atlanta...........19
Rizzo, Chicago...............19
Carpenter, St. Louis .......18
Norris, San Diego ..........18

SLUGGING PERCENTAGE
Harper, Washington .... .721
Goldschmidt, Arizona....662
Frazier, Cincinnati ........606

TRIPLES
Revere, Philadelphia ........5
Realmuto, Miami.............4
Fowler, Chicago...............4

ERA
Cole, Pittsburgh ......... 1.73
Miller, Atlanta.............1.84
Greinke, DODGERS .....1.92
Burnett, Pittsburgh......2.11
Scherzer, Washington ..2.13
DeGrom, New York ......2.42
Wacha, St. Louis.........2.45
Hammel, Chicago .......2.81
Anderson, Arizona.......2.82
Cueto, Cincinnati ........2.85
W-L
Cole, Pittsburgh ........... 9-2
Colon, New York ...........9-4
Wacha, St. Louis ..........8-2
Shields, San Diego .......7-0
Martinez, St. Louis........7-2
Bumgarner, San Fran. ...7-3
DeGrom, New York........7-4
SAVES
Rosenthal, St. Louis ...... 20
Melancon, Pittsburgh .....19
Storen, Washington........19
Familia, New York ..........18
Casilla, San Francisco ....18
Grilli, Atlanta ................16
Kimbrel, San Diego........15
INNINGS PITCHED
Hamels, Philadelphia.. 87.1
Kershaw, DODGERS.....87.0
Cueto, Cincinnati ........85.1
Bumgarner, San Fran...85.1
Scherzer, Washington ..84.1
Harang, Philadelphia...83.0
Colon, New York .........81.2
Shields, San Diego .....80.2
Cashner, San Diego.....80.0
STRIKEOUTS
Kershaw, DODGERS ..... 112
Shields, San Diego ........98
Scherzer, Washington .....97
Hamels, Philadelphia .....91
Liriano, Pittsburgh..........87
Cole, Pittsburgh.............86
Ross, San Diego............83
Arrieta, Chicago ............83
Cueto, Cincinnati...........82
Harvey, New York ...........82

“I just don’t like giving
freebies. I want someone to
beat me.”
— K EN G ILES ,

Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, to the
Philadelphia Daily News, explaining
a dugout incident on Friday
captured on television. The Phillies
ordered him to walk Pedro Alvarez
of the Pittsburgh Pirates. After the
inning, Giles returned to the dugout
and got into a shouting match with
pitching coach Bob McClure, so
heated that the Phillies’
broadcasters said Giles and
McClure had to be separated by
Cole Hamels.

“What was so funny about
the list is: I was like, ‘Guys,
all these things have been
out for, like, six years. How
do you not have any of this
stuff ?’ ”
— B RANDON M OSS ,

Cleveland Indians outfielder, on the
ransom note delivered by Indians
relievers, asking for Apple products
in exchange for the ball Moss hit for
his 100th career home run, which
landed in the Cleveland bullpen.
Apple agreed to honor the
demands, which included four
iPads, three Apple watches, and an
iPhone.

— Bill Shaikin

Allen J. Schaben Los Angeles Times

JOSE ALTUVE of the Houston Astros is

atop the American League in stolen bases.
Through Friday
BATTING AVERAGE
Fielder, Texas ............346
Kipnis, Cleveland .......332
Cabrera, Detroit ........330
Cruz, Seattle .............326
Donaldson, Toronto ....322
Moustakas, Kan. City .321
Reddick, Oakland ......309
Jones, Baltimore .......308
Brantley, Cleveland ....308
Pedroia, Boston ........308
HOME RUNS
Cruz, Seattle .............. 18
Trout, ANGELS .............18
Donaldson, Toronto ......17
Pujols, ANGELS ...........17
Teixeira, New York.........17
Davis, Baltimore ..........13
Valbuena, Houston .......13
Cabrera, Detroit ...........13
Encarnacion, Toronto ....13
Ramirez, Boston ..........13
RUNS BATTED IN
Teixeira, New York........ 45
Donaldson, Toronto ......45
Cabrera, Detroit ...........43
Fielder, Texas...............42
Morales, Kansas City ....41
Vogt, Oakland..............40
Abreu, Chicago ............39
Gattis, Houston............39
Cruz, Seattle ...............39
Bautista, Toronto..........38
McCann, New York .......38
Reddick, Oakland.........38
STOLEN BASES
Altuve, Houston .......... 17
Gardner, New York........15
Ellsbury, New York ........14
Davis, Detroit ..............14
Springer, Houston ........13
DeShields, Texas..........13
SLUGGING PERCENTAGE
Cruz, Seattle .............604
Donaldson, Toronto.....592
Trout, ANGELS ...........590
Cabrera, Detroit .........577

Teixeira, New York .......566
Pujols, ANGELS..........533
Reddick, Oakland.......531
ON-BASE PERCENTAGE
Cabrera, Detroit .........436
Kipnis, Cleveland........408
Fielder, Texas.............408
Vogt, Oakland ............389
Bautista, Toronto ........386
Trout, ANGELS ...........385
RUNS
Donaldson, Toronto ..... 51
Dozier, Minnesota ........49
Trout, ANGELS .............47
Gardner, New York........42
Bautista, Toronto..........41
Kipnis, Cleveland .........41
Cain, Kansas City.........37
HITS
Fielder, Texas.............. 82
Kipnis, Cleveland .........80
Donaldson, Toronto ......79
Pedroia, Boston ...........76
Cruz, Seattle ...............74
Altuve, Houston ...........72
Cabrera, Detroit ...........71
Jones, Baltimore ..........70
BASES ON BALLS
Santana, Cleveland ..... 45
Bautista, Toronto..........41
Cabrera, Detroit ...........39
Springer, Houston ........35
Teixeira, New York.........34
Vogt, Oakland..............34
DOUBLES
Brantley, Cleveland ...... 19
Kipnis, Cleveland .........19
Morales, Kansas City ....18
Cespedes, Detroit ........18
Dozier, Minnesota ........18
Smith, Seattle .............16
TRIPLES
Orlando, Kansas City ..... 5
Davis, Detroit ................5
Kipnis, Cleveland ...........4
Kiermaier, Tampa Bay .....4
Eaton, Chicago ..............4
DeShields, Texas............4

ERA
Gray, Oakland ...........1.74
Archer, Tampa Bay.....1.84
Keuchel, Houston......1.90
Pelfrey, Minnesota .....2.28
Price, Detroit ............2.44
Odorizzi, Tampa Bay...2.47
Santiago, ANGELS .....2.59
Chavez, Oakland .......2.64
Martinez, Texas .........2.65
Simon, Detroit ..........2.76
W-L
Hernandez, Seattle..... 9-3
Keuchel, Houston........7-2
Gray, Oakland.............7-3
Pineda, New York ........7-3
Archer, Tampa Bay ......7-4
Buehrle, Toronto .........7-4
Carrasco, Cleveland.....7-5
SAVES
Perkins, Minnesota ...... 21
Street, ANGELS............18
Britton, Baltimore.........17
Miller, New York ...........17
Soria, Detroit...............16
Boxberger, Tampa Bay...15
Gregerson, Houston......15
INNINGS PITCHED
Keuchel, Houston......94.2
Price, Detroit ............92.1
Kluber, Cleveland ......91.2
Gray, Oakland ...........88.0
Weaver, ANGELS .......84.0
Archer, Tampa Bay.....83.0
Hernandez, Seattle ....82.2
Sanchez, Detroit........82.0
Samardzija, Chicago ..80.1
Buehrle, Toronto........78.1
STRIKEOUTS
Kluber, Cleveland .......109
Archer, Tampa Bay......108
Sale, Chicago..............93
Salazar, Cleveland........87
Hernandez, Seattle.......82
Price, Detroit ...............82
Gray, Oakland..............79
Pineda, New York .........78
Carrasco, Cleveland......77

D6

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I M E S. C O M /S P O RT S

BASEBALL

Omaha crowd could
get behind Fullerton
The Titans will be
underdogs when they
take on Vanderbilt at
College World Series.
By Shotgun Spratling

Ted Kirk Associated Press

DANIEL PINERO scores on a double by Kenny Towns in the eighth inning of

Virginia’s 5-3 victory over Arkansas at the College World Series.
COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

Virginia and Florida
get off on the right foot
Josh Sborz (5-2) struck
out five of the 10 batters he
faced in three innings.

associated press

Results,
schedules

OMAHA — Kenny Towns
hit a tiebreaking double in
the eighth inning after Daniel Pinero stole second base
and third base, and Virginia
opened the College World
Series with a 5-3 victory over
Arkansas on Saturday.
The Cavaliers (40-22),
the 2014 national runnersup, will play Monday against
Florida and the Razorbacks
(40-24) will play Miami in an
elimination game.Arkansas
tied the score, 3-3, in the fifth
inning on Andrew Benintendi’s home run, his 20th this
season. Joe McCarthy of Virginia opened the scoring
with a drive into the rightfield seats in the second inning.
Trey Killian (3-5) left
with one out in the eighth after Pinero singled for his
third hit. Zack Jackson replaced Killian and Pinero
stole second base and third

at Omaha (times PDT)
Saturday’s results

8 Virginia 5, Arkansas 3
8 Florida 15, Miami 3
Today’s games

8 Louisiana St. vs. Texas
Christian, noon, ESPN
8 Cal State Fullerton vs.
Vanderbilt, 5, ESPN2
on consecutive pitches. Pinero scored when Towns
drove a ball into the rightfield corner.
Ernie Clement had a runscoring single in the ninth inning. The Cavaliers scored
all of their runs with two
outs.
Virginia starter Connor
Jones made it through six innings despite giving up six
hits, walking two batters and
hitting two.

Florida 15, Miami 3: The
Gators (50-16) scored 11 runs
in the fourth inning to tie a
CWS record and hand the
Hurricanes (49-16) their
most lopsided postseason
loss.
The Gators turned a 2-1
deficit into a 10-run lead.
They had nine hits against
Andrew Suarez (9-2) and
two relievers.
Florida sent 15 batters to
the plate in the 40-minute inning, with Peter Alonso driving in three runs and Josh
Tobias and JJ Schwartz
driving in two apiece.
It was the most runs
scored in an inning at the
CWS since Stanford had an
11-run ninth against Florida
State in 2008.
Logan Shore (10-6) scattered seven hits and struck
out six batters in five innings.

The people of Omaha like
their steaks big and their college baseball programs
small.
That’s why Cal State Fullerton probably will have
strong support at the College
World Series beginning Sunday when the Titans open
against defending national
champion Vanderbilt at 5
p.m. PDT.
Each June, the hometown
fans pack TD Ameritrade
Park — and, before the new
ballpark, Rosenblatt Stadium — regardless of
whether local favorites Nebraska or Creighton are part
of the field. The Cornhuskers
and Bluejays have combined
for four appearances in the
tournament’s 65-year history, so the locals often are
looking for a team to adopt.
Typically, they choose an
underdog, whether that is a
regional No. 4 seed such as
Fresno State, which won the
national championship in
2008; an upstart making its
first appearance, such as
Stony Brook or Kent State in
2012; or a traditional baseball
power from a school without
a football program such as
Fullerton.
“The people of the city of
Omaha are kind of the bluecollar people. They’re the
hardworking people,” said
Fullerton assistant Chad
Baum, who is making his
fifth College World Series appearance as a player and
coach with the Titans. “They
kind of relate and know we’re
that little commuter school,
that little blip, and they kind
of gravitate toward us.”
The Titans got here by
producing runs with walks,
hit batters and sacrifices.
They win with pitching and
defense rather than a slew of
highly drafted sluggers.
Vanderbilt and Louisiana
State have the top two draft
picks in the recent Major
League
Baseball
draft
playing shortstop, Dansby
Swanson and Alex Bregman.
Arkansas’ Andrew Benintendi and Miami’s David

The little school
that could
Despite its perceived status as
a David battling the NCAA’s
Goliaths, Cal State Fullerton
has fielded one of the nation’s
most successful baseball
programs over the last 40
years. The Titans’ overall and
College World Series records
in 16 previous appearances (*
won national championship):
Year

Coach

Overall

1975

Augie Garrido

36-16-1

CWS
0-2

1979

Augie Garrido

60-14

5-1*

1982

Augie Garrido

51-23

0-2

1984

Augie Garrido

65-20

5-1*

1988

Larry Cochell

43-18

2-2

1990

Larry Cochell

36-23

0-2

1992

Augie Garrido

46-17

4-2

1994

Augie Garrido

47-16

2-2

1995

Augie Garrido

57-9

4-0*

1999

George Horton

50-14

1-2

2001

George Horton

48-18

2-2

2003 George Horton

50-16

2-2

2004 George Horton

42-21

5-1*

2006 George Horton

49-15

2-2

2007 George Horton

38-23

0-2

2009 Dave Serrano

47-16

0-2

Thompson led the nation in
home runs.
Fullerton counters with
the stingiest pitcher in college baseball, Thomas Eshelman, who has an 18.71 strikeout-to-walk ratio, and a lineup that has hit a pedestrian
.265.
The Titans also play to
the crowd. The coaching staff
instructs the players to
throw beach balls back into
the stands rather than out of
play, part of an effort to be
the most fan-friendly contingent in the eight-team field.
“We’ve been lucky enough
to have dudes that win the
crowd when we’ve played
here,” Baum said, citing former Titans Mark Kotsay,
Kurt Suzuki and Jason
Windsor.
This year, Fullerton has
another potential crowd winner in closer Tyler Peitzmeier. The senior lefthander, who pitched eight innings in relief in last weekend’s super regional series
win over Louisville, is the
only Titan from outside of
California. He is from Yutan,
Neb. — 25 miles west of
Omaha.
“I actually grew up in
Omaha,” Peitzmeier said.
“My parents would buy me a
10-pack of general admission

tickets every year when it was
back at Rosenblatt.”
Peitzmeier became a Fullerton fan after seeing the Titans play Nebraska here in
2001. He is looking forward to
playing in front of his family
and friends, and said his parents might be even more excited than he is.
“It means a lot to them because they grew up in Omaha
here too,” Peitzmeier said.
“They’ve grown up around
the College World Series and
I think it’s been a dream for
them for me to come back.”

Reunited

For the second week in a
row, Eshelman will oppose a
fellow USA Baseball Collegiate National Team member.
Last week, Eshelman and the
Titans bested Louisville’s
Kyle Funkhouser, who was
the 35th pick overall, by the
Dodgers, in the MLB draft.
Sunday, it will be Vanderbilt
right-hander Carson Fulmer,
the No. 8 overall pick.
“You always want to play
the best, and with him in the
opposite dugout it’s going to
be a hard game,” said Eshelman, who was the 46th pick
of the draft, by the Houston
Astros. “We’re going to have a
difficult time putting up runs
against him, but we’re just
going to try to grind like we
always do.”
The Titans have a strong
track record against Team
USA members. Eshelman
previously defeated UC
Santa Barbara right-hander
Dillon Tate — the No. 4 overall pick in the draft, by Texas
— and the Titans won a
three-game series against infielder Mark Mathias’ Cal
Poly team and the Fullerton
Regional, which included Arizona State closer Ryan Burr
and Clemson catcher Chris
Okey.
Along with Eshelman and
injured Fullerton starter Justin Garza, there are six members of last summer’s Team
USA squad participating in
the College World Series.
Three are from Vanderbilt:
Fulmer, outfielder Bryan
Reynolds and shortstop
Swanson.
“I’m really looking forward to facing Dansby,” Eshelman said. “I think he’s obviously the best player in the
draft and all of Division I.”
[email protected]

A major drop in use seen, but it’s still ‘part of the game’
[Tobacco, from D1]
took his life at age 54.
Curt Schilling, a former
All-Star pitcher, said last
year he had undergone
treatment for cancer that resulted from smokeless tobacco use. In April, he
penned an open letter to his
younger self warning of the
dangers.
And last month, the mayor of San Francisco signed
an ordinance that in 2016 will
ban tobacco from all sporting venues in the city, including AT&T Park, home of the
defending World Series
champion San Francisco Giants.
That has not stopped
many college players from
using smokeless tobacco.
“No matter how many
times you look a guy in the
eye and say Tony Gwynn
and Curt Schilling, if that
guy wants to dip, he’s going
to find a way,” said Andy Lopez, who guided Pepperdine
and Arizona to national titles before retiring last
month after 33 years as a college coach.
The NCAA prohibits
players, coaches, umpires,
athletic trainers and managers from using tobacco at
game sites. If umpires catch

players using tobacco, the
player and coach face ejection.
“There is zero tolerance,”
said Chuck Lyon, a college
umpire for nearly three decades.
According to the NCAA
rule book, “Umpires who use
tobacco before, during or after a game in the vicinity of
the site shall be reported to
and punished by the proper
disciplinary authority.”
Players and coaches interviewed for this story said
they had seen umpires using
tobacco. But Lyon said, “As a
crew chief, I would turn that
in immediately.”
Results of the NCAA’s
most recent quadrennial
survey of about 21,000 college
athletes from all sports
showed that tobacco use by
college baseball players was
decreasing. The 2013 results,
released last July in a report
titled, “NCAA National
Study of Substance Abuse
Habits of College StudentAthletes,” showed a drop in
“spit” tobacco use since 2009.
In 2005, the overall percentage of acknowledged
use in the previous 12
months was 42.5%. It
climbed to 52.3% in 2009, but
dropped to 47.2% in 2013 —

LICENSE TO DEAL
Financing as low as 1.99%*

Unlimited Factory Backed Warranty
Rigorous Vehicle Inspection

2013 Mercedes-Benz
E350

Carfax Vehicle Report
Roadside Assistance Program

29,888

$
(65091C/DA721887)

7 Day/500 Mileage Exchange

16721 Ventura Blvd., Encino | www.mbencino.com

800.677.3001

LAA3356995-1

Mercedes-Benz of Encino

*Financing as low as 1.99% for 36 months, 2.99% for 48-72 months on select Certified Pre-owned Mercedes-Benz. Financing based on approved
Tier 1 Credit, through MBFS. See dealer for details. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes,
any finance charges, any dealer document preparation charge and any emission testing charge. Ad expires close of business date of publication.

though that’s still nearly half
of the players in a sport in
which it is banned.
Coaches said they address tobacco with their
players before every season.
“You also bring it up
throughout the season,”
UCLA Coach John Savage
said, “but it’s not a daily reminder.”
Cal State Northridge
Coach Greg Moore said, “We
educate them constantly
and
talk
about
their
choices.” But, he added, “I
know that me saying smokeless tobacco is unhealthy is
not going to get a guy to
change his habit.”
The California Interscholastic Federation, which governs high school sports in
the state, forbids the use of
tobacco products by athletes and coaches. But most
players say they first experimented with tobacco in high
school.
“They get into it for the
same reason 12-year-olds
start smoking — they think
it’s a cool thing to do,” UC Irvine Coach Mike Gillespie
said.
Chatsworth Coach Tom
Meusborn said tobacco use
by players has dropped dramatically since he began at
the school in 1990. “I think
they understand and are becoming more health conscious with their training
and diet,” he said.
Jim Ozella, Newhall
Hart’s coach since 2000, also
sees fewer high school players using tobacco. “I just
bring up the topic of Tony
Gwynn,” said Ozella, whose
son worked as an equipment
manager at San Diego State
when Gwynn coached there.
College players said they
were aware of the risks of using tobacco products.
Still, Cal State Northridge
infielder
William
Colantono began to dip as a
young member of a mostly
older varsity high school
team. “Being around them, I

Rick Madonik Toronto Star via Getty Images

TORONTO BLUE JAYS catcher Josh Thole spits

while using smokeless tobacco during spring training.
picked it up,” he said. “Not
that I’m proud of it.”
Colantono said that
while most of his summer
league teammates used
smokeless tobacco, only “a
handful” of his Northridge
teammates do, and they
partake off the field.
“It’s easy for me not to
have to do it on the field,” he
said. “I’m not crazy about it
where I have to have it all the
time.”
Eshelman,
Fullerton’s

ace right-hander, started to
dip in high school because “I
thought it was cool.” Fellow
Titans pitcher John Gavin
began in high school on “a
dare.” Both said they occasionally use tobacco, but not
on the field.
“After a game when you
want to hang out and relax,”
said Eshelman, a junior.
“Just kind of a stress reliever,” said Gavin, a freshman.
Several college baseball

summer leagues, which have
rosters comprised of players
from across the United
States, also ban the use of tobacco during games.
Sal Colangelo, longtime
manager of the Bethesda
(Md.) Big Train in the Cal
Ripken Collegiate League,
said he attempts to educate
players, but for some “it’s a
way of life.”
“You go into their trucks
and there are cases and
cases of tobacco and dip,” he
said. “It’s like a 7-Eleven.”
Several coaches from
West Coast schools acknowledged using tobacco,
though a few agreed to speak
about it only if they were not
identified.
One, who said he recently
quit, recalled an umpire
once threatening to eject
him for chewing when he
went out to argue a call. Another, who has used smokeless tobacco for more than
two decades, admitted he
was addicted.
“For me, personally, that
would be one of my greatest
accomplishments if I can
stop,” he said.
Former
Pepperdine
Coach Steve Rodriguez
played on Pepperdine’s 1992
national
championship
team and professionally for
seven seasons, including 18
games in the majors. He
coached the Waves for 12
seasons before being hired
last week as coach of Baylor.
He said he chewed leaf tobacco until about five years
ago.
“I was a hypocrite because I would say, ‘You can’t
do it,’ but I would still do it,”
he said, adding he is now
passionate about educating
his players about the risks.
“I want to make sure,” he
said, “that I give them the
best opportunity to not have
to deal with really, really big
issues.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @latimes.com

L AT I M ES . C O M / S P O RT S

SS

S U NDAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

D7

THE DAY IN SPORTS

Werdum defeats rusty Velasquez
wire reports

Fabricio Werdum of Brazil defeated a rusty Cain Velasquez by
tap-out in the third round to become the undisputed heavyweight
champion at UFC 188 on Saturday
night at Mexico City.
With 2 minutes 13 seconds left in
the third round, Werdum (20-5-1)
took down Velasquez, who was
coming of a 20-month layoff after
injuries to his shoulder and knee.
Werdum, a Brazilian jiujitsu specialist, was able to cut local favorite
Velasquez (13-2) in the left eye during the first round, and the former
heavyweight champion struggled
through the rest of the fight to
overcome it.
Deontay Wilder successfully
defended his WBC heavyweight title with a ninth-round knockout of
Eric Molina at Bartow Arena in
Birmingham, Ala., a short drive
from his hometown. The 6-foot-7
Wilder (34-0) also knocked down
Molina (23-3) in the fourth and
twice again in the fifth. In an earlier
bout, Jose Pedraza (20-0) claimed

Bolt

ETC.

rory won the 400 in 49.86, the
world’s fastest this year.

Bolt disappointed
Usain Bolt called his performance in the 200 meters the worst of
his career after he posted an uncharacteristically slow time of
20.29 seconds in winning the race
Saturday in the Adidas Grand Prix
at New York.
Hoping to break 20 seconds for
the first time this year, Bolt ran
what he deemed a “horrible” curve
and said he was so discouraged he
eased up before the finish. His time
was more than a second off his
world record of 19.19. Tyson Gay
won the 100, rallying after a slow
start to finish in 10.12 while running
into a headwind. Francena McCo-

GOLF

BASKETBALL
WNBA
Saturday’s Results
No games scheduled
Today’s Schedule
Seattle at SPARKS
Chicago at Indiana
Minnesota at Phoenix
Atlanta at Connecticut
Tulsa at San Antonio
Washington at New York

$6-MILLION FEDEX ST. JUDE CLASSIC
At Memphis, Tenn.—Par 70
TPC Southwind—7,239 yards
54-Hole Scores
Greg Owen.....................64-70-67—201
Fabian Gomez ................66-68-67—201
Scott Brown...................65-69-68—202
Brooks Koepka...............64-67-71—202
Matt Jones.....................69-67-68—204
Austin Cook ...................68-64-72—204
Tim Wilkinson ................70-70-65—205
Camilo Villegas ..............71-68-66—205
Arjun Atwal ....................72-65-68—205
David Toms....................70-66-69—205
Chad Campbell ..............69-66-70—205
Ryan Palmer ..................64-71-70—205
Tom Hoge ......................69-65-71—205
Chris Smith....................67-67-71—205
Chez Reavie...................70-70-66—206
Max Homa.....................68-70-68—206
Michael Thompson..........69-69-68—206
Kevin Chappell ...............71-64-71—206
Seung-Yul Noh ...............69-72-66—207
Brendon de Jonge...........71-70-66—207
Hudson Swafford ............71-68-68—207
Stewart Cink ..................68-70-69—207
John Merrick ..................69-68-70—207
Phil Mickelson................68-69-70—207
Jason Gore ....................71-65-71—207
Spencer Levin ................67-68-72—207
Tom Gillis ......................66-68-73—207
Russell Knox ..................70-64-73—207
Steven Alker...................65-68-74—207
a-Bryson DeChambeau....69-71-68—208
Nick Watney...................69-71-68—208
Patrick Rodgers ..............70-69-69—208
Alex Cejka .....................71-68-69—208
Tyrone Van Aswegen ........69-69-70—208
Billy Hurley III.................72-66-70—208
Billy Horschel.................71-67-70—208
George McNeill...............71-67-70—208
Boo Weekley ..................67-70-71—208
Colt Knost .....................72-64-72—208
Robert Allenby ...............71-70-68—209
Vaughn Taylor .................67-74-68—209
Carl Pettersson...............72-69-68—209
Will Wilcox.....................68-72-69—209
Lucas Glover ..................67-72-70—209
Cameron Percy ...............69-69-71—209
Luke Donald ..................69-68-72—209
Jason Bohn ...................70-71-69—210
Mark Hubbard................72-68-70—210
Zack Sucher...................68-72-70—210
Steven Bowditch.............69-71-70—210
Alex Prugh .....................66-74-70—210
David Hearn...................71-68-71—210
Ben Crane .....................66-70-74—210
Mark Wilson ..................67-69-74—210
Whee Kim .....................73-68-70—211
Ken Duke ......................68-71-72—211
Zac Blair .......................69-70-72—211
Eric Axley ......................70-69-72—211
Harris English.................69-67-75—211
Oscar Fraustro................69-72-71—212
Jason Kokrak .................69-71-72—212
Heath Slocum ................68-72-72—212
Martin Laird ...................68-71-73—212
John Rollins ...................67-70-75—212
Chad Collins ..................71-66-75—212
Jon Curran.....................70-71-72—213
Charlie Beljan ................74-66-73—213
Roberto Castro ...............69-70-74—213
Brian Davis....................65-72-76—213
Tommy Gainey................66-74-74—214
Brian Stuard ..................68-70-76—214
Kyle Stanley...................69-71-75—215
Jim Renner ....................69-70-76—215
Aaron Baddeley..............71-70-77—218
Harrison Frazar ...............70-69-81—220

-9
-9
-8
-8
-6
-6
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-5
-4
-4
-4
-4
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-2
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
+1
+1
+1
+1
+1
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+3
+3
+3
+3
+4
+4
+5
+5
+8
+10

Defending IndyCar champion
Will Power drove the fastest lap in
the sixth round of qualifying at Toronto to take the 41st pole position
of his career. Power completed the
1.755-mile, 11-turn Exhibition Place

TRANSACTIONS

-16
-8
-7
-7
-7
-7
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-6
-5
-5
-5
-5
-4
-4
-4
-4
-4
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-3
-2
-1
-1
-1
-1
-1
E
E
E
+1
+1
+1
+1
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+2
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+3
+4
+4
+5
+5
+5
+5
+6
+7
+7
+7
+8
+8
+8
+9
+9
+9
+10
+13
+13
+13
+14

BASEBALL
Dodgers—Optioned infielder Ronald Torreyes
to Tulsa (TL); designated second baseman Darwin Barney for assignment; sent outfielder Scott
Van Slyke to Rancho Cucamonga (Cal) for a rehab assignment.
Arizona—Designated pitcher J.C. Ramirez for
assignment; called up pitcher Allen Webster from
Reno (PCL).
Atlanta—Assigned pitcher Yean Carlos Gil
outright to Carolina (Carolina).
Cleveland—Activated pitcher Scott Atchison
from the 15-day disabled list; optioned pitcher
C.C. Lee to Columbus (IL).
Detroit—Optioned pitcher Angel Nesbitt to Toledo (IL); activated pitcher Justin Verlander from
the 15-day disabled list.
Kansas City—Put pitcher Jason Vargas on the
15-day disabled list, retroactive to June 9; called
up pitcher Brandon Finnegan from Omaha (PCL).
Miami—Optioned pitchers Andre Rienzo, Kendry Flores and Adam Conley to New Orleans
(PCL); called up pitcher Steve Cishek from Jacksonville (SL) and second baseman Derek Dietrich from New Orleans; activated pitcher Mat Latos from the 15-day disabled list.
N.Y. Mets—Put pitcher Erik Goeddel on the
15-day disabled list; called up second baseman
Danny Muno from Las Vegas (PCL); claimed outfielder Kirk Nieuwenhuis off waivers from the Angels; transferred pitcher Jerry Blevins to the 60day disabled list
N.Y. Yankees—Assigned pitcher Esmil Rogers
outright to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL); optioned
pitcher Jacob Lindgren to Scranton/WilkesBarre; purchased the contract of pitcher Sergio
Santos from Trenton (EL); called up pitcher Jose
Ramirez from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre.
Oakland—Sent first baseman Ike Davis to
Nashville (PCL) for a rehab assignment.
Pittsburgh—Agreed to terms with pitchers
Bret Helton, Seth McGarry and Jonathan Brubaker on minor league contracts.
San Diego—Sent pitcher Cory Luebke to Lake
Elsinore (Cal) for a rehab assignment.
Seattle—Designated outfielder Rickie Weeks
for assignment; called up pitcher Danny Farquhar from Tacoma (PCL).
Tampa Bay—Optioned outfielder Mikie Mahtook to Durham (IL); called up catcher Curt Casali from Durham.
Toronto—Sent second baseman Steve Tolleson to Buffalo (IL) for a rehab assignment.
Washington—Sent pitcher Doug Fister to Harrisburg (EL) for a rehab assignment.
HOCKEY
Montreal—Signed defenseman Nathan
Beaulieu to a two-year contract.

COLLEGE
BASEBALL

NCAA COLLEGE WORLD SERIES
At Omaha
TD Ameritrade Park
All Times Pacific
Double Elimination
Saturday’s Results
Virginia 5, Arkansas 3
Virgnia ...............010 020 011—5 3 1
Arkansas ...........002 010 000—3 7 0
Jones, Sborz and Thaiss; Killian (3-5) and
Pennell. W— Sborz (5-2). HR: Virginia—McCarthy
(2). Arkansas—Benintendi (20).
Florida 15, Miami 3
Miami................101 001 011—3 11 3
Florida .............001 (11)00 30x—15 14 1
Suarez, D.Garcia (4), Beauprez (5), Mediavilla (6), Hammond (7), Briggi (7), B.Garcis (8) and
Collins; Shore, Young (6), Rhodes (8), Dunning
(9) and Rivera. W—Shore (10-6). L—Suarez
(9-2).
Today’s Schedule
TCU (51-13) vs. LSU (53-10), noon
Cal St. Fullerton (39-23) vs. Vanderbilt (4719), 5 p.m.
Monday’s Schedule
Arkansas (40-24) vs. Miami (49-16), noon
Virginia (40-22) vs. Florida (47-19), 5 p.m.

NASCAR STOCK CARS
XFINITY Series
Great Clips 250
At Brooklyn, Mich.
Michigan International Speedway
Track: Two-mile oval
1. Kyle Busch, Toyota, 125 laps, 137.1 rating,
0 points, $52,773. 2. Chase Elliott, Chevrolet,
125, 109, 43, $41,458. 3. Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 125, 104, 0, $26,229. 4. Chris Buescher,
Ford, 125, 117.7, 41, $31,031. 5. Elliott Sadler,
Ford, 125, 91.4, 39, $27,396. 6. Kevin Harvick,
Chevrolet, 125, 114.6, 0, $19,450. 7. Joey Logano, Ford, 125, 129.3, 0, $28,607. 8. Aric Almirola, Ford, 125, 89.9, 0, $19,040. 9. Brian Scott,
Chevrolet, 125, 106.6, 36, $25,518. 10. Denny
Hamlin, Toyota, 125, 96.9, 0, $19,490.
11. Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 125, 94.5, 33,
$24,362. 12. Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 125,
81.6, 32, $24,185. 13. Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 125,
85.9, 31, $23,932. 14. Alex Bowman, Chevrolet,
125, 80, 0, $17,805. 15. Darrell Wallace Jr.,
Ford, 125, 86.6, 29, $25,779. 16. Dakoda Armstrong, Ford, 125, 71.1, 28, $23,552. 17. Ryan
Sieg, Chevrolet, 125, 72.9, 27, $23,501. 18.
Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 125, 93.8, 0, $17,701.
19. Ryan Reed, Ford, 124, 65, 25, $23,400. 20.
Daniel Suarez, Toyota, 124, 72.1, 24, $23,850.
Average speed of winner: 132.567 mph.
Time of race: 1 hour, 53 minutes, 9 seconds.
Margin of victory: 0.477 seconds. Caution flags:
8 for 26 laps. Lead changes: 13 among 7 drivers.
Top 10 in points: 1. Buescher, 489; 2. Dillon,
464; 3. Elliott, 454; 4. Smith, 434; 5. D.Wallace
Jr., 428; 6. Sadler, 414; 7. Scott, 394; 8. Reed,
378; 9. Gaughan, 378; 10. Suarez, 369.

CYCLING

Power

Oregon’s Jenna Prandini won
the 100 meters and took second to
Kentucky’s Dezerea Bryant in the
200 at Eugene, Ore., leading the
Ducks to their first NCAA women’s
track and field title in 30 years. USC
was seventh with 34 points. Among
the Trojans’ top finishers were
Dior Hall (third, 100 hurdles), Ky
Westbrook (fourth, 100) and the
400 relay (third), 800 relay (second) and 1,600 relay (second).

AUTO RACING

$3.5-MILLION WOMEN’S PGA CHAMPIONSHIP
At Harrison, N.Y.—Par 73
Westchester Country Club—6,670 yards
54-Hole Scores
Inbee Park.....................71-68-66—205 -14
Sei Young Kim................70-68-69—207 -12
Suzann Pettersen............74-66-71—211 -8
Brooke Henderson ..........67-73-71—211 -8
Karrie Webb...................68-71-72—211 -8
Morgan Pressel...............73-70-69—212 -7
Shanshan Feng ..............73-72-68—213 -6
Brittany Lincicome ..........70-74-69—213 -6
Hyo Joo Kim...................70-74-69—213 -6
Sakura Yokomine ............74-71-69—214 -5
Anna Nordqvist ..............71-73-70—214 -5
Julieta Granada ..............72-71-71—214 -5
Lexi Thompson ...............70-72-72—214 -5
Stacy Lewis ...................70-71-73—214 -5
So Yeon Ryu ..................72-72-71—215 -4
Gerina Piller...................72-70-73—215 -4
Cristie Kerr ....................70-72-73—215 -4
Q Baek .........................74-71-71—216 -3
Chella Choi....................70-74-72—216 -3
Karine Icher ...................69-75-72—216 -3
Candie Kung ..................70-72-74—216 -3
Mika Miyazato ................74-71-72—217 -2
Catriona Matthew ...........73-72-72—217 -2
Wei-Ling Hsu..................74-71-72—217 -2
Mirim Lee......................72-72-73—217 -2
Jane Rah.......................70-74-73—217 -2
Charley Hull ...................68-74-75—217 -2
Jenny Shin.....................66-75-76—217 -2
Ha Na Jang....................72-73-73—218 -1
Lizette Salas ..................74-71-73—218 -1
Mo Martin .....................72-71-75—218 -1
Jennifer Song .................70-73-75—218 -1
Azahara Munoz...............70-73-75—218 -1
Paula Creamer ...............71-76-72—219 E
Minjee Lee ....................72-74-73—219 E
Na Yeon Choi .................76-70-73—219 E
Mi Jung Hur ...................71-74-74—219 E
Sandra Gal ....................70-74-75—219 E
Dori Carter.....................72-72-75—219 E
Hee Kyung Seo ..............74-73-73—220 +1
Moriya Jutanugarn...........68-78-74—220 +1
Laura Davies..................72-74-74—220 +1
Jane Park ......................72-74-74—220 +1
Haru Nomura .................73-73-74—220 +1
Mi Hyang Lee .................73-72-75—220 +1
Sydnee Michaels ............71-74-75—220 +1
Thidapa Suwannapura .....72-75-74—221 +2
Alena Sharp...................72-74-75—221 +2
Amy Yang ......................73-73-75—221 +2
Brittany Lang..................71-75-75—221 +2
Jenny Suh......................73-73-75—221 +2
Jee Young Lee ................75-70-76—221 +2
Angela Stanford..............73-72-76—221 +2
Kelly Tan .......................74-73-75—222 +3
Min Lee ........................70-77-75—222 +3
Kelly Shon.....................71-76-75—222 +3
Sadena Parks.................74-73-75—222 +3
Felicity Johnson ..............73-74-75—222 +3
Michelle Wie..................75-72-75—222 +3
Joanna Klatten ...............70-74-78—222 +3
Meena Lee ....................72-75-76—223 +4
Mina Harigae .................71-75-77—223 +4
Becky Morgan ................72-73-78—223 +4
Kris Tamulis ...................71-72-80—223 +4
Amy Anderson................74-73-77—224 +5
Perrine Delacour.............71-76-77—224 +5
Gwladys Nocera..............71-75-78—224 +5
Marina Alex ...................72-72-80—224 +5
Caroline Hedwall.............71-71-82—224 +5
Juli Inkster.....................73-73-79—225 +6
P.K. Kongkraphan............74-73-79—226 +7
Alison Lee .....................72-74-80—226 +7
Lee-Anne Pace ...............73-72-81—226 +7
CHAMPIONS TOUR
$2.7-MILLION SENIOR PLAYERS
CHAMPIONSHIP
At Belmont, Mass.—Par 71
Belmont Country Club—6,812 yards
54-Hole Scores
Bernhard Langer.............65-65-67—197
Russ Cochran.................69-65-71—205
Scott Verplank................69-71-66—206
Colin Montgomerie..........68-71-67—206
Jeff Hart ........................70-69-67—206
Guy Boros .....................67-70-69—206
Billy Andrade .................70-71-66—207
Esteban Toledo...............69-71-67—207
Olin Browne ...................69-70-68—207
Mark Brooks ..................72-67-68—207
Joe Durant.....................70-68-69—207
Kirk Triplett ....................70-68-69—207
Steve Pate .....................73-63-71—207
Lee Janzen ....................67-69-71—207
Marco Dawson ...............69-69-70—208
Gene Sauers..................68-71-69—208
Kevin Sutherland ............71-66-71—208
Jesper Parnevik ..............70-66-72—208
Mark Calcavecchia ..........69-72-68—209
Paul Goydos ..................73-67-69—209
Scott Dunlap..................73-66-70—209
Kenny Perry ...................70-69-70—209
Loren Roberts ................69-69-71—209
Jeff Coston ....................72-72-66—210
Rocco Mediate ...............67-74-69—210
Willie Wood ...................71-70-69—210
Rick Gibson ...................70-70-70—210
Tom Lehman ..................72-68-70—210
Michael Allen .................73-66-71—210
Jeff Maggert...................71-68-71—210
Woody Austin .................71-67-72—210
John Riegger ..................74-69-68—211
Steve Jones ...................72-74-66—212
Grant Waite ...................72-71-69—212
Jeff Sluman ...................73-69-70—212
Bart Bryant....................72-70-70—212
Mark Mouland................71-71-70—212
Wes Short, Jr..................74-69-70—213
Jerry Smith ....................73-69-71—213
Joey Sindelar .................72-70-71—213
Mike Reid......................71-72-71—214
Brian Henninger..............71-72-71—214
Brad Bryant ...................73-70-71—214
David Frost ....................70-73-71—214
Barry Lane ....................75-73-67—215
Tom Byrum ....................72-75-68—215
Tom Pernice Jr. ...............70-75-70—215
Scott Hoch ....................70-74-71—215
Roger Chapman..............72-71-72—215
Brad Faxon ....................74-64-77—215
Corey Pavin....................75-72-69—216
Mark McNulty.................78-70-68—216
Duffy Waldorf .................75-72-69—216
Hale Irwin......................72-74-70—216
Jim Carter......................74-71-71—216
Rod Spittle ....................73-71-72—216
Gary Hallberg.................71-70-75—216
Fred Funk......................74-74-69—217
Chien Soon Lu ...............72-72-73—217
Larry Mize .....................76-72-70—218
Mark Wiebe ...................75-72-71—218
Jay Don Blake ................72-71-75—218
John Cook .....................78-65-75—218
Mike Goodes .................72-72-75—219
Bob Gilder.....................73-76-71—220
Jose Coceres..................77-71-72—220
Dan Forsman .................75-72-73—220
Sandy Lyle.....................76-75-70—221
Hal Sutton.....................73-75-73—221
Joe Daley ......................72-74-75—221
John Inman....................73-79-70—222
Skip Kendall ..................78-72-72—222
Jim Rutledge..................78-70-74—222
John Huston...................73-78-72—223
Bobby Wadkins ..............79-74-73—226
Wayne Levi ....................73-76-77—226
Bob Tway.......................77-71-78—226
Steve Lowery..................78-78-71—227

street circuit in 59.4280 seconds,
finishing with just five seconds left
in the 10-minute final segment of
knockout qualifications.

the vacant IBF junior-lightweight
title with a unanimous decision
over Andrey Klimov (19-2). . . .
Nicholas Walters (26-0) outpointed Miguel Marriaga (20-1) in a
WBA featherweight fight at New
York. Walters still was stripped of
his title because he did not make
the 126-pound weight limit Friday.

CRITERIUM DU DAUPHINE
At Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc, France
Seventh Stage
A 96.3-mile mountain stage from
Montmelian to Saint-Gervais Mont Blanc
1. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky, 4 hours, 24 minutes, 17 seconds. 2. Tejay Van Garderen, U.S.,
BMC Racing, 17 seconds behind. 3. Louis
Meintjes, South Africa, MTN-Qhubeka, :41. 4.
Benet Intxausti, Spain, Movistar, same time. 5.
Joaquim Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, :54. 6.
Romain Bardet, France, AG2R La Mondiale,
1:08. 7. Alexis Vuillermoz, France, AG2R La Mondiale, 1:15. 8. Andrew Talansky, U.S., Cannondale-Garmin, 1:25. 9. Rui Costa, Portugal,
Lampre Merida, 1:34. 10. Daniel Navarro, Spain,
Cofidis, 1:45.
Others included: 11. Simon Yates, Britain, Orica GreenEdge, 1:47. 17. Alejandro Valverde,
Spain, Movistar, 2:03. 24. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy,
Astana, 3:58.
STANDINGS (after seven stages)—1. Van Garderen, 26:59:27. 2. Froome, :18 behind. 3. Intxausti, :45. 4. Costa, 1:10. 5. Yates, 1:29. 6. Valverde, 1:40. 7. Bardet, 1:45. 8. Daniel Martin,
Ireland, Cannondale-Garmin, 2:29. 9. Talansky,
2:39. 10. Joaquim Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha,
2:46.
Others included: 11. Nibali, 3:05.
TOUR DE SUISSE
At Risch-Rotkreuz, Switzerland
First Stage
A 3.2-mile individual time trial
1. Tom Dumoulin, Netherlands, Giant-Alpecin,
5 minutes, 41 seconds. 2. Fabian Cancellara,
Switzerland, Leopard-Trek, 2 seconds behind. 3.
Matthias Braendle, Austria, IAM Cycling, :04. 4.
Peter Sagan, Slovakia, Tinkoff-Saxo, :05. 5.
Steve Morabito, Switzerland, FDJ, same time. 6.
Greg Van Avermaet, Belgium, BMC Racing, st. 7.
Cameron Meyer, Australia, Orica-GreenEdge,
:06. 8. Jon Izaguirre, Spain, Movistar, same time.
9. Adriano Malori, Italy, Movistar, st. 10. Geraint
Thomas, Britain, Sky, :07.
Others included: 20. Benjamin King, U.S.,
Cannondale-Garmin, :10. 52. Danny Pate, U.S.,
Sky, :17.

INDYCARS
Honda Indy Toronto
At Toronto
Toronto Street Circuit, 1.755 miles
After Saturday’s qualifying; today’s lineup
(All cars Dallara chassis)
1. Will Power, Chevrolet, 106.314 mph. 2. Simon Pagenaud, Chevrolet, 105.99. 3. Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 105.964. 4. Scott Dixon,
Chevrolet, 105.497. 5. Sebastien Bourdais,
Chevrolet, 105.474. 6. Luca Filippi, Chevrolet,
104.896. 7. Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet,
105.486. 8. Takuma Sato, Honda, 105.388. 9.
Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 105.142. 10. Graham
Rahal, Honda, 105.083. 11. Josef Newgarden,
Chevrolet, 105.068. 12. James Jakes, Honda,
104.503.
13. Carlos Munoz, Honda, 104.112. 14. Jack
Hawksworth, Honda, 102.804. 15. Charlie Kimball, Chevrolet, 103.82. 16. Ryan Hunter-Reay,
Honda, 102.572. 17. Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 103.586. 18. Marco Andretti, Honda,
101.919. 19. Conor Daly, Honda, 103.144. 20.
Stefano Coletti, Chevrolet, 101.25. 21. Tristan
Vautier, Honda, 102.721. 22. Gabby Chaves,
Honda, 101.247. 23. Rodolfo Gonzalez, Honda,
97.175.
DRAG RACING
National Hot Rod Assn.
New England Nationals
At Epping, N.H.
New England Dragway and Motorsports Park
After Saturday’s qualifying; today’s
final eliminations pairings
TOP FUEL—1. Tony Schumacher, 3.742 seconds, 324.28 mph vs. 16. Morgan Lucas,
10.229, 302.48; 2. Richie Crampton, 3.744,
325.92 vs. 15. Dan Mercier, 4.376, 295.21; 3.
Shawn Langdon, 3.745, 324.98 vs. 14. Terry
McMillen, 4.056, 305.70; 4. Steve Torrence,
3.765, 323.04 vs. 13. Dave Connolly, 3.870,
309.84; 5. Spencer Massey, 3.773,7.66 vs. 12.
Leah Pritchett, 3.861, 315.05; 6. Antron Brown,
3.784, 320.74 vs. 11. Larry Dixon, 3.824,
321.88; 7. Doug Kalitta, 3.795, 323.12 vs. 10.
Brittany Force, 3.819, 320.89; 8. J.R. Todd,
3.813, 322.27 vs. 9. Clay Millican, 3.817,
318.17.
FUNNY CAR—1. Tommy Johnson Jr., Dodge
Charger, 4.047, 319.45 vs. 16. Bob Tasca III,
Ford Mustang, 4.650, 219.90; 2. Cruz Pedregon,
Toyota Camry, 4.052, 308.14 vs. 15. Jeff Diehl,
Toyota Solara, 4.632, 237.55; 3. John Force,
Chevy Camaro, 4.055, 318.24 vs. 14. Dave Richards, Solara, 4.624, 195.17; 4. Courtney Force,
Camaro, 4.059, 319.45 vs. 13. Dom Lagana, Solara, 4.240, 301.87; 5. Robert Hight, Chevrolet
Camaro, 4.068, 320.13 vs. 12. Tony Pedregon,
Camry, 4.187, 288.15; 6. Matt Hagan, Charger,
4.070, 318.24 vs. 11. Jack Beckman, Charger,
4.145, 308.50; 7. Del Worsham, Camry, 4.073,
313.66 vs. 10. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.095,
310.20; 8. Alexis DeJoria, Camry, 4.075, 309.42
vs. 9. Ron Capps, Charger, 4.081, 315.42.
PRO STOCK—1. Chris McGaha, Chevy Camaro,
6.520, 212.90, bye; 2. Greg Anderson, Camaro,
6.521, 213.30 vs. 15. Val Smeland, Chevy Cobalt, broke; 3. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.530,
212.83 vs. 14. Alan Prusiensky, Dodge Avenger,
6.673, 209.62; 4. Erica Enders, Camaro, 6.543,
212.66 vs. 13. V. Gaines, Dodge Dart, 6.643,
211.00; 5. Vincent Nobile, Camaro, 6.552,
212.39 vs. 12. John Gaydosh Jr, Pontiac GXP,
6.641, 209.82; 6. Jonathan Gray, Camaro,
6.553, 212.09 vs. 11. Kenny Delco, Camaro,
6.602, 210.01; 7. Shane Gray, Camaro, 6.562,
211.63 vs. 10. Drew Skillman, Camaro, 6.590,
211.10; 8. Allen Johnson, Dart, 6.563, 212.26
vs. 9. Larry Morgan, Camaro, 6.569, 212.69.

PRO FOOTBALL

ARENA LEAGUE
Saturday’s Results
KISS at San Jose
Orlando 45, Philadelphia 42

Returning to NASCAR’s Xfinity
Series for the first time since his accident at Daytona left him with a
broken leg and foot, Kyle Busch
won at Michigan International
Speedway for his 71st career victory
on the circuit. Busch won the 250mile, 125-lap race in his No. 54 Toyota by 0.477 seconds over Chase
Elliott at Brooklyn, Mich.
Top-seeded Rafael Nadal beat
fourth-seeded Gael Monfils, 6-3,
6-4, to reach the final of the Mercedes Cup, a grass-court tournament
at Stuttgart, Germany. Nadal will
next play eighth-seeded Viktor
Troicki, who beat second-seeded
Marin Cilic, 6-3, 6-7 (1), 7-6 (2). . . .
Belinda Bencic defeated Jelena
Jankovic, 6-3, 6-3, in the semifinals
of the grass-court Topshelf Open
at ’s-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.
Bencic next faces fifth-seeded Camila Giorgi. In men’s play, secondseeded David Goffin will face qualifier Nicolas Mahut in the final.

TRACK AND FIELD

NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS
At Eugene, Ore.
(All race distances in meters)
Finals
Women
100—1. Jenna Prandini, Oregon, 10.96. 2.
Morolake Akinosun, Texas, 10.97. 3. Dezerea
Bryant, Kentucky, 11.01. 4. Ky Westbrook, USC,
11.11. 5. Aaliyah Brown, Texas A&M, 11.14. 6.
Aleia Hobbs, LSU, 11.16. 7. Keilah Tyson, Kentucky, 11.21. 8. Jennifer Madu, Texas A&M,
11.45.
200—1. Dezerea Bryant, Kentucky, 22.18. 2.
Jenna Prandini, Oregon, 22.21. 3. Kamaria
Brown, Texas A&M, 22.24. 4. Kyra Jefferson,
Florida, 22.24. 5. Morolake Akinosun, Texas,
22.52. 6. Aaliyah Brown, Texas A&M, 22.76. 7.
Cierra White, Texas Tech, 22.94. 8. Jada Martin,
LSU, 22.97.
400—1. Kala Funderburk, Florida St., 51.67.
2. Kendall Baisden, Texas, 51.74. 3. Daye Shon
Roberson, Oklahoma, 51.74. 4. Taylor Ellis-Watson, Arkansas, 52.01. 5. Shakima Wimbley, Miami, 52.08. 6. Margaret Bamgbose, Notre
Dame, 52.13. 7. Ashley Spencer, Texas, 52.65.
8. Kiara Porter, VCU, 52.67.
800—1. Raevyn Rogers, Oregon, 1:59.71. 2.
Claudia Saunders, Stanford, 2:00.63. 3. Hanna
Green, Virginia Tech, 2:01.17. 4. Chrishuna Williams, Arkansas, 2:01.67. 5. Alethia Marrero, Indiana St., 2:03.86. 6. Natoya Goule, Clemson,
2:05.19. 7. Claudia Francis, Florida, 2:07.72. 8.
Savannah Camacho, Oklahoma St., 2:09.07.
1500—1. Rhianwedd Price, Mississippi St.,
4:09.56. 2. Shelby Houlihan, Arizona St.,
4:09.67. 3. Sara Sutherland, Colorado, 4:13.48.
4. Natalja Piliusina, Oklahoma St., 4:15.01. 5.
Raquel Lambdin, UC Davis, 4:15.28. 6. Stephanie Schappert, Villanova, 4:16.01. 7. Brook Handler, Michigan, 4:16.19. 8. Linden Hall, Florida
St., 4:16.58.
3000 STEEPLECHASE—1. Colleen Quigley,
Florida St., 9:29.32. 2. Courtney Frerichs, Missouri.Kansas City, 9:31.36. 3. Leah OConnor,
Michigan St., 9:33.38. 4. Marisa Howard, Boise
St., 9:37.84. 5. Erin Teschuk, North Dakota St.,
9:42.15. 6. Rachel Johnson, Baylor, 9:42.93. 7.
Elinor Purrier, New Hampshire, 9:53.69. 8. Maddie Van Beek, North Dakota St., 9:54.42.
5000—1. Emily Sisson, Providence, 15:34.10.
2. Dominique Scott, Arkansas, 15:40.47. 3. Jessica Tonn, Stanford, 15:41.72. 4. Kate Avery,
Iona, 15:41.95. 5. Erin Finn, Michigan,
15:43.97. 6. Calli Thackery, New Mexico,
15:47.15. 7. Shelby Houlihan, Arizona St.,
15:49.72. 8. Liv Westphal, Boston College,
15:52.17.
100 HURDLES—1. Kendra Harrison, Kentucky,
12.55. 2. Cindy Ofili, Michigan, 12.60. 3. Dior
Hall, USC, 12.74. 4. Jade Barber, Notre Dame,
12.85. 5. Bridgette Owens, Florida, 12.86. 6.
Chanice Chase, LSU, 12.95. 7. DEvynne Charlton, Purdue, 13.00. 8. Daeshon Gordon, LSU,
13.29.
400 HURDLES—1. Shamier Little, Texas A&M,
53.74. 2. Kendra Harrison, Kentucky, 54.09. 3.
Leah Nugent, Kentucky, 55.82. 4. Sage Watson,
Florida St., 55.97. 5. Jade Miller, Harvard,
56.68. 6. Nnenya Hailey, Arizona, 56.98. 7.
Amalie Iuel, USC, 56.99. 7. Jaide Stepter, USC,
57.12.
4X100 RELAY—1. Florida, 42.95 seconds. 2.
Texas A&M, 43.08. 3. USC, 43.27. 4. Texas,
43.38. 5. LSU, 43.69. 6. Purdue, 44.55. 7. Mississippi, 44.64. Oregon, disqualified.
4X400 RELAY—1. Florida, 3:28.12. 2. USC,
3:29.97. 3. Florida St., 3:31.78. 4. Purdue,
3:31.98. 5. Miami, 3:33.90. 6. Arkansas,
3:34.27. 7. Texas A&M, 3:34.41. 8. Texas,
3:37.31.
HIGH JUMP—1. Jeannelle Scheper, South Carolina, 6 feet, 23⁄4inches. 2. Kimberly Williamson,
Kansas State, 6-23⁄4. 3. Leontia Kallenou, Georgia, 6-11⁄2. 4. Akela Jones, Kansas St., 6-11⁄2. 5.

The Kings’ top minor league affiliate, the Manchester Monarchs,
won their first Calder Cup, beating
the Utica Comets, 2-1, in Game 5 of
the American Hockey League’s title series at the Utica, N.Y.
In soccer, Argentina opened its
Copa America play with a 2-2 draw
with Paraguay at Rancagua, Chile.
Uruguay beat Jamaica, 1-0, in Antofagasta, Chile. . . . Brazil won its
second-straight penalty shootout,
beating Portugal, 3-1, to reach the
semifinals of the FIFA Under-20
World Cup at Hamilton, New Zealand. The Brazilians will play Mali,
which stunned Germany, 4-3, on
penalties, at Christchurch.
UCLA closer David Berg was
voted the stopper of the year by the
National Collegiate Baseball Writers Assn., becoming the first twotime recipient of the award. Berg
also won in 2013.
Charges have been dismissed
against the WNBA’s Glory Johnson in a domestic violence case involving her then-fiancee Brittney
Griner, Johnson’s attorney said.

Tatiana Gusin, Georgia, 6-1⁄2. 6. Claudia Garcia
Jou, Akron, 5-111⁄4. 7. Erika Hurd, Cincinnati, and
Marusa Cernjul, Nebraska, 5-111⁄4.
DISCUS—1.Shelbi Vaughan, Texas A&M,
201-5. 2. Kelsey Card, Wisconsin, 194-10. 3.
Emmonnie Henderson, Louisville, 191-5. 4. Tera
Novy, USC, 191-3. 5. Valarie Allman, Stanford,
184-11. 6. Alexis Cooks, Akron, 182-1. 7. Beckie
Famurewa, Kentucky, 181-9. 8. Alexandra
Collatz, USC, 181-8.
TRIPLE JUMP—1. Keturah Orji, Georgia,
46-51⁄4. 2. Marshay Ryan, Auburn, 44-43⁄4. 3. Simone Charley. Vanderbilt, 44-31⁄4. 4. Nadia Eke,
Columbia, 44-2. 5. Tori Franklin, Michigan St.,
43-103⁄4. 6. Nataliyah Frias, LSU, 43-81⁄2. 7. Allie
Saunders, Texas St., 43-53⁄4. 8. Daisy Ding, Rice,
43-3.
TEAM STANDINGS—1. Oregon 59 points. 2.
Kentucky 50. 3. Texas A&M 47. 4. Arkansas 43.
5. Georgia 41. 6. Florida St. 35. 7. USC 34. 8.
Florida 32. 9. Kansas St. and Texas 28.

PRO SOCCER

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
WEST
W L T
Pts GF GA
Seattle ...........9 4 2
29 23 11
Vancouver .......8 6 2
26 18 15
Sporting KC.....6 2 6
24 22 15
Portland .........6 5 4
22 15 14
FC Dallas........6 5 4
22 18 22
GALAXY ..........5 5 7
22 16 19
Houston .........5 5 5
20 21 19
San Jose ........5 5 4
19 14 15
Real Salt Lake .4 5 6
18 13 18
Colorado ........2 4 8
14 11 12
EAST
W L T
Pts GF GA
D.C. United .....8 4 4
28 20 15
New England ...6 4 6
24 22 20
Toronto FC ......6 5 1
19 19 16
Orlando City ....4 5 5
17 19 19
New York ........4 4 5
17 17 17
Columbus .......4 6 5
17 21 22
Philadelphia....4 9 3
15 18 25
Montreal.........4 5 2
14 14 18
Chicago..........4 8 2
14 17 22
NY City FC.......3 7 5
14 15 19
Three points for a win, one for a tie.
Saturday’s Results
GALAXY 1 Columbus 1
New York City FC 3, Montreal 1
New England 2, Chicago 0
Seattle 3, FC Dallas 0
Today’s Schedule
D.C. United at Orlando City, 4 p.m.
Summary
Galaxy 1, Crew 1
Galazy............................................1 0—1
Columbus .......................................0 1—1
FIRST HALF—1. GALAXY, Lletget 1, 14th minute.
SECOND HALF—2. Columbus, Higuain 4 (Finlay), 66th.
GOALIES—GALAXY, Jaime Penedo; Columbus,
Steve Clark.
Yellow cards—Gonzalez, GALAXY, 71st; Rogers,
GALAXY, 87th.
Referee—Robert Sibiga. Assistant Referees—
Greg Barkey. Brian Dunn. 4th official—Jorge Gonzalez.
Lineups
GALAXY—Jaime Penedo, Leonardo, Omar
Gonzalez, Dan Gargan, Baggio Husidic, Sebastian Lletget (Alan Gordon, 84th), Stefan Ishizaki,
Robbie Rogers, Mika Vayrynen (Kenney Walker,
81st), Juninho, Jose Villarreal (Gyasi Zardes,
60th).
Columbus—Steve Clark, Waylon Francis, Michael Parkhurst, Emanuel Pogatetz, Tony Tchani,
Mohammed Saeid, Justin Meram, Hector Jimenez, Federico Higuain (Ben Speas, 90th+), Ethan
Finlay (Aaron Schoenfeld, 84th), Kei Kamara.

TENNIS
$921,000 TOPSHELF OPEN
At Den Bosch, Netherlands
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
MEN’S SINGLES (semifinals)—Nicolas Mahut,
France, d. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 5-7, 6-3,
6-4; David Goffin (2), Belgium, d. Gilles Muller,
Luxembourg, 7-6 (4), 6-4.
WOMEN’S SINGLES (semifinals)—Belinda
Bencic (4), Switzerland, d. Jelena Jankovic (2),
Serbia, 6-3, 6-3; Camila Giorgi (5), Italy, d. Kiki
Bertens, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-4.
MEN’S DOUBLES (final)—Ivo Karlovic, Croatia-Lukasz Kubot, Poland, d. Pierre-Hugues Herbert-Nicolas Mahut, France, 6-2, 7-6 (9).
WOMEN’S DOUBLES (final)—Asia Muhammad, and Laura Siegemund, Germany, d. Jelena
Jankovic, Serbia-Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (3),
Russia, 6-3, 7-5.
$713,300 MERCEDES CUP
At Stuttgart, Germany
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
SINGLES (semifinals)—Rafael Nadal (1),
Spain, d. Gael Monf ils (4), France, 6-3, 6-4;
Viktor Troicki (8), Serbia, d. Marin Cilic (2), Croatia, 6-3, 6-7 (1), 7-6 (2).
DOUBLES (semifinals)—Rohan Bopanna, India-Florin Mergea (4), Romania, d. Marcin Matkowski, Poland-Nenad Zimonjic (2), Serbia, 6-3,
6-7 (6), 10-7.

THE ODDS

Baseball

National League
Favorite
at San Diego -115
at New York -120
at Miami
-130
at Pittsburgh -125
Washington
-160
at S. Francisco -150
at St. Louis
-140
at Chicago
-175
American League
Favorite
Oakland
-115
Cleveland
-130
Chicago
-140
at Baltimore -115
at Boston
-130
at Houston
-130
at Texas
-115

Underdog
DODGERS
Atlanta
Colorado
Philadelphia
at Milwaukee
Arizona
Kansas City
Cincinnati

+105
+110
+120
+115
+150
+140
+130
+165

Underdog
at ANGELS
at Detroit
at Tampa Bay
New York
Toronto
Seattle
Minnesota

+105
+120
+130
+105
+120
+120
+105

NBA Finals
Favorite
Line (O/U/)
Underdog
at Golden State 81⁄2 (1951⁄2.)
Cleveland
Copyright 2015 World Features Syndicate, Inc.

MINOR LEAGUE
BASEBALL
PACIFIC COAST LEAGUE
Saturday’s Results
New Orleans 5, Omaha 4, 13 innings
Round Rock 5, Memphis 4
Albuquerque 6, Tacoma 3
Oklahoma City 6, Nashville 4
Colorado Springs 4, Iowa 1
Salt Lake 8, Fresno 7
El Paso 8, Sacramento 7
Las Vegas 10, Reno 5
CALIFORNIA LEAGUE
Saturday’s Results
Lancaster 13, Lake Elsinore 7
Inland Empire 5, Visalia 1
High Desert 8, San Jose 6
Rancho Cucamonga 5, Stockton 1
Modesto at Bakersfield

SANTA ANITA RESULTS
Copyright 2015 by Equibase Co. 30th day of 39-day meet.
6254 FIRST RACE. 1 mile. Allowance optional claiming.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price
$20,000. Purse $58,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
4 Big Book
Bejarano
7.60 3.40 3.20
1 Wonderful Lie
Talamo
2.80 2.60
5 Winninginfashion Solis
4.80
8 Also Ran: Thermodynamics, Warren’s Tricia R..
8 Time: 23.11, 45.86, 1.10.41, 1.23.54, 1.36.96. Cloudy &
Fast. Trainer: Tim Yakteen. Owner: George Krikorian.
8 Scratched: Kana Flavor.
8 Exotics: $1 Exacta (4-1) paid $8.00, $1 Superfecta (4-15-6) paid $108.00, $1 Trifecta (4-1-5) paid $78.40.
6255 SECOND RACE. 6 furlongs. Maiden claiming.
3-year-olds and up. Claiming price $20,000. Purse
$19,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
8 Distinctive B
Gonzalez
7.00 3.40 2.80
4 Soul Crusher
Baze
3.40 2.80
7 Artic Warrior
Pena
3.80
8 Also Ran: Cyber Star, Dothraki, Coach John, Dee For Dave,
Broke The Mold.
8 Time: 22.13, 45.13, 56.84, 1.08.82. Cloudy & Fast. Trainer:
James M. Cassidy. Owner: Cassidy, James M. and Kieron and
DeLahunt, Mary.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (4-8) paid $35.20, $1 Exacta
(8-4) paid $11.90, $1 Superfecta (8-4-7-2) paid $456.80, $1
Trifecta (8-4-7) paid $44.70.
6256 THIRD RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Claiming.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$25,000-$22,500. Purse $32,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
3 Majestic Minister Bejarno
4.40 2.80 2.40
6 Frandontjudge
Gonzalez
5.60 3.60
1 Salsita
Valdez
3.40

8 Also Ran: Prettyhotprincess, Moscato Girl, Nazareth, Hugh
Knew.
8 Time: 21.81, 44.36, 1.08.84, 1.15.09. Cloudy & Firm. Trainer: Mike Puype. Owner: Joseph Lacombe Stable, Inc..
8 Scratched: Chilada.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (8-3) paid $25.40, $1 Exacta
(3-6) paid $14.20, $1 Superfecta (3-6-1-8) paid $309.20, $1
Trifecta (3-6-1) paid $52.30, $1 Pick Three (4-8-3) paid
$49.30.
6257 FOURTH RACE. 5 furlongs. Maiden special weight.
2-year-olds. Purse $56,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
8 Ralis
Gutierrz
4.60 2.60 2.20
1 Hot Ore
Baze
2.80 2.20
2 Carlos Dangerous Quinonz
3.00
8 Also Ran: Bully Pulpit, Cherokee Dynasty, Ward ’n Jerry,
Phantom Heat, Aragorn Flyer.
8 Time: 22.31, 45.84, 57.69. Cloudy & Fast. Trainer: Doug F.
O’Neill. Owner: Reddam Racing LLC.
8 Scratched: Castle.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (3-8) paid $11.80, $1 Exacta (8-1)
paid $5.80, $1 Superfecta (8-1-2-9) paid $160.80, $1 Trifecta (8-1-2) paid $21.00, $1 Pick Three (8-3-8) paid $29.10.
6258 FIFTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Shoemaker Mile.
3-year-olds and up. Purse $400,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
2 Talco (FR)
Bejarno
28.40 6.00 5.20
3 Midnight Storm Baze
3.00 3.40
4 Seek Again
Lezcano
5.40
8 Also Ran: Winning Prize (ARG), Bal A Bali (BRZ).
8 Time: 22.93, 46.53, 1.10.17, 1.22.38, 1.35.00. Cloudy &
Firm. Trainer: John W. Sadler. Owner: Hronis Racing LLC.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (8-2) paid $46.00, $1 Exacta
(2-3) paid $36.80, $1 Trifecta (2-3-4) paid $136.60, $1 Pick
Three (3-8-2) paid $72.80, 50-Cent Pick Four (8-2/3-4/8-2)
4 correct paid $151.25, 50-Cent Pick Five (4-8-2/3-4/8-2) 5
correct paid $1,039.60.

6259 SIXTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Claiming. 3-year-olds
and up. Claiming price $8,000. Purse $17,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 My Slew
Perez
6.20 4.00 2.80
8 Dekko
Pereira
10.60 5.80
9 Coolington
Talamo
3.00
8 Also Ran: Frensham, Relentless Heat, Warren’s Rail Bird, Sir
Barclay, Outthink’em, Como Mi Padre.
8 Time: 21.62, 44.44, 1.09.29, 1.15.69. Cloudy & Fast. Trainer: Mark Glatt. Owner: Drummond, Lee, McGoldrick, Brian and
Riso, Joe.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (2-7) paid $109.60, $1 Exacta
(7-8) paid $26.90, $1 Superfecta (7-8-9-6) paid $391.30,
$1 Trifecta (7-8-9) paid $127.90, $1 Pick Three (8-2-7) paid
$88.50.
6260 SEVENTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Allowance
optional claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price
$40,000. Purse $58,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
5 Fueled/Bourbon Baze
27.40 14.20 9.20
10 Tosheen
Pedrza
30.00 16.40
8 Brave Act
Bejarno
5.80
8 Also Ran: Labour (ARG), Somethings Unusual, Incline Village, Unusual Taste, Bam Bam (BRZ), Louden’s Gray, Eddie’s
First.
8 Time: 22.40, 45.49, 1.08.43, 1.14.50. Cloudy & Firm.
Trainer: Dan Blacker. Owner: Bourbon Lane Stable.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (7-5) paid $95.40, $1 Exacta (510) paid $480.80, $1 Superfecta (5-10-8-7) paid
$18,187.10, $1 Trifecta (5-10-8) paid $3,520.60, $1 Pick
Three (2-7-5) paid $622.90.
6261 EIGHTH RACE. 11⁄16 mile. Adoration Stakes. Fillies
and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $100,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
4 Beholder
Stevens
2.40 2.10 2.10

5 Warren’s Veneda Baze
2.40 2.10
1 My Monet
Nicolas
3.20
8 Also Ran: Wild In The Saddle, Grandiose Tactics, Oscar
Party.
8 Time: 23.51, 47.04, 1.10.86, 1.35.27, 1.41.67. Cloudy &
Fast. Trainer: Richard E. Mandella. Owner: Spendthrift Farm
LLC.
8 Scratched: Cast In Silver.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (5-4) paid $41.00, $1 Exacta
(4-5) paid $2.00, $1 Superfecta (4-5-1-6) paid $17.90, $1
Trifecta (4-5-1) paid $9.10, $1 Pick Three (7-5-4) paid
$85.70.
6262 NINTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Maiden
special weight. Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up.
Purse $56,000.
P# Horse
Jockey
Win Place Show
7 Big Move
Bejarno
3.00 2.40 2.10
9 Ticaboo
Pedrza
14.20 7.00
1 Unusual Storm Prat
4.00
8 Also Ran: Lily Kai, Take It Easyplease, Dixie Tweet, Golden
Mamba, Avo, Express Checkout, Warren’s Tea Party.
8 Time: 22.23, 45.34, 1.08.75, 1.14.96. Cloudy & Firm.
Trainer: Tim Yakteen. Owner: George Krikorian.
8 Scratched: none.
8 Exotics: $2 Daily Double (4-7) paid $4.40, $1 Exacta (7-9)
paid $27.60, $1 Superfecta (7-9-1-3) paid $535.70, $1 Super High Five (7-9-1-3-6) 18 tickets paid $2,199.20, $1 Trifecta (7-9-1) paid $119.40, $1 Pick Three (5-4-7) paid
$43.20, 50-Cent Pick Four (7-5-4-7) 6671 tickets with 4 correct paid $79.55, $2 Pick Six (4/8-2-7-5-4-7) 1409 tickets
with 5 out of 6 paid $74.40, $2 Pick Six (4/8-2-7-5-4-7) 31
tickets with 6 correct paid $9,819.60.
ATTENDANCE/MUTUEL HANDLE
On-Track Attendance-10,542. Mutuel handle-$1,721,423
Inter-Track Attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$2,689,971
Out of State Attendance-N/A. Mutuel handle-$7,168,500
Total Attendance-10,542. Mutuel handle-$11,579,894

SANTA ANITA ENTRIES
31st day of a 39-day thoroughbred meet.
6263 FIRST RACE (12:30 p.m.) 61⁄2 furlongs. Maiden
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$40,000-$35,000. Purse $27,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6137 Bandido Too,2
R Bejarano,118
8-5
6090 Visibility,4
T Pereira,124
3-1
6031 Best Two Minutes,1 T Baze,118
7-2
6187 Zarqa Star,5
D Van Dyke,118
7-2
5554 Warren My Boy,6
F Prat,118
6-1
6137 Saxon Lord,3
M Pedroza,118
15-1
6264 SECOND RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Claiming.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$40,000-$35,000. Purse $40,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(6126) Dissension,2
R Bejarano,122
2-1
6126 Pearl De Vere,6
J Talamo,122
3-1
(6081) Vanlose Stairway,1
Mn Garcia,124
3-1
6126 Two Step Flor,3
K Desormeaux,122 5-1
6126 More Stormyweather,4 F Perez,120
6-1
(5571) Pica,5
T Baze,122
6-1
6265 THIRD RACE. 1 mile. Claiming. Fillies and mares.
3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices $12,500-$10,500.
Purse $16,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6122 Wild Caroline,4
T Baze,124
8-5
6143 I Heart You,6
K Desormeaux,118
2-1

6202
6054
6122
6224

Flyin For A Livin,5
Amina Perfect,3
Lady Comic,1
Lady Dash,2

A Gryder,124
B Pena,X115
M Gutierrez,124
F Valdez,118

5-2
6-1
12-1
15-1

6266 FOURTH RACE. 1 mile. Maiden special weight.
3-year-olds and up. State bred. Purse $56,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6038 Fight Thru,4
F Perez,118
9-5
6192 Seedsandstemsagain,7 T Pereira,124
5-2
6103 Jens De Ville,3
F Prat,118
9-2
....
Cowboy,2
M Gutierrez,118
5-1
6157 Silver Spirit,5
A Solis,124
5-1
6157 Bold Papa,6
Mn Garcia,118
8-1
6078 Royal Rebel,1
G Nicolas,118
20-1
6267 FIFTH RACE. 1 mile turf. Claiming. 3-year-olds and
up. Claiming prices $32,000-$28,000. Purse $35,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(6144) Jomelo,1
R Bejarano,119
3-1
6099 Sinfully,6
F Prat,120
4-1
6109 Los Bambinos,7
M Pedroza,120
9-2
(6059) Fast Track,5
J Verenzuela,124
5-1
6144 Empty Headed,9
T Baze,120
6-1
5566 Huntsville,10
F Perez,118
8-1
6109 Press Baron (GB),8 F Valdez,120
8-1
6059 This One’s For Mel,4 E Maldonado,120
15-1
6072 Aotearoa,2
Mn Garcia,120
20-1
6059 Ahasuerus,3
B Blanc,120
30-1
Also eligible

6144

Buymeabond,11

C Nakatani,120

10-1

6268 SIXTH RACE. 61⁄2 furlongs. Allowance optional
claiming. Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up.
Claiming price $40,000. Purse $58,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6113 Ben’s Duchess,1
J Talamo,116
3-1
(5365) Black Betsy,11
Mn Garcia,116
7-2
6158 Dr. Fager’s Gal,10
M Pedroza,116
6-1
....
French Press,4
M Smith,122
6-1
6027 Lotta Attitude,3
D Flores,124
8-1
6150 Meinertzhageni,6
F Perez,124
8-1
(4033) My Fiona,2
R Bejarano,118
8-1
6115 D’ya Knowwhatimean,8 T Baze,122
12-1
2226 Rosies Ready,9
F Prat,122
15-1
6150 Shakeitupbetty,7
D Van Dyke,124
20-1
6120 Unforgettable U,5
E Maldonado,122 30-1
6269 SEVENTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Allowance
optional claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming price
$62,500. Purse $60,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6156 Toledo Eddie,1
R Bejarano,124
5-2
(6130) Clever Royal,3
K Desormeaux,122
7-2
6128 Horse Laugh,6
D Van Dyke,122
4-1
(6101) Cautious Giant,4
T Baze,122
9-2
2045 Alpha Bullet,5
M Gutierrez,122
6-1
6128 Pepnic,7
J Talamo,124
6-1
6135 Head South,2
S Gonzalez,124
8-1

6270 EIGHTH RACE. 6 furlongs. Desert Stormer Stakes.
Fillies and mares. 3-year-olds and up. Purse $75,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
(5143) Sam’s Sister,8
R Bejarano,124
9-5
....
Tesalina (CHI),1
F Prat,124
3-1
6150 Harlington’s Rose,7
J Talamo,124
8-1
5543 Living The Life (IRE),4 M Smith,124
8-1
6027 Wasted At Midnight,5 Mn Garcia,121
8-1
....
Cast In Silver,3
F Perez,121
12-1
(5202) Mechaya,11
D Van Dyke,119
12-1
5248 Ramona’s Wildcat,10 A Solis,124
12-1
5006 Amaranth,2
I Antongeorgi,124 15-1
(6120) Big Break,9
F Valdez,119
20-1
(2063) Winning Vision,6
T Baze,121
20-1
6271 NINTH RACE. About 61⁄2 furlongs turf. Maiden
claiming. 3-year-olds and up. Claiming prices
$50,000-$40,000. Purse $31,000.
PR
Horse (PP)
Jockey,Wt
Odds
6164 Nakamoto,6
M Pedroza,118
5-2
6031 Currency Exchange,3 R Bejarano,118
3-1
6164 True Image,9
F Prat,118
4-1
6171 Restrike,2
D Van Dyke,116
6-1
5491 Relative Time,5
K Desormeaux,124 8-1
6103 Pyrotechnics,7
J Talamo,122
12-1
6103 Village Kitten,1
I Puglisi,122
12-1
6147 Black Tie,4
E Maldonado,122 15-1
....
Da Fastest One,8
B Pena,X111
15-1
6137 Love On The Road,10 S Gonzalez,118
20-1

D8

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

S

L AT I M E S. C O M /S P O RT S

WOMEN’S WORLD CUP

On familiar turf

U.S. forward Leroux expects an emotional time playing Tuesday in hometown of Vancouver, Canada

By Kevin Baxter
VANCOUVER, Canada
— Ray Chadwick hasn’t spoken to his daughter for a
year. Her choice, he says, not
his.
But this week he plans to
make the 31⁄2-hour drive
from his home in south-central British Columbia to
Vancouver to be near her
just the same. So when forward Sydney Leroux takes
the soccer field for the
United States on Tuesday in
the final game of group play
in the women’s World Cup,
she may not know her father
is there, but his voice will
among those cheering her
the loudest.
“Of course I wouldn’t
miss it,” he said.
A former pitcher with the
Angels, Chadwick was absent through much of Leroux’s childhood, so the two
were never close. But they
were never as distant as they
have been over the last year.
“I don’t talk to him,” Leroux said coldly. She didn’t
say why, nor will Chadwick.
“She doesn’t want to talk
about it, so I won’t talk about
it,” he said. “I’m not going to
put it out there in the media.”
Yet, Leroux, 25, wouldn’t
be playing for the U.S. national team if not for her father, and not just because of
the obvious physical gifts he
gave her. Leroux’s mother,
Sandi, also deserves credit
for that since she, too, was a
talented
athlete,
good
enough to play third base for
Canada’s national softball
team.
She was also the more
supportive parent, working
odd hours so she could attend her daughter’s baseball
— Sydney, who once
dreamed of being the first female major league player,
played in boys’ leagues from
the age of 5 — and soccer
games.
But Chadwick gave his
daughter something her
mother couldn’t — dual nationality, making her eligible
to play for the U.S. national
team.

Jewel Samad Agence France-Presse/Getty Images

SYDNEY LEROUX , a native of Canada and a forward on the U.S. women’s soccer team, says, “It’s a crazy

story for me to come home, for me to play in front of my family, my friends in an American jersey.”
Chadwick, who grew up
in North Carolina, was
pitching for a minor league
team in Vancouver when he
met Sandi at a Canadian
Football League game. The
two dated for a while, but
shortly after Leroux discovered she was pregnant,
Chadwick went off to pitch in
winter ball. By the time Sydney was born in suburban
Vancouver the next spring,
her parents had separated.
As a result, Leroux grew
up Canadian, even playing
for that country in the U-19
World Cup at 14, making her
the youngest player in the
tournament. Her dream,
however, was to play for the
U.S., a team she had been enamored with since watching
it win the 1999 World Cup in
front of 90,000 in the Rose
Bowl.
So she told her mother
she would play in the U.S. or
not play at all.
“I believe in myself. And I

wanted to put myself in a position where I could become
better and I could play on
the best team in the world,
which I still think is the
United States,” she said.
At 15, Leroux left home

GROUP D

U.S. female athletes are treated differently

STANDINGS
Times PDT

GROUP A
Pts GF GA

COUNTRY

W

L

T

COUNTRY

W

L

T

Canada

1

0

1

4

1

0

United States

1

0

1

4

3

1

China

1

1

0

3

1

1

Australia

1

1

0

3

3

3

Netherlands

1

1

0

3

1

1

Sweden

0

0

2

2

3

3

New Zealand

0

1

1

1

0

1

Nigeria

0

1

1

1

3

5

Pts GF GA

June 6
Canada 1, China 0
Netherlands 1, New Zealand 0

Monday’s results
United States 3, Australia 1
Nigeria 3, Sweden 3

Thursday’s results
China 1, Netherlands 0
Canada 0, New Zealand 0

Friday’s results
United States 0, Sweden 0
Australia 2, Nigeria 0

Monday at Winnipeg
China vs. New Zealand, 4:30 p.m.

Tuesday at Edmonton
Australia vs. Sweden, 5 p.m.

Monday at Montreal
Canada vs. Netherlands, 4:30 p.m.

Tuesday at Vancouver
United States vs. Nigeria, 5 p.m.

GROUP B

GROUP E
Pts GF GA

COUNTRY

W

L

T

COUNTRY

W

L

T

Germany

1

0

1

4

11

1

Brazil

2

0

0

6

3

0

Norway

1

0

1

4

5

1

Costa Rica

0

0

2

2

3

3

Pts GF GA

Thailand

1

1

0

3

3

6

Spain

0

1

1

1

1

2

Ivory Coast

0

2

0

0

2

13

South Korea

0

1

1

1

2

4

June 7
Norway 4, Thailand 0
Germany 10, Ivory Coast 0

Tuesday’s results
Spain 1, Costa Rica 1
Brazil 2, South Korea 0

Thursday at Ottawa
Germany 1, Norway 1
Thailand 3, Ivory Coast 2

Saturday’s results
Brazil 1, Spain 0
Costa Rica 2, South Korea 2

Monday at Winnipeg
Thailand vs. Germany, 1 p.m.

Wednesday at Ottawa
South Korea vs. Spain, 4 p.m.

Monday at Moncton
Ivory Coast vs. Norway, 1 p.m.

Wednesday at Moncton
Costa Rica vs. Brazil, 4 p.m.

GROUP C

GROUP F
Pts GF GA

COUNTRY

W

L

T

COUNTRY

W

L

T

Japan

2

0

0

6

3

1

Colombia

1

0

1

4

3

Switzerland

1

1

0

3

10

2

England

1

1

0

3

2

2

Cameroon

1

1

0

3

7

2

France

1

1

0

3

1

2

Pts GF GA

Ecuador

0

2

0

0

1

16

Mexico

0

1

1

1

2

3

Monday’s results
Cameroon 6, Ecuador 0
Japan 1, Switzerland 0

Tuesday’s results
France 1, England 0
Colombia 1, Mexico 1

Friday’s results
Switzerland 10, Ecuador 1
Japan 2, Cameroon 1

Saturday’s results
Colombia 2, France 0
England 2, Mexico 1

Tuesday at Edmonton
Switzerland vs. Cameroon, 2 p.m.

Wednesday at Ottawa
Mexico vs. France, 1 p.m.

Tuesday at Winnipeg
Ecuador vs. Japan, 2 p.m.

Wednesday at Montreal
England vs. Colombia, 1 p.m.

1

LEADERS
GOALS
Mittag, Germany ..................... 4
Enganamouit, Cameroon ........... 3
Sasic, Germany ....................... 3
Humm, Switzerland .................. 3
Bachmann, Switzerland............. 3
Srimanee, Thailand .................. 2
Simon, Australia ...................... 2
Rapinoe, United States ............. 2
Herlovsen, Norway.................... 2

ronto.
After being booed by the
sellout crowd when she
came off the bench, Leroux
scored in stoppage time to
close out a 3-0 win. She celebrated by flashing the U.S.
crest on her blue-and-white
jersey to the crowd, then lifting an index finger to her lips
to shush the spectators.
“Syd revels in having
something to prove. That’s
when you get your very best
from Syd,” said U.S. Coach
Jill Ellis, who also recruited
Leroux to UCLA. “Her personality, it’s a kind of bringit-on personality.”
The
demonstration
earned her a yellow card, but
it also showed that if the
U.S.-Canada rivalry needed
a villain, Leroux would be
happy to accept the role.
“It makes it fun, it makes
it exciting,” she said.
Tuesday’s game will
mark Leroux’s second trip
home to Vancouver with the
U.S. national team, but this
visit is all business. Although the U.S. leads its
group standings going into
the game with Nigeria, Leroux is one of a number of
U.S. players who haven’t
played well in the tournament.
They’ll all need to get better if Leroux hopes to make
it back to her hometown for
the World Cup final in three
weeks.
“It’s different for me because I’m going to be putting
on a U.S. jersey in my home
country,” said Leroux, who
has 35 goals in 73 games for
the U.S. “That’s going to be
emotional. It’s a crazy story
for me to come home, for me
to play in front of my family,
my friends in an American
jersey.
“There’s nothing like it.”
Up in the stands, Chadwick promises he’ll be
watching, and smiling, regardless of how the game
ends.
“I watch from afar and I
know that she’s successful
and happy,” Chadwick said.
“And as a father, that’s all
you want.”

SHOTS ON GOAL
Enganamouit, Cameroon .......... 8
Sasic, Germany ....................... 6
Popp, Germany........................ 6
Humm, Switzerland .................. 5
Mittag, Germany ...................... 5
Tang, China............................. 5
Bachmann, Switzerland............. 5
Sinclair, Canada ...................... 4
Hegerberg, Norway ................... 4

SAVES
Berruz, Ecuador ..................... 13
Diaz, Costa Rica..................... 11
Thiamale, Ivory Coast................ 9
Hjelmseth, Norway ................... 9
Bardsley, England..................... 9
Santiago, Mexico ..................... 9
Nayler, New Zealand ................. 8
Boonsing, Thailand................... 8
Van Veenedaal, Netherlands....... 8

Angels Baseball

FORMER ANGELS pitcher Ray Chadwick and

daughter Sydney Leroux are estranged.

[Plaschke, from D1]
“We live in such a patriarchal sports culture, it
continually diminishes the
talents and accomplishments of women while highlighting their objectification,”
said Dan Lebowitz, executive
director of the Center for the
Study of Sport in Society at
Northeastern University.
“You look at the Women’s
World Cup, it’s there at the
forefront once again.”
It started before the
tournament started, when
FIFA, soccer’s loathsome
governing body, decided for
the first time to allow a World
Cup to be played on artificial
turf. The six Canadian host
cities made the request
because of the difficulty in
growing the proper grass in
their climate. FIFA agreed
even though, for soccer
games in the summer, such
turf is hot, slippery and dangerous.
Several high-profile players sued FIFA over the decision based on gender equity
— the men have never played
on artificial turf — but that
suit was dropped. Still, the
effects have already been
seen in games played on
fields as hot as 120 degrees.
There have been numerous
slips and muscle cramping
among players struggling
after nearly two hours of
running on what is essentially concrete.
“The players won’t say it,
but I will: The field situation
is terrible, it’s crazy,” said
Foudy, a television analyst
and former national team
co-captain. “FIFA calls themselves guardians of the game,
but there’s no way the guardian of the game for both men
and women would hold a
World Cup on turf.”
The foolishness continued
when the tournament began
with Hope Solo in goal for the
U.S. team despite the uncovering of documents indicating she was the aggressor in
an alleged domestic violence
incident last spring. Although the case had been
dropped for procedural
reasons, police records,
depositions and interviews
obtained by ESPN’s “Outside

for the U.S., living first with a
host family in Seattle, where
things didn’t work out, and
then with six others in Arizona, where she excelled in soccer.
By the time she entered

the Lines” allege Solo
slammed her teenage nephew’s head into the floor during the altercation.
Unlike players involved in
recent domestic violence
cases in the NFL, Solo was
not punished for the incident,
and U.S. Soccer President
Sunil Gulati shamefully
acknowledged Saturday the
federation never fully investigated it.
If this were a men’s sport,
the appropriateness of Solo
playing under these circumstances would have been
loudly questioned until public pressure forced her from
the team. But sadly, women
are still viewed differently,
more like a cute sideshow

college, Leroux, then 18, was
being invited to play for a
U.S. age-group team. But
first she would need permission from FIFA to switch allegiances, and once she received it, there would be no
going back.
Leroux
didn’t
think
twice, pulling on the U.S. jersey, then scoring a tournament-high five goals to lead
the team to the U-20 World
Cup title.
“I don’t regret anything,”
she said. “My life would be
completely different. So I
haven’t really thought of
that. I’m just very happy to
be where I am today. Because it has been a journey.”
At UCLA, she tied the
school’s season record with
23 goals as a sophomore.
And by her senior year, she
was playing for the senior
national team, which didn’t
go over so well back home
when she returned for a notso-friendly friendly in To-

Smith later apologized on
Twitter, but the notion of
these players as AYSO
Barbies remains strong in the
minds even among those who
should know better.
“That is a prominent
example of the framework
through which most people
look at female sports,” said
Lebowitz. “The play in this
Women’s World Cup rivals
anything you will see anywhere in sports — the speed
of the game, the incredible
athleticism of the game, yet
it’s obscured by the idiocy of
some of the ideas [about]
female athletes.”
America’s Title IX-inspired female athletes are the
greatest in the world, and

‘The play in this Women’s World Cup
rivals anything you will see anywhere in
sports ... yet it’s obscured by the idiocy of
some of the ideas [about] female athletes.’
— Dan Lebowitz, executive director of the Center for the

Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University

than a group of serious athletes whose representation of
the U.S. is vital and whose
national impact is real.
A low point took place on
the Women’s World Cup’s
home TV network, Fox, when
Solo’s troubles were showered with nauseating indifference.
“Save it for Judge Judy,”
Eric Wynalda, a former U.S.
men’s star, said during a
televised discussion. “I don’t
really need to know what is
going on the outside of the
field right now.”
Save it for Judge Judy?
Can you imagine if someone
said that about Ray Rice?
Then the tournament
began and, of course, somebody with a giant microphone just had to make a
sexist remark. This time it
was ESPN’s Stephen A.
Smith, who commented on
German players turning their
heads away from the ball
during a brilliant free-kick
goal by Norway, saying,
“They might not have wanted
to mess their hair.”

should be held to the highest
standard. Yet even now, in
the tournament’s televised
discussions and written
accounts, there are few hard
criticisms of a group that has
a scary win against 10thranked Australia and a
dispirited tie against fifthranked Sweden.
There has been very little
questioning about the benching of veteran Abby Wambach, who is third in career
World Cup goals. Yet remember the outrage last summer
when the U.S. men’s team cut
veteran Landon Donovan?
Several U.S. players have
clearly underachieved, particularly the front line and
midfielders — except for
irrepressible Megan Rapinoe
— yet many concerns are
muted or couched.
Sometimes the difference
on television can be found in
what the Fox announcers
don’t say. In the 64th minute
against Sweden on Friday,
Carli Lloyd collided heads so
hard with Sweden’s Jessica
Samuelsson that Lloyd was

[email protected]

sprawled out in pain while
Samuelson was briefly taken
from the field for treatment
of a huge gash on her head.
Both players finished the
game, and not once did anyone mention the idea they
should have been pulled out
to undergo a concussion
examination.
If this were a men’s sport
— remember Stephen Curry
against Memphis early in the
NBA playoffs? — there would
have been outrage.
Michael Messner, professor of sociology and gender
studies at USC and coauthor
of a recently released study of
how TV news media covers
women’s sports, said his
research shows women are
constantly discussed in
softer tones.
“The excitement level we
see in the coverage of women’s sports is mostly bland,”
he said. “Women athletes are
framed in safe sorts of ways,
as mothers, girls next door,
girlfriends, categories we can
be comfortable with.”
There’s at least one area
in which this dynamic is
thankfully changing, that
being Twitter, where Foudy
said the increased public
questioning is welcome after
years in which, after a bad
game, she would get angry
that nobody seemed to care
enough to rip.
“While the criticism is
obviously not to the level of
the men’s game, it’s still
light-years ahead of when I
played,” said Foudy. “It’s a
sign of respect that we are
talking about what the U.S
should do to get better, poking holes in our strategy.
That’s a good thing.”
One step forward, one
step back into the manhole.
At the end of Friday’s telecast, Fox showed a Women’s
World Cup promo featuring
fans in a bar — apparently
watching women’s soccer on
television. The most distinct
fan is a bald guy raising his
right fist in triumph.
The guy is proudly wearing a U.S. national team
souvenir: a Cobi Jones jersey.
[email protected]
Twitter: @billplaschke

L AT I M ES . C O M / S P O RT S

SS

Reactions vary to
Sundhage’s words

Brazil
wins,
1-0, over
Spain

match with Colombia last
week after referee Therese
Neguel of Cameroon waved
off a late goal by Charlyn
Corral that video replays
showed should have counted.
Neguel, officiating her
first World Cup game, relied
on the first use of goal-line
technology in a women’s
World Cup to award Mexico’s
goal in that same game.
“I got the impression that
we have a group of referees
that are not familiar with the
level of the competition, with
the scenario, with the type of
game that they are going to
face,” Mexican Coach Leonardo Cuellar said. “On one
play, they changed three
times their decision. It was always on the edge.”
Coaches were told before
the tournament to be tolerant of referees’ mistakes. But
Cuellar said there is a noticeable difference in the quality
of officiating for his team’s
games and games played by
Germany or Canada, whose
second match drew highly respected referee Bibiana
Steinhaus, the first female to
call men’s professional games
in Germany.
“They’re not petrified or
wondering what they’re going to call,” said Cuellar,
whose team is unlikely to advance after losing to England
on Saturday. “I might get reprimanded for my comments,
but teams work very hard to
qualify and teams work very
hard to be prepared and they
want to be on even ground.”

By Kevin Baxter

associated press

Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

COLOMBIA’S SANDRA SEPULVEDA stops the ball during a Group F match

against France, which lost despite outshooting Colombia, 21-3.

Underdog surprises
third-ranked France
COLOMBIA 2
FRANCE 0
associated press

Lady Andrade and Catalina Usme scored goals as Colombia stunned third-ranked
France, 2-0, on Saturday in
one of the biggest upsets in
Women’s World Cup history.
The underdog Colombians opened the scoring in the
19th minute. Andrade broke
free from a pair of defenders
for a tap-in goal.
Usme clinched her country’s first World Cup win with

a goal on the counterattack in
the 93rd minute.
“We’ve proved that we’re
not just here to make up the
numbers. We knew that we’d
have to play intelligently and
fight for every ball. My players
are real battlers,” Colombia
Coach Fabian Taborda said
of his 28th-ranked team.
The French lost despite
outshooting Colombia, 21-3,
in Moncton, Canada. Much of
that was thanks to the play of
Colombian goalkeeper Sandra Sepulveda, who made a
number of sprawling saves
that increasingly frustrated
the French attack.

“There were numerous aspects that weren’t quite right
[Saturday]. We weren’t accurate enough with our passes
at key moments. Despite
that, we still created chances,
but their goalkeeper had a
great match,” France Coach
Philippe Bergeroo said.
France was unlucky as
well. Colombian defender
Daniela Montoya appeared to
touch the ball with her hand
inside the penalty area in the
67th minute, but a foul wasn’t
called.
Colombia will face England on Wednesday in Montreal.

Kirby gets England started in victory
ENGLAND 2, MEXICO 1
associated press

Fran Kirby and Karen
Carney scored in the second
half, and England beat Mexico, 2-1, Saturday at the Women’s World Cup in Moncton,

Canada.
The English moved into a
tie with France for second in
Group F with three points
and a game to go. Colombia
is the surprise leader of the
group after a 2-0 upset of
France.
The 21-year-old Kirby got
the first goal of the World

Cup for England when she
used a toe poke to beat Cecilia Santiago in the 71st minute. Carney scored on a
header in the 82nd minute.
Fabiola Ibarra scored in
stoppage time for Mexico.
Mexico, last in its group,
plays France on Wednesday
in Ottawa.

VANCOUVER, Canada —
Former U.S. Coach Pia
Sundhage had some rough
words for some of her former
players before her current
team, Sweden, played her former one to scoreless draw in a
World Cup match Friday.
But much of that appeared to be forgotten by the
time the game ended in a
scoreless draw, with Sundhage and U.S. Coach Jill Ellis
wrapping one another in a
warm hug on the sidelines.
“Pia’s got extraordinary
character and I love hanging
out with her,” said Ellis,
Sundhage’s assistant during
her days with the U.S. national team. “We’ll be friends
for a long, long time.”
One person who wasn’t
smiling, though, was midfielder Carli Lloyd. Sundhage said Lloyd, who twice
scored the winning goal in an
Olympic final, would wilt on
the field if she felt the coaches
had lost faith in her.
“I’m not hurt or bothered
by what anyone says. But I
was a bit more confused,” she
told reporters after Friday’s
game. “I’ve done nothing but
respect Pia until the day she
left. In 2008 she showed faith
in me and I helped her win. In
2012 she had no faith in me
and I still helped her win.”
Lloyd was benched for the
opening game of the 2012 London Olympics, but started
the next five, scoring twice in
the final.
“I don’t change my game
plan for any coach,” Lloyd
continued. “Whether the
coach likes me or not, I still
bring 100%.”

Fox draws record
audience

Fox’s coverage of the U.S.Sweden game on Friday averaged 4.5 million views, the
largest U.S. television audience ever for a group-stage
match and the fourth-largest
for any women’s World Cup
game.
The network said Saturday that the only women’s
World Cup matches to draw
larger audiences were the
1999 and 2011 finals and a 1999
semifinal.

Judgment call
Several teams have complained about inconsistent
officiating in this World Cup.
And much of that probably
stems from FIFA’s attempt at
inclusion, which has meant
using referees from countries
where the women’s game is
still developing.
Mexico, for example, had
to settle for a draw in its first

[email protected]

Chicago
can win
the Cup
at home
Monday
[Stanley Cup, from D1]
In the fifth consecutive
Cup Final game decided by
one goal, the Blackhawks’
defense was formidable, led
by the tireless Niklas Hjalmarsson and his game-high
seven blocks. And their
support players came
through again, with Vermette recording the winning
goal for the second time in
the Final and third time in
this playoff run.
“Whether we’re one win
away or 15 wins away, you
come in with that belief and
you know what your team is
capable of,” Toews said. “If
anything, you don’t want to
underachieve. You want to
get the most out of each
other and find a way to
come together as a group
and give yourself a chance
to be here. I think that’s
what everyone in this room
wants.”
The Blackhawks can win
the Cup at home for the first
time since 1938, when they
completed a best-of-five
series against the Toronto
Maple Leafs at the old Chicago Stadium. They won at
Detroit in 1961, at Philadelphia in 2010 and at Boston in
2013. A seventh game, if
necessary, would be played
Wednesday in Tampa.
This is when their experience will come into play,
where the core group of
what is the closest thing to a
dynasty the NHL has seen
in the salary-cap era must
take charge. The Lightning
came back from a 3-2 deficit
in the first round, against
Detroit, and Coach Jon
Cooper remains confident
that his team can do that
again.
“People can’t sit here and
say, ‘Well, the inexperienced
Lightning.’ I think we’re the
gamer Lightning,” he said.
“These guys have gamed
out these playoffs, and I
expect nothing less in Game

After long
delay,
L.A. plays
to a draw
GALAXY 1
COLUMBUS 1
associated press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Federico Higuain scored the
equalizer in the 66th minute,
and the Columbus Crew salvaged a 1-1 draw with the
Galaxy after a lightning
storm delayed the start of
the match for two hours and
10 minutes Saturday night.
Ethan Finlay hurdled
Galaxy defender Leonardo
to get to Tony Tchani’s entry
pass along the right side and
cut it diagonally back to Higuain for the finish.
Despite lightning being
spotted in the area just moments before kickoff, the
Crew (4-6-5) attracted the
season’s first sellout crowd
at the expanded-capacity
(21,051) Mapfre Stadium.
Sebastian Lletget, in his
first MLS start, scored in the
14th minute for the Galaxy
(5-5-7).
He allowed Robbie Rogers’ pass to go through his
legs and beat Crew goalkeeper Steve Clark with a
left-footed shot just inside
the near post.
Columbus had the momentum and chances in
the final minutes but failed
to capitalize, extending
its winless streak to six
games.

Mike Carlson Getty Images

TAMPA BAY’S Ryan Callahan, right, is part of a big pileup in front of the Chicago net in the third period.

STANLEY CUP
FINAL
Chicago vs. Tampa Bay
Blackhawks lead series, 3-2
Gm 1 Chicago 2, at Tampa Bay 1
Gm 2 at Tampa Bay 4, Chicago 3
Gm 3 Tampa Bay 3, at Chicago 2
Gm 4 at Chicago 2, Tampa Bay 1
Gm 5 Chicago 2, at Tampa Bay 1
Gm 6 Monday at Chicago, 5
Gm 7 Wed. at Tampa Bay, 5*
Times PDT
TV: Channel 4

Mike Carlson Getty Images

COREY Crawford makes

a save against the Lightning’s J.T. Brown during
the second period.

6 in Chicago.”
Less than a minute after
Lightning forward Nikita
Kucherov suffered an undisclosed injury when he
tripped over Crawford and
collided with the post in the
first period, Chicago capitalized on a misplay by
Tampa Bay goalie Ben

* if necessary

Bishop. The puck had been
dumped into Tampa Bay’s
zone and defenseman Victor
Hedman was preparing to
play it, but Bishop came out
of his net and to the left
faceoff circle, where he
collided with Hedman. Both
went down, leaving an
empty net for Patrick Sharp
to score at 6:11, his first goal
in 14 games.
Bishop, who missed
Game 4 because of an undisclosed injury, was slow to get
up but stayed in the game.
Bishop made 27 saves, to 30
by Crawford.
“I was just trying to force
the play, skate as fast as I

can up the ice and apply
some pressure,” Sharp said.
Tampa Bay pulled even
at 10:53 of the second period,
on a fine setup from Jason
Garrison to Valtteri Filppula, who scored from a tough
angle. But Vermette was a
difference-maker again and
Crawford stopped 15 shots
in the third period to send
the Blackhawks back home
with a chance to claim the
Cup Monday.
It’s so close they can
taste it, but they’re experienced enough not to start
counting Champagne bubbles yet.
“You go through the ups
and downs every playoff
run. It didn’t start off the
way I wanted but I was able
to stay with it,” said Crawford, who was benched for
three games in the first
round against Nashville.
“It’s been great up to this
point. With a chance to go
back to our building, I think
everyone’s pretty excited
about it. But we can’t get
ahead of ourselves. There’s
a lot of work to do here and
it’s going to be an even harder battle.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @helenenothelen

Blackhawks 2, Lightning 1
Chicago ...................................1
Tampa Bay ...............................0

0
1

1 — 2
0 — 1

FIRST PERIOD: 1. Chi., Sharp 5 (Teravainen,
Toews), 6:11. Penalties—None.
SECOND PERIOD: 2. Tam., Filppula 4 (Garrison, Stralman), 10:53. Penalties—Paquette, T.B.
(hooking), :47. Saad, Chi. (slashing), 11:25.
THIRD PERIOD: 3. Chi., Vermette 4 (Versteeg),
2:00. Penalty—T.B. bench, served by Drouin (too
many men), 19:51.
SHOTS ON GOAL: Chi. 14-8-7—29. T.B. 5-1215—32. Power-play conversions—Chi. 0 of 2. T.B.
0 of 1.
GOALIES: Chi., Crawford 12-6-0 (32 shots-31
saves). Tam., Bishop 13-10-0 (29-27).
Att—19,204 (19,204). T—2:32.

LICENSE TO DEAL

Financing as low as 1.99%*
Unlimited Factory Backed Warranty
Rigorous Vehicle Inspection
Carfax Vehicle Report
Roadside Assistance Program
7 Day/500 Mileage Exchange

2013 Mercedes-Benz

C250

23,988

$
(64774C/DR276114)

Mercedes-Benz of Encino
16721 Ventura Blvd., Encino | www.mbencino.com

800.677.3001

LAA3357014-1

Costa Rica 2, South Korea 2: Karla Villalobos came
off the bench to score in the
89th minute as Costa Rica
escaped with a 2-2 draw
against South Korea at
Montreal.
South Korea led, 2-1, after
a 25th-minute header by
Gaeul Jeon and appeared
poised to win its first game in
World Cup history.
However, Villalobos, who
entered as a substitute in the
76th minute, equalized in
the closing moments to earn
Costa Rica (0-0-2) a second
straight draw in Group E.
Melissa Herrera scored the
opening goal for Costa Rica.
So-Yun Ji scored for
South Korea (0-1-1) on a penalty kick in the 21st minute to
tie it.

D9

WOMEN’S WORLD CUP NOTES

WOMEN’S WORLD
CUP RESULTS

Andressa Alves scored in
the 44th minute as Brazil
earned a spot in the knockout stage with a 1-0 win over
Spain at the Women’s World
Cup at Montreal on Saturday.
The win is the eighth
straight in group stage play
for Brazil, which is unbeaten
in 14 group matches since a
loss to Germany in 1995.
Spain (0-1-1) controlled
the game for much of the
first half, but Brazil closed
the half with a flurry —
capped by Alves’ second-effort goal after her first shot
was cleared near the goal
line.
Irene Paredes nearly
equalized for Spain in stoppage time, but her shot off
Brazilian goalkeeper Luciana bounced off the near post.
Brazil (2-0) ends group
stage play against Costa
Rica on Wednesday, while
Spain faces South Korea.

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

*Financing as low as 1.99% for 36 months, 2.99% for 48-72 months on select Certified Pre-owned Mercedes-Benz. Financing based on approved
Tier 1 Credit, through MBFS. See dealer for details. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All advertised prices exclude government fees and taxes,
any finance charges, any dealer document preparation charge and any emission testing charge. Ad expires close of business date of publication.

D10

SUNDAY, JUNE 14, 2015

S

LOS ANGELES TIMES

TRUSTED NAME BRAND
55" Class 4K Ultra HD Smart TV
• Built-in Wi-Fi, 3 HDMI,
2 USB
• Quad-Core Processor
• 4k Upscaling - Upscale
Standard and HD
Content to Near 4K
Quality
Regular Price $997.99

#

$100

!."

55"

We Pay
the Sales
Tax*

CLASS

54.6" Actual Diagonal Screen Size

PROMO
CODE

SAVE
10%

..-

In-Store Only

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
Code No Rainchecks

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

10.1" Quad-Core
Touchscreen 2-in-1 PC

#

PROMO
CODE

+%!

-

Quad
Core

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
VTA1005XB
Code
#8379477

SAVE
42%

# ..-

SAVE
60%

In-Store and Online
Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8048974

SAVE
33%

-

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
H50-90C1000AUS
Code
#8296976

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

Regular Price $49.99
In-Store Price $34.99
Mail-In Rebate $30.00
PROMO
CODE
*Rebate Offer Does Not
Refund the Sales Tax Paid by
the Customer

In-Store & Online

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8126005

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

• CrystalTalk Dual-Mic
Noise Cancellation Technology
• A2DP Streaming Audio
• Up to 300ft Range

+'

PROMO
CODE

..-

SAVE
44%

In-Store and Online
Limit 2 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8048674

'%

SHIPS FREE

SAVE
61%

Limit 2 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#7535286

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

+(.

24"

#

$100
Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last #

Regular Price $214.99
In-Store Price $199.99

$10 PROMO
CODE
#
..-

+.

SAVE
66%

In-Store & Online

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
#8270746
Code

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

Ships Free with
$34 Order or More

$10
#
..-

*.

Ships Free with
34 Order or More

$

#

PROMO
CODE

SAVE
37%

In-Store Only
Limit 1 per Customer
† Rebates are Paid in the
form of Prepaid Debit Card.
While Supplies Last. No Rainchecks
#8231766
Promo Code

www.facebook.com/fryselectronics

SHOP ONLINE www.Frys.com

“Advertised prices valid only in metropolitan circulation area of newspaper in which this advertisement appears.
Prices and selection shown in this advertisement may not be available online at Fry’s website: www.Frys.com”
Actual memory capacity stated above may be less. Total
accessible memory capacity may vary depending on
operating environment and/or method of calculating units
Fry’s Electronics Card, American Express® Card, of memory (i.e., megabytes or gigabytes). Portions of
hard drives may be reserved for the recovery partition or
MasterCard, Visa Card, And Discover Card
used by pre-loaded software.
Accepted at All Fry’s Locations

SHIPS FREE

SAVE
43%

In-Store & Online

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8446978

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

Limit 3 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
#8379377
Code

$30

PROMO
CODE

'$...-

#

SHIPS FREE

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

SHIPS FREE

$26

#

PROMO
CODE

*$.

-

SAVE
13%

*After Sunday Promo

In-Store Only
Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
Code No Rainchecks
#8044234

www.frys.com/signmeup

SAVE
17%

STORE HOURS
S Mon-Fri 8-9, Sat 9-9, Sun 9-8
Prices Good Sunday, June 14, 2015 through Saturday, June 20, 2015.
Prices subject to change after Saturday, June 20, 2015.

ANAHEIM 3370 E. La Palma (714) 688-3000 • FAX (714) 688-3018
BURBANK 2311 N. Hollywood Way (818) 526-8100 • FAX (818) 526-8118
CITY OF INDUSTRY 13401 CROSSROADS PARKWAY-NORTH
(562) 463-2400 • FAX (562) 463-2418
FOUNTAIN VALLEY 10800 Kalama River Ave.
(714) 378-4400 • FAX (714) 378-4418
MANHATTAN BEACH 3600 Sepulveda Blvd.
(310) 364-FRYS (3797) • FAX (310) 364-3718
OXNARD 1901 E. Ventura Blvd. (805) 751-1300 • FAX (805) 751-0198
WOODLAND HILLS 6100 Canoga Ave. (818) 227-1000 • FAX (818) 227-1018

Limit Rights Reserved. Not Responsible for Typographical Errors.
Rebates Subject to Manufacturer’s Specifications. Designated trademarks
and brands are the property of their respective owners. Sales tax to be
calculated and paid on the in-store price for all rebate products.

In White
Color

PROMO
CODE

$...-

SAVE
22%

Each

In-Store & Online

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
#8461068/#8461138

*After Sunday Promo Code
www.frys.com/signmeup

• Detachable Hand Vac for
Floor-to-Ceiling Cleaning
Regular Price $399

In-Store and Online

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8080424

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

OXNARD STORE Mon-Fri 10-10, Sat 9-9, Sun 10-8

#

$10

Motion Sync Upright
Bagless Vacuum

• 3 Speed Fans with Oscillation
• 24-Hour Timer • Fully Adjustable
Thermostat with Remote Control
Regular Price $449.99
In-Store Price $399.99
In-Store and Online

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8068884

• Built-in 2MP HD Camera
• Equipped with the latest 6-axis flight
control systems, 3D lock, More
e force
scheduled flight, operating more to the
Regular Price $89.99 Each
Also
In-Store Price $79.99 Each
Available

PROMO
CODE

+%...-

In-Store and Online

SAVE
64%

X5SC Explores RC
Quadcopter

12,000 BTU
Portable AC, Heater,
Fan and Dehumidifier

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

Home of Fast, Friendly,
Knowledgeable Service

$50

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

• 3.6GHz Quad-Core
• 8MB Cache
• Integrated HD 4600 Graphics
Regular Price $309.99
Instant Savings $14.99

• 500GB Systems
• Wireless Controller

Regular Price $59.99
In-Store Price $29.99

In-Store & Online

Limit 2 per Customer
While Supplies Last
Code No Rainchecks

PROMO
CODE

..

No Rainchecks
#8472838

*After Sunday
www.frys.com/signmeup

Refurbished to Original
Factory Specifications

Refurbished to Original
Factory Specifications

Intell® Core
e™ i7
4790 Processor

PROMO
CODE

-

SAVE
40%

• 150-Sheet Front-Loading
tte
Cassett
• Wireless, Built-In Ethernet
Regular Price $279
In-Store Sale Price $199

In-Store and Online

SAVE
27%

*After Sunday Promo Code
www.frys.com/signmeup

• Explore Online with Confidence,
Protected by ESET’s
Award-Winning Technology

3 PCs/
1-Year Coverage

!...-

16:9 Aspect Ratio

-

'""

PROMO
CODE

imageCLASS LBP7110Cw
Color Laser Printer

24" Actual Diagonal Screen Size

PROMO
CODE

$111

#

$10

SHIPS FREE

500GB Console

• Detachable Bluetooth Camera Control
• Axis Universal Smartphone Cradle
• Gopro Mount Compatible

In Store and Online

$30

SHIPS FREE

*With Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

Regular Price $39.99

..-

SAVE
60%
*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

• Intel Core i7 3.9GHz
• Intel Iris Pro 5200 Graphics
• 2.5" HDD/SSD Supoport
Regular Price $599
Instant Savings $11
Mail-In Rebate $100

Selfie Snap With
Bluetooth+Tripod

Bluetooth Headset

PROMO
CODE

+..-

In-Store & Online

Limit 2 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
RC70
Code
#7386304

BRIX i7-4770R
Barebone

$4

#

#

• Delivers Full-Range Sound • Programmable LED Lights
Regular Price $149.99
In-Store Price $99.99

PROMO
CODE

SHIPS FREE

In-Store and Online

NOD32 Antivirus 2015

• Manage your Data, whether you are
Splitting, Resizing, Converting or
Merging Volumes

#

*%%

PROMO
CODE

SHIPS FREE

Disk Director 12

$5

#

$34

• Includes Full Size SD Adapter
• Transfer Speeds of Up to 48MB/s
Perfect for Capturing Full HD Videos
Regular Price $24.99
Instant Savings $7

*With Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

SHIPS FREE

#

$30

• 1920x1080 Resolution
• 1,000:1 Contrast Ratio
• 5ms Response Time
Regular Price $149
In-Store Sale Price $139

• 4GB DDR3 Memory
• 1TB Hard Drive

PULSE, WIRELESS
SPEAKER
WITH LED LIGHT SHOW

• Tower Speakers Deliever
Incredibly Accurate Sound
• Black Ash Finish Fits any
High-End Audio, Video System
• Up to 250 Wattts RMS Power
Regular Price $499
In-Store Price $229

24" Widescreen
LED Monitor

32GB

PROMO
CODE

&,))-

SAVE
33%
*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

In-Store Only

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks
Code
#8466498

SHIPS FREE

Regular Price $24.99

Ships Free with
$34 Order or More

PROMO
CODE

Desktop PC with Intel®
Pentium® J2900 Processor

In-Store and Online

• For 12V Systems
• Includes Windshield Mounts
• Charges on Sunny and Cloudy Days!

$15

21.5" ACTUAL DIAGONAL SCREEN

Regular Price $369
In-Store Sale Price $278

2W Solar Battery
Maintainer

$5

".

*After Sunday Promo
www.frys.com/signmeup

SHIPS FREE

.

• Full HD 1080p Resolution
• 5ms Response Time
• HDMI, VGA (PC Input)
Regular Price $119
In-Store Price $99

$20
#
-

6.5" TOWER SPEAKER

CLASS

Touchscreen

• 2GB Memory
• 32GB SSD
• One Year Free Subscription
Offfice 365
• Windows 8.1
Regular Price $258
In-Store Sale Price $198

$50

22"

22" CLASS
LED HD TV

$269

+'(

#

SHIPS FREE

PROMO
CODE

-

In-Store and Online

SAVE
67%

Limit 1 per Customer
While Supplies Last
No Rainchecks

#8060044/#8323127/
#8445848

*After Sunday Promo Code
www.frys.com/signmeup

SPECIAL FINANCING!

Fry’s Credit offers three separate financing programs depending
on the item being purchased. The terms of the program are one
of the following: 365 days, 730 days or 1095 days.
NO INTEREST if paid in full within 365 or 730 or 1095 days ††
Monthly payments required. Interest will be charged to your Account from the date
of purchase if Promotional Plan balance is not paid in full within 365 or 730 or 1095
days according to the specific term that matches the promotional item purchased or if
minimum monthly payments are not made by Due Date. Making the minimum monthly
payment may not pay off your promotional purchase in time to avoid interest charges.
††Valid on select items only. Financing Info: Subject to credit approval on the Fry’s Credit
Account by First Electronic Bank. Min. Interest Charge = $2.00. Review your cardholder
agreement, call 1-866-322-8008, or visit www.fryscredit.com for more info. Deferred
Interest Info: Variable Standard APR = Prime Rate+23.74% (as of 05/01/15 it is 26.99%).
Variable Penalty APR = Prime Rate+26.74% (as of 05/01/15 it is 29.99%). (NC0515)
LAT/OCR/VEN_[DayOfWeek]_1DAY_000000

CALENDAR

E

S U N D A Y , J U N E 1 4 , 2 0 1 5 :: L A T I M E S . C O M / C A L E N D A R

A teen
comedy,
but with
a twist
‘Dope,’ set in Inglewood,
tells a story about black
culture that doesn’t fall
into the usual categories.
By Lorraine Ali
Drug dealers or dorks? Hiphop or punk rock? Harvard or
the ’hood?
There’s no need to chose
sides in “Dope,” a comedydrama that takes pleasure in redefining what it means to be
young, black and growing up in
a tough part of town.
Set in present-day Inglewood, nerdy high school senior
Malcolm (Shameik Moore) and
his equally nonpopular friends
Jib (Tony Revolori) and Diggy
(Kiersey Clemons) aren’t like
most of their classmates. They
openly discuss their Ivy League
aspirations, play in a pop-punk
band and have a fixation with
1990s pop culture that manifests itself in unfashionable flattops and baggy TLC-wear.
But when they accidentally
cross paths with neighborhood
drug dealer Dom (rapper A$AP
Rocky), the naive trio is forced
to rely on their geek smarts to
navigate a world of crime,
gangs, profiling cops and corruption. In the process they
[See ‘Dope,’ E5]

Hanna Barczyk For The Times

FRANKLY
OVERDUE
Viewers attacking TV’s ‘rape glut’ need to take a closer look

MARY MCNAMARA television critic >>> After avoiding the subject for much of its lifetime, television has begun featuring stories that include rape. And many people are not happy about it.
With television now functioning as much national encounter group as entertainment, any act of violence or misfortune befalling a major character is immediately followed by a cacophony of anguish and/
or rage on social media. But none, not even child murder, sparks as much emotional fury and deep
thought as rape.
Once upon a time, the assault of a main character was wreathed in solemnity, heralded by disclaimers and intimations of “a very important episode.” Lately, however, shows as thematically diverse as
“The Americans,” “Scandal,” “Outlander,” “Game of Thrones,” “Downton Abbey,” “House of Cards”
and “Mad Men” have used it as either a real-time plot point or a defining bit of back story.
Few of which have escaped protest. This spring, the midseason rape of Sansa Stark (Sophie Turner)
so offended some “Game of Thrones” fans that they called for a boycott. The reaction, which included
U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) tweeting that the “disgusting” scene meant she was “done” with
the show, sparked yet another round of essays, columns, tweets and blogs about what is now being
referred to as the “rape glut.”
Indeed, the “Game of Thrones” commentary had barely died down when “Outlander,” criticized dur[See Rape, E15]
ing its first season for the frequency of scenes in which its heroine was nearly

Experience an unforgettable
journey back in time.

Rachel Morrison Open Road Films

SHAMEIK MOORE stars

as Malcolm in “Dope.”

VIDEO GAMES

Pulled
together
by ‘Adr1ft’

By Todd Martens
Never mind the destroyed
space station and the references to the isles of Los Angeles.
“Adr1ft” may look like a work of
science fiction, but in reality it’s
one of the most deeply personal
video games of 2015. It’s also one
borne out of an uniquely contemporary calamity.
Adam Orth in spring 2013
had a good gig at Microsoft,
working primarily on ways to
make television viewing more
interactive. Then one day he got
a little too vocal on Twitter and
found himself out of a job.
“Sometimes,” he said, “you
have to burn everything right to
the ground.”
[See ‘Adr1ft,’ E10]

E2

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

L AT I M E S . C OM / CA L EN DA R

FEEDBACK
second season, I would have
given up television in protest.
Catherine C. Cate
Santa Ana

Lily Tomlin’s
advocacy

Getty Images

DIRECTOR ROBERT ALTMAN’S masterful “Nashville” cried out for a sequel.

A film director’s theatrical touch
Altman films are driven by the wonder of live theater, which draws us into the
idiosyncratic nature of each character [“How an Altman Gem Lost a Sequel,” June 7]. The
interaction is conducted like great music. Unfortunately, most movie tickets are sold to eat
popcorn, watch car chases, see buildings explode, follow plot twists and of course the
occasional sight gag. Character is limited to stereotypes. Unfortunately, good theater
doesn’t pay, either in small venues or in films, as it requires the audience to tune in to new
people. We can only hope that American directors who understand theater will continue to
find a way to get their films made.
Ken Hense
El Segundo
Thank you so much for
dedicating enough words
to uncover the tip of the
iceberg of “Nashville” and
its aborted sequel. What a
lovely gift to film buffs,

writers, actors and singers.
The times they have
changed, and the Nashville
skyline looks like a poptart,
so to revisit this and even
touch on the subtle point-

ed themes of this film is a
gift in a cinema universe
that looks like a comic
book.
A Downs
Long Beach

What Rebecca Keegan
didn’t reference in her
article [“Leave ’Em
Laughing,” June 7], and
what many people are not
aware, is the tireless work
Lily Tomlin has done on
behalf of elephants in
captivity.
A longtime animalrights activist, she has
been an outspoken advocate against elephant
abuse in zoos and circuses,
and narrated and executive-produced an HBO
documentary in 2013
(along with her wife, Jane
Wagner, who wrote the
doc) called “An Apology to
Elephants.”
Not only did Tomlin win
an Emmy for voice-over
narration, but her crusade
has helped lead to the
decision by Ringling
Brothers Circus to phase
out their elephant acts in
2017 and the recent banning of the bullhook. A
trumpet salute to Lily for
making such a difference
in the plight of the world’s
largest land mammal.
Katharine Kramer
Toluca Lake
::
If “Grace and Frankie”
had not been renewed for a

WHAT IT TAKES TO KEEP A FAMILY TOGETHER

Cheap shot at
conservatives
I was thrilled to see that
Chris Barton listed “Actors’
opinions” as overrated, and
I looked to see whom he
would target: Sean Penn?
George Clooney? Susan
Sarandon? Nope — Vince
Vaughn, for his pro-gun
views.
This left me wondering
whether Vaughn would have
been mentioned if he’d been
calling for stricter gun restrictions. Somehow, I
doubt it. Perhaps Barton
should have made clear that
he considers actors’ conservative opinions overrated.
Brendan Powers
Orange

‘Thrones’ offers
up shoddy pulp
I thought the burning of
the innocent child on the
last segment of “Game of
Thrones” to be horrifying
and disgusting.
It’s seems like the writers
are choosing the lowest
common denominator —

- PAUL MACINNES, THE GUARDIAN

“DAYS LATER AND
I CAN’T GET THIS
MOVIE OUT OF
MY HEAD.”

-Joshua Rothkopf, TIME OUT NEW YORK
K

“MARK RUFFALO’’S
FINEST PERFORMANCE TO DATE.”

How to reach us
Subscription Services:
(800) 252-9141
Calendar Section
Phone: (213) 237-7770
Fax: (213) 237-7630

“SUPERBLY OBSERVED.
UNUSUALLY WARM
AND PERCEPTIVE.”

“MOVINGLY HEARTFELT ANND FRESH.”

betrayal, murder and massacre — to arouse emotion
in the viewer. Creepy. It just
gets old.
We have the Sparrows
and Harpys going on their
murderous rampages, but
the choice to kill the darling
little child by burning at the
stake struck a low blow with
me.
This was not entertainment but shoddy pulp. It
breaks my heart to see the
child screaming for her
father, her mother, someone
to save her and no one has
the courage to make a move.
Besides, she was one of
the most interesting characters in the show.
Paul L. Hovsepian
Sierra Madre

- JORDAN HOFFMAN, VANITY FAIR

E-mail:
[email protected]
latimes.com
Mailing Address:
Los Angeles Times
Calendar Letters
202 W. 1st St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Letters:
Submissions are subject to
editing for space and
content considerations.

FREE from the LA Times:
New 2014/15
Parent Reading Guide

To help your
child read,
start early with
bathtub books.
For more tips, download
a copy or order today.
latimes.com/Readingby9

-Germain Lussier, SLASHFILM

“AN ASSURED CROWD PLEASER.
-Justin Chang, VARIETY

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS FRIDAY

WEST LOS ANGELES Landmark’s Nuart Theatre (310) 473-8530
ONE WEEK ONLY

14RB9061

AN IRRESISTIBLE DEBUT FOR WRITER-DIRECTTOR MAYA FORBES.”

“Deserves To Be The Summer’s
Sleeper Hit. It’s That Sharply
Funny, Touching And Vital.”
– Peter Travers,

“Grade: A. Sparkling With Smart
Humor And Constant Visual Surprises,
‘Me And Earl’ Holds A Unique Appeal
That’s Certain To Last.”
– Anisha Jhaveri,

MARK

ZOE

RUFFALO

SALDANA

INFINITELY POLAR BEAR
A FILM BY MAYA FORBES

SUNDANCE

TORONTO

LOS ANGELES

ASONYPICTURESCLASSICSRELEASE PAPERSTREETFICASTILMSNG AND PARKPICTURES
BADROBOT KGBMEDIA MARKRUFFALO ZOESALDANAMUSIC“INFINITELYPOLARBEAR”
ICOSTUMEMOGENEWOLODARSKY ASHLEYAUFDERHEI
D
E
DOUGLASAI
B
EL
ERI
K
AHAMPSON
RANDALLPOSTEREXECUTIVMEGHANCURRI
ER BY THEODORESHAPIRO
BY
EDITED
E
DESIGNER KASIA WALICKA-MAIMONE BY MICHAELR.MILLER, A.C.E.
CARLSPRAGUE BOBBYBUKOWSKI PRODUCERS J.J.ABRAMS BRYANBURK AUSTIN STARK
RUTHMUTCH NOAHMILLMAN JACKIE KELMANBISBEE DANNYRIFKIN TOMVALERIO RICHARDRIFWRIKITTENANDN MARKRUFFALO PRODUCEDBY WALLYWOLODARSKY BENJIKOHN BINGOGUBELMANN
SAMBISBEE GALTNIEDERHOFFER DIRECTEDBY MAYAFORBES
IN ASSOCIATION
PRESENT
WITH
AND
COMUSIC
PRODUCER
SUPERVISIONBY
PRODUCTION
DIRECTOROF
DESIGNER
PHOTOGRAPHY

COPYRIGHT © 2014 IPB, LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

WWW.SONYCLASSICS.COM

STARTS FRIDAY

HOLLYWOOD
Cinemas
At Sunset & Vine (323) 464-4226

WEST LOS ANGELES
at W. Pico & Westwood
(310) 470-0492 www.landmarktheatres.com

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.INFINITELYPOLARBEAR.COM

EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENTS NOW PLAYING
WEST LOS ANGELES

HOLLYWOOD

at Sunset & Vine
at W. Pico & Westwood (310) 470-0492
(323) 464-4226 Sun 9:15, 9:45,10:45 AM,
Sun 10:00, 11:50 AM, 12:30, 2:20, 3:00, 4:50, 12:15, 12:45, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:45, 5:45,
5:30, 7:20, 8:00, 9:45 & 10:25 PM
7:15, 10:00, 11:00 PM & 12:05 AM

CENTURY CITY
AMC Century City 15
amctheatres.com
Sun 10:45, 11:40 AM, 1:25, 2:25, 4:10,
5:10, 7:00, 8:00, 9:45 & 10:50 PM

L AT I M ES . C O M / CA L E N DA R

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

E3

SUNDAY CALENDAR
THE
UNSEEN
MARILYN

FINDING
HIMSELF
THROUGH
‘ME AND
EARL’

DIRECTOR
PUTS
WOMEN
UP FRONT

CLASSIC
HOLLYWOOD,
E6

MOVIES, E8

ON FILM, E4

THE SUNDAY CONVERSATION

POP & HISS

N.W.A.
biopic
gets a
bad rap
By August Brown

Carolyn Cole Los Angeles Times

HOLLY HUNTER says although actors like herself jump routinely from stage to TV to movies, it wasn’t the case when she started.

The gypsy in her soul
By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK — In the 35 years since she
landed her first paid gig, Holly Hunter has
proven herself an actress of almost unparalleled range. Her versatility was showcased
vividly in 1993, when she starred as a mute, 19th
century bride in Jane Campion’s “The Piano”
(for which she won an Oscar), a sassy secretary
in “The Firm” (which earned her an Oscar
nomination) and a homicidal housewife in
HBO’s “The Positively True Adventures of the
Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom”
(which earned her an Emmy).
This week Hunter, 57, appears opposite Al
Pacino as a kindhearted bank teller in David
Gordon Green’s “Manglehorn.” On the horizon
are roles in Terrence Malick’s “Weightless” and
Zack Snyder’s “Batman v Superman: Dawn of
Justice” as well as a reunion with Anna Paquin,
her costar from “The Piano,” in the family
drama “Breakable You.”
Your upcoming projects could not be more
different from one another.
Doing all these different kinds of wildly
different experiences, it just adds to feeling
very alive, and they each make me feel excited
in different ways. With “Manglehorn” and
“Batman,” you have two directors that are
comfortable in their milieu, you know? David
Gordon Green knows and understands Austin
[where the film is set]. He went to college with
tons of the guys that he works with, so it’s really
nice to be on the set where there’s that level of
comfort and trust. And Zack should be directing giant movies, he flourishes under that
pressure.
How was it working with Al Pacino for the
first time?
He’s lovely. He can still be very vulnerable,
very open to another actor. I loved seeing that.
As we get older, people close down. We get less
adaptive, less flexible — literally. Curiosity can
diminish, and you want safety. You want what
you know. Familiarity. This is one of the rea-

sons I like to act — it’s because acting forces you
into situations you don’t know. I like the gypsy
aspect of [acting] – I feel that it keeps me much
more adaptive.
It does seem like you’ve consciously tried to
work with a wide array of filmmakers.
Actually, that’s not true. One of the things
that I loved so much about [the TNT series]
“Saving Grace” is that I got to work with the
same people over and over again.… But I also
really like to go from stage to television to movies. That’s such a normal thing now. When I first
started in 1980, that was not the norm, to
bounce back and forth in that way. I was doing
television, movies and theater all the time. I
certainly did my share of bouncing.
The prevailing wisdom these days is that TV is
more hospitable to women than film. Do you
agree?
Yes. I’m hitting a seam right now where I
don’t particularly feel that way, but statistically
it’s true. There are, in terms of numbers, more
leading roles for women in television than there
are features. That’s absolutely certain. And it
used to be that women went into television
when they got older. Now, women are going into
television, period.
Is there a “Holly Hunter part” — a type of role
you’re offered a lot?
I am often offered roles or women who are
very strong, uncompromising. But it’s fun to do
“Manglehorn,” where I’m playing somebody
who’s very open, very optimistic, very positive. I
don’t want to bore myself.
G.J., the spiritual leader you played in the
Sundance miniseries “Top of the Lake,” was a
singular creation. How did you and writerdirector Jane Campion develop that character?
We rehearsed a lot. Jane loves to rehearse, to
play theater games, Simon Says, musical
chairs, talent contests, dances, a lot of improv.…
I deduced some elements of her that felt like
home. And when we started shooting, it kind of

UNDERRATED
Donnie Trumpet & The
Social Experiment’s
“Surf ”: A rewarding
thread running through
pop music of late is the
bold underscoring of the
connection between
hip-hop and jazz on
albums by Robert Glasper, Kendrick Lamar and others. Among the
latest is this free download from
Chicago trumpet player Nico Segal
and indie favorite Chance the Rapper, who call on guests such as Erykah Badu and Janelle Monáe to
craft a category-defying album rich
with twisted funk and R&B.

fell into place, you know? The character presented herself. It was really a kick to do that
and a great group of women at that women’s
camp, to be hanging out with everybody. And
Jane was just a blast. She’s so silly and fun.
You’ve built a long career while mostly avoiding typical leading-lady roles. How do you
think you’ve managed to stay around?
It’s something I’m proud of, to have longevity in a career that is as challenging as this one
is. There’s something mysterious about the
whole process of hammering out a career;
there’s a lot of serendipity. I don’t know a whole
bunch of people who have the [production]
shingles, and they’re reeling out great projects
for themselves to star in. Generally, actors hang
around on the surface of the water waiting for
something to hit, and I’ve always enjoyed that.
There’s really a lot to be said for sticking
around.
Were there moments when you worried about
what might come next?
No. I am not built that way. I know brilliant
actors who feel they will never work again, and
I’ve never had that. Sometimes I go into a very
minor depression about, like, why can’t I get
better stuff? And then I’ll do something kind of
great. And my own life is interesting enough
where if my career is not galvanizing and riveting, something else is. I have many neuroses,
but one of them is not I will never work again.
What do you see as the major break in your
career?
[Meeting] casting director Joy Todd. She
did that magical thing that you wish as a young
actor or actress might happen.... She got me in
a horror movie called “The Burning,” which
Harvey Weinstein produced. It was filming
there in North Tonawanda, N.Y., just outside of
Buffalo, and I was making like a thousand
dollars a week. It was unbelievable money! I
was rolling in dough, sleeping in cash. I think I
said one sentence.
[email protected]

OVERRATED
The Women’s World
Cup: Sure, it’s spawned
by the same moneydevouring hub of institutional corruption that is
FIFA, but if you can set
aside the source — and
the inexplicable artificial
turf — this marathon event will offer
as many if not more skills and thrills
than the Brazilian boondoggle that
was last year’s men’s tournament.
For extra intrigue, count just how
many calls go against the powerful
U.S. team as retribution for taking
down the head of international
soccer’s governing body.

Your MP3s: Remember
when Apple’s ads made a
computer choice feel like
an artistic statement?
The “Think Different”
days seem long gone as
the company enters the
streaming music field
with Apple Music, a service mostly
distinctive for its impending unavoidability if you use iTunes. For
years Apple sold digital music, but
you have to wonder how much longer it will care about your purchases
now that it courts truckloads of
cash in monthly rental fees. Stock
up on CDs now.

“Game of Thrones”
going off-book: Given the
realities of TV, HBO’s
series had to race ahead
of George R.R. Martin’s
gestating fantasy saga
and into new directions.
Still, as an uneven fifth
season closes this week there are
red flags, including rushed character shifts, a tiresome repetition of
cruelty to women and, last week, a
dragon-assisted action sequence
that came together with the CGI
subtlety of “Clash of the Titans.”
Hopefully the game can change.
— Chris Barton

Just days after Ice Cube
announced that an N.W.A.
reunion (well, most of a
reunion) would land at the
BET Experience festival,
one member of the group is
lambasting the major, soonto-be-released biopic about
the pioneering hip-hop act.
MC Ren, a founding
rapper and writer in the
group, brought out the long
knives Wednesday in his
criticism of the official trailer for “Straight Outta
Compton,” in which Dr. Dre
and Ice Cube get substantially (and almost exclusively) more billing than the
rest of the group, which also
included Ren, DJ Yella and
Eazy-E. The trailer was
released April 1.
“When you have ... work
on a hip hop film that don’t
know ... about hip hop this is
what happens. How the hell
u leave me out after all,” he
wrote. “The work I put into
them records. It’s disrespectful to me, my family
and most of all my FANS.”
Ren, also known as Lorenzo Patterson, was far
from a marginal figure in
the quintet’s history. The
“Straight Outta Compton”
credits list him as a writer or
co-writer on seven of the
film’s 10 songs. Earlier this
week, he retweeted news of
the quasi-N.W.A. reunion,

Todd MacMillan Universal

BILLING for Ice Cube,

above, and Dr. Dre drew
ire of an ex-bandmate.
which will feature only Ice
Cube, Ren and DJ Yella.
Representatives at Universal Pictures did not
immediately return requests for comment about
Ren’s displeasure with the
trailer.
The rollout for the film
has had plenty of trouble.
Suge Knight, the Death
Row Records founder and
once feared, now faded
hip-hop mogul, has been
charged with murder after
authorities said he ran over
two men on the set of a
promotional shoot for the
film. Last week, the widow
of one of the victims, Terry
Carter, filed a wrongfuldeath lawsuit that names
Knight, Ice Cube and Dr.
Dre as defendants.
“Straight Outta Compton” is due in theaters on
Aug. 14.
[email protected]
Twitter: @PopHiss and
@AugustBrown

E4

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

L AT I M E S . C OM / CA L EN DA R

“The most subversive comedy of the year,
indie or otherwise!”
“hysterical – pushes past the limits
other comedies have observed for years!”
taylor
schilling

jason
schwartzman

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

E5

MOVIES

“sundance’s best sex comedy!”

adam
scott

L AT I M E S. C O M /CA L E NDA R

‘You might go into “Dope” feeling you already know what
this movie is because ... there’s kids, they’re from Inglewood,
oh, it’s drugs. ... I wanted to ... subvert your expectations.’

judith
godrèche

—R ICK F AMUYIWA , ‘Dope’ writer-director
Get into the swing of things June 19
ARCLIGHT HOLLYWOOD
THE LANDMARK

JASON SCHWARTZMAN & PRODUCER MARK
DUPLASS IN-PERSON FOR Q&A’S OPENING WEEKEND.

“S
SWEEPS YOU AWAY.

UNAPOLOGETICALLY EMOTIONAL
AND IMPECCABLY MADE AN EXCEPTIONAL ROMANCE.”
-K
Kenneth Turan, LOS A
AN
NGEL
LES TIMES

AL
A
LICIA
IA VI
VIKA
KAN
ANDER KI
KIT HA
HAR
ARI
RINGTON
TAR
ARON EGERTON
EMILY WATSON
HAYL
HA
YLEY ATW
TWE
WELL
COLIN MORGAN
AN
WE
EST and MIRA
RAN
ANDA R
RIICHA
HAR
ARD
RDSON
with DOMINIC W

TESTAM
AMENT OF YOUTH
BASED ON THE POWERF
RFUL BEST-SELLING MEMOIR BY V
VE
ER
RA
A BRI
RITTAI
AIN

directed by james

kent

W W W.SS O N Y C L A S S I C S .CC O M

NOW PLAYING
WEST LOS ANGELES
The LANDMARK at W. Pico & Westwood
(310) 470-0492 landmarktheatres.com
Fri-Sun: 10:25 • 1:20 • 4:15 • 7:10 • 10:10
Mon-Thur: 1:20 • 4:15 • 7:10 • 10:00

WEST HOLLYWOOD
Sundance Sunset Cinemas
sundancecinemas.com
Free 3-Hour Validated Parking. All Shows 21+
Fri-Sun: 11:15 • 1:50 • 4:30 • 7:15 • 10:00
Mon-Thur: 1:15 • 4:15 • 7:10 • 9:50

SORRY, NO PASSES ACCEPTED FOR THIS ENGAGEMENT

COSTA MESA
PASADENA
Regency South Coast Village (714) 557-5701 Laemmle’s Playhouse 7 (626) 844-6500 laemmle.com

Larry Horricks 20th Century Fox

MELISSA McCARTHY in “Spy” has to deal with doubters and dimwits, just like women in Hollywood.

VIEW THE TRAILER AT WWW.TESTAMENTOFYOUTHMOVIE.COM

“IT’S DOUBTFUL YOU’LL SEE A BETTER
DOCUMENTARY THIS YEAR THAN THIS

SENSATIONAL FILM.”
– Dennis Dermody, PAPER

“GRIPPING. YOU WON’T BE ABLE TO
PULL YOUR EYES OFF THE SCREEN.
Once you’ve met these kids, you won’t forget them or the film that puts a hypnotic and
haunting spin on movie love.”
– Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“THRILLING, HEARTBREAKING,
CONFOUNDING.
A transcendant work of art.”
– David Edelstein, NEW YORK MAGAZINE

“UNLIKE ANY DOCUMENTARY
YOU’VE EVER SEEN.
It marks the arrival of a major new talent.”
– Nigel Smith, INDIEWIRE

“INTOXICATING.
– Wesley Morris, GRANTLAND

“AN OUT-OF-NOWHERE WALLOP.”
– Amy Nicholson, THE VILLAGE VOICE

Magnolia Pictures Kotva Films and Verisimilitude present a film by CRYSTAL MOSELLE “THE WOLFPACK” Music supervisors RANDALl POSTER MEGHAN CURRIER music by DANNY BENSI Saunder Jurriaans with ASKA MATSUMIYA
Associate producers MEGAN DELANEY TRACE HENDERSON co-producers BEN SNYDER RENÉ SASCHA JOHANNSEN Executive producers TYLER BRODIE LOUISE INGALLS STURGES CAMERON BRODIE DAVID CROSS
Produced by CRYSTAL MOSELLE IZABELLA TZENKOVA HUNTER GRAY ALEX ORLOVSKY Edited by ENAT SIDI directed by CRYSTAL MOSELLe © Wolfpack Project, LLC.

STARTS
FRIDAY

FACEBOOK : THEWOLFPACKDOCUMENTARY

Info Line

310.478.3836

ROYAL

11523 Santa Monica Blvd.

INSTAGRAM: THEWOLFPACKFILM

HOLLYWOOD
Cinemas
At Sunset & Vine (323) 464-4226

TM

West L.A.

NOOFTAFRAID
SUBTITLES
www.LAEMMLE.com

NoHo 7

5240 Lankershim Blvd.

No. Hollywood

MADAME BOVARY E (10:30 AM 1:20 PM)
4:10 PM 7:00 PM 9:50 PM

JURASSIC WORLD C (11:00 AM 1:00 PM)
4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM

THE FAREWELL PARTY I (10:40 AM
1:00 PM) 3:20 PM 5:40 PM 8:00 PM 10:15 PM

LOVE & MERCY C (10:15 AM 1:10 PM)
4:10 PM 7:10 PM 10:10 PM

LOVE AT FIRST FIGHT I (1:50 PM) 4:20 PM
7:10 PM 9:40 PM

SPY E (11:00 AM 1:50 PM) 4:40 PM 7:30 PM
10:15 PM

THE 100 YEAR OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT
THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED E
(11:00 AM)

ENTOURAGE E (10:30 AM 1:50 PM) 4:50 PM
7:40 PM 10:15 PM

MONICA

1332 Second Street

Santa Monica

CLOSED FOR
RENOVATION

MUSIC HALL
9036 Wilshire Blvd.

I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS C (11:00 AM
1:20 PM) 3:50 PM 7:00 PM 9:30 PM
WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE B ENGLISH
SUBTITLES (11:10 AM 1:40 PM) 7:10 PM
9:50 PM
WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE B 4:30 PM

Beverly Hills

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD E (10:45 AM 1:30 PM)
4:20 PM 7:20 PM 10:10 PM

TOWN CENTER

THE 11TH HOUR I 10:00 PM
EVERY LAST CHILD I (12:00 PM) 2:20 PM
7:20 PM 9:55 PM
CHARLIE’S COUNTRY I 2:30 PM 7:30 PM
GEMMA BOVERY E 4:40 PM
ONE CUT, ONE LIFE I (12:00 PM) 2:25 PM
4:50 PM 7:20 PM
IRIS C (12:20 PM 5:10 PM)

17200 Ventura Blvd.

Encino

LIVE FROM NEW YORK! I (10:40 AM
12:45 PM) 3:00 PM 6:00 PM 8:10 PM 10:15 PM
THE FAREWELL PARTY I (10:45 AM
1:00 PM) 3:20 PM 5:40 PM 8:00 PM 10:15 PM
I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS C (10:30 AM
1:50 PM) 4:30 PM 7:20 PM 9:45 PM

REDEEMER I 9:55 PM

WOMAN IN GOLD C (11:10 AM 12:45 PM)
3:20 PM

PLAYHOUSE

HAMARI ADHURI KAHANI I SPECIAL
ENGAGEMENT 2:30 PM 5:30 PM 8:30 PM

673 E. Colorado Blvd.

Pasadena

LIVE FROM NEW YORK! I (11:10 AM
1:20 PM) 3:30 PM 5:40 PM 8:00 PM 10:15 PM

DIL DHADAKNE DO I SPECIAL
ENGAGEMENT 5:00 PM 8:30 PM

CLAREMONT

THE FAREWELL PARTY I (10:40 AM
1:00 PM) 3:15 PM 5:30 PM 7:50 PM 10:10 PM

450 W. 2nd Street

LOVE & MERCY C (10:45 AM 1:10 PM)
4:10 PM 7:10 PM 10:10 PM

JURASSIC WORLD C (10:00 AM 1:00 PM)
4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM

TESTAMENT OF YOUTH C (11:00 AM
1:00 PM) 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 10:00 PM

LOVE & MERCY C (10:15 AM 1:00 PM)
4:00 PM 7:00 PM 9:55 PM

I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS C (10:40 AM
1:50 PM) 4:30 PM 7:20 PM 9:55 PM

SPY E (10:45 AM 1:30 PM) 4:20 PM 7:10 PM
10:00 PM

LOVE AT FIRST FIGHT I (10:50 AM 1:40 PM)
4:40 PM 7:30 PM 9:55 PM
WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE B 4:20 PM
WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE B ENGLISH
SUBTITLES (11:00 AM 1:30 PM) 7:00 PM
9:40 PM

BARGAIN IN ( )

Point made by comedy
genre gender-flipping

Director Paul Feig proves
women can drive a
commercial success while
delivering the laughs.

Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times

“DOPE” principals include Chanel Iman, Kiersey Clemons, Tony Revolori, writer-director Rick Famuyiwa (rear), Shameik Moore, Blake Anderson, Quincy Brown.

‘Bueller’ meets the ‘Boyz’

By Glenn Whipp

The whole movie feels dreamed.”

THEWOLFPACKFILM.COM

ON FILM

Claremont

ENTOURAGE E (1:40 PM) 4:30 PM 7:20 PM
10:00 PM
I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS C (11:00 AM
1:20 PM) 4:10 PM 7:00 PM 9:30 PM
THE 100 YEAR OLD MAN WHO CLIMBED OUT
THE WINDOW AND DISAPPEARED E
(11:00 AM)
FOR 6/14/2015 ONLY

I don’t know about you, but normally a movie that trades heavily on
jokes pegged to hemorrhoid wipes,
stool softeners and anti-fungal cream
doesn’t prompt me to leave the theater thinking I’ve seen something that
significantly advances the cause of
women in film.
But that’s precisely what happened with “Spy,” the Paul Feig comedy starring Melissa McCarthy as a
lonely CIA analyst who goes from being a patronized team player to saving
the world over the course of a funny
two hours. In addition to McCarthy’s
secret agent, “Spy” sports an ensemble of strong women — Allison Janney
as a CIA boss, Rose Byrne making like
Marie Antoinette playing the villain,
Miranda Hart as McCarthy’s overlooked colleague and best friend.
They’re women in power, though Feig
never calls attention to their status or
remarks on it. It just is.
“Spy” won’t win any awards — humanitarian, academy or otherwise.
But in addition to being wildly entertaining, watching the film makes one
thing clear: Paul Feig is one of the
most important filmmakers working
in Hollywood today. With his last
three movies, Feig has obliterated the
wall that separated the sexes in movie
comedies.
First he made “Bridesmaids,” a
raunchy, liberating comedy about female friendship, and followed it up
with “The Heat,” a raucous buddy cop
comedy, and now “Spy,” which toggles
between being a James Bond spoof
and a giddy saga of self-actualization.
After being told for years that he
couldn’t cast women in leads, Feig
now exclusively does just that, taking
genres and flipping them to make
great, commercially successful showcases for talent like McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Sandra Bullock. And as
you probably know, he’s not stopping.
His next movie will be a “Ghostbusters” reboot starring McCarthy, Wiig,
Leslie Jones and Kate McKinnon.
And he’s doing it only because, after
repeatedly turning down the chance
to direct a conventional “Ghostbusters” sequel, the studio let Feig cast it
the way he wanted.
“Spy,” from 20th Century Fox, feels
like the movie Feig wrote for all the
women in Hollywood who have had to
deal with doubters and dimwits their
entire careers. McCarthy’s character
begins the movie as something of a
high-tech Moneypenny, communicating with Jude Law’s 007 stand-in via
an earpiece, tipping him off to every
enemy and obstacle around the corner.
The reward for her expertise?
She’s asked to pick up his dry cleaning
(and fire his gardener) before he arrives home. Despite her obvious expertise, Susan is ignored and belittled. She wants to work in the field but
doubts she’ll ever be given the opportunity.
“They would never let me be a spy,”
she laments.
Hearing those words, it’s hard not
to think of the recent ACLU review
that found a “very disturbing and
compelling picture of long-running

Suzanne Hanover Universal Studios

“BRIDESMAIDS,” which grossed $288 million worldwide, contra-

dicted the idea that foreign audiences won’t see female-driven films.

Larry Horricks 20th Century Fox

DIRECTOR PAUL FEIG (center) with Jude Law and Melissa Mc-

Carthy on the set of his most recent female-centric movie, “Spy.”

systemic discrimination in the film
and television industries.”
The success of “Bridesmaids” was
supposed to help change all that. The
movie, written by Wiig and Annie Mumolo, grossed $288 million worldwide
with more than 40% of the take coming from overseas, dismissing the notion that foreign audiences won’t see
female-driven movies.
Before “Bridesmaids” premiered,
Feig told The Times that “all my female writer friends had their projects
on hold, on probation” with executives telling them they’d have to wait
to see if audiences embraced the film.
They did. But it would seem that
many of those projects must still be
on probation. Women wrote only 11%
of the top-250-grossing films in 2014,
according to San Diego State University’s Celluloid Ceiling Report, a drop
of 2% from the late ’90s. A USC study
found that in 2013 and 2014, women directed just1.9% of the top-grossing100
films.
Feig is doing what he can to boost
those totals, working with Katie Dippold on “The Heat” and the upcoming
“Ghostbusters” as well as Wiig and
Mumolo on “Bridesmaids.” (He wrote
“Spy.”) But really, the most important thing he’s doing with these movies is creating emotionally honest female characters who are strong,
funny and driving the plot.
Yes, the films are silly and profane.
They also own a carefree feminism
that feels organic to the storytelling.
In the immortal words of the Isley
Brothers, they fight the power (the
song that opens “The Heat”), but

their politics remain primarily focused on the democracy of comedy. If
you’re funny, you can be a star, regardless of gender, race or body type.
This has always been his subject of
choice. Fifteen years ago, after the
brief, glorious run of his coming-ofage TV series “Freaks and Geeks,”
Feig had his pick of movies — provided they were about young men trying to get lucky. He wasn’t interested.
The films he did make — “Unaccompanied Minors,” “I Am David” —
didn’t do well at the box office, landing Feig in movie jail for several years.
He returned to television, bolstering his resume and his skill set directing such shows as “The Office,” “Arrested Development,” “Nurse Jackie”
and the “Mad Men” episode in which a
bored Betty pulled out Bobby’s BB
gun and took aim at the neighbor’s pigeons.
The common ground in these
shows: They all contained well-written roles for actresses.
“It’s very much a conscious decision,” Feig told The Times. “I just love
working with women.”
Not surprisingly, Feig has faced
backlash, mostly from “Ghostbusters” diehards who can’t wrap their
heads around the idea of women being given the keys to the proton packs.
Which just seems absurd on so many
levels. I mean: McCarthy, Wiig,
McKinnon, Jones. Who you gonna
call? When you come up with four funnier humans, pick up the phone and
give me a shout.
[email protected]

[‘Dope,’ from E1]
come to find who they truly are, or
at least what they want out of life,
and it’s of course far more complex
than a Tupac song.
Part “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,”
part “Boyz n the Hood,” the film
doesn’t fit neatly into any particular marketing niche — and that was
always director and writer Rick Famuyiwa’s intention.
“It’s not a ’hood film or romantic
comedy or Tyler Perry,” says Famuyiwa, 41, the son of Nigerian immigrants who grew up in Inglewood. “It’s like there’s only two or
three things black films can be, and
it’s none of those.”
Not surprisingly, Hollywood
didn’t get it.
After unsuccessfully shopping
his screenplay around studios, Famuyiwa ended up making “Dope”
independently with the help of producers Forest Whitaker and Nina
Bongiovi (they’d just finished producing “Fruitvale Station”). They
helped wrangle more interest,
bringing in backers from the music
world, including Pharrell Williams
as executive producer and Sean
Combs (a.k.a. Puffy) as co-executive producer, among others.
Once “Dope” premiered to enthusiastic audiences at the Sundance Film Festival in January, it
was bought for a reported $7 million by Open Road Films and Sony
Pictures Worldwide. It arrives in
theaters Friday.
It joins a small wave of films, TV
and books that are playing with
and testing tired notions of race,
especially blackness—“Dear White
People,” “Blackish,” “The Sellout,”
to name a few.
The film co-stars Zoe Kravitz as
the gang-tattooed love interest
and Rick Fox as a suspiciously
smooth banker. L.A. rappers such
as Casey Veggies populate the
film’s large cast. Whitaker narrates
“Dope,” and Williams composed
four songs for Malcolm’s band.
“The ’90s were a great decade
for music, not just hip-hop,” says
Williams. “The era is defined by
many unique voices, it was the perfect soundtrack to represent the
spirit of the movie. In creating the
songs for Awreeoh [Malcolm’s
band], I was inspired by the angst
of these characters, how they see
the world, their dreams and aspirations.”
“Dope” is a funny and unpredictable ride through Malcolm’s
rough neighborhood, known as the
Bottoms. His journey is fueled by
teen lust, miscommunication and
scenarios so absurd they could
only happen in his corner of L.A.
“Everything that happens in the
[film] world seems to happen to
white suburban people — alien invasions, house hauntings, whatever,” Famuyiwa says with a laugh.

David M. Moir Open Road Films

WRITER-DIRECTOR Rick Famuyiwa with Amin Joseph, who appears as the Voice, on location

during filming of “Dope,” which takes a different slant from usual by focusing on nerds in the ’hood.

Rachel Morrison Open Road Films

SHAMEIK MOORE as Malcolm in a scene with Zoe Kravitz as the gang-tattooed love interest in

the unpredictable “Dope,” executive-produced by Pharrell Williams, Sean Combs and others.
“When people see that L.A., they’re
only seeing the L.A. of Judd Apatow.”
The film is also meant to upend
preconceptions about coming-ofage films and race — but done with
a light touch.
“You might go into ‘Dope’ feeling you already know what this
movie is because, all right, there’s
kids, they’re from Inglewood, oh,
it’s drugs,” says Famuyiwa on the
phone from Atlanta, where he’s
shooting his very different next
project, the story of Anita Hill and
Clarence Thomas for HBO.
“But actually the kid who’s the

drug dealer is the white kid from
Brentwood, and the black kids
from the ’hood go to him to get help
because he’s the expert on [selling]
drugs,” he says. “I wanted to take
everything and subvert your expectations.”

Unorthodox paths
The goal of subversion interested Whitaker and Williams from
the start. Like Famuyiwa, both
self-identify as misfits, and both
cut their own unorthodox paths in
their respective fields.
Before Williams became involved in “Dope” or launched his

now ubiquitous song “Happy,” he
was part of an eclectic music outfit
called N.E.R.D. Needless to say he
also related to Malcolm and his
gang.
“We weren’t the toughest guys
in the world in high school, but we
also weren’t afraid,” said Williams
in a statement about the film. “And
we felt like being intelligent was not
necessarily a negative thing. Rick
brilliantly sews that together in
DOPE.”
Famuyiwa’s earlier projects include “The Wood,” another coming-of-age story set in Inglewood
that he made straight out of USC

film school. He also wrote the
screenplays for several comedies
and dramas geared to African
American audiences, such as
“Brown Sugar” and “Our Family
Wedding.”
But after a couple of decades
dealing with risk-averse studios
and film execs, eventually Famuyiwa was ready to break loose from
cinematic conventions.
“I was fortunate to write pretty
much a year out of film school and
start making movies in the Hollywood studio system,” says Famuyiwa, still based in L.A. “But with
each progressive film it became
more frustrating not being able to
speak and say things I wanted to
say. I wanted to rediscover something artistically that I felt I was
losing and say things I never really
had a chance to say.”
Famuyiwa describes “Dope” as
“Risky Business” for the social-media generation. Bitcoin, YouTube,
iPhone apps, texting, streaming
and the dark Web are major players
here. Technology is a large part of
what sets these kids apart from the
Inglewood Famuyiwa grew up in.
“Everyone would assume these
kids from Inglewood would form a
hip-hop group, but I thought Malcolm would be into so many different [genres] that they would form a
band that played everything,” he
says. “Because of technology,
there’s no longer the social shaming that goes on if you’re a black kid
walking into a record store to buy
Nirvana.”
“Dope’s” teens, however, are
still teens — obnoxious, annoying,
fast-food obsessed and occasionally stupid.
To keep the characters fallible,
Famuyiwa had to fight his own instincts. That’s because he was
writing “Dope” around the time
Trayvon Martin was shot and
killed by George Zimmerman. The
way Martin’s character was picked
apart by the media and in the
courtroom affected how Famuyiwa
would portray Malcolm and his
friends
“There’s pressure as a filmmaker to combat that [narrative]
and try and show how great these
teens are by polishing off all the
hard edges,” says Famuyiwa, who
has a young son. “But I wanted
these kids to be as raw and emotional and young and mistakeprone as all kids are, because at the
end of the day they are just kids.
They have value and potential.
“Sometimes that potential gets
nurtured if you live in a place like
Brentwood and discouraged and
unseen if you live in Inglewood,” he
says. “But at the end of the day, the
lottery of birth shouldn’t determine your value to the world.”
[email protected]

E6

S U NDAY , J U NE 14 , 2 015

L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L EN DA R

L AT I M E S. C O M /CA L E NDA R

S U N DAY , J U N E 14 , 2 015

CLASSIC HOLLYWOOD

‘Marilyn
Monroe
Missing
Moments’

latimes.com/classichollywood

Marilyn
moments
The late actress gets
star billing at the
Hollywood Museum’s
new exhibition.
By Susan King

Milton H. Greene

MARILYN MONROE at a 1950s photo shoot, one of about 1,000 unpublished images by Milton H. Greene.

The Hollywood Museum’s new Marilyn Monroe
Missing Moments exhibition is nothing if not comprehensive.
It features the star’s personal accessories, her costumes from such films as
1955’s “The Seven Year Itch,”
her refrigerator and even
medication found on her
nightstand on Aug. 6, 1962,
the night of her death.

Donelle Dadigan, the
founder and president of the
Hollywood Museum, at the
old Max Faxtor building on
Highland Avenue, said the
exhibition spans Monroe’s
entire life, from her childhood, through her career,
her loves, her marriages, her
untimely death at age 36,
and her legacy for generations of movie fans.
One highlight of the exhibition, which continues
through Sept. 6, are previously unpublished Monroe
photos by Milton H. Greene,
best known for his mesmerizing portraits of the sex
symbol. The two met in 1953
when he shot the up-andcoming actress for Look
[See Monroe, E7]

Where: Hollywood
Museum
1660 N. Highland Ave.,
Hollywood
When: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Wednesdays through
Sundays through Sept. 6
Price: Admission is $5 to
$15
Info: www.thehollywood
museum.com

latimes.com
Photographs by

A PRODUCTION PICTURE of Marilyn Monroe

MEMORABILIA on display in the Hollywood Museum’s Marilyn Monroe exhib-

it. Other items to see are her personal accessories, costumes and even her fridge.

[Monroe, from E6]
magazine.
The photos include studio portraits and candids of
her on the set of 1956’s “Bus
Stop” and with such celebrities as Edward R. Murrow
and Sammy Davis Jr.
Dadigan acquired some
1,000
never-before-published Greene images of
Monroe a few years ago at
auction.
“We have the negatives,

lectibles that include Monroe Barbie dolls, drinking
glasses, ceramic figurines
and even a wine called Marilyn Merlot.
“Her popularity continues to grow over the years,”
said Adams. “People want
an attachment to her in any
way shape or form. I loved
her since I was 6 years old. It
was because of my grandma.
She related to Marilyn — she
was of the same time pe-

the transparencies and the
copyrights,” said Dadigan,
who will be adding more
Greene photos as well as
Monroe photos shot by
other photographers during
the exhibition.
The museum, said Dadigan, has an international
network of donors. “This
time we have five different
collections from all around
the world.”
Jill Adams donated col-

riod.”
Monroe, who would have
been 89 this year, “has gotten
more popular as the years
have passed,” noted Dadigan. “With Marilyn, there are
people who come from
around the world for pilgrimages [to Los Angeles]
for her birthday and they
come for the anniversary of
her death.”
Dadigan believes that
men were attracted to Mon-

TOR
C
A
D
A
E
L

NG
I
T
R
O
P
P
SU RESS
ACT

roe’s beauty as well as her
vulnerability. “They wanted
to rescue her.” Women also
loved Monroe, Dadigan
adds, because “she had that
realness that women could
relate to. She had issues, she
made mistakes.”
Among the other highlights of the exhibition:
8 Monroe’s USO and Joe
DiMaggio honeymoon
dresses.
8 Jewelry from 1953’s

/classichollywood

Go online to see more
photos of the “Missing
Moments” exhibition.
“Gentleman Prefer
Blondes” and “How to Marry a Millionaire.”
8 Monroe’s own hot pink
Pucci top and black satin
jeans.
8 Her makeup chair and
makeup kit.
8 Photographs from her
childhood.
[email protected]

S
E
I
R
E
S
DY
E
M
O
C
G
N
I
D
N
A
O U TST

MATT

C
N
A
L
B
E
L

BRADLEY

D
R
O
F
T
I
H
W
N
H
A
H
N
A
COOG
STEVE

Jay L. Clendenin Los Angeles Times

from 1953’s “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” is on exhibit.

S
E
I
R
E
S
Y
D
E
M
O
C
G
N
I
D
N
A
T
S
T
U
O

N
Y
R
H
T
KA

E7

NG
I
T
R
O
P
P
SU
ACTOR

OR
T
C
A
D
A
LE

“ HAPPYissh is impressive... [it] will make you
wiince, laugh, cringe and thinkk.”

“A series that’ss quietly become one of the best current
comedies on tellevision… extrem
mely, wondeerfully funny.”

THE WRAP

NPR

TELEVISION ACADEMY MEMBERS
WATCH FULL SEASONS AT SHO.COM/FYC
©2015 Showtime Networks Inc. All rights ree served. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Incc ., a CBS Company. Emmy® is a registered trademark of the
Academy of Television Arts & Sciencc es. “Episodes”: ©Hat Trick Productions Ltd. All rights reserved. “Happyiss h” : ©Showtime Networks Inc. All rights reserved.

HOME THEATER

BETTE DAVIS FILMS ON DVD

NEW RELEASES

Bette Davis fans — and
just who out there isn’t? —
are in for a treat thanks to
Warner Archive. Four Davis flicks made their DVD
debuts Tuesday, including
two with the wonderful
king of the pre-Code flicks
Warren William — the 1932
political comedy “The Dark
Horse,” which also stars
Guy Kibbee, and 1936’s
“Satan Met a Lady,” Warner Bros.’ second adaptation
of Dashiell Hammett’s
“The Maltese Falcon.”
Rounding out the new releases are the 1935 crime
drama “Secret Agent,”
with her frequent costar
George Brent and Ricardo
Cortez, and the 1948 romantic comedy “June
Bride,” also starring Robert Montgomery. “June
Bride” also marked Debbie
Reynolds’ film debut.

‘Tales’ needs
little translation

By Noel Murray

Wild Tales

Sony, $30.99; Blu-ray, $34.99
Available on VOD Tuesday.

Damián Szifrón’s funny,
stylish foreign language film
Oscar nominee is the kind of
movie that could turn foreign film skeptics into fans.
Szifrón writes and directs a
sextet of short stories, connected by the theme of temporary madness and unified
by the movie’s willingness to
present everyday life as an
especially
nerve-racking
“Twilight Zone” episode. Although every vignette begins with ordinary frustrations — like road rage or
parking tickets — the tension builds and the filmmaking gets more expressive as
the characters turn irrational and violent. “Wild Tales”
isn’t that profound, but for a
depiction of human behav-

ior at its most extreme, it has
an unusual panache. The
DVD and Blu-ray add featurettes.

Magnolia Pictures

UNHERALDED MUSICIANS Carol Kaye and Bill

Pitman in Danny Tedesco’s “The Wrecking Crew!”

The Wrecking Crew!
Magnolia, $26.98; Blu-ray, $29.98

Like “Standing in the
Shadows of Motown” and
“20 Feet from Stardom,”
Danny Tedesco’s documentary is an informative, inspiring look at the musicians
who worked in virtual anonymity to help shape popular music. The film returns
to the Los Angeles pop and
rock scenes of the 1960s,
when a group of savvy, versatile, collaborative session
players rounded out the musical visions of everyone
from Phil Spector to Brian
Wilson. As the son of one of
those sidemen, Tedesco
knew who to talk to and
what to ask and gets into
both the musicians’ worka-

Javier Julia Sony Pictures Classics

RICARDO DARIN in the funny, stylish “Wild Tales,” a foreign language film Oscar nominee.

holic lifestyle and how they
came up with riffs and fills
that are among the era’s
most memorable. The result
is a meaningful reflection on
an art at one of its key transition-points. The DVD and
Blu-ray add deleted scenes.

Andre Gregory &
Wallace Shawn:
3 Films

Criterion, $99.95; Blu-ray, $99.95

The odd partnership of
New York avant-garde thea-

ter
mainstays
Wallace
Shawn and Andre Gregory
was first introduced to
moviegoers in 1981’s “My
Dinner with Andre,” where
they turned a fictionalized
version of their own lives into
a filmed conversation as polished and potent as a great
play. Shawn, Gregory and
their “Dinner” director Louis Malle re-teamed for 1994’s
“Vanya on 42nd Street,” an
Anton Chekhov adaptation
that the actors rehearsed
with friends in a crumbling

old theater for years before
they put it on screen. And
then last year they worked
with director Jonathan
Demme in a fancy New York
club to do a modernized take
on Henrik Ibsen, “A Master
Builder.” Criterion’s box set
of all three films includes
new and vintage documentaries and interviews, making it an unexpectedly generous package of Gregory and
Shawn’s collaborations and
a document of the work of
two artists with one foot in

the classics and the other in
experimentation for experimentation’s sake.

Welcome to Me

Millennium, $19.99; Blu-ray,
$24.99

Since leaving “Saturday
Night Live,” Kristen Wiig
hasn’t really followed up on
her blockbuster 2011 comedy
“Bridesmaids,”
instead
choosing to do bit parts in
larger movies and leads in
[See New releases, E7]

[New releases, from E6]
eccentric indies. “Welcome
to Me” is another of the latter. Wiig stars as a lottery
winner with mental and
emotional disorders who
uses her jackpot to finance a
television show where she
talks about her life and her
obsessions, to the consternation of her friends, family
and lovers. It’s an edgy performance in an admirably
dark
but
distractingly
quirky film, written by Eliot
Laurence and directed by
Shira Piven.

And…
Beyond The Reach

Lionsgate, $19.98; Blu-ray, $24.99

Chappie

Sony, $30.99; Blu-ray, $34.99
Available on VOD Tuesday.

The Lazarus Effect

20th Century Fox, $29.98; Bluray, $39.99
Available on VOD Tuesday.

The Newsroom
The Complete Third
Season

HBO, $39.98; Blu-ray, $49.99

Run All Night

Warner Bros., $28.98; Blu-ray,
$44.95
Available on VOD Tuesday.

Unfinished Business

20th Century Fox, $29.98; Bluray, $39.99

[email protected]

Associated Press

THE VERSATILITY of Bette Davis is reflected in the DVDs.

E8

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

L ATI M E S . CO M / CA L EN DA R

D
N
A
L
E
M
HO
S
E
I
R
E
S
A
M
A
R
D
G
N
I
D
N
A
T
S
T
U
O

L AT I ME S . CO M / CA L E NDAR

S U N DAY, J U N E 14 , 2 015

S
E
I
R
E
S
A
M
A
R
D
G
N
I
D
N
A
T
S
T
U
O

“Astounding…
every performance
glitters.”
THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Michael Robinson Chavez Los Angeles Times

“EVERYTHING changed with this particular film,” said Alfonso Gomez-Rejon.

INDIE FOCUS

E
R
I
A
L
C

S
E
N
DA
SS
E
R
T
C
A
LEAD

Y
D
N
A
M

N
I
K
N
I
T
A
P
R
O
T
C
A
G
N
PPORTI

SU

★★★★★

“The best season of Homeland yet...
let the thrill ride continue.”
VULTURE

TELEVISION ACADEMY MEMBERS
WATCH FULL SEASONS AT SHO.COM/FYC

Veteran reborn
in ‘Me and Earl’

Director Alfonso
Gomez-Rejon, 42, was
transformed by the
Sundance winner.
By Mark Olsen
In the novel “Me and Earl
and the Dying Girl,” written
in the voice of a teenage boy,
the lead character notes
that “when you convert a
good book into a film, stupid
things happen. God only
knows what would happen if
you tried to convert this unstoppable barf-fest into a
film. The FBI would probably have to get involved.”
Authorities of a kind did
get involved, but the movie
adaptation went on to win
both the Grand Jury Prize
and audience award when it
premiered at the Sundance
Film Festival this year. Adapted for the screen by the
book’s author, Jesse Andrews, the film is directed
with an earnest warmth by
Alfonso Gomez-Rejon.
Gomez-Rejon is both a
fresh voice and something of
a veteran. At 42, he has been
working his way up from production assistant to director
over 20-plus years. Having
done second-unit and television directing, he made his
feature film debut with the
little-seen 2014 horror film
“The Town That Dreaded
Sundown.” But it is with “Me
and Earl” that he has fully, finally found himself.
“There is this version of
everything I’ve done before,
which is a very, very long
story, and then there’s this,”
said Gomez-Rejon in Los
Angeles. “To me, even
though it’s my second film it
really does feel like I re-

started my career, my life. I
found myself as a man and a
filmmaker.
Everything
changed with this particular
film. So it is a very long story
and a very short one.”
In the film, now playing in
Los Angeles, Greg Gaines
(Thomas Mann) is a high
school senior with a carefully
cultivated anonymity that
falls apart when he strikes
up a friendship with Rachel
Kushner (Olivia Cooke), a
classmate diagnosed with
terminal cancer. Greg and
his best friend Earl Jackson
(RJ Cyler) have long secretly
done short parody remakes
of classic films and they
eventually set out to make a
movie for real for Rachel.
The film is haunted by the
specter of death while moving through the joys of life.
Gomez-Rejon infuses the
film with both a playful energy and a heartfelt, emotional
heft. It’s a specific kind of
movie, which makes use of
the home video commentary
track to a Powell and Pressburger movie and a clip from
Les Blank’s documentary on
Werner Herzog. The GainesJackson movies within the
movie — with titles such as
‘A
Sockwork
Orange,”
“Scabface” and “Pooping
Tom” — are witty and affectionate, and the film is littered with references to
movies and filmmakers.

Quality teachers

Originally from Laredo,
Texas, Gomez-Rejon moved
to New York for college and
immediately also started
working on film shoots as a
production assistant. He
worked as an assistant to
Martin Scorsese, which created connections that led in
turn to working with Nora
Ephron and Robert De Niro.

“To this day, I used to be
Martin Scorsese’s assistant,
and that gets you some
cred,” Gomez-Rejon said
with a proud smile.
For a time he was back in
Texas selling phones and
running a coffee shop with a
friend. Then he was Alejandro González-Iñárittu’s assistant on “21 Grams,” directed second unit on
Ephron’s “Julie & Julia,” and
González-Iñárittu’s “Babel.”
Directing second unit on
Ryan Murphy’s “Eat Pray
Love” in turn led to directing
episodes of “Glee” and
“American Horror Story.”
“One thing led to another, and even though I was directing second unit on movies that got bigger and bigger
and it gave me an opportunity to direct, I was still not
telling my own stories,” said
Gomez-Rejon.
When his father, a psychiatrist, passed away unexpectedly,
Gomez-Rejon
threw himself into more
work. When he got an early
copy of the script for “Me
and Earl” he passionately
pursued the project, making
a mood-reel visual presentation to give producers an
idea of what he wanted to do
with the project.
“Even though this is a
script written by Jesse I
found a way to interpret it
that felt like it was mine,” he
said. “I was going to tell a
personal story through this
script, so it feels like I finally
made a movie where I discovered my own voice while
making it.”
Of his connection to the
material, he added, “It felt
very funny, very honest and
authentic. I identified with
them in the way you identify
with the kids from ‘The
[See Indie Focus, E9]

[Indie Focus, from E8]
Breakfast Club.’ There was
something very beautiful
about the way they all
spoke.”
Besides the central trio of
roles, the film has an impressive supporting cast that includes Nick Offerman and
Connie Britton as Greg’s
parents, Molly Shannon as
Rachel’s mother and Jon
Bernthal as a sympathetic
teacher.
Cooke was cast before
the production found its
Greg, and she read against a
few other potential young
actors for the male lead.
When she read with Mann,
everyone in the room knew it
was right.
“Their chemistry was
perfect. It was a chemistry
beyond sex or anything like
that,” said Gomez-Rejon. “It
maybe could go there someday but didn’t read that immediately. They respect
each other. They get each
other.”
The film was shot in
Pittsburgh, where Andrews
grew up. Though it is no
lon