Mar 4, 2014

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commissioners' packet for March 4th Franklin County Commission meeting

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FRANKLIN COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REGULAR MEETING FRANKLIN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ANNEX MARCH 4, 2014 9:00 AM AGENDA
The Board of County Commissioners asks that all cell phones are turned off or placed on silent (vibrate) mode. If you would like to comment on any matter, when recognized by the Chairman, state your name, sign the speaker log, and please adhere to the 3 minute time limit. If you plan on distributing any handouts (information) to the Commission, please provide a copy to the Clerk for the official records.

9:00 A.M.

Call to Order Prayer and Pledge Approval of the Minutes Payment of County Bills Department Supervisor Report Howard Nabors – Superintendent of Public Works Fonda Davis – Solid Waste Director Nikki Millender- Parks & Recreation Pam Brownell- Emergency Management Director Warren Emo- Armory Update Re-Bid of County Hanger Improvements Bid Openings for Oak Street and Bayshore Drive Projects and Alligator Point Revetment Kim Bodine- Update on Workforce Activities Ray Brownsworth- Hospital Update Marcia Johnson- Clerk of Courts Alan Pierce- Director of Administrative Service T. Michael Shuler- County Attorney Report Commissioners’ & Public Comments Adjourn

9:15 A.M.

9:45 A.M. 10:00 A.M. 10:15 A.M. 10:30 A.M. 10:45 A.M. 11:00 A.M. 11:15 A.M. 11:30 A.M. 11:45 A.M. 12:00 P.M.

Franklin County Road Department Detail of Work Performed and Material Hauled by District March 4, 2014
District 1 Work Performed:
Shoulder Work Pot hole Repair (Fill) Boat Ramp Repair Shoulder Work Sea Wall (build up, placed rock, etc.) Cleaned out culverts Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Sea Wall (build up, placed rock, etc.), Shoulder Work Litter Pickup Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Driveway repair Sea Wall (build up, placed rock, etc.), Road Repair Box drag

Date
2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014

Road
Begonia Street Creamer Street St. George Island Boat Ramp Franklin Blvd Franklin Blvd Hickory Dip Barber Street 1st Street Shuler Avenue Old Ferry Dock Road Gilbert Street Franklin Blvd School Road Gunn Street E 8th Street E Pine Avenue E 9th Street Brinkley Street E 7th Street Patton Street Baine Street Gander Street Bell Street Buck Street Gibson Street Randolph Street E 6th Street Bruce Street Land Street Porter Street Cook Street Brown Street Nedley Street Quinn Street W 3rd Street Franklin Blvd Franklin Blvd W Sawyer Street

Equip
2000 Int # 4 2000 Int # 4 2006 Ford F-350 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2009 Hino 2003 Int # 5 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 2009 Hino 2009 Hino NEW HOLLAND TS115

1 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 1 Work Performed:
Blocked Off Parking lot repair Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) Sign Maintenance Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Pot hole Repair (Fill) Cleaned out culverts Pot hole Repair (Fill) Pot hole Repair (Fill) Pot hole Repair (Fill) Pot hole Repair (Fill) Pot hole Repair (Fill) Pot hole Repair (Fill) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Pot hole Repair (Fill) Swept / Blowed off Intersection, Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc) Box drag

Date
2/20/2014 2/20/2014 2/20/2014 2/20/2014 2/20/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/25/2014

Road
Franklin Blvd Franklin Blvd Patton Drive St. George Island Boat Ramp Jefferson Street Hickory Dip Avenue A Barber Street Shuler Avenue Segree Street Washington Street Jefferson Street 1st Street Begonia Street Begonia Street Hickory Dip Power Drive W 6th Street Shuler Avenue E 5th Street E 6th Street E Gulf Beach Drive W 9th Street W 8th Street W 7th Street W 1st Street W 2nd Street E Pine Avenue W Pine Avenue W Gulf Beach Drive E 1st Street E 2nd Street E Gulf Beach Drive E 3rd Street E 10th Street W 3rd Street E 10th Street

Equip
930A CAT LOADER 2009 Hino 2003 Int # 5 2006 Ford F-350 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2000 Int # 4 2003 Int # 5 2000 Int # 4 2000 Int # 4 2000 Int # 4 2000 Int # 4 2000 Int # 4 2000 Int # 4 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2000 Int # 4 2006 Ford F-350 7740 TRACTOR

2 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 1 Work Performed:
Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Litter Pickup Box drag Box drag Box drag Box drag Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts

Date
2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014

Road
E 9th Street E 11th Street E Bay Shore Drive W 4th Street Baine Street E 8th Street Brinkley Street Bell Street W 3rd Street W 5th Street E 7th Street E Gulf Beach Drive

Equip
7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 2009 Hino

2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014

E Pine Avenue E 6th Street E 4th Street Gunn Street E Gulf Beach Drive

7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 2006 Ford F-350

2/25/2014

W Gulf Beach Drive

2006 Ford F-350

2/25/2014

W Gorrie Drive

2006 Ford F-350

Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc), 2/25/2014 Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc), 2/25/2014 Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc), 2/25/2014 Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way Box drag Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Litter Pickup Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 2/25/2014

E Gorrie Drive

2003 Int # 5

W 4th Street

2003 Int # 5

Bike Path (St. George Island)

2003 Int # 5

W 6th Street W Gulf Beach Drive

7740 TRACTOR 2009 Hino

2/25/2014

Bike Path (St. George Island)

2009 Hino

Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc), 2/25/2014 Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way Sidewalk Maintenance (Build, Take Out, etc), 2/25/2014 Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way Graded Road(s) Box drag 2/25/2014 2/25/2014

E 1st Street

2003 Int # 5

E 4th Street

2003 Int # 5

W 11th Street W 7th Street

12H GRADER 7740 TRACTOR

3 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 1 Work Performed:
Cut grass along shoulders of road on county right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Litter Pickup

Date
2/25/2014

Road
W 4th Street

Equip
2009 Hino

Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Graded Road(s) 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public

W Pine Avenue W Bay Shore Drive W 9th Street W 10th Street E Pine Avenue Porter Street W Sawyer Street Nedley Street Bradford Street Brown Street McCloud Street Gibson Street W 8th Street Akel Street Cook Street Marks Street Bledsoe Street Randolph Street Palmer Street Land Street Buck Street Patton Drive Bruce Street Quinn Street Wing Street 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Jackel 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014

12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 12H GRADER 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR 7740 TRACTOR Shuler Avenue 2009 Hino County Roads Eastpoint, Pinki Gilbert Street 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino Mack Dump Truck # 1

Old Ferry Dock Road N Bay Shore Drive Rose Drive Carroll Street Apple Way 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino

S Franklin Street School Road 2009 Hino

2009 Hino

4 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 1 Work Performed:

Date

Road
2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Jackel 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Jackel 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Jackel 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014

Equip
Barber St 2009 Hino 2009 Hino

Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public

South Bay Shore Drive Hatfield Street 2009 Hino Avenue D 2009 Hino

County Roads Eastpoint, Pinki County Roads, St. George Island County Roads Eastpoint, Pinki 1st Street 2009 Hino

Jeep none none

County Roads Eastpoint, Pinki 2nd Street 3rd Street David Street 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino

none

Material HAUL From:
Debris Debris Debris

Date
2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014

Road
Franklin Blvd E Gulf Beach Drive W Gulf Beach Drive

Cubic Yards
9 4.5 4.5

Tons
0 0 0 0

Debris

TOTAL 18 Date
2/18/2014 2/18/2014

Material HAUL To:
#57 rock #57 rock

Road
Franklin Blvd Franklin Blvd

Cubic Yards
9 9

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

#57 rock
89# Shell 2/17/2014 Franklin Blvd

TOTAL 18
9

89# Shell
Black Dirt 2/17/2014 Franklin Blvd

TOTAL 9
9

Black Dirt
Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/26/2014 Franklin Blvd Cook Street E 6th Street W Pine Avenue Brown Street Nedley Street Bradford Street Chili Blvd

TOTAL 9
9 18 18 18 6 6 6 18

5 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 1 Material HAUL To:
Lime Rock
Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt

Date
2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/20/2014 2/20/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014

Road
Creamer Street Begonia Street Patton Drive Brown Elementary School W 6th Street E 5th Street E 6th Street E Gulf Beach Drive W 9th Street W 8th Street W 7th Street E 1st Street

Cubic Yards TOTAL 99
9 9 9 18 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Milled Asphalt
Parking Bumpers 2/20/2014 Franklin Blvd

TOTAL 53
6

Parking Bumpers
Rebar 2/19/2014 Franklin Blvd

TOTAL 6
15

Rebar
Sand 2/25/2014 Bradford Street

TOTAL 15
18

Sand

TOTAL 18 Date Road
CR30A 12th Street SE 12th Street SE CR67 Avenue D S Heffernan Drive Chillas Hall Holland Avenue Jeff Sanders Road CR30A SE Bayview Drive Alligator Drive Bald Point Road Angus Morrison Pine Street 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014

District 2 Work Performed:

Equip
2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2009 Hino 2003 Int # 5 NEW HOLLAND TS115 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 2006 Ford F-350 NEW HOLLAND TS115 2006 Ford F-350 1998 Int # 3 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 Duvall Road none McIntyre Road none Crooked River Road none

Trim Trees 2/13/2014 Trim Trees 2/13/2014 Trim Trees 2/13/2014 Cut Trees down and removed, Trim Trees 2/17/2014 Box drag 2/18/2014 Sign Maintenance, Road Repair 2/18/2014 Sign Maintenance, Road Repair 2/18/2014 Sign Maintenance, Road Repair 2/18/2014 Box drag 2/18/2014 Sign Maintenance 2/19/2014 Driveway repair, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public

6 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 2 Work Performed:

Date

Road
Pinewood Avenue 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Oak Street 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Sanders 2/26/2014 Tom Roberts Road 2/26/2014 Lake Morality Road Oak Street Bald Point Road Lakeview Drive Gulf Shore BLVD 2/26/2014 Harbor Circle 2/26/2014 Fiesta Drive Carnival Lane Mardi Gras Way CR 370 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 George Vause Road

Equip
1998 Int # 3 McIntyre Road Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 County Roads, Alligator Point Chip Morrison Road 4X4 CR67 Duvall Road 4X4 none

Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Cleaned out culverts 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Litter Pickup 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/26/2014

Fuel Truck FORD F-150

2003 Int # 5 Fuel Truck FORD F-150

2003 Int # 5 County Roads, Alligator Point County Roads, Carrabelle, Cheryl

none none

Lakeview Drive Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 2009 Hino Duvall Road none

2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino McIntyre Road none 2009 Hino Harry Morrison Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino 2009 Hino Gulf Shore BLVD 4X4 Harbor Circle 4X4 2009 Hino

Fuel Truck FORD F-150

Fuel Truck FORD F-150

Material HAUL From:
Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris

Date
2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014

Road
Fiesta Drive Tom Roberts Road CR 370 Oak Street Bald Point Road Lakeview Drive Carnival Lane

Cubic Yards
1 1 1 4 1 1 1

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0

7 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 2 Material HAUL From:
Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris

Date
2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014

Road
Gulf Shore BLVD George Vause Road Lake Morality Road Mardi Gras Way Harbor Circle

Cubic Yards
1 1 4 1 1

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Debris
Trees Trees 2/13/2014 2/17/2014 12th Street SE CR67

TOTAL 18
9 9

Trees

TOTAL 18 Date
2/25/2014

Material HAUL To:
Lime Rock

Road
Carrabelle Cemetery

Cubic Yards
18

Tons
0 0

Lime Rock

TOTAL 18 Date Road
12th Street Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. 11th Street Avenue L 12th Street 24th Avenue Oak Drive Howell Lane 2/26/2014 Lockley 2/26/2014 Lockley 2/26/2014 Lockley 25th Avenue

District 3 Work Performed:

Equip
1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 12H GRADER 7740 TRACTOR County Roads Apalachicola, Noah County Roads Apalachicola, Noah County Roads Apalachicola, Noah 1998 Int # 3

Driveway repair 2/17/2014 Driveway repair 2/18/2014 Driveway repair 2/18/2014 Driveway repair 2/18/2014 Driveway repair 2/19/2014 Driveway repair 2/19/2014 Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/19/2014 Box drag 2/25/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out

none none Jeep

Pine Drive

1998 Int # 3

Material HAUL To:
Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna)

Date
2/17/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014

Road
12th Street Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. Avenue L 11th Street 12th Street 12th Street

Cubic Yards
9 9 9 9 9 9

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Yellow LimeRock (Marianna)

TOTAL 54

District 4 8 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 4 Work Performed:
Shoulder Work Flagged Culvert installation, Driveway repair Litter Pickup Shoulder Work Shoulder Work Flagged Shoulder Work Flagged

Date
2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014

Road
26th Avenue Bayview Drive Bayview Drive Apalachicola Air Port 26th Avenue 26th Avenue 26th Avenue 26th Avenue 26th Avenue 26th Avenue 26th Avenue Bayview Drive 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 Bayview Drive Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachee Street Magnolia Lane Apalachicola Air Port Magnolia Lane Paradise Lane Apalachicola Air Port Gibson Road Brownsville Road Apalachicola Air Port Linden Road Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Oyster Road CR30A 8 Mile 10 Mile Pal Rivers Road Gibson Road Odena Road Sas Road Cypress Street Brownsville Road Alan Drive

Equip
12H GRADER Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 1998 Int # 3 930A CAT LOADER 930A CAT LOADER 930A CAT LOADER Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 12H GRADER Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 none none 00 Mack for Loboy 26th Avenue 2003 Int # 5 26th Avenue 2003 Int # 5

Shoulder Work 2/13/2014 Shoulder Work 2/13/2014 Culvert installation 2/13/2014 Swept, Blowed off road/parking lot/intersection Swept, Blowed off road/parking lot/intersection Culvert installation Roll Material, Roll Material Loaded Trucks Driveway repair Litter Pickup, Picked up roots Loaded Trucks Graded Road(s) Graded Road(s) Graded Road(s) Shoulder Work Cut bushes back Cleaned off Fence Driveway repair Cleaned off Fence Loaded Trucks Pot hole Repair (Fill) Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Upgraded Driveway repair Sign Maintenance Driveway repair, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/20/2014

M313C EXCUVATOR 12H GRADER 930A CAT LOADER 1998 Int # 3 2006 Ford F-350 938 LOADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 12H GRADER 1998 Int # 3 TS100 TRACTOR 2000 Int # 4 1998 Int # 3 12H GRADER 2000 Int # 4 938 LOADER 12H GRADER 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 12H GRADER 1998 Int # 3 2006 Ford F-350 1998 Int # 3

9 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 4 Work Performed:

Date

Road
Long Road Linden Road Brownsville Road Apalachicola Air Port Highland Park Road Oyster Road Pal Rivers Road Alan Drive Pine Log Boat Ramp Paradise Lane Magnolia Circle Bluff Road 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 Squire Road Pal Rivers Road Brownsville Road Rosemont Street Brownsville Road Highland Park Road Apalachicola Air Port Bay City Road Linden Road

Equip
1998 Int # 3 M313C EXCUVATOR TS100 TRACTOR 2000 Int # 4 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 NEW HOLLAND TS115 1998 Int # 3 Teat Road Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 8 Mile 4X4 10 Mile 4X4 13 Mile 4X4 Fuel Truck FORD F-150 Fuel Truck FORD F-150 Fuel Truck FORD F-150

Driveway repair, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Culvert repair, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Cut bushes back 2/20/2014 Cleaned off Fence 2/20/2014 Driveway repair, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Driveway repair, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Blocked Off 2/20/2014 Driveway repair 2/20/2014 Box drag 2/20/2014 Box drag 2/20/2014 Box drag 2/20/2014 Litter Pickup 2/24/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/24/2014 Litter Pickup 2/24/2014 Cut bushes back 2/25/2014 Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 Cleaned off Fence 2/25/2014 Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public

1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 TS100 TRACTOR 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3 2000 Int # 4 1998 Int # 3 1998 Int # 3

Jakie Whitehurst Street

1998 Int # 3

2/26/2014 Smokey Parrish 2/26/2014 Smokey Parrish Gibson Road

County Roads, Apalachicola County Roads, Apalachicola 1998 Int # 3

none Jeep

Brownsville Road

1998 Int # 3

2/26/2014 Smokey Parrish

County Roads, Apalachicola

none

10 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 4 Work Performed:

Date

Road
Long Road

Equip
1998 Int # 3

Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Cut grass along shoulders of road on county 2/26/2014 right of way, Weed Eat & Cut Grass around signs & Culverts, Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out

Squire Road

1998 Int # 3

Hathcock Road

1998 Int # 3

Material HAUL From:
Black Dirt

Date
2/13/2014

Road
Bayview Drive

Cubic Yards
9

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Black Dirt
Debris Debris Debris Debris 2/13/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 Apalachicola Air Port Squire Road Pal Rivers Road Bluff Road

TOTAL 9
18 3 3 3

Debris
Ditch Dirt 2/13/2014 26th Avenue

TOTAL 27
9

Ditch Dirt
Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port Apalachicola Air Port

TOTAL 9
18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18

Lime Rock
Sand Sand 2/17/2014 2/25/2014 D.W. Wilson Ball Park Pine Log Boat Ramp

TOTAL 180
18 9

Sand
Trees 2/25/2014 Pine Log Road

TOTAL 27
9

Trees

TOTAL 9 Date
2/20/2014

Material HAUL To:
#57 rock

Road
Long Road

Cubic Yards
9

Tons
0 0 0 0

#57 rock
18" x 30' Culvert 2/13/2014 Bayview Drive

TOTAL 9
1

18" x 30' Culvert

TOTAL 1

11 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 4 Material HAUL To:
Black Dirt Black Dirt Black Dirt Black Dirt Black Dirt Black Dirt Black Dirt Black Dirt

Date
2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/20/2014 2/20/2014

Road
Gibson Road Magnolia Lane Oyster Road Sas Road Oyster Road Sas Road Long Road Alan Drive

Cubic Yards
9 18 18 18 18 18 18 18

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Black Dirt
Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock Lime Rock 2/13/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 Bayview Drive Air Port Road Sas Road Air Port Road Highland Park Road Sas Road

TOTAL 135
18 18 18 18 18 18

Lime Rock
Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt Milled Asphalt 2/20/2014 2/20/2014 2/20/2014 Alan Drive Bayview Drive Oyster Road

TOTAL 108
4.5 4.5 9

Milled Asphalt
Sand Sand Sand Sand Sand 2/17/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 2/19/2014 D.W. Wilson Ball Park Sas Road Sas Road Sas Road Sas Road

TOTAL 18
18 18 18 18 18

Sand
Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) 2/17/2014 2/18/2014 2/19/2014 2/20/2014 Apalachee Street Linden Road Cypress Street Highland Park Road

TOTAL 90
9 9 9 9

Yellow LimeRock (Marianna)

TOTAL 36 Date
2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/13/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/17/2014 2/18/2014

District 5 Work Performed:
Litter Pickup Cut Trees down and removed Cleaned out culverts Pot hole Repair (Fill) Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Litter Pickup Box drag

Road
Otterslide Road 5th Street Lighthouse Road Bear Creek Rd Wilderness Road Otterslide Road Ridge Road Jeffie Tucker Road

Equip
2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 M313C EXCUVATOR 2000 Int # 4 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 NEW HOLLAND TS115

12 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 5 Work Performed:

Date

Road
North Road Tallahassee Street Sand Beach Road Twin Lakes Road Bloody Bluff Road 1st Street E 8th Street Lindsey Road Whispering Pines Drive 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 Otterslide Road 2/24/2014 Lighthouse Road River Road Wilderness Road Bear Creek Rd

Equip
NEW HOLLAND TS115 2003 Int # 5 NEW HOLLAND TS115 2003 Int # 5 NEW HOLLAND TS115 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5 2006 Ford F-350 2003 Int # 5 Owl Creek Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 Gardners Landing Road Bloody Bluff Road Brick Yard Road Wright Lake Road Hickory Landing Wright Lake Road 4X4 none none none none none Fuel Truck FORD F-150

Box drag 2/18/2014 Litter Pickup 2/18/2014 Box drag 2/18/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/18/2014 Box drag 2/18/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/18/2014 Driveway repair 2/20/2014 Sign Maintenance 2/20/2014 Shoulder Work, Pot hole Repair (Fill) 2/20/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/24/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Cleaned out culverts Sign Maintenance, Washout Repair Litter Pickup Litter Pickup 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014

Ashley Landing Fuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 Sand Beach Road Hickory Landing 4X4 North Road none Fuel Truck FORD F-150 Fuel Truck FORD F-150 Fuel Truck FORD F-150 none Fuel Truck FORD F-150

Brick Yard Road 4X4 Bloody Bluff Road 4X4 Gardners Landing Road 4X4 Pitts Road 4X4

Fuel Truck FORD F-150 Fuel Truck FORD F-150 Fuel Truck FORD F-150

Sand Beach Road 4X4 Jeffie Tucker Road 4X4 2003 Int # 5 North Road 4X4

Fuel Truck FORD F-150

446 BACK HOE 2009 Hino 2003 Int # 5 2003 Int # 5

13 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 5 Work Performed:

Date

Road
Ridge Road 2/24/2014 Connector Road Ridge Road State Street State Street 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Massey 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Massey 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Massey 2/26/2014 Massey 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Massey 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 Wilderness Road 2/26/2014 Ridge Road 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014 2/26/2014

Equip
2003 Int # 5 Jeffie Tucker Road 1998 Int # 3 436 BACKHOE 436 BACKHOE 2003 Int # 5 CC Land 2009 Hino County Roads, Carrabelle, William 10th Street 2009 Hino none none

Litter Pickup 2/24/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Litter Pickup 2/25/2014 Cleaned ditches 2/25/2014 Culvert installation 2/25/2014 Driveway repair 2/25/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Weep Hole Maintenance Cut/ Cleared / Dug Out Cleaned ditches 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Cleaned ditches 2/26/2014 Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public Checked county roads for safety of traveling for public

Teresa Avenue 2000 Int # 4 County Roads, Eastpoint William 4th Street Mill Road 4X4 2009 Hino Fuel Truck FORD F-150 none

New River RoadFuel Truck FORD F-150 4X4 County Roads, Eastpoint William County Roads, Eastpoint William New River Roadnone County Roads, Eastpoint William Michael Way Mill Road 2000 Int # 4 none 2000 Int # 4 none Mack Dump Truck # 1 Jeep

Wylonda Avenue 2000 Int # 4 Moore Street 2000 Int # 4 Dunlap Road

2009 Hino

2009 Hino 2009 Hino

Tallahassee Street E Bay Drive Plum Street 2009 Hino 2009 Hino

Lighthouse Road

none

14 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

District 5 Material HAUL From:
Black Dirt

Date
2/17/2014

Road
Magnolia Bay Drive

Cubic Yards
18

Tons
0 0

Black Dirt

TOTAL 18 Date
2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/24/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014 2/25/2014

Material HAUL To:
Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris Debris

Road
Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill Landfill

Cubic Yards
1 4 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 3 3 1 9 4.5 4.5

Tons
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Debris
Lime Rock 2/20/2014 8th Street

TOTAL 45
9

Lime Rock
Milled Asphalt 2/17/2014 Bear Creek Rd

TOTAL 9
9

Milled Asphalt
Sand Sand 2/19/2014 2/25/2014 Sheriff's Office ( Jail ) State Street

TOTAL 9
18 9

Sand
Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) Yellow LimeRock (Marianna) 2/18/2014 2/18/2014 1st Street E 1st Street E

TOTAL 27
9 9

Yellow LimeRock (Marianna)

TOTAL 18

15 Detail from 2/13/2014 - 2/26/2014

FRANKLIN COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF
Solid Waste & Recycling  Animal Control
210 State Road 65 Eastpoint, Florida 32328 Tel.: 850-670-8167 Fax: 850-670-5716 Email: [email protected]

DIRECTOR’S REPORT FOR: The Franklin County Board of County Commissioners DATE: March 4, 2014 TIME: 9:00 A.M. SUBJECT(S): CENTRAL LANDFILL SEMI-ANNUAL MONITORING WELLS TESTING: FOR BOARD INFORMATION: Semi-annual testing was conducted on the monitoring wells at the Franklin County Central Landfill. Monitoring well MW-22 showed exceedances of total dissolved solids (TDS), benzene, sodium, arsenic, boron, and chloride. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection requests that the County initiate corrective actions in accordance with Rule 62-701.510(6)(c),FAC. Which states that evaluation monitoring shall continue and a Site Assessment Report be completed and sent to FDEP no later than August 11, 2014. No additional well installations or sampling activities will be needed. The required evaluation monitoring and Site Assessment Report have been coordinated with Trinity Analysis & Development Corporation at the approximate cost $9600. ACTION REQUESTED: None. Right-of-Way Debris Pickup / Recycle Material Hauled February 13th – February 26th FOR BOARD INFORMATION: February 13th – February 26th RIGHT–OF–WAY DEBRIS PICKUP Apalachicola Eastpoint St George Island Carrabelle Lanark Alligator Point
54.89 TONS 90.37 TONS 58.54 TONS 35.43 TONS 8.10 TONS -0- TONS

Apalachicol a Cardboard Plastic,Paper, Glass, Aluminum
6.35 TONS 3.60 TONS

RECYCLE MATERIAL HAULED Eastpoint St George Carrabelle Lanark Island
4.18 TONS 1.10 TONS 2.52 TONS 4.23 TONS 1.47 TONS 1.85 TONS .42 TONS 1.22 TONS

Alligator Point
-0- TONS .82 TONS

St James
-0- TONS -0- TONS

REQUESTED ACTION: None

28 Airport Road Apalachicola, Florida 32320 (850) 653-8977, Fax (850) 653-3643 [email protected]

Report to Board of County Commissioners

Date: March 04, 2014 Action Items: None

Information Items: 1. The Management Experts and Emergency Management worked on bid packages for the EOC wind retrofit mitigation grant project on February 28, 2014. I will work with Alan on getting the bid packages out and on making sure we have covered everything and follow the proper producers for the county. 2. Emergency Management has a county training and exercise needs planning session scheduled at the EOC for March12, 2014 at 9:00am. 3. March 13, 2014 my office will be attending the Region 2 meeting and will give me the opportunity to introduce my new staff members.

Sincerely,

Pamela Brownell
Pamela Brownell Director

Franklin County, Board Of Commissioners Hospital CEO report March 4, 2014 1. Lab Testing – Weems is now able to do lab test for County Employees that have Blue Cross and Blue Shield or Capital Health Plan by agreements with both LabCorp and Quest. In addition, through Lab Corp, we can do tests for any insurance requiring the patient to use a Quest Draw Site. 2. 2013 Audit of Financials Statements – has been completed and provided to the commission. The net profit/loss for Fiscal Year is -171,625. 3. December Financial report – the year to date financial performance for Weems is provided in the attached Income Statement and as follows:
$ 250,176 Hospital $ (40,950) Clinic $ 16,364 Ambulance $ 225,590 Total

4. BLS Schedule - The BLS ambulance will be scheduled from 10 am to 6 pm on Friday to Monday out of the Hospital. A review of the data has indicated that there are few if any runs during the interim period. 5. Insurance Signup Times - Beginning March 4th, a FL Health Connector representative will be on-site to assist residents with obtaining health insurance. Under the Affordable Care Act, the open enrollment period to sign-up ends 3/31/14. To assist with this limited time frame, a representative will be at Weems Hospital on Tuesdays from 9am to 3pm and on Wednesdays from 9am to 12pm. On Wednesday afternoons, a representative will be at Weems Medical Center East in Carrabelle from 1pm to 4pm. 6. Switch in Billing Companies – This past week, CSS took over the billing of the hospital claims. We began transitioning several weeks ago with the full transition being effective February 28th. Particular emphasis has been given by CSS and Weems to keeping the cash flow stable but the actual impact cannot be projected. We are holding off in switching EMS companies to limit the potential dip in cash at one time. 7. Payroll – at present Weems is able to meet it payroll obligations over time. Due to a recent dip in cash receipts, we asked for an advance from the commission. This could have alternately been done out of the money market. Had we been able to wait one more day, this would not have been an issue. It is a cash flow and timing issue. The primary issue is will the cash flow remain within normal bounds. The next two weeks will be critical in knowing what the cash position and requirements will be. I will attend the next Commission meeting later this month and update the commission on any changes in the matter along with recommendations or requests as needed. Our objective is to get to April when we get our quarterly ambulance subsidy and cost report settlement is received.

AVERAGE DAILY CENSUS FOR WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL – 2 YEARS

AVERAGE DAILY CENSUS

Sep-13 Aug-13 3.24 3.13 Sep-12 Aug-12 3.56 4.01

FY2014 Jan-14 Dec-13 Nov-13 Oct-13 3.13 3.39 3.70 2.00 Fy 2013 Jul-13 Jun-13 May-13 Apr-13 Mar-13 Feb-13 Jan-13 Dec-12 Nov-12 Oct-12 4.30 3.27 3.61 3.11 3.15 2.75 2.91 4.34 3.79 5.40 fy2012 FY 2012 Jul-12 Jun-12 May-12 Apr-12 Mar-12 Feb-12 Jan-12 Dec-11 Nov-11 Oct-11 2.14 3.52 1.75 1.94 2.04 3.37 2.92 4.08 3.24 3.91 12 MO = 3

GEORGE E WEEMS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL INCOME STATEMENT DECEMBER 31, 2013 Current Month
Hospital Operating Revenues Clinic Ambulance Total Hospital

Fiscal Year to Date
Clinic Ambulance Total

Inpatient Revenues Outpatient Revenues Emergency Depeartment Revenues
Total Patient Services Revenue

$

201,969 $ 267,914 391,162 861,045 (397,004) (127,381) 100,834 437,494 203,880 32,211 44,144 46,389 27,272 21,225 13,925 11,015 4,798 399 2,000 10,712 15,268 433,238 4,256 42,140 95 2,027 977 45,239

$ 99,076 99,076 (61,425) 37,651 41,959 6,124 872 1,718 2,293 1,356 56 2,826 671 57,876 (20,225) 10,000 10,000

$ 132,181 132,181 (70,054) 62,127 52,105 11,345 5,263 511 187 2,169 1,247 9,340 82,166 (20,039) 42,133 42,133
22,094 $

201,969 499,171 391,162 1,092,302 (528,483) (127,381) 100,834 537,272 297,944 49,680 50,279 48,108 30,077 22,768 16,150 15,087 4,798 399 2,000 20,722 15,268 573,280 (36,007) 42,133 52,140 95 2,027 977 97,372
61,364

$

594,175 $ 890,307 1,248,696 2,733,178 (1,246,517) (395,013) 100,834 1,192,481 618,772 103,608 192,513 108,277 80,151 84,152 43,612 34,040 16,368 1,146 4,245 10,329 66,124 45,804 1,409,141 (216,660) 140,773 295 321,807 3,961 466,835

$ 294,198 294,198 (182,623) 111,575 131,641 21,417 2,113 5,370 6,018 5,316 913 7,049 578 2,111 182,525 (70,950) 30,000 30,000

$ 594,175 295,056 1,479,561 1,248,696 295,056 (155,585) (200) 139,272 158,945 34,754 11,670 241 2,525 1,954 14,493 3,767 2,437 18,520 249,305 (110,034) 126,398 126,398
16,364 $

3,322,432 (1,584,725) (395,213) 100,834 1,443,328 909,358 159,779 206,296 113,888 88,694 91,422 59,018 44,856 16,368 1,146 4,822 12,766 86,755 45,804 1,840,972 (397,644) 126,398 170,773 295 321,807 3,961 623,233
225,590

Less: Contractual Allowances Bad Debt and Charity LIP & DISH
Net Patient Revenue

Operating Expenses Salaries and Wages Employee Benefits Professional Fees Purchased Services Clinical Supplies Non-Clinical Supplies Repairs & Maintenance Utilities Insurance Interest Expense Training & Development Marketing Other Depreciation Total Operating Expenses
Net Income or Loss from Operations Non-Operating Revenues & Expenses

County Sales Tax Subsidy Sales Tax Capital Sales Tax Reciepts Interest Income Grant Income Miscellaneous Income
Total Non-Operating Revenues & Expenses Net Income or Loss from Operations $

49,495

$

(10,225) $

$

250,176

$

(40,950) $

100%

20%

40%

60%

80%

0%

Was your registration handled in a professional and courteous manner? How would you rate the speed of the admission process? How would you rate the preadmission process? How would you rate the pleasantness of the room décor? How was the courtesy of the person who cleaned your room? How would you rate the room temperature? Rate how well things worked (TV, call bell, lights, bed, etc). If you were placed on a special/restricted diet, how well was it explained? How was the temperature of the meals (cold food cold, hot food hot)? How was the quality of the food? How was the courtesy of the person that served your food? Rate the waiting time for tests or treatments. How was the concern shown for your comfort during your tests or treatment? Did the staff explain what would happen during the tests or treatments? Rate the skill of the person who took your blood Rate the courtesy of the person who took your blood. Rate the courtesy and professionalism of the Radiology staff

n=12, Very Satisfied 87%, Satisfied 99%
Very Poor

Fair

In Patient Satisfaction Survey- January 2014

Poor

Good

Very Good

Page 1 of 4

100%

20%

40%

60%

80%

0%

How often did the nurses listen to you carefully? How often did the nurses explain things in a way you could understand? After you pressed the call bell, how often did you get help as soon as you wanted it? How often did the doctors treat you with courtesy and respect? How often did the doctors listen to you carefully? How often did the doctors explain things in a way you could understand? how often were your room and bathroom kept clean?

how often was the area around your room quiet at night? How often did you get help in getting to the bathroom or in using a bedpan as soon as you wanted it? How often was your pain controlled? How often did the staff do everything they could to help you with your pain? How often did the hospital staff tell you what the medicine was for? How often did the hospital staff describe possible side effects in a way that you could understand?

In Patient Satisfaction Survey- January 2014

Never

Always

Usually

Sometimes

Page 2 of 4

In Patient Satisfaction Survey- January 2014
Would you recommend this hospital to your family and friends?
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Definetly No Probably No Probably Yes Definetly Yes

How would you rate our hospital on a scale from 0 to 10?
6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Page 3 of 4

In Patient Satisfaction Survey- January 2014
What do our patients have to say about us?
                 What did you like most about our facility? Temp & clean The care and friendliness Very professional Good care, locally Food Everyone cares They were nice and very helpful The staff was the best Excellent service very pleased. What you may lack in high-tech diagnostic equipment, you make up in “personal” care. What did you like least about our facility? Going to bath room TV reception not good Is there anyone you would like to mention? Courtney & Debbie Everything was good; everyone was great. Can’t remember and in fact did not learn everyone’s name, but all were courteous, caring, and professional. Everyone did a thumbs up How else might we improve? Nametags? I have no complaints at all the way it is now.

Page 4 of 4

Overall Patient Satisfaction Scores
In-Patient January 2013 February 2013 March 2013 April 2013 May 2013 June 2013 July 2013 August 2013 September 2013 October 2013 November 2013 December 2013 January 2014 67% (very satisfied) 92% (satisfied/very satisfied) 59% (very satisfied) 94% (satisfied/very satisfied) 79% (very satisfied) 91% (satisfied/very satisfied) 80% (very satisfied) 97% (satisfied/very satisfied) 88% (very satisfied) 98% (satisfied/very satisfied) 88% (very satisfied) 99% (satisfied/very satisfied) 93% (very satisfied) 97% (satisfied/very satisfied) 95% (very satisfied) 98% (satisfied/very satisfied) 87% (very satisfied) 97% (satisfied/very satisfied) 94% (very satisfied) 96% (satisfied/very satisfied) 74% (very satisfied) 89% (satisfied/very satisfied) 89% (very satisfied) 98%(satisfied/very satisfied) 87% (very satisfied) 99%(satisfied/very satisfied) ER Patient 91% (very satisfied) 99% (satisfied/very satisfied) 86% (very satisfied) 98% (satisfied/very satisfied) 87% (very satisfied) 98% (satisfied/very satisfied) 78% (very satisfied) 91% (satisfied/very satisfied) 90% (very satisfied) 97% (satisfied/very satisfied) 92% (very satisfied) 99% (satisfied/very satisfied) 90% (very satisfied) 99% (satisfied/very satisfied) 88% (very satisfied) 98% (satisfied/very satisfied) 89% (very satisfied) 98% (satisfied/very satisfied) 71% (very satisfied) 79% (satisfied/very satisfied) 86% (very satisfied) 99% (satisfied/very satisfied) 81% (very satisfied) 87% (satisfied/very satisfied) 62% (very satisfied) 75% (satisfied/very satisfied)

100%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

0%
Registration professional and courteous Wait time before brought to room Wait time before seen by ER physician Nurses professional and courteous Nurses explain procedures & answer questions Nurses concern for privacy Doctors courteous and attentive to needs Doctors took the time to listen Doctors kept informed about treatment Doctors showed concern for comfort Lab staff professional & courteous Radiology staff professional & courteous Respiratory staff professional & courteous Courtesy with which family and friends were treated Staff concern to keep family & friends informed Staff concern to let family and friends be with Courtesy of person who took personal/insurance Privacy when personal/insurance info taken Ease of giving personal/insurance info Kept informed about delays Degree staff cared about patient as a person Info about home care Condition of ER facilities and equipment Overall experience in ER Likelihood of recommending

N= 18

ER Patient Satisfaction Survey-January 2014

Very Satisfied 62%
Fair Poor Good Very Poor Very Good

Satisfied 75%

Page 1 of 3

100%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

0% Fair Poor Good Very Poor Very Good

Re gis tra tio n Nu rs e Do s ct or s Ra La b di o Re log Ke F y am sp Ca p t i i r i nf l re or y a n at or d m y ab df ou ed rie ab tp nd ou at s ie td n e ta In fo s a la y s ab ou pe r so th n o m Ov C e c Lik era ond ll e it i are el on ih oo x pe of r d of ienc E R e re in co ER m m en di ng

ER Patient Satisfaction Survey-January 2014

Page 2 of 3

ER Patient Satisfaction Survey-January 2014
If you experienced another emergency condition, would you return to Weems ER?

Yes No No Response

What do our patients have to say about us?
What did you like most about our facility?  Was perfect  Fast friendly and clean How else might we improve?  Don’t know

Page 3 of 3

Governing Board of Directors
Members Present: Members Absent: Staff Present:

2014

February 7, 2014
Jim Bachrach, Acting Chair; Duffie Harrison, Secretary; Anne Wilson; Robert Davis; Deborah Huckeba; and Homer McMillan Pat Conrad, MD Ray Brownsworth, CEO; Ginny Griner, HR/ Med Staff; Becky Gibson, DON; Craig Gibson, POD; Heather Huron, Admin. Assistant Lauren Faison, TMH Liaison; Alan Feiffer, Concerned Citizens of Franklin Co. ; Larry Throneberry, Adams Management Services Corporation; Joe Gordie, Adams Management Services Corporation Discussion Call to Order  The meeting was called to order at 1:30pm.  Minutes from 11/14/2013 and 12/13/2013 were presented for approval. Action

Guests Present:



A motion was made by Huckeba to approve the minutes as presented, seconded by Davis. Motion carried unanimously.

County Report  No report available TMH Report  Lauren Faison shared that she would be obtaining a market share report for Weems from Cindy Blair, TMH VP of Data Quality. She would begin bringing this report on a monthly basis.

 

Faison offered to coordinate a meeting with TMH Service Line Administrators and Weems to determine the existing gaps in healthcare services and how TMH can assist to fill the needs. Faison gave an update on the continued growth of telemedicine services. She stated that Weems East continued to be the largest referral source. Faison reported coordinating efforts with Dermatology Associates to provide tele-consults at the Carrabelle location. She also shared her work with TMH neurologists to develop a stroke intervention program

Page 1 of 5

Governing Board of Directors
through telemedicine. In regards to legislative efforts, Faison shared that she and Dr. Watson recently made a live presentation before the House of Representatives to promote reimbursement for telemedicine.
New Facility Construction Timeline  Larry Throneberry, Adams Management Services, reviewed a construction timeline from present to completion. Throneberry stated the critical goal to meet the current year’s USDA funding cycle. Construction Format Presentation  Joe Gordy, Adams Management Services, reviewed construction methods for the new facility. o Design-Bid-Build vs. Design-Build vs. Construction Manager At-Risk o Due to constraints, Brownsworth recommended Design-Build method.

2014

February 7, 2014



A motion was made by Huckeba to approve the Design-Build method, seconded by McMillan. Motion carried unanimously. A motion was made by McMillan to approve Phase 1 of the Adams proposal at a cost of $14,000, seconded by Davis. Motion carried unanimously.

Adams Healthcare Proposal for RFP Management  Adams Management Services Proposal for Hospital Expansion & Renovation for Project Management Services was presented for approval. Phase 1: Team Procurement and Project Planning, cost not to exceed $14,000 Phase 2: Design and Construction, cost $10,000 per month o Bachrach expressed concern with undetermined length of phase 2 at a cost of $10,000/month. Throneberry stated that he could give a maximum cost to not exceed.



BKD Proposal for Feasibility Study  Proposal from BKD for Phase 2 of the feasibility study was presented for approval. In Phase 2, BKD would examine the financial forecast with an objective of expressing an Opinion Letter as to the feasibility of project affordability.



A motion was made by Huckeba to approve the BKD proposal for Phase 2 of the feasibility study to result in an Opinion Letter at a cost of $60,000, seconded by Davis.

Page 2 of 5

Governing Board of Directors

2014

February 7, 2014 Motion carried unanimously. Brownsworth will take the proposal to the BOCC for approval.
CEO Report Consent Agenda The following were presented for approval on the Consent Agenda.  Patient Satisfaction Report  Designation of Corporate Officers o Compliance Officer- Ginny Griner o Patient Safety Officer- Becky Gibson o Privacy Officer- Bobbie Turrell o Safety/ Environment of Care Officer- Craig Gibson o Security Officer- Kevin Ward  Designation of External Risk Manager o Day Ann Logue, RN, LHRM with Day A. Hopes & Associates  Disaster Plan 2014  Risk Management & Regulatory Board Summary Report HealthTrust Proposal  Brownsworth stated his intentions to move to an exclusive GPO contract with HealthTrust. He informed the board that a market study had been performed on medications and supplies. The study results showed that the HealthTrust GPO could save 30%, equivalent to $47,000/year, on supplies. The pharmaceutical vendor may remain the same due to a projected savings of only 5% with medications. Financial Report  September 2013 Income Statement & Balance Sheet, October 2013 Income Statement & Balance Sheet, 2013 Retained Earnings Reconciliation, and Summary of Fiscal Year 2013 Financials were presented for review.  Brownsworth shared that the agreement with Ray Leadbetter had been severed due to his inability to meet contractual obligations. Roberson & Associates had been engaged to assist with the financials. Leadbetter completed the financials through fiscal year end. Roberson & Assoc. began with the October 2013 financials. Brownsworth stated that he would be participating with



A motion was made by Harrison to approve the Consent Agenda as presented, seconded by Wilson. Motion carried unanimously.

Page 3 of 5

Governing Board of Directors
reconciliations. Davis questioned the daily batch process. Davis stated that back up detail should be attached with all journal entries. Brownsworth requested that Davis come by the finance office mid-week and review with James Roberson. Administrative Team Updates  B. Gibson reported o Continued electronic health record implementation and training over the next 6 weeks with May 1, 2014 as the full implementation date o Revenue Cycle Team meetings every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with the focused intention of improving the revenue cycle process and cash flow o In-patient reimbursement decrease due to DRG payment system effective 10/2013; previously payment was made per day o In response to Bachrach’s inquiry regarding Prolia injections, Gibson confirmed that the hospital has been preforming the injections for about 6 months o An Open House event will be held at Weems West on February 24th from 2pm to 4pm. o Clinic volume of approximately 15 patients per provider per day; Charbonneau’s volume has remained steady while Whaley’s has decreased. o Process improvements for clinic patient recall visits and Medicare physicals  Griner reported o Roy “Skip” Parker, PA-C would be seeing patients on Mondays at Weems Medical Center West starting Monday, February 10th o 3 new physicians would be presented for privileges at the Tuesday, February 11th Medical Staff meeting o Quest Lab and Labcorp have been contracted to provide 3rd party billing capabilities. Quest is currently limited to Weems and county employees with BCBS. The process of becoming a Quest lab station has begun. The Labcorp contract will allow the hospital to accept CHP patients. While the reimbursement will be less, it will allow the hospital to provide a community service and positively promote the hospital in the community.  C. Gibson reported o Working with the ambulance department to track run reports and decrease overtime. Old Business/ New Business  Brownsworth presented Rick Watson as Comm. Jackel’s appointee to the BOD.

2014

February 7, 2014



A motion to approve Rick Watson to the BOD was made

Page 4 of 5

Governing Board of Directors

2014

 

February 7, 2014 by Davis, seconded by Huckeba. Motion carried unanimously.
In an effort to expedite the new facility process, Harrison made a recommendation to delegate one board member to speak on behalf of the BOD. Bachrach agreed to be the representative. McMillan made a motion to set aside a segment at the beginning of each board meeting for public comments. After discussion, the motion was amended to allow any number of people to speak during the specified time, but individual comments would be limited to 3 minutes each.



 Bachrach reminded each board member to communicate with their county commissioners. Adjournment  The meeting was adjourned at 3:39pm.

A motion was made by McMillan to limit public comment to the beginning of each meeting with a maximum time of 3 minutes per speaker, seconded by Wilson. Motion carried 5 to 1 with Harrison in opposition.

Page 5 of 5

Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida
Special-Purpose Financial Statements September 30, 2013

Certified Public Accountants

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219-B Avenue E • Apalachicola, FL 32320
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TABLE OF CONTENTS FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA HOSPITAL FUND For the Year Ended September 30, 2013

Table of Contents Independent Auditors’ Report ........................................................................................... Special-Purpose Financial Statements Special-Purpose Statement of Net Position .................................................................... Special-Purpose Statements of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Position ........................................................................................... Special-Purpose Statement of Cash Flows ..................................................................... Notes to Special-Purpose Financial Statements .............................................................. Compliance Section Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting And On Compliance And Other Matters Based On An Audit Of Financial Statements Performed In Accordance With Government Auditing Standards ................................................................................... Schedule of Findings and Responses .............................................................................. 3

1

5 6 8

16 18

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INDEPENDENT AUDITORS’ REPORT Board of Directors George E. Weems Memorial Hospital Franklin County, Florida Apalachicola, Florida Report on the Financial Statements We have audited the accompanying special-purpose financial statements of the Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida Hospital, as of and for the year ended September 30, 2013, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the Hospital’s basic financial statements as listed in the table of contents. Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinions. Opinions In our opinion, the special-purpose financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Hospital as of September 30, 2013, and the respective changes in financial position, cash flows thereof, for the year then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.. Basis of Accounting As discussed in note-1, the special-purpose financial statements present only the Hospital Fund and do not purport to, and do not, present fairly the financial position of Franklin County, Florida as of September 30, 2013, and the changes in its financial position, or, where applicable, its cash flows for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Other Reporting Required by Government Auditing Standards In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated February 27, 2014, on our consideration of the Hospital’s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the Hospital’s internal control over financial reporting and compliance. Restriction on Use This report is intended solely for the information and use of the Hospital, it’s management, the Board of County Commissioners of Franklin County, Florida, and the State of Florida Auditor General, and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties. Apalachicola, FL February 27, 2014

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FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA HOSPITAL FUND Special-Purpose Statement of Net Position – Proprietary Fund For the Year Ended September 30, 2013

ASSETS Current Assets Cash and cash equivalents Accounts receivable (net of allowance for doubtful accounts) Due from other funds Prepaid expenses Total current assets Noncurrent Assets Capital assets Land Buildings Equipment and furniture Construction in progress Total capital assets Less accumulated depreciation Net capital assets (net of accumulated depreciation) Total Assets

$

397,574 687,740 165,117 75,826 1,326,257

13,400 1,594,815 1,858,367 342,094 3,808,676 (1,354,469) 2,454,207 $ 3,780,464

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 3

FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA HOSPITAL FUND Special-Purpose Statement of Net Position – Proprietary Fund (continued) For the Year Ended September 30, 2013

LIABILITIES Current Liabilities Accounts payable Accrued liabilities Compensated absences - current Leases payable - current Notes payable - current Total current liabilities Noncurrent Liabilities Compensated absences Leases payable Notes payable Total noncurrent liabilities Total Liabilities Net Position: Net investment in capital assets Unrestricted Total Net Position

$

208,164 185,627 26,155 63,581 85,714 569,241 107,113 85,288 75,001 267,402 836,643

2,144,623 799,198 $ 2,943,821

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 4

STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES, AND CHANGES IN NET POSITION – PROPRIETARY FUND
HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013

Operating Revenues Net patient service revenue Other Total operating revenues Operating expenses Employee leasing Advertising Licenses and permits Professional services Training and development Insurance Other contract services Other patient care related costs Repairs and maintenance Minor equipment Supplies Clinical supplies Travel Utilities Other current charges Depreciation Total operating expenses Operating Income (loss) Nonoperating revenues (expense) Transfers in Interest income Operating contributions and grants Interest expense Total Nonoperating revenue (expense) Change in net position Net position, beginning of year Prior period adjustment – note 8 Net position, end of year

$ 5,198,022 241,447 5,439,469 3,836,846 65,585 30,044 833,087 11,492 441,976 609,115 163,060 68,515 40,664 88,514 575,510 31,789 183,165 330,763 307,806 7,617,931 (2,178,462) 1,601,060 1,949 418,764 (14,936) 2,006,837 (171,625) 3,068,711 46,735 $ 2,943,821

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 5

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS – PROPRIETARY FUND
HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013

Operating activities Receipts from customers Payments to suppliers and others Payments to employees Net cash used in operating activities Noncapital financing activities Contributions and grants Transfers in Net cash provided by noncapital financing activities Capital and related financing activities Acquisition of capital assets Payments on long-term debt Interest paid on long-term debt Net cash used in capital and related financing activities Investing activities Interest received Net cash provided by investing activities Net increase in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents, beginning Cash and cash equivalents, ending

$ 5,968,682 (3,912,332) (3,801,837) (1,745,487) 418,764 1,601,060 2,019,824 (298,519) (148,347) (15,539) (462,405) 1,949 1,949 (186,119) 583,693 $ 397,574

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 6

STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS – PROPRIETARY FUND (continued)
HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013

Reconciliation of operating income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities Operating income (loss) Adjustments to reconcile operating income (loss) to net cash used in operating activities Depreciation expense (Increase) decrease in Accounts receivable (net) Due from other funds Prepaid expenses Deposits (Increase) decrease in Compensated absences Accounts payable Accrued liabilities Deferred revenue Total adjustments Net cash used in operating activities

$ (2,178,462)

307,806 529,213 58,880 6,685 25,000 35,009 (29,710) (286,045) (213,863) 432,975 $ (1,745,487)

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements. 7

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Basis of Presentation The Hospital operates as a proprietary fund and applies all applicable Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) pronouncements. A Proprietary type fund is used to account for operations that are financed and operated in a manner similar to private business enterprises, where the intent of the governing body is that the costs (expenses, including depreciation) of providing foods of services to the general public on a continuing basis be financed or recovered primarily through user charges. The Hospital exercises oversight responsibility through designation of management, budgetary review and approval, and financial management. Reporting Entity Activity and financial position of the George E. Weems Memorial Hospital (the Hospital) makes up the hospital fund which is an enterprise fund of Franklin County, Florida. Measurement Focus, Basis of Accounting, and Financial Statement Presentation The accompanying special-purpose financial statements are reported using the economic resources measurement focus, and the accrual basis of accounting. Revenues are reported when earned and expenses are recorded when a liability is incurred, regardless of the timing of related cash flows. There were no entities that required inclusion as component units within the Hospital’s Special-Purpose Financial Statements. Proprietary funds distinguish operating revenues and expenses from Nonoperating items. Operating revenues and expenses generally result from providing services and producing and delivering goods in connection with a proprietary fund’s principal ongoing operations. The principal operating revenue of the Hospital is charges to customers for medical services. Operating expenses include the cost of services and supplies, administrative expenses, and depreciation on capital assets. All revenues and expenses not meeting this definition are reported as nonoperating revenues and expenses. Use of Estimates The preparation of special-purpose financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and disclosures. Accordingly, actual results could differ from those estimates. Cash and Cash Equivalents The Hospital considers certificates of deposit and other highly liquid debt instruments with initial maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents. 8

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 1 – SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (continued) Capital Assets It is the Hospital’s policy to capitalize property and equipment over $5,000. Lesser amounts are expensed. Property and equipment is valued at historical cost or estimated historical cost if actual historical cost is not available. Donated fixed assets are valued at their estimated fair value on the date donated. Depreciation of fixed assets is charged as an expense against operations. Depreciation has been provided over the estimated useful lives of the assets using the straight-line method. The useful lives are generally as follows: Buildings Equipment and furniture Use of Restricted Assets It is generally the practice of the Hospital to utilize restricted net position before unrestricted net position when possible. Subsequent Events Management has evaluated subsequent events through the issuance date of the financial statements. NOTE 2 – CASH AND INVESTMENTS All Hospital depositories are banks designated by the State Treasurer as qualified public depositories. Chapter 280, Florida Statutes “Florida Security for Public Deposits Act” provides procedures for public depositories to insure monies in banks and savings and loans are collateralized with the Treasurer as an agent for the public entities. All Hospital cash consists of checking accounts and interest-bearing time deposits in a local bank. The Hospital held no investments at September 30, 2013 Interest Rate Risk At September 30, 2013, the Hospital did not hold any investments that were considered to be an interest rate risk. Credit Risks At September 30, 2013, the Hospital did not hold any investments that were considered to be a credit risk. 9 40 Years 3-10 Years

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 2 – CASH AND INVESTMENTS (continued) Custodial Risk At September 30, 2013, the Hospital did not hold any deposits or investments that were considered to be a custodial risk. Concentration of Credit Risk At September 30, 2013, the Hospital did not hold any investments that were considered to be a concentration of credit risk. NOTE 3 – ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Accounts receivable are shown at their net realizable value and include amounts due from customers for medical services served by the Hospital as follows: September 30, 2013 Accounts receivable Less allowance for doubtful accounts Accounts receivable, net $ 2,994,452 (2,306,712) $ 687,740

Accounts receivable are recorded based upon medical services provided. An allowance for doubtful accounts is established for estimated amounts not expected to be collected.

10

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 4– CAPITAL ASSETS Capital assets activity for the year ended September 30, 2013, was as follows: Balance 09/30/12 Proprietary Fund Capital assets not being depreciated Construction in progress Land Total capital assets, not being depreciated Capital assets being depreciated: Buildings Equipment and furniture Total capital assets being depreciated Less accumulated depreciation Total capital assets, being depreciated, net Total capital assets, net Balance 09/30/13

Increases (Decreases) — $ — — — — — — —

$

334,494 $ 13,400

7,600 $ —

342,094 13,400

347,894

7,600 — 290,919 290,919 307,806

355,494

1,594,815 1,567,448 3,162,263 1,046,663

1,594,815 1,858,367 3,453,182 1,354,469

2,115,600 $ 2,463,494 $

(16,887) (9,287) $

2,098,713

— $ 2,454,207

11

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 5 – NONCURRENT LIABILITIES Noncurrent liabilities of the Hospital for the year ended September 30, 2013, were as follows:
Balance September 30, 2012 Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development – Loan #1 payable in quarterly payments of $10,714 plus interest at 3%. Matures August 2015. Office of Tourism, Trade, and Economic Development – Loan #2 payable in quarterly payments of $10,714 plus interest at 3%. Matures in May 2015. Olympus – Colonoscope lease payable in monthly payments of $2,067 including interest at 14%. Matures in August 2014 Med One Capital Funding, LLC Pharmacy dispenser lease payable in monthly payments of $2,316 including interest at 0%. Ricoh – copier lease payable In monthly payments of $1,334 Including interest at 5%. Matures October 2014. Dell Computer Leasing – payable $271 monthly including interest at 9.5%. Matures March 2017. Liability for compensated absences Total Balance September 30, 2013 Due Within One Year

Additions

Deductions

$

117,857

$



$

(42,857) $

75,000

$

42,858

128,572



(42,857)

85,715

42,857

43,046



(20,258)

22,788

22,788



136,618

(30,102)

106,516

27,787

21,521



(10,051)

11,470

10,565

10,317 98,259 $ 419,572

— 35,009 $ 171,627

(2,222) — $ (148,347) $

8,095 133,268 442,852 $

2,441 25,321 174,617

12

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 5 – NONCURRENT LIABILITIES (continued) Future debt service requirements on noncurrent liabilities are summarized below:
OTTED Loan #1
Year Ending September 30, 2014 2015 Total $ Principal 42,858 32,142 75,000 $ Interest 1,768 512 2,280 $ Total 44,626 32,654 77,280 $

OTTED Loan #2
Principal 42,856 42,859 85,715 $ Interest 2,090 833 2,923 $ Total 44,946 43,692 88,638

$

$

$

$

$

$

The Hospital enters into various lease agreements that are accounted for as capital leases. Future minimum payments for capitalized leases are as follows:
Computers
Year Ending September 30, 2014 2015 2016 2017 Total $ Principal 2,441 2,683 2,950 21 8,095 $ Interest 813 571 304 2 1,690 $ Total 3,254 3,254 3,254 23 9,785

Pharmacy Dispenser
Principal $ 27,787 27,787 27,787 23,155 106,516 $ Interest — — — — — $ Total 27,787 27,787 27,787 23,155 106,516

$

$

$

$

$

$

Copier
Year Ending September 30, 2014 2015 Total $ Principal 10,565 905 11,470 $ Interest 334 3 337 $ Total 10,899 908 11,807 $ Principal 22,788 — 22,788

Colonoscope
Interest $ 1,546 — 1,546 $ Total 24,334 — 24,334

$

$

$

$

$

$

The carrying value of the equipment under capital lease net of accumulated depreciation was $169,634 as of September 30, 2013.

13

NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS HOSPITAL FUND OF FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 NOTE 6 – EMPLOYEE LEASE On July 20, 2010, the Hospital entered into an agreement with Fortune Business Solutions to provide employees for the Hospital. Under the agreement, Fortune Business Solutions is the employer of all persons working at the Hospital. The Hospital reimburses Fortune Business Solutions for all wages and management fees associated with the lease. The agreement automatically renews each year unless written notice is provided 60 days prior to the beginning of the next term. Employee leasing costs totaled $3,836,846 for the year ended September 30, 2013. NOTE 7 – RISK MANAGEMENT The Hospital is exposed to various risks of loss related to torts; theft of, damage to and destruction of assets; errors or omissions; and natural disasters for which the government carries commercial insurance. Insurance against losses are provided for the following types of risk: • • • General and automobile liability Real and personal property damage Public officials’ liability

NOTE 8 – PRIOR PERIOD ADJUSTMENT As a result of corrections made during the year the net position was increased $46,735. Prior period adjustments of an increase of $432,361 for management fees and accrued payroll, $13,393 for leased equipment previously expensed, and a decrease of $399.019 in patient accounts receivable from prior years deemed not to be due.

14

COMPLIANCE SECTION

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REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING AND ON COMPLIANCE AND OTHER MATTERS BASED ON AN AUDIT OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS PERFORMED IN ACCORDANCE WITH GOVERNMENT AUDITING STANDARDS Board of Directors George E. Weems Memorial Hospital Franklin County, Florida Apalachicola, Florida We have audited, in accordance with the auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, the financial statements of the Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida, as of and for the year ended, September 30, 2013, and the related notes to the financial statements, which collectively comprise the Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida’s special-purpose financial statements and have issued our report thereon dated February 27, 2014. Internal Control Over Financial Reporting In planning and performing our audit of the financial statements, we considered the Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida’s internal control over financial reporting (internal control) to determine the audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances for the purpose of expressing our opinions on the financial statements, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida’s internal control. Our consideration of internal control was for the limited purpose described in the preceding paragraph and was not designed to identify all deficiencies in internal control that might be material weaknesses or significant deficiencies and therefore, material weaknesses or significant deficiencies may exist that were not identified. However, as described in the accompanying schedule of findings and questioned costs, we identified certain deficiencies in internal control that we consider to be material weaknesses and significant deficiencies. A deficiency in internal control exists when the design or operation of a control does not allow management or employees, in the normal course of performing their assigned functions, to prevent, or detect and correct, misstatements on a timely basis. A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the entity’s financial statements will not be prevented, or detected and corrected on a timely basis. We consider the deficiencies described in the accompanying schedule of findings and responses to be material weaknesses. (13-01 and 13-02). 16

A significant deficiency is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control that is less severe than a material weakness, yet important enough to merit attention by those charged with governance. Compliance and Other Matters As part of obtaining reasonable assurance about whether the Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida’s special-purpose financial statements are free from material misstatement, we performed tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements, noncompliance with which could have a direct and material effect on the determination of financial statement amounts. However, providing an opinion on compliance with those provisions was not an objective of our audit, and accordingly, we do not express such an opinion. The results of our tests disclosed no instances of noncompliance or other matters that are required to be reported under Government Auditing Standards. The Hospital Fund of Franklin County, Florida’s Response to Findings The Hospital’s response to the findings identified in our audit is described in the accompanying schedule of findings and responses. The Hospital’s response was not subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the financial statements and, accordingly, we express no opinion on it. Purpose of this Report The purpose of this report is solely to describe the scope of our testing of internal control and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control or on compliance. This report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the entity’s internal control and compliance. This report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the entity’s internal control and compliance. Accordingly, this communication is not suitable for any other purpose.

Apalachicola, FL February 27, 2014

Vance CPA, LLC

17

FRANKLIN COUNTY, FLORIDA HOSPITAL FUND Summary Schedule of Current Year Audit Findings and Responses For the Year Ended September 30, 2013 13-01 (prior year 12-01 and 11-01) Significant Adjustments Required Significant adjustments to the financial records were made in order for the specialpurpose financial statements to conform to U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Recommendation: Additional personnel be hired to provide the accounting knowledge to insure financial records are maintained according to generally accepted accounting principles. Response: The Hospital has added additional personnel to correct this issue. 13-02 (prior year 12-02 and 11-02) Inadequate Design of Internal Control The internal control system is inadequately designed to prepare the special-purpose financial statements without significant risk of misstatement Recommendation: Internal control should be modified so to include personnel with adequate knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles in the preparation of the financial statements. Response: The Hospital has added additional personnel to correct this issue.

18

Report to the Board of County Commissioners March 4, 2014 1-Inform the Board that the US Dept. of Commerce has allocated $6.3M for the Apalachicola Bay oyster failure. The funds will most likely be sent to FWC, and perhaps the Workforce Board, for actual disbursement as the two largest components of the funds are for worker retraining, and oyster bed restoration. Details have not been released on when funds will become available. 2- Inform the Board that the Governor has appointed his six appointments to the RESTORE Council. While the appointments are all from northwest Florida, only one, Mr, Mike Sole, has working knowledge of Franklin County and the Apalachicola Bay. 3- Board action to sign a letter requesting a boundary modification of an existing grant so that the county can be reimbursed for some to all of the funds used to purchase the property in Eastpoint behind the old Jr. Food Store and across the street from the Eastpoint pavilion. The state is willing to pay for an appraisal, and then reimburse the county for the appraised value of the land. 4- Board action to award low bid to Poloronis Construction for drainage and security work at the Apalachicola airport and to sign contract documents in the amount of $375,199.35. Poloronis Construction’s bid was for $538,253.90 but the scope of the work has been revised to fit the grant funds available. The work that was removed from this project will still be done, but we are waiting for a soon to be released $2.4M JPA for more drainage improvements at the airport to reschedule the work. The $2.4M JPA work will also be bid out. 5- Board action to continue LAP certified status in order to be eligible to receive DOT funds. Examples of current LAP projects are: Bluff Road widening and resurfacing, Carrabelle multi-use path, and the Alligator Point Mulit-Use path. The Board action is to direct the Chairman to sign the LAP agreements and to approve a Resolution appointing a staff person to fill the following required positions: Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Liaison Officer; Title VI Officer; Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Officer, and Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator. 6- Board action to clarify the record that Ms. Carol Barfield is the Board’s appointment for the Circuit 2 DJJ Board in place of Mr. David Walker. 7- Board action to approve Emo Architects to create bid documents and supervise construction of replacement HVAC on courthouse. The existing units are over 20 years old and are no longer repairable. The new units will be more energy efficient. Estimated project construction cost is $50K and will come out of courthouse maintenance.

8- Inform Board that Mr. Cliff Butler has resigned from county Housing Board. Mr. Butler was an appointment out of Commissioner Massey’s district. I have spoken to Commissioner Massey about a replacement. 9- Board direction on whether the Board wants to allow a limited number of vendors, like 2, to set up in specific areas at Carrabelle Beach Park. Ms. Nikki Millender has been approached by a vendor interested in selling ice cream during the summer. Ms. Millender has determined that there is limited space if the Board wants to allow vendors in the Park. Vendors can not set up in the St. George Island Park because of a reverter clause on the property that says the county can not allow commercial activities within the property that was given to the county. 10- Inform Board that the NACo conference for which Mr. Brian Deloge, Leon County Commissioner, will be seeking the position of a NACo Vice-President will be held July 11-14, 2014. Board direction on whether Board members want to attend.

NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT

Consolidated Annual Report March 1, 2014
ANNUAL REPORT 2014-01

On the cover, clockwise from upper left: Pitt Spring on Econfina Creek after restoration; sod-based rotation in Jackson County; well being completed into the Claiborne Formation in Jackson County; contract crew planting longleaf pines at Econfina Creek Water Management Area; District staff checking hydrologic monitoring station near the Chipola River.

NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT
GOVERNING BOARD
GEORGE ROBERTS, Chair Panama City JERRY PATE, Vice Chair Pensacola JOHN ALTER Malone GUS ANDREWS DeFuniak Springs JON COSTELLO Tallahassee STEPHANIE BLOYD Panama City Beach NICK PATRONIS Panama City Beach JONATHAN P. STEVERSON Executive Director GARY CLARK Chipley BO SPRING Port St. Joe

Headquarters
81 Water Management Drive Havana, Florida 32333-4712 (850) 539-5999

Tallahassee
(Environmental Resource Permitting) Carr Building, Suite 225 3800 Commonwealth Blvd. MS LS225 Tallahassee, FL 32399 (850) 921-2986

Crestview
(Resource Regulation) 180 E. Redstone Avenue Crestview, Florida 32539 (850) 683-5044

REPORT CONTRIBUTORS
General Coordination ...................................................................... Paul Thorpe Document Development and Distribution .......................... Leigh Brooks 1 – SWMP Annual Work Plan Report ………….. Leigh Brooks and Paul Thorpe 2 – MFL Priority List .................................................................... Graham Lewis 3 – Five Year Capital Improvement Plan ....................... William Cleckley 4 – Water Supply ..........................................Leigh Brooks and Paul Thorpe 5 – Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report .... Carol Bert and Paul Thorpe 6 – Mitigation Donation Annual Report ............... Michael Bateman and Duncan Cairns 7 – SWIM Program Summary Report....................................... Paul Thorpe

Milton
(Land Management) 5453 Davisson Road Milton, FL 32583 Tel. (850) 626-3101

Marianna
(Land Management) 4765 Pelt Street Marianna, FL 32446 (850) 482-9522

Econfina
(Land Management) 6418 E. Highway 20 Youngstown, FL 32466 (850) 722-9919

For additional information or to request a copy of this report, please contact Paul Thorpe at (850) 539-5999 or [email protected]

Executive Summary
This Consolidated Annual Report fulfills the requirement of section 373.036(7)(a), Florida Statutes (F.S.), that the Northwest Florida Water Management District (“NWFWMD” or “District”) annually prepare and submit a report on management of water resources to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Copies are provided to the chairs of legislative committees with substantive or fiscal jurisdiction over water management districts and the governing boards of counties with jurisdiction or deriving funds for operations of the District, as well as the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The report is also made available to the public online at www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/consolidatedAR/consolAR.html. The March 1, 2014, NWFWMD Consolidated Annual Report includes seven required reports, as specified in section 373.036(7)(b), F.S. These are:        The Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Report; The Minimum Flows and Levels Annual Priority List (section 373.042(2), F.S.); The Annual Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan (section 373.536(6)(a)3, F.S.); The Five-Year Water Resource Development Work Program (section 373.536(6)(a)4, F.S.); The Alternative Water Supplies Annual Report (section 373.707(8)(n), F.S.); The Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report (section 373.199(7), F.S.); and The Mitigation Donation Annual Report (section 373.414(1)(b)2, F.S.).

Also included is one optional element, a Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) Program Summary Report that describes projects implemented to protect and improve water quality and watershed resources. Together, the reports that follow provide the status of Northwest Florida Water Management District programs that work toward the protection, restoration, and sustainability of northwest Florida’s water and related resources. Priorities adopted by the Governing Board in the fiscal year (FY) 2013-2014 budget and outlined in the preliminary FY 2014-2015 budget are springs restoration and protection, Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, minimum flows and levels and water resource monitoring, water supply, and watershed resource protection and restoration. Highlights of the reports are:  Springs Protection and Restoration – The Econfina Springs Complex Phase II restoration for Williford Spring in Washington County was initiated, and construction is scheduled to begin early spring 2014. Additional projects are underway for Holmes Creek, Jackson Blue Spring, and Devil’s Hole Spring. (Chapter One – Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report; Chapter Five – Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report) Minimum Flows and Levels (MFLs) – The District advanced its implementation of minimum flows and levels in Northwest Florida. The water resource monitoring program was expanded to fill data gaps, and consulting firms were retained to provide technical and ecological work plans for MFL development. Data collection and work plan development has begun for the St. Marks River Rise, Wakulla Spring, and Sally Ward Spring. (Chapter Two – Minimum Flows and Levels Annual Priority List) Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) Rivers Basin – District staff provided substantial technical support to the state of Florida in its effort to achieve sufficient interstate freshwater NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report ES-1





allocations to protect the economic and ecological viability of the Apalachicola River and Bay. (Chapter One – Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report)  Water Supply Development – The District rolled out a competitive grant program, the Water Supply Development Community Assistance Initiative, providing $10 million to local governments and utilities to meet local water supply needs. Additionally, the City of Blountstown was provided $235,845 to replace a water distribution line and the City of Port St. Joe $106,000 to upgrade a pump station. (Chapter One – Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report; Chapter Four – Water Supply) Water Supply Assessment (WSA) – A five-year update to the WSA has been completed and was presented to the Governing Board in February 2014. The report provides a comprehensive assessment of the adequacy of water supplies across northwest Florida and identifies regions that require regional water supply planning. (Chapter Four – Water Supply) Regional Water Supply Planning – The District is scheduled to complete an update to the Region III Regional Water Supply Plan (RWSP) in March 2014. Regional water supply plan implementation continues for Region II. It is recommended that regional water supply planning for Region V be discontinued based on the results of the WSA. (Chapter Four – Water Supply) Agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs) – The District continued cooperative assistance for the Mobile Irrigation Lab and Sod-Based Crop Rotation programs that promote water conservation and reduced use of pesticide and fertilizer. A new initiative for FY 2013-2014 is to fund the implementation of agricultural BMPs and irrigation retrofits in the Jackson Blue Spring basin. (Chapter One – Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report) Habitat Restoration – Extensive restoration activities were completed on District lands and other public lands across northwest Florida. These include streambank restoration, reforestation and groundcover habitat restoration, and hydrologic restoration. (Chapter Five – Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report) Water Quality Protection and Restoration – The District is working with local governments in the Apalachicola River and Bay and St. Andrew Bay watersheds to implement stormwater retrofit projects for water quality improvement. Staff have also assisted with RESTORE Act planning and are implementing stormwater projects funded by MOEX Offshore, LLC, to benefit St. Andrew and Choctawhatchee bays (Chapter Seven – Surface Water Improvement and Management Program Summary Report) Water Resource Monitoring – Expansion of the District’s water resource monitoring network continued. This network is essential for water resource and water supply development, MFLs, and watershed protection and restoration. (Chapter One – Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report; Chapter Four – Water Supply) Flood Protection and Floodplain Management – The development of digital flood maps for northwest Florida counties is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2014. The District continues to act as an advocate for the public in the FEMA watershed Risk Mapping, Assessment and Planning (Risk MAP) program. District web sites provide detailed flood information, portal.nwfwmdfloodmaps.com, and elevation data, www.nwfwmdlidar.com. (Chapter One – Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report)















NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report ES-2

Table of Contents
Executive Summary ________________________________________________________ ES-1 Chapter One: Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report _____________ 1
1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Introduction _________________________________________________________________ 1 Water Supply _______________________________________________________________ 3 Water Quality and Natural Systems ______________________________________________ 6 Flood Protection and Floodplain Management _____________________________________ 11

Chapter Two: Minimum Flows and Levels Annual Priority List ______________________ 13 Chapter Three: Annual Five-Year Capital Improvements Plan _______________________ 17
3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 4.1 4.2 5.1 5.2 Introduction ________________________________________________________________ Five-Year Capital Improvements Plan ___________________________________________ Project Descriptions _________________________________________________________ Appendix __________________________________________________________________ 17 18 20 31

Chapter Four: Water Supply ___________________________________________________ 33
Five-Year Water Resource Development Work Program: FY 2013-2014 Update _________ 33 Alternative Water Supplies Annual Report________________________________________ 57 Land Acquisition Work Plan___________________________________________________ 61 Capital Improvement Work Plan _______________________________________________ 92

Chapter Five: Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report ___________________________ 61

Chapter Six: Mitigation Donation Annual Report __________________________________ 97 Chapter Seven: Surface Water Improvement and Management Program Summary Report 99
7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 Introduction ________________________________________________________________ 99 SWIM Priority List __________________________________________________________ 99 Current Project Priorities ____________________________________________________ 101 Potential Funding Related to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill _______________________ 103

Chapter Eight: References____________________________________________________ 104

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page i

List of Tables
Table 2-1. Northwest Florida Water Management District MFL Priority List (2014) _______________ 14 Table 3-1. NWFWMD Five Year Capital Improvements Plan, Fiscal Years 2014-2018 ____________ 18 Table 4-1. Region II Water Resource Development Projects __________________________________ 38 Table 4-2. 2014-2018 Region II WRDWP Project Funding ___________________________________ 44 Table 4-3. Region II Water Supply Development Projects____________________________________ 45 Table 4-4. Region III Water Resource Development Projects _________________________________ 47 Table 4-5. 2014-2018 Region III WRDWP Project Funding __________________________________ 49 Table 4-6. Region III Water Supply Development Projects ___________________________________ 49 Table 4-7. Region V Water Resource Development Projects __________________________________ 51 Table 4-8. 2014-2018 Region V WRDWP Project Funding___________________________________ 53 Table 4-9. Region V Water Supply Development Projects ___________________________________ 53 Table 4-10. Alternative Water Supply and Water Resource Development Projects Funded under the Water Protection and Sustainability Program____________________________________ 58 Table 4-11. Additional Water Supply Development Assistance Projects _________________________ 59 Table 5-1. Restoration, Enhancement and Maintenance (2013) ________________________________ 88 Table 5-2. Access and Recreation Management (2013) ______________________________________ 89 Table 5-3. Projected Funding, Staffing and Resource Management for FY 2013-2014______________ 90 Table 5-4. Currently Approved Florida Forever Capital Improvement Projects ___________________ 94 Table 5-5. Additional Eligible Projects___________________________________________________ 94 Table 7-1. NWFWMD SWIM Priority List ______________________________________________ 100 Table 7-2. Current SWIM Projects _____________________________________________________ 101

List of Figures
Figure 1-1. Water Supply Planning Regions of the Northwest Florida Water Management District _____ 4 Figure 1-2. NWFWMD Watersheds ______________________________________________________ 7 Figure 1-3. Floodplain Mapping Status __________________________________________________ 11 Figure 2-1. NWFWMD MFL Priority Waterbodies (2013-2014 Schedule)_______________________ 15 Figure 4-1. Water Supply Planning Regions ______________________________________________ 34 Figure 4-2. Water Supply Planning Region II _____________________________________________ 37 Figure 4-3. Water Supply Planning Region III _____________________________________________ 46 Figure 4-4. Water Supply Planning Region V _____________________________________________ 50 Figure 5-1. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas _____________________________________________ 66 Figure 5-2. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas (West Region) _________________________________ 67 Figure 5-3. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas (Central Region) _______________________________ 74 Figure 5-4. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas (East Region) __________________________________ 80 Figure 5-5. NWFWMD Capital Project Distribution ________________________________________ 96 Figure 7-1. NWFWMD SWIM Priority Watersheds ________________________________________ 99

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report ii

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report

Chapter One: Strategic Water Management Plan Annual Work Plan Report
1.1 Introduction

Section 373.036(2)(e), Florida Statutes (F.S.), gives the Governing Board the option of substituting an annual strategic plan for the five-year district water management plan (DWMP) and the DWMP annual report. The statute requires the strategic plan to include separately an annual work plan report on its implementation for the previous fiscal year, addressing success indicators, deliverables, and milestones. The Governing Board approved substituting the Strategic Water Management Plan (SWMP) for the DWMP in November 2010 (NWFWMD 2011). The 2011-2015 SWMP was completed and posted in January 2011 (www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/swmp/swmp.html). To address changing conditions and priorities, as well as emerging water resource challenges, a comprehensive review and update of the SWMP is anticipated to be completed in FY 2013-2014. For the purposes of this report, strategic priorities are as specified by the Governing Board in the District’s adopted FY 2013-2014 budget and outlined in the District’s preliminary FY 2014-2015 budget, and are described below.  Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin – Management of water resources in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint (ACF) basin continues to be a major emphasis of the District in partnership with other state agencies and regional stakeholders. As in the current year, budget priorities for FY 2014-2015 include providing technical assistance to the Governor’s Office and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) on an array of issues related to interstate freshwater allocation. The District additionally intends to complete development and initiate application of an updated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of Apalachicola Bay. This model will support resource assessments and evaluations of potential actions to improve and maintain a healthy bay environment, including management of freshwater inflows and implementation of cooperative water quality improvement projects in coastal Franklin County. Stormwater retrofit projects have been initiated in cooperation with the City of Apalachicola to improve water quality in Apalachicola Bay. Minimum Flows and Levels – The District is expending significant effort to develop minimum flows and levels (MFLs) according to the approved schedule. Beginning in FY 2014-2015, recurring program costs are estimated to average $2.3 million annually. By 2016, the current schedule will have six waterbodies in various stages of assessment simultaneously. Work planned for FY 20142015 includes data collection to support hydrologic and hydrodynamic modeling for St. Marks River Rise and Wakulla Springs, and data collection to support development of groundwater flow and saltwater intrusion models for the coastal Floridan aquifer in Franklin County and in Planning Region II (Santa Rosa, Okaloosa and Walton counties). Work planned for the following year includes technical assessments for the St. Marks River Rise and Wakulla Systems, coastal Franklin County and coastal Region II, as well as enhanced hydrologic data collection for Jackson Blue Spring. Water Resource Monitoring – Major objectives and priorities for FY 2014-2015 include further expansion of the hydrologic monitoring network in support of the MFL program and continued network improvements to improve efficiency to expand real time access to hydrologic data on the District’s website. The District renewed revenue agreements with DEP to monitor water quality in aquifers, streams, and lakes and renewed revenue agreements with Bay County, Leon County, and the City of Tallahassee to monitor surface water discharge and rainfall for stormwater management and flood warning. The District additionally continues its joint funding agreement with the U.S. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 1





2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report Geological Survey to collect hydrologic data on the Apalachicola River, Yellow River, Telogia Creek, and the Spring Creek Springs Group  Springs Protection and Restoration – Protection and restoration of northwest Florida’s springs and associated systems are a continuing priority. Current activities include restoration and protection projects for Williford Spring and Devil’s Hole Spring within the Econfina Creek Water Management Area (WMA) and within the Holmes Creek WMA (Washington County), assistance implementing agricultural best management practices (BMPs) for irrigation and fertilization and funding irrigation retrofits in the Jackson Blue Springs basin (Jackson County), and enhanced monitoring and resource assessment for major systems District-wide. Water Supply Development Assistance – The District is continuing implementation of its Water Supply Development Community Assistance Initiative. Through this initiative, the District is providing competitive grant funding for local governments and utilities, with emphasis on supporting financially disadvantaged communities. The District has allocated $10 million from the FY 20132014 budget for water supply development assistance. It is anticipated that 24 separate communities within 13 counties will receive direct assistance. Water Resource Development – The districtwide water supply assessment update has been completed, with recommendations being presented to the Governing Board in February 2014 for regional water supply planning needs. Additionally, consulting services will be engaged to support development of a Floridan aquifer groundwater model in the eastern portion of the District, which will support the MFL, RWSP, and Resource Regulation programs. District staff will further work with Okaloosa and Bay counties to support development of alternative water supply projects. Watershed Resource Protection and Restoration – A focused effort of the District has been cooperative stormwater retrofit, water quality, and habitat restoration projects in the Apalachicola River and Bay and St. Andrew Bay watersheds. Specific efforts include financial support of a Mobile Irrigation Laboratory (MIL) in cooperation with Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), cooperative funding with producers for agricultural BMPs within the Jackson Blue Spring groundwater contribution area, financial support for research and outreach on University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Services (IFAS) Sod-Based Crop Rotation Program, restoration of Williford Springs and stormwater retrofit projects to improve water quality in St. Andrew Bay and Apalachicola Bay. District staff are also continuing participation in multi-agency project planning associated with the federal RESTORE Act. The District is further providing engineering services to support stormwater retrofit projects within St. Andrew and Choctawhatchee bays funded by the MOEX Offshore settlement. Land Management and Restoration – District staff continue extensive efforts to manage and restore water and related resources within District lands. These activities are focused on protecting and restoring water resources and natural systems while keeping lands and adjacent waters accessible for compatible public use.









NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 2

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report  Flood Protection and Floodplain Management – The District continues to work in cooperation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) on flood map modernization and the Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning (Risk MAP) program. It is anticipated that final effective digital flood insurance rate maps (DFIRMs) will be issued for Franklin and Jefferson counties in February 2014 and in Wakulla County in September 2014. Detailed coastal remapping studies continue for Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay and Gulf counties. Detailed floodplain and elevation data respectively are provided to the public online at portal.nwfwmdfloodmaps.com and www.nwfwmdlidar.com. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Wetland Mitigation – The District continues to serve FDOT wetland mitigation needs in areas outside of existing private mitigation bank service areas. Restoration, long-term management, and monitoring activities are ongoing at existing FDOT mitigation sites. For newly identified mitigation needs, private mitigation banks are given first consideration. Information Technology (IT) Initiatives – The District is conducting a strategic assessment of IT needs and investing in modernization of IT infrastructure to improve automation of District process. Associated priorities are the development of land management database and implementation of epermitting.





All of these priorities are consistent with the broader state goal of enhanced water resource protection to promote Florida’s economic well-being and quality of life. Accomplishments and current objectives are organized below by statutory areas of responsibility (section 373.036, F.S.). Where applicable, strategic priorities are indicated, as are quantitative indicators of progress.

1.2

Water Supply

Section 373.701, F.S., declares the state’s policy to promote the availability of sufficient water for all existing and future reasonable-beneficial uses and natural systems. The District implements this policy through cooperative, interrelated initiatives and programs focused on the water resources of northwest Florida. Among these are water resource development, water supply development assistance, regional water supply planning, regulation of wells and consumptive uses, and development of MFLs. The NWFWMD is divided into seven regions for the purpose of evaluating current and anticipated water supply needs (Figure 1-1). RWSPs are developed for regions where existing sources of water are considered inadequate for meeting water demands over a 20-year planning horizon while also sustaining water resources and natural systems. These plans include water resource and water supply development components with supporting data and analysis, and they identify priority projects and funding strategies.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 3

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report

Figure 1-1. Water Supply Planning Regions of the Northwest Florida Water Management District

The District’s 2013 Water Supply Assessment (WSA) Update (NWFWMD 2014) has been completed. The WSA evaluates the adequacy of existing and anticipated water sources across Northwest Florida to meet future water demands while also sustaining water resources and associated natural systems. The 2013 WSA Update includes water use estimates for the 2010 base year, demand projections for a 20-year planning period (2015–2035), and water resource assessments for each of the District’s seven water supply planning regions. Based on the WSA Update, the Governing Board approved the continuation of regional water supply planning in Region II (encompassing Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties) and Region III (Bay County), and discontinued regional water supply planning in Region V (Gulf and Franklin counties). Discontinuation of the Region V plan reflects past completion of the primary project priority within the region, as well as lower growth rates than has been origionally projected. According to the 2013 WSA Update, public supply demand is anticipated to increase 14 million gallons per day (MGD) in Region II and 9 MGD in Region III by 2035. Overall, water demand projections declined significantly from the 2008 WSA due to generally reduced population growth projections. An update to the RWSP for Region II was completed in 2012. Considerable progress has been made in the development of inland groundwater sources within that region. In Region III, potential vulnerability of the primary public water supply reservoir to effects of major hurricanes is the primary focus of the plan. An update to the Region III RWSP is in progress. Accomplishments from the past year and current activities are described below.  The districtwide 2013 WSA Update was completed and regional water supply planning recommendations were presented to the Governing Board in February 2014. The RWSP for Region III is being updated and will be considered by the Governing Board in March 2014. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/water_supply_planning/regional_water_supply_planning.html As reported through statewide water management district performance metrics, approximately 86% of the increase in Public Supply water demand anticipated between 2010 and 2030 has thus far been realized and fully allocated through the permitting process.



NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 4

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report  A District contractor completed the Basis of Design Report for the Coastal Water Systems Interconnect Project. Potential project priorities are identified to enhance coastal water system reliability by enabling transfer of water between utilities if necessary due to droughts or other water shortages. The work also included blending analyses, hydraulic network modeling, and development of preliminary designs and cost estimates. The final design phase, followed by permitting and construction, will follow if additional funding becomes available. Regional Utilities of Walton County completed construction of pipeline facilities with District funding assistance. Through this project, the utility extended water transmission lines along approximately five miles of U.S. Highway 98 in south Walton County. The District provided $750,000 in grant funding, matched by over $1.36 million in local funding. Construction was completed on a major transmission pipeline from the inland wellfield in Walton County to the coastal service areas of South Walton Utility Company and Destin Water Users. The District provided a grant of $2.5 million for the project, matched by over $19 million in local funding. The District continued to assist rural communities in the development of sustainable water supplies. The District provided $106,000 to assist the City of Port St. Joe with a vital upgrade to the Chipola Pump Station surface water withdrawal facility. The Governing Board also awarded a grant of $235,845 to the City of Blountstown to assist with the installation of a new 12-inch water distribution main along State Road 20. The District rolled out a $10 million competitive grant program, the Water Supply Development Community Assistance Initiative. The program’s purpose is to help local governments and utilities meet local water supply challenges while addressing regional priorities for water resource protection and management. An emphasis was given to projects that further accomplish District plans and priorities, as well as those that serve financially disadvantaged communities. It is anticipated that grant funded projects will be initiated during FY 2013-2014. A Districtwide potentiometric surface map of the Floridan Aquifer was developed in GIS to reflect 238 water level measurements from June 2012. It shows regional scale features such as depression cones, which are the result of cumulative groundwater withdrawals. The District continues to work with DEP and the other four water management districts in an intensive effort to improve the statewide consistency of consumptive water use permitting. Goals of this effort, termed “CUPcon” (consumptive use permitting consistency), include makin g programs more predictable, ensuring equitable treatment statewide, providing consistent environmental protection, promoting streamlining and efficiency, and incentivizing behavior that protects water resources. The draft rule is in review by participating agencies, as well as the Legislature and Governor’s office. In the past year, the Consumptive Use program reduced the annualized median in-house processing time of all individual water use applications by 49% and cost per permit by 3.3%. The cost per permit decreased by 39% between the fourth Quarter of FY 2011-2012 to the third Quarter of FY 2012-2013; however, the cost in the fourth Quarter of FY 2012-2013 increased somewhat to support training of new staff. Emphasis is on having pre-application meetings to address issues prior to permit application submittal to minimize the number of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). The Marianna field office was closed to achieve cost savings. The program continues to explore ways to reduce costs to process permits. As described below, the District continues support for the MIL and Sod-Based Crop Rotation programs. These efforts are focused within the Apalachicola River watershed and improve both agricultural water use efficiency and water quality protection. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 5

















2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report

1.3

Water Quality and Natural Systems

A number of District programs are focused on protection and restoration of water quality and aquatic, wetland, and riparian habitats. These include land acquisition and management, FDOT mitigation, the Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) program, and the MFL program. To date, the District has acquired over 224,000 acres, primarily through fee simple acquisition. These lands support natural systems and protect wetland and floodplain functions, groundwater recharge, surface and groundwater quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. District-owned lands are all open to the public and are managed to sustain public access and enjoyment, as well as water resource quality. Management and restoration efforts, including prescribed burns, vegetation enhancement, and timber harvesting, continue across 212,380 managed acres. In addition, the District maintains and improves public access and recreational amenities, such as boat ramps, primitive campsites, and day use (swimming and picnic) areas. District lands include the majority of the Escambia and Choctawhatchee river floodplains, as well as extensive lands along the Yellow, Shoal, Blackwater, Chipola, Perdido, and Apalachicola rivers; Holmes and Econfina creeks; Garcon Point; Live Oak Point; and Perdido Bay. The District has also acquired the majority of the recharge area for springs that discharge into Econfina Creek and form a major component of the water contribution to Deer Point Lake Reservoir. Additionally, the District helped Escambia County preserve Jones Swamp as a conservation and greenway area and has assisted with local government land acquisitions in Leon County. The in-lieu fee mitigation program is implemented in conjunction with the Umbrella, Watershed-based Regional Mitigation Plan (UWRMP). This plan serves FDOT wetland mitigation needs in areas outside of existing mitigation bank service areas and is accessible at nwfwmdwetlands.com. The program includes projects such as the Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank and Tate’s Hell State Forest hydrologic restoration, among many others. The SWIM program provides the planning framework, based on the District’s major riverine -estuarine watersheds (Figure 1-2), for addressing watershed protection and restoration. Implementation is accomplished through a variety of projects, including stormwater retrofits for water quality improvement and protection from flooding, wetland and aquatic habitat restoration, and resource assessments.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 6

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report

Figure 1-2. NWFWMD Watersheds

The SWIM program and approved plans are described in Chapter Seven of the Consolidated Annual Report, as well as at www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/swim/swimdesc.htm. Accomplishments over the last fiscal year and ongoing activities include the following:  The District is continuing focused efforts to develop MFLs according to the approved schedule. Staff initiated an expanded monitoring program to fill data gaps for the St. Marks River Rise and Wakulla Springs-Spring Creek systems, as well as for the coastal Floridan Aquifer in Franklin County. Enhancements made to the District’s water resource monitoring network include installation of additional water level, water quality and rainfall stations, and substantially increased monitoring frequency. The District provided technical support to the Governor’s Office and DEP on a variety of issues related to freshwater allocation within the ACF basin. These include development of alternative operating procedures for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ ( ACOE) reservoir system through revisions to the Water Control Manual; review and comment on the ACOE’s unimpaired flow data set that is the base for much of the hydrologic modeling of the system; and exploring options for interstate water management. Staff continue to work with the Governor’s office, other state agencies, including FDACS, DEP and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWCC), as well as local governments, to understand and counter the effects of the recent collapse of the Apalachicola Bay fisheries. These efforts include participation in the Apalachicola Bay Oyster Recovery Task Force, planning for construction of a series of local water quality improvement projects, development of a bay management plan, and additional studies targeting freshwater needs of the system. Throughout the year, District staff collaborated in developing a plan to achieve significant restoration and protection of coastal waterbodies pursuant to the federal RESTORE Act. In addition to ensuring an optimal response to impacts caused by the Deepwater Horizon incident, NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 7







2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report the District and other state and federal agencies are working in collaboration with a broad base of public and private stakeholders to achieve restoration and protection of coastal ecosystems and associated economic resources and public uses.  As a part of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill settlement with MOEX Offshore, LLC, DEP identified several stormwater projects for implementation in the Choctawhatchee Bay and St. Andrew Bay watersheds. DEP has retained the District to provide engineering design, permit preparation and limited construction administration services for four of these projects: the Lisenby Avenue stormwater management facility (St. Andrew Bay), as well as the Lovejoy, Hill Avenue, Overbrook and Tanglewood stormwater facilities (Choctawhatchee Bay). In March 2013, a notice to proceed was issued to the District for the Lisenby Avenue project. A task order for the remaining projects assigned to the District is undergoing the approval process. District staff completed a screening assessment of Apalachicola River and Bay nonpoint source pollutant loading across the watershed and identified focal areas for water quality improvement projects. Detailed project planning for retrofit and restoration needs continued through the year. Following the above screening assessment, the District entered into an agreement with the City of Apalachicola to fund, design and construct a stormwater retrofit project that will improve water quality and provide flood relief within the Battery Park basin. Additional priority projects have been identified in cooperation with the city, and implementation is expected to begin over the coming year. District staff are working with local governments in the St. Andrew Bay watershed to implement priority urban stormwater retrofit projects to improve water quality within St. Andrew Bay. In January 2013, the Governing Board agreed to assist Washington County in funding stream bank restoration and protection measures and repairs and improvements to Hightower, Spurling and Live Oak Landings within the Holmes Creek WMA. The county has finalized the designs and is awaiting permit modifications for the construction of vegetated retaining walls; however, previously permitted construction has been delayed due to flooding. Designs for the Williford Spring restoration project have been completed. Staff evaluated the project for cost savings and revised plans to realize an estimated project savings of $300,000 $400,000 (subject to bids). Installation is expected to be completed during FY 2013-2014. The District continues to provide funding for the Northwest Florida Mobile Irrigation Laboratory. The MIL supports water conservation within the Jackson Blue Spring basin and other agricultural areas. Piped agricultural irrigation systems are evaluated to estimate potential and actual water savings, and recommendations are provided as needed for repairs and retrofits. Results include improved water use efficiency and reduced costs. This program is supported cooperatively with FDACS and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). With grant funding assistance from the District, University of Florida IFAS researchers are continuing efforts in Jackson County to refine and implement farming techniques that decrease irrigation demands, increase nitrogen use efficiency, reduce the incidence of plant pests, improve soil and water quality, diversity farm income, and manage economic risk. Through these efforts, the sod-based crop rotation system has demonstrated improved yields and reduced costs, while also reducing water and fertilizer use. Significant land management activities included prescribed burns on approximately 9,700 acres of District lands, as well as vegetation management (herbicide) and habitat enhancements on approximately 1,300 acres.



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NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 8

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report  A cooperative project with Walton County to improve a popular boat ramp and camping area at Dead River Landing was substantially completed. Completion of the final phase was delayed due to high water conditions. A shoreline restoration project was completed along approximately 225 feet of Seven Runs Creek in Walton County. This project applied a non-structural approach utilizing geotextile bags to stabilize the shoreline with a vegetated retaining wall. The project was constructed by Walton County crews, with the District providing materials and construction oversight assistance. In its ongoing reforestation and groundcover habitat restoration program, the District completed hand planting of 621 acres of disturbed longleaf pine, wet pine flatwoods, and wiregrass habitat across northwest Florida. These habitat restoration activities enhance groundwater recharge, improve wetland functions, and offset wetland losses caused by FDOT projects. Additionally, over 284,000 longleaf pine tubelings were planted within five WMAs and the Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank. The District also reestablished groundcover habitat, planting over 372,000 plugs of wiregrass and toothache grass on disturbed habitat sites at the Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank and the Perdido River WMA. Seeds for many District groundcover projects were collected from District land on the Econfina Creek WMA. The District continues to research, refine, and establish new habitat restoration techniques that increase species diversity and ecosystem health. District staff completed draft updates to the mitigation plan to be compliant with mitigation banking and in-lieu fee rules under 40 CFR Part 230. At the Dutex mitigation site (Escambia County), a helicopter burn was conducted in March for the entire 820 acres. The burn greatly reduced shrub cover and helped stimulate the seed bank. Additional shrub reduction was conducted for 102 acres within the western parcel. In 2014, restoration activities will continue in the western tract. In the eastern tract, the initial shrub reduction will commence within 120 acres of former hydric pine flatwoods and wet prairie converted to titi swamp in the absence of fire. The Yellow River Ranch mitigation site in Santa Rosa County is progressing towards success. The 102-acre hydric pine flatwoods restoration area was burned in 2013. The burn was successful and fire carried well across the site. Exotic species control continued in 2013. Control of exotic grasses and popcorn tree has been successful with the cover of invasive exotic species well below the 1% cover required in the permit. The Lafayette Creek restoration site in Walton County has responded well to shrub reduction within the 50-acre hydric pine flatwoods and wet prairie. Colonies of white topped pitcher plants have re-emerged with the removal of the black titi shrub cover. Toothache grass and wiregrass are common in the understory. Shrub sprouts will continue to be treated as needed in 2014. In addition, a successful burn was conducted on 423 acres, including 50 acres of hydric pine flatwoods mixed with wet prairie and 373 acres of sand hill and mesic pine flatwoods. Five hundred acres of uplands and wetlands were burned at the Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank (Washington County) in 2013. Shrubs within the hydric pine flatwoods have been reduced to less than 5% cover, below permit requirements. An evaluation of planted wiregrass plugs revealed an average of 70% survival within the wetlands and 80% survival in uplands. Wiregrass seedlings were observed at all sites. Appropriate native species continue to increase in number and cover. Hardwoods and sand pine seedlings were eradicated in 102 acres of sand hill restoration that had previously been converted to a sand pine plantation. This area continues to progress towards a diverse sandhill community.







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NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 9

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report  Hydrologic restoration activities are continuing in Tate’s Hell State Forest. The District and the Florida Forest Service are working to complete Phase I and begin Phase II of restoration activities in the Whiskey George, Doyle Creek, and Juniper Creek drainage area (approximately 20,800 acres), including installing 16 low-water crossings, 25 culvert improvements and 39 ditch blocks. These efforts will enhance flows and improve water quality in East Bay, one of the primary nursery areas of Apalachicola Bay. Maintenance and monitoring continued on 20 mitigation projects associated with the Umbrella Regional Mitigation Plan. Sites are evaluated for wetland community development, hydrologic condition, exotic species control, and wildlife usage. All sites successfully met restoration objectives. The District provided 1.31 mitigation credits from the Sandhill Lakes Mitigation Bank and purchased 3.14 credits from the private Nokuse Plantation Mitigation Bank for FDOT District Three impacts. Two new mitigation efforts, St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve Hydrologic Enhancements and an Eglin Air Force Base mitigation project, were planned during FY 20122013 as offsetting mitigation for three FDOT projects outside of any private mitigation bank service area and remote from any existing District mitigation site. At the St. Joseph Bay State Buffer Preserve, six low-water crossings and associated ditch plugs were installed to restore the natural hydrology of adjacent hydric pine flatwoods and forested wetlands. This restoration offsets wetland impacts associated with the FDOT road improvements to SR 30A. In FY 2013-2014, FDOT is anticipating the addition of one new project involving District mitigation. The proposed US 331 Bridge improvements in Walton County will have estuarine wetland impacts, a minor portion of which will have mitigation provided by the District. There are no other new FDOT District mitigation projects anticipated for FY 2013-2014.With funding assistance from the District and other partners, the Blueprint 2000 Intergovernmental Agency has completed the Cascades Park Watershed Restoration Project. Components include major stormwater ponds, retaining walls, utility relocations, landscaping to support littoral vegetation, and stream reconstruction, all within the St. Marks River watershed. The Environmental Resource Permitting (ERP) program reduced the annualized median in-house processing time of all authorizations combined (individuals, exemptions, noticed general permits, extensions, and modifications) by 79% and cost per permit by 65%. There was a focus on having pre-application meetings to address issues prior to permit application submittal to minimize the number of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). The Crestview and Tallahassee field offices were moved onto smaller facilities, significantly reducing costs. The program continues to explore new ways to reduce in-house processing time and improve efficiency to decrease cost to process permits. The ERP and Management and Storage of Storm Water (MSSW) programs were combined as a result of the adoption of the Statewide Environmental Resource Permitting (SWERP) rules in chapter 62.330, F.A.C. SWERP brought greater consistency to these regulatory programs for all five water management districts and DEP while allowing differing design criteria to consider the specific geological and hydrological conditions found throughout the state. Besides streamlining the regulatory process, it allowed the NWFWMD to eliminate one entire Bureau (MSSW) which reduced costs. SWERP also eliminated the chapter 40A-4 rules for the district. Watershed restoration activities were conducted in the Apalachicola and St. Marks River watersheds through the SWIM and Florida Forever programs. Hydrologic restoration within Tate’s Hell State Forest in the Apalachicola Bay watershed included construction of two hardened low water crossings, three earthen ditch plugs, and one culvert modification. Within the NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 10















2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report St. Marks River watershed, stormwater treatment for a 760-acre drainage area was completed as a component of the Cascades Park project. Project features include major stormwater ponds, an alum treatment system, retaining walls, utility relocations, landscaping to support littoral vegetation, and stream reconstruction. Pollutant load reductions for these facilities are expected to exceed 90% in total suspended solids, 22% in total nitrogen, 66% in total phosphorus, and 29% in biochemical oxygen demand, as well as an annual reduction of over 22,000 pounds of sediment.

1.4

Flood Protection and Floodplain Management

In 2003, the NWFWMD accepted delegation and responsibility for modernizing flood hazard maps into a digital format for all of its jurisdictional area through a Cooperating Technical Partner (CTP) agreement with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). As a result of this partnership and associated efforts, all of northwest Florida now has digital flood insurance rate maps (DFIRMs). FEMA has also initiated the Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning (Risk MAP) program, which is the focus of the District’s current effort. This effort includes collaboration with state and local agencies to deliver quality data to increase public awareness of and support for actions that reduce flood-related risks. The general goal of the program is to foster informed risk management decisions and actions that mitigate flood risk through a consistent approach to assessing potential vulnerability and losses.

Figure 1-3. Floodplain Mapping Status

Recent Flood Protection and Floodplain Management accomplishments and objectives include the following:  DFIRMs have now been developed through the Map Modernization process for all of the counties of northwest Florida. Final effective DFIRMs have been completed for Escambia, Santa Rosa, Bay, Gulf, Walton, Gadsden, Leon, Holmes, Washington, Jackson, Calhoun, Liberty, Franklin, and Jefferson counties. Preliminary DFIRMs have been completed for Wakulla County. Approximately 98 percent of the 1,254 DFIRM map panels completed have thus far been adopted by local NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 11

2014 SWMP Annual Work Plan Report governments. Additional coastal re-studies are in progress across several counties to further update and enhance available data (Figure 1-3).  The District’s Flood Information Portal is available online for all of northwest Florida at portal.nwfwmdfloodmaps.com. The portal, through an intuitive online interface, makes detailed flood information down to the individual parcel level available to the public. The District launched a public website providing detailed Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)based elevation and surface feature data for properties across northwest Florida. The data provided is ten times more detailed than most previous topographic maps. This provides an important tool for many of the District’s water resource management and flood protection functions. Residents and technical experts can also use the data to plan for activities including landscaping, resource protection, flood risk evaluation, and construction. The website is available at www.nwfwmdlidar.com. Work continues on the Risk MAP program funded by FEMA through a CTP agreement. Detailed coastal remapping studies continue for Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay and Gulf counties. Additionally, county-wide mapping, floodplain mapping, assessment, and planning evaluations at the watershed level are ongoing for the Lower Ochlockonee River, Apalachicola River, New River, Chipola River, Pensacola Bay, Perdido Bay, Perdido River, and Apalachee Bay – St. Marks River watersheds. This nonstructural effort contributed greatly to the accomplishment of the District’s floodplain management and protection area of responsibility. It also enhances the District’s ability to protect and manage floodplains without acquiring land or making structural modifications.



 

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 12

MFL Priority List

Chapter Two: Minimum Flows and Levels Annual Priority List
Section 373.042, F.S., requires each water management district to develop minimum flows and levels (MFLs) for specific surface and groundwaters within their jurisdiction. The MFL for a given waterbody is the limit at which further withdrawals would be significantly harmful to the water resources or ecology of the area. MFLs are calculated using best available data and consider natural seasonal fluctuations; non-consumptive uses; and environmental values associated with coastal, estuarine, riverine, spring, aquatic, and wetlands ecology as specified in section 62-40.473, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.). Establishment of an MFL involves a series of steps ranging from identification of priority waterbodies to the adoption of DEP rules codifying each MFL. Adopted MFLs are considered when reviewing consumptive use permit applications. A recovery or prevention strategy must be developed for any waterbody where consumptive uses are currently or anticipated to result in flows or levels below an adopted MFL. The NWFWMD FY 2013-2014 MFL priority list and schedule were developed based on recommendations of an internal, multi-disciplinary working group. Review criteria included resource status and vulnerability, data availability, the sufficiency of existing modeling tools, statutory requirements and guidance provided by DEP. The list represents an environmentally protective MFL program, scheduled to be implemented in a realistic, technically sound, and achievable manner. Twenty-two priority waterbodies were identified and prioritized based on the working group assessment. The technical evaluation for each MFL is expected to require approximately five years of data collection and analysis. Data collection has begun and will occur concurrently for several waterbodies. Starting in 2018, one MFL assessment is expected to be completed annually. It is anticipated that the technical assessment for the St. Marks River Rise, a first magnitude spring in southeastern Leon County that shares a substantial portion of its groundwater contribution area with Wakulla Springs, will be completed in 2018. The second assessment is scheduled to be completed in 2019 for the Floridan Aquifer in coastal Franklin County. Completion of each technical assessment will be followed by a rulemaking process. The data and MFL assessments developed for the St. Marks River Rise will also assist in establishing an MFL for Wakulla Springs. The FY 2013-2014 priority list and timelines are subject to the availability of funds, data collection and analysis needs, climatic conditions, peer review, and rule challenges. The list and schedule will be reevaluated annually, and adjustments will be made as appropriate. The 2013-2014 priority list has been submitted to DEP (Table 2-1).

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 13

MFL Priority List Table 2-1. Northwest Florida Water Management District MFL Priority List (2014)
Waterbody St. Marks River Rise Wakulla Springs Sally Ward Spring Floridan – Coastal Franklin County Floridan – Coastal Region II Jackson Blue Spring Floridan – Coastal Bay County Econfina Creek & Spring complex Deer Point Lake Yellow River/Shoal River Floridan – Inland Walton County Floridan – Coastal Gulf County Floridan – Inland Franklin County Inland Sand and Gravel Morrison Spring Holmes Blue Spring Blue Hole Spring Ponce de Leon Spring Washington Blue & Potter Spring Complex Baltzell Spring group/upper Chipola Spring complex Holmes Creek & Spring complex Telogia Creek WB Type2, 3 Spr (1st) Spr (1 ) Spr (2nd) A A Spr (1st) A Spr (1st & 2nd)/R L R A A A A Spr (2nd) Spr (2nd) Spr (2nd hist.) Spr (2nd) Spr (2nd) Spr (2nd)/ R Spr (2nd)/ R R
st

County Leon Wakulla Wakulla Franklin Coastal Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton Jackson Bay Bay, Jackson, Washington Bay Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton Walton Gulf Franklin Santa Rosa, Okaloosa Walton Holmes Jackson Holmes Washington Jackson Washington Liberty, Gadsden

MFL Initiation 2013 2013 2013 2014 2015 2016 2018 2019 2020 2021

Estimated Completion Technical Rule Assessment4 Adoption5 2018 2020 2021 2021 2019 2020 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2023 2023 2021 2022 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028

MFL Technical Assessments will be initiated as soon as fiscal and staffing resources allow.

Waterbodies Subject to Regulatory Reservations

Apalachicola River

R

Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin

Chipola River

R

Jackson, Calhoun, Gulf

The magnitude, duration and frequency of observed flows are reserved, essentially in total, all seasons for the protection of fish and wildlife of the Chipola River, Apalachicola River, associated floodplains and Apalachicola Bay (40A-2.223, F.A.C.).

Footnotes 1 Priority list and schedule will be re-evaluated on an annual basis. 2 WB Type: A=aquifer, L=lake, R=river, Spr=spring (1st or 2nd magnitude). 3 All first magnitude springs, and second magnitude springs on state lands are required to be listed according to section 373.042, F.S. 4 It is anticipated that each proposed MFL will be submitted for scientific peer review following the technical assessment. 5 Based on an estimated 18-24 months from completion of technical assessments to final rule adoption.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 14

MFL Priority List

Figure 2-1. NWFWMD MFL Priority Waterbodies (2013-2014 Schedule)

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 15

MFL Priority List

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NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 16

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan

Chapter Three: Annual Five-Year Capital Improvements Plan
3.1 Introduction

The five-year capital improvements plan (CIP) includes projected revenues and expenditures for capital improvements from fiscal years 2013-2014 through 2017-2018. As directed by section 373.536(6)(a)(3), F.S., the CIP has been prepared in a manner comparable to the fixed capital outlay format set forth in section 216.043, F.S. The format for this plan is drawn from the standard budget reporting format prescribed by the Executive Office of the Governor. Capital improvement projects may be budgeted in either of two standard program categories. Those programs and their activities and sub-activities are represented below: 2.0 Acquisition, Restoration and Public Works 2.1 Land Acquisition 2.2 Water Source Development 2.2.1 Water Resource Development Projects 2.2.2 Water Supply Development Assistance 2.2.3 Other Water Source Development Activities 2.3 Surface Water Projects 2.4 Other Cooperative Projects 2.5 Facilities Construction & Major Renovations 2.6 Other Acquisition and Restoration Activities 3.0 Operation and Maintenance of Lands and Works 3.1 Land Management 3.2 Works 3.3 Facilities 3.4 Invasive Plant Control 3.5 Other Operation and Maintenance Activities The only activities and sub-activities under program 2.0 Acquisition, Restoration and Public Works that may include capital improvement projects are: 2.1 Land Acquisition, 2.2.1 Water Resource Development Projects, 2.2.3 Other Water Source Development Activities, 2.3 Surface Water Projects, and 2.5 Facilities Construction and Major Renovations. The Northwest Florida Water Management District has projects in each of these categories. The only activities under program 3.0 Operation and Maintenance of Lands and Works that may include capital improvement projects are: 3.1 Land Management and 3.2 Works. Of these, the Northwest Florida Water Management District only has capital improvement projects in activity 3.1. The CIP includes expenditures for basic construction costs (permits, inspections, site development, etc.) and other project costs (land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, etc.). A district’s CIP contains only those projects that will be owned and capitalized as fixed assets by the district. The District does not capitalize construction projects having a total project cost of less than $50,000. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 17

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan

3.2

Five-Year Capital Improvements Plan

The purpose of the Five-Year Capital Improvements Plan (CIP) is to project future needs and anticipate future funding requirements to meet those needs. The CIP includes expenditures for basic construction costs (permits, inspections, site development, etc.), other project costs (land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, etc.) and anticipated changes in program costs, changes in maintenance costs and changes in utility costs. The development and construction of all capital projects are budgeted either under program heading 2.0 Acquisition, Restoration and Public Works or under program heading 3.0 Operation and Maintenance of Lands and Works. The District’s capital improvements projects are categorized according to the following activities:  Land Acquisition;  Surface Water Projects;  Facilities Construction and Major Renovations; and  Land Management. The District's Florida Forever Work Plan, Land Acquisition Plan, Five-Year Water Resource Development Work Plan, Land Management Plan and Northwest Florida Umbrella, Watershed-based, Regional Mitigation Plan may also provide valuable insight to the District's long range capital improvements plan. Table 3-1. NWFWMD Five Year Capital Improvements Plan, Fiscal Years 2014-2018 2.0 ACQUISITION, RESTORATION, AND PUBLIC WORKS
2.1 Land Acquisition
Revenues ($) 2013-14 Water Management Lands Trust Fund Florida Forever District Land Acquisition Reserve Land Management Fund TOTAL 0 0 48,612 0 48,612 2014-15 0 0 47,094 0 47,094

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 50,000 50,000 2016-17 0 0 50,000 50,000 2017-18 0 0 50,000 50,000

Expenditures ($) 2013-14 Florida Forever - Land Acquisitions Land Acquisition Water Management Lands Trust Fund Land Management Fund TOTAL 0 48,612 0 0 48,612 2014-15 0 47,094 0 0 47,094

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 50,000 0 0 50,000 2016-17 0 50,000 0 0 50,000 2017-18 0 50,000 0 50,000

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 18

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan
2.2 Water Source Development
Revenues ($) 2013-14 Florida Forever TOTAL 0 0 2014-15 0 0

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 2016-17 0 0 2017-18 0 0

Expenditures ($) 2013-14 Florida Forever - Land Acquisitions TOTAL 0 0 2014-15 0 0

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 2016-17 0 0 2017-18 0 0

2.3 Surface Water Projects
Revenues ($) 2013-14 FDOT Mitigation Funds TOTAL 2,500,000 2,500,000 2014-15 2,250,000 2,250,000

Fiscal Year
2015-16 1,500,000 1,500,000 2016-17 1,500,000 1,500,000 2017-18 1,500,000 1,500,000

Expenditures ($) 2013-14 FDOT Mitigation TOTAL 2,500,000 2,500,000 2014-15 2,250,000 2,250,000

Fiscal Year
2015-16 1,500,000 1,500,000 2016-17 1,500,000 1,500,000 2017-18 1,500,000 1,500,000

2.5 Facilities Construction and Major Renovations
Revenues ($) 2013-14 Florida Forever Water Management Lands Trust Fund Land Management Fund TOTAL 0 0 0 0 2014-15 0 0 0 0

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 0 0 2016-17 0 0 0 0 2017-18 0 0 0 0

Expenditures ($) 2013-14 None Projected TOTAL 0 0 2014-15 0 0

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 2016-17 0 0 2017-18 0 0

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 19

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan 3.0 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDS AND WORKS
3.1 Land Management
Revenues ($) 2013-14 Water Management Lands Trust Fund Florida Forever Land Management Fund Line Item 1638A - 2013-2014 GENERAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT. FWCC AHRE Section Funds (anticipated) TOTAL 0 0 1,315,713 377,000 70,000 1,762,713 2014-15 0 0 75,000 0 55,000 130,000

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 50,000 0 0 50,000 2016-17 0 0 50,000 0 0 50,000 2017-18 0 0 50,000 0 0 50,000

Expenditures ($) 2013-14 Canoe/Small Boat Launch(s) ESC - Spring Restoration & Protection Project; Phase II - Williford Spring Streambank Restoration & Public Recreation – Cooperative with Local Governments Public Access Road Construction Streambank and Solution Hole Restoration and Protection TOTAL TOTAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURES ($) 0 1,507,713 255,000 0 0 1,762,713 2014-15 0 75,000 0 0 55,000 130,000

Fiscal Year
2015-16 0 0 0 0 50,000 50,000 2016-17 0 0 0 0 50,000 50,000 2017-18 0 0

0 50,000 50,000

4,311,325

2,427,094

1,600,000

1,600,000

1,600,000

3.3

Project Descriptions

The following pages provide a brief description of each capital improvements plan activity.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 20

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 2.0 ACQUISITION, RESTORATION, AND PUBLIC WORKS ACTIVITY: 2.1 LAND ACQUISITION

Project Title: Save Our Rivers, Preservation 2000 and Florida Forever Land Purchases - No land acquisitions are anticipated in FY 2013-2014. Type: Unimproved Land Physical Location: Undetermined - Within the District's 16-county boundaries Square Footage/Physical Description: N/A Expected Completion Date: N/A Historical Background/Need for Project: To protect and preserve the water resources within the District's 16-county boundaries. Plan Linkages: Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): None Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): Purchase price of land is unknown at this time. Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): Land acquisition ancillary costs are unknown at this time. Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): N/A Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: Varied. Maintenance costs to be determined based on the locations and types of lands ultimately acquired.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 21

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 2.0 ACQUISITION, RESTORATION, AND PUBLIC WORKS ACTIVITY: 2.2 WATER SOURCE DEVELOPMENT

Project Title: Save Our Rivers and Florida Forever Land Purchases - No land acquisitions are anticipated in FY 2013-2014. Type: Unimproved Land Physical Location: Undetermined - Within the District's 16-county boundaries Square Footage/Physical Description: N/A Expected Completion Date: N/A Historical Background/Need for Project: To protect and preserve the water resources within the District's 16-county boundaries. Plan Linkages: Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): None Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): Purchase price of land is unknown at this time. Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): Land acquisition ancillary costs are unknown at this time. Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): N/A Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: Varied. Maintenance costs to be determined based on the locations and types of lands ultimately acquired.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 22

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 2.0 ACQUISITION, RESTORATION, AND PUBLIC WORKS ACTIVITY: 2.3 SURFACE WATER PROJECTS

Project Title: Regional Mitigation for FDOT Wetlands Impacts Type: Wetlands, waterbodies and buffers that qualify as mitigation for FDOT wetland impacts Physical Location: Various locations - Watersheds within the District Square Footage/Physical Description: Land purchases, land management restoration activities (shrub reduction, herbicide, vegetative planting, etc.), and/or construction of various capital restoration structures (e.g., bridges, low water crossings, water control structures). Expected Completion Date: Program is ongoing, year-to-year. Historical Background/Need for Project: Section 373.4137, F.S., provides that the districts mitigate for FDOT wetland impacts that are not within the service area of a private mitigation bank or when credits from a mitigation bank are not deemed appropriate. Plan Linkages: Northwest Florida Umbrella, Watershed-based, Regional Mitigation Plan, Florida Forever Work Plan, SWIM plans. Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems. Alternative(s): Specific projects may be excluded from the mitigation plan, in whole or in part, upon the election of the FDOT, a transportation authority if applicable, or the District. Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): Unknown at this time. Multiple projects. Costs are determined by project type (land acquisition, bridge construction, low water crossing, etc.). Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): An amount equal to 15 percent of the total construction and land acquisition costs are estimated for engineering design work, surveying, land appraisals, environmental audits, etc. Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): Unknown at this time. Multiple projects. Costs are determined by project type (land acquisition, bridge construction, low water crossing, etc.). Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: Unknown at this time. Multiple projects. Costs are determined by project type (land acquisition, bridge construction, low water crossing, etc.)

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 23

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 2.0 ACQUISITION, RESTORATION, AND PUBLIC WORKS ACTIVITY: 2.5 FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION AND MAJOR RENOVATIONS

Project Title: No facilities construction or major renovations are anticipated in FY 2013-2014 Type: Physical Location: Square Footage/Physical Description: Expected Completion Date: Historical Background/Need for Project: Plan Linkages: Florida Forever Work Plan, District Strategic Plan, District Budget Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing:

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 24

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 3.0 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDS AND WORKS ACTIVITY: 3.1 LAND MANAGEMENT Project Title: Public Waterway Access Type: Canoe/Small Boat Launch(s) Physical Location: TBD Square Footage/Physical Description: TBD Expected Completion Date: TBD Historical Background/Need for Project: Suitable public waterway access, especially in sensitive riparian, lacustrine and floodplain areas on District lands. Plan Linkages: District's Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): NWFWMD could delay potential projects when sites are identified, however adverse stormwater and shoreline impacts will continue, i.e., erosion, siltation and sedimentation issues, which would adversely impact water quality in stream, lakes and rivers. Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): N/A Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): N/A Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): N/A Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: N/A

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 25

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 3.0 ACQUISITION, RESTORATION, AND PUBLIC WORKS ACTIVITY: 3.1 FACILITIES CONSTRUCTION AND MAJOR RENOVATIONS

Project Title: Econfina Springs Complex - Spring Restoration & Protection Project; Phase II - Williford Spring. Type: Spring Restoration and Protection Project Physical Location: Econfina Creek Water Management Area Square Footage/Physical Description: Proposed restoration and protection of Williford Spring, a second magnitude spring. Engineering designs include, but are not limited to, the following: 1) spring vent sediment removal; 2) spring bank and shoreline restoration and protection utilizing geotechnical materials and native vegetation; 3) enhanced spring and spring-run protection with the construction of an elevated mono-pile boardwalk which provides access to a canoe dock/gangway for use by canoeists/kayakers; 4) associated stormwater facilities to prevent sediment from entering the spring pool; 5) spring entry steps and limestone terrace for public access; 6) connector and interpretative trail construction in sensitive karst areas to protect water resources, provide public access and link to Pitt and Sylvan Springs (Phase I); 7) island and shoreline restoration; 8) associated public access and recreation facilities including parking area, picnic pavilions, a compositing toilet, sidewalks, boardwalks, a spring view deck, etc. and; 9) landscape restoration utilizing native species at all sites. Final engineering designs have been completed; an DEP permit has been received; and approval of the ACOE permit and Washington County Development Order is anticipated on or before February 28, 2014. Bid preparation, bidding and bid approval for Phase II are anticipated to be completed by on or before April 10, 2014. Construction of Phase II is scheduled to begin on or before May 1, 2014. Expected Completion Date: Construction for Phase II is slated to be completed on or before December 31, 2014. A site stabilization and landscape plant grow-in period will occur after facilities construction and is anticipated to last until May 1, 2016 or for a minimum 15-month period. Signage will be completed during the grow-in period. The site is scheduled to open on or before May 1, 2016, subject to weather factors, etc. Historical Background/Need for Project: Project will restore and protect a significant second magnitude spring by removing from one to three feet of sediment, addressing stormwater issues, preventing erosion, enhancing water quality, protecting natural systems and restoring and enhancing riparian and associated aquatic habitats adversely impacted in the past due to unregulated public access and recreational use. Plan Linkages: District's Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): NWFWMD could delay the project, which would adversely impact Williford Spring and the water quality of Econfina Creek (a Class I Waterbody). Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): Estimated at $1,400,000, subject to final architecture/engineering design, permitting and bidding.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 26

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): $448,452 for engineering services (preconstruction, bidding and construction phase services), archaeological oversight (sediment removal), survey (next to adjacent private landowner) and security fencing. [$75,000 proposed in FY 2014-2015 for resource protection, public safety and interpretive signage] Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): None Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: N/A

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 27

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 3.0 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDS AND WORKS ACTIVITY: 3.1 LAND MANAGEMENT Project Title: Streambank Restoration and Protection and Repairs and Improvements to Hightower, Spurling and Live Oak Landings – Cooperative Local Government Agreement (Washington County). Type: Streambank Restoration and Protection and Public Access and Recreation Physical Location(s): Hightower, Spurling and Live Oak Landings (Washington County) – Choctawhatchee River/Holmes Creek WMA. Square Footage/Physical Description: The restoration and protection of approximately 500 feet of eroded shoreline or streambank at three boat launch locations along Holmes Creek utilizing geotextile bags to create a vegetative retaining wall, as well as the repair and improvement of these boat launch sites, including but not limited to: 1) the construction of four stormwater facilities; 2) the demolition, regrading and construction of a boat launch at Live Oak Landing; 3) access road improvements; 4) parking area improvements at all three sites; 5) the construction of a bank fishing pier at Live Oak Landing; 6) a short boardwalk and spring observation deck at Hightower Landing spring; 7) the installation of protective wooden rail fencing at all sites and; 8) the development of picnic areas and four primitive campsites at Spurling Landing. Expected Completion Date: On or before January 11, 2015, subject to permits and water levels. Historical Background/Need for Project: Significant streambank erosion is occurring at all three sites and lack of stormwater treatment facilities are causing significant siltation and sedimentation issues at all three sites, especially at Hightower and Live Oak Landings. In addition, the boat launch at Live Oak Landing cannot be used properly during low water periods, limiting public access and recreation. Enhanced public access and recreation facilities are also needed, especially at Live Oak and Spurling Landings. Plan Linkages: District's Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): NWFWMD could delay the project and shorelines or streambanks will continue to erode; stormwater will continue to impact the water quality of Holmes Creek; the public will have difficulty accessing Holmes Creek and adjacent District lands for recreation purposes, and; public recreation opportunities will be diminished. Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): 200,000. Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): $55,000 ($45,000 for District-provided geotextile bags and $10,000 for rail fencing, picnic tables, grills, fire rings, etc. for primitive campsites). Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): None. Per the agreement, Washington County will maintain, cleanup sites and provide law enforcement patrols. Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: County responsibility. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 28

Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 3.0 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDS AND WORKS ACTIVITY: 3.1 LAND MANAGEMENT Project Title: No Public or Land Management Access Road Construction (Materials Only) Project(s) are anticipated in FY 2013-2014 due to lack of adequate funds. Type: Single or Double Lane Paved Public Access Road (Approx. 30-foot wide) Physical Location(s): St. Andrew’s Tract - Section 9 (Hwy. 167, SW Jackson Co.); Altha Tract - Johnny Boy Landing and Look And Tremble Roads (Calhoun County) and; Beaverdam Creek Tract - Harry Donar Road (Liberty County). Square Footage/Physical Description: – TBD, approx. _________ square feet Expected Completion Date: N/A Historical Background/Need for Project: __________ Road(s) is (are) currently sand or clay that experience(s) considerable stormwater impacts (erosion/wetland habitat sedimentation and siltation) during heavy rainfall events. Paving the road(s) will lessen stormwater impacts and provide enhanced public/land management access to a portion of the ________WMA(s). Plan Linkages: District's Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): NWFWMD could delay the project, which would allow the road to continue to erode and impact adjacent water resources, hinder vehicular access by the public to District lands, etc. Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): Cooperative project(s) [Local Govt. Agreements] with Calhoun, Jackson or Liberty Counties – Funding for asphalt only. Counties will provide all labor and equipment. Zero dollars in FY 2012-2013 and beyond due to lack of adequate funds. Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): N/A. Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): None Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: County responsibility.

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Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan PROGRAM: 3.0 OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF LANDS AND WORKS ACTIVITY: 3.1 LAND MANAGEMENT Project Title: Streambank and Solution Hole Restoration and Protection Type: Shoreline and/or Solution Hole Restoration and Protection Physical Location: District-wide - TBD Square Footage/Physical Description: Shoreline and/or solution hole bank restoration and protection utilizing geotextile bags and providing for public access while protecting water resources, subject to engineering design and permitting. Expected Completion Date: TBD Historical Background/Need for Project: Shorelines and solution holes are experiencing significant bank erosion and sedimentation due to adverse impacts caused by unregulated public use on sensitive slope areas. Projects will stabilize highly erodible slopes while providing public access and recreational use. Plan Linkages: District's Florida Forever Work Plan Area(s) of Responsibility: Water Supply, Water Quality, Flood Protection and Natural Systems Alternative(s): District could delay project(s), which may lead to further degradation of shorelines and/or solution holes, which may cause these areas to be closed to public access and use. Basic Construction Costs (includes permits, inspections, communications requirements, utilities outside building, site development, other): > $50,000. Other Project Costs (includes land, survey, existing facility acquisition, professional services, other): The District will utilize in-house staff for engineering design services and in-house staff and Public Works Inmate Crew for construction. Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Initial (includes salaries, benefits, equipment, furniture, expenses): $0 Anticipated Additional Operating Costs/Continuing: None. Public Works Inmate Crew will conduct site cleanup and maintenance.

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Annual Five Year Capital Improvements Plan

3.4

Appendix

Water Management District Standard Format Program Definitions for Programs and Activities Found in the Northwest Florida Water Management District’s Capital Improvements Plan. 2.0 Acquisition, Restoration and Public Works This program includes the development and construction of all capital projects (except for those contained in Program 3.0), including water resource development projects/water supply development assistance, water control projects, and support and administrative facilities construction; cooperative projects; land acquisition (including Save Our Rivers/Preservation 2000/Florida Forever) and the restoration of lands and water bodies. 2.1 Land Acquisition: The acquisition of land and facilities for the protection and management of water resources. This activity category does not include land acquisition components of “water resource development projects,” “surface water projects,” or “other cooperative projects.” 2.2 Water Source Development: The acquisition of land and facilities for the protection and management of water resources. This activity category includes land acquisition components of “water resource development projects,” “water supply development assistance projects,” or “other water source development activities.” 2.3 Surface Water Projects: Those projects that restore or protect surface water quality, flood protection, or surface-water related resources through the acquisition and improvement of land, construction of public works, and other activities. 2.5 Facilities Construction and Major Renovations: Design, construction, and significant renovation of all district support and administrative facilities.

3.0 Operation and Maintenance of Lands and Works This program includes all operation and maintenance of facilities, flood control and water supply structures, lands, and other works authorized by Chapter 373, F.S. 3.1 Land Management (P2000/Save Our Rivers/Florida Forever): Maintenance, custodial, public use improvements, and restoration efforts for lands acquired through Save Our Rivers, Preservation 2000, Florida Forever or other land acquisition programs.

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Water Supply

Chapter Four: Water Supply
4.1 Five-Year Water Resource Development Work Program: FY 20132014 Update Introduction
In 1997, the Florida Legislature amended the Florida Water Resources Act (section 373, F.S.) to provide direction to the state’s five water management districts on regional water supply planning. This amendment provided a two-step process that involves: (1) dividing the jurisdictions of each water management district into water supply planning regions and assessing the water supply needs and sources of each region; and (2) developing regional water supply plans for those regions where existing sources of water are considered inadequate to supply water for all existing and future reasonable-beneficial uses and to sustain water resources and related natural systems over a twenty-year planning period. Each water management district is required by section 373.536(6)(a)4, F.S., as amended in 2012, to prepare a Five-Year Water Resource Development Work Program to describe the District’s implementation strategy and funding plan for the water resource, water supply, and alternative water supply development components of each approved regional water supply plan (RWSP) developed or revised under section 373.709, F.S. In accordance with the statute, the Work Program is submitted to the Governor, the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection, the chairs of legislative committees with substantive or fiscal jurisdiction over the districts, and the governing boards of counties constituting each of the five districts. The Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) then conducts a review of the Work Program, to include a “written evaluation of the program’s consistency with the furtherance of the district’s approved regional water supply plans, and the adequacy of proposed expenditures.” Water resource development and water supply development are complementary components of the RWSP. Water resource development projects are typically regional and broad in scope, while water supply development projects are more localized and address water treatment, storage, and delivery to end users. Water resource development supports and facilitates future alternative water supply development, which provides for the development of non-traditional water sources. Water management districts are statutorily responsible primarily for water resource development, while water supply development is primarily the responsibility of local governments, water supply authorities, and utilities. The districts do, however, also provide technical and financial assistance for water supply development projects. Alternative water supply and water resource development projects supplement dedicated regulatory efforts to ensure the long-term sustainability of water resources.

Regional Water Supply Planning in Northwest Florida
The Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD or “District”) established seven water supply planning regions in 1996 (Figure 4-1). The initial District Water Supply Assessment (WSA) (NWFWMD 1998) evaluated whether supplies would be sufficient to meet demands through 2020, and it was determined that only Region II (Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties) required a RWSP. The primary resource concern identified in Region II is a pronounced drawdown in the coastal Floridan Aquifer caused by long term pumping.

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Water Supply In 2006, the NWFWMD Governing Board determined that the need for planning alternative surface water development in Gulf County and resource constraints in coastal Franklin County (Region V) warranted development of a RWSP. Similarly, in 2008, the Governing Board concluded that the need for additional source redundancy and sustainability warranted development of a RWSP for Region III (Bay County). A District-wide WSA update was completed in 2008 (approved May 2009), extending water demand projections and an evaluation of sources through 2030. The update concluded that no additional RWSPs were required and that water supply planning and implementation efforts should continue in regions II, III, and V (Coates et al. 2008). The District has updated the WSA for 2013 (Countryman et al. 2014). The 2013 update retained the conclusion that regional water supply planning should continue for region’s II and III, but recommended that the plan for Region V be discontinued based on project completion and reduced growth rates. The governing board approved this recommendation in February 2014.

Figure 4-1. Water Supply Planning Regions

As required by section 373.709(2)(a)1, F.S., the RWSP level of certainty planning goal is to identify and meet existing and future reasonable-beneficial water needs during a 1-in-10 year drought event. While water supply sources can become constrained during drought conditions, demands can increase for certain uses, such as agricultural irrigation and outdoor water use. District RWSPs include strategies to help drought-proof northwest Florida communities through alternative water supply development, the interconnection of water systems, reuse of reclaimed water, and water conservation. The 2008 Water Supply Assessment Update (Coates et al., 2008) provides a more thorough discussion of the quantification of 1-in-10 year drought demands. Implementation of strategies detailed in the Water Resource Development Work Program (WRDWP) will make additional water available to meet future needs in a timely manner through the planning period. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 34

Water Supply

Sources of water identified include the inland Floridan Aquifer, Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer, reclaimed water, and surface waters. Water conservation is emphasized to improve water use efficiency and longterm water resource sustainability. It should be noted that the consumptive use permitting program also plays a major role in ensuring that water resources are available to meet future demands in a sustainable manner. Preliminary results from the 2013 WSA update (in progress) indicate that public supply remains the largest use category for the District, accounting for approximately 44 percent of the demand in 2010. It is expected that this will continue to hold true through the 2015-2035 planning period. Public supply accounted for approximately 63 percent of 2010 water use in Region II, with recreational water use comprising an additional 17 percent. In Region III, public supply and industrial-commercial-institutional (ICI) water use together accounted for approximately 70 percent of the water demand, with 36 percent and 34 percent of use respectively. In Region V, public supply and ICI comprised approximately 53 percent and 30 percent of water use respectively in 2010.

Funding for Water Resource and Supply Development
The state constitution limits the NWFWMD to 1/20th (.05 mills) of the ad valorem taxing authority afforded the other four water management districts. The District’s fiscal year (FY) 2012-2013 ad valorem tax millage rate, as set by the Governing Board, was .04. To fulfill legislatively mandated water supply planning and water resource development activities under this revenue constraint, the District looks to other sources of funding, when available, including the following:        Water Management Lands Trust Fund; Water Protection and Sustainability Program Trust Fund; Legislative special appropriations; Florida Forever; District General Fund; Federal grants; and Local government and water supply utility cost sharing.

Water resource development in northwest Florida has depended primarily on funding from the Water Management Lands Trust Fund (WMLTF), however no appropriations from the WMLTF for water resource and supply development have been made since FY 2010-2011. To the extent possible, the District is applying limited ad valorem funding to accomplish basic water supply planning functions and augmenting these funds using previously encumbered funds and reserves for priority projects. Ad valorem funding available to the NWFWMD, however, is inadequate to support implementation of major water resource and supply development projects and initiatives. The Water Protection and Sustainability Program Trust Fund (WPSPTF), established by the 2005 Florida Legislature, allowed the District to provide cost-share assistance for construction of alternative water supply development projects and priority water resource development and springs protection activities. Projects funded under the WPSPTF are listed in Appendix A and are described in the March 1 Consolidated Annual Report. No funding has been appropriated for the WPSPTF since FY 2009-2010. The Florida Forever Trust Fund has supported acquisition of lands throughout northwest Florida that provide critical water resource functions, including water quality protection and aquifer recharge.

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Water Supply Additionally, Florida Forever has been a potential source of construction funding for reclaimed water storage facilities. Florida Forever, however, has not had significant appropriations since FY 2010-2011. Local government and utility funding participation is especially important for several types of water resource development projects, notably including reuse of reclaimed water, water conservation, and aquifer storage and recovery. All projects require substantial local investment once they reach the water supply development stage. Funding budgeted for water resource development is listed below in summary tables for regions II, III, and V (tables 2, 5, and 8, respectively). The proposed water resource development funding for FY 20132014 is $325,400. The anticipated five year water resource development implementation cost through FY 2017-2018 is $1,447,600. Additionally, the district expects to spend approximately $10 million of reserve funds during FY 2013-2014 for water supply development assistance grants across northwest Florida. This represents approximately 26% of the reserve funds within the Distri ct’s FY 2013-2014 budget. Where enhanced monitoring and water resource development needs are identified, District reserve funds are being used to support these activities during the short term. Efforts to identify adequate funding for long-term water resource and supply development will continue.

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Water Supply

Region II: Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties
Since the 1940s, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties (Figure 4-2) have been characterized by rapid population growth and a concentration of development and water demands within coastal portions of the region. Long-term pumping of the coastal Floridan Aquifer in southern Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties caused formation of a substantial cone of depression, creating a risk of significant salt water intrusion and damage to public supply wells. Resource regulation and water supply planning and development over the past two decades have focused on reducing coastal withdrawals, constraining coastal demand, and developing inland water supply sources as alternatives to coastal ground water. Chapter 40A-2, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), established the coastal Water Resource Caution Area (WRCA) across the southern reach of all three counties (Figure 4-2). Within the coastal WRCA, regulatory approaches to resource sustainability are applied, including stringent conservation and reporting requirements and the prohibition of new allocations of coastal Floridan Aquifer water for nonpotable uses.

Figure 4-2. Water Supply Planning Region II

The District’s first RWSP was approved by the Governing Board for Region II in February 2001 (NWFWMD 2001). The Region II RWSP described the region’s water supply needs, identified traditional and alternative water sources, and analyzed the ability of these sources to meet future demands to 2020. Updates to the plan were approved in 2006 (NWFWMD 2006) and again in 2012 (Busen and Bartel 2012). In the process, water resource and water supply development components have been revised, progress on project implementation was described, and water demands were projected to 2030. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 37

Water Supply Preliminary estimates for 2010 indicate that public supply accounted for 46 MGD, or 63 percent of the region’s water use. It is expected that the relative importance of public supply within the region will continue to increase through the planning horizon.

Region II Water Resource Development
The Region II RWSP includes ten water resource development projects encompassing strategies for developing water resources in support of alternative water supply development. These are summarized in Table 4-1. Descriptions of the strategies and their current progress follow.
Table 4-1. Region II Water Resource Development Projects

Project
Floridan Aquifer Sustainability Modeling Inland Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer Development and Sustainability Development of Surface Water Sources Aquifer Storage and Recovery Feasibility Water Reuse Coordination Water Conservation Coordination Regional Water Supply Planning Interconnection of Water Supply Conveyance Systems Hydrologic Data Collection and Analysis Abandoned Well Plugging

Activity
Development and application of a regional ground water flow model and salt water intrusion models. Development and application of a three-dimensional, transient ground water flow model. Identification and development of feasible surface water sources and optimal facilities. Development of aquifer storage and recovery systems, primarily to support the reuse of reclaimed water. Assistance in the development of reclaimed water to offset and conserve potable water resources. Assistance to local governments and utilities in the conservation of potable water resources. Development and implementation of regional water supply plans. Interconnection of coastal utility infrastructure to enhance the resilience of the coastal water systems. Collection and analysis of surface and ground water data throughout the region. Assistance to local governments and utilities in the plugging of abandoned wells.

Water Identified or Made Available (MGD) 30 18 25 2 5* 3** N/A N/A N/A N/A

* Preliminary update for 2010-2030. ** Additional anticipated quantities to be determined.

Floridan Aquifer Sustainability Modeling Limiting further salt water intrusion into the coastal Floridan Aquifer and sustaining the aquifer as a viable water supply source is a primary focus of the RWSP. The Floridan Aquifer Sustainability Model was developed to include a western domain encompassing Santa Rosa and western Okaloosa counties and an eastern domain that includes eastern Okaloosa and Walton counties. The model has been used to evaluate long-term safe yields from the coastal aquifer, pumpage from consumptive use permits, and future withdrawal scenarios to evaluate cumulative impacts. Model simulations have been run to predict the extent of salt water intrusion through 2100 for the eastern and western model domains. The simulations incorporated historical withdrawals and proposed future pumping rates. Results indicate that salt water intrusion into potable portions of the Floridan Aquifer continue to occur at a slow, manageable rate (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 2007b, HydroGeoLogic, Inc. and Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc. 2007). Principal pathways of saline water intrusion identified include lateral intrusion within the upper Floridan Aquifer from beneath the Gulf of Mexico, lateral intrusion from the NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 38

Water Supply

lower to the upper Floridan Aquifer around the edge of the Bucatunna Clay confining unit, intrusion of saline waters where the Bucatunna Clay confining unit is absent (easternmost Choctawhatchee Bay area), and downward vertical leakage through the Intermediate System. Under current pumping conditions, it is estimated that the coastal Floridan Aquifer is sustainable through 2050 and likely beyond (Busen and Bartel 2012). Future model applications will be directed toward analysis of drawdown effects of increased pumping of the Floridan Aquifer in inland areas and alternative withdrawal scenario development. Funding reflected over the next two years (Table 4-2) includes a portion of funding allocated for development and improvement of groundwater models District-wide. Inland Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer Development and Sustainability Due to its high recharge rate, the inland Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer in Region II is capable of providing regionally-significant quantities of water. Through this project, a three-dimensional, transient ground water flow model has been developed to assess the volume of water sustainably available from the aquifer. The study area for this effort lies between the Blackwater and Yellow Rivers in Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties. The model includes the transient response of the aquifer to drought and climatic variability. In previous years, considerable data were gathered, which involved constructing projectspecific monitoring wells, determining aquifer hydraulic properties, mapping aquifer unit thicknesses, and measuring ground-water levels and stream discharge. The ground water flow model was subsequently developed and calibrated. Development of an inland Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer wellfield was initiated in 1999 within the Santa Rosa County portion of the study area. Prior to the development of the wellfield, approximately one MGD were being withdrawn from the area for public supply. A pipeline from the inland Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer wellfield to the coastal area was completed in late 2003. Since then, potable water withdrawals from the wellfield and vicinity have increased to over five MGD. Water from the wellfield is being conveyed south to alleviate pumping demand from the Floridan Aquifer along the coast. Modeling results to date indicate that an additional 12 MGD may be allocated from the inland Sand-andGravel Aquifer study area for a ground water production total of approximately 18 MGD. The ability of the aquifer to sustain a production of 18 MGD and avoid or minimize impacts to natural resources will depend on the management of withdrawals. Withdrawals can be managed by the proper placement of wells, variable pumping scenarios, and limiting drawdown in wells. Preliminary mapping of the extent and quality of wetlands in the study area has been completed. Further investigation is needed to verify wetland quality and assess potential impacts to seepage wetlands and streams sourced by Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer ground water. The District has completed development of backwater models of the Yellow and Blackwater Rivers, which are useful for accurately delineating floodplains of these rivers. In 2012-2013, the District provided technical assistance to Santa Rosa County in its wellfield protection efforts by using the existing inland Sand-and-Gravel aquifer groundwater flow model to delineate capture zones for wells in the wellfield area. Based on the capture zone analysis, Santa Rosa County expanded its wellfield protection ordinance to include additional public supply wells and aquifer recharge areas. It is anticipated that the model will also be applied to the resource assessment portion of the WSA update. Additional application and assessment, including evaluation of potential wetland effects from future withdrawals, may also be conducted depending on funding availability.

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Water Supply As with the Floridan Aquifer Sustainability model, funding reflected over the next two years (Table 4-2) includes a portion of funding allocated for development and improvement of groundwater models District-wide. Development of Surface Water Sources In 2006, the District and its water supply consultants prepared an analysis of potential surface water supply sources in Okaloosa County, presented in the report “Conceptual Alternative Water Supply Development Projects and Planning Level Cost Estimates” (PBS&J 2006). This study reviewed various technically and economically feasible alternatives, including direct river withdrawal and riverbank filtration. The District also concurrently reviewed an evaluation of a proposed Yellow River Reservoir and concluded that the proposal is not economically feasible and that its implementation would cause significant environmental impacts and mitigation requirements. Surface waters in the Yellow and Shoal rivers basins are being further evaluated as potential future water supply sources for Okaloosa County. Potential facilities may include direct withdrawal and treatment systems, as well as offline reservoir or other storage facilities. Funding reflected over the next two years (Table 4-2) provides for further coordination between District and Okaloosa County staff to fully explore options and needs based on current and projected conditions. Aquifer Storage and Recovery Feasibility Aquifer storage and recovery (ASR), depending on the particular hydrogeologic and economic considerations of an area, has the potential to support storage of large quantities of water more effectively and at a lower cost than above ground storage. Aquifer storage and recovery systems have not been developed on a widespread basis within Region II due to hydrogeologic conditions, economic feasibility, the need for water quality evaluations, and other technical constraints. Destin Water Users recently developed an ASR system that is permitted for a 2.125 MGD annual average daily flow capacity. The system consists of seven wells for storage of reclaimed water in the Sand and Gravel Aquifer. This reclaimed water is available to meet irrigation demands, helping to conserve potable water resources. The use of ASR in the future for storage of reclaimed water or perhaps as a salinity barrier may require a regional approach, since water introduced into a geologic formation could affect the ground water beneath jurisdictions or service areas of multiple utilities. In coordination with evaluations of surface water supply and reclaimed water alternatives, and if additional funding becomes available, the District may conduct preliminary ground water model analyses of the feasibility of additional ASR activities within Region II. A cooperative approach between utilities, the District, and DEP will be sought for any project development. Water Reuse Coordination As of 2012, 21 reuse applications associated with 10 reuse systems in Region II were permitted for public access reclaimed water, producing an estimated 8.83 MGD for public access reuse (DEP 2013). These facilities supported landscape irrigation for approximately 2,083 residences, 19 golf courses, eight parks, three schools, and one cemetery. In response to regulatory and cooperative planning efforts, significant investments in reuse have been made in the region, particularly for golf course irrigation in coastal areas. Most of the wastewater utilities serving coastal Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton counties provide some public access reuse water that offsets potable demand. Past District funding assistance has helped provide for construction of new reuse facilities near Freeport and in north-central Okaloosa County. A District-wide grant program initiated for FY 2013-2014 will make funding available for reuse projects, as well as other priority water supply development assistance projects. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 40

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The Region II RWSP previously identified approximately 5 MGD of new beneficial reuse to offset demands on the coastal Floridan Aquifer within Region II. This estimate has been updated to 5.4 MGD for the RWSP 2010-2030 planning horizon. The District will revise this estimate as additional data become available. Reuse planning activities over the previous year were incorporated into efforts to update reuse and recreation water use portions of the WSA update. Significant progress has been achieved in identifying potential resources for water reclamation and reuse District-wide through 2035. Assisting utilities and local governments in developing beneficial reuse projects will remain a priority, with implementation depending on funding availability. Future project emphasis will be focused on opportunities that reduce demand for potable water and provide environmental benefit. Note that the District has allocated a portion of its reserve funds over the next two years for local water supply development assistance grants. It is anticipated the beneficial reuse projects proposed by local governments and utilities will receive priority consideration for grant funding. Water Conservation Coordination A significant effort at water conservation has been underway in Region II for some time, substantially due to regulatory requirements and incentives established within the coastal WRCA. As a result, the estimated potential for additional potable water conservation within the coastal portion of the region is relatively low (estimated previously at 2.5 MGD) (PBS&J 2000a). Water conservation remains a priority, however, to build upon current water use efficiency and resource sustainability. Under chapter 40A-2, F.A.C., new withdrawals from the Floridan Aquifer for non-potable uses are not permitted within the coastal WRCA. Additionally, in response to resource limitations, cooperative planning, and regulatory requirements and incentives, numerous utilities implement water conservation measures that include inclining block rates, conservation plans, and the reuse of reclaimed water. The goal for utility conservation measures is to reduce the annual average residential per capita water consumption to 100 gallons per day or lower and to reduce water leakage to 10 percent or less of the water withdrawn. Utilities withdrawing an average of over 100,000 gallons per day are required to report withdrawals annually, and requirements to report residential per capita values are being phased in. Most utilities reporting these values are achieving the 100 residential gallons per capita per day (gpcd) goal, and overall reported residential per capita use in the District is 100 gpcd or less. The District’s 2013-2014 budget includes a significant investment in information technology (IT) enhancements and improvements, including a complete rebuild of the District’s website . The District intends for the website to better educate residents about how they can participate in water management, including providing easy-to-access water conservation tools and educational materials. Budgeted funding is not specific to regions or projects. District staff continue to promote water conservation education and awareness through such activities as the distribution of water conservation brochures and information and through the Water Conservation Hotel and Motel Program (Water CHAMP), which reduces washing of linens and towels. As of August 2013, 32 hotels were participating in the program, including 16 in Region II. In cooperation with other water management districts, the District participated in the statewide study of the effects of water rate pricing structures on public supply water demand (Whitcomb 2005). The NWFWMD coordinates distribution of the associated water rates model to utilities in cooperation with the author.

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Water Supply Regional Water Supply Planning Development and refinement of regional strategies, project planning and development, and RWSP updates are essential components of water resource development. Related activities include technical support and coordination with local governments and utilities to ensure a regional focus in the planning and development of alternative water supply projects. Associated administrative activities include project and funding management, coordination with DEP and other agencies, and progress reporting. The District provides assistance with hydrogeology and related technical evaluations for development of new and alternative water sources, including the inland Floridan Aquifer, the Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer, surface water, and reclaimed water. The District has also assisted local governments and utilities in development of water transmission facilities extending from inland wellfields to the coastal WRCA. District staff also work with local governments and state and regional agencies to enhance coordination of land use and water supply planning. District staff previously distributed guidelines and provided technical assistance to local governments for preparing water supply comprehensive plan amendments and water supply facilities work plans. In 2012, the District completed an update to the Region II RWSP. Additional activities included coordination of program funding sources and grant agreements. Two major grant funded projects were completed during the year. WRP, Inc. (a partnership between Destin Water Users, Inc., and South Walton Utility Company, Inc.) completed construction of a 15-mile potable water transmission pipeline from the inland wellfield in Walton County, south across Choctawhatchee Bay to the coastal region. Regional Utilities of Walton County also completed construction of over five miles of water transmission pipeline along the U.S. Highway 98 corridor. These facilities are interconnected with the inland wellfield, conveying inland ground water to meet coastal demand. Additionally, the 2012-2013 WRDWP Annual Report was completed and incorporated into the March 1, 2013, Consolidated Annual Report. Interconnection of Water Supply Conveyance Systems The Coastal Water Systems Interconnection Project is a District initiative focused on increasing water supply reliability in coastal communities. The goal of the project is to enhance the resilience of the coastal water systems by enabling transfer of water between utilities should the need arise due to droughts or other contingencies. Multi-jurisdictional and regional water conveyance systems will better ensure water availability for emergency response and disaster recovery in the event of water shortages, natural disasters, environmental emergencies, or system failures. This is a cooperative effort with local utilities. The Coastal Water Systems Interconnect Project includes a comprehensive Basis of Design Report (BODR) to evaluate potential interconnections that would serve multiple utilities. Existing interconnections were evaluated to determine their capacity and ability to meet the emergency needs of the interconnected utilities. The evaluation was conducted for current and future conditions (2030) and assessed utility emergency production capacities and demands. The evaluation identified two priority major interconnections that would significantly enhance emergency water supplies for coastal communities. An interconnection between southern Walton and Bay counties would improve emergency water system reliability for customers of Bay County Utilities and Regional Utilities in Walton County. A second interconnection between the Fairpoint Regional Utility System in Santa Rosa County and the Okaloosa County West water system would enhance emergency water supply reliability in coastal Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties. Participating local governments and utilities will own, operate, and maintain any constructed interconnection pipelines and associated facilities. Implementation would require negotiation of cooperative agreements between utilities to provide for interconnection funding, engineering specifications, and operational requirements. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 42

Water Supply

Hydrologic Data Collection and Analysis The District has a data collection network of rainfall gauges, stream gauges, and monitoring wells throughout Region II. Groundwater and surface water monitoring capabilities have been enhanced by continuing cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey surface water gauging network and development of an expanded monitoring network for the Sand-and-Gravel and Floridan aquifers where new water sources have been developed or are planned. In addition, the District will continue to monitor conditions within the coastal WRCA for salt water intrusion and aquifer sustainability. The monitoring network is essential for ensuring that long-term water supply initiatives are successful and sustainable, as well as for refining groundwater models and analyses needed to make future management decisions and to further develop water management strategies. Details of monitoring conducted as part of the Water Resource Development Work Program, as well as other programs, may be found in the Hydrologic Monitoring Plan (Barrios et al., 2011), available at: www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hydrologic_monitoring_plan/hydrologic_monitoring_plan.html. The need has been identified to further expand and enhance the District’s water resource monitoring network to support resource sustainability and cumulative impact assessments, to develop alternative water supplies, and to establish minimum flows and levels (MFLs). Among the enhancements planned are additional water level, water quality, and rainfall stations, and substantially increased monitoring frequency. Plans for an expanded hydrologic and water quality monitoring network were completed in 2013 with the network expansion for Region II planned for completion in 2014. Abandoned Well Plugging The District’s resource regulation program includes an active effort to plug abandoned artesian wells. The overall goal of the program is to protect available ground water resources from aging, uncontrolled, or improperly constructed wells that are no longer in use. The District achieves proper abandonment of such wells through two methods: requiring contractors to plug abandoned wells found on site during new well construction, or initiating a well abandonment contract with a well owner or local government. The District provides technical assistance and funding to utilities for plugging abandoned wells identified as having the potential to adversely affect ground water quality. Well abandonment is an ongoing effort and is likely to continue as more wells are identified for plugging in the future. The District will continue to implement this project through regulatory programs, where feasible. This project supports District efforts to sustain coastal water supply sources. To date, the District has facilitated the plugging of 4,844 abandoned wells within Region II, 242 of which were plugged in FY 2012-2013. Funding Summary: Region II Water Resource Development Projects Table 4-2 displays past year expenditures, current year budget, and anticipated future expenditures for water resource development within Region II.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 43

Water Supply Table 4-2. 2014-2018 Region II WRDWP Project Funding
Water Resource Development Projects Floridan Aquifer Sustainability2 Inland Sand-andGravel Aquifer Surface Water Sources Aquifer Storage and Recovery Water Reuse Water Conservation3 Regional Water Supply Planning Interconnect Hydrologic Data Abandoned Well Plugging4 TOTAL
1 2

FY 12-13 Expenditures

Anticipated Five Year Work Program FY 13-14 Budget1 FY 14-15 FY 15-16 FY 16-17 FY 17-18

FY14-FY18 Cost Estimate

$0 $27,791 $1,624 $0 $10,907 $3,194 $48,407 $2,453 $62,122 $0 $156,499

$11,400 $24,800 $1,900 $0 $9,000 $8,200 $18,000 $2,600 $83,900 $0 $159,800

$12,600 $25,600 $15,000 $0 $15,000 $5,000 $15,000 $0 $90,000 $0 $178,200

$10,000 $10,000 TBD $0 $15,000 $5,000 $20,000 $0 $90,000 $0 $150,000

$15,000 $15,000 TBD $0 $15,000 $5,000 $25,000 $0 $90,000 $0 $165,000

$20,000 $20,000 TBD $0 $15,000 $5,000 $30,000 $0 $90,000 $0 $180,000

$69,000 $95,400 $16,900 $0 $69,000 $28,200 $108,000 $2,600 $443,900 $0 $833,000

FY 14 figures based on adopted budget. Funding for application of the Floridan Aquifer Sustainability Model during the Water Supply Assessment (WSA) update and subsequent evaluations is captured within budget listed for the Regional Water Supply Planning project 3 Water conservation expenditures and budgets shown are for resource management and planning activities and do not include significant efforts extended through Resource Regulation. 4 Funding in future years will be budgeted as assistance needs are identified.

The budget for FY 2013-2014 reflects a decrease in anticipated spending as compared to budgets of previous years. Significant budget items previously accomplished include the major contractual expenses for development of the coastal interconnect BODR, the Floridan Aquifer Sustainability Model, the Sand and Gravel Aquifer model, and earlier contractual work in support of feasibility assessments of surface water sources in Okaloosa County. Staff resources during FY 2012-2013 were shifted substantially toward completion of a District-wide WSA update as well as to the MFL program, support for state efforts with respect to the Gulf of Mexico RESTORE Act, and springs protection and restoration initiatives. Resources over the next five years will be similarly focused on MFL development and water supply development funding.

Region II Water Supply Development
Water supply development strategies of the Region II RWSP, including preferred alternative water supply development projects, are listed in Table 4-3.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 44

Water Supply

Table 4-3. Region II Water Supply Development Projects
Project Activity Development of the inland Floridan Aquifer wellfield and transmission infrastructure to bring inland ground water to serve coastal utilities in Walton County. Development of the Inland Sand and Gravel Aquifer wellfield and associated infrastructure to bring inland ground water to serve coastal utilities in Santa Rosa County. Development of alternative surface water supply source, storage system, conveyance, and conjunctive use. Assist utilities and local governments in the development of reclaimed water to achieve potable water offset. Development of conveyance and interconnection facilities, facilitating development of alternative water supplies. Estimated Cost Water Made Available or Anticipated (MGD) 281

Inland Floridan Aquifer Alternative Water Supply Inland Sand and Gravel Aquifer Alternative Water Supply Surface Water Supply Development Water Reuse Facilities Water Supply Management Projects
1

$48,100,268

$9,588,500

182

TBD

25

TBD

5

$41,200,000

N/A

Represents total capacity of inland wellfield. New capacity is approximately 15 MGD. Approximately 13 MGD are currently permitted. 2 Represents total estimated capacity of the inland wellfield region. Approximately 8 MGD currently permitted.

Major water supply development projects completed to date have included inland ground water sources for coastal utilities in all three counties. These include the inland Sand and Gravel Aquifer wellfield in Santa Rosa County, inland Floridan Aquifer wells and transmission facilities in Okaloosa County, and an inland Floridan Aquifer wellfield and transmission facilities in Walton County. As stated above, two major construction projects were completed during the past year. WRP, Inc. completed a 15-mile potable water transmission pipeline from the inland wellfield in Walton County, south across Choctawhatchee Bay to serve coastal service areas in Walton and Okaloosa counties. Additionally, Regional Utilities of Walton County constructed over five miles of water transmission pipeline along the U.S. Highway 98 corridor. These facilities also convey inland ground water to meet coastal demand. To date, Region II water supply development projects have made approximately 21 MGD of water available for the region, including 13 MGD from the inland Floridan Aquifer and eight MGD from the inland Sand and Gravel Aquifer. An additional 40 MGD is estimated to be available from these sources for future development, including 10 MGD from the inland Sand and Gravel Aquifer, 25 MGD from surface water, and at least 5 MGD from reclaimed water. These water supplies, together with traditional water supply sources, are anticipated to be sufficient to meet projected demands through 2030 under both normal and 1-in-10 year drought conditions. Additional detail is available in the 2012 Region II RWSP update (Busen and Bartel 2012).

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 45

Water Supply

Region III: Bay County
The Governing Board approved a RWSP for Region III (Figure 4-3) in August 2008 (NWFWMD 2008). The plan describes concerns about the long-term sustainability of water supply resources within the region and presents strategies to increase source reliability and minimize the vulnerability to a major hurricane storm surge. The region depends on Deer Point Lake Reservoir as the primary public supply source of water. Major storm surge has been identified as a potential threat to the resource given the possibilities of salt water entering the reservoir and of damage to or loss of the impoundment structure.

Figure 4-3. Water Supply Planning Region III

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 46

Water Supply

Existing and reasonably anticipated surface water supplies in the region are considered adequate to meet projected water demands through 2030 while sustaining water resources and related natural systems (Coates et al., 2008). However, the surface water reservoir is the sole source of potable water for most of the region’s population, and concerns have been identified about its potential vulnerability to the effects of major hurricanes. The NWFWMD will continue to work with local governments and utilities in the region to address this issue and otherwise ensure the long-term reliability and sustainability of potable water resources. Efforts have been initiated to update the Region III RWSP.

Region III Water Resource Development
The Region III RWSP includes three water resource development strategies. These are summarized in Table 4-4. Descriptions of the strategies and their current progress follow. Table 4-4. Region III Water Resource Development Projects Project
Hydrologic and Water Quality Data Collection, Monitoring, and Analysis Water Reuse and Conservation Assistance Regional Water Supply Coordination and Technical Assistance

Activity
Hydrologic data collection, analysis, and modeling to identify baseline conditions and trends to support alternative water supply development. Assistance to local governments and utilities in developing reclaimed water and to enhance water conservation efforts. Technical assistance, support for utility interconnections, and development and update of the regional water supply plan.

Water Identified or Made Available (MGD)
TBD 5* TBD

* This represents a preliminary estimate of potential potable water offset that may be available from 2010-2030, based on projected wastewater flows compared to current reuse within the region.

Among the water resource development projects, the primary project that would lend itself to additional water being made available is Water Reuse and Conservation assistance. Reuse of reclaimed water and water conservation are activities implemented by local governments and utilities. The District, however, can lend technical, planning, and potentially financial assistance. Hydrologic and Water Quality Data Collection, Monitoring, and Analysis Implementation of this project provides the water resource data collection, analysis, and modeling needed for characterizing baseline conditions and subsequently identifying and evaluating future alternative water supply sources. The data collection and analysis developed will also facilitate the long-term monitoring needed to ensure future withdrawals are managed to protect water resources and associated natural systems. In cooperation with Bay County, the District continues implementation of the Deer Point Lake Watershed Hydrologic Monitoring program. This effort includes operation of stream stage/discharge and rainfall monitoring stations that provide a continuous record of precipitation and surface water flows during both dry weather and storm conditions. The District operates additional groundwater level, stream flow, and lake level monitoring sites within the county, all intended to characterize water resource conditions and trends within the region.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 47

Water Supply Details of monitoring conducted as part of the Water Resource Development Work Program, as well as other work programs, may be found in the Hydrologic Monitoring Plan (Barrios et al., 2011), available at: www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hydrologic_monitoring_plan/hydrologic_monitoring_plan.html. Water Reuse and Conservation Assistance The reuse of reclaimed water is an important regional strategy, given its potential for reducing and constraining potable water demand, improving efficient use of available resources, and supporting sustainable long-term management. District staff coordinate with DEP as that agency carries out its reuse regulation responsibilities. In 2012, an estimated three MGD of reclaimed water were used for public access reuse in Region III (DEP 2013). This included irrigation of an estimated 980 residences, three golf courses, four parks, and three schools. Based on an analysis of current water reuse (DEP 2013) compared with projected wastewater flows, a preliminary estimate is that reclamation of nearly 10 MGD of additional wastewater (annual average daily flow) may be feasible by 2030. Of that, it is estimated that approximately five MGD of potable water offset could be achieved through beneficial reuse activities, such as landscape irrigation. Successful implementation could assist in the discontinuation of surface water discharges by two wastewater treatment plants into St. Andrew Bay. Additional reuse could be achieved if industrial applications of reclaimed water are identified in the region. Enhanced water conservation efforts may reduce water use and limit long-term demand. Application of conservation rate structures, conservation measures in local building codes and ordinances, consumptive use permitting conditions, water loss prevention and correction efforts, and public outreach and education are expected to be especially important. The District continues to coordinate the Water CHAMP program and distribute water conservation brochures to utilities and local governments in the region. Regional Water Supply Coordination and Technical Assistance Through this strategy, the District provides technical assistance to local governments and water suppliers. Local governments in regions subject to a RWSP must address statutory requirements to effectively coordinate land use and water supply planning. Such local governments are required to amend their comprehensive plans as necessary to include a Water Supply Facilities Work Plan and to otherwise ensure water supplies are planned and developed to meet future growth in a manner consistent with the RWSP. The coastal water systems interconnection initiative described above also considers interconnections within Region III. Utility interconnections, in concert with continued development of alternative water supply sources, enhance the resilience of water supplies within the coastal regions in the face of droughts, major storms, and other possible events. The initial evaluation included three utilities within Bay County. It is anticipated that an update to the RWSP for Region III will be developed during 2013. Through this process, the allocation of alternative water supply development funding will be further evaluated based on a current assessment of the optimal strategies for addressing water resource needs identified in the RWSP and WSA. Funding Summary: Region III Water Resource Development Projects Table 4-5 displays past year expenditures, current year budget, and anticipated future expenditures for water resource development within Region III.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 48

Water Supply

Table 4-5. 2014-2018 Region III WRDWP Project Funding
Water Resource Development Projects Hydrologic and Water Quality Data Collection, Monitoring, and Analysis Water Reuse and Conservation Assistance RWS Coord. and Technical Assist. TOTAL
1

FY 12-13 Expenditures

Anticipated Five Year Work Program FY 13-14 Budget1 FY 14-15 FY 15-16 FY 16-17 FY 17-18

FY14-FY18 Cost Estimate

$22,891

$50,100

$55,000

$20,000

$20,000

$20,000

$165,100

$4,259 $25,442 $52,442

$10,000 $28,800 $88,900

$8,000 $30,000 $93,000

$8,000 $20,000 $48,000

$8,000 $20,000 $48,000

$8,000 $20,000 $48,000

$42,000 $118,800 $325,900

FY 14 figures based on adopted budget.

Increased funding in FY 2013-2014 reflects an anticipated RWSP update and technical assistance to local governments and utilities in the planning region, as well as an increased focus on identifying potential reuse projects within the region and for continuing to develop the District’s hydrologic monitoring network. Funding is also expected to increase in FY 2013-2014 for an enhanced monitoring network to support resource sustainability monitoring.

Region III Water Supply Development
Water supply development strategies identified in the Region III RWSP are listed in Table 4-6. Table 4-6. Region III Water Supply Development Projects Project
Inland Ground Water Source Development and Water Supply Source Protection Utility Interconnections and Infrastructure Enhancements

Activity
Alternative project options currently being explored in cooperation with Bay County. Assist with delivery system interconnections and facility improvements. Specifically identified is a potential 42” pipeline connection between southern Bay and Walton counties. Construction of water reuse facilities to provide reclaimed water for landscape irrigation and other beneficial uses.

Estimated Cost
N/A1

Water Made Available or Anticipated (MGD)
TBD

$25,700,0002

TBD

Water Reuse Facilities
1

TBD

TBD

Planning level cost estimates and anticipated quantities of water to be made available will be re-evaluated during the update to the Region III RWSP, scheduled for 2013. 2 Planning level cost estimate to await alternative project planning and engineering.

From 2009-2012, the District provided water supply development assistance to the City of Callaway for extending a potable water transmission main within the Allanton Peninsula and for a water and sewer systems interconnection with Sandy Creek Utility Services, Inc.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 49

Water Supply

Region V: Gulf and Franklin Counties
The Region V RWSP was approved by the Governing Board in January 2007 (NWFWMD 2007). The primary concern described is salt water intrusion into the coastal Floridan Aquifer, which has implications for the long-term sustainability of coastal ground water supplies within both Franklin and Gulf counties. Although public supply demands are relatively small, they represent three quarters of the total projected demand for 2030. To meet projected demands associated with permanent and seasonal population growth, a surface water supply source has been developed for the City of Port St. Joe and its vicinity in Gulf County, and the inland Floridan Aquifer has been evaluated as a long-term source for coastal Franklin County. Given the completion of the major alternative water supply project and reduced growth rates, the 2013 Water Supply Assessment update recommended that regional water supply planning be discontinued in Region V (Countryman et al. 2014). The Governing Board approved this recommendation in February 2014.

Figure 4-4. Water Supply Planning Region V

Region V Water Resource Development
The Region V RWSP includes four water resource development projects encompassing strategies supporting alternative water supply development. These are summarized in Table 4-7. Descriptions of the strategies and their current progress follow.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 50

Water Supply

Table 4-7. Region V Water Resource Development Projects Project
Hydrologic and Water Quality Data Collection, Monitoring, and Analysis Regional Water Supply Coordination, Source Protection, and Engineering and Technical Assistance Water Reuse and Conservation Coordination Assistance Regional Water Supply Plan Implementation

Activity
Water resource data collection, analysis, and modeling to support future alternative water supply development. Inland groundwater resources evaluated in Franklin County. Technical assistance to help local governments and utilities meet water supply-related source protection, project design, and engineering requirements. Assistance provided to Port St. Joe for surface water treatment facility. Coordination and assistance to utilities and local governments for development of reclaimed water for beneficial uses. Planning and tracking project implementation, grant administration, fulfilling statutory reporting requirements, and related activities.

Water Identified or Made Available (MGD)
3

6

TBD

N/A

Hydrologic and Water Quality Data Collection, Monitoring, and Analysis This activity provides for water resource data collection, analysis, and modeling to determine the location and distribution of potential future production wells and other water supply sources to serve Region V communities. Tasks include ground water modeling, water quality sampling and analysis, and hydrologic monitoring and analysis. Long term emphasis includes water quality and hydrologic monitoring to identify and evaluate trends. The District has conducted data collection and analysis to evaluate inland ground water sources within Franklin County. Approximately three MGD were identified as potentially being available from the inland Floridan Aquifer. In addition, the coastal Floridan Aquifer in Franklin County has been identified as a resource of concern. Consequently, the District included the resource within the updated MFL priority list. Completion of a technical assessment is planned for 2019. Expanded hydrologic data collection in support of the MFL monitoring effort began in 2013. The District has also assisted the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District (EPWSD) in test well development and aquifer testing. This effort led to the development of a new water supply production well, located further inland from the immediate coastal area. Expected outcomes include reduced withdrawals from the coastal aquifer and a resulting reduced threat to water supply wells from salt water intrusion. Regional Water Supply Coordination, Source Protection, and Engineering and Technical Assistance This project provides for technical assistance to help local governments and utilities meet water supplyrelated source protection, project design, and engineering requirements. The District helps support regional coordination and planning on the part of regional water supply utilities and local governments. Assistance is focused on protecting ground and surface water sources, water resource engineering, intergovernmental coordination, and other technical assistance. The District’s coastal water systems interconnection planning extends to Gulf County. Such interconnections are intended to enhance the reliability of water supplies within the coastal areas in the face of droughts, major storms, and other possible events. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 51

Water Supply In addition to providing funding assistance to the City of Port St. Joe for construction of its new surface water supply facility (described below), the District has provided additional assistance for improvements to the city’s potable water distribution system. With District assistance, the City of Carrabelle completed an engineering analysis of a potential interconnection with the Alligator Point Water Resources District. Completion of this interconnection would assist in regional drought-proofing and in ensuring system reliability through summer and holiday heavy use periods. The City of Carrabelle has enacted a conservation-oriented rate structure as part of this effort, thereby improving water use efficiency, particularly for new development. Technical and financial assistance has previously been provided to the City of Wewahitchka for test well development. Water Reuse and Conservation Coordination Assistance Water reuse is an important component of the long-term regional water supply strategy and is pursued where feasible as a means of providing non-potable water for beneficial uses, thereby offsetting potable demand, and constraining long-term potable demand. The District’s role in developing water reuse includes coordination among utilities, inventorying existing and potential reclaimed water sources and beneficial uses, and providing technical and financial assistance for specific reuse projects. As of 2012, an estimated 0.29 MGD of public access reclaimed water was reused in Region V (DEP 2013). This includes irrigation of one golf course and toilet flushing at the Franklin Correctional Institution. Water reuse needs and opportunities to support RWSP implementation and enhance the sustainability of water resources will continue to be pursued by District staff. Other conservation assistance provided by the District to Region V has included distribution of the water rates model (Whitcomb 2005) and water conservation brochures to utilities, as well as Water CHAMPS coordination with hotels. Regional Water Supply Plan Implementation Implementing the RWSP for Region V encompasses planning and tracking project implementation, grant administration, reporting, and related activities. While this project does not directly provide water, the efforts encompassed do support the long-term development of alternative water supply sources, including the approximately nine MGD estimated to be available across the region through development of alternative surface water and inland ground water sources. During the past year, the District continued RWSP implementation tracking, project planning and coordination of program funding sources and contracts. The WRDWP Annual Report and March 1 Consolidated Annual Report were completed. Given completion of the major alternative water supply project and reduced growth rates, the 2013 Water Supply Assessment update recommended that regional water supply planning be discontinued in Region V (Countryman et al. 2014). The Governing Board approved this recommendation in February 2014. Funding Summary: Region V Water Resource Development Projects Table 4-8 displays past year expenditures, current year budget, and anticipated future expenditures for water resource development within Region V. Expenditures for FY 2012-2013 were somewhat greater than had been anticipated largely due to efforts to enhance monitoring within the region, as well as technical assistance provided to the City of Port St. Joe as that city adjusts its water supply facilities to its new surface water supply source. The five-year funding estimates are based on continued RWSP development and implementation in Region V, with an update to the plan following completion of the District-wide WSA. Funding is expected to increase beginning in FY 2013-2014 to support enhanced monitoring and for development and improvement of groundwater models District-wide. NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 52

Water Supply

Table 4-8. 2014-2018 Region V WRDWP Project Funding
Water Resource Development Projects Hydrologic and Water Quality Data Collection and Analysis Coord., Source Protection, Eng. and Tech. Assist. Water Reuse and Conservation Coord. Assist. Regional Water Supply Plan Implementation TOTAL
1

FY 12-13 Expenditures

Anticipated Five Year Work Program
FY 13-14 Budget1 FY 14-15 FY 15-16 FY 16-17 FY 17-18

FY14-FY18 Cost Estimate

$16,096 $10,556 $4,259 $3,453 $34,365

$58,600 $3,600 $7,300 $7,200 $76,700

$55,000 $5,000 $5,000 $8,000 $73,000

$25,000 $5,000 $5,000 $8,000 $43,000

$25,000 $10,000 $5,000 $8,000 $48,000

$25,000 $10,000 $5,000 $8,000 $48,000

$188,600 $33,600 $27,300 $39,200 $288,700

FY 14 figures based on adopted budget.

Note: The need for regional water supply planning in Region V is being reevaluated through a new update to the Districtwide Water Supply Assessment, currently under development. This five year work program is based on program continuation, as last approved by the Governing Board.

Region V Water Supply Development
Water supply development strategies within the Region V RWSP are listed in Table 4-9. Table 4-9. Region V Water Supply Development Projects Project
Inland Ground Water Source Development and Water Supply Source Protection Alternative Surface Water Treatment and Transport Facility Development Utility Interconnections and Infrastructure Enhancements Reclaimed Water Use

Activity
Engineering analysis, facility construction, source protection, and hydrologic restoration. Construction of water treatment and transmission facilities, specifically including alternative water supply development in Gulf County. Assist with delivery system interconnections and facility improvements. Construction of water reuse facilities to provide reclaimed water for landscape irrigation and other beneficial uses.

Estimated Cost
$1,000,000

Water Made Available or Anticipated (MGD)
3

$16,737,000

6

TBD TBD

TBD <1

With funding assistance and cooperation from the District, the City of Port St. Joe constructed a six MGD surface water treatment plant as an alternative water source to reduce reliance on coastal ground water (Appendix A). Development of the new treatment facility shifted the City’s public water supply source from naturally constrained ground water to surface water derived from the Chipola River via an existing fresh water canal. This enabled the City to meet projected future demands while reducing the stress on

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 53

Water Supply local ground water resources. In addition to meeting municipal needs, the city may in the future be able to make this resource available for nearby areas outside of the city limits. Funding and technical assistance provided to the Eastpoint Water and Sewer District has led to development of a water supply production well located further inland from previously existing water supply wells. Withdrawals in the immediate coastal area and the threat of salt water intrusion are, as a result, being reduced. During FY 2012-2013, the District provided water supply development funding assistance to the City of Port St. Joe to enable the city to complete repairs and upgrades to its pump station on the Chipola River. Additionally, the District provided additional technical assistance to the City to support efforts to address water quality issues associated with the distribution system.

District-wide Initiatives
The 2013 update to the district-wide Water Supply Assessment was completed over the past year. This assessment incorporated demand projections to 2035 for all regions and all water use categories. Evaluations of the status and sufficiency of water resources were also updated as part of the assessment. The District continues to emphasize water supply development assistance for financially disadvantaged small local governments. Early in the year, the District awarded $106,000 to assist the City of Port St. Joe with a needed upgrade to the Chipola Pump Station surface water withdrawal facility. The District also awarded $235,845 in grant funding to the City of Blountstown, matching City funds needed for the replacement of a major water distribution line along State Road 20. Furthermore, the Governing Board approved a major water supply development assistance grant initiative, scheduled for implementation during FY 2013-2014. The Basis of Design Report for the Coastal Water Systems Interconnection Initiative, as described above, was completed in 2013. The report provided a detailed analysis of interconnect alternatives and design parameters. Candidate interconnection projects were described, as will key issues and challenges, including utility emergency capacities and water blending analysis. The basis of design report included conceptual designs for a coastal interconnection between Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties and a coastal interconnection between Walton and Bay counties. Significant progress has been achieved in identifying potential expansion of wastewater reclamation and water reuse District-wide through 2035. This information is being incorporated into the 2013 WSA update. Assisting utilities and local governments in developing beneficial reuse projects will remain a priority, with implementation depending on future funding availability. Significant efforts are underway to enhance agricultural water use efficiency and support implementation of associated water quality best management practices, targeted primarily for the Jackson Blue Spring basin of the Apalachicola River watershed. For FY 2013-2014, the District has budgeted $752,000 of legislatively appropriated springs restoration funding for these activities. The funding will provide a 75 percent cost-share to help producers retrofit center pivot irrigation systems, support expansion of the northwest Florida mobile irrigation laboratory program, and provide cost-share funds to implement fertigation and other efficient fertilization systems. Together, these efforts are expected to achieve significant reductions in both water use and pollutant loading within the Jackson Blue Spring basin. The District continues its program to properly plug abandoned or contaminated wells for financially constrained public water systems, in water resource caution areas, in areas identified under chapter 62524, Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) (Escambia, Santa Rosa, Jackson, and Leon counties), and in NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 54

Water Supply

other areas as necessary. The program at one time had matching funding from DEP and was able to cover 100 percent of costs. The program currently pays up to 50 percent of costs to plug and abandon eligible wells. During 2013, 242 wells were plugged at no cost to the District.

References
Many of these references may be found on the District’s website under Publications & Data, Technical Publications: www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubsdata/techpubs.html.
Barrios, K., R.L. Bartel, N. Wooten, and M. Lopez. 2011. Hydrologic Monitoring Plan: Version 1.0. Northwest Florida Water Management District, Program Development Series 2011-04. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hydrologic_monitoring_plan/hydrologic_monitoring_plan.html Bartel, R. L., T. R. Pratt, T. L. Macmillan, R. R. Potts, C. J. Richards, R. D. Womble, J. A. Bonekemper, and R. A. Countryman. 2000. Regional Water Supply Plan for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties . Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 2000-1. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/2000_plan/rwsp.htm Bonekemper, J. 2003. Northwest Florida Water Management District Water Supply Projections 2005-2025. Northwest Florida Water Management District Water Resources Assessment 03-01. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/water_supply_projections/water_supply_projections.htm Busen, K. and R. Bartel. 2012. 2012 Regional Water Supply Plan Update for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Water Supply Planning Region II . Northwest Florida Water Management District Water Resources Assessment 2012-01. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/RWSP_Region2.htm Coates, K., C. Coger, R. A. Countryman, M. Pritzl, and C. J. Richards. 2008. 2008 Water Supply Assessment Update. Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 08-02. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/wsa/WSA%20Updates/wsa_update_2008.htm

Countryman, T.C., L. Brooks, K. Busen, E. Chelette, K. Coates, F. Florida, and P. Thorpe. 2014. 2013 Water Supply Assessment Update. Havana: Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 13-01. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/wsa/WSA%20Updates/wsa_update_2013.html
DeFosset, K.L. 2004. Availability of Ground Water from the Sand-And-Gravel Aquifer in Coastal Okaloosa County, Florida. Northwest Florida Water Management District, Water Resources Technical File Report 04-1. August 2004. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/wrtfr04-01/wrtfr04-01.htm Florida Department of Environmental Protection. 2013. 2012 Reuse Inventory. DEP Water Reuse Program. May 2013. Tallahassee, FL. www.dep.state.fl.us/water/reuse Florida Natural Areas Inventory. 2013. Florida Conservation Lands, June 2013. www.fnai.org/gisdata.cfm HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2000. Modeling of Ground Water Flow in Walton, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida. May 2000. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hglgwmod/hglgwmodel.htm HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2005. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Western Domain Model. May 2005. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hgl_western_domain/hgl_western_domain.html

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 55

Water Supply
HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2007a. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Eastern Domain Model, Final Report. September 2007. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hgl_eastern_domain/hgl_eastern_domain.html HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2007b. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Eastern Domain Forecast Simulations. March 2007. HydroGeoLogic, Inc. and Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc. 2007. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Western Domain Forecast Simulations. March 2007. Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2006. Regional Water Supply Plan for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Plan Update. Water Resource Assessment 2006-1. September 2006. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/2006_plan/rwsp.htm Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2007. Regional Water Supply Plan: Region V, Franklin and Gulf Counties. Water Resources Assessment 07-01. January 2007. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/rwsp/plan.htm Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2008. Region III Regional Water Supply Plan, Bay County, Florida. Program Development Series 08-02. August 2008. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/water_supply_planning/Region%20III%20RWSP_08-1208%20FINALweb%20version.pdf Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2013. Consolidated Annual Report. March 1, 2014. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/consolidatedAR/consolAR.html PBS&J. 2000a. Water Conservation Task Summary Report. August 2000. PBS&J. 2000b. Reuse Task Summary Report. August 2000. PBS&J. 2006. Water Supply Planning Region II Final Report: Conceptual Alternative Water Supply Development Projects and Planning Level Cost Estimates. October 2006. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/final_%20water_Report/Final%20Water%20Supply%20Study%20Report.p df Pratt, T.R. 2001. Results of Floridan Aquifer Drilling Program in Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Florida. Technical File Report 01-1. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/tfr01-1/tfr01-1.htm Ryan, P. L., T. L. Macmillian, T. R. Pratt, A. R. Chelette, C. J. Richards, R. A. Countryman, and G. L. Marchman. 1998. District Water Supply Assessment. Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 98-2. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/wsa/wsamain.htm Whitcomb, J.B. 2005. Florida Water Rates Evaluation of Single Family Homes. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/permits/waterratesreport.pdf

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 56

Water Supply

4.2

Alternative Water Supplies Annual Report

Each water management district is required under section 373.707(8)(n), F.S., to submit as part of the Consolidated Annual Report a chapter or section that:     accounts for the disbursal of all budgeted amounts pursuant to section 373.707, F.S.; describes all alternative water supply projects funded; describes the quantity of new water to be made available as a result of such projects; and accounts separately for any other funding provided through grants, matching grants, revolving loans, and the use of district land or facilities to implement regional water supply plans.

Beginning in 2006, the District began funding a series of alternative water supply and water resource development projects through the Water Protection and Sustainability Program Trust Fund (WPSPTF). These projects helped implement strategies of the District and local utilities to identify and develop alternative water supplies to meet long-term needs in a sustainable manner. Efforts over the past year were focused on continued implementation of approved water supply and water resource development projects pursuant to the RWSPs, as well as water supply development assistance for financially disadvantaged small local governments and associated utilities. Tables 4-10 and 4-11 provide summary information on projects to date. It should be noted that substantial water supply development assistance has been provided to local governments and utilities using funding sources other than the WPSPTF. In 2013, the District initiated the Water Supply Development Community Assistance Initiative, which will provide approximately $10 million in competitive grant funding across northwest Florida. These funds provide a very significant contribution to addressing widespread needs on the part of utilities and local governments in the region. Additionally, the District has provided over $3 million in additional District grant funding for development of water supply transmission pipelines bringing water from the inland Floridan Aquifer wellfield in Walton County to serve coastal communities. A grant of $106,000 was awarded to the City of Port St. Joe for pump station repairs, and a $235,845 grant was awarded to the City of Blountstown for replacement of a water distribution main along State Road 20. These are in addition to a number of earlier grants, as outlined in Table 4-11.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 57

Water Supply Table 4-10. Alternative Water Supply and Water Resource Development Projects Funded under the Water Protection and Sustainability Program
Project
Area-wide Alternative Water Supply Source Expansion Tram Road Public Access Reuse Facility Bob Sikes Reuse Project Inland Floridan Aquifer Source - WRD Ground Water Modeling & Aquifer Testing - WRD Surface Water Treatment Plant City of Chipley Reuse Project Wakulla County Reuse Project Advanced Wastewater Treatment & Water Reuse Facilities Alternative Pump Station

Region

Local Sponsor

Activity

Status

WPSPTF FY Approp.
FY 2006 FY 2006; FY 2007 FY 2006 FY 2006 FY 2006; FY 2007 FY 2007 FY 2007 FY 2007 FY 2007

Anticipated WPSPTF Local Water Contribution Contribution 1 (MGD)
15.1 $6,500,000 $9,991,891

Total

Local %

II

Regional Utilities, Inland wellfield South Walton expansion Utility Co. Tallahassee Okaloosa County NWFWMD; Franklin County Utilities Bay County Port St. Joe Chipley Wakulla County Tallahassee Water reuse/ spring protection Water reuse Inland source evaluation

Complete

$16,491,891

61%

VII II V

Complete Complete Complete

1.2 0.7 3.0
2

$1,350,000 $2,000,000 $300,000

$5,250,000 $4,509,132 $0

$6,600,000 $6,509,132 $300,000

80% 69% 0%

III V IV VII VII

Inland source evaluation Surface water Water reuse Water reuse Water resource development/ springs protection Alternative raw water pump station and force main

Complete Complete Complete Construction Complete

0.0 6.0 1.2 0.4 4.5

$350,000 $4,000,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000

$800,000 $12,736,700 $4,500,000 $750,000 $5,800,000

$1,150,000 $16,736,700 $5,000,000 $1,250,000 $6,300,000
2

70% 76% 90% 60% 92%

III

Bay County Total

Engineering

FY 2008

30.0 62.1

$5,470,000 $21,470,000

$19,530,000 $63,867,723

$25,000,000 $85,337,723

78% 73%

1

Anticipated water made available rounded to the nearest 100,000 gallons per day.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 58

Water Supply Table 4-11. Additional Water Supply Development Assistance Projects Project
City of Freeport Reuse Project Allanton Peninsula Water and Wastewater Extension Project East Okaloosa County Water and Sewer Extension Walton County Phase II Regional Water Supply Port St. Joe Water Distribution System Improvements Carrabelle-Alligator Point Interconnection Feasibility Study Wewahitchka Water Supply System Improvements Water and Sewer Systems Interconnections Water Transmission Line Construction and Interconnection Gretna to Greensboro Watermain Extension Water Supply Improvements; Preliminary Engineering

Local Sponsor
Freeport

Region
II

Activity
Water reuse storage and transmission system construction Water supply transmission and distribution system construction Water supply transmission and interconnection Construction of transmission and Storage Facilities; associated with inland wellfield AWSD Water supply improvements Interconnection feasibility assessment; enactment of conservation rate structure Water supply development; test production well construction Interconnections of water systems and sewer systems between Callaway and Sandy Creek Utility Transmission line and interconnection construction Water supply transmission and distribution Facility Construction Preliminary engineering and environmental analysis

Status
Complete

Completion
FY 2010

NWFWMD Contribution
$3,000,000

Funding Source
SWIM, Florida Forever WMLTF District General Fund EMRTF; District General Fund District General Fund WMLTF District General Fund District General Fund District General Fund District General Fund District General Fund

Callaway Okaloosa County Regional Utilities Port St. Joe

III

Complete

FY 2010

$100,000

II

Complete

FY 2010

$750,000

II

Complete

FY 2011

$2,000,000

V

Complete

FY 2011

$50,000

Carrabelle

V

Complete

FY 2011

$100,000

Wewahitchka

V

Complete

FY 2011

$400,000

Callaway

III

Complete

FY 2012

$53,998

Freeport Gretna; Gadsden County Gretna

II

Complete

FY 2012

$800,000

VI

Complete

FY 2012

$449,888

VI

Complete

FY 2012

$50,000

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 59

Water Supply Table 4-11. Additional Water Supply Development Assistance Projects (continued) Project
Pine Island Water Distribution System Expansion Water Main Construction (South Walton County)

Local Sponsor
Calhoun County

Region
IV

Activity
Expansion of water distribution system to unincorporated community Construction of transmission facilities and subaqueous pipeline from inland wellfield to serve coastal Walton and Okaloosa counties. Water main extension along U.S. Highway 98 in Walton County Complete repairs to existing pump station; including diesel power supply replacement Test well development and data analysis Assistance to Okaloosa County for surface water development. Installation of approximately 5,500 LF of new 12-inch water main.

Status
Complete

Completion
FY 2013

NWFWMD Contribution
$98,607

Funding Source
District General Fund

WRP, Inc.

II

Complete

FY 2013

$2,500,000

District General Fund

U.S. Highway 98 Water Line Extension Chipola Pump Station Repairs Test Well Development Okaloosa County AWS Surface Water State Road 20 Water Line Replacement

Regional Utilities Port St. Joe Panacea Area Water System Okaloosa County Blountstown

II

Complete

FY 2013

$750,000

District General Fund District General Fund District General Fund District General Fund District General Fund

V

Complete

FY 2013

$106,000

VII

Planning

FY 2013

$30,500

II

Planning Engineering, Permitting

FY 2015

TBD

IV

FY 2015

$235,845

Total

$11,474,838

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 60

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Chapter Five: Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report
5.1 Land Acquisition Work Plan

Introduction
Section 373.199(7), F.S. requires the Northwest Florida Water Management District (District) to annually update the Florida Forever Work Plan. To date, this is the 13th annual update of the 2001 Florida Forever Work Plan. Since 2006 this plan has been presented as a separate chapter in the Consolidated Annual Report as required by section 373.036(7), F.S. This plan contains information on projects eligible to receive funding under the Florida Forever Act and also reports on land management activities, lands surplused and the progress of funding, staffing and resource management of projects for which the District is responsible.

Florida Forever Program
In 1999, the Florida Legislature passed the Florida Forever Act (section 259.105, F.S.) which has continued the state’s long-term commitment to environmental land acquisition, restoration of degraded natural areas, and high-quality outdoor recreation opportunities. While previous programs focused almost exclusively on the acquisition of environmentally sensitive lands, the Florida Forever program is somewhat different in that it authorizes the use of up to half of the program funding for certain types of capital improvement projects. Eligible uses of these funds include water resource development, stormwater management projects, water body restoration, recreation facilities, public access improvements, and removing invasive plants, among others. The remaining fifty percent must be spent on land acquisition. Since the inception of the District’s land acquisition program, the goal has been to bring as much floodplain as possible of our major rivers and creeks under public ownership and protection. The Florida Forever Land Acquisition Program continues to increase the acres of wetland, floodplain and aquifer recharge areas acquired by the District. To date, over 224,783 acres have been protected for water resource purposes through the land acquisition efforts of the District either in fee simple or through conservation easements. A summary of acquisitions and surplusing completed in 2013 is provided below.

Summary of Acquisitions and Surplusing Completed in 2013
Fee Simple Acquisitions Property Sartor Date Purchased 09/24/13 TOTAL Acres 10 10 Cost $15,000 $15,000 Surplused Lands Property Parch Road Old River Road Date Surplused 12/13/13 12/13/13 TOTAL Acres 0.4 1.5 1.9 Sale Price $2,400.00 $3,400.00 $5,800.00 Funding Source(s) Preservation 2000 Preservation 2000 Water Management Area Blackwater River Yellow River Funding Source(s) Reserves Water Management Area Econfina Creek

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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Acquisition Planning
The District employs a watershed approach to select and prioritize the important water resource and natural systems within the major river basins of northwest Florida. Primary among the considerations in this process are how specific floodplain or buffer areas help satisfy the District’s water resources and natural system protection objectives; the availability of funds; the seller’s willingness; how different areas fit into the District’s land management scheme; and the size, accessibility and overall condition of each property. Recommendations from interest groups, landowners, local governments, agency representatives and other interested parties are given full consideration in the acquisition process. Subject to receiving funding for Florida Forever, the District’s acquisition efforts this year will focus on the purchase of inholdings and additions to the existing water management areas (WMAs) as well as Conservation Easements in each of the existing WMA’s. Existing WMAs include the Perdido River, Escambia River, Blackwater River, Yellow River, Garcon Point, Choctawhatchee River/Holmes Creek, Econfina Creek, Chipola River, and Apalachicola River. All of these WMAs will be high priority areas for the acquisition of additions and inholdings. Acquisition efforts will be directed toward acquiring those properties which the District adjoins on one, two or three sides (additions) or those parcels which the District surrounds on all sides (inholdings). In developing the annual update to the District’s Florida Forever Five Year Land Acquisition Work Plan, District staff shall review Florida Forever projects proposed by DEP’s, Division of State Lands in order to minimize redundancy and facilitate an efficient and mutually supportive land acquisition effort.

Approved Acquisition Areas
The approved acquisition areas listed below are not presented on a priority basis. For each of these water bodies, it is desirable to acquire both the floodplain and a natural buffer zone to provide further water resource protection.
Rivers & Creeks Originating In Florida Wakulla River St. Marks River Econfina Creek and other Tributaries of Deer Point Lake Lafayette Creek Rivers and Creeks Originating Outside Florida Apalachicola River Lower Apalachicola River Wetland Chipola River Choctawhatchee River including Holmes Creek Escambia River Blackwater River including Juniper, Big Coldwater and Coldwater creeks Ochlockonee River and its major tributaries Yellow and Shoal Rivers Perdido River and Bay Springs Lakes & Ponds Other Ecosystems, Basins and Buffers Southwest Escambia County Ecosystem Garcon Point Ecosystem West Bay Buffer Sandy Creek Basin Apalachicola Bay and St. Vincent Sound Buffer

St. Marks River near Natural Bridge Spring Lake Spring Group Area Waddell Springs Bosel Springs Hays Springs Gainer Springs

Lake Jackson Sand Hill Lakes

Groundwater Recharge Areas Such lands may be designated by the District as Recharge Areas for the Floridan, Sand-and-Gravel and other important aquifers.

Donated Lands The District will accept donations of lands within its major acquisition areas if those lands are necessary for water management, water supply and the conservation and protection of land and water resources.

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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report
Exchange Lands The District may exchange lands it has acquired under the Florida Forever program for other lands that qualify for acquisition under the program. The District’s Governing Board establishes the terms and conditions it considers necessary to equalize values of the exchange properties. In all such exchanges, the District’s goal will be to ensure that there is no net loss of wetland protection and that there is a net positive environmental benefit. Mitigation Acquisitions Under Florida law, unavoidable losses of natural wetlands or wetland functions require “mitigation” through the acquisition or restoration of other nearby wetlands. The District is often the recipient of such lands in the form of donations and also serves as the mitigation agent for the Florida Department of Transportation. Whenever possible, the District attempts to acquire mitigation lands contiguous to its existing ownership, but since proximity to the original wetland impact is often paramount, the District will acquire or manage isolated tracts at times. Surplus Section 373.089, F.S., allows the Governing Board of the District to sell (surplus) lands or interest or rights in lands to which the District has acquired title or to which it may hereafter acquire title. Any lands, or interests or rights in lands, determined by the Governing Board to be surplus may be sold by the District at any time for the highest price, but in no case shall the selling price be less than the appraised value.

Surplus Lands
In the fall of 2012, District staff conducted an evaluation of all District lands to determine if there were any parcels appropriate for surplus. The parcels recommended for surplus were small, non-contiguous, isolated tracts or connected only on a corner. The following tracts were declared surplus by the District’s Governing Board.

WMA Escambia River Blackwater River Yellow River Choctawhatchee River Choctawhatchee River Econfina Creek

Acres 110.5 0.4 1.5 38 38 10

County Escambia Santa Rosa Okaloosa Walton Walton Washington

Acquired Date April 26, 1994 August 3, 2001 December 15, 1999 July 31, 1992 July 31, 1992 December 19, 1997

Status For Sale Sold on 12-13-13 Sold on 12-13-13 Under Contract For Sale For Sale

During FY 2013-2014, District staff will continue to evaluate District lands for potential surplus parcels.

Note to Landowners
It is important to note that the District’s land acquisition process only involves willing sellers and is usually initiated by landowners offering parcels for sale. This plan includes a number of areas the District has identified for potential purchase. If your property is included in any of our acquisition areas or maps and you do not desire to sell your land to the District, Florida Statutes require the District to remove your property from the acquisition plan at the earliest opportunity. Please contact the Division of Land Management and Acquisition at (850) 539-5999 at any time if you wish to remove your property from possible purchase consideration. The District will maintain a list of such requests and annually adjust its acquisition plan accordingly.

Note on Less-Than-Fee Methods of Land Protection
In “less than fee” purchases, the District attempts to acquire only those rights in property (i.e., development and land use conversion rights) that are needed to accomplish specific water resource and environmental protection goals. Such less than fee methods can provide a number of public benefits. First acquisition funding can be conserved, thereby enabling the protection of more land with limited NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 63

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report funds. Also, the property continues in private ownership and thus may remain on local property tax rolls. Moreover, the District does not incur the long-term costs of land management since the property’s management and maintenance remains the landowner’s responsibility. Not all properties are suitable for less than fee acquisition, but the potential benefits make these kinds of transactions a viable alternative to the District’s typical fee-simple land purchases.

DEP Florida Forever Priority List
The Florida Forever Priority List can be found at http://www.dep.state.fl.us/lands/FFplan.htm

Florida Forever Goals and Numeric Performance Measures
As outlined in chapter 18-24, F.A.C., the District is required to report on the goals and measures for lands to be acquired under the Florida Forever program. The following summarizes the goals and measures applicable to Northwest Florida Water Management District.

Florida Forever Goals and Numeric Performance Measures
Reported as of October 1, 2013 Rule No. 18-24.0022 (2)(d)1. For proposed acquisitions, see section 5.1, (Florida Forever) Land Acquisition Five-Year Work Plan in the Consolidated Annual Report. Acquisitions of lakes, wetlands, and floodplain areas to date = 187,112 Total acres 15,255 Florida Forever acres

(2)(d)2. Acquisitions for water resource development to date = 41,616 Total acres (incl. fee and l-t-f) 3,663 Florida Forever acres (incl. fee and l-t-f) (3)(a)2. Refer to section 5.2, (Florida Forever) Capital Improvement Work Plan of the Consolidated Annual Report for funded capital improvements identified in SWIM, stormwater, or restoration plans. (3)(a)3. NWFWMD lands to be treated for upland invasive, exotic plants = <100 acres The District has not conducted surveys to identify the spatial distribution of invasive exotic plant infestation on District lands. It is known that invasive plant problems exist at varying levels on some District lands, and staff treat with herbicide as needed. (3)(b) New water to be made available through Florida Forever funding for water resource development Major water resource development accomplishment provided by additions to Econfina Creek Water Management Area. Additionally, Florida Forever funding contributed to the construction of a 750,000 gallon reuse storage facility for the City of Freeport to serve a 0.6 MGD reuse water service area. Funding for water supply development, including construction of water reuse facilities, is primarily provided through the Water Protection and Sustainability Program Trust Fund, NWFWMD General Fund, and local funding. See the NWFWMD Five Year Water Resource Development Work Program report and Consolidated Annual Report. (4)(a)1. All NWFWMD lands are in need of and are undergoing management by the District. In need of restoration = 15,696 acres Undergoing restoration = 1,186 acres Restoration completed = 18,369 acres Restoration maintenance = 18,369 acres

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 64

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report
(4)(a)3. Refer to section 5.2, (Florida Forever) Capital Improvement Work Plan of the Consolidated Annual Report for capital improvements identified in SWIM, stormwater, or restoration plans. (4)(a)6. NWFWMD lands under upland invasive, exotic plant maintenance control = <3,500 acres (4)(b) Refer to section 4.1, Five-Year Water Resource Development Work Program: FY 2012-2013 of the Consolidated Annual Report for quantity of new water made available through regional water supply plans. (4)(c) See section 5.1, (Florida Forever) Land Acquisition Work Plan (Table 2) of the Consolidated Annual Report for resource-based recreation facilities by type.

Land Acquisition Projects
The Florida Forever Act, in particular section 373.199(3), F.S., identifies information that must be included for each Florida Forever Project. Some of the required information is relatively general and applicable to all projects. To reduce the redundancies of this plan, general information is provided separately as part of the District’s Five Year Plan for the Florida Forever Program. Specific land acquisition projects are individually identified and detailed information specific to the project is provided in the following pages.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 65

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Figure 5-1. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 66

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Figure 5-2. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas (West Region)

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 67

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Perdido River and Bay Basin
The Perdido River serves as the state line, separating Florida from Alabama. The Perdido River has been designated an Outstanding Florida Water and Special Water system; a canoe trail; and a recreation area. The upper part of the river is a shifting sand river system, unique to portions of Northwest Florida, south Alabama, southern Mississippi and eastern Louisiana, while the lower end of the river is characteristic of a black water stream. The District owns 6,261 acres in fee and 4 acres in less than fee between the Perdido River and Bay. The project area is mostly undeveloped and contains a diverse list of species. Acquisition of any floodplain area along the Perdido River, whether in fee or less than fee, will significantly protect the water resources of the area as well as enhance water quality protection efforts for the Perdido Bay system. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands along the river, around the river mouth, and designated tributaries. The Perdido Bay is an estuarine system which receives fresh water from the Perdido River. Subsidiary embayments within the Perdido Bay estuary include Tarkiln Bay, Arnica Bay, Wolf Bay, Bayou La Launch and Bayou St. John. Perdido Key separates Perdido, Tarkiln, and Arnica bays, Bayou La Launch and Bayou St. John from the Gulf of Mexico. Big Lagoon adjoins Perdido Bay to the east, separating it from Pensacola Bay. Currently, the District owns 810.19 acres along Perdido Bay. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to the bay which can enhance water quality protection and mitigate for wetland impacts associated with FDOT highway construction in southern Escambia County.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 1,447 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 68

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Southwest Escambia County Ecosystem
Several major estuarine drainages including Jones Swamp, Bayou Grande, Big Lagoon, and Tarkiln Bay, intersect in southwest Escambia County. These, in turn, comprise portions of the Pensacola and Perdido bay watersheds. The proposed acquisition borders a major urban area and is experiencing encroachment from residential and commercial development. The project area is characterized by an undulating topography where remnants of ancient dune lines alternate with lower intervening swales that drain east or west, parallel to the Gulf coast. The wet prairies in the area are some of the last examples of what may be one of the most diverse plant communities in the southeast, supporting large stands of white-topped pitcher plants and almost 100 other plant species. Protecting the ecological integrity of this area is important to the quality of water resources in the Pensacola and Perdido bay systems. Acquisition will help limit nonpoint pollution and untreated stormwater runoff by preventing channelization. Wetlands and upland buffers will also be preserved, and riparian buffer zones will be maintained. Additionally, public access will be improved and fish, wildlife, and estuarine productivity will be protected. This acquisition is consistent with a number of major initiatives designed to protect environmental and other public resources in the region. These include water quality treatment systems, acquisition programs for the Jones Swamp Wetland Preserve and the Perdido Pitcher Plant Prairie, and efforts to prevent encroachment on NAS Pensacola. Together with nearby state parks, these acquisitions will provide for a major environmental reserve and greenway system within a rapidly urbanizing area.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 11,000 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

Groundwater Recharge Area
Designated area has groundwater recharge potential.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 69

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Escambia River Basin
Beginning at the confluence of the Conecuh River and Escambia Creek above the Florida-Alabama border and discharging into Escambia Bay, the Escambia River corridor contains a rich diversity of plant and animal species, as well as many rare fish and waterfowl. The Escambia River basin is broad and well drained in the upper reaches, and swampy below Molino, Florida. While the overall water quality is considered good, many point and non-point pollution sources empty into the river. Currently, the District owns 35,413 acres in fee and 19 acres in less than fee along the river. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands around the river mouth and designated tributaries.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 6,644 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 70

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Garcon Point Ecosystem
This proposed land acquisition project contains most of the Garcon Point Peninsula, which borders Pensacola, Escambia, East and Blackwater bays. The project area is largely undeveloped and includes a variety of natural communities that are in good to excellent condition. The entire tract provides considerable protection to the water quality of the surrounding estuary, as well as harboring a number of rare and endangered species. The emergent estuarine marsh that borders several miles of shoreline within the project is an important source of organic detritus and nutrients and serves as a nursery for many of the species found in Pensacola Bay. These wetlands function as both stormwater filtration and a storm buffer area, as well as providing erosion controls to the neighboring uplands. A minimum of 13 endangered or threatened species are known to live in the region including the recently listed federally endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander. The northern wet prairie portion is known to be an outstanding pitcher plant habitat. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands. Currently the District owns 3,245 acres on Garcon Point.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 3,200 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Blackwater River Basin
Originating in the Conecuh National Forest in Alabama, the Blackwater River has a large portion of its Florida watershed further protected by the Blackwater River State Forest. In all, nearly 50 miles of the river corridor is remote and undeveloped. As a result, the Blackwater River is considered one of Florida’s best preserved waterways. Currently the District owns 381 acres along the river. The acquisition area includes a large area of mature longleaf pine forest; considerable bottomland forest and marsh acreage; upland mixed forest; and blackwater stream and seepage slope communities. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands. Approximately 380 acres have been acquired along the Blackwater River immediately south of Milton in Santa Rosa County.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis prior to acceptance.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 11,449 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over the next five years or more. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Yellow/Shoal River Basin
The Yellow River has its headwaters in Conecuh National Forest in Alabama and forms the northern border of Eglin Air Force Base (AFB) across much of eastern Santa Rosa and western Okaloosa counties. The proposed acquisitions would bring much of the remainder of the Yellow River floodplain in Florida under public ownership. Included in the project is a segment of the lower Shoal River, the largest tributary to the Yellow River. Large private landowners own a majority of the floodplain in this project, but considerable areas of the bordering and buffer lands are being sought to ensure effective management and protection of water resources. Highest priority will be given to tracts in the western portion of the project within the 100-year floodplain. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands. Currently the District owns 17,742 acres along the river. Although the Yellow and Shoal rivers exhibit good overall water quality, both are fed largely by rainwater runoff and are thus susceptible to pollution from land use activities. The proposed purchase area would provide water quality protection from the Alabama border and encompass roughly 39,000 acres. Purchase of lands northwest of Eglin AFB, along the I-10 corridor, would provide approximately 52,000 acres of land that has the potential for future water resource development to supplement the strained potable water sources in southern Santa Rosa and Okaloosa counties. Acquisitions in this area are recommended by the District Regional Water Supply Plan for Okaloosa, Santa Rosa and Walton counties to protect future supply sources.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 39,140 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

Groundwater Recharge Areas
In Escambia and Santa Rosa counties, the Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer is the principal source of potable water for public supply. The Sand-and-Gravel Aquifer is unconfined or poorly confined, making it particularly susceptible to contamination by land uses. Land acquisition along the I-10 corridor between the Yellow and Blackwater rivers in Santa Rosa County would protect recharge areas that are important for future water supply sources.

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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Figure 5-3. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas (Central Region)

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Lafayette Creek
Originating in south central Walton County, the Lafayette Creek drainage basin is located northeast of Freeport, Florida. The main stem of the creek begins about seven miles east of Freeport and runs due west for about six miles before it turns south and empties into LaGrange Bayou/Choctawhatchee Bay. Additional purchases along the creek will protect many diverse natural communities and habitat types. In addition, any proposed acquisitions will also protect a portion of the water resources of Magnolia and Wolf creeks, both of which are significant tributaries to Lafayette Creek. Currently, the District owns 3,160 acres along the creek, including 420 acres for FDOT mitigation purposes. The area between the Choctawhatchee River and Eglin Air Force Base is part of the Northwest Florida Greenway Corridor which serves to protect open space stretching from the Apalachicola National Forest to Eglin Air Force Base. It is intended to preserve environmentally sensitive areas, sustain existing military lands and airspace, maintain the economic viability of forest lands and provide recreation. The District, in cooperation with Eglin Air Force Base, acquired a 1,095.3-acre conservation easement from Nokuse Plantation utilizing Department of Defense Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration (REPI) funds. Acquisition of this Conservation Easement will ensure the protection of seepage streams within the Magnolia and Lafayette Creeks and buffer Eglin Air Force Base lands to the west.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 5,800 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Choctawhatchee River/Holmes Creek Basin
Originating in Alabama and flowing into Choctawhatchee Bay, the Choctawhatchee River/Holmes Creek basin encompasses the second largest floodplain in the state. Approximately 3,133 square miles of the watershed is in Alabama and 2,052 square miles is in Florida. The river is 170 miles long with about 88 miles in Florida. Although the river basin exhibits localized water quality problems, primarily due to agricultural land use in the upper basin, the overall water quality is considered good. The river basin encompasses several springs and a variety of habitats including bottomland hardwood forests, marshes and Tupelo-Cypress swamps. Due to the river corridor’s undeveloped nature, the basin provides habitat for a variety of native w ildlife, including several endangered plant and animal species. The river also serves as a breeding and migratory area for both the Alligator Gar and the Gulf Sturgeon. The District currently owns 63,386 acres along the river and creek in fee and less than fee. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands, around the river’s mouth, designated tributaries such as Holmes Creek, and other projects that can mitigate for wetland impacts associated with FDOT highway construction.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 55,064 acres have been identified for fee simple acquisition on the Choctawhatchee River and Holmes Creek, and 7,000 acres have been identified for possible less than fee acquisition on Holmes Creek. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project West Bay Buffer
West Bay is the westernmost embayment of the St. Andrew Bay estuary. The bay supports notable shellfish and seagrass communities, important fisheries, and other environmental and economic resources. The West Bay watershed is characterized by extensive pine flatwoods, as well as hardwood forests, cypress wetlands, mixed-forested wetlands, freshwater marshes, wet prairie, and other wetlands. Salt marshes, inland forested wetlands, and associated upland communities are especially prominent in several areas, including the Breakfast Point peninsula and other lands adjacent to the Burnt Mill and Crooked Creek tributaries. Like other estuaries, the bay is vulnerable to impacts associated with intensive residential and commercial development. Potential impacts include the long-term degradation as a result of nonpoint source pollution, as well as habitat loss and fragmentation. The proposed acquisition would help prevent such degradation by preserving intact an extensive ecosystem of forests, scrub, salt marshes, and freshwater wetlands. Preserving the associated wetland and upland communities in the vicinity of the bay would also protect water quality by providing a substantial riparian buffer and maintaining the natural hydrology in the vicinity of the bay. The District currently owns 719 acres in the West Bay Buffer. In addition to providing for water resource protection and public use, this acquisition will be consistent with several ongoing initiatives, including the West Bay Sector Plan. These initiatives also include efforts to restore seagrass communities in the bay and to improve the treatment and management of domestic wastewater.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 47,281 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Econfina Creek
Econfina Creek is the major contributor to Deer Point Lake, which serves as the public water supply for Bay County, including Panama City, Panama City Beach and neighboring communities. The proposed purchases along the creek contain several spring-run streams, which are imperiled biological communities. The slope forest communities that border considerable lengths of the creek contain some of the highest species diversity encountered in Florida. The sand hills portion of the project features high rolling pinelands, steephead ravines, and numerous sandhill upland lakes. Much of the sand hills area is of excellent quality, with a nearly intact ground cover of wiregrass and dropseed. At least 18 species of rare or endangered plants inhabit the sand hills area. The District currently owns over 43,771 acres in fee and less than fee, including the 2,155-acre Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands and parcels with significant aquifer recharge potential.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 39,669 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

Groundwater Recharge Areas
The upper portion of the acquisition project is a significant recharge area of the Floridan Aquifer. The majority of the acreage purchased by the District and targeted for future purchase is one of the most important recharge areas for the Floridan Aquifer in northwest Florida. Recharge rates in the area have been estimated at 25 to 40 inches per year, and this recharge drives the spring flows along Econfina Creek, the largest tributary of the Deer Point Lake Reservoir. The reservoir currently provides approximately 50 million gallons per day for residential, commercial and industrial water uses in Bay County.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Sandy Creek Basin
Sandy Creek is a major tributary of East Bay, the easternmost embayment of the St. Andrew Bay estuary. The creek’s basin is characterized by extensive pine flatwoods, as well as hardwood forests, saltmarshes, cypress wetlands, mixed forested wetlands, freshwater marshes, wet prairie, and other wetlands. Salt and freshwater marshes, inland forested wetlands, and associated upland communities are especially prominent along the creek and its tributaries. Preservation of the Sandy Creek basin will protect a major tributary basin of East Bay. In so doing, it would preserve water quality and a mosaic of interconnected upland, wetland, stream, and estuarine habitats. The acquisition would also protect water quality by providing a substantial riparian buffer and maintaining natural hydrology.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 15,000 acres have been identified for acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds. .

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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Figure 5-4. Proposed Land Acquisition Areas (East Region)

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Chipola River Basin
A new area along the Middle Chipola River has been identified for less than fee acquisition. The area is comprised of approximately 2,400 acres in northern Calhoun and southern Jackson counties. Acquisition of this tract will help protect over 3.4 miles of the west bank and 4.25 miles of the east bank of the Chipola, River. In 2009, the District acquired 1,377.76 acres in fee along the Middle Chipola River, including the “Look-N-Tremble” rapids. The District now owns a total of 9,094 acres in fee simple and holds a conservation easement on 810 acres in the Chipola River Basin. Two additional areas have been identified for less than fee acquisition along the Chipola River. The first is comprised of approximately 6,000 acres in the Spring Lake Spring Group area located in central Jackson County. Acquisition of land in the Spring Lake Spring Group area with its numerous springs, and tributaries which end up in the Chipola River, will provide enhanced water resource protection to the area. The second proposed less than fee acquisition contains a core tract of roughly 20,000 acres in the river basin in Calhoun and Gulf counties. The Chipola River is the largest tributary to the Apalachicola River and its mostly spring-fed waters make an important and consistent contribution of sediment-free water to the Apalachicola. The degree of biological diversity of the Chipola appears to be nearly as high as that of the Apalachicola. Priority purchases will be focused along the middle reaches of the Chipola River.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 1,025 acres has been identified for possible fee acquisition and 28,400 acres have been identified for possible less than fee acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Apalachicola Bay/St. Vincent Sound Buffer
Apalachicola Bay has been recognized as a resource of state, federal, and international significance. The bay has extensive fish and shellfish resources, and it supports noteworthy commercial and recreational fisheries and other recreational and economic activities. It has been designated an Outstanding Florida Water, a State Aquatic Preserve, and an International Biosphere Reserve. It includes the Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. State and federal agencies, as well as the NWFWMD, have made extensive investments in acquiring and protecting lands throughout the basin. This project would provide an important addition to these efforts. Like other northwest Florida estuaries, Apalachicola Bay is vulnerable to impacts associated with development. Such potential impacts include the long-term effects of non-point source pollution and habitat loss and fragmentation. The proposed acquisition would help prevent such degradation by preserving the integrated forest and wetland community bordering St. Vincent Sound and Apalachicola Bay. The acquisition would limit new sources of pollution, prevent habitat loss and fragmentation, and protect the stability and integrity of littoral vegetation. The acquisition would also protect water quality by providing a substantial riparian buffer which would help prevent channelization from new impervious surfaces. The land targeted through this project is immediately adjacent to some of the most productive oyster harvesting areas of the Apalachicola Bay system, including the Indian Lagoon, Scorpion and Paradise bars.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 5,200 acres have been identified for less than fee acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Upper Apalachicola River Basin
The Apalachicola River begins below Lake Seminole at the confluence of Chattahoochee and Flint rivers. It has the largest floodplain in the state and is widely regarded as one of the state’s most important natural resources. The Apalachicola River supports the highly productive fishery in Apalachicola Bay, and more endangered plant species can be found along the river’s upper stretches than in any comparably -sized river in the state. The District owns 36,823 acres of river floodplain and holds a conservation easement on 1,550 acres. Major habitat types along the Apalachicola River include coastal marshes, freshwater marshes, flatwoods and bottomland hardwood swamp. Water tupelo, Ogeechee tupelo, Bald cypress, Carolina ash and Swamp tupelo have been identified in the floodplain, as well as numerous species of rare fish. Substantial additional acreage of the Apalachicola system is owned by other public agencies and private conservation organizations. Priority purchases will be concentrated on parcels adjacent to existing District lands, other conservation lands and designated tributaries.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 50,132 acres have been identified for possible fee acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project Ochlockonee River Basin
The Ochlockonee River originates in the coastal plain of Georgia and traverses parts of five Florida counties. Water quality in the river is lowest when it enters Florida and generally improves as it flows closer to the Gulf of Mexico. The Ochlockonee is primarily fed by rainwater runoff, and is therefore susceptible to pollution by land use activities. Large parts of the watershed are publicly owned, including Joe Budd Wildlife Management Area, Lake Talquin State Forest and Apalachicola National Forest. The District’s primary focus is to acquire less than fee rights on privately owned floodplain land separating existing federal and state properties. Public ownership of the erosion-prone lands bordering this usually fast flowing river will reduce the likelihood of water quality degradation. The District presently has 3,675 acres in less than fee holdings in the area.

Public Access
All District conservation lands are available for public use. Such uses include fishing, hunting, camping, hiking, boating, swimming, and other recreational and educational activities. Access issues are addressed on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 11,767 acres have been identified for less than fee acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Florida Forever Land Acquisition Project St. Marks/Wakulla Rivers
The Wakulla River originates at Wakulla Springs and flows south approximately 10 miles to join the St. Marks River at the town of St. Marks in Wakulla County. The St. Marks River starts east of Tallahassee as a narrow stream, widens considerably below Horn Spring, and then disappears underground at Natural Bridge. After reemerging as a much stronger river at St. Marks Spring, it flows 11 miles to its confluence with the Wakulla River. While the lower reach of the river below the town of St. Marks is protected and preserved as part of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, much of the remainder of the two river watersheds is threatened by active riverfront development and in the adjacent highlands. The St. Marks supports one of the most heavily used inshore saltwater fisheries in north Florida, the viability of which is largely dependent on the quality of freshwater flowing into the estuarine system. Both the Wakulla Springs State Park and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge are major refuges for numerous biological species. The District presently has 1,376 acres under less than fee acquisition in the area.

BluePrint 2000
In December 2003, the Northwest Florida Water Management District and the City of Tallahassee-Leon County BluePrint 2000 Intergovernmental Agency entered into a five-year Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to work cooperatively to acquire conservation easements to protect and preserve the water resources of the St. Marks River basin in Leon County. Although this MOA has now expired, the District and BluePrint 2000 successfully purchased conservation easements on a 132.62-acre tract and 194.5-acre tract, both located in Leon County.

Land Acquisition
Approximately 45,456 acres have been identified for possible acquisition. Sufficient lands have been identified to allow for a flexible implementation strategy over at least the next five years. The timing of any given acquisition will depend upon such considerations as: Governing Board policy; Threats to the resource; Availability of willing sellers; Tract size; General market conditions; Available staff resources, and Availability of funds.

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Implementation of the 2012-2013 Work Plan Land Acquisition
The District acquired one 10-acre inholding in fee simple in the Econfina Creek WMA.

Land Management
The District completed numerous land management activities during Fiscal Year 2012-2013. Management and restoration efforts including prescribed burns, native species planting and timber harvesting, continue across the District’s 212,379 managed acres. In addition, the District maintains and improves public access and recreational amenities such as boat ramps, primitive campsites, and swimming and picnic areas. In the pages that follow, Table 5-1 and Table 5-2 provide additional information on specific land restoration activities completed during the year. The projected Fiscal Year 2013-2014 staffing and management budget by WMA can be found in Table 5-3. To date, the District has conserved and protected 224,782, acres primarily through fee simple acquisition. These lands protect natural systems, wetland and floodplain functions, groundwater recharge, surface and groundwater quality, and fish and wildlife habitat. District-owned lands are all accessible to the public and are managed to protect water resources while providing public access and resource-based recreation. District lands include the majority of the Escambia and Choctawhatchee river floodplains, as well as extensive lands along the Perdido, Blackwater, Yellow, Shoal, and Apalachicola rivers; Lafayette, Holmes and Econfina creeks; and on Perdido Bay, Garcon Point and Live Oak Point. In addition, the District manages and conducts habitat restoration and maintenance on Yellow River Ranch, Live Oak Point, Ward Creek West and Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank. The District has acquired the majority of the groundwater recharge area for springs that discharge into Econfina Creek and form a crucial component of the water contribution to Deer Point Lake Reservoir. Land Management Accomplishments (FY 2012-2013)  Phase II of the Econfina Springs complex restoration program continued with the completion of final designs and permit applications for the Williford Spring component. Funding sources were identified and secured for construction in the spring of 2014. Prescribed burns were conducted on approximately 9,700 acres of District-owned land. Vegetation management and habitat enhancement activities were conducted on approximately 1,875 acres. 249 group camping permits at seven reservation-only sites on District lands. 23 special resource area permits were issued for larger events on District property. Six timber harvests were conducted on District lands totaling 1,952 acres. A cooperative project with Walton County to improve a boat ramp and camping area at Dead River Landing was substantially completed. Over 9,000 acres of District-owned land were surveyed for invasive exotic plants, and control measures were implemented for all identified problem areas.

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Restoration
The District accomplishes water resource restoration through several interrelated programs, primarily Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM), Land Management, and Mitigation. Approved NWFWMD plans with substantial restoration components include the following:  Apalachicola River and Bay Management Plan (1996)  Pensacola Bay System SWIM Plan (1997)  Lake Jackson Management Plan (1997)  Choctawhatchee River and Bay SWIM Plan (2002)  St. Andrew Bay Watershed SWIM Plan (2000)  St. Marks River Watershed SWIM Plan (2009)  Tate’s Hell State Forest Hydrologic Restoration Plan (2010)  Florida Forever Capital Improvements Plan Restoration Accomplishments (FY 2012-2013)  A streambank restoration project at Dead River Landing in Walton County totaling approximately 225 feet was implemented using a vegetative retaining wall to stabilize the eroding riverbank at a popular recreation site. The project was built by Walton County staff with assistance from the District. The District also completed the hand planting of 621 acres of disturbed longleaf pine, wet pine flatwoods, and wiregrass habitat across northwest Florida. These habitat restoration activities enhance groundwater recharge, improve wetland functions, and offset wetland losses due to Department of Transportation projects. Over 284,000 longleaf pine tubelings were planted on the Perdido River, Escambia River, Yellow River, Choctawhatchee River and Econfina Creek WMAs and the Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank. The District also reestablished groundcover habitat, planting over 372,000 plugs of upland and wetland wiregrass and toothache grass on disturbed habitat sites on the Sand Hill Lakes Mitigation Bank and the Perdido River mitigation tract. Seeds for many District groundcover projects were collected from District land on Econfina Creek WMA. The District continues to research, refine and establish new habitat restoration techniques that increase species diversity and ecosystem health.



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Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report Table 5-1. Restoration, Enhancement and Maintenance (2013) Acres Burned Acres Planted Upland Hardwoods Acres Harvested Habitat Restoration Acres Treated For Invasive, Nonnative or Off-site Species 22 2000 1 23 850 3560 4061 168 493 127 850 2504 1493 146 493 127 97 1302 959 845 421 22 201 68 133 205 160 25 27 23 151 130 25 27 30 49 1172 351 301 50 11 38 1172 862 3630 1019 20 132 1399 1804 443 621 95 469 57 1704 312 132 220 1172 7554

Upland/Wetland Wiregrass and Toothache Grass

Growing Season

Site Preparation

Fuel Reduction

Longleaf Pine

Wiregrass Propagation

Restoration

Slash Pine

Water Management Area Escambia River Garcon Point Blackwater River Yellow River Perdido River Choctawhatchee River Econfina Creek St. Andrews Carter Restoration Ward Creek West Devils Swamp Restoration Chipola River Apalachicola River Lake Jackson Totals

7 78 78

7

77 46 205 9665

77 46 205 6019

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 88

Thinning

Total

Total

Total

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report Table 5-2. Access and Recreation Management (2013) Reserved Group Sites

Primitive Campsites

Group Use Permits

Water Management Area Escambia River Garcon Point Blackwater River Yellow River Perdido River Choctawhatchee River Econfina Creek Chipola River Apalachicola River Lake Jackson Totals 45 8 10 3 1 1 9 13

Number Maintained 9 8 9 3 1 2 3 9 14 7 3 13 8 6 4 12 18 3 1 1 38 40 1 2 58 7 34 5 1 4 3 11 4 2 1 4 4 8 14 2 1 1 45 7 56 4 3 1 8 11

Miles Maintained 1 2 27

Issued 14

Maps/Brochures Printed 40 10

Installed 2

1 50 9 15 22 6 18 3 3 10 35 5 7 7 339 249 2 47 32 103 130 195 40

6 10 30

30

70 102

126

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 89

Weather Pavilions 1 1 1 5

Information Signs

General Purpose

Portolet Stations

Picnic Grounds

Boat Landings

Parking Areas

Public Parks

Nature Trail

Nature Trail

Hiking Trail

Access Road

Canoe Trail

Horse Trail

Bike Trail

Birding

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report Table 5-3. Projected Funding, Staffing and Resource Management for FY 2013-2014
Region Water Management Area Escambia Escambia Conservation Easements Garcon Point Western Yellow/Escribano Blackwater Perdido Perdido Conservation Easements Western Region Total Choctawhatchee Choctawhatchee/Holmes Conservation Easements Econfina St. Andrew/Econfina Conservation Easements Ward Creek West Carter Restoration Central Region Total Chipola Apalachicola Apalachicola/Chipola Conservation Easements Lake Jackson St. Marks Conservation Easements Ochlockonee Conservation Easements Eastern Region Total Regional Totals Acres 35,413 19 3,245 17,729 381 6,261 4 63,052 60,848 2,537 39,184 2,433 719 2,155 107,876 9,094 36,823 2,359 516 1,376 3,675 53,843 224,771 5 3 Assigned Staff Total Funding $147,043 $1,051 $80,810 $94,303 $20,349 $157,395 $1,051 $ 502,002 $368,612 $19,905 $903,639 $4,923 $0 $57,250 $1,354,329 $174,941 $98,874 $3,899 $165,440 $4,116 $4,999 $452,269 $2,308,600 Funding for Resource Management $93,470 $500 $39,750 $55,750 $9,400 $110,450 $500$500 $309,820 $219,125 $13,000 $677,255 $500 $0 $57,250 $967,130 $101,250 $44,350 $500 $131,178 $750 $750 $278,778 $1,555,728

Central

Eastern

2 10

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Other Projects Land Management Administration IT Initiative Land Management Database Florida National Scenic Trail - Econfina Creek Williford Spring Restoration Live Oak Streambank Restoration Hightower Streambank Restoration Spurling Streambank Restoration Grand Total

Acres

Assigned Staff 4

Total Funding $2,200,347 $132,116 $204,107 $10,000 $33,439 $4,892 $4,892 $3,964

Funding for Resource Management $1,625,664 $132,116 $134,250 $10,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $3,457,758

224,771

14

$4,902,357

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 91

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

5.2

Capital Improvement Work Plan

As required by section 373.199(2), F.S., the five-year work plan includes capital improvement projects that further the goals of the Florida Forever Act (section 259.105, F.S.). These include priorities identified in approved SWIM plans and other restoration plans, water resource development projects, and other eligible Florida Forever projects and improvements to District lands and facilities approved by the Governing Board. Priority waterbody and water resource descriptions are outlined in approved SWIM plans and RWSPs. These plans respectively are available at www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/swmp/swim.html and www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/water_supply_planning/regional_water_supply_planning.html. From 2003-2008, the District offered grant funding to local governments for capital improvements that help implement SWIM projects, water resource development projects, and projects included within stormwater master plans. Over $23 million has been awarded for 55 stormwater retrofit, restoration, and reuse projects under the program. These grants have leveraged significant additional funding, with over $52 million in local and other match funding being allocated to the approved projects. Facility ownership, permitting, and long-term maintenance remain the responsibilities of the grantees, as provided through cooperative grant agreements. Due to the lack of new Florida Forever funding, grant cycles have not been offered for the past several years. Performance measures for restoration projects are incorporated within the Strategic Water Management Plan (www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/swmp/swmp.html) and described in Chapter 1 of the Consolidated Annual Report. Cooperative local grant project accomplishment is described in this section and in www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/swim/fla_forever_grants/fla_forever_grants.htm by SWIM watershed and jurisdiction.

Implementation of the 2012-2013 Five Year Work Plan
Implementation of the Apalachicola River and Bay/Tates Hell Swamp wetland restoration project continued through hydrologic restoration within the Whiskey George Creek basin of Tate’s Hell State Forest. Construction completed included two hardened low water crossings, three earthen ditch plugs, and one culvert modification. Blueprint 2000 and the City of Tallahassee have completed funded watershed restoration components of the Cascades Park Watershed Restoration Project. Project features include major stormwater ponds, retaining walls, utility relocations, landscaping to support littoral vegetation, and stream reconstruction, all within the St. Marks River watershed.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 92

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Fiscal Year 2014-2018 Capital Improvement Work Plan
Table 5-4 lists projects currently approved for Florida Forever capital improvement funding. These are funded from prior year appropriations. Table 5-5 identifies additional projects eligible for Florida Forever capital improvement funding, depending on funding availability. Although the Florida Forever Act was extended to 2018, appropriations have been eliminated and future funding may be unavailable. Final approval of funding for any project requires specific Governing Board approval. Funding from SWIM, legislative special appropriation, Water Management Lands Trust Fund, federal grants, local governments, and potentially other sources may also contribute to project accomplishment. Where implementation is precluded due to current funding limitations, projects are identified to assist in long-term project planning and prioritization. The funding indicated represents current estimates and may be revised based on evolving project needs. There is significant potential for additional projects that would meet challenges described within the Pensacola, Choctawhatchee, St. Marks River, and Lake Jackson watershed SWIM plans, in addition to those listed in the table below. Figure 5-5 illustrates the distribution of current and past capital improvement projects District-wide. Additional preservation, enhancement, and restoration projects accomplished to meet regional mitigation needs are described in the Northwest Florida Umbrella, Watershed-based, Regional Mitigation Plan (“Umbrella Plan”), available at www.nwfwmdwetlands.com/.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 93

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Table 5-4. Currently Approved Florida Forever Capital Improvement Projects
Project
Apalachicola River and Bay Stormwater Retrofit Projects

Watershed
Apalachicola River and Bay

Description
Implementation of cooperative stormwater retrofit projects that improve water quality in the Apalachicola River and Bay watershed. Previously titled Apalachicola River and Bay Wetland Restoration Project encompassed this work. Continues implementation of the Tate’s Hell State Forest Hydrologic Restoration Plan; Provides water quality, hydrologic, and habitat restoration. Currently contracted activities include construction of eight low water crossings, ten earthen ditch plugs, one flashboard riser, and nine culvert modifications, as well as removal of one-half mile of dirt logging road and adjacent ditches. Stormwater retrofit for water quality and flood control. Spring Avenue cooperative project approved in 2011.

Project Partners
City of Apalachicola and Carrabelle; Other local governments

Progress (3/1/2014)
Preliminary planning completed for new stormwater retrofit and restoration projects. Construction of low water crossings, ditch plugs, and other hydrologic restoration components continue. Completion of work planned for the Whiskey George basin expected in FY 2013-2014. Engineering and permitting; construction initiated Construction complete

Estimated Funding*
$425,000

Tates Hell Swamp Hydrologic Restoration

Apalachicola River and Bay

DOF, DEP, FWCC, local governments

$160,900

Watson Bayou St. Andrew Stormwater Retrofit Bay Cascades Park St. Marks Stormwater retrofit and stream restoration. Grant project Watershed Resource River approved in 2009. Restoration * Florida Forever portion of funding only.

Bay County Blueprint 2000

$586,200 $300,000

Total

$1,472,100

Table 5-5. Additional Eligible Projects
Project Description Status (3/1/2014)
Planning and Engineering Planning through construction Planning

Eligible Funding Sources
Florida Forever SWIM Federal Grants Florida Forever SWIM* Florida Forever SWIM

Estimated Funding

Apalachicola River and Bay Watershed Additional Tates Hell Continues implementation of the Tate’s Hell State Forest Hydrologic Restoration Plan; Swamp Hydrologic Provides water quality, hydrologic, and habitat restoration. Restoration Construction of projects identified in the City of Apalachicola Stormwater Master Plan, as well as other stormwater retrofit projects identified through an ongoing SWIM program Stormwater retrofit basinwide assessment. Project objectives include water quality improvement and restoration and enhancement of wetland and aquatic habitat. Shoreline and Tidal Marsh Restoration Restoration of intertidal habitat, to include salt marsh and seagrass habitat, oyster reef and living shorelines projects, and associated breakwaters.

$5,330,000

$3,645,000

TBD

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 94

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Project
St. Andrew Bay Watershed

Description
Implementation of cooperative stormwater retrofit projects that improve water quality in the St. Andrew Bay watershed. Projects may include those identified in the Stormwater Master Plan prepared for Bay County and its municipalities, as well as other projects identified by local governments and watershed stakeholders. Project objectives include water quality improvement and restoration and enhancement of wetland and aquatic habitat. Unpaved road stabilization to abate direct impacts on Econfina Creek, Deer Point Lake, and the St. Andrew Bay estuary. Includes Scotts Road – Econfina Creek crossing and potentially other sites. Project objectives include water quality improvement and restoration and enhancement of wetland and aquatic habitat. Spring restoration at Williford Springs in Washington County. Project components include sediment removal, spring bank restoration and protection, stormwater facilities, canoe dock/boardwalk (to minimize use impacts), and compatible public access improvements. Restoration of intertidal habitat, to include salt marsh and seagrass habitat, oyster reef and living shorelines projects, and associated breakwaters.

Status (3/1/2014)

Eligible Funding Sources

Estimated Funding

Stormwater Retrofit

Planning through construction Planning through construction Planning and permitting Planning

Florida Forever SWIM, MOEX

$903,985

Unpaved Road sedimentation abatement

Florida Forever SWIM General Fund SWIM Florida Forever FWCC Florida Forever SWIM

$549,000

Econfina Spring Complex Restoration Shoreline and Tidal Marsh Restoration

$1,848,452

TBD

Choctawhatchee River and Bay Watershed Continued salt marsh and littoral habitat restoration and protection at Live Oak Point, in Choctawhatchee Bay. Six oyster shell reefs have been planned, with associated salt marsh Shoreline and Tidal Marsh planting. Three have been completed thus far. Also includes additional restoration of Restoration intertidal habitat elsewhere in the bay, to include salt marsh and seagrass habitat, oyster reef and living shorelines projects, and associated breakwaters Implementation of cooperative stormwater retrofit projects that improve water quality in Stormwater Retrofit Choctawhatchee Bay. Project objectives include water quality improvement and restoration and enhancement of wetland and aquatic habitat. Ochlockonee River and Bay Watershed Additional Tates Hell Implementation of portions of the Tate’s Hell State Forest Hydrologic Restoration Plan within Swamp Hydrologic the Ochlockonee River and Bay watershed; provides water quality, hydrologic, and habitat Restoration restoration. Pensacola Bay System Implementation of cooperative stormwater retrofit projects that improve water quality in the Stormwater Retrofit Pensacola Bay System. Project objectives include water quality improvement and restoration and enhancement of wetland and aquatic habitat. Shoreline and Tidal Marsh Restoration Restoration of intertidal habitat, to include salt marsh and seagrass habitat, oyster reef and living shorelines projects, and associated breakwaters.

Planning for additional construction

Florida Forever SWIM

$200,000

Planning

Florida Forever SWIM Florida Forever SWIM Federal Grants Florida Forever SWIM Florida Forever SWIM

TBD

Planning and Engineering

$1,580,000

Planning Planning

TBD TBD

* SWIM funding is provided from the Ecosystem Management and Restoration Trust Fund and potentially the Water Management Lands Trust Fund and Water Protection and Sustainability Trust Fund.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 95

Florida Forever Work Plan Annual Report

Figure 5-5. NWFWMD Capital Project Distribution

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 96

Mitigation Donation Annual Report

Chapter Six: Mitigation Donation Annual Report
Section 373.414(1)(b)2, F.S., requires the District and DEP to report by March 1 of each year, as part of this report, all cash donations accepted as mitigation for use in duly noticed environmental creation, preservation, enhancement, or restoration projects that offset impacts permitted under Chapter 373, Part IV, F.S., Management and Storage of Surface Waters. The report is required to include a description of the endorsed mitigation projects and, except for projects governed as mitigation banks or regional offsite mitigation, must address, as applicable, success criteria, project implementation status and timeframe, monitoring, long-term management, provisions for preservation, and full cost accounting. The report specifically excludes contributions required under section 373.4137, F.S. (regional mitigation for specified transportation impacts). The Northwest Florida Water Management District implemented Environmental Resource Permitting (ERP) Phase II (wetland resource permitting), jointly with DEP, beginning on November 1, 2010. The ERP and Management and Storage of Storm Water (MSSW) programs were combined during FY 20122013 as a result of the adoption of the Statewide Environmental Resource Permitting (SWERP) rules in chapter 62.330, F.A.C. Any cash donations accepted by the District as mitigation during the current fiscal year will be reported annually in this report. No cash donations were received in FY 2012-2013.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 97

Mitigation Donation Annual Report

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NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 98

SWIM Program Summary Report

Chapter Seven: Surface Water Improvement and Management Program Summary Report
7.1 Introduction

Section 373.036(7)(d), F.S., provides that districts may include in the Consolidated Annual Report additional information on the status or management of water resources as deemed appropriate. The NWFWMD has a long-term program to protect and restore watershed resources. The Surface Water Improvement and Management (SWIM) program provides the framework for watershed and project planning for the major riverine-estuarine watersheds indicated below (Figure 7-1).

Figure 7-1. NWFWMD SWIM Priority Watersheds

7.2

SWIM Priority List

The Northwest Florida Water Management District’s SWIM Priority list is provided in Table 7-1. Pursuant to section 373.453, F.S., the SWIM priority list may be periodically reviewed with updates reflected in this section. In addition to respective watersheds, the list identifies major tributaries and waterbodies. All other tributaries, sub-embayments, and contributing basins are also considered as being within the listed priority waterbodies. A more detailed discussion is provided in the report, Surface Water Improvement and Management Program Priority List (NWFWMD 2006a).

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 99

SWIM Program Summary Report Table 7-1. NWFWMD SWIM Priority List Watershed Apalachicola River and Bay Watershed Apalachicola River Apalachicola Bay Chipola River Pensacola Bay System Escambia River Blackwater River Yellow River Shoal River East Bay River Pensacola Bay Choctawhatchee River Holmes Creek Choctawhatchee Bay St. Andrew Bay Watershed St. Andrew Bay North Bay West Bay East Bay St. Marks River Wakulla River Lake Miccosukee St. Joseph Bay Deer Point Lake Reservoir Econfina Creek Escambia Bay East Bay Blackwater Bay Western and Central Santa Rosa Sound Big Lagoon Eastern Santa Rosa Sound New River Lake Seminole Plan update approved 1996 SWIM Plan Status

Plan update approved 1997

Choctawhatchee River and Bay Watershed Plan update approved 2002

Plan approved 2000

St. Marks River and Apalachee Bay Watershed Lake Lafayette Lake Munson Apalachee Bay Plan update approved 2009

Ochlockonee River and Bay Watershed Ochlockonee Bay Ochlockonee River Lake Jackson Lake Iamonia Draft plan completed 2011 Lake Jackson plan update approved 1997 Draft plan completed 2011

Perdido River and Bay Watershed Perdido River Perdido Bay

SWIM plans are developed to address cumulative anthropogenic impacts on water quality and aquatic habitats. They incorporate comprehensive strategies to both restore and to protect watershed resources. Implementation is accomplished through a variety of activities such as planning and constructing stormwater retrofits to improve water quality and flood protection; restoring wetland and aquatic habitats; assessing freshwater needs and other resources; protecting springs; and public outreach and awareness. The SWIM program also supports coordination of state and federal grants and implementation of cooperative capital improvement projects with local governments. Figure 5-5 above (Section 5.2, Florida Forever Capital Improvement Work Plan) illustrates the distribution of past capital improvement projects implemented across the District with SWIM program planning and coordination.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 100

SWIM Program Summary Report Historically, SWIM plan implementation has integrated and leveraged a variety of funding sources, including SWIM (sections 373.451-373.459, F.S.), the Water Management Lands Trust Fund (section 373.59, F.S.), the Ecosystem Management and Restoration Trust Fund (section 403.1651, F.S.), Florida Forever (section 259.105 and section 373.199, F.S.), legislative special appropriations, the Water Protection and Sustainability Program (section 403.890, F.S.), state and federal grants, and funding through local government partnerships. Cumulatively, the overall effort has resulted in significant protection and improvement of water resources District-wide.

7.3

Current Project Priorities

In 2012, the District established a renewed focus on the Apalachicola River and Bay and St. Andrew Bay watersheds, applying remaining Ecosystem Management and Restoration Trust Fund revenues appropriated by past legislatures to address acute problems apparent within these two systems. Additionally, significant legislative funding has been appropriated to implement priority water quality improvement projects and to update the three dimensional hydrodynamic model for Apalachicola Bay. It is expected that this funding will further leverage and build upon local resources, as well as additional state and federal grant funding. Table 7-2 lists priority SWIM projects currently in the planning stages or otherwise under consideration. Note that there is overlap between the project priorities listed here and those within the Florida Forever Capital Improvement Plan (Table 5-4), particularly for construction projects requiring multiple funding sources for completion. Additional funding sources, including from local governments and state and federal grant sources, may be identified to complement the funding indicated below. Table 7-2. Current SWIM Projects Project Cooperators Estimated Cost Description

Apalachicola River and Bay Watershed
Stormwater retrofit for 54-acre basin in downtown Apalachicola. Phase 1 ($71,500 for engineering, surveying, and permitting) funded for FY 2012-2013 and FY 2013-2014. Phase 2 ($443,000 for construction) funding anticipated for FYs 14-16. Continued/enhanced implementation within the Jackson Blue Spring basin and other agricultural areas. Cost listed is FY 2013-2014 annual cost. Continued development and implementation of agricultural BMPs. Cost listed is annual cost for FY 2013-2014. Continued hydrologic data collection. Project funded for FY 2013-2014.

Battery Park Stormwater Retrofit

City of Apalachicola

$514,500

Mobile Irrigation Lab

FDACS; USDA NRCS; West FL RC&D Council

$72,000

Sod-based Crop Rotation Program

UF IFAS

$40,000

Additional Data Collection

USGS

$50,000

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 101

SWIM Program Summary Report

Project
Apalachicola Bay Stormwater Improvements

Cooperators

Estimated Cost
$2,535,000

Description
Construction of stormwater retrofit projects in three priority basins of the city to improve water quality in Apalachicola Bay. Implementation of cooperative stormwater retrofit projects that improve water quality in the Apalachicola River and Bay watershed Multi-agency coordination to identify current needs and priority actions to improve bay water quality. Update to and application of the three dimensional hydrodynamic model for Apalachicola Bay. Implementation of stormwater retrofit projects within the St. Andrew Bay watershed. Implementation of unpaved road sedimentation abatement projects within the St. Andrew Bay watershed. Implementation of aquatic and riparian habitat restoration components of the overall project. Engineering design and surveying for stormwater retrofit. MOEX funding with construction coordinated by DEP. Engineering design and surveying for stormwater retrofit. MOEX funding with construction coordinated by DEP. Engineering design and surveying for stormwater retrofit. MOEX funding with construction coordinated by DEP. Engineering design and surveying for stormwater retrofit. MOEX funding with construction coordinated by DEP.

City of Apalachicola

Apalachicola River and Bay Stormwater Retrofit Projects Apalachicola Bay Strategic Plan Bay Freshwater Needs Assessment

City of Apalachicola and Carrabelle; Other local governments

$425,000

Watershed stakeholders

$250,000

Watershed stakeholders

$215,000

St. Andrew Bay Watershed
Stormwater Retrofit and Restoration Grants Unpaved Road Sedimentation Abatement Williford Springs Restoration Cities of Panama City, Parker, Callaway, Mexico Beach Bay County $1,125,000

$671,000

NWFWMD

$400,000

Lisenby Avenue Pond

Panama City

$84,757

Choctawhatchee River and Bay Watershed Hill/Lovejoy Ponds Okaloosa County $63,167

Overbrook Pond

Okaloosa County

$40,089

Tanglewood Pond

Okaloosa County

$29,294

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 102

SWIM Program Summary Report

7.4

Potential Funding Related to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

District staff are continuing to assist state agencies and other watershed stakeholders in identifying project priorities and participating in project development for potential funding related to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. The District’s SWIM plans and associated watersheds provide the planning context for this evaluation. Federal RESTORE Act, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Natural Resource Damage Assessment, MOEX Offshore penalties, and other associated funding have the potential to help address current problems and challenges. This may be particularly important for those watersheds that currently have no available SWIM funding.

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 103

References

Chapter Eight: References
Barrios, K., R.L. Bartel, N. Wooten, and M. Lopez. 2011. Hydrologic Monitoring Plan: Version 1.0. Program Development Series 2011-04. Northwest Florida Water Management District. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hydrologic_monitoring_plan/hydrologic_monitoring_plan.html Bartel, R.L., K. Barrios, M. Pritzl, and K. Coates. 2011. Jackson Blue Spring: Water Resources Assessment. Water Resources Assessment 2011-01. Northwest Florida Water Management District. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/wra11-01/WRA11-01.pdf Bartel, R. L., T. R. Pratt, T. L. Macmillan, R. R. Potts, C. J. Richards, R. D. Womble, J. A. Bonekemper, and R. A. Countryman. 2000. Regional Water Supply Plan for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties. Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 2000-1. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/2000_plan/rwsp.htm Bonekemper, J. 2003. Northwest Florida Water Management District Water Supply Projections 20052025. Northwest Florida Water Management District Water Resources Assessment 03-01. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/water_supply_projections/water_supply_projections.htm Bonekemper, J., Macmillan, T., Bartel, R., Thorpe, P., Marchman, G., Layfield, H., Fisher, G., and Cleckley, W. 2001. Florida Forever 2001 Five-Year Work Plan. Project Development Series 2001-1. Northwest Florida Water Management District. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/florida_forever/florida_forever.htm Busen, K. and R. Bartel. 2012. 2012 Regional Water Supply Plan Update for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Water Supply Planning Region II. Northwest Florida Water Management District Water Resources Assessment 2012-01. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/RWSP_Region2.htm Coates, K., C. Coger, R. A. Countryman, M. Pritzl, and C. J. Richards. 2008. 2008 Water Supply Assessment Update. Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 08-02. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/wsa/WSA%20Updates/wsa_update_2008.htm Countryman, T.C., L. Brooks, K. Busen, E. Chelette, K. Coates, F. Florida, and P. Thorpe. 2014. 2013 Water Supply Assessment Update. Havana: Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 13-01. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/wsa/WSA%20Updates/wsa_update_2013.html DeFosset, Kevin L. 2004. Availability of Ground Water from the Sand-And-Gravel Aquifer in Coastal Okaloosa County, Florida. Water Resources Technical File Report 04-1. August 2004. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/wrtfr04-01/wrtfr04-01.htm Florida Department of Environmental Protection. 2013. 2012 Reuse Inventory. DEP Water Reuse Program. May 2013. Tallahassee, FL. www.dep.state.fl.us/water/reuse Florida Natural Areas Inventory. 2013. Florida Conservation Lands, June 2013. www.fnai.org/gisdata.cfm

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 104

References HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2000. Modeling of Ground Water Flow in Walton, Okaloosa and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida. May 2000. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hglgwmod/hglgwmodel.htm HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2005. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Western Domain Model. May 2005. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hgl_western_domain/hgl_western_domain.html HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2007a. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Eastern Domain Model, Final Report. September 2007. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/hgl_eastern_domain/hgl_eastern_domain.html HydroGeoLogic, Inc. 2007b. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Eastern Domain Forecast Simulations. March 2007. HydroGeoLogic, Inc. and Hazlett-Kincaid, Inc. 2007. Saltwater Intrusion in the Floridan Aquifer in Walton, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida: Western Domain Forecast Simulations. Lewis, F.G. 2010. East Bay/Blackwater Bay/Lower Yellow River Preliminary Baseline Resource Characterization: With a Discussion of Flow-dependent Habitats and Species. Water Resources Special Report 2010-02. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/wrsr2010-02_east_bay/wrsr2010-02.html Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2006a. Surface Water Improvement and Management Program Priority List. Program Development Series 2006-02. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/swimpriority%20list%202-06.pdf Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2006b. Regional Water Supply Plan for Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Plan Update. Water Resource Assessment 2006-01. September 2006 (approved October 26, 2006). Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/2006_plan/rwsp.htm Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2007. Regional Water Supply Plan: Region V, Franklin and Gulf Counties. Water Resources Assessment 07-01. January 2007 (approved January 25, 2007). Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/rwsp/plan.htm Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2008. Region III Regional Water Supply Plan, Bay County, Florida. Program Development Series 08-02. August 2008. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/water_supply_planning/region_III_wsp.html Northwest Florida Water Management District. 2011. Strategic Water Management Plan. Program Development Series 2010-03. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/swmp/swmp.html PBS&J. 2000a. Water Conservation Task Summary Report. August 2000. PBS&J. 2000b. Reuse Task Summary Report. August 2000. PBS&J. 2006. Final Report: Conceptual Alternative Water Supply Development Projects and Planning Level Cost Estimates. October 2006. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/RWSP_Region2/RWSP_Region2.htm

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 105

References Pratt, Thomas R. 2001. Results of Floridan Aquifer Drilling Program in Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Walton Counties, Florida. Technical File Report 01-1. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/pubs/tfr01-1/tfr01-1.htm Ryan, P. L., T. L. Macmillian, T. R. Pratt, A. R. Chelette, C. J. Richards, R. A. Countryman, and G. L. Marchman. 1998. District Water Supply Assessment. Northwest Florida Water Management District. Water Resources Assessment 98-2. Havana, Florida. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/rmd/wsa/wsamain.htm Whitcomb, John B. 2005. Florida Water Rates Evaluation of Single Family Homes. www.nwfwmd.state.fl.us/permits/waterratesreport.pdf

NWFWMD 2014 Consolidated Annual Report Page 106

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