MEDICAL TOURISM Industry in India (Full Details)

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Under Guidance of Prof Chabbi Sinha
Submitted by : SECTION 1B (HEALTHCARE)
ANAND TUTEJA 1B-40 NANDITA KATIYAR 1B-54 SHRAVAN RASTOGI 1B-59 RASWINDER JIT SINGH 1B-31 RUPAL NIMBHORKAR 1B-33 ARUN PUNDIR 1B-43

COMPANY CHOSEN :

Contact Details :
Address: Med Access India Pvt. Ltd. A3/9/5, Millennium Towers, Sector 9, Sanpada, Navi Mumbai- 400 705 Maharashtra, India.

Phone:

Landline: +91 22 27530766 Cell Phone: +91 981900 6011/ +91 998772 2880 Fax: +91 22 27530766

E-mail:

[email protected] [email protected]

Project Guide :
Mrs. Shashi Wankhede Marketing Director Med Access India Pvt Ltd
Mobile : 919823226011
Before co-founding Med Access, Mrs Shashi Wankhede was heading the sales & marketing for South-East Asia for a US multinational. She is a strategist and believes in absolute customer and market oriented approach to marketing. She is an MBA in marketing and she is having an experience of 22 years in marketing.

LOCATIONS OF MED ACCESS

CONTENTS
1. About the Project & Project Objectives 2. OVERVIEW OF THE INDIAN HEALTHCARE SECTOR a. Classification b. Categorization Schemes c. PEST Analysis d. Ongoing Initiatives e. Strengths / Opportunities f. Threats / Weaknesses 3. MEDICAL TOURISM INDUSTRY IN INDIA a. Through the Ages b. Countries Promoting c. potential d. Why INDIA e. Government Initiatives f. Cost Comparison g. Source of Medical Tourists h. Concerns i. Industry Issues j. Path Forward 4. SEGMENTATION OF THE MARKET a. Segmentation b. Benefit Clusters c. Zeithmal Customer Pyramid d. On basis of Treatment Required e. On basis of Domain of Medical & Therapeutic Care

5. DIFFERENTIATION a. Services b. Personnel c. Channel 6. POSITIONING a. By Benefit b. By Attribute c. By price / quality d. Complexity vs Diversity 7. NATURE OF CUSTOMER CONTACT 8. PURCHASE PROCESS 9. RISKS PERCEIVED & MINIMIZATION 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. EASE OF EVALUATION SERVICES MARKETING SYSTEM CORE & SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICES FLOWER OF SERVICE NEED GAPS IDENTIFIED SERVICE BLUEPRINT ZONE OF TOLERANCE SERVICE INSIGHTS (in customers own words) COSTS TO CUSTOMERS

ABOUT THE PROJECT : The project has been conducted by the students of section 1b (HEALTHCARE GROUP) of sims,, pune TO DEVELOP A LIVE PROJECT IN THE MEDICAL TOURISM INDUSTRY OF INDIA. The project attempts to gain an insight into the medical tourism sector in india by taking an example of company – med access

PROJECT OBJECTIVES : 1. to gain an insight into the medical tourism sector of india 2. to study critically the various aspects of service delivery in this sector like :  Step by step purchase process  Zone of tolerance  Flower of service  Costs to the customers  Detailed segmentation  Nature of customer contact  Ease of evaluation of service  Service blueprint  Perceived risks  Service marketing system  Core & supplementary services

HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY
The healthcare industry can be classified as 1) Medical service providers 2) Diagnostic service providers 3) Third party service providers 3a) Clinical trials 3b) Healthcare service providers 3c) Medical Transcription & Telemedicine 3d) Health Insurance 3e) Others (laundry , caterer etc) 4) Bio-Pharmaceuticals Manufacturers 5) Medical Devices Manufacturers

CLASSIFICATION
1) NATURE OF ORGANIZATION
Purpose Structure Type Individuals Profit (provided by private players) Non-profit (provided by government and NGOs) Both Public and Private

2) NATURE OF SERVICE
Degree of tradability Service directed towards Degree of merchantability Embodied Service Pure Service (Doctor consultation) Individuals Low

3.) CUSTOMER RELATIONSHIP
Type of relationship Degree of participation Formal ( medical services and 3rd party services) Informal (Diagnostic services) Customer present during service performance: (medical services and Diagnostic services) Customer not present during service performance: (3rd party service providers)

4.) NATURE OF DEMAND
Level of demand Demand exceeds capacity (Doctor-patient ratio in India :0.6/1000) (Global Average 1.2/1000) Variable degree of fluctuation

Degree of fluctuation

5.) SERVICE PACKAGE
Number of services and goods Units of service Degree of equipment base Multiple Services, multiple goods (Medical service providers and diagnostic services) Multiple services, one good (3rd party services) Only services (HCC) Situation and time both High (diagnostic services) Medium (Medical services and 3rd party services)

Degree of customization Degree of durability

High Cannot be defined

6.) DELIVERY METHOD
Availability of service Nature of delivery Type of Consumption Allocation of capacity Multiple Sites Both Independent Reservation, order of arrival and preferential

CATEGORIZATION SCHEMES
1) Nature of the service act :
People Tangible Actions Intangible actions Things

Medical services Diagnostic services

Clinical Trials

Healthcare convenience portals Medical transcription

2) Relationship with customers: type of relationship and nature of service delivery
Membership relationship Continuous No formal relationship

Diagnostic services Medical services
Discrete
Judgement of customer contact personnel

Clinical trials

Healthcare convenience portals Medical transcription

3) Customization and Judgement of customer contact personnel in service delivery
Extent to which services are customised

High Medical services Medical transcription
High Low

Low Clinical trials

Diagnostic services

Healthcare convenience portals

Areas of Opportunity in HC sector o Medical-Infrastructure o Telemedicine o Medical-Equipment o Medical-textiles o Health-Insurance o Clinical-Trials o Health-services-outsourcing o Medical value travel

STRENGTHS / OPPORTUNITIES o 8 crore diabetics by 2030 now=6crore o 100% FDI allowed o Booming health insurance (premiums grew 133% for private players) o Favourable destination for clinical trials (no regul’n; huge popul’n) o Medical tourism becoming the core competency of Indian HC sector o No of hospitals increasing (Apollo 250hosps; max 750 beds delhi) o New players in hospital business (wockhardt; reliance; aditya-birla) o 40 bn US $ expenditure on healthcare in next 5 years o Proposal to setup medical parks ~SEZs o Focus on integrated medical services (Apollo health city) o ISRO to launch “healthsat” by 2010 (satellite for telemedicine) o Availability of a large pool of English speaking doctors o Large no of contract research & manufacturing organizations o India has largest no of USFDA approved plants outside USA (ie 61) o Indian strengths in AYURVEDA, UNANI, YOGA & HOMOEOPATHY o In 2008 the US patents on 35 drugs worth 73 bn $ have expired o Increasing income of people o Increasing awareness of people o Increasing diseases in people

Areas of THREATS / WEAKNESSES o Lack of venture capital o Lack of govt spending o Low emphasis on R&D o Low emphasis on branding

FACTS & FIGURES
o o o o GLOBAL HEALTHCARE REVENUE 2.8 trillion US $ INDIAN INDUSTRY US $ 34 bn INDUSTRY BY 2012 PROJECTED US$40 bn ANNUAL GROWTH RATE 13%

Out of the total healthcare spending, 15% is government funded, 4% is from social insurance, 1% is from private insurance and the remaining 80% is out of pocket expenditure.

o o o o o

REVENUES FROM THE SECTOR CONSTITUTE 5.2% OF GDP AND WILL REACH 7.2% BY 2012 EMPLOYMENT TO 40 LAKH PPL. WILL REACH 70 LAKH BY 2012. GLOBAL NO. 4 WITH 8% IN VOLUME & 2% IN VALUE BED / 1000 POPULATION RATIO = 1.03 IN INDIA. WHEREAS IN CHINA, KOREA, THAILAND ITS 4.3. TARGET IS TO INCREASE IT TO 1.85 BY 2012.

>30% of the national bed strength is concentrated in 150-odd corporate hospitals. (eg Apollo has 6400 beds in 32 hospitals)
DOCTOR : POPULATION = 1:1722 FOR ALLOPATHIC AND 1:1280 FOR ALL STREAMS OF DOCS. DOCTOR POPUL’N RATIO = 0.6 / 1000 1.2 / 1000 AS COMPARED TO GLOBAL AVERAGE =

o o o o o o o o o o

DENTIST POPUL’N RATIO = 1 : 250000 IN RURAL ; 1 : 10000 IN URBAN INDIA WILL BE SPENDING 40 bn US $ ON HEALTHCARE IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS PRIVATE SECTOR ACCOUNTS FOR NEARLY 80% BY 2030 INDIA WILL HAVE A POOL OF 8 CRORE DIABETICS (NOW=6 CRORE) 100 % FDI ALLOWED NO. OF DOCTORS IN INDIA = 6,25,000 ; DENTISTS = 80000 NO. OF DIAGNOSTIC CENTRES = 14000 NO OF NURSING HOMES IN INDIA = 24000

PEST ANALYSIS

1 Political Factors Legislation for Accreditation of Healthcare Institutions Extension of Visa Period for Medical Tourists Regulatory & Tax Reforms 2 Economic Factors Lack of Government Spending

3 Social Factors Increasing Elderly Population Geographical Reach Increasing Demand for Specialty Services

4 Technological Factors Use of Information Technology Role of Telemedicine

ONGOING INITIATIVES o o o o o o

R & D development Transparency in procedures Quality issues Corporate Governance Public – private partnership programs Govt initiatives – NATIONAL RURAL HEALTH MISSION

MEDICAL TOURISM THROUGH THE AGES
Neolithic & Bronze Age Middle Ages 16th century Mineral & Hot Spring visits Thermal Springs “Fountain of Youth” Spa

17th /18th century
19th century 20th century 1991

Sea & Mountain Air (TB sanitarium)
“Health Farms” or “Fat Farms” Formation of International Spa Association

TODAY

“Hospitals more like spas & spas more like hospitals.”

COUNTRIES

PROMOTING

MEDICAL

TOURISM

POTENTIAL OF MEDICAL TOURISM

Healthcare Indicators  Global healthcare revenue US$ 2.8 trillion  India’s healthcare industry worth US$ 34 billion; to grow by 13% per annum for next 6 years  Tertiary care to earn addnl. revenue of Rs. 5-10,000 crores  Health procedures across world show 200-800% cost difference  No of medical tourists to increase geometrically
300000 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 0

2,72,000 1,80,000

2004

2007

 Internationally accredited medical facilities using the latest technologies  Highly qualified Physicians/Surgeons and hospital support staff  Significant cost savings compared to domestic private healthcare  Medical treatment costs in India are lower by at least 60-80% when compared to North America and the UK  No Wait Lists  Fluent English speaking staff  Easy visa availability for patient as well as family members for 1 year extendable upto 2 yrs  Options for private room, translator, private chef, dedicated staff during your stay and many other tailor-made services  Can easily be combined with a holiday / business trip  Alternative Therapies in India for Medical Treatment India is renowned for ancient alternative therapies such as Ayurveda, Yoga and Meditation, and Therapeutic Massage. India is an exotic tourist destination offering everything from beaches, mountains, cosmopolitan cities, quaint villages and pilgrimages to suit every palate. Rich in history and culture, India has proved to be an oasis in the modern world, providing complete health and well being, while providing the latest in technology.  Indian Corporate Hospitals  Indian corporate hospitals have a large pool of doctors, nurses, and support staff ensuring individualized care. The highly skilled personnel, with wide experience and international exposure excel in Cardiology and Cardiothoracic surgery, Orthopedic surgery, Bariatric or Obesity surgery, Gastroenterology, Ophthalmology, Dentistry, and Urology, to name a few.  All medical investigations are conducted using the latest, technologically advanced and cutting edge diagnostic equipment.  Stringent quality assurance exercises consistently ensure reliable and high quality test results in a timely manner.

GOVERNMENT INITIATIVES
 To encourage medical tourism in India, govt has extended the time limit of MEDICAL VISAS to 1 year (from 3 months) extendable by another 1 year.
 Indian govt also provides visas to the attendants / family members of the patient.  To capitalize on medical tourism and build a sustained public-private partnership in the hospital industry, the Indian government is supporting an initiative by well known heart surgeon Dr. Naresh Trehan to build a “Medi City” in Gurgaon, on the outskirts of Delhi. The compound will include a 900-bed hospital that supports 17 super specialties, a medical college and paramedical college. The project, on 43 acres of land, will cost an estimated $493 million. The Medi City will integrate allopathic care with alternative treatments, including unani, ayurvedic and homeopathic medicine, and it will provide telemedicine services as well.  To encourage the growth of medical tourism, the government also is providing a variety of incentives, including lower import duties and higher depreciation rates on medical equipment, as well as expedited visas for overseas patients seeking medical care in India.

SOURCE

OF

MEDICAL

TOURISTS

IN

INDIA

CONCERNS
Consumer’s Point of View
Negative Perceptions

Unhygienic

Medical Insurance Inadequate Cover Underdeveloped Insurance Frauds

Instability

Pollution Backward & Bureaucratic
Accreditation No Uniformity ISO, CRISIL, ICRA WEST: JCAHO

Terrorism Prone

Communal Unrest
Connectivity

Few Global Players
Overseas Companies Refuse Reimbursements

Less Flights!!

Bad Roads Public Transport

CONCERNS
Promoter’s Point of View
No Regulation Inadequate Land Reforms Taxation Anomalies Funding Constraints Infrastructure Deficiencies Implementation Lacunae Bureaucratic Bottlenecks

Ensuring Ethics No Coordinated Systemic Supports

Electricity Power Supply

Water

INDUSTRY ISSUES

Standardized education in Medical Institutions

Doctors

Strong regulatory mechanism to curb quacks
No communication and inter-personal level teaching

Nurses & Paramedical

“Spinal ” level not “Cerebral” level thinkers Inefficient Language skills Lack of Standardization Hygiene awareness in medical attendants

Service

Unhygienic Food handling Lack of Hospitality Services Heterogeneous Pricing of services

IMMEDIATE TACTICAL IMPERATIVES
India’s Focus
Build reputation as leader in healthcare in developing world :

   

SAARC Countries South East Asia, Middle East, Central Asia, Africa Domestic Tourists & Patients India Diaspora NRIs

Procedures amenable to Medical Tourism: Chronic / Acute :
Eye Surgery (Cataract, Retina) ; Heart & Circulatory ; Cancer ; Gynaecology ; Genito-Urinary ; Reproductive Dysfunction ; In-vitro procedures ; Hip and Joint Replacement Surgery etc. Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery ; Dental Cosmetology

Cosmetic : Preventive :

Preventive Health Checks ; Dental Procedures

PATH FORWARD (Potential + Improvements)
IMPROVEMENTS POTENTIAL
Doctors & Paramedics
Expertise Recognized Cost Advantage Language Skills Vibrant Industries IT Strength Management Skills Pharmaceutical Industry Tourism Potential Service Industry Mindset

Uniform Medical Education Standards Industry Accredit ion Standards Mandatory Accreditation of all Colleges & Hospitals Target-oriented Infrastructure Investment

More Medical, Nursing collages and Hospitals
Regulatory Bodies with Teeth

Government soft loan to Private Players
Tax Holiday & Further Duty Roll Back Apex Industry body under Union List Greater Industry & Govt. Interaction Medical Insurance Reforms Seamless Single-Window Facility to Tourists
Govt. promotes India as Health Tourism Destination

PATH FORWARD ( For Success )
REALIZED POTENTIAL
GDP Growth

SPIN-OFF
Employment in Healthcare Sector Employment in Tourism Industry Percolation effect in Healthcare in India Overall Growth in Commerce Reversal & Arrest of Brain Drain Stimulus to Pharmaceuticals Industry Growth in Insurance Industry Better medical facilities for larger population Catalyzes India to the Club of Global Leaders

INDIA EMERGES AS MAJOR HEALTH TOURISM DESTINATION

SEGMENTATION OF THE MEDICAL TOURISM MARKET

GENERAL DEMOGRAPHIC :  All age groups  Both the genders OBJECTIVE SUBJECTIVE GEOGRAPHIC :  USA  Europe  Middle East

SPECIFIC USAGE RATE : Small BRAND LOYALTY : On extreme ends (v. high / v. low) depending on the service experience TYPE OF PURCHASE : Special

SOCIO ECONOMIC : USER STATUS : Middle & Lower Income Generally a one time buy. Group people unable to Repeat purchases may also afford quality medical occur occasionally but care in their own unlikely. countries LIFESTYLE :  Health conscious people  Beauty conscious people  Disease affected people  Nature loving people  People loving traditional Indian remedies BENEFITS SOUGHT :  Cost advantage  Quick processes  Quality medical care ATTITUDE TOWARDS SERVICE : Highly Enthusiastic ATTITUDE TOWARDS TECHNOLOGY : Favoring a blend of technology, culture & nature.

(functionals)

CHANNEL PREFERENCES : Preferring a direct channel augmented with personal touch.

BENEFIT CLUSTERS IN THE MEDICAL TOURISM MARKET

ZEITHMAL’S CUSTOMER PYRAMID

SEGMENTATION ON BASIS OF TREATMENT REQUIRED

Medical tourists come to India for many treatments but they can be classified & segmented as follows :

SEGMENTATION ON BASIS OF TREATMENT REQUIRED

SEGMENTATION ON BASIS OF DOMAIN OF MEDICAL & THERAPEUTIC CARE
CROSS-BORDER health and wellness services or medical tourism can be clustered into four distinct domains that are inter-connected by the provision of professional medical and therapeutic care.
FULL HOSPITAL CARE & TREATMENT

SPECIALTY CLINICS

(e.g. eye, dental and cosmetic services)

WELLNESS & SPA CENTERS

RETIREMENT & LONG TERM CARE FOR THE ELDERLY

SERVICES DIFFERENTIATION IN MEDACCESS

 Ordering Ease : Any service can be ordered on the internet / phone channel making it very convenient for anybody sitting in any corner of the world to avail the service.  Delivery : The delivery of the service is instantaneous. It starts right from the moment the tourist / patient lands in India & ends only when he returns.  Customer Training : Full training / information / briefing is provided to the customers regarding the type of treatment, doctor operating on, hospital providing service, additional services etc.

 Maintenance : MedAccess takes extra effort to maintain the quality of services being provided to the customers by its 24 X 7 customer service center remaining in touch with all the customers, hospitals & other service providers.  Miscellaneous services : A 24 X 7 customer service center operates. It provides instant response to all the queries of the customer by email / phone.
PERSONNEL DIFFERENTIATION IN MEDACCESS

MedAccess ensures that their employees are always no. 1 on the formal parameters :  Competence  Courtesy  Credibility  Communication  Reliability  Responsiveness
CHANNEL DIFFERENTIATION IN MEDACCESS

MedAccess follows only one channel of service delivery i.e. the INTERNET channel. It accepts payments in all major currencies from all types of accounts.

POSITIONING OF MEDACCESS 1. Positioning by Benefit :

2. Positioning by Attribute :

3. Positioning by Price / Quality :

COMPLEXITY VS DIVERSITY

NATURE OF CUSTOMER CONTACT

STEP BY STEP PURCHASE PROCESS
Step 1

General Enquiry Form:
After Med Access India receives the Enquiry Form with customer’s basic questions and concerns, it responds with relevant information including:
  

Answers to all initial queries. Budgetary estimate of all inclusive cost estimates for surgery. A basic outline of recuperation period for your selected surgical procedure.

Step 2

Medical History Form:
 

 

Customers send the completed Medical History Form. They send recent Photographs /X-Ray's / CT scan / MRI Scan's / Echocardiogram / Angiogram / Pathological Reports or a summary of observations on them as per the treatment/ procedure requirements. Medical History Form and additional medical inputs are forwarded to the surgeon for professional inputs. Surgeon will make an initial Clinical Medical Evaluation.

Step 3

E-Mail Correspondence & Telephonic Consultation:




Med Access India urges customers to continue asking any questions about their treatment. These questions can be directed to Med Access via email or telephonically as part of the service. Med Access India arranges telephonic consultation with the surgeon.

Step 4

Booking Form:
   

Customers forward the completed Booking Form to confirm their provisional booking. They also forward their detailed flight information. Med Access India will forward pre & post operation instructions for the selected procedure. Med Access India will Invoice the customers for payment of the nonrefundable registration deposit.



On receipt of the funds Med Access will confirm their bookings and forward a detailed itinerary for their surgery and medical appointments.

Step 5

Arrival:


Customers are welcomed at the airport by Med Access India’s Representative.

Step 6

Pre-operative consultation with the Surgeon:
 

   

The first consultation with the surgeon is scheduled soon on their arrival. The selected surgeon will: 1. Satisfy all their queries. 2. They mutually agree about the outcome and expectations of the results of your surgery. 3. They should have discussed all the available alternatives and understood the risks of the procedure to their satisfaction. They sign the consent. They will receive the final confirmation on the fee quoted in the initial enquiry after further medical evaluation by the surgeon. The balance due after payment of the deposit is payable directly to the hospital/surgeon at their pre operative consultation. Payment can be made via cash or credit cards.

Step 7

Surgery:
Med Access India’s representative will accompany them to the hospital on the day of surgery to ensure that everything is in order. Step 8

Recuperation:
They need to recuperate in the place of their surgery for the required post operative period which is dependent on the nature of the procedure. The bookings are done in advance as per their choice and selection.

Step 9

India Holiday:
In case they are interested to take their Tour India Holiday or opted for an Ayurvedic or Rejuvenation, Med Access India will make all necessary arrangements and bookings. Step 10

Feedback and Follow up:
 

After they reach back home, follow up e mail consultations are available all the times. In its endeavor to continuously improve its services, Med Access would request them for their honest inputs, suggestions and comments .

PERCEIVED RISKS & MINIMIZING THEM  Functional – unsatisfactory performance outcomes THIS IS TAKEN CARE OF BY ASSOCIATING WITH THE BEST HOSPITALS & PHYSICIANS IN INDIA  Financial – monetary loss, unexpected extra costs THIS IS TAKEN CARE OF BY GIVING THE PATIENT A PRELIMNARY QUOTE ABOUT THE SERVICES DESIRED & THE SITUATIONS WHERE IT CAN CHANGE. ALSO PERSONAL ATTENTION IS PAID TO CUSTOMERS PROBLEMS REGARDING ANY FINANCIAL QUERY  Temporal – wasted time, delays lead to problems THIS IS TAKEN CARE OF BY MAKING THE BOOKINGS IN ADVANCE AS SOON AS THE CONFIRMATION IS RECEIVED FROM THE PATIENT / CUSTOMER  Physical – personal injury THIS IS TAKEN CARE OF BY ASSOCIATING WITH THE THE BEST HOSPITALS & PHYSICIANS IN INDIA  Psychological – fears and negative emotions THIS IS TAKEN CARE OF BY REAFFIRMING & REASSURING THE PATIENTS WITH PERSONAL CONTACT & TESTIMONIALS OF OTHER PATIENTS.  Sensory – unwanted impacts to any of five senses THIS IS TAKEN CARE OF BY ASSOCIATING WITH THE THE BEST HOSPITALS & PHYSICIANS IN INDIA

EASE OF EVALUATION

SERVICE MARKETING SYSTEM

CORE &SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICES IN MED ACCESS

FLOWER OF SERVICE IN MED ACCESS

NEED GAPS IDENTIFIED BY MED ACCESS

SERVICE BLUEPRINT

ZONE OF TOLERANCE
The zone of tolerance has been quite less as can be seen from the patients view point. The difference between the adequate service and the desired service is very less because Med Access provide online forms, telephonic consultation, delegated hospitals and best surgeons. All one has to do is get off the airport and the rest will be done for you from transportation to the end surgery. This has lead to the overwhelming performance of Med Access and has gained tremendous popularity.

SERVICE INSIGHT (IN PATIENTS OWN WORDS) Patient's Name : Mike Smith To Future Patients: I have suffered from back problems, in the lumber region for as long as I can remember. The last occurrence lasted about 4 weeks, really painful and I finally decided that it was time I did something about it. I had heard about India being the forerunner in orthopedic surgery, so being how I am, I looked for this on the net and came up with Med Access India. The best move I have made in a long time. I contacted them, explaining my problems and had a reply from the above, Shashi. From that point my worry’s and apprehensions stopped. We mailed each other for about two weeks, then I made my decision ‘’lets do it’’. Shashi is very professional, extremely organized and puts one at ease. It is like talking to your sister, comforting. I arranged my flights and that is all I had to do, Shashi did the rest. She arranged surgery with the best surgeon (no second best for her), the hospital, the transportation, the lot. Everything went like a well oiled clock, I didn’t believe it. I arrived in the delegated hospital late, 3-30am. Shashi was there at 10am to check how things were and she kept on checking every day. ‘’Things alright, problems with the staff, do you need anything? The surgeon, I had total confidence in. He told me exactly what he was going to do, how he was going to do it. The next day I was in and out of surgery before 11am. Post op care was good; the staff was very attentive from start to finish. After two days I was up and about, doing exercises. I had never been so straight in my life, wonderful. I have been home for two weeks ( still doing the exercise, don’t forget them) and to say I feel great would be an understatement. I am 65 years old, that’s when you need a good back. If anyone needs further assurance, contact me at [email protected]

Patient's Name : Anthony Coombs Humphreys Shoulder Stabilization, West Sussex, UK Symptoms I had been suffering from a dreadful aching in my right shoulder – karate injuries – general wear and tear – work history – all the usual things "younger people" begin to suffer with – with age and a little help with life thrown in., I had no let-up from the constant nagging pain and the limited use of my shoulder joint. Sleep at night was affected as was my usual attitude to anything "physical" and I had always enjoyed sports and a full active life. I consulted doctors in the UK and a diagnosis was made whereupon an operation was advised as soon as possible, However, I could not be assured that I would not contract MRSA infection (the super bug) in either the private or national health sectors and waiting lists were almost as long as my poor defunct arm. I then decided to look elsewhere and explore other avenues and to undergo treatment in another country. A Solution ? I was advised by a family member in the nursing profession to contact Med Access India, a new innovative company run by professionals doctor Wankhede his son From the point of contact in e-mailing Med Access - all costings, contact with the surgical team, discussions with hospital, travel and suitable dates were all taken into consideration. I was dealt with in a compassionate, businesslike and professional manner. Actions speak louder than words ! Leaving for India and following e-mail correspondence I had no apprehension as to my treatment and care. I arrived in Bombay on a scheduled flight from the UK and was immediately met by the Marketing Director and conveyed in a Med Access personal car to the hospital, whereupon I was then introduced to the personal relations management team and registered into the hospital. Within a period from 11.30 in the morning to 5 pm that afternoon I had undergone the following:MRI scan Several x-rays Personal consultation with the surgeon who was to carry out the operation Blood tests Heart ultrasound

The operation was then scheduled for 2 pm the following day. On a personal note, security for my belongings (which was paramount whilst in the hospital's care) was uppermost in the mind of the staff. I had my computer with me, not to mention travellers' cheques and this was factored in to the "care and concern" and for my welfare. I was even asked what my preference was for dvds, books, music etc. The nursing on my ward was exemplary before my operation and this was just day one ! The operation was then performed on the day following my arrival and I was in ICU for twenty-four hours where I was watched continually whilst coming round from the anaesthetic and the staff were satisfied I could be allowed back to my bed and room whereupon I was on constant 10/15 minute observations. It struck me that all the doctors involved were so professional and polite that I felt that I could have been the only and most important patient in the hospital. My room was as you would expect from a first class quality private hospital in the UK and the cleanliness was second to none. As I came round from the operation and during a consultation with the surgeon it seemed that I had in fact had two surgical procedures in one and I was slightly concerned as to an increase in costs on my quoted bill. The PR people swung into action and I was assured both verbally and by a price structure in place in the hospital, of the situation at all times. As it turned out I was in the hospital less days than I was quoted for that this was reflected in my bill, which in turn was "offset" against the extra procedure carried out. Post operation examinations were performed and I was then free to be discharged. The vexed question of costs is always on your mind in such situations and I was assured, anyone who considers using Med Access India that any misgivings are unfounded. The bill was presented, itemised and details given verbally by the PR Department in the hospital. They were on hand at all times to explain fully any queries I had. All my relevant investigative data was given to me on my discharge with referral letters to any doctors, physiotherapists and pharmacies – all presented in the package.

Med Access India then returned me efficiently to the airport where I in fact caught a flight to Goa for my period of recuperation. The hospital welcomes, as a matter of course, members of your family or friends if they wish to stay or visit during your period of hospitalisation. During my stay, I was always advised on my food requirements by a qualified dietician – therefore a slight word of caution – be aware the food is very different to that we receive in western society! My conclusions… The whole experience from initial contact and referral to my post operative discharge was that I would not have received such exceptional treatment, care and consideration if I had gone anywhere else in the world.

COSTS TO PATIENTS / CUSTOMERS

Search Costs

Internet Consulting Agencies Time Costs

Operating Costs Incidental Expenses

Purchase and Use Costs

Treatment Costs Psychological Costs Tourism Costs Necessary follow-up Problem solving

After Costs

BIBLIOGRAPHY / REFERENCES OVERVIEW OF INDIAN HEALTHCARE SECTOR

(indiaitaly.com)
OPPORTUNITES IN HEALTHCARE : DESTINATION INDIA

(joint survey by FICCI and Ernst & Young)
HEALTHCARE IN INDIA : Emerging Market Report 2007

(Price Waterhouse Coopers)
INDIAN HEALTHCARE : The New Frontier

(Heidrick & Struggles)
MED ACCESS INDIA PRIVATE LTD.

(medaccessindia.com)
Mrs SHASHI WANKHEDE

(Marketing Director Med Access)
FACULTY PRESENTATIONS

(Prof Chabbi Sinha)

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