Montgomery 101211

Published on December 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 25 | Comments: 0 | Views: 145
of x
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content


www.themontgomerysun.com
OCTOBER 12-18, 2011
FREE
KEVIN CANESSA JR./The Sun
Montgomery High School cheerleaders warm up before their annual Pink Out fund raiser during
the Oct. 6 football game against Phillipsburg.
Montgomery Pink Out
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Veterans fund raiser
Event will raise money for
local memorial. PAGE 3
PRSRT STD
US POSTAGE
PAID
BELLMAWR, NJ
PERMIT NO. 1239
Bias
conviction
upheld
Appeals court chooses not to
change sentence of man in
Skillman bias intimidation crime
By KEVIN CANESSA JR.
The Montgomery Sun
It’s one of those stories most
would rather forget, but it’s resur-
faced again – and the man in-
volved will remain incarcerated
for a crime he was convicted of
committing several years ago.
A state appeals court last week
upheld a lower-court’s conviction
of 39-year-old John Burnett Mem-
mel, who more than a year ago
was sentenced to five years in
prison on charges that he used
“bias intimidation,” threatened
to kill and unlawfully possessed a
gun during an incident involving
a black man, Quran Vaughn, his
fiancée and his children in 2007.
According to the per curiam
appellate-court decision, in 2007,
Memmel threatened to kill
Vaughn, while using the “N”
word during the fracas. The inci-
dent took place after Memmel and
Vaughn were nearly involved in a
car crash in Montgomery Town-
ship.
Reports say Memmel cut
Vaughn off on a township road,
and then caught up to him at a
nearby traffic light. It was at that
traffic light that Memmel was al-
leged to have said: “You want to
get killed, ni****?”
Memmel also flashed a gun at
Vaughn, a weapon that was later
determined to be fake, reports
said.
At the time of the incident,
Vaughn’s young children were
also in the car, according to re-
ports.
According to reports, Mem-
mel’s defense was that he was
under the influence of narcotic
painkillers for a bad back – and as
such, Memmel’s lawyer, at the
original trial, argued he should
be sentenced only to probation –
without prison time.
But the judge in the original
trial didn’t buy the defense and
sentenced Memmel to five years
in prison, reports said.
On appeal, Hemmel’s lawyers
argued several other matters they
believed were improper during
the original trial.
The lawyers also argued that
character witnesses should have
been allowed to testify on Mem-
mel’s behalf at the original trial.
Appellate Court judges Edith
Payne and Susan Reisner, in their
majority ruling, said such claims
were unwarranted.
By KEVIN CANESSA JR.
The Montgomery Sun
When one thinks of the game
of football, the color pink doesn’t
exactly come to mind, does it?
Yet that was hardly the case on
Thursday, Oct. 6 at the Mont-
gomery-Phillipsburg football
game at Cougar Field, as throngs
of onlookers – and all of the
school’s cheerleaders – donned
pink as a way to raise thousands
of dollars for the Steelchase Can-
cer Center at the Somerset Med-
ical Center.
Donna Castronovo, mother of
cheerleader Dana Castronovo and
director of Special Events at Som-
erset Medical Center Foundation
originally brought the idea to
cheerleading Coach Liz
Wittmann.
Donna Castronovo said she
first saw a “Pink Out” at a Notre
Dame High School football game
in Lawrenceville several years
ago.
She approached Notre Dame’s
principal, a nun, to find out how
and why they did the “Pink Out,”
and last year, for the first time in
Montgomery High School’s histo-
ry, the “Pink Out” became a reali-
ty there.
The event raised $2,500 the first
year.
Half of the fund raiser, which
actually netted $5,000, went to the
cheerleaders.
But the girls, Castronovo said,
didn’t want the “Pink Out” to
raise money for anything other
than the Steelchase Center this
year.
So, all proceeds, which include
the sale of pink T-shirts, pink
pens and pink wristbands, will go
to the center.
“When we came back (after see-
ing the Notre Dame game), I
spoke with the cheerleaders’ fund
raiser, and we came to a consen-
sus – ‘Let’s see that we can do,’”
Castronovo said. “And this was
not just about raising the money,
mind you. It was about the aware-
ness.”
And indeed the awareness
brought about some shocking sta-
tistics.
In Somerset County alone, an
average of 25 people are diag-
nosed with cancer each week.
please see UPHELD, page 5
Coming together for a cure
please see PINK, page 7
2 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — OCTOBER 12-18, 2011
· Cosmetic Dentistry
· Zoom!" Whitening
· InvisaIign
®
InvisibIe Braces
· FamiIy Dentistry
· Emergencies WeIcome
James J. CaIIy, DMD
609-924-8300
New Patients Welcome!
Evening and Weekend
Appointments Available
Montgomery KnoII
192 Tamarack CircIe SkiIIman
www.mysmiIedoc.com
Classic Smiles
We carry a variety of
brands for…
WOMEN
Wild Fox
Siwy Jeans
Kova & T
Gypsy 05
CHILDREN
Baby Sara
Hanna Banana
Wheat • Toffee Moon
Love Marks
4436 Route 27, Suite One
gps: 4436 Lincoln Highway
Kingston, N.J. 08528
609-454-5065
www.PoohPeachBoutique.com
¬I!vcv Oak ConstvuctIon, ¡andscapc & Masonvy
PO Box 3417 • Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 864-6967
www.silveroakconstruction.biz
1378 Rte 206

Skillman, NJ
609-252-0880
www.genteelstrattoria.com
We also offer catering!
FREE
DELIVERY!
GLUTEN
FREE
GENTEEL’S
PIZZERIA
Buy 1 dinner, get 2nd entrée
HALF OFF
With this coupon.
Dine-in only. Cannot be
combined with other offers.
Expires 10/31/11.
Valid Mon. - Fri.
$3 OFF
Any $20 delivery
With this coupon.
Valid Mon. - Sat.
Meet your
local candidates
The Montgomery Township
Tea Party will host a Meet the
Candidates for township commit-
tee candidates on Thursday, Oct.
13 at 7:15 p.m. at the Otto Kauf-
man Senior Center, 356 Skillman
Road, Skillman.
Both candidates, Mark Pe-
traske, a Democrat, and Rich
Smith, a Republican, are expected
to attend the event.
For additional information,
send an e-mail to [email protected]
gomeryteaparty.org.
Learn about
Korean culture
Presented by The Korean Spirit
and Culture Promotion Project, a
nonprofit organization dedicated
to raising awareness of Korean
history and culture, come to the
Mary Jacobs Library Friday, Oct.
14 at 6:30 p.m. to enjoy two short
films about Korea.
The first film illustrates the
artistic and cultural achieve-
ments of Korea’s past such as
Hangul (Korean alphabet) and
The Tripitaka Koreana (a nation-
al treasure of Korea and regis-
tered as part of UNESCO’s “Mem-
ory of the World”).
The second film shows Korea’s
industrial achievements since the
Korean War.
After the presentation, a com-
plimentary Korean traditional
meal will be served.
This program is free, but regis-
tration is required.
To register online, log on to
www.libraryinsight.net/eventde-
tails.asp?jx=mjp&lmx=222616.
For more information about
any programs at the Mary Jacobs
Library, or to register, visit us at
64 Washington St. in Rocky Hill
or call (609) 924-7073 ext. 4.
For a complete list of upcom-
ing library programs and addi-
tional information about the
Somerset County Library Sys-
tem, visit www.sclsnj.org.
‘Rebirth’ documentary
to be shown at RVCC
The public is invited to Raritan
Valley Community College’s
(RVCC) special, free screenings of
the full-length documentary, “Re-
birth,” on Monday, Oct. 24. at ei-
ther noon or 7 p.m. in the Confer-
ence Center at the college’s
Branchburg Campus.
The 100-minute documentary,
which premiered at the Sundance
Film Festival in January, is the re-
sult of a decade-long project by di-
rector Jim Whitaker.
The film offers a living history
Briefs
please see BRIEFS, page 7
The Princeton Elks Lodge
#2129 of Montgomery Township,
which has become a lightning rod
to many charitable and service-
related activities in Montgomery
and throughout the greater
Princeton area, is yet again
preparing to host a community
event.
Joining with the Montgomery
Veterans Memorial Committee,
October’s community service
event is to raise awareness of the
issues faced by many military
families and the needs attached to
their special circumstances when
disabled veterans return home.
On Oct. 16 at 5 p.m., Robert M.
Church, exalted ruler of the
Princeton Elks Lodge #2129, and
Hugh Dyer, chairman of the
Montgomery Veterans Memorial,
will co-host a simple pasta dinner
called “Dinner and a Conversa-
tion” at the Princeton Elks Lodge,
354 Route 518, Skillman.
The dinner, which will include
some lively entertainment, more
importantly will include as a
guest speaker Scot King, a Ma-
rine corporal who only a few
short weeks ago brought the New
York State Assembly to its feet for
a five-minute standing ovation.
King is riding his bicycle
across the country to raise aware-
ness of the issues faced by com-
bat veterans who return home
after duty in Afghanistan and in
the greater Persian Gulf region.
King’s ride will encompass
more than 20,000 miles over two
years. On his stops, he is meeting
with various groups and govern-
ment officials to raise awareness
of combat-related issues. For
more information on his ride,
visit www.rememberthewound-
edride.com.
Involved the first year of his
ride, and counting on support
from the Elks and local families,
King will be housed at the home
of Tom and Danielle Devine, of
Montgomery. Tom is a Marine
whose name is on the Mont-
gomery Veterans Memorial, and
who has been a stalwart member
of the Montgomery Veterans Me-
morial Committee for more than
10 years.
The dinner, which will be open
to all areas residents, community
groups and veterans, will also be
accepting donations for the Mont-
gomery Veterans Memorial, the
Princeton Elks Veterans Commit-
tee and King’s Remember the
Wounded Ride.
For reservations or more infor-
mation, call or e-mail Church at
(908) 240-9694 or
[email protected]
OCTOBER 12-18, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 3
WEIGHT LOSS RESULTS
YOU CAN COUNT ON…
Non-surg|ca| we|ght |oss
Safe and effect|ve
Oustom|zed p|ans
800 Bunn Drive, Suite 202, Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone (609) 683-1919 • Fax (609) 430-9202
www.princetonweightlosscenter.com
‘Dinner and a Conversation’ on Oct. 16
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at [email protected]
sun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
Event will help raise awareness of issues faced by combat-wounded veterans
4 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — OCTOBER 12-18, 2011
4484 Route 27
Kingston, NJ 08528
609.497.1777
www.enoterra.com
“Stuzzi Hour”
Hoppy Hour
4:30·ó:30pm
5undoy·Wednesdoy
Feo|uring 5ó glosses ol wine ond
complimen|ory s|urrichini
(sovory snocks)
Nen|ion |his od lor o
lree locovore |·shir|
(while supplies los|, one per gues|)
1CIN U5 FCk
From March through June,
The Smiles For Life Foundation,
the children’s charity arm of the
Crown Council, in cooperation
with hundreds of dental practices
throughout the United States and
Canada, professionally whitens
teeth to raise money for seriously
ill, disabled and underprivileged
children in local communities
across the globe.
They are members of the
Crown Council, an alliance of
leading-edge dental teams that
are passionately committed to
promoting oral health, fighting
oral cancer and serving their
communities through charitable
work.
Since 1998, Smiles for Life have
raised more than $30 million, ben-
efiting hundreds of children’s
charities. Central New Jersey is
fortunate to have one such den-
tist: Dr. Mary V. DeCicco.
DeCicco brings to the Skillman
area 21st-century technology
with five-star customer service.
As a member of the Academy of
General Dentistry, American
Dental Association and the
Crown Council, DeCicco is a den-
tist dedicated to making amazing
changes to a person’s life.
For the past 10 years, DeCicco
has participated in the Smile for
Life fund-raising program. She
and her skilled team have raised
more than $20,000 for several local
charities. This year, she and her
team chose the Hugs for Brady
Foundation.
The Hugs for Brady Founda-
tion is a non-profit organization
dedicated to helping local kids
who are battling the horrors of
pediatric cancer.
Sherrie Wells, founder of the
Hugs for Brady Foundation said,
“The proceeds from Dr. DeCicco’s
Smile for Life efforts will go di-
rectly to helping us fund a much
needed pediatric/hematology fel-
lowship program at the Robert
Wood Johnson University, Bristol-
Myers Squibb Children’s Hospital
in New Brunswick.”
DeCicco has been practicing
dentistry for more than 30 years.
Her office is located at 67 Tama-
rack Circle in Skillman.
For more information regard-
ing her dental practice, log on to
www.deciccodental.com.
For more information on the
Hugs for Brady Foundation, log
on to www.hugsforbrady.org.
Photo special to The Sun
Sherrie Wells, left, founder of the Hugs for Brady Foundation, ac-
cepts a donation from Dr. Mary V. DeCicco on behalf of the Smile for
Life fund-raising program.
Local fund-raising program makes
donation to the Hugs for Brady Foundation
“(The) defendant contends that
the verdict was against the
weight of the evidence; the trial
court abused its discretion in per-
mitting a witness to testify and in
limiting (the) defendant from in-
troducing certain character wit-
ness testimony; and the judge
should have sentenced him to pro-
bation,” the judges wrote in the
majority opinion. “Finding no
merit in any of these contentions,
we affirm.”
Attorneys for Memmel also ar-
gued that Vaughn’s son – who tes-
tified in the original trial – should
not have been permitted to do so
and that the presiding judge
abused his discretion by doing so.
Again, not so, said the appel-
late judges.
“… We find no abuse of the
judge’s discretion in allowing the
child to testify,” the judges wrote.
The defense had ample advance
notice of the testimony to be of-
fered by this witness. (The) defen-
dant’s arguments on this point
warrant no further discussion.”
On appeal, Memmel’s attor-
neys also argued that the threat
level in this case didn’t amount to
“bias intimidation,” according to
reports.
But the appeals court affirmed
the lower-court judge’s five-year
sentence, as well.
“This was not a victimless
crime,” the judges wrote. “(The)
defendant committed an ap-
palling act and inflicted a terrify-
ing experience on Vaughn, his fi-
ancée and their young children.
We affirm substantially for the
reasons set forth by the trial
judge in his comprehensive oral
opinion on June 11, 2010, and his
written statement of reasons set
forth in the judgment of convic-
tion.”
Memmel’s lawyer had hoped to
knock the sentence down to pro-
bation on appeal, according to re-
ports.
Memmel’s attorneys were not
immediately available for com-
ment.
OCTOBER 12-18, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 5
You’re invited to McCaffrey’s 2nd Annual Food Showcase!
October 14th & 15th
The $5 admission charge will fully benefit The Crisi Ministry
of Princeton & Trenton and Canine Support Teams, as well
as entitle admitted to $5 Off at McCaffrey’s Market.
WINDOWWHOLESALERS, INC.
(609) 823-4320
www.windowwholesalers.com
$
197
FAMILY OWNED
AND OPERATED
LIFETIME WARRANTY
FULLY WELDED SASH AND
FRAME TILT-IN FOR EASY CLEANING
WHY PAY RETAIL?
Deal Directly with the Wholesaler!
We will beat any written comparable quote!
FREE
INSTALLATION
Per Window. Screens Included.
Reg. $419 (Up to 101 UI)
Installed by factory trained technicians
Only
FREE
FREE
FREE
NJ License #13VH04584700
2011 TAX CREDIT APPROVED
TITANIUM
LOWE
ARGON
GLASS
FOAM INSULATED
WINDOWS
$
119 VaIue
$9
99
REFILL
ON ANY INKJET
BLACK OR COLOR
Expires 10/31/11. Must present coupon.
Save Big with Refilled Inkjets
1340 Route 206
Skillman, NJ 08558
(Across from Shoprite)
609-681-TECH (8324)
Expert Computer Service & Repair
Explore • Discover • Achieve
OPEN HOUSES
Tuesday, October 18 • 9:30am-11:30am
Saturday, November 12 • 10am-12noon
2 year olds through Grade V
[email protected] • www.pjs.org
90 FACKLER ROAD
(Between Princeton Pike and Route 206)
(609) 924-8126
Sentence goes unchanged
UPHELD
Continued from page 1
6 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — OCTOBER 12-18, 2011
103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300
Princeton, N.J. 08540
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
KEVIN CANESSA
Associate Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Montgomery Sun is published weekly by
Elauwit Media LLC, 103 Carnegie Center,
Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540. It is
mailed weekly to select addresses in the
08502 ZIP code. If you are not on the mailing
list, six-month subscriptions are available
for $39.99. PDFs of the print publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please send an
email [email protected] For
advertising information, call 609-751-
0245 or email [email protected]
gomerysun.com. The Sun welcomes sugges-
tions and comments from readers – includ-
ing information about errors that may call
for a correction. Send your comments to
[email protected], or call the
newsroom at 609-751-0245.
SPEAK UP
The Montgomery Sun welcomes letters from
readers. Brief and to the point is best, so we
look for letters that are 300 words or fewer.
Be sure to include your name, address and
phone number with your letter, and know
that we will print your name and hometown
with the letter. We do not print anonymous
letters. Send letters via e-mail to
[email protected], via fax at 856-
427-0934, or via the mail at 103 Carnegie
Center, Suite 300, Princeton, N.J. 08540.
The Montgomery Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
in our opinion
T
he Nov. 8 elections are right
around the corner. That means
increased pulse rates, profuse
sweating and normally rational people
occasionally acting a bit unusual.
Emotions always run high during
elections – especially if they include
hotly-contested local races. This year,
since the entire Legislature is on the
ballot, everyone has a reason to show
up at the polls, even if your town has
no local races.
Here at The Sun, we have a few
things planned:
First, if your town has a local con-
test, all of the candidates have been in-
vited to participate in our Meet the
Candidates series. This series will pro-
file the candidates, give them a few
questions to answer and, finally, give
them a chance to make a final pitch to
voters. We ask candidates to avoid at-
tacks on their opponents and focus on
what they would do if elected.
For the most part, this series will ap-
pear online. This way, candidates have
all the space they need to respond to
questions, and readers can interact
with each other and, perhaps, the can-
didates, in discussing the issues.
Our election letters policy appears
elsewhere on this page. As you will
see, we have implemented special
rules to try to keep things as produc-
tive, fair and civil as possible. We en-
courage you to read the policy and
contact your local editor if you have
any questions.
Some of these changes are new this
year. After each election, we review
our coverage and policies and talk to
candidates and readers. Then we try to
improve the process for the next elec-
tion.
As always, we welcome your feed-
back and ideas, and we encourage
everyone to get involved in this year’s
elections.
Election time
Here’s what you will find in The Sun in the coming weeks
Here they come
Get ready to meet your local candi-
dates. And find out how you can offer
your thoughts on the election.
Elections letter policy
To be fair to candidates and voters in the
upcoming Nov. 8 election, here’s how let-
ters to the editor regarding the election will
be handled for the next few weeks.
The Sun will publish letters regarding the
election in print editions through Oct. 26.
After that, election letters will be published
online only.
We’re doing this to prevent last-minute
attacks and accusations that leave no time
for responses or rebuttals in print. The
online format allows for ongoing commen-
tary and debate.
We recognize this isn’t a perfect system.
For example, responses to letters in the
Oct. 26 print edition will appear online only,
not in print. But, we think this is a reason-
able policy that allows the community to
debate important issues, while keeping
things as fair as possible for everyone.
Please keep in mind that the usual rules
apply to election letters: Anonymous letters
will not be published, all letters are subject
to editing, avoid letters that are in poor
taste or libelous, etc.
Also keep in mind that, to be considered for
a print edition, we should have your letter
in hand no later than the Thursday prior to
publication. For example, if you want your
letter to appear in the Oct. 26 edition, we
should receive it no later than Oct. 20. We
anticipate a large number of letters this
campaign season, so don’t delay. We will
attempt to publish as many letters as possi-
ble.
If we receive more election letters than we
can publish due to limited space in our
papers, the letters we publish will reflect
the ratio of letters received. For example, if
we receive 30 letters supporting Candidate
A, and 10 letters supporting Candidate B,
we will publish three letters for Candidate
A and one for Candidate B.
Please contact your local editor through
the email address in this paper with any
questions.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Montgomery needs
Rich Smith
Come November, I will be enthusiasti-
cally voting for Rich Smith for Mont-
gomery Township Committee. The current
Republican team is doing a great job, and
Rich’s unique background and dedication
to Montgomery will ensure we stay on the
right track.
Rich and his wife, Valerie, moved to
Montgomery 15 years ago and quickly be-
came involved in the community. Rich was
one of the founding officers of the Mont-
gomery Township Education Foundation,
a non-profit organization committed to
supporting our public school system and
children (like his two daughters).
During his time with the MTEF, its
biggest accomplishment was securing
funding for the construction of Cougar
Stadium.
Rich and his family also helped lead the
local relief effort for Hurricane Katrina
victims in 2005. Along with several other
families, Rich and Valerie organized and
obtained donations. Not only did they gath-
er enough supplies to fill a 50-foot trailer,
they also drove down to Biloxi, Miss. to de-
liver the goods.
In addition, Rich’s community service
includes volunteer work with our local
government. He is currently serving on
Montgomery’s zoning board and is a for-
mer member of the Transportation Advi-
sory Committee.
However, what makes me so excited
about Rich is his construction-engineering
and business background. He has worked
for some of the largest construction com-
panies in the nation and is an infrastruc-
ture expert. Montgomery faces several sig-
nificant challenges with our sewer system
and roadways over the next few years.
Clearly, he has the right experience and
skills at the right time. On Nov. 8, please
vote for Rich Smith. Montgomery needs
him.
Christine Madrid
Disappointed with
election hyperbole
This year’s township election should be
one residents of Montgomery can be proud
of, but unfortunately, the local Democratic
team has already gone overboard.
Why do elections have to be full of hy-
perbole and political foolishness?
I am very disappointed with the Democ-
rats and their candidate, Mark Petraske.
The Democrats are claiming that the Re-
publican township committee doesn’t “rep-
resent the views of most residents.”
Really?
This claim is clearly false. The Republi-
can team has won the past three elections –
including 2008 – when almost 90 percent of
(township) registered voters came to the
polls.
Why can’t we just focus on the issues in-
stead of meaningless rhetoric?
please see LETTERS, page 9
OCTOBER 12-18, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 7
ANNUALS • PERENNIALS • SHRUBS • TREES
ORCHIDS • HOUSE PLANTS • POTTERY
CONTAINER GARDENING • SPECIAL EVENTS DECOR
LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND INSTALLATION
Floral Design
Now Available
Find the perfect floral
arrangement for any
occassion. Send flowers
anywhere in the country
or locally.
(90B) 559-B002
1980 Route 206 • Belle Mead, NJ 08502 • www.MontgomeryGardens.com
Join us on Facebook
Cardcn Ccnlcr : ¦lcr|-l
FREE
Estimates
Fully
Insured
Trim Work Gutter Cleaning Wall Repair
Wallpaper Removal
$500 OFF
Entire
Exterior
Painting
Coupon must be presented at time estimate.
Cannot be combined. Expires 10/31/11.
$100 OFF
Entire
Powerwashing
Job
Coupon must be presented at time estimate.
Cannot be combined. Expires 10/31/11.
“It’s really a shocking statis-
tic,” Castronovo said.
Castronovo said the generosity
of local businesses, which donat-
ed the pens, the wristbands and
other in-kind items, ensured that
a substantial amount of money
could be raised in 2011.
The Manville-based company
that makes the “Pink Out” T-
shirts only charged the cheerlead-
ers $3.50 per shirt.
They’re then able to sell the
shirts for $10, turning around a
$6.50 profit – all of which is to be
donated to the center.
“It’s so important for today’s
children to understand the bene-
fits of philanthropy,” Castronovo
said.
“It’s so important to (give) back
to the community. My daughter is
a cheerleader, and I am so proud
of her and each of the girls for
what they do here. It’s incredi-
ble.”
While it wasn’t immediately
known how much was raised
from this year’s donations, it’s ex-
pected that sometime later this
month the cheerleaders will pres-
ent a “sizeable” check to the
Steelchase Center in a ceremony
on the Montgomery High School
campus.
“We’re all touched by cancer in
one way or another,” Castronovo
said.
“Whether it’s a family member
of friend, we had to do our part to
assist the center.”
Fighting cancer
PINK
Continued from page 1
and personal witness to one of
the most profound events in
American history – September 11,
2001 – and the healing that has
come in its wake.
“Rebirth” chronicles the lives
of five people directly affected by
9/11, from early 2002 through
2009.
Their narratives express the
mixture of recovery and resilien-
cy from grief, loss and trauma,
which are the messages of the
film.
The New York Times describes
“Rebirth” as “a record of recov-
ery, without narration, graphic
images or expert opinions, but
shot through with the poetry of
deeply felt emotions.”
For additional information,
contact Peppy Margolis at pmar-
[email protected]
RVCC’s main campus is located
at 118 Lamington Road in Branch-
burg.
Briefs
BRIEFS
Continued from page 2
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at [email protected] Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
WEDNESDAY
October 12
FOR ALL
Tai Chi for Relaxation: 10 a.m. at
Mary Jacobs Library.
Ballroom Dance Class: 7:30 p.m.
356 Skillman Road. Call 609-466-
3023 for more info.
Book Bites: Grades 6 and up at
Mary Jacobs Library. 4:30 p.m. Call
609-924-7073 ext. 5 to register.
The Roebling Legacy: Book signing
and talk at 7:30 p.m. at Mary Jacobs
Library.
THURSDAY
October 13
FOR ALL
Veterans Traveling Tribute: At
North Branch Park. Starting at 1 p.m.
FRIDAY
October 14
FOR ALL
Hidden Treasures of Korean Art
and Modern Korea: 6:30 p.m. at
Mary Jacobs Library.
Veterans Traveling Tribute: At
North Branch Park. Starting at 1 p.m.
SATURDAY
October 15
FOR ALL
Rock-tober Hike: Sourland Moun-
tains at 1:30 p.m. Call 609-7377592
for more info.
Sing with Pat: Ages 1-4 at Mary
Jacobs Library 10:30 a.m.
Veterans Traveling Tribute: At
North Branch Park. Starting at 1 p.m.
Montgomery Farmers Market: 9
a.m. – 1 p.m. at Village Shopper
shopping center, Rt. 206 South,
Skillman.
Somerset Shredding Event: 9 a.m.
Call 908-203-6080 for more info.
SUNDAY
October 16
FOR ALL
Remember the Wounded Ride and
Dinner: 5 p.m. dinner at Elks lodge.
Barn Rededication: 3 p.m. at the
Harlingen Reform Church.
Veterans Traveling Tribute: At
North Branch Park. Starting at 1 p.m.
MONDAY
October 17
FOR ALL
Crafts for Little Hands: Ages 2-6 at
Mary Jacobs Library. Classes at 10
a.m. and 11 a.m.
TUESDAY
October 18
FOR ALL
Toddler Sing with Pat: For ages 1-3
at 10:30 a.m. at Mary Jacobs
Library.
Teen Advisory Board: Meeting at
Mary Jacobs Library. 4:30 p.m.
Ghosthunting in N.J. and N.Y.: 7
p.m. at Mary Jacobs Library.
calendar PAGE 8 OCTOBER 12-18, 2011
COMPILED BY ALAN BAUER
MONTGOMERY GOES PINK
C
ougar Field was decorated in pink and included this sign which brought attention to the Pink
Out, held during the Oct. 6 football game against Phillipsburg to raise cancer awareness.
Want to be listed?
To have your Montgomery meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings, information must be
received, in writing, two weeks prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Montgomery Sun, 103 Carnegie Center, Suite 300, Princeton,
N.J. 08540. Or by email: [email protected]
Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website (www.themontgomerysun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo is sufficient. Every attempt is made to
provide coverage to all organizations.
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900
SHERMAN SMITH
PIumbing, Heating & Air Inc.
(908) 359-1656
$20 OFF
PIumbing
Expires 12/15/11. Coupon must be
presented before estimate. Cannot be
combined with any other offers.
$50 OFF
HVAC Maintenance Contract
Expires 11/15/11. New customers only.
Coupon must be presented before estimate.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
$100 OFF
Humidifier
Expires 12/15/11. Coupon must be
presented before estimate. Cannot be
combined with any other offers.
The Montgomery Health De-
partment has announced its flu
vaccination clinic schedule. It’s
free for senior citizens with
Medicare. Pre-registration has
started.
The Centers for Disease Con-
trol and Prevention recommends
vaccination against the flu for all
people older than six months.
The Montgomery Township
Health Department is offering the
following flu vaccination clinics
this fall:
nWednesday, Oct. 19
Otto Kaufman Community
Center, 356 Skillman Road, Skill-
man (both morning and evening
appointments available)
nWednesday, Oct. 26
Pennington Borough Hall, 30
North Main St., Pennington (Ap-
pointments from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.)
nThursday, Nov. 3
Hopewell Borough Train Sta-
tion, Railroad Place, Hopewell
(Appointments from 4 p.m. to 7
p.m.)
Shots will be available by ap-
pointment.
Walk-ins will be accommodat-
ed if extra vaccine is available.
To reserve your shot:
n Go to
www.twp.montgomery.nj.us/depts/
health/immunizations.asp and
click on the “Schedule Now” but-
ton, or
n E-mail [email protected]
gomery.nj.us with your name, ad-
dress, age and phone number, or
nCall the health department at
(908) 359-8211 ext. 227
The flu shot will cost $25 for
non-Medicare individuals.
If you can’t afford the flu shot,
you may request a hardship fee
waiver by e-mailing
[email protected]
A hardship is defined as some-
one who lost of job or who is
uninsured.
Also new this year, the health
department is also offering flu
shots to children age 4 and older
(accompanied by their parents).
Vaccinating your kids against
flu helps to keep them from miss-
ing school and prevents the mis-
ery of the flu.
A pneumonia vaccine will also
be available for qualifying senior
citizens 65 and older.
OCTOBER 12-18, 2011 –THE MONTGOMERY SUN 9
Mortgage rates are effective March 16, 2011. This rate is on a thirty year fixed mortgage. Offer is subject to credit approval and may
change without notice. *Minimum loan amount is $200,000, maximum LTV 80%.
4.750
%
30 YEAR FIXED
MORTGAGE
FIRST TIME HOME BUYERS can purchase a new
home with as little as 3.5% down payment.
American Wide Loans has some of the
best Mortgage Rates and nationwide
home loans for all your mortgage needs.
We have a no points and no fees
option available for refinancing
and purchasing your home.
For more information about today’s lowest rates,
call (888) 765-9960 or apply online at
http://elauw.it/amwideloans.
The following reports can be
found on file with the Mont-
gomery Township Police Depart-
ment:
On Sept. 19, a Trenton man was
arrested on outstanding war-
rants, police said. Sgt. J. Gill, of
the Montgomery Township Police
Department, said he stopped a
black Nissan Sentra on Orchard
Road for an inspection violation.
Gill said he observed the man
seated in the rear of the vehicle
without a seat belt on. Further in-
vestigation revealed he had three
outstanding warrants, according
to reports. Two were out of
Princeton Borough for failure to
wear a seat belt and providing
false information to the police
and one was out of Ewing for
trespassing. The man was arrest-
ed and taken to Police headquar-
ters for processing and was then
turned over to the Princeton Bor-
ough Police Department, reports
said.
On Sept. 28 at 7:10 p.m., police
say they responded to a residence
on Hendrickson Drive for a re-
ported burglary. The resident
told police that when he arrived
home from work, he noticed his
home had been entered and that
property was stolen. Police said
an investigation disclosed cash
and jewelry were taken.
On Sept. 30 at 10:14 a.m., police
said they stopped a 2005 Toyota Si-
enna on Dutchtown-Harlingen
Road, after a random plate in-
quiry revealed that the registered
owner’s driver’s license was sus-
pended.
The driver was identified as a
50-year-old Skillman woman.
Also in the car was her husband,
a 61-year-old man who had an ac-
tive traffic warrant out of Mont-
gomery Twp. The man was ar-
rested and brought back to head-
quarters for processing, where he
posted the full $350 bail before
being released, police said. The
woman was issued summonses
for driving while suspended, fail-
ure to exhibit a valid registration
card and failure to exhibit a valid
insurance card. She is scheduled
to appear in Montgomery Twp.
Municipal Court, police said.
On Oct. 3, a resident on Kildee
Road told police that someone
drove a vehicle over her lawn,
causing damage to the landscape
totaling $300.
On Oct. 3, the owner of Ritacco
Construction Company reported
a granite bridge placard was re-
moved from a construction site at
the new Belle Mead Bridge, ac-
cording to reports. The granite
placard was four-feet long by two-
feet wide and has “New Jersey
2011” engraved on it. The placard
was soon to be mounted on the
bridge. The cost of the placard is
approximately $1,000, according
to reports.
On Oct. 4, a Carrier Clinic em-
ployee reported that a night earli-
er, she was assaulted by a 17-year-
old resident of East Mountain
Youth Lodge, reports said.
On Oct. 4, a Princeton resident
told police that around 5 p.m. the
day before, her purse was stolen
at Montgomery Center, according
to reports. Police said the woman
told them she had been grocery
shopping at ShopRite and was on
her way home when she realized
her purse was missing.
POLICE REPORTS
Montgomery residents: Don’t forget your flu shot
Are the Democrats seriously
claiming that the quality of town-
ship services is declining?
Montgomery’s response to
Hurricane Irene was outstand-
ing.
Our police, public works team
and volunteer firefighters and
EMS all worked extremely well
together and handled the storm
much better than other towns.
The facts simply don’t support
their claims.
Please remember, Mr. Petraske
was (former Gov.) Jon Corzine’s
hand-picked candidate for the
General Assembly in 2009.
He has a long record of sup-
porting tax-and-spend govern-
ment.
He also supported the former
local Democratic team for years
when they raised our municipal
taxes by 30 percent, increased our
debt to $60 million and depleted
our surplus by 75 percent.
On Nov. 8, I urge you to vote for
the better choice, Rich Smith.
Rich’s construction-engineering
background and real-world busi-
ness experience will serve Mont-
gomery well.
More importantly, he is run-
ning a campaign all of Mont-
gomery can be proud of and he
will ensure that we stay on the
right track.
Kathleen Eberhardt
Letters to the editor
LETTERS
Continued from page 6
Send us your Montgomery news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at [email protected]
sun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
Veterans and active members
of America’s armed services trav-
el great distances and make great
sacrifices to preserve and protect
freedom and liberty. How far will
you travel to honor their contri-
bution?
The American Veterans Trav-
eling Tribute and Traveling Wall
will visit the Somerset County
Park Commission’s North
Branch Park/County Fair-
grounds on Milltown Road this
week.
The wall will be open to visi-
tors at the fairgrounds from 1
p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, through 3
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16. Visitors will
be welcome around the clock. The
AVTT’s appearance in Somerset
County is sponsored by Vietnam
Veterans of America, Chapter
452.
Chairing the AVTT host com-
mittee is Sen. Christopher “Kip”
Bateman, who was instrumental
in obtaining some of the funding
to support the Wall’s visit to Som-
erset County.
“This is a wonderful opportu-
nity to recognize and remember
the many service men and
women who have given their all
in the name of freedom,” Bate-
man said.
“Hosting the Traveling Tribute
in Somerset County will be a
great honor,” Freeholder Director
Robert Zaborowski said. “We
want our Somerset County veter-
ans to know we have not forgotten
the sacrifices they made.”
The county’s Wall of Honor,
which Zaborowski spearheaded
in 2003, also will be on display.
During the visit, county offi-
cials will present commemorative
medals to current and former res-
idents who served during the
Vietnam era, Freeholder Peter S.
Palmer said. Eligible veterans
who did not receive a Vietnam era
medal from the county in 2005 are
invited to apply online at
www.co.somerset.nj.us/medal-
form.htm. For more information,
call (908) 541-5710 or email veter-
[email protected]
The mission of the AVTT proj-
ect is to travel the nation to honor,
respect and remember men and
women who served, and to pay
tribute to those who gave all in
that service. Since the tribute is
mobile, it allows people to honor
and respect veterans and active
military personnel without hav-
ing to travel great distances.
The AVTT presents several
Cost of Freedom memorials and
exhibits, with its centerpiece
being the Traveling Wall, an 80-
percent-scale version of the Viet-
nam Memorial Wall in Washing-
ton, D.C. Across its 370-foot
length, the wall contains every
single name etched on the origi-
nal. At its apex, the memorial is
an impressive eight-feet tall. The
traveling wall was completed in
1998 and began traveling that
year.
AVTT’s traveling wall is the
largest Wall replica traveling the
USA, and is not to be confused
with several other replica Walls:
The Moving Wall, The Dignity
Wall, and the Wall That Heals.
The other memorials and ex-
hibits included in the AVTT event
include:
n The Cost of Freedom Memo-
rial: A series of stand-up exhibits
created in gold dog tags to record
the names of those who gave
their lives for our freedom since
Vietnam and including present-
day Enduring Freedom and Iraqi
Freedom. This is a stunning ex-
hibit for all to see. This one-of-a-
kind tribute honors those who
have fallen and to which there is
not currently a memorial for
their honor and remembrance.
Each dog tag permanently
records the casualty information
(full name, branch of service,
rank, date and location of casual-
ty) for that American hero. This
tribute is updated constantly and
will be accurate to the day it ar-
rives in Bridgewater.
Currently, the AVTT Gold Dog
Tag display is the tribute to those
who have fallen in hostile mili-
tary actions between the end of
Vietnam and the 9/11 attacks, as
well as members of the Armed
Forces who have given their lives
in the Global War on Terror.
n 9/11 Memorials: A stand-up
exhibit with lighted twin towers
to make sure “we never forget.”
Each name is recorded according
to their location at the time of the
tragedy.
n Walk Of Heroes: A series of
stand-up’s that pay tribute and
provide education regarding our
country’s history, as well as con-
flicts in which America was in-
volved to ensure our freedom.
Freedom did not come for free
and these tributes represent the
true cost of freedom as paid in
lives.
n Vietnam Remembered: A na-
tionally-acclaimed art display of
original paintings and more, for
viewing, education, and reflec-
tion.
n World War II: To assure all
living veterans are honored,
AVTT presents displays of pic-
tures and information to pay spe-
cific tribute to WWII veterans.
n Korean War: A beautiful pic-
torial display of the men who
fought the forgotten war along
with battle maps and the war
timeline.
nFounding and Historical Doc-
uments: A display of our coun-
try’s founding and significant his-
torical documents including the
Constitution, Declaration of Inde-
pendence and other historical
documents.
nPolice and Fire Display: Pan-
els honoring law enforcement and
firefighters with pictorial display.
n Ft. Hood: A panel memorial-
izing the causalities at the Ft.
Hood 2009 shooting.
n Commanders in Chief: Pic-
tures of each of our commanders
in chief throughout history.
n Tribute Panel: Anyone can
purchase a custom-inscribed dog
tag to place on the tribute panel.
This is a tribute and a personal
message to a loved one, past or
present. This tribute panel travels
the U.S. with all other exhibits.
The American Veterans Trav-
eling Tribute is a veteran-owned
project committed to travel the
country to honor, respect and re-
member those who served, and
pay specific tribute to those who
gave all. AVTT is not government
sponsored or affiliated, but fund-
ed through sponsorship fees, do-
nations and sale of merchandise
at events. AVTT works with The
Traveling Wall Foundation, an
IRS-designated, charitable, non-
profit organization. Donations or
support to AVTT’s mission, via
the foundation, are qualified
charitable tax deductions. For
more information or to schedule
an AVTT event, visit www.avtt.org
or call (903) 714-8634.
10 THE MONTGOMERY SUN — OCTOBER 12-18, 2011
Bttgt//eIæuw.It/stuyvesæmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures offers custom tailored
packages and accommodations for serious and casual hunters alike. All of our packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all meals and accommodations at
our newly remodeled lodge - Stuyvesant Manor; the former estate of Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier -
which is also licensed as a bed and breakfast.
Whether you're looking for a short getaway, a corporate retreat, a camping weekend or even a seminar
with guest speakers and instructors, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures is a perfect spot.
Foz InIoznatIon, to nake a zesezvatIon oz to zeach
ouz tzIp-pIannIng concIezge, caII
(888} 690-0041
FALL AND 8PRINO
Turkey, WhitetaiI Deer
(archery, rifIe, muzzIeIoader),
Pheaaant (fieId and tower),
Coyote, Rabbit and WaterfowI
FBOm WHITBTAIL DBBB AND WILD T0BHBY TO
PHBASANTS, WATBBFOWL AND mOBB.
Somerset County has expanded
its curbside recycling program to
accept all plastic bottles and con-
tainers marked #1 through #7.
As a result, households are
now allowed up to two buckets at
no cost.
As a courtesy, the county pro-
vides Montgomery Township
with a supply of buckets.
You may obtain them at the re-
ception area of the Montgomery
Township municipal offices at
2261 Route 206, Belle Mead.
Your name and address will be
logged in.
After that, there is a charge of
$10 for each bucket.
Additional information is
available at
www.co.somerset.nj.us.
Residents are reminded to
rinse all bottles, jars and cans be-
fore placing them in buckets.
This maintains a sanitary con-
tainer.
Clean recyclables are also more
desirable as they are considered a
higher quality by the recycling
mills, which purchase materials.
Please also keep your recycling
buckets clean.
All residents are asked by Som-
erset County to thoroughly clean
and rinse their recycling buckets
periodically with hot, soapy
water.
Plastic recycling
expanded in county
This is a reminder, as autumn
has arrived, that residents are re-
sponsible for proper disposal of
their leaves.
Montgomery Township does
not provide a leaf disposal pro-
gram.
Stormwater regulations do not
permit leaves to be placed in the
road or in storm drains.
The township must ensure the
safety of motorists, cyclists and
pedestrians who travel township
roadways and sidewalks.
Here are some guidelines:
n Remember to keep leaves out
of storm drains and out of the
street.
n Follow Montgomery’s yard
waste disposal rules for things
such as holiday tree or tree
branch drop-off.
Check the Container Facility
and Bulletins pages of the town-
ship website at www.mont-
gomery.nj.us or contact Public
Works at (908) 359-8211 ext. 300.
n Use a mulching mower that
recycles grass clippings and
leaves into the lawn.
n Use leaves as a resource for
compost.
For tips on how to compost, go
to the Public Works section of
Montgomery’s website.
Somerset County also has large
compost bins available for $50
each, a considerable discount to
retail price.
The county also provides semi-
nars twice a year on how to com-
post.
Contact the county Office of
Recycling at (908) 231-7109.
A reminder about leaf
disposal regulations
Veterans Traveling Tribute opens tomorrow
classified
T HE MO N T G O ME R Y S U N
OCTOBER 12-18, 2011 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week. • All classified ads must be prepaid.
Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun Newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
45per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
175per month Only
$
55per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 856-528-4698 or email us: [email protected]
Cherr y Hi l l Sun • Haddonf i el d Sun
Marl t on Sun • Medf ord Sun
Moorest own Sun • Mt . Laurel Sun
Shamong Sun • Tabernacl e Sun
Voorhees Sun • Washi ngt on Twp. Sun
LET THE SUNS
WORK FOR YOU!
Call (856) 427-0933 for
Advertising info.
856-356-2775
BOARD YOUR
DOG IN A
LOVING HOME!
NOT A KENNEL!
www.OurHome-DogBoarding.com
FREE ESTIMATES
856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved
Repair and Restoration
“Cracks are our specialty.”
Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete
New Concrete
Seal Coating Power Washing
Mudjacking
Concrete Leveling
Stain Removal
Concrete Repair
Dog Boarding Autos
ATTENTION
JUNK CARS WANTED
Sell your junk car for $250 and up for
more info call Mike at 609-820-8643
licensed salvage yard
EIectricaI Services
SDK HOME REPAIR
Any repair you can
think of, we can do.
· Gutter Cleaning
& Repairs
· Soffitt Fascia
· Rotten Wood
· Door Installation
· Painting
· Kitchens
Fully Insured · Licensed
609-481-8886
24 hour
Emergency
Service
Lic# NJ 13VH05972600
Home Improvement
Roofing
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 11/2/11.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 11/2/11.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 11/2/11.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 11/2/11.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
WB
ABB GBOWIHGl
Join the Elauwit Team today!
.And so con you.
Call Ed Lynes 856-528-4698 or
email resume to [email protected]
• Opens new business relationships
• Must be outgoing, driven and confident
• Full time
ACCOUNT MANAGER
DOG WALKING/PET CARE
Insured and Bonded
www.kittykissesandpuppypaws.com
732-616-2634
Dog WaIking
Handyman Services
• Large or Small Repairs
• Dependable, Family-based
Call Buddy Today! 609-468-0585
FREE ESTIMATES!
Fully Insured • Lic. #13VH01208100
When you
mention this ad. 10% OFF
PAWS AND PEEPS, LLC
Pet Sitting Service
We love them when you have to leave them!
vacations/long works hours/weekends
P.O. Box 6624 • Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
www.pawsandpeeps.com
licensed - bonded - insured - PSI member 609-903-9007
Pet Sitting




























































ASSOCIATED AUCTIONEERS
888-527-0401 215-739-1021
www.associatedauctioneers.com
PAL# AU003521
AUCTION
Thurs. Oct. 13, 2011 @ 12pm
4-Story Building Zoned C-3
5th and South 607 E. Passyunk Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19147
ABSOLUTE AUCTION
Sat. Oct. 22, 2011 @ 12pm
Single Family Home
Built in 2011!
3214 Pacific, Ave, Longport, NJ 08403
• 3BR, 2.5 baths
• 3-Story
• Beach & Ocean
Views
• 2385 sq. ft.
• Fireplace
• Hardwood
Floors
CALL NJ OFFICE FOR APPT/FURTHER INFO
856-243-6694 • EMAIL: [email protected]
Join our email list, text your email address to 267-401-5449


























Oct. 19 @ 3pm: 25 Residential and Multi-family
properties-some being sold absolute! Auction
held at offices of Associated Auctioneers, 2400
E Tioga Street Philadelphia PA 19134. Also
$500,000 worth of building materials to be sold
at 10am.
Oct. 20 @ 12pm: 3.3 acres w/ warehouse 731
Lower Landing Road Blackwood NJ Zoned in-
dustrial. Can be see from: Route 42 Property
backs to the Delaware River. Vehicles. Saw
Equipment and Scrap Metal also for sale!
Oct. 21 @ 12pm: 43+ acres. Preliminary ap-
proved for 10 building lots. Borders Trump Na-
tional Golf and Country Club. Financing
Available. Erial and New Brooklyn Road. Turn-
ersville-Hickstown Road and Little Mill Road,
Erial New Jersey.
Oct. 22 @ 12pm: 3214 Pacific Ave. Longport,
NJ New Construction with Ocean Views. 2,355
s/f, 3 Br, 2.5 Ba, Azek details, hurricane rated
windows, custom paint, state-of-the-art kitchen
with granite counters and glass marble back-
splash and much more! Starting Bid $599.000.
Auctioneers Note: In the next 90 days, Associ-
ated will be auctioning 35 millions dollars in
Prime Commercial Real Estate. Call for list.
See Web for More Information.
STARTING
BID PRICE
$595,000
VCLVC SUMMLk SALLS LVLN1
SAIL + SLCUkL
CCVLkAGL ÞLAN
S
¥LAk WAkkAN1¥
¥LAk SCnLDULLD MAIN1LNANCL
¥LAk WLAk & 1LAk
2012 VCLVC S601S
Lease for
36 Month
$
399
*
72 Month
Purchase
$
489
**
· Adaptive Cruise Control
· Pedestrian detection with Full Auto Brake
· Collision Warning with Full Auto Brake
· Blind Spot Information System
· Rear Park Assist Camera
· Safer interior materials
· Fuel-saving design
· 85% recyclable
· Cleaner exhaust
· Minimum drag
*Stock #12212, MSRP $34,645 All prices with tax, tags, registration, acquisition and documentation fees additional. 36 month,
10,000 mile lease with $399.00 due at signing. Expires 10/31/11. **Stock #12212, MSRP $34,645 All prices with tax, tags,
registration and documentation fees additional. 72 month finance purchase with zero down. Expires 10/31/11.
VCLVC CI ÞkINCL1CN
2931 8kUNSWICk ÞIkL
LAWkLNCLVILLL, NI 08648
(609) 882·0600
WWW.VCLVCCIÞkINCL1CN.CCM
Volvo builds the cars, we build relationships.

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close