Morning Calm Korea Weekly, June 4, 2010

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The Morning Calm is a weekly Command information newspaper published by the Installation Management Command Korea for service members, military family members and civilian employees serving, working and living on U.S. Army Installations throughout the Republic of Korea. To learn more about living and working in Korea visit our website imcom.korea.army.mil or visit our Flickr site to see images of life in the ROK at http://www.flickr.com/photos/imcomkorea

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Content

WELCOME TO KOREA: Special Edition to the Morning Calm Navigation Tips for Newcomers
Korea-wide Road Map P20 Korean Traffic Signs P29 Incheon Airport Guide P36

June 4, 2010 • Volume 8, Issue 33

Published for those serving in the Republic of Korea

http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Welcome to Korea
The Land of the Morning Calm awaits you
OVERVIEW
P08 P14 P16 P22 IMCOM Overview Education Housing In-processing FMWR Religious Support P02 P04 P06 P31 P33 P39

— Photo by R. Slade Walters

GARRISONS
USAG Red Cloud USAG Yongsan USAG Humphreys USAG Daegu

MAPS & GUIDES

P37 Medical Care Facilities

Learn Korean P35

Radio and TV Map of Korea Korean War History Demilitarized Zone Traffic Signs Airport Guide

P12 P20 P24 P27 P29 P36

PAGE 2 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil
Published by Installation Management Command - Korea Commander/Publisher: Brig. Gen. John Uberti Public Affairs Officer/Editor: Slade Walters Senior Editor: Dave Palmer USAG-RED CLOUD Commander: Col. Larry A. Jackson Public Affairs Officer: Margaret Banish-Donaldson CI Officer: James F. Cunningham USAG Yongsan Commander: Col. David W. Hall Public Affairs Officer: Dan Thompson CI Officer: Jane Lee Staff Writers: Sgt. Opal Vaughn, Cpl. Kim Hyung-joon, Spc. Richard Canfield, Pfc. Choe Yong-joon USAG-HUMPHREYS Commander: Col. Joseph P. Moore Public Affairs Officer: Lori Yerdon Writer-Editor: Steven Hoover Designer: Pfc. Joon Woo Baek USAG-DAEGU Commander: Col. Terry Hodges Public Affairs Officer: Philip Molter Staff Writers: PfV2 Jang Bong-seok, PV2 Kim Min-jae, Interns: Kim Min-yeong, Kim See-un This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the IMCOM-Korea, Public Affairs, APO AP 96205. Circulation: 9,500 Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way connected with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with the Contracting Command-Korea. The civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or services advertised. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. Oriental Press President: Charles Chong Commercial Advertising Telephone: 738-5005 or 723-4253 Fax: (02) 790-5795 E-mail: [email protected] Mail address: PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758 Location: IMCOM-K HQ, Yongsan, Main Post SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: Phone: DSN 738-4068 E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly @korea.army.mil

WELCOME TO KOREA

The Morning Calm

Welcome to Korea:

assure you that the best is yet to come. I take great pleasure in welcoming you to Recently, we gathered community members the Republic of Korea. Whether this is your first and senior leaders together to sign the Army time on the peninsula or a return assignment, Family Covenant. That promise is our guarantee you can look forward to a rewarding tour of duty to provide a quality of life commensurate with in the “Land of the Morning Calm.” the service of our great Soldiers and Family You are joining a proud line of military Members. I remain fully committed to this professionals who helped the Republic of Korea covenant and assure you that IMCOM will become a booming world economic power continue to support and expand programs and and one of our strongest Allies. You are a part facilities to support our Soldiers, Families and of our Good Neighbor Program and the way our Civilian workforce. you interact with our Korean friends makes a Our Families are in many ways the true real difference in the strength of our Alliance. selfless servants to our Army and our nation. Every Servicemember, Civilian, Contractor and With that in mind I pledge to continue improving Family Member stationed in Korea represents your quality of life here; wholly embracing the United States. Treat our Korean friends as the Army Family Covenant and the valuable you would want to be treated. programs available to Soldiers and Families Korea is an ancient nation with a rich 5,000at every garrison in Korea. IMCOM-Korea is year history. The people of the Republic of Brig. General. John Uberti there for you and your Family so you can focus Korea have developed this nation into a vibrant IMCOM Korea Region Commander on your mission. economy that competes in the international The realignment of USFK and the transformation at USAG-Humphreys arena with the 11th largest Gross Domestic Product in the world, and is one of the largest transformational efforts in the history of our Army. the largest ship building facility found anywhere. For both newcomers and returnees to Korea, you’ll see a move This expansion is a key part of the Yongsan Relocation and Land towards the best the Army has to offer. You can count on your local MWR, Partnership Plan. All of our garrisons have accomplished a tremendous services units and USO to help you look forward to a personally and amount of major construction projects, force protection initiatives and, professionally rewarding experience in the “Land of the Morning Calm”. most importantly, they have greatly increased the readiness and improved Please take advantage of the many trips and tours to better understand the quality of life for our Soldiers and Families. As exemplified by the photos on this page and the next, we are the wonderful culture of our Korean Ally. From your first day in Korea, you’ll become a part of a new vision of entering a new era — one that has open the door to expanded command sponsorship opportunities and is geared towards normalizing tours for making life better for Soldiers, DoD Civilians and Family Members. United States Forces Korea is in the midst of a transformation that is our Soldiers, Civilians and Families. Welcome to the “New Korea.” turning Quonset huts into memories and is committed to providing modern facilities on consolidated bases in just a few short years. Service programs here are also improving to match the new facilities. The construction of Brig. General John Uberti new Army Family Housing, a robust facility renovation program and Commanding General rapidly expanding family support services have all contributed significantly Installation Management Command to Korea becoming a sought after “Assignment of Choice” — and I can Korea Region

The Army’s ‘Assignment of Choice’

Online Resources
Morning Calm Newspaper http://imcom.korea.army.mil Welcome/Newcomer Videos www.dailymotion.com/imcomkorea IMCOM-K Region Photos www.flickr.com/imcomkorea IMCOM-K Region Videos www.youtube.com/imcomkorea Korean War Videos www.youtube.com/warinkorea Korea Tourism Videos www.youtube.com/koreaculture Twitter News Feed www.twitter.com/imcomkorea USAG-Red Cloud http://ima.korea.army.mil/area1/ USAG Yongsan http://yongsan.korea.army.mil/ USAG-Humphreys http://humphreys.korea.army.mil/ USAG-Daegu http://daegu.korea.army.mil/

TOUR NORMALIZATION: USAG Yongsan Commander Col. Dave Hall reads stories to children to celebrate the Army birthday at the Yongsan Child Development Center. The number of command sponsored family members in Korea is expected to grow over the coming years. In December 2009 the Department of Defense increased accompanied tour lengths from two- to three-years for Service members assigned to Pyeongtaek, Osan, Daegu, Chinhae and Seoul. This new stationing policy maintains one-year unaccompanied tours for all locations, and authorizes two-year accompanied tours at Uijeongbu and Dongducheon. Existing infrastructure will allow an increase to 4,350 command sponsored positions. A phased program will synchronize further increases in family authorizations with the expansion of necessary infrastructure. This phased approach ensures that the appropriate level of necessary services, such as education and medical care, are in place as the number of family members increases. To download this or other photos from the U.S. Army in Korea visit www.flickr.com/imcomkorea — U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan Public Affairs

WELCOME TO KOREA

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 3 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

IMCOM-Korea Region
Commander: BG John Uberti Command Sgt Major: CSM David Abbott Deputy: James M. Joyner Location: Seoul, South Korea News: http://imcom.korea.army.mil Photos: www.flickr.com/imcomkorea Videos: www.youtube.com/imcomkorea History: The Installation Management Command, a single organization with six regional offices worldwide, was activated on Oct. 24, 2006, to apply a uniform business structure to manage U.S. Army installations, sustain the environment and enhance the well-being of the military community. It consolidated three organizations under a single command as a direct reporting unit: The former Installation Management Agency; Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command, and the Army Environmental Command, which is a subordinate command of IMCOM. The command brings together all base operations support services to ensure optimal care, support and training of our fighting force, overseeing all facets of installation support, including environmental programs, construction, morale and welfare, family care, force protection, logistics, public works, and the planning, programming and budget matters that provide resources for these functions. The establishment of IMCOM was a historic, comprehensive change enabling the Army to enhance quality of life for Soldiers, enable tactical units to focus on training, deployment and operations, strengthen combat readiness to prevail in transformation, and support the Army’s Vision. Mission: Our mission is to provide the U.S. Army in Korea the installation capabilities and services to support expeditionary operations in a time of persistent conflict, and to provide a quality of life for Soldiers & Families commensurate with their service. Vision: We are the Army’s home. We provide a source of balance that ensures, an environment in which Soldiers and Families can thrive, a structure that supports unit readiness in an era of persistent conflict, and a foundation for building the future. Army Family Covenant: We recognize the commitment and increasing sacrifices that our families are making every day and are committed to providing Soldiers and families a quality of life that is commensurate with their service. We are also working to providing our families a strong, supportive environment where they can thrive, and are committed to building a partnership with Army families that enhances their strength and resilience and improve family readiness.

FUN FOR EVERYONE: One of the most popular facilities is the “Splish and Splash” aquatics park. The first of its kind in Korea, this facility features and Olympic-sized lap pool, slides, a diving area and shallow play zones for small children. — U.S. Army Photo by Edward N. Johnson

YOUR HOME AWAY FROM HOME: (Center left) Soldiers speed away in their go-karts as the green flag raises at the newly construted USAGCasey 500 Speedway. — U.S. Army Photo by Jim Cunningham (Center right) The Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders perform for the USAG Daegu community at the Camp Walker Kelly Gym. — U.S. Army photo by Kim, Keun-kyo (Bottom right) Korean tradition dancers take to the streets of Yongsan Garrison during the 2008 Yongsan Fall Festival. (Bottom left) A community member participates in a golf tournament at the Sung Nam Golf Course near Seoul. This FMWR facility consists of an 18 hole championship golf course and golf pro shop. IMCOM-Korea manages four golf course spread out across the region. — U.S. Army Photo by Edward N. Johnson

PAGE 4 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil
Seoul School Bus Transportation Off-post residents should register for school bus transportation at the same time you register for school. School bus registration is located in Building 4106, with the school registrar. For information, call DSN 738-5032. Seoul American Elementary School With classes in grades preschool to fifth grade, a staff of 113 and 1,200 students, Seoul American Elementary School is one of the largest elementary schools in the Pacific Region. Known for its extensive curriculum program, SAES also offers programs for special needs students, counseling, enrichment, English as a Second Language, Korean Immersion, Host Nation Culture, computer, media, art, music and physical education programs. SAES offers a Sure Start program for four-year old children identified as “at risk” for educational success. This program is similar to the Head Start program implemented in many of the school districts in the United States. Seoul American Elementary School will

EDUCATION & SCHOOLS
placement courses, a Professional Technical Studies program, CISCO Academy I and II, Computer Service and Support, and an Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps program. There are new courses in reading, algebra support, and Chinese. Seoul American High School will begin classes at 7:55 a.m., and conclude at 2:40 p.m. Lunch is from 12:30 – 1:10 p.m. Principal: Richard J. Schlueter, DSN 738-5265/5261. For info, visit www.seoul-hs.pac.dodea.edu. Humphreys American School Humphreys American School is located on USAG-Humphreys in nearby Pyongtaek City. The school opened in 2002 for grades K to 6. HAS began accepting middle school students, grades 7and 8, in 2008. There are approximately 500 students in this fast growing community. Students will also receive art, music, physical education, computer technology, and host nation instruction. There is special education, English as a Second Language and Enrichment Program for those students who qualify. A counselor and nurse will be on the staff. Registration takes place in the school’s office throughout the year. Bus registration also is completed in the school office. Principal: Joyce Diggs (753-6313). Contact: 753-6313. For information, visit www.humphrey-es.pac.dodea.edu.

Korea District Superintendent’s Office U.S. Eighth Army Garrison, Yongsan Email: [email protected] Phone: (DSN) 738-6826 From the U.S.: 011-82-2-7918-5922 Web Site: http://www.korea.pac.dodea.edu Casey Elementary School Superintendent’s Office DSN: 738-5922 Email: [email protected] Phone: (DSN) 738-5554 Web Site: http://www.casey-es.pac.dodea.edu CT Joy Elementary School Commander Fleet Activities Chinhae Email: principal_*[email protected] Phone: (DSN) 762-5466/5477 From the U.S.: 011-82-55-540-5466 Web Site: http://www.ctjoy-es.pac.dodea.edu Daegu American School Camp George Email: [email protected] Phone: (DSN) 768-9501 From the U.S.: 011-82-53-473-4354 http://www.daegu-un.pac.dodea.edu Humphreys American School Humphreys Garrison Email: [email protected] Phone: (DSN) 753-6313 From the U.S.: 011-82-31-691-9527 http://www.humphreys-es.pac.dodea.edu Osan Elementary School Osan Air Base Email: [email protected] Phone: (DSN) 784-6912 From the U.S.: 011-82-31-661-6912 http://www.osan-es.pac.dodea.edu Osan High School Osan Air Base Email: [email protected] Phone: DSN 784-9076/9098/9096 From the U.S.: 011-82-31-661-9098 http://www.osan-hs.pac.dodea.edu Seoul Elementary School U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan Principal: Dr. Catherine Yurica Email: principal_*[email protected] Phone: DSN 736-5437/4842 From the U.S.: 011-82-2-7916-5437 Web Site: http://www.seoul-es.pac.dodea.edu Seoul High School U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan Principal: David Dinges Email: [email protected] Phone: DSN 738-5263 From the U.S.: 011-82-2-798-3666/7 http://www.seoul-hs.pac.dodea.edu Seoul Middle School U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan Principal: Richard J. Schlueter Email: [email protected] Phone: (DSN) 736-7337/7364 From the U.S.: 011-82-2-7916-7337/7364 http://www.seoul-ms.pac.dodea.edu

Graduation & Beyond
Department of Defense Dependent Schools
ll new families are encouraged to register as soon as they arrive. In Seoul go to the Community Services Building, Bldg. 4106, located across the street from Dragon Hill Lodge and adjacent to Popeye’s. For schools other than Seoul, you will take all paperwork directly to the school office to register your students. The registration offices will require that certain specific items be presented to register your children . You will need to bring a copy of the sponsor’s orders, the student’s immunization records, identification cards and date of estimated return to States or extension (if applicable). You must also have sponsor and student social security numbers. Children entering grades kindergarten or first should show a birth certificate or passport. All children entering kindergarten must be 5 years old by Oct. 31. If your child is not included on your orders, a copy of the Family Entry Approval will also be necessary. Navy personnel must contact Personnel Services Detachment to acquire a letter stating the names of the children accompanying them. The telephone number of the Seoul registrar is DSN 738-7707. An alternate number to obtain information regarding the schools is the Korea District Superintendent’s Office at DSN 738-5922.

Osan American Elementary School

A

start at 8 a.m. and will dismiss at 2:15 p.m. Students in K thru fifth grade are required to remain at school during the lunch period. For information, visit www.seoul-es.pac.dodea. edu or call the school at DSN 736-4613. Principal: Melissa Klopfer, 736-4613/5978.

Seoul American Middle School Seoul American Middle serves approximately 600 students in grades 6-8. A staff of 62 dedicated to the academic growth of all students provides an age appropriate program designed to meet the needs of middle school students. Seoul American Middle School starts at 8 a.m. and dismisses at 2:35 p.m. There are two lunches, noon-12:30 p.m. and 12:30-1:00 p.m.; students are required to remain on the school campus during lunch. For information, visit www.seoul-ms.pac.dodea.edu. Principal: David Dinges, DSN 736-7364, Seoul American High School Seoul American High School has an enrollment of approximately 700 students in grades nine through 12 and a staff of 74. SAHS offers a curriculum designed to fit the college bound student including advanced

Osan American Elementary School is located on Osan Air Base, Songtan, Pyongtaek City. The school hours are 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. There are approximately 375 students enrolled in Osan American Elementary School. OAES offers the core curriculum and in addition provides English as a Second Language, Gifted Education, services for learning-impaired and communication-impaired students, art, music, physical education and Korean Culture. Extracurricular activities are offered two days a week. Access to technology education is presented in one of two computer labs for preschool to grade six. Registration takes place throughout the year in the main office. (784-6912) Bus registration is held in the high school. Principal: David L Petree, 784-6912. For info, visit www.osan-es.pac.dodea.edu. Osan American Middle/High School Osan American High School provides education for 360 students, grades seven through 12. School hours are 8:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Students are bussed from USAG Humphreys to Osan American High School. Osan American High School also offers a full academic program to include Computer Service and Support technology classes for students. There

EDUCATION & SCHOOLS
is an Air Force JROTC program. Registration takes place throughout the year in the main office. (784-9076) Bus registration takes place in the Bus Registration Office in the high school. Principal: Marie Cullen, 784-9094/9098. Daegu American School Daegu American School, located at Camp George, USAG Daegu, is a unit school providing education for Pre-Kindergarten to 12th grade. The estimated enrollment for SY 10-11 is 725 students. The school hours are from 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Registration is done at the DAS offices during school hours. DAS offers JROTC for 8-12 graders and a full slate of extracurricular activities for students in every grade. Contact the Student Transportation Office, 768-7722/6301, for informatin on bus routes and registration. A new high school (Walker High) for grades 9-12 is being built on Camp Walker and will open for the 2011-12 school year. Principal: Keith Henson, 768-9501. For information, visit www.daegu-un. pac.dodea.edu. C. T. Joy Elementary School C. T. Joy Elementary School is the smallest DoDDS-Korea school. It is located at the U. S. Navy Support Base at Chinhae. There are 35 students enrolled in Kindergarten to 8th grade. Casey Elementary School Itinerant special educationwill open for Sure Casey Elementary School teachers, school psychologist, eighth grade on Casey Garrison Aug. Start through information specialist and technology personnel complementwill be 8 a.m.the 2:55 p.m. 30. The school hours and support to educational program. Principal: Dr. Marguerite for an enrollment School officials are planning Green, 762-5466. Visit www.ctjoy-es.pac.dodea.edu. the 2010-2011 of an estimated 230 students for academic year, but will be able to accommodate more than 500 students when the second wing is completed the following summer. CAS will offer the core curriculum in addition to providing English as a Second Language, gifted education, services for learning-impaired, and communication-impaired students, art, music, physical education, and Korean culture. For students not currently enrolled in Department of Defense Dependents Schools Korea, registration will be held in Army Community Services (bldg. S-16) at Red Cloud Garrison June 15 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. A second registration will be held at Casey Garrison’s Maude Hall (bldg. 2440) June 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Parents who have children enrolled in DoDDS-Korea can verify if their children are on the list to attend Casey Elementary School by contacting the principal. For more information, visit www.casey-es.pac. dodea.edu or contact principal, Shelly Kennedy, at DSN 738-5554 or [email protected] dodea.edu.

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 5 http://imcom.korea.army.mil
Army Adult Education Centers
Camp Carroll (USAG Daegu) ...............765-7702 Camp Henry (USAG Daegu) ................768-6693 Camp Hovey .........................................730-5161 Camp Stanley .......................................732-5543 K-16 ......................................................741-6051 USAG-Casey ........................................730-6859 USAG-Humphreys ................................753-8901 USAG-Red Cloud .................................732-7015 USAG Yongsan.....................................723-8098

Universities & Colleges
Central Texas College Camp Carroll (USAG Daegu) ...............765-8346 USAG-Humphreys ................................753-8911 USAG Yongsan.....................................723-4961 USAG-Red Cloud .................................732-6772 University of Maryland Camp Carroll (USAG Daegu) ...............765-7728 Camp Henry & K2 (USAG Daegu) .......768-7857 Camp Hovey .........................................730-5160 Camp Long ...........................................721-3452 Camps Stanley/Kyle .............................732-5543 Chinae ..................................................762-5385 K-16 ......................................................741-6525 Kunsan AB ............................................782-7924 Osan AB ...............................................784-3252 USAG-Casey ........................................730-6852 USAG-Humphreys ................................753-8915 USAG-Red Cloud .................................732-7134 USAG Yongsan.....................................723-7141 University of Oklahoma Osan AB ...............................................784-4406 University of Phoenix Camp Henry (USAG Daegu) ................768-8094 Osan AB ...............................................784-5664 USAG Humphreys ................................753-8920 USAG Yongsan.....................................723-7807 Troy University USAG Yongsan.....................................723-7508

SCHOOL MUSICAL: Humphreys American School students perform holiday classic songs during the HAS Musical at the USAGHumphreys Community Activity Center.

AFTER-SCHOOL ACTIVITIES: Schoolaged children have access to a full-range of after-school activities, including youth FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL: Approximately 2,200 student were enrolled for the 2008/2009 school year in Seoul American Elementary School, sports, Scouting, free movies and a Seoul American Middle School and Seoul American High School. FACING PAGE: Seoul American Middle School 2008 class photo. variety of modern recreational facilities.

DoDEA Virtual School program
DoDEA will operate a Virtual School starting with School Year 2009/2010. Department of Defense Dependent Education Activity (DoDEA) has operated a successful Distance Learning Program since 1990. DoDEA is transforming the existing distance learning program to provide a comprehensive accredited Virtual School by SY 10-11. The major goals of the DoDEA Virtual School Program are to (1) Provide a fully accredited Virtual School Program for Grades 9-12 to meet DoDEA’s graduation requirements and address course needs of eligible students; (2) develop and deliver customized, standards-based courses that contain flexibility to provide students with differentiated instruction and provide opportunities for increased synchronous interaction to support active engagement and help students be successful in the online environment; and (3) address the educational needs of military-connected students in transition and ensure that eligible students have access to a quality DoDEA educational experience, regardless of location or circumstance. Beginning SY 09/10, DoDEA will establish a DoDDS-Pacific/DDESS-Guam Area hub in Korea. There will be 37 courses available through the DoDEA Virtual School Program. Thirteen of these courses will be taught by DoDEA Virtual School teachers and twenty-four courses will be available through a DoDEA contracted vendor. At least four of these courses will be taught

from the Virtual School hub in Korea. Most of the thirteen courses are offered by teachers in the European hub. Eventually, courses will also be taught from a domestic hub. The twenty-four courses offered through a DoDEA contracted vendor will provide limited seats for DoDEA students throughout the world in subject areas where courses are not yet developed within the DoDEA Virtual School Program. Utilizing contracted vendors helps DoDEA meet immediate needs of individual or small groups of students who need a course to graduate. In the future, we plan to reduce the number of vendor-delivered courses as we expand our course offerings delivered through the DoDEA Virtual School Program. For SY 09/10 we anticipate the target audience attending the Virtual School will be those students wishing to supplement their course offerings at a DoDDS school or to supplement their course offerings in their Non-DoD School Program placement. For additional information on Virtual School opportunities, please contact your respective high school principal: Seoul American High School – 738-8140 Osan American High School – 784-9096 Daegu American School – 768-9500

PAGE 6 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

WELCOME TO KOREA

ARMY FAMILY HOUSING: Army Family Covenant signing ceremonies were held at installations throughout Korea as a symbolic commitment to family quality of life. Tower, or high rise style family housing in Korea provides ample living space for an average American family while being conveniently located to post amenities. Hannam Village and Burke Towers at USAG Yongsan and family housing in Daegu follow this style. Housing under construction at Humphreys Garrison has also been developed to meet the needs of families by providing highrise design with a Main Street USA feel.

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 7 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Army Housing:

Welcome home to Korea
Army Family Housing Accompanied, command-sponsored personnel are housed in Army Family Housing. When you inprocess at the housing office, your name will be placed on the appropriate waiting list for your rank and family composition. Placement on the waiting list will be based on your eligibility date, normally the date you departed your previous duty station. The bedroom requirements are determined by the size of your family. Couples with no children or with one child are eligible for two-bedroom units. Sponsors with two children are authorized threebedroom units and families with three or more children are authorized a four-bedrooms unit. Family housing is normally available upon arrival except for four- and five-bedroom requirements. Families with a requirement of four bedrooms or more may voluntarily accept a unit with fewer bedrooms than they are authorized. This may significantly decrease the waiting time for quarters; however, keep in mind that you will be considered adequately housed for the remainder of your tour, if you elect to do this. The Housing Office provides travel decisions for concurrent travel (family housing available within 60 days of arrival), deferred travel (housing available within 140 days of arrival) and non-concurrent travel (housing available after 140 days of arrival). For information on housing travel status or availability of family housing, contact your local housing office. Off-Post Housing Off-post housing is plentiful and consists of highrise, mid- and low-rise apartments, villas, duplexes and some single homes. Civilian employees are required to reside off post except for positions designated as key and essential. For active-duty military, regardless of service, you can only reside off post if adequate government quarters for your rank and family size are not available. You will then be given a certificate of non-availability and authorization to seek economy quarters. Regardless if you are military or civilian, do not enter into a lease agreement without processing through the Housing Referral Office. Unaccompanied Personnel Housing Unaccompanied personnel are normally assigned to Unaccompanied Personnel Housing on post. These facilities consist of newly renovated barracks, bachelor enlisted quarters, senior enlisted quarters and bachelor officer quarters. Unaccompanied personnel are required to reside in on-post government quarters if space is available for their rank. Only when UPH is full will Servicemembers be given a certificate of nonavailability and be authorized to reside off post. For additional information on UPH, please call 738-5506. Living Quarters Allowance LQA is a tax-free allowance paid to civilian employees recruited from the U.S. in order to substantially offset the cost for suitable permanent housing while stationed in Korea. LQA covers the cost of rent and utilities. Most civilian employees assigned to Korea live off-post in modern, spacious apartments. Upon arrival to Korea employees will meet with the Garrison housing office and receive assistance in finding just the right home.

Housing Offices
Red Cloud........................... 732-9342 Yongsan .............................. 738-3211 Humphreys ......................... 753-7356 Daegu/Camp Henry ............ 768-7009 (off-post referral) ................. 768-8116 Daegu/Camp Carroll ........... 765-7823

Moving with Pets
By USAG Yongsan Public Affairs Veterinary services are on Yongsan from the 129th Medical Detachment and in USAG Daegu at the Camp Walker 106th Med. Det. Vet Clinic. All basic shots are provided at a nominal cost. If you are bringing your pets, you must have: Health Certificate, less than 10 days old. The original plus two copies. — Rabies Certificate (the original plus two copies). The vaccination must be current and at least 30 days old. — Animals arriving without a current rabies vaccination or one that is less than 30 days old will be quarantined at the owner’s expense for up to a maximum of 30 days. — Bill of Lading or Certificate of Excess Baggage with original signature (if the animal is traveling unaccompanied). For information, call the Yongsan clinic at 738-5145, or the Daegu clinic at 7644858. From the United States, call 01182-505- number. The Osan Veterinary Treatment Facility and Animal Shelter is also available at 031-661-6614, Bldg. 766 at Osan Air Base, www.51services.com/vet.html.

Construction of Army Family Housing in Korea is a major command priority as more families prepare to move to the Land of the Morning Calm. Housing units like those pictured above at USAG-Humphreys are designed to give Soldiers and Families a sense of normalcy and community with every modern amenity one would expect to find in the States while living overseas.

Im ji n

Geumcheon

PAGE 8 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Hwacheon

USAG RED CLOUD

Gaeseong
Panmunjeom Yeonan

USAG-Casey
Dongducheon

Gapyeong

Chuncheo

USAG-Red Cloud
Ganghwa

Uijongbu Gimpo
100

Community Profile

Goyang

Namyangju

Se o u l
Commander: Col. Larry ‘Pepper’ Jackson Command Sgt. Major: Earlene Lavender Deputy: Richard Davis Location: Uijeongbu, South Korea Population: 25,000 History: USAG-Red Cloud serves U.S. forces along the Korean demilitarized zone. Its mission-driven vision is to time and again monitor the pulse of and improve quality of life for each member of the USAG-RC community. Red Cloud is located at the “tip of the spear,” forwardly deployed against the Korean DMZ. The garrison manages base operations for USAG-Casey, Hovey, Mobile, Castle and Rodriguez Range in the north; and USAG-Red Cloud, Stanley, and Jackson in the south.
130 2

Guri

Han

USAG-Yongsan
Seoul
Nam h an

Bucheon

Pu k h

an

Incheon
Incheon
Siheung
100

Ho

Gwangmyeong
Gwacheonon

Gwangju

Anyang Ansan

Seongnam
Gunpo
Uiwang
1

35

Gyeonggi-Do
Yongin

Hwaseong USAG-Red Cloud is located in and around and enjoy good live entertainment and great shopping trips, amusement park trips and so Suwon Uijeongbu, a city of more than 250,000 people, food. The famous Redwood Steak House offers much more. The “Genesis” urban paintball Air Base about 40 minutes north of Seoul. Camps fine dining at extremely good prices with special course at USAG-Casey has proven to be popular with Soldiers from around the peninsula. Stanley and Jackson are a part of the Red emphasis on quality Black Angus steaks. Osan Cloud enclave and are located in and around A drive over to the Iron Triangle is well Key Facilities: Janghowon Osan Uijeongbu proper. The Red Cloud enclave is worth the trip if anyone is planning to visit FMWR Entertainment Division Air Base FMWR Entertainment Division regularly newly command sponsored and features many Camp Hovey. Red Cloud Lodge..............732-6805/6807 delivers top quality live entertainment to USAGadvantages for young Families. USAG-Casey Army Community Services ....... 732-7779 RC facilities throughout the year. is also a part of the garrison command of Red FMWR Bowling Casey Lodge ............................ 730-4247 Anseong Comedy is also a major part of the USAGCloud and the Casey enclave includes Camps, Bowling is very popular in USAG-Red Cloud Hosptial..................................... 732-6011 Castle, Castle North, Mobile and Camp Hovey with four bowling centers offering a variety of RC entertainment program, with the “Comedy Pyeongtaek on the East side of USAG-Casey. The Casey special tournaments, league play and open ROK’s” series scheduled every quarter at Emergency Numbers: enclave is in and around Dongducheon, a city bowling, not to mention snack shops serving various club facilities. 35 of more than 90,000. everything from our famous Hot Stuff Pizza Military Fire Dept. Eumseong Seonghwan USAG-Red Cloud Family Morale, Welfare, to Mean Gene’s traditional bowling cuisine of FMWR Special Events USAG-Red Cloud ..................... 732-6617 Club patrons always enjoy many special and Recreation services truly are ‘Second burgers, fries, pizza and more. USAG-Casey ............................ 730-5906 to None,’ with outstanding recreational Community Bowling Centers also offers free events scheduled throughout the year, such Jincheon 15 Camp Stanley ........................... 732-5660 opportunities for Soldiers, Families and civilian bowling for Soldiers in uniform from 11 a.m. to as the very popular Texas Hold ‘em poker personnel serving on the Korean peninsula. 1 p.m. weekdays except holidays. The Camp tournaments, talent competitions, fashion Asan Cheonan Seosan No matter what garrison you are stationed in, Hovey Bowling Center offers free bowling for shows and more, in addition to their usual Unit Military Police Right-Arm g c h e o USAG-Red Cloud, USAG- Casey, or Camps Soldiers in uniform from 11 a. m. 1 p. m. every Appreciation Nights, C h u n Nights, theme n g b u USAG-Red Cloud ..................... 732-6693 1 Castle, Mobile, Bonifas, Hovey, Stanley, Wednesday & Friday. To bowl for free, Soldiers nights and other social events for patrons to USAG-Casey ............................ 730-4417 enjoy. Jackson or anywhere else on the peninsula, need only rent their shoes. Camp Stanley ........................... 732-5310 there are plenty of quality FMWR facilities and The USAG-Casey Bowling Center is open services available for everyone to enjoy. Yesan Monday-Thursday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., FMWR Physical Fitness Troop Medical Center Warrior Country is well known for its Friday from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. and Sunday and USAG-Red Cloud ..................... 732-7379 comprehensiveCheongju sports and fitness programs. FMWR Clubs holidays from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. USAG-Casey ............................ 730-4320 You willHongseong of good things to eat find plenty Bowling at the Camp Hovey Bowling Center There are 8 physical fitness centers, 4 swimming Camp Stanley ........................... 732-5314 and drink at FMWR clubs throughout Warrior is available Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday pools (3 indoor), multiple ball fields and outdoor USAG Yongsan......................... 737-5545 Country. At USAG- Red Cloud, Mitchell’s is from 5 to 10 p.m., Friday from 5 to 11 p.m., courts in the garrison, all frequently used by the place to go for lunch and dinner or to enjoy Saturday from 1 to 11 p.m. and Sunday and Soldiers and other authorized patrons daily. Emergency Hot Lines an evening of fun and entertainment. Their holidays from 1 to 10 p.m. It is closed every Chung heo FMWR Arts and Crafts outstanding lunch buffet is offered weekdays cTuesday. n g n a m - D o Fire ........................................... 911 Gwangcheon 1 Arts and Crafts shops in USAG-RC continue from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. People can also Boeun Sexual Assault ......................... 158 Cheongyang to provide patrons with an opportunity to learn order from the menu at extremely reasonable FMWR Golf Abandoned Spouse .................. 730-3635 new skills. Ceramics, hobby crafts, model rates. If golf is your thing, then Warrior Country is Sintanjin Gongju Emergency (on-post) ................ 911 Camp Stanley Songyun the popular the place you want to be. There are two nine- building, framing and more are all popular with operates Medical Emergency .................. 116 Reggie’s. The most recent addition to Tommy’s hole golf courses here, one at USAG-Casey, Soldiers, their Families and guests. Bar located in Reggie’s is the new MPOG Indian Head Golf Course, and one at USAGMilitary & Family Life Consultant gaming system. Red Cloud, Willows Golf Course. Soldiers have FMWR Libraries Program Daecheon AdultsDaejeon can take advantage and children alike The Gateway Club at USAG-Casey is the priority for making tee times at both courses,25 but USAG-Red Cloud..............010-3147-0756 hot spot for all of USAG-Red Cloud. The club need to phone three days in advance for their of one of the four FMWR libraries that offer USAG-Casey/Hovey..........010-8691manager is a 2009 winner of the Army’s best reservations. Golf lessons are offered every aDVDs,e o n access, and videos, in addition D e j Internet 1 3666 to a wide selection of books and magazines. manager in club operations. The Gateway Saturday from 9 to 11 a.m. Spouse/Child abuse ................. 911 Club boasts several great food and beverage FMWR Quality of Life products, including Reggie’s Express, Primo’s FMWRNonsan Activity Centers Community Fraud, Waste-Abuse ................. 738-7867 USAG-RC’s Army Community Services Express, and the latest addition, the Java USAG-RC has four Community Activity Café, featuring Starbucks gourmet coffee and Centers for patrons to choose from. Each CAC program offers Soldiers and Family membersYeongdong DPW Emergency Work Orders delicious sandwiches and wraps, desserts and offers a wide variety of tours and trips, games, important programs to improve their quality of more. The rock never stops in the trendy and Internet access and more on an on-going basis. life. Ongoing classes in personal finance, job USAG-Red Cloud ..................... 732-7714 newly renovated Gateway nightclub with its light USAG-RC CACs offer everything from remote- search, resume writing, relocation assistance, Geumsan USAG-Casey ............................ 730-3727 shows, big screen televisions, DJ sounds, and controlled car demonstrations and competitions VISA and passport issues, career assessment, Seocheon Camp Stanley ........................... 732-5360 live entertainment on a regular basis. to deep-sea fishing excursions and everything Family Advocacy concerns, information and Hamyol The Warrior’s Club at USAG-Casey is in between, including pool tournaments, plastic referral, and more are offered at ACS locations AMERICAN EMBASSY............. 721-4114 another hot spot for those who want to relax model-building demonstrations, table games, at USAG-s Red Cloud, Stanley and Casey. 15 Janghang Muju

United States Army Garrison Red Cloud Suwon
Icheon
Yeoju
50

USAG-Humphreys

Gunsan
Kunsan Air Base

Iksan

Pongdong

USAG RED CLOUD

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 9 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

(Clockwise from top) Children hunt Easter eggs at USAG-Casey, Chinese circus entertains Families on Labor Day at USAGCasey, Soldiers race Go Karts at the Casey 500, Families are entertained with the Samoan Folk Singers during a Hukilau presented by FMWR at the Gateway Park on USAG-Casey, Soldiers and Family members enjoy Paintball fights on the USAG-Casey paintball field, more than 200 Soldiers run for the Bataan Death March Qualifier to qualify for the main Bataan Memorial Death March held on White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico last March. All events are sponsored by FMWR.

PAGE 10 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

WELCOME TO KOREA

Prepare early for PCS moves
Special to the Morning Calm Personal Property Shipping and Processing Offices experience their peak movement season each year from May through August. During these months, there are as many personal property shipments as the rest of the year combined. As such, customers are reminded to plan their moves well in advance. Customers who are within the 90 days of their Date Expected to Return from Overseas and still do not have reassignment instructions, should contact their order-issuing authority in order to expedite processing and issuance of their orders as soon as possible. Servicemembers, retirees, and DoD employees are advised to make counseling appointments with PPPOs in their area of responsibility immediately upon receipt of PCS/ Travel Orders. In order to obtain desired packing and pick up dates, customers should make counseling appointments at least three weeks in advance to alleviate conflicts that may occur with desired packing and pick up dates. When scheduling dates, customers should remember to: n Avoid scheduling pickup dates on the day their housing lease expires, since this prevents adjustments for unforeseen challenges such as carrier equipment shortages which sometimes occur during this busy time of year. n Avoid changing their scheduled packing and pickup days once made—there is no guarantee that they will be able to obtain immediate or near-term alternate dates. n Please understand that not everyone will be able to move on the last day of the month due to the many moves occurring during this peak movement season. As a reminder, certain items cannot be shipped. These items include: n Combustible liquids (certain alcoholic beverages, antifreeze compounds) n Explosives (fireworks, propellants, ammunition) n Compressed gases (fire extinguishers, scuba diving tanks, aerosol cans) Corrosive liquids (acids, acidic batteries, disinfectants, rust preventing/removing compounds) n Flammables (acetone, ammonia, cleaning fluids, enamel, kerosene/gasoline, propane tanks, enamel, paint, varnish, turpentine) Pets are another important part of many people’s PCS moves, shipment of pets are the owner’s responsibility and must be done at the owner’s expense. Commercial airlines often restrict shipment of pets to certain destinations during summer months due to high temperatures coupled with extended aircraft ground times. Pet owners should coordinate their shipments well in advance of their projected departures with the airlines. Members are referred to the Transportation and Travel “It’s Your Move” Army Pamphlet 55-2 on the SDDC Home Page: www.sddc.army.mil for further helpful shipping information. IMCOM Korea Installation Transportation Offices remain committed to assist you in everything possible to help ensure you have a smooth move. Early preparation by people moving during the
n

peak movement season will greatly help. DoD Customers (Service Members, Retirees and Department of Defense Civilians) now enjoy Full Replacement Value protection on most DoD-funded personal property shipments. Under the FRV program, the Transportation Service Provider/Carrier is liable for the greater of $5,000 per shipment or $4 times the net weight of the shipment (in pounds), up to $50,000. The Military Surface Deployment and Distribution Command have published a detailed set of guidelines that governs FRV coverage on its website. DoD Customers can find the website at http://www.sddc.army.mil/ ; click Full Replacement Value Protection. Further FRV information can be found on the various Military Claims Offices websites. For information, contact Grant Robinson, Traffic Management Specialist, Transportation Branch, Logistics Division, IMCOM- Korea, at 738-3466.

AAFES Facilities
POST EXCHANGES Camp Bonifas Bonifas PX Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-6 p.m./ Sun. 11 a.m.- 4 p.m. Wed. Closed, 734-8584 Camp Hovey Hovey PX/ Concessions Mon.-Fri. noon- 7 p.m./ Sat. & Sun. Closed, 730-5146 USAG DAEGU Camp Walker Main PX Daily 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. 764-4638/4305 Camp Carroll PX Daily 7 a.m. - 8 p.m. 765-8330 USAG HUMPHREYS Exchange Shopping Mall, Bldg. S-400 Daily 9 a.m.-8 p.m. 753-8291/8297 Suwon PX Mon.-Tue., Sat. noon-8 p.m./ Wed.-Thu. 11 a.m.-8 p.m./ Fri. noon-9 p.m./Sun. 1-7 p.m. 788-5505 Yong In PX Mon.-Tue., Thu.-Sat. noon-7 p.m. Wed./Sun. Closed 741-7445 USAG CASEY Main Exchange PX, Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 730-4860/ 4865 USAG RED CLOUD PX Daily 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Customer Service:732-6733 USAG YONGSAN MAIN EXCHANGE Yongsan Main Post - Main Store

Daily 9 a.m.-8 p.m. 724-3088/ 3244 K-16 PX Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 741-6379, (031)720-6379 Hannam PX Tue. 10 a.m.-6 p.m./Thu. - Sun. 1-9 p.m. Mon. & Wed. Closed, 723-4462, SHOPETTES USAG CASEY Shopette Sun.-Thu. 9 a.m.-9 p.m./ Fri. & Sat. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. 730-4486 Video Rental/ BookMark Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m./Sun. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 730-3247 Dragon Valley PX 730-4872 Mon.-Fri. noon-7 p.m./ Sat. 11 a.m.-4 p.m./ Sun. Closed Division Headquarters PX Trailer 730-1732 Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m./ Sat. 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sun. Closed Mini Mall 730-4310 Mon-Fri 1000-1900/ Sat & Sun 1000-1800 Camp Hovey Hovey PX/ Concessions Mon.-Fri. noon-7 p.m./Sat. & Sun. Closed, 730-5146 Camp Hovey Mini Mall,Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m./ Sat. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sun. Closed, 730-5176 USAG DAEGU Camp Henry Mon-Sat 7 a.m.- 7 p.m.; Sun. 7 a.m. - 7 p.m. 768-7562

Camp Walker Shoppette/Class Six Daily 7 a.m. - 10 p.m. 768-7562/ 6647 USAG HUMPHREYS AFH Shoppette Daily 8 a.m.-10 p.m., 753-8037 3rd MI Shoppette Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.- 11 p.m., 753-8908 Sat. 9 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sun. 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. Zoeckler Station Exchange Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. 754-3626/3541 Sat.-Sun. 10 a.m.- 10 p.m. USAG RED CLOUD Mini Mall Mon. Closed/Tue.-Fri. 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m., 732-6497 Red Cloud Shoppette w/ Video Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m.-11 p.m. 732-6668 USAG Yongsan Four Seasons 723-2072/ 2073 Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. M/P Shoppette 723-2068/ 2069 Daily 7 a.m.-10 p.m. Hospital PX 737-4475/ 5136 Mon.-Fri. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Camp Coiner Mini-Mall Mon.-Sat 11 a.m.-8 p.m./Sun. Closed 724-4120/5179 Dragon Hill PX Daily 1 a.m.-midnight 738-6090/ 6809

COMMISSARIES USAG Daegu Camp Walker Commissary Tues.-Fri. 11 a.m.-7 p.m./Sat. 9 a.m. - 7 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; 764-4950 USAG Daegu Camp Carroll Commissary Tues.-Sat. 11 a.m.- 7 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; 730-4452 Humphreys Commissary Mon.- Fri. 11 a.m.- 7 p.m.; Sat. 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.; Sun. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.; Closed Wednesday 753-5467/5464 Casey Commissary 730-4452 Tues.-Fri. 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Yongsan Commissary Tue.-Wed./Sat.-Sun. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Thur.-Fri. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 736-3301 Hannam Commissary Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wed.-Thur. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri. 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. 723-3892 AAFES THEATERS Henry Theater 768-7724/7732 Hovey Theater 730-5142 Stanley Theater 732-5565 Casey Theater 730-1364 Red Cloud Theater 732-6620 Humphreys Movie Theater 753-7716 Yongsan Theater 728-3154 Movie Times: 738-7389

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 11 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Shopping off post
Whether you’re looking to spend an afternoon browsing the latest products in a spacious department store or pick up some souvenirs in a traditional Korean market, there’s always a place to shop in Korea. For information on all the shopping venues listed (and more) visit www.tour2korea.com
Myeong-dong Shopping District Offers clothes, accessories and shoes Seoul Subway Line 4 Myeongdong Station Exit Namdaemun Market Offers food, tableware, clothes, jewelry, shoes, eyeglasses, and cameras Seoul Subway Line 4, Hoehyeon Station Exit Dongdaemun Market Offers clothes (including Hanboks), jewelry, shoes, and sports wear Seoul Subway Line 2 Dongdaemun Stadium Station, or Line 1 or 4 Dongdaemun Station Insa-dong Offers souvenirs, traditional crafts, and artworks Seoul Subway Line 1, Jonggak Station Itaewon Offers clothes, shoes, antiques and tailor shops Seoul Subway Line 6, Itaewon Station Exit 1,2,3 Apgujeong Offers luxury brand botiques COEX Mall – Underground Shopping City www.coexmall.com (English) Exit No. 5 and No. 6 of Samseong Subway Station (Seoul Subway Line No. 2) are connected to the COEX Mall. Seoul Medicine Market Hours are 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Closed first and third Sunday of each month Located near Dongdaemun, Subway – Line 1 Jegi Station Exit #2 – which is connected to the Seoul Medicine Market Daegu Medicine Market (Jung-gu Deagu) Hours of Operation: Mon-Fri 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (until 5 p.m. during the winter) Sat., Holidays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Sundays 5 min from the Banwoldang Subway Station and Jungangno Station E-Mart Located throughout Korea, E-Mart offers a wide selection of products ranging from electronics, entertainment, apparel, toys, jewelry, grocery, household goods, and more. Lotte World Shopping Mall and Lotte Mart Adjacent to Lotte World amusement park in Seoul; Lotte Mart contains a Toys R Us. Lotte Department Store is located throughout the Korea region. g

U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson

PAGE 12 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

RADIO AND TELEVISION

Tune in to American Forces Network Korea for news, entertainment
Thunder AM Schedule
Monday Mdnt Country Music 7:00 NPR - All Things Considered 8:00. Oldies Noon AFN-Korea News Block 12:30 Health Show 1:00 Dr. Laura/Paul Harvey 2:00 Oldies 7:00 Rush Limbaugh 8:00 Ed Schultz Show 9:00 NPR - Morning Edition Tuesday – Friday Mdnt Country Music 6:00 NPR - All Things Considered 8:00 Oldies Noon AFN-Korea News Block 12:30 Tue-Face the Nation Wed-ABC World News Thu-This Week on ABC Fri-Real Estate Today 1 p.m. Dr. Laura/Paul Harvey 2:00 Oldies 7:00 Rush Limbaugh 8:00 Ed Schultz Show 9:00 NPR - Morning Edition Saturday Mdnt Country Music 6:00 NPR - All Things Considered 7:00 Oldies 3 p.m Sports Overnight America 6:00 Country Music 10:00 American Country Countdown Sunday Mdnt American Country Countdown 2:00 Country Music 7:00 NPR – All Things Considered/Marketplace 9:00 Kim Komando 10:00 Oldies 11:00 The Best of Our Knowledge 11:30 Weekly Presidential Address/ Democratic Response Noon The C.A.R Show 1:00 Oldies 3:00 Sports Overnight America 6:00 Oldies 7:00 Car Talk 8:00 NPR - A Prairie Home Companion 10:00 NPR - Weekend Edition

AFN The Eagle Schedule
Monday – Friday Mdnt AFN The Eagle 5:45 Local Morning Show 10:00 Mid-day Show 2:00 Afternoon Show 6:00 AFN The Eagle Saturday Mdnt AFN The Eagle Noon Top 40 with Ryan Seacrest 4:00 AFN The Eagle 10:00 Top 40 with Ryan Seacrest Sunday Mdnt 2:00 7:00 8:00 11:00 Noon Top 40 with Ryan Seacrest AFN The Eagle Eagle Wings AFN The Eagle Eagle Wings AFN The Eagle

TV Channel Programming
Channel 701 702 703 704 705 706 707 708 709 710 Programming AFN|Sports AFN|Prime Atlantic AFN|Spectrum AFN|Prime Pacific AFN|News AFN|xtra Program Guide Pentagon Channel AFN|Family AFN|Movie

Radio Frequencies
Location Chinhae (Chinhae Naval Base) Daegu (Camp Walker) Dongducheon (USAG-Casey) Gunsan (Kunsan Air Base) Gwangju (Gwangju Air Base) Pohang (Camp Mujuk) Pyongtaek (USAG-Humphrey) Seoul (USAG Yongsan) Songtan (Osan Air Base) Uijongbu (USAG-Red Cloud) Waegwan (Camp Carroll) Wonju (Camp Long) AM / FM 1512 / 88.5 1080 / 88.5 1197 / 88.3 1440 / 88.5 None / 88.5 1512 / None 1440 / 88.3 1530 / 102.7 1359 / 88.5 1161 / 88.5 1080 / 88.5 1440 / 88.3

Cable TV, courtesy of Army Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation
Cable Television
Almost every Soldier in the USA has access to cable television, and during your tour in Korea that will be no different! FMWR operates the Army’s only cable television program in the world. This one-ofa-kind quality of life program offers free basic service to residents living on-post on Army installations. Basic Service includes, AFN-Pacific, AFN-News, AFN-Sports, CNN International and several local Korean stations. Residents can also subscribe to a Premium Package that offers a diversified channel line-up that includes movies, sports, adventure and much more. We have sign-up locations on each garrison. For additional information and current subscription rates call or visit your local FMWR Cable TV office. FMWR Cable services are only available on military installations. Authorized viewers residing off-post can take advantage of the AFRTS Direct to Home Service. The necessary equipment to receive this service can be leased from your local AAFES Exchange. For technical assistance, please call 738-2288 (CATV); on Camp Walker, 764-5596.

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 13 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Shop, Save and thrive

COMMISSARY BENEFITS are part of the Army
Family Covenant’s commitment to provide a strong, supportive environment where Soldiers and Families can thrive.

WhAT IT MEANS:
• Through the ‘Bringing the Benefit to You’ campaign, Guard and Reserve Soldiers and their Families have shopped on-site at more than 100 remote locations and purchased $14 million worth of commissary products. • An average of 30% SAVINGS OR MORE on purchases compared to commercial prices. • Within the next three years, more than $200 million will be spent on building new commissaries and enhancing existing commissaries to better serve customers.

Visit

to learn more about the Army Family Covenant.

PAGE 14 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

USAG-Red Cloud
Ganghwa
USAG Yongsan

Gapyeo

Uijongbu Gimpo

Goyang

100

Se o u l

Guri

Namyangju

130

Community Profile
Commander: Col. David W. Hall Command Sergeant Major: Command Sgt. Maj. Ralph J. Rusch Deputy: Paul Cramer Location: Seoul, Republic of Korea Website: http://yongsan.korea.army.mil Population: 25,000 Servicemembers, Civilian Employees, Family Members, contractors, retirees, Korean Augmentees to the U.S. Army, Korean military, Korean Service Corps, Korean National Employees. History: Yongsan Garrison is one of nine Army installations that make up U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan. Yongsan is home to the headquarters of the U.S. military presence in Korea, known as United States Forces Korea, as well as the headquarters for the 8th U.S. Army and the Installation Management Command Korea Region.At the close of World War II, U.S. forces took over the garrison from occupying Japanese Imperial Army soldiers. The newly formed Republic of Korea government granted U.S. forces permission to use the garrison. During the Korean War, the garrison was abandoned, and then reclaimed. Camp Coiner, covering approximately 50 acres on Yongsan Garrison’s northern edge, is named after 2nd Lt. Randall Coiner, a Korean War Silver Star recipient. After the Korean War it served as Korea’s primary in-processing facility for Army troops. The 1st Replacement Company serves as the central in-processing and orientation center for U.S. Servicemembers and their families arriving to Korea. The garrison also provides installation support for a U.S. Army leased housing area called Hannam Village, K-16 Air Base, Camp Kim, Camp Market, the Far East District Compound, several remote signal sites, Camp Morse, Sungnam Golf Course, Command Post Tango and Camp Coiner. Key Facilities: 1st Replacement Company.......723-6452 Army Community Services ....... 738-7505 Dragon Hill Lodge ..................... 790-0016 United Service Organizations... 724-7003 U.S. Embassy Association.........721-4487 Hospital..................................... 737-2273 Postal Service Center................738-4412 Equal Employment Opportunity 738-4473 Boy/Girl Scouts............................738-6371 Western Union.............................724-3849 Education Center.........................723-8098 Directory Assistance....................723-1110 Emergency Numbers: Abuse hotline ............................ 101 Military Police ........................... 110 Medical Emergency .................. 116 Fire ........................................... 101 Emergency (on-post) ................ 911 Medical Emergency .................. 116

Incheon

Incheon

Bucheon
Siheung
100

2

Han

USAG-Yongsan
Seoul
Nam h

Pu k h

an

an

Gwangmyeong Anyang Ansan Gunpo
Uiwang

Gwacheonon
1

Gwangju

Seongnam

35

Gyeongg
Icheon

Yongin
50

Hwaseong

Suwon
Suwon Air Base

Osan
Osan Air Base

USAG-Humphreys
Seonghwan

Anseong

Pyeongtaek
35

United States Army Garrison Yongsan
15

Seosan

Welcome to the U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan. United Service Organization (USO), a child We are one of the top seven Army installations development center, indoor and outdoor in the world today. swimming pools, an automotive care center, The garrison won $250,000 for its Bronze and a self-service gas station. Prize Army Communities of Excellence victory The garrison is also home to the Dragon in 2010 and finished as a finalist in the 2009 Hill Lodge. The hotel is operated as an Armed competition. Forces Recreation Center by the U.S. Army USAG Yongsan supports Soldiers, Civilians in support of the mission. The Dragon Hill and Family Members with outstanding installation Lodge is one of four Armed Forces Recreation Yesan facilities, spacious housing, a 5-star hotel and Centers around the world. fantastic restaurants, new first-rate recreational The garrison consists of two main areas, centers and spectacular access to Korean food Main Post and South Post, which are and culture. physically divided by a four-lane boulevard USAG Yongsan serves the largest population that links two Seoul neighborhoods. In 2003, Hongseong of Americans (17,000) in Korea with excellence in garrison officials constructed a two-lane installation management and customer support overpass bridge over the boulevard to solve while continuously improving quality of life in the traffic congestion problems. U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan community. Collier Field House is the community’s “If you are a newcomer to Korea, ‘Welcome,’” primary fitness center. The facility is named said Garrison Commander Col. Dave Hall. “The in honor of Corporal John Collier, who was Republic of Korea is a great place to live, work posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor or visit. Whether this is your first tour to Korea for his service during the Korean War. This Gwangcheon or a return assignment, you can look forward sports complex is located on Yongsan South to a personally and professionally rewarding Post and features basketball, racquetball, Cheongyang experience in the Land of the Morning Calm.” volleyball, baseball, softball, aerobic, and The garrison comprises just over 630 acres weight training facilities, and also offers located within Yongsan District of Seoul, Korea’s authorized patrons a variety of instructor-lead Songyun capital. Garrison facilities include multiple family fitness training programs. The Collier Field housing areas, a large commissary and post House is also used for community events and exchange, numerous Army Family and Morale, town hall meetings. Welfare and Recreation facilities, restaurants, East of the garrison is the commercial indoor and outdoor sports complexes, a library, a shopping district of Itaewon. With its bowling alley, a skateboard park, a miniature golf westernized shopping and nightlife, it is a complex, a hospital, three dental clinics, three popular place to visit. To the west of Yongsan Department of Defense Dependent Schools, a is the Samgakji subway station and world

Asan Cheonan

Jinc

Chungcheongnam-Do
Gongju

Daecheon

famous Yongsan Electronics Market. The USAG Yongsan community is a vibrant American neighborhood located in the center of the fifth largest city on the planet. Yongsan community members are used to a 1 high quality of life, frequent celebrations, picnics, events and a wide variety of activities. For example, the Yongsan Arts and Crafts Center is one of the top such facilities in the Army. In 2007, the Army recognized the Arts and Crafts Center as the best. There are all kinds of classes and activities from a digital photography studio to a woodworking shop. The Yongsan theater program is another major plus for community members. Local actors are always working on the next production to be performed at the Moyer Theatre. Bowling centers on K-16 Air Base and Yongsan Garrison offer contests and promotions, league bowling and special events. The Yongsan chapel community offers a 1 wide variety of workshop options at the South Post Chapel and Memorial Chapel at Yongsan Garrison, and at the K-16 Air Base Chapel Sintanjin located in the Community Activities Center. The Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation staff, as well as the Camp Kim USO constantly offer tour options around Korea and Asia. Because of the nearby Incheon International Airport, Yongsan is a gateway to the rest of Asia. 25 Truly, a tour of duty at USAG Yongsan is a well-rounded life experience.

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PHOTO CAPTIONS: (Top) Seoul American High School Falcons win the region championship in 2008. (Top left) Yongsan’s housing is family friendly with conveniently located playground and recreation areas. (Middle left) Korean elementary school children visit the Yongsan Fire Department. (Bottom left) Cheerleaders from Seoul Elementary School march in the Yongsan Fall Festival parade. (Left) Yongsan’s popular dog park opened to the garrison community April 11. (Above) Yongsan Garrison is located near Doeksu Palace in downtown Seoul.

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Commander: Col. Joseph P. Moore Command Sgt. Major: Jason K. Kim Deputy: David W. Frodsham Location: Pyeongtaek, South Korea Population: 10,000 http://humphreys.korea.army.mil/ History: The airfield was originally constructed in 1919, by the Japanese and was known as the Pyeongtaek Airfield during the Korean War. It was called K-6 when the U.S. Air Force repaired and built a new runway to accommodate a Marine Air Group and the 614th Tactical Control Group. In 1961, the airfield was re-named Camp Humphreys, in honor of CWO Benjamin K. Humphreys of the 6th Transportation Company, who died in a helicopter accident near here. The Humphreys District Command was activated in 1964 as a separate installation command of the Eighth U.S. Army. Later it was designated as the 23rd Direct Support Group, which provided all direct support, supply and maintenance, training aides, and operated the Eighth Army Milk Plant. In 1974, with the activation of the 19th Support Brigade, this was designated as U.S. Army Garrison, Camp Humphreys. In 1985, it was restructured to support wartime missions and was designated the 23rd Support Group. In 1996, a separate U.S. Army Support Activity Area III was activated to provide base operations and community support.

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United States Army Garrison Humphreys
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Welcome to United States Army Garrison HumphreysHongseong of choice and the the installation fastest growing area in the Republic of Korea. Located in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, about 55 miles south of Seoul, USAG Humphreys is home to the 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade of the 2nd Infantry Division, Military Intelligence units and other military organizations. For years Humphreys was known as a Gwangcheon small, quiet installation but with the decision to relocate all of U.S. Forces Korea south of Cheongyang Seoul the post is rapidly changing. Eventually, USAG Humphreys will be the new home to United States Forces Korea. Songyun The current population is approximately 10,000—about 3,500 are Servicemembers, the rest Civilians, Family Members and contractors. The population should eventually grow to approximately 65,000. To support the current and future population new facilities are going up all over post that will provide Army-Standard service to all who live, work, serve, train and play here. Gone are the Quonset Huts, corrugated metal buildings that became an unofficial signature of the Army in Korea; they have been replaced by gleaming new high-rise buildings to house Families and Soldiers in comfort. Two new multi-story troop billets with their own dining facility opened recently and provide top-notch living accommodations and dining for Soldiers. Ground was broken for six new 1 + 1 Soldier barracks that will open later this year. The installation is home to Humphreys

Key Facilities: AAFES Taxi Service ................. 753-3414 Alaska Mining Company ........... 754-3101 Army Community Services ....... 753-8401 Humphreys Army Lodge ........... 753-7355 Community Activities Center..... 753-8825 Child Development Center ....... 753-8601 Department Public Works ......... 753-6045 Family Readiness Center ......... 753-6522 Humphreys Library ................... 753-8817 Humphreys Main PX................. 753-8291 Medical Clinic ........................... 753-8388 MP Hill Gym.............................. 753-5971 Super Gym ............................... 753-8810 Humphreys USO ...................... 753-6281 Zoeckler Gym ........................... 754-8083 Youth Services .......................... 753-8507 Public Affairs Office .................. 754-6130 Splish and Splash Water Park .. 754-6412 Tommy D’s ................................ 753-8181 Transportation Motor Pool ........ 753-6656 Emergency Numbers: Abuse hotline ............................ 101 Emergency (on-post) ................ 911 Fire ........................................... 101 Military Police ........................... 911 Medical Emergency .................. 911 PHT Hotline .............................. 333

Chungcheongnam-Do
Gongju

Daecheon

American School for students from kindergarten through eighth grade. A 303 child capacity Child Development Center, located close to the family housing towers, opened in January 2008 and provides a bright, modern, safe and fun place for young kids to stay while their parents work. Three new gyms also opened in 2008 and provide everything from basketball, weight training, aerobics, swimming, exercise machines and climbing walls. Humphreys also has several synthetic turf athletic fields that support thriving unit and youth sports programs. One of the most popular facilities here is the Splish and Splash Water Park the first of its kind in Korea. The water park is open to ID card holders throughout the Korean peninsula and features an Olympic-sized lap pool, diving area, water slides and safe areas for young children. USAG Humphreys currently has a medium-sized PX and Commissary, three PX Shoppettes, a PX food court with a variety of fast food outlets, a Starbucks, a beauty salon, barbershop, Diamond Water, flower shop, dry cleaning, new car and motorcycle sales and several Korean vendors. The Humphreys Community Activity Center, recognized as the best in Korea, is home to function rooms, pool rooms, indoor swimming pool, sound-proofed music rooms, a pottery shop, a frame shop and a ballroom for unit and community functions.

Despite all of the changes the garrison is undergoing our guiding philosophy will never change: Provide World-Class Customer Service for the Soldiers, Families, Civilians and Retirees who live, work, serve, train and play at Humphreys.

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(Clockwise from top) The annual Polar Bear plunge offers a mid-winter taste of the Humphreys Splish and Splash Water Park; Unit’s from throughout Korea come to the Humphreys Super Gym for the best in tournament basketball action; Among the Humphreys New Parent Support programs for pre-school children is Stomp and Romp class, designed to help children develop motor skills; Christmas holiday entertainment at Humphreys includes annual performances by the Dallas Cowboys Cheerleaders and holiday dinner concert performances by Humphreys American School students; Child and Youth Services offer after school activites include 4-H clubs such as photography and art; the Humphreys Garrison Better Opportunity for Single Soldiers program has been recognized as among the best in the Army for for the past several years. – U.S. Army photos by Bob McElroy, Lori Yerdon, Mike Mooney and Ken Hall

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SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

LEFT: Gyeongbokgung Palace; the name of the palace translates in English as “Palace Greatly Blessed by Heaven.” – U.S. Army photo by Dave Palmer ABOVE TOP TO BOTTOM: Gyeongbokgung Palace guard; A traditional Korean building located near Namhansanseong (old Seoul fortress); T-Rex stands guard at the Gwacheon Science Museum in Gyeonggi province; Visitors to Lotte World amusement park spend a sunny day enjoying the thrill rides and other attractions. – U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS

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TOP: A beautiful, ten-foot-tall hand-made lantern float constructed out of wood, wire, paper and paint, made for the Seoul Buddhist Lotus Lantern Festival in held each spring in Seoul ABOVE LEFT: Students from the Seoul American Elementary School Ski Club enjoy a ski trip to Star Ski Resort. ABOVE RIGHT: The main hall at Changdeokgung palace in Seoul. LEFT TO RIGHT: A robot stands guard outside of the Seoul Animation Museum; A traditional dancer performs a routine at a summer festival ; A sculpture outside of the Korean War Memorial in Seoul – U.S. Army photos by Edward N. Johnson

Online Resources for U.S. Army Garrisons (USAG) in Korea
Official Website (IMCOM-K) .............. http://imcom.korea.army.mil Welcome Videos and News ............... www.youtube.com/imcomkorearegion www.break.com/imcomkorea www.dailymotion.com/imcomkorea Morning Calm News Photos .............. www.flickr.com/imcomkorea Social Networking (Army Korea) ....... www.myspace.com/imcomkorea www.facebook.com/imcomkorea http://delicious.com/imcomkorea http://twitter.com/imcomkorea
*This map is not for navigational purposes and should only be used for general reference.

Republic of Korea — U.S. Army Installation Guide

Jeomchon Hamchang

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Gyeongsangbuk-Do
Sangju
Uiseong

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Community Profile
Commander: Col. Terry D. Hodges Command Sgt. Major: Arnold S. Gabriel Deputy: William E. Christman

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Waegwan

Location: Daegu, South Korea Population: 5,000 History: United States Army Garrison Daegu is headquartered on Camp Henry. During the Korean War, the camp saw little action because it was inside the northern edge of what became known as the Pusan (now Busan) Perimeter. The camp was used by the Korean Army after its liberation from Japan in 1945 and then used by the United States after the Korean War. The camp was memorialized in May 1960 in honor of First Lieutenant Frederick F. Henry, who served with Company Geochang F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. Henry was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for action near Am-dong, Korea, on Sept. 1, 1950. Key Facilities: Camp Henry ACS ..................... 768-7112 Camp Carroll ACS .................... 765-8993 Camp Walker Lodge ................. 764-5536 Hamyang 12 Camp Walker Lodge Annex ...... 764-5536 Camp Carroll Lodge ................. 765-7722 Hospital..................................... 764-4222 Community Activity Center ....... 764-5919 Library....................................... 764-5910 Kelly Fitness Center ................. 764-4800 Auto Crafts Shop ...................... 768-8164 Child & Youth Services ............. 764-5297 Child Development Center ....... 768-8476 School Age Services................. 764-4381 MS&Teen Director .................... 764-5722 Youth Sports Director ............... 764-4859 Ration Control (Henry).............. 768-7518 Ration Control (Carroll)............. 765-7890 Vehicle Registration (Walker) ... 768-6108 Vehicle Registration (Carroll) .... 765-8575 Pass and ID (Carroll) ................ 765-8537 Pass and ID (Henry) ................. 768-6101 Community Bank ...................... 768-7449 American Red Cross ................ 768-7993 Arts and Crafts.......................... 764-5692 Area IV Chaplain ...................... 764-5455 Ha-Dong Family Action Plan Manager ..... 768-8129 Morale, Welfare and Rec .......... 768-7025 Education Center (Carroll) ........ 765-7702 Evergreen Club......................... 764-4060 Gwangyang Bowling Center ......................... 764-4334 Evergreen Golf Course ............. 764-4601 Army Emergency 768-8127 Suncheon Relief ............ 768-8634 Equal Employment Opportunity ... Housing Manager ..................... 768-7239 Public Affairs Office .................. 768-8070 Emergency Numbers: Abuse hotline ............................ 101 Military Police ........................... 110 Medical Emergency .................. 116 Yeosu Fire ........................................... 101 Emergency (on-post) ................ 911

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Samnangjin Hanam

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United States Army Garrison Daegu club system featuring the nine-hole Evergreen in Daegu are textiles, metals and machinery, encompasses all Army facilities in Area IV, in Golf Course on Camp Walker. Daegu’s while the apples grown in the area are renowned the southern third of the peninsula from Deajon pools, 10 recreation facilities, playgrounds throughout East Asia. Daegu maintains South to Busan. The city of Daegu is known as the and fitness centers are conveniently a sister city relationship with Atlanta, Ga. Changwon units on Camp Henry are the “Apple Capital of Korea.” It lies tucked in a valley located within the Army communities. Major tenant between the Palgong Mountains to the north and Gimhae Daegu Garrison, headquartered on Camp 19th Expeditionary Sustainment Command and Masan the Nakdong River to the south. The area of this Henry, manages the installations and provides the U.S. Army Field Support Brigade-Far East. Jinju scenic city covers more than 70 square miles and base operations services for the people The Army and Air Force Exchange Service is approximately 136 feet above sea level. There who live and work here. USAG Daegu Southern Exchange Office and U.S. Army Corps Jinhae are four distinct seasons here, with the climate also provides support to sister services in of Engineers-Far East District Southern Resident similar to Washington, D.C. Daegu is one of the Area IV, including those stationed at Fleet Office are also located on the installation. oldest cities in Korea with a wealth of tradition in Activities Chinhae (U.S. Navy) in Jinhae, Camp George consists of Military its history. The local traditional medicine market Gwangju Air Base (U.S. Army and U.S. Air Family Housing, the Daegu American is one of the oldest in Korea and is just one of Force on a ROK Air Force installation) in School (K-12) and Child Development Sacheon the many interesting off-post cultural sites in the Gwangju, and Camp Mujuk (U.S. Marine Center, slated to close late in 2010 when a surrounding community. Corps) in Pohang. Area IV is the largest of new, larger CDC opens on Camp Walker. 10 The Daegu Garrison consists of three base the U.S. Army’s four geographic regions in the Camp Walker also has MFH as well as the clusters: Daegu (Camps George, Henry and ROK, covering about 10,000 square miles. main PX and Commissary, medical and dental Geosong Walker); Waegwan (Camp Carroll); and Busan The US Army Garrison Daegu won the facilities and of course the Evergreen Golf Club. (Busan Storage Center and Pier 8). There are 2009 Broze Army Community of Excellence Camp Carroll in Waegwan, just north about 10,000 Soldiers, Department of the Army (ACOE) Award, and was a finalist again in Geojedo of Daegu, is home to Materiel Support Civilian employees, contractors, Korean national 2010. The unit has received 12 Department Command- Korea (MSC-K), the 501st employees, Korean Augmentation to the U.S. of the Army and 8th U.S. Army ACOE awards Sustainment Brigade, the 2-1 Air Defense Army, or KATUSA Soldiers, and Family Members since the program was created in 1988 Artillery Battalion, and a number of other units. Geoje USAG Daegu, along with Camp Humphreys who live and work within USAG Daegu and Area IV. and USAG Daegu was named the Army’s The Daegu military community offers a well- best small overseas installation that year. in Pyongteaek, will remain as one of two strategic Tongyeong rounded schedule of Family, Morale, Welfare Daegu Metropolitan City is the fourth and enduring hubs for the Army and U.S. and Recreation activities and special events largest municipality in the Republic of Korea, Forces Korea. Nearly $1B is being dedicated Namhaedo throughout the year. Programs like those with a population of about 2.5 million. It is the to building and infrastructure improvements, offered through the Child Development Center, largest city in the North Gyeongsang Province some of which have already been completed Army Community Service, Community Activities (Gyeongsangbuk-do) and is located about 180 (like the Camp Carroll Community Activities Center, Child and Youth Services, Better miles southeast of Seoul. Because Daegu sits Center), some are under construction in 2010 Opportunities for Single Soldiers are always in a basin, the mountains trap hot and humid air (new CDC and building renovations for a new available . In addition, Daegu has an excellent manking for balmy summers. Major industries High School) and some planned through 2017.

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(Clockwise from top) The annual Mask Festival is a celebration of traditional Korean culture in Daegu; The ArmyNavy flag football game played by local Servicemembers draws a crowd every fall on the sports fields at Daegu; There’s no better place to learn Tae Kwon Do, the official martial art of Korea; Daegu youth celebrate reading at the post library--one of many on-going community events offered at the garrison; Swimmers escape the summer heat at Daegu’s on-post pool.

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THE KOREAN WAR

Korean War overview, 1950-1953
Outbreak of the War The Korean War began with a surprise attack June 25, 1950, when eight divisions and an armored brigade (90,000 soldiers) of the North Korean People’s Army attacked in three columns across the 38th parallel and invaded the Republic of Korea. Many of the NKPA were battle-tested, having served in the Chinese and Soviet armies in World War II. The 98,000-strong ROK Army, its combat training incomplete, and having no tanks and only 89 howitzers, was no match for the betterequipped NKPA. Aided only by a 500-man U.S. Korean Military Advisory Group, the ROKA was overwhelmed. Spearheaded by tanks, NKPA forces moved rapidly through the Uijongbu Gap on the west side of the Korean peninsula and captured Seoul, South Korea’s capital. The ROKA fled south in disarray across the Han River toward Pusan, a major port at the southeastern tip of the Korean peninsula. On June 25, the U.N. Security Council denounced North Korea’s actions and called for a cessation of hostilities and withdrawal of the NKPA to the 38th parallel. President Harry S. Truman directed General of the Army Douglas MacArthur, whose Far East Command was located in Tokyo, to evacuate American dependents from Korea and send ammunition to the beleaguered ROKA. The following day, Truman sanctioned the use of American air and naval forces below the 38th parallel. The next day, as the situation worsened, the United Nations requested its members to furnish military assistance to repel the invasion. Truman then extended American air and naval actions to North Korea and authorized the use of U.S. Army troops to protect Pusan. MacArthur, however, recommended committing a U.S. Army regiment in the Seoul area. Truman agreed, and on June 30 he told MacArthur to use all forces available to him. South to the Naktong Ground forces most readily available to MacArthur included the 1st Cavalry Division and the 7th, 24th and 25th Infantry Divisions, all under 8th U.S. Army headquartered in Japan; the 29th Regimental Combat Team in Okinawa, Japan; and the 5th RCT from Hawaii. But these units were hard pressed to defend the ROK because they were undermanned and their mobility and firepower had been reduced by shortages of organic units and equipment. In an effort to delay the NKPA advance, MacArthur ordered the 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment of the 24th Infantry Division moved to a defensive position astride the main road near Osan, 10 miles below Suwon. Named Task Force Smith after the battalion commander, this 540-man command lacked effective anti-tank weapons and was ill-prepared to stop the NKPA. Outflanked by an NKPA division and suffering some 200 casualties and the loss of all equipment, TF Smith broke into a disorganized retreat. Meanwhile, at the United Nation’s request, the United States formed the United Nations Command, which would integrate all American and allied forces. General MacArthur became its commander. He assigned command of ground forces in Korea to Eighth U.S. Army under Lieutenant General Walton H. Walker. At the request of ROK President Syngman Rhee, Walker also assumed command of the ROK Army. By the beginning of August, after the arrival of the 29th RCT from Okinawa on July 26, Eighth U.S. Army held only a small portion of southeastern Korea. Walker ordered a stand along a 140-mile line arching from the Korea Strait to the East Sea west and north of Busan. Known as the “Pusan Perimeter,” American divisions occupied the western segment, basing their position along the Naktong River; the ROK Army defended the northern segment. With Pusan secure, additional troops and equipment began arriving to reinforce EUSA’s perilously long, thin defensive line. At the same time the arrival of the U.S. Army’s 5th RCT from Hawaii, the 2d Infantry Division and the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade from the United States, and a British infantry brigade, strengthened EUSA. North to the Yalu Truman authorized MacArthur to send his forces north of the 38th parallel on Sept. 27, provided there was no indication that major Soviet or Chinese Communist Forces would enter the war. The U.N. General Assembly approved the UNC’s entry into North Korea 10 days later, when it called for the restoration of peace and security throughout Korea. American and ROK Army forces rapidly advanced northward. Warnings of Chinese intervention increased as the UNC pressed deeper into North Korea. At a Wake Island meeting on Oct. 15, Truman directed MacArthur to continue his advance if he believed UNC forces had a reasonable chance of success. Hoping to end operations before the onset of winter, MacArthur ordered all ground forces to advance to the northern border as rapidly as possible. The New War Beginning on Oct. 25, UNC forces met stout resistance almost everywhere across their front. On November 1, the 1st Cavalry Division’s 8th Cavalry Regiment fought fierce battles with the CCF. Severe fighting continued Nov. 5–6, after which the CCF abruptly halted its activities in all sectors, leaving the UNC uncertain as to whether the CCF’s actions had been merely defensive. Tenth Corps, reinforced by the U.S. 3d Infantry Division, and EUSA slowly renewed their offensive. Thinning logistical lines of support, inadequate intelligence and sub-zero cold added to the difficulties of the UNC. With the 7th Division leading, X Corps reached the Yalu at the town of Hyesanjin. Eighth Army units

Fighting with the 2nd Infantry Division north of the Chongchon River, Sgt. Major Cleveland, weapons squad leader, points out communist-led North Korean position to his machine gun crew, Nov. 20, 1950. The entire U.S. Army Korean War image archive can be downloaded online at www.flickr.com/imcomkorea — U.S. Army Photo by Pfc. James Cox.

Incheon Having traded space for time, MacArthur saw that the deeper the NKPA drove south, the more vulnerable it became to an amphibious envelopment. The amphibious force consisted of the 1st Marine Division and the 7th Infantry Division, its ranks fleshed out with several thousand Korean recruits. MacArthur’s decision to land at Incheon was a dangerous but remarkably bold and successful gamble. Tidal conditions allowed only a small window of opportunity for the landing. Moreover, he would be committing his last major reserves at a time when no more general reserve units were available in the United States. Following the successful, lightly opposed landings at Incheon on Sept. 15, arduous streetto-street combat took place to liberate Seoul. On Sept. 29, the capital city was returned to President Rhee. Although many communist guerillas would remain behind, the NKPA virtually disintegrated and ceased to be an effective fighting force.

THE KOREAN WAR

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ABOVE: With her brother on her back a war weary Korean girl trudges by a stalled M-26 tank, at Haengju, Korea, June 9, 1951. (Photo by Maj. R.V. Spencer, UAF, Navy) TOP CENTER: A gunner fires a recoilless rifle, near Oetlook-tong, Korea, June 9, 1951. Photo by Peterson, Army) TOP RIGHT: U.N. forces crossing the 38th parallel, withdrawing from Pyongyang. began moving forward from the Chongchon on Nov. 24, and were hit hard by strong CCF attacks. On Nov. 27, the attacks engulfed the leftmost forces of the X Corps at the Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir, and by Nov. 28th, UNC positions began to crumble. MacArthur informed Washington that the UNC faced an entirely new war. With more than 300,000 Chinese in North Korea, he directed Walker to withdraw to escape envelopment by the CCF. MacArthur ordered X Corps to fall back to a beachhead around the port of Hungnam. Unrelenting CCF pressure, which often included surprise nighttime assaults and hand-to-hand combat and the rigors of a harsh winter, made the UNC’s retreat dangerous and costly. The 2d Division, covering the withdrawal of I Corps and the ROK II Corps from the Chongchon, encountered an entrenched CCF force below the town of Kunu-ri. The CCF surrounded and severely punished the 2d Division as the unit fought its way through the gauntlet to escape. Changjin (Chosin) Reservoir Abandoning Pyongyang on Dec. 5, elements of 8th U.S. Army reached the 38th parallel 10 days later, where it prepared to protect Seoul and develop a coast-to-coast defense. Tenth Corps fought a 13-day running battle to the east coast as it withdrew to Hungnam. Near the Changjin Reservoir, the 1st Marine Division and elements of the U.S. 7th Division met stiff opposition from the CCF in positions overlooking the mountain road to the sea. The 3d Division, positioned near Hungnam with X Corps, was sent inland to open the road and protect the withdrawal of the Army and Marine Corps units. On Dec. 11, X Corps completed its move to Hungnam, and American and ROK Army forces began their evacuation to Pusan the same day. Tenth Corps, which became part of 8th U.S. Army , completed the evacuation Christmas Eve. A Change in Leadership CCF attacks and successive withdrawals had weakened EUSA, and General Walker’s accidental death on Dec. 23, was another dispiriting blow. Lieutenant General Matthew B. Ridgway, who arrived from Washington, D.C., on Dec. 26, took command of EUSA. Despite Ridgway’s hurried efforts to brace the defensive line across the peninsula, he and his men could not contain the CCF’s New Year’s offensive. Seoul fell in early January 1951. Ridgway pulled EUSA’s entire front below the 38th parallel. When the CCF offensive faltered in mid-January, Ridgway was ready to resume the offensive and adopted a strategy to inflict maximum casualties on the enemy with minimum losses to his troops. Ridgway proposed a war of maneuver, slashing the enemy as it withdrew and fighting delaying actions when the enemy attacked. Land gains became less important than damaging the CCF/ NKPA and keeping the enemy off balance. Ridgway’s offensive began on Jan. 25, advancing slowly and methodically, ridge by ridge, phase line by phase line, wiping out each pocket of resistance before moving farther north. Operations THUNDERBOLT, KILLER, RIPPER and RUGGED carried the U.N. forces forward. EUSA liberated Seoul in mid-March and neared the 38th parallel. For the next month, EUSA cautiously probed north of the parallel, expanding the front first to phase Line KANSAS, 10 miles above the 38th, and then to the Iron Triangle, an enemy logistical area north of Line KANSAS. Ridgway’s ground strategy proved apt for the new, more limited objectives that American and U.N. officials adopted of clearing the CCF/NKPA from South Korea and opening negotiations with the enemy. Because of differences

regarding war strategy and goals, Truman relieved MacArthur as United Nations Forces commander on April 11, and replaced him with Ridgway. On April 14, Lieutenant General James A. Van Fleet succeeded Ridgway as head of EUSA. Eight days after Van Fleet assumed command, the enemy began its spring offensive. The major CCF and NKPA attack was directed at Seoul. The I Corps contained the enemy’s advance. EUSA halted the attack on May 20, after the enemy had penetrated 30 miles. Seeking to preclude another enemy attack, Van Fleet ordered EUSA forward. By the end of May, EUSA had progressed to a position just short of Line KANSAS, having virtually cleared the ROK of enemy troops. Van Fleet moved next to reach Line WYOMING, which would give EUSA control of the lower portion of the Iron Triangle. When the Soviet Union’s delegate to the United Nations proposed a cease-fire in Korea on June 23, 8th U.S. Army occupied Line KANSAS and the Wyoming Bulge, ground suitable for a strong defense. The Static War As the fighting lapsed into patrolling and small local clashes, armistice negotiations began on July 10, 1951. The opposing delegations agreed that hostilities would continue until an armistice was signed. Except for brief episodes, action along the front for the next two years never regained the momentum of the first year. On Nov. 17, the two delegations agreed that a line of demarcation during the armistice would be the existing line of contact provided an agreement was reached in 30 days. On Nov. 12, Ridgway ordered Van Fleet to cease offensive operations. Fighting tapered off to patrol clashes, raids and small battles for possession of outposts in no-man’s land. The battlefield stalemate was periodically interrupted by artillery duels, ambushes, raids and costly small-scale hill battles such as Old Baldy. The battlefield lull enabled the Army to

return the 1st Cavalry and 24th Infantry Divisions to Japan and to replace them with the 40th and 45th Infantry Divisions, two of the eight Army National Guard divisions that were mobilized during the war. A new United Nations Forces commander, General Mark W. Clark, replaced Ridgway in May 1952, and Lieutenant General Maxwell D. Taylor replaced Van Fleet as 8th U.S. Army commander in February 1953. As armistice negotiations entered their final and decisive phase in May, the enemy stepped up combat action. CCF forces launched regimental attacks against EUSA outposts in the west. In July, the enemy sought to wrest more ground from the UNC by driving a wedge eight miles deep into 8th Army’s central sector. Taylor quickly contained the enemy and counterattacked, but with an armistice agreement imminent, 8th U.S. Army halted its attack on July 20 short of the original line. Finally, on July 27, 1953, the Armistice was signed and all fighting stopped. After 37 months of combat, total UNC casualties reached more than 550,000, including 95,000 dead. American losses included 33,686 killed and 103,284 wounded. United States Army casualties alone totaled 27,728 dead and 77,596 wounded. The bulk of these casualties occurred during the first year of fighting. The estimate of enemy casualties, including prisoners, exceeded 1,500,000 of whom 900,000 were Chinese. The Army deployed eight divisions to Korea-the 1st Cavalry Division; the 2d, 3d, 7th, 24th, 25th, 40th and 45th Infantry Divisions; and the 5th, 29th and 187th RCTs. U.S. Army personnel received 78 of the 131 Medals of Honor awarded to military members who served in Korea. Source: http://korea50.army.mil To learn more about the Korean War, visit the U.S. Army’s official, online digital image and video archives: PHOTOS: www.flickr.com/imcomkorea VIDEOS: www.youtube.com/warinkorea

KATUSA
Korean Augmentee to the United States Army
In Korea, most military-aged males must serve in the armed forces for a period of at least two years. Some of these young men perform their obligation to their country by becoming integrated into the 8th U.S. Army through a unique program known as Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army. KATUSA Soldiers are Republic of Korea Army soldiers who serve under the U.S. chain of command, but are commanded by the ROK Army in personnel management. The KATUSA program began in July 1950, through an informal agreement between the ROK president and Gen. Douglas MacArthur to augment U.S. forces during the early stages of the Korean War. Until 1982, KATUSA Soldiers were selected from either the Army Basic Military Training Center or cadres of ROK Army units. Currently, KATUSA Soldiers are chosen randomly among a pool comprised of those who have demonstrated English proficiency as measured by a standardized test. The KATUSA program is important because KATUSA Soldiers comprise approximately 10 percent of the total 8th U.S. Army manpower in Korea, with more than 3,500 KATUSA Soldiers serving side-by-side with their U.S. counterparts. The program also serves as a combat multiplier and increases combat readiness for the U.S. and ROK combined defense capability throughout the Korean peninsula. In addition, the program is symbolic of the U.S and ROK alliance and mutual support systems. Because of their limited service time, KATUSA Soldiers have a promotion system that differs from U.S. Soldiers. While their American counterparts gain promotion by amassing points and attending boards, KATUSA Soldiers serve in a rank for a specified period of time and are then automatically promoted to the next highest rank. ROKA staff office has five major missions. These include KATUSA management, KATUSA discipline, ROKA-directed training, U.S. and ROK friendship activities and U.S. and ROK liaison work. Serving as a KATUSA Soldier is a tradition that strengthens the Republic of Korea and the ROK-U.S. military Alliance.

PAGE 26 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

KATUSA

2008 KATUSA-U.S. Soldier Friendship Week, Yongsan Garrison (above). KATUSAs serve alongside U.S. Servicemembers across Korea (below). — U.S. Army Photos

Republic of Korea Military Rank
SO-WI JUNG-WI DAE-WI SO-RYEONG JUNG-RYEONG DAE-RYEONG JUN-JANG SO-JANG JUNG-JANG DAE-JANG SECOND LIEUTENANT SO-WI FIRST LIEUTENANT JUNG-WI CAPTAIN DAE-WI MAJOR SO-RYEONG LIEUTENANT COLONEL JUNG-RYEONG COLONEL DAE-RYEONG BRIGADIER GENERAL JUN-JANG MAJOR GENERAL SO-JANG LIEUTENANT GENERAL JUNG-JANG GENERAL DAE-JANG

ENSIGN

LIEUTENANT JG

LIEUTENANT

LT COMMANDER

COMMANDER

CAPTAIN

REAR ADMIRAL (lower) REAR ADMIRAL (upper)

VICE ADMIRAL

ADMIRAL

YI-BYEONG

IL-BYEONG

SANG-BYEONG

BYEONG-JANG

HA-SA

CHUNG-SA

SANG-SA

WON-SA

In general terms, the Republic of Korea military rank and grade structure corresponds, with that of the U.S military, as does the correlation between rank and responsibility.

KOREAN DEMILITARIZED ZONE

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 27 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Take a trip inside the Korean Demilitarized Zone
PANMUNJOM — The Korean War began on a Sunday morning in 1950, when Communist North Korean struck South Korea in a pre-dawn infantry and artillery assault. Over the next three years it is estimated that about one million South Koreans were killed or went missing in the conflict. An additional 33,686 U.S. Servicemembers perished in battle at places with names like “Heartbreak Ridge” and “Pork Chop Hill.” Almost exactly three years after the conflict began, a cease-fire was declared on July 27, 1953 and since that time North and South Korea have been separated by one of the world’s most intensely guarded borders. The Korean DMZ cuts across the peninsula near the 38th parallel, along the line of fighting positions held by each side when the cease-fire was called. That cease-fire remains in effect today. A journey to the DMZ helps to illustrate the importance of the U.S. military presence in Korea, and the vital partnership of the US-ROK Alliance. Interesting sites to visit include Dorasan Station, a railroad that runs between the two Koreas; the “Third Infiltration Tunnel”, one of four known tunnels constructed by North Korea; The Military Armistice Commission Building, and the Bridge of No Return, a historic remnant of the Cold War era, which crosses
the DMZ in the Joint Security Area. The bridge is especially noteworthy as it was used for prisoner exchanges at the end of the Korean War. The name originates from the fact that prisoners were given the choice to remain in the country of their captivity or cross over to the other country. But if they chose to cross the bridge, they would never be allowed to return. Today, a trip to the Korean Demilitarized Zone can be a surreal experience. Often described as the most heavily defended border in the world, this remains one of the only places on earth where large armies still stand toe-to-toe in formidable opposition. Inside the DMZ, Panmunjom is a heavily fortified encampment, patrolled at all times by ROK soldiers in stoic silence. Rigid protocol dictates that visitors are not to wave, shout or gesticulate in any way toward North Korean guards positioned just yards away. For the most part, it’s exactly what one would expect from such a place. But the DMZ reveals a few surprises. It may be the last place one would expect to find a popular tourist attraction with a gift shop and a one-hole golf course. Servicemembers, Civilians and Family Members are encouraged to visit the DMZ while stationed in Korea. For information on the USO’s tour schedule or reservations, call DSN 795-3063/3028 or DSN 724-7781.

(Clockwise from bottom right) A landmine marker. A ROK soldier stands guard in the Joint Security Area. The bridge of “No Return.” A United Nations Security Battalion Soldier is greeted by youth in the village of Tae Sung Dong, inside the DMZ. A ROK soldier looks north while on guard duty inside the Joint Security Area. — U.S. Army photos by Edward Johnson

Korean food basics

PAGE 28 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

WELCEOME TO KOREA

Photo courtesy Flickr user abex

ABOVE: Samgyeopsal TOP RIGHT: Bi bim bap ABOVE LEFT: Japche BELOW LEFT: Kimbap BELOW RIGHT: Various types of kimchi, top to bottom: Traditional cabbage kimchi; Cucumber Kimchi; Radish kimchi –– All photos U.S. Army Photos by Debbie Hong unless otherwise noted

VARIOUS KOREAN FOODS Rice (uncooked) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Alcohol beverage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Korean pickled cabbage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Korean bean paste . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soy sauce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Salt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sugar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vinegar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sesame oil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seasoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Red pepper powder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tofu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flour. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beef . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lamb . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Corn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Barley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Broth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Broth w/ rice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ox bone soup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Korean pickled cabbage soup . . . . . . . . . . Spicy seafood soup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soybean paste stew. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rice, vegetables and meat mixed in a bowl Steamed ribs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seaweed wrapped rice and vegetables. . . . Soup with wheat flakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cold noodle soup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinese spicy seafood noodles . . . . . . . . . Chinese black noodles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dumplings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Korean BBQ pork belly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rice noodles with meat and vegetables . . . Marinated, thinly sliced braised beef . . . . . 쌀. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 술. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 김치 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 된장 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 간장 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 소금 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 설탕 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 식초 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 참기름 . . . . . . . . . . . 조미료 . . . . . . . . . . . 고춧가루 . . . . . . . . . 두부 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 밀가루 . . . . . . . . . . . 소고기 . . . . . . . . . . . 돼지고기 . . . . . . . . . 닭고기 . . . . . . . . . . . 양고기 . . . . . . . . . . . 옥수수 . . . . . . . . . . . 보리 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 콩. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 밥. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 국. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 국밥 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 설렁탕 . . . . . . . . . . . 김치찌개 . . . . . . . . . 해물탕 . . . . . . . . . . . 된장찌개 . . . . . . . . . 비빔밥 . . . . . . . . . . . 갈비찜 . . . . . . . . . . . 김밥 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 수제비 . . . . . . . . . . . 냉면 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 짬뽕 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 짜장면 . . . . . . . . . . . 만두 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 삼겹살 . . . . . . . . . . . 잡채 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 불고기 . . . . . . . . . . . Ssal Sul Kimchi Dwinjang Ganjang Sogeum Seoltang Shikcho Chamgireum Jomiryo Gochutgaru Dubu Milgaru Sogogi Dwaeji gogi Dak gogi Yang gogi Oksusu Bori Kong Bap Guk Gukbap Seolreong tang Gimchi jjigae Haemul tang Doenjang jjigae Bi bim bap Galbi jjim Kimbap Sujebi Nengmyun Jjam ppong Jjajangmyun Mandu Samgyeopsal Japche Bulgogi

UTENSILS, TABLEWARE Rice (uncooked) . Knife. . . . . . . . . . Fork . . . . . . . . . . Spoon . . . . . . . . Tea Spoon . . . . . Chopsticks . . . . . Napkin . . . . . . . . Bowl. . . . . . . . . . Plate. . . . . . . . . . Drinking Glass . . Cup . . . . . . . . . . 쌀 ...... 칼 ...... 포크 . . . . 수저 . . . . 티수푼. . . 젓가락. . . 냅킨 . . . . 그릇 . . . . 접시 . . . . 잔 ...... 컵 ...... Ssa Kal Pokeu Sujeo Tisupun Jeotkarak Nepkin Geureut Jeopshi Jan Keop

Useful restaurant phrases
May I have a cup of coffee? 커피 한잔 주세요. Coffee hanjan juseyo. Looks great. 맛잇겠습니다. Mashitgetsseumnida. Thanks for the meal. (Before eating) 잘먹겠습니다. Jalmueokget seumnida. Thanks for the meal. (After done eating) 잘먹었습니다. Jalmueokgeot sseumnida. It's on me. 제가 살게요. Jega salkkeyo. You’re welcome. 천만에요. Chunmaneyo. Why don’t we get a drink? 술 한잔 어때요? Sul hanjan eottaeyo? Thank you. 감사합니다. Gamsahapnida. It's very delicious! 너무 맛있습니다! Neomu matitsseumnida! It doesn't taste good. 맛이 없습니다. Mateopsseupnida. Not too spicy, please. 너무 맵게 하지 말아 주세요. Neomu maepge haji mara juseyo. Sounds great. 좋아요. Joayo. It's my favorite! 제가 가장 좋아 하는것입니다. Jega gajang joa haneun gushipmnida. Would you like something to drink? 음료수 좀 드릴까요? Eumryosu jom deurilkkayo? Which food would you like? 어떤 음식을 드시겠습니까? Eotteon eumshik eul deushigetsseumnikka? Where is the restroom? 화장실이 어디죠? Hwajangshil i eodijo?

DRIVING IN KOREA

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 29 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

South Korean Traffic Signs

USFK Pam 385-2

A complete guide to South Korean traffic signs and driving regulations is available online at http://imcom.korea.army.mil or http://www.usfk.mil

WELCOME TO KOREA

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 31 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Ration Readiness:

Ration Control Card use in US Forces Korea
Information courtesy of USAG Yongsan and USAG Daegu Public Affairs For Civilian employees and Family Members, the most important thing you may need in Korea, besides a great pair of walking shoes, is a Ration Control Card. Your ration card is just as important as your military identification card. In short, it is a card that most on-post businesses, like Army and Air Force Exchange, commissary and various other facilities need to see before you can make purchases. Officials want to make sure you are not purchasing huge quantities of any item in order to resell. Your sponsor should be able to help provide you with a temporary card when you arrive. To get a ration card, applicants must attend a training session at the Yongsan Readiness Center. Upon completion of the course, applicants will receive a memorandum to take to the Directorate of Emergency Services, Ration Control Issue Point. DES at Yongsan is located on South Post at U.S. Army Garrison Yongsan, Bldg. 4305, Room 105. For information, call 738-4612. USAG Daegu has two issue points on Camp Henry (768-7158) in Daegu and on Camp Carroll (765-7890) in Waegwan. Here is some important information you should know about ration control and how to make sure you can do your part to combat black marketing: g You will need a ration card for each authorized Family Member (children ages 10 and up). g Don’t leave home without it. g During their first two weeks in Korea, Civilian employees and Family Members can shop in the commissary and exchange with a military identification card and a copy of their PCS orders. g Family Members with sponsors assigned to 2nd Infantry Division need to contact the Division Liaison Office at the Yongsan Readiness Center across the parking lot of the Dragon Hill Lodge for a ration card. g Every purchase in the commissary is recorded in a real-time system based on a shopper’s identification number. The commissary system sends information to a database which automatically generates a violation notice if you exceed your purchase limit. g At the PX, ration limits restrict purchasing a maximum of three of the same high-value item. Cosmetics, select health and beauty aids and select wines are some of the high-value, highdemand items. Ration card process and procedures will be covered in-depth during the inprocessing program at the Yongsan Readiness Center.

Yongsan’s 1st Replacement Company provides ‘one-stop’ orientation for newcomers
YONGSAN GARRISON, REPUBLIC OF KOREA – The 1st Replacement Company, the central inprocessing and orientation center for nearly everyone on orders to Korea, has a new four-day program. 1RC officials reorganized the current five-day program into four days. “We did this so we could get Soldiers out to their units faster,” said CSM Ralph Rusch, Yongsan Garrison Command Sergeant Major. “After analyzing the schedule, we realized there was some down time that we could use better, and this makes more efficient use of Soldiers’ time.” The 1RC is designed to be a one-stop central inprocessing and orientation center for Soldiers and Civilians and their Families who will live in Areas II, III and IV. It first opened in August 2007 under a USFK initiative to provide in-depth orientation for newcomers to Korea. While Soldiers must attend the entire four days, Civilians and Family Members must attend two of the four days. Soldiers who will be assigned to 2nd Infantry Division will inprocess at the Warrior Readiness Center located at Camp Stanley, Rusch said. New arrivals initially check in with the 1st Replacement Company, from arrival at the airport through the next full duty day, referred to as “Day 0.” The 1RC takes over from there. “We call our four days of inprocessing Alpha, Bravo, Charlie and Delta, respectively,” Rusch explained. “They rotate and are not tied to any specific day of the week. If you arrive Tuesday evening, then Wednesday is your Day 0 with the 1RC and Thursday is your Day Alpha, Bravo, Charlie or Delta, depending on the briefing schedule for the current week.” Two days of orientation for Soldiers consist of briefings introducing them to policies, regulations, and readiness training inherent to Korea, including Department of the Army-mandated personal financial management training for first-term Soldiers. Civilian Employees and Family Members join in on Charlie and Delta days, which focus on available family and community programs, ration card process and procedures, and Korean culture, including a trip to the Korean War Museum adjacent to Yongsan Main Post. For Yongsan-based families, Army Community Service hosts an hourlong windshield tour of Yongsan Garrison. “Everyone loves the cultural sessions,” Rusch said. “The feedback we get shows that is the highlight of the training, and they want more.” Spouses, Civilians, and Family Members eligible for ration cards must attend Charlie and Delta days as a prerequisite to getting a ration card. The 1RC also has a free child-care facility on-site with a capacity of 15 children. “The program has really become a family-friendly experience,” Rusch said. “We want your first impressions of Korea to be positive.” g

WELCOME TO KOREA

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 33 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

FMWR Directory
Director of FMWR
USAG Red Cloud.....................................................732-6869 USAG Yongsan........................................................738-5225 USAG Humphreys...................................................754-7501 USAG Daegu...........................................................768-7939 Korea Region...........................................................723-4149

Army Community Services
Casey .................................................................730-3107 Red Cloud...........................................................732-7779 Camp Stanley .....................................................732-5883 Hannam Village ..................................................723-6721 Yongsan ..............................................................738-4617 Humphreys .........................................................753-8401 Suwon.................................................................788-5024 Camp Carroll ......................................................765-8993 Camp Henry/Walker ...........................................768-7112 Korea Region......................................................723-3830

Entertainment
USAG Red Cloud.....................................................732-6760 USAG Yongsan...... ..................................................723-5721 USAG Humphreys ...................................................753-8191 USAG Daegu...........................................................764-4440 Korea Region..........................................................723-3749

Arts and Crafts Centers Golf Courses, Driving Ranges and Mini Golf
Casey Indianhead..................................................730-4885 Red Cloud..............................................................732-6843 Yongsan Sports Complex......................................738-4190 Sung Nam Golf Club ............................................ 736-3483 Humphreys ...........................................................754-6412 Evergreen, Camp Walker......................................764-4601 Korea Region........................................................736-3483 Red Cloud...........................................................732-7355 Camp Stanley .....................................................732-5464 K-16 ....................................................................741-6923 Yongsan ..............................................................738-4750 Humphreys .........................................................753-6706 Camp Walker ......................................................765-5692 Korea Region......................................................725-6070

Auto Crafts
Yongsan ..............................................................738-5042 Humphreys .........................................................753-8547 Camp Henry .......................................................768-8164 Korea Region......................................................723-8510

Indoor/Outdoor Swimming Pools
Camp Hovey .......................................................730-5780 Red Cloud........................................................... 732-653 Camp Stanley......................................................730-5916 Yongsan ..............................................................725-6984 Humphreys .........................................................753-8835 Camp Carroll ......................................................765-7708/4273 Camp Walker ......................................................764-3873/4553 Korea Region......................................................725-5064

Bowling Centers
Casey .................................................................730-4577 Hovey .................................................................730-5167 Red Cloud...........................................................732-6930 Camp Stanley .....................................................732-5370 K-16 ....................................................................741-6473 Yongsan ..............................................................723-7830 Humphreys .........................................................754-5722 Camp Carroll ......................................................765-4470 Camp Walker ......................................................764-4334 Korea Region......................................................723-4153

Libraries
Casey .................................................................730-6329 Camp Hovey .......................................................730-5171 Rec Cloud ...........................................................732-6723 Camp Stanley .....................................................732-5596 Hannam Villange ................................................723-3348 K-16 ....................................................................741-6391 Yongsan ..............................................................723-7380 Humphreys .........................................................753-8817 Suwon.................................................................788-5449 Camp Carroll ......................................................765-8407 Camp Walker ......................................................764-4318 Korea Region......................................................725-7222

Community Activity Centers
Casey .................................................................730-4853 Hovey .................................................................730-5125 Red Cloud...........................................................732-6246 Stanley................................................................732-5336 Yongsan ..............................................................723-3291 K-16 ....................................................................741-6473 Humphreys .........................................................753-8825 Suwon.................................................................788-6058 Carroll .................................................................765-7484 Walker ................................................................764-4123 Korea Region......................................................723-8510

Better Opportunities for Single and Unaccompanied Soldiers in Korea sponsors morale-boosting events for Soldiers throughout the year including the Boss Winter Games, “Boss Factor” contest, dinner cruises, and trips to amusement parks and cultural sites.

Lodging
Camp Casey .......................................................730-4247 Humphreys .........................................................753-6580 Camp Carroll ......................................................765-7722 Camp Walker.......................................................764-5536 Camp Walker Annex ...........................................764-5536 Korea Region......................................................723-8617

BOSS in Korea:

Better Opportunities through BOSS

Child Development Centers
Yongsan ..............................................................738-3406 Humphreys .........................................................753-8601 Daegu .................................................................768-7707 Korea Region......................................................725-3205

Marketing
USAG Red Cloud ...............................................732-6274 USAG Yongsan...................................................738-4058 USAG Humphreys ..............................................754-8257 USAG Daegu ......................................................768-7563 Korea Region......................................................723-8472

B

Middle School and Teen Centers
Hannam Village ..................................................723-8765 Yongsan Middle School ......................................738-2310 Yongsan Teen Center .........................................738-8813 Camp Walker ......................................................764-5721 USAG Humphreys...............................................753-5614

Casey/Hovey ......................................................730-4602 Red Cloud...........................................................732-7519 Stanley................................................................732-5366 Yongsan ..............................................................738-5254 K-16 ....................................................................741-6473 Humphreys .........................................................753-8825 Suwon.................................................................788-6020 Carroll .................................................................765-8325 Walker ................................................................764-4426 Korea Region......................................................725-6070

BOSS

etter Opportunities for Single and Unaccompanied Soldiers, or BOSS, is a dynamic Soldier program in Korea. It is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for single or geographically single Soldiers of all ranks by providing them an effective voice at the installation where they serve. Soldiers and FMWR advisors work hand-in-hand with Commanders, Command Sergeants’ Major, and First Sergeants to provide superior leisure programs and help direct the resolution of quality of life issues for Soldiers. What is BOSS? The Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers Program supports the overall quality of single and unaccompanied Soldiers’ lives. BOSS identifies real Soldier well being issues and concerns by recommending improvements through the chain of command. BOSS encourages and assists single Soldiers in identifying and planning for recreational and leisure activities. Additionally, it gives single Soldiers the opportunity to participate in and contribute to their respective communities. History of BOSS The BOSS program was established in 1989 to respond to the recreational needs of single soldiers, who make up 40% of the Army. As the program was implemented throughout the Army, it became evident that well being was the primary concern of single soldiers. In 1991, the Chief of Staff of the Army officially expanded BOSS to include all aspects of soldiers’ lives. BOSS members later began to express an interest in participating in community service projects. Recreation and leisure, well being (Quality of Life), and community service are the core components of the BOSS program. How Does BOSS Work? Installations establish a formal BOSS program,

to include a BOSS council consisting of single Soldier representatives from installation units. Typically, the installation Command Sergeant Major serves as the senior military advisor to the council. An installation FMWR advisor is appointed to provide guidance in planning activities, financial accountability, and marketing. Motivated single Soldiers with strong senior military and FMWR guidance are the backbone of the BOSS program. Who May Participate in BOSS events? All events are targeted to the single and unaccompanied Soldier. Although the intent of the BOSS program in Korea is for single and unaccompanied Soldiers; events are typically open to all authorized FMWR users. What Happens to the Issues Raised by BOSS? Issues addressed during a BOSS meeting will be formatted and submitted to the senior military advisor to seek resolution through the proper command channels or staff agency. Issues that cannot be resolved at the installation level are coordinated with the installation Army Family Action Plan coordinator and may be released by the installation commander to go forward to the major Army command AFAP. What is the Soldier’s Role in BOSS? BOSS councils are comprised of single and unaccompanied Soldiers from major subordinate commands and separate units on an installation. Single and unaccompanied Soldiers have and opportunity to become unit representatives, volunteer to assist in planning an event, and/or attend BOSS activities. The Department of the Army BOSS circular 608-0401 defines the roles of the chain of command and FMWR personnel at all levels

School Age Services
Hannam Village ..................................................723-4522 Yongsan ..............................................................738-4707 Humphreys .........................................................753-8507 Camp Walker ......................................................764-5298

Clubs
Casey Gateway Club .....................................................730-4884 Redwood Steak House .......................................730-2195 Warrior’s Club .....................................................730-2195 Camp Hovey Iron Triangle........................................................730-5166 Red Cloud CG’s Mess ..........................................................732-8797 Mitchell’s Sports Grill ..........................................732-8189 Camp Stanley Reggie’s..............................................................732-5485 Yongsan Commiskey’s ......................................................736-3969 Harvey’s Lounge.................................................738-5365 Main Post Club ...................................................723-5678 Humphreys Alaska Mining Co................................................754-3101 Gateway Game Room ........................................754-3171 MacGregor’s Market ...........................................753-7447 Tommy D’s ..........................................................753-8191 Camp Carroll Hideway Club .....................................................765-8574 Camp Henry Henry’s Place .....................................................768-7300 Camp Walker Hilltop..................................................................764-4985 Evergreen............................................................764-4060

School Liason Officer
USAG Yongsan...................................................738-5556 USAG Humphreys ..............................................753-8820 USAG Daegu ......................................................764-5297 Korea Region......................................................725-5227

Sports/Fitness Centers
Carey Field House (Casey) ................................730-2323 Hanson Field House (Casey) .............................730-3220 Camp Hovey .......................................................730-1977 Red Cloud...........................................................732-6309 Camp Stanley .....................................................732-5460 Hannam Village ..................................................723-6849 K-16 ....................................................................741-6328 Collier Field House (Yongsan) ............................736-4588 Trent Gym (Yongsan) .........................................724-8466 Humphreys .........................................................753-8810 MP Hill (Humphreys) ..........................................753-5971 Suwon.................................................................788-6020 Camp Carroll ......................................................765-8287 Camp Henry .......................................................768-6604 Camp Walker ......................................................764-4800 Korea Region......................................................725-5064

Youth Sports
USAG Yongsan...................................................738-8117 USAG Humphreys ..............................................753-5602 USAG Daegu ......................................................764-5722 Korea Region......................................................725-3207

Korean language basics
The Korean written language, Hangul, is very easy for newcomers to Korea to learn in just a few hours. Knowing how to sound out words can help with reading street signs, subway station names, and names of businesses. Many English and other foreign words are written in Hangul in Korean. You’ll be amazed at how many signs you can read and excited when you discover that you recognize English words written in Hangul. There have been many different styles of romanization for Korean over the years. Recently a revised romanization of Korean has been adopted. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on July 7, 2000, by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism. This guide uses that revised romanization standard. To properly pronounce romanized Korean, use the pronunciation guide at the right.
ROMANIZED KOREAN PRONUNCIATION GUIDE Consonants in Korean sound similar to English consonants. Generally, hard consonants in Korean like “k” and “p” are not as hard as the English versions unless a double consonant like “kk” or “pp” is used. There are many exceptions that you will learn through experience. Vowels can be a little bit tricky. The romanized korean letter “i” is always pronounced with a long “e” sound like in the word “seen”. The romanized letters “e” and “ae” are pronounced with a short “e” sound like “beg”. The letters “oe” together sound like the word “way”. The letter “a” is pronounced with the short “a” sound like in the word “blah”. The letter “o” is pronounced like the vowel sound in the word “boat”. The letter “u” is pronounced like the vowel sound in “swoon”. The vowel combination “eo” is pronounced like “aw” in “saw”. The vowel combination “eu” is pronounced like the vowel sound in “good”. The vowel combination “ui” is pronounced like “whee”. All of the vowel combinations that start with the letter “y” and “w” are pronounced with a “y” or “w” sound added to the beginning of the sound.

KOREAN LANGUAGE

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 35 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

VOWELS Korean Character Romanized CONSONANTS Korean Character Romanized

ㅣ i

ㅔ e

ㅚ oe ㅂ b,p

ㅐ ae ㄷ d,t

ㅏ a ㅈ j

ㅗ o ㄱ g,k

ㅜ u ㅃ pp

ㅓ eo ㄸ tt

ㅡ eu ㅉ jj

ㅢ ui ㄲ kk

ㅖ ye ㅍ p

ㅒ yae ㅌ t

ㅑ ya ㅊ ch

ㅛ yo ㅋ k

ㅠ yu ㅅ s

ㅕ yeo ㅎ h

ㅟ wi ㅆ ss

ㅞ ㅙ ㅘ we wae wa ㅁ m ㄴ n ㅇ ng

ㅝ wo ㄹ r,l

BASIC KOREAN PHRASES
What time is it? 시간 좀 알려주세요. Shiganjom alryeo juseyo. What is that? 저건 뭐죠? Jeogeon mwojyo? Please show me. 보여주세요 Boyeojuseyo. That’s ok. 괜찮아요 Gwaenchanayo. You’re welcome. 천만에요. Chunmaneyo. Could you please take me there? 저 좀 데려다 주시겠습니까? Jeo jom deryeoda jushigetsseumnikka? Please drop me here. 여기 세워 주세요. Yeogi sewojuseyo. Follow me. 따라오세요. Ttara oseyo.
RELATIVE DATE Today. . . . . . . . 오늘 . . . . . . . . Oneul Yesterday. . . . . 어제 . . . . . . . . Eoje Tomorrow. . . . . 내일 . . . . . . Naeil This month. . . . 이달 . . . . . . . . I-dal Next month . . . 다음 달 . . . . . . Da eum-dal Last month . . . 지난 달 . . . . . . Jinan-dal PRONOUNS I............ My . . . . . . . . . . Me . . . . . . . . . . He/She. . . . . . . His . . . . . . . . . . Him . . . . . . . . . Her. . . . . . . . . . This . . . . . . . . . These. . . . . . . . That . . . . . . . . . Our. . . . . . . . . . 나는 . . . . . . . . Naneun 나의 . . . . . . . . Na ui 나를 . . . . . . . . Na reul 그 . . . . . . . . . . Geu 그의 . . . . . . . . Geu ui 그를 . . . . . . . . Geu reul 그녀의. . . . . . . Geunyeo ui 이것은. . . . . . . I geoteun 이것들은 . . . . . I geotdeuleun 저것은. . . . . . . Jeogeotseun 우리의. . . . . . . Uriui

See you tomorrow. 내일 또 뵈요. Naeil tto boeyo. Nice to meet you. 만나서 반가워요 Mannaseo bangawotsseo. Have a nice day. 좋은 하루 되세요. Joeun haru doeseyo. What’s your name? 이름이 뭐죠? I reum e mwojyo?
MORE ADJECTIVES Few . . . . . . . . . 적은 Slow. . . . . . . . . 느린 Fast . . . . . . . . . 빠른 COLORS White . . . . . . . . 흰색 Black . . . . . . . . 검정 Red . . . . . . . . . 빨강 Blue . . . . . . . . . 파랑 Green. . . . . . . . 초록 Yellow . . . . . . . 노랑 Purple . . . . . . . 보라 Orange. . . . . . . 주홍 Pink . . . . . . . . . 분홍 Brown . . . . . . . 갈색 Grey. . . . . . . . . 회색 VERBS Go . . . . . . . . . . Stop. . . . . . . . . Meet . . . . . . . . Part away. . . . . Laugh. . . . . . . . Cry. . . . . . . . . . Sit . . . . . . . . . . Stand . . . . . . . . Like . . . . . . . . . Hate . . . . . . . . . Live . . . . . . . . . Die . . . . . . . . . Departure. . . . . Arrival . . . . . . . Different . . . . . Same . . . . . . . . Far away . . . . . Near. . . . . . . . . Enter . . . . . . . . Exit. . . . . . . . . . On . . . . . . . . . . Off . . . . . . . . . .

My name is ~. 저는 ~입니다. Jeoneun ~ipnida. Good luck to you. 당신께 행운이 있기를. Dangshinkke haengwun i itgireul. I didn’t know. 몰랐습니다. Mollatsseum-nida. What day is today? 오늘은 무슨 요일 입니까? Onuel eun museun yo il ipnikka?
ANIMALS Cow . . . . . . . . . Horse . . . . . . . . Dog/Crab. . . . . Puppy . . . . . . . Cat. . . . . . . . . . Rabbit . . . . . . . Turtle . . . . . . . . Mouse . . . . . . . Alligator . . . . . . Lion . . . . . . . . . Snake . . . . . . . Tiger . . . . . . . . Bear. . . . . . . . . Monkey . . . . . . INSECTS Ant . . . . . . . . . . Bee . . . . . . . . . Cicada . . . . . . . Dragonfly. . . . . Mosquito . . . . . Fly . . . . . . . . . . 소 . . . . . . . . . . So 말 . . . . . . . . . . Mal 개/게 . . . . . . . . Gae/Ge 강아지. . . . . . . Gang aji 고양이. . . . . . . Goyang-i 토끼 . . . . . . . . Tokki 거북이. . . . . . . Geobugi 쥐 . . . . . . . . . . Jwi 악어 . . . . . . . . Ageo 사자 . . . . . . . . Saja 뱀 . . . . . . . . . . Baem 호랑이. . . . . . . Horang-i 곰 . . . . . . . . . . Gom 원숭이. . . . . . . Wonsungg개미 . . . . . . . . Gaemi 벌 . . . . . . . . . . Beol 매미 . . . . . . . . Maemi 잠자리. . . . . . . Jamjari 모기 . . . . . . . . Mogi 파리 . . . . . . . . Pari

BASIC KOREAN VOCABULARY
DAYS OF THE WEEK Monday . . . . . . 월요일. . . . . . . Wol yo-il Tuesday . . . . . . 화요일. . . . . . . Hwa yo-il Wednesday . . . 수요일. . . . . . . Suyo-il Thursday . . . . . 목요일. . . . . . . Mok yo-il Friday. . . . . . . . 금요일. . . . . . . Geum yo-il Saturday . . . . . 토요일. . . . . . . Toyo-il Sunday . . . . . . 일요일. . . . . . . Il yo-il MONTHS January . . . . . . February . . . . . March . . . . . . . April . . . . . . . . . May . . . . . . . . . June. . . . . . . . . July . . . . . . . . . August . . . . . . . September. . . . October . . . . . . November . . . . December . . . . DATES 1st . . . . . . . . . . 2nd . . . . . . . . . 3rd . . . . . . . . . . 4th . . . . . . . . . . 5th . . . . . . . . . . 6th . . . . . . . . . . 7th . . . . . . . . . . 8th . . . . . . . . . . 9th . . . . . . . . . . 10th . . . . . . . . . 11th . . . . . . . . . 12th . . . . . . . . . 20th . . . . . . . . . 21st . . . . . . . . . 22nd . . . . . . . . 30th . . . . . . . . . 31st . . . . . . . . . SEASONS Winter . . . . . . . Spring . . . . . . . Summer. . . . . . Fall . . . . . . . . . . 일월 . . . . . . . . Il wol 이월 . . . . . . . . I wol 삼월 . . . . . . . . Sam wol 사월 . . . . . . . . Sa wol 오월 . . . . . . . . O wol 육월 . . . . . . . . Yu wol 칠월 . . . . . . . . Chil wol 팔월 . . . . . . . . Pal wol 구월 . . . . . . . . Gu wol 십월 . . . . . . . . Shi wol 십일월. . . . . . . Ship il wol 십이월. . . . . . . Ship i wol 일일 . . . . . . . . Il-il 이일 . . . . . . . . I-il 삼일 . . . . . . . . Sam-il 사일 . . . . . . . . Sa-il 오일 . . . . . . . . O-il 육일 . . . . . . . . Yu-gil 칠일 . . . . . . . . Chil-il 팔일 . . . . . . . . Pal-il 구일 . . . . . . . . Gu-il 십일 . . . . . . . . Ship-il 십일 일 . . . . . . Ship il-il 십이 일 . . . . . . Ship ee-il 이십 일 . . . . . . I ship-il 이십일 일 . . . . I ship il-il 이십이 일 . . . . I ship i-il 삼십 일 . . . . . . Sam ship-il 삼십일 일 . . . . Sam ship il-il 겨울 . . . . . . . . Gyeo-ul 봄 . . . . . . . . . . Bom 여름 . . . . . . . . Yeoreum 가을 . . . . . . . . Ga eul

. . . . . . . . Jeokgeun . . . . . . . . Neurin . . . . . . . . Ppareun . . . . . . . . Huinsaek . . . . . . . . Geomjeong . . . . . . . . Ppalgang . . . . . . . . Parang . . . . . . . . Chorok . . . . . . . . Norang . . . . . . . . Bora . . . . . . . . Juhong . . . . . . . . Bunhong . . . . . . . . Galsaek . . . . . . . . Hwoesaek

INTERROGATIVE Who . . . . . . . . . 누가 . . . . . . . . Nuga What . . . . . . . . 무엇을. . . . . . . Mu-utseul When . . . . . . . . 언제 . . . . . . . . Unje Why . . . . . . . . . 왜 . . . . . . . . . . Wae Where . . . . . . . 어디서. . . . . . . Eodiseo How . . . . . . . . . 어떻게. . . . . . . Eotteoke CONJUNCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . And . . . . . . . . . 그리고. . . . . . . Geurigo So . . . . . . . . . . 그래서. . . . . . . Geuraeseo Or/Also . . . . . . 또는 . . . . . . . . Ttoneun But . . . . . . . . . . 그러나. . . . . . . Geureona ADJECTIVES Light. . . . . . . . . Heavy . . . . . . . Dirty. . . . . . . . . Strong . . . . . . . Weak . . . . . . . . Deep . . . . . . . . Shallow . . . . . . Different . . . . . . Similar . . . . . . . Hot. . . . . . . . . . Cold . . . . . . . . . High . . . . . . . . . Low . . . . . . . . . Numerous . . . . 가벼운. . . . . . . Gabyeo-un 무거운. . . . . . . Mugeo-un 더러운. . . . . . . Deoreo eun 강한 . . . . . . . . Ganghan 약한 . . . . . . . . Yahkhan 깊은 . . . . . . . . Gip eun 얕은 . . . . . . . . Yadht eun 다른 . . . . . . . . Dareun 닮은 . . . . . . . . Dalmeun 뜨거운. . . . . . . TTeugeo eun 추운 . . . . . . . . Chu eun 높은 . . . . . . . . Nopeun 낮은 . . . . . . . . Najeun 많은 . . . . . . . . Maneun

가다 . . . . . . . . Gada 서다 . . . . . . . . Seoda 만나다. . . . . . . Man nada 헤어지다 . . . . . He-eojida 웃다 . . . . . . . . Utda 울다 . . . . . . . . Ulda 앉다 . . . . . . . . An dda 일어서다 . . . . . Ireo seoda 좋아하다 . . . . . Joa hada 싫어하다 . . . . . Shireohada 살다 . . . . . . . . Salda 죽다 . . . . . . . . Juka 출발하다 . . . . . Chubal hada 도착하다 . . . . . Dochak hada 다르다. . . . . . . Da reuda 같다 . . . . . . . . Gatda 멀다 . . . . . . . . Meolda 가깝다. . . . . . . Gakkapda 들어가. . . . . . . Deu reogada 나가다. . . . . . . Nagada 켜다 . . . . . . . . Kyeoda 끄다 . . . . . . . . Kkeuda

FAMILY MEMBERS Grandfather . . . 할아버지 . . . . . Harabeoji Grandmother. . 할머니. . . . . . . Halmeoni Father . . . . . . . 아버지. . . . . . . Abeoji Mother. . . . . . . 어머니. . . . . . . Eomeoni Older brother. . 형 . . . . . . . . . . Hyeong Older sister . . . 누나 . . . . . . . . Nuna Younger bro. . . 남동생. . . . . . . Namdongsaeng Younger sis. . . . 여동생. . . . . . . Yeodongsaeng

GENERAL VOCABULARY Water. . . . . . . . 물 . . . . . . . . . . Mul Outdoors . . . . . 밖 . . . . . . . . . . Bakk Half . . . . . . . . . 반 . . . . . . . . . . Ban Night . . . . . . . . 밤 . . . . . . . . . . Bam Fire. . . . . . . . . . 불 . . . . . . . . . . Bul Mountain . . . . . 산 . . . . . . . . . . San Hand . . . . . . . . 손 . . . . . . . . . . Son Clothes . . . . . . 옷 . . . . . . . . . . Ot Sleep . . . . . . . . 잠 . . . . . . . . . . Jam House . . . . . . . 집 . . . . . . . . . . Jip Car. . . . . . . . . . 차 . . . . . . . . . . Cha Book . . . . . . . . 책 . . . . . . . . . . Chaek Gun . . . . . . . . . 총 . . . . . . . . . . Chong Knife . . . . . . . . 칼 . . . . . . . . . . Kal Marriage . . . . . 결혼 . . . . . . . . Gyeolhon Tour . . . . . . . . . 관광 . . . . . . . . Gwan gwang Husband . . . . . 남편 . . . . . . . . Nampyeon Hospital . . . . . . 병원 . . . . . . . . Byeongwon A stroll . . . . . . . 산책 . . . . . . . . Sanchaek Present . . . . . . 선물 . . . . . . . . Sunmul Newspaper . . . 신문 . . . . . . . . Shinmun Bank . . . . . . . . 은행 . . . . . . . . Eun haeng Bachelor . . . . . 총각 . . . . . . . . Chong gak Student . . . . . . 학생 . . . . . . . . Haksaeng Cash . . . . . . . . 현금 . . . . . . . . Hyun geum

PAGE 36 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

TRANSPORTATION

USO in Korea: There for you
USO Seoul, Camp Kim Tel: 724-3301/7781/7003 Address: #104, Galwol-Dong, Yongsan-Ku, Seoul 140-150, Korea

What to expect upon arriving at Incheon
When you arrive in Korea at Incheon International Airport, one thing is almost certain - you will be tired and wish you were anywhere else rather than dealing with paperwork. Do not, under any circumstances, try to bring weapons or contraband into Korea. While the customs inspectors are pleasant and helpful, they are also very thorough. Contraband, such as drugs and deer antlers, will get you in trouble not only with the Koreans but also the U.S. Military Police. All incoming personnel must first process through the 1st Replacement Company desk at the airport. Inbound Army personnel must use the 1RC bus to Yongsan Garrison. Soldiers have to use this form of transportation, unless a sponsor has obtained prior clearance from 1RC. This policy applies to staff sergeants and below. Senior noncommissioned officers and officers can be picked up by a sponsor if they get prior clearance. For information, call 7236452, or commercial 0505-723-6452. At Incheon International Airport, newcomers are met by U.S. Forces Korea reception personnel at the baggage claim area. If you do not see the reception personnel in the terminal, go through the entire customs and immigration and baggage claim process with your leave form, orders and identification card ready. For civilians only, make sure your passport is stamped. You should look for the U.S. Military Liaison Office located near Gate 14. There are several exits out of the baggage claim area. If you are unsure which exit is correct, go ahead and depart any exit. You should read the monitors located above the exit doors. Your flight number will be posted with an exit door letter. If you have exited the wrong way, don’t worry, you will be able to easily walk to the correct exit. Once you have met your sponsor, they will most likely take you directly to your lodging, but please check-in to 1RC first. The first night’s lodging is paid for by 1RC, but only if personnel check-in. The 1RC will also be able to advise you where you need to go for in processing. For civilians only, if you need to go to Yongsan on your own, go through any of the exit doors. You can either take a taxi (expensive) or the Dragon Hill Lodge shuttle (free) to Yongsan Garrison. If you wish to take the bus, look for signs to the USO desk, located at Gate 14. If the USO desk is open, they can tell you when the bus to Yongsan is departing. Since you will be in permanent change of station status, you and your family members will have priority above anyone else wishing to ride the bus, aside from any others in PCS status. Taxis are located outside the terminal. Army and Air Force Exchange Service taxis have English-speaking drivers. They are the only taxis authorized to come on-post, so it is better to take one of these. The AAFES taxis, which are black with gold letters, park to the far right as you exit the airport. The AAFES taxi stand is near Gate 14. For information, call 02-7913-5550. All AAFES taxis have meters, that read in Korean currency, but drivers accept U.S. dollars. If you take a Korean taxi, be sure to have Korean currency. Try to select a cab which has clearly visible identification about both the driver and vehicle. A taxi ride to post will cost about $50-$60. Passengers travelling on foreign airlines at the Incheon International Airport should use the newly-opened terminal building. Until now, both domestic and foreign airlines have used the existing terminal. With the opening of the new terminal building, the moving line for arrival and departure procedures will be significantly changed. Arriving at the existing terminal, passengers of foreign airlines should go through check-in and departure procedure, and get on STARLINE (shuttle railway) at the underground of terminal to move to the new terminal building. It takes about 10 minutes to get to the terminal building including walking. During arrival, take STARLINE at the terminal building, move to the existing terminal and go through the arrival procedure. Check-in counters on third floor of the existing terminal will be rearranged. In the past, check-in counters of Korean Air and Asiana Airlines were located on the east side and foreign airlines were on the west side. However, Asiana Airlines will move to the west and foreign airlines will move to the center. Unlike the existing terminal, the newly-built terminal building is equipped with facilities only for departure and arrival procedures. It has two stories below and five above the ground. Among 30 gates of the terminal building, three are available for the world’s largest passenger plane-A380. All Military Arrivals All Army personnel must report to the 1RC, Bldg. 4034 next to the Dragon Hill Lodge. You will have a short briefing, and then check into lodging. Locations for inprocessing vary depending on service. Contact your military liaison or sponsor. nU.S. Army - Army personnel begin inprocessing at 1st Replacement Company. Call 723-6452. nU.S. Air Force - Air Force members inprocess with the Air Force Element. Call 723-8389. nU.S. Navy - Naval personnel begin in Yongsan with the Personnel Support Detachment on Main Post. Call 723-4651. nU.S. Marine Corps - Marines inprocess with the Administrative Office on Main Post. Call 723-7032.

Administrative Offices: Mon -Fri 0800-1700 Tours and Travel: M-Sat, 0800-1700 Canteen: M-F, 0700-1400 USO Seoul, Moyer Rec Center Tel: 723-4130 Address: #104, Galwol-Dong, Yongsan-Ku, Seoul 140-150, Korea Hours of Operation: TuesdaySaturday, 0900-1700 USO Incheon Airport Tel: 723-8621/6056 Address: #104, Galwol-Dong, Yongsan-Ku, Seoul 140-150, Korea Hours of Operation: Monday-Sunday, 0600-2300 USO Casey Garrison Tel: 730-4466/4813/4812 Address: Bldg. S3025 Eesadan, Camp Casey, Dongduchon, Kyunggi-do USO Building: Tues-Sat 0800-2200, Sun ,1200-1800 USO Canteen Tues-Sat, 0700-1400 USO Humphreys Garrison Tel: 753-6281 Hours of Operation: Tuesday-Saturday 0900-1800 USO Osan AMC Terminal Tel: 784-3491 Address: AMC Terminal APO AP 96278 Hours of Operation: Tuesday 06001600, Wed 0900-1500, Thurs 07001700, Friday 0900-1500 USO Daegu Mon-Fri 0900 - 1900 For more information about USO Daegu, visit www.uso.org or call USO Daegu at Tel: 764-4437 USO Mobile Canteen Want to improve morale in the field for your Servicemembers? Or need music for a unit, company organizational day? Request the Mobile Canteen to come to your location! Call 730-4813/4467 for information. For information about the USO in Korea: http://affiliates.uso. org/korea

Airport Shuttle Bus
Dragon Hill Lodge Departure Incheon Stop #5 Incheon Stop #11
Incheon Departure Stop #14

6:30 7:28 7:30 7:40 8:50 9:00

**7:00 8:00 8:01 ##

** 08:30 10:00 10:01 ##

10:30 11:29 11:30 11:40 12:50 13:00

**15:30 16:30 16:31 ##

Dragon Hill Lodge Arrival Moyer Rec Ctr Arrival
** Operated by New Kyong Dong Tours Co

## 1st Replacement Company (1RC)-Provided Buses Depart Incheon for 1RC (building across parking lot from DHL) at: 08:00, 10:00, 17:00, 18:00, 19:00, 21:00, and 22:00. Priority is given to inbound PCS personnel but other passengers may ride on a Space Available basis. IAW AR 58-1, RIDERSHIP PRECEDENCE: (1) ACTIVE DUTY AND DOD PERSONNEL ON OFFICIAL ORDERS (I.E. PCS, TDY, AND EMERGENCY LEAVE) (2) DOD CONTRACTORS PERFORMING OFFICIAL TRAVEL (3) NON-DOD FEDERAL EMPLOYEES ON OFFICIAL ORDERS (4) STANDBY CATEGORY PASSENGERS (IN ORDER OF PRIORITY): A. OFF-DUTY MILITARY AND DOD CIVILIANS (I.E. REGULAR LEAVE) B. RESERVE AND NATIONAL GUARD MEMBERS C. DEPENDENTS OF ACTIVE-DUTY PERSONNEL D. RETIREES

MEDICAL CARE

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 37 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

65th Medical Brigade On or Off Post; You Are Always Our Patient
The staff of 65th Medical Brigade welcomes you to the Korea! The mission of the 65th Medical Brigade is to provide patient-friendly access to high quality health care through all phases of tour normalization, while remaining trained and ready . The 65th Medical Brigade strives to make itself the pride of the community and an organization of choice in which to serve and work. As our Army’s only MTOE medical unit, 65th Medical Brigade embraces the challenge of providing Joint Commission accredited care and USAMEDCOM business practices, while remaining ready to transition to hostilities in order to fight and win. To accomplish its varied and complex missions, the 65th Medical Brigade has many subordinate organizations throughout the Korean Peninsula. Some of these organizations are the Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital, which provides hospitalization, surgical services, intensive care, and numerous specialty care clinics; the 168th Area Support Medical Battalion, which provides Family Health Clinics services in each area; and several Troop Medical Clinics. The 121 Combat Support Hospital is a 164 field hospital in support of combat operations or operations other than war. To allow the medical staff to maintain clinical proficiency, the personnel for the 121 Combat Support Hospital works at the Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital. Included within the brigade are the 618th Dental Company, which provides dental services throughout the Peninsula and the 106th Veterinary Detachment, which performs the dual mission of food inspection and animal patient care. Upon arrival, with the assistance of the 1st Replacement Company, our 65th Medical Brigade personnel will assist you with the medical portion of your in-processing. They will provide information pertinent to obtaining health, dental, and pet care while you are stationed in Korea. In addition to on-post medical coverage, the 65th Medical Brigade also has partnered with over 20 Korean hospitals. Many of the hospitals feature Western trained specialists, as well as English-speaking staff members to assist and treat our patients. Keeping with its mission, the 65th Medical Brigade offers courtesy vans to the facilities, and provides patient liaisons to help you through the process. The 65th Medical Brigade truly believes in our motto, “On or Off Post, you are Always our Patient”. For information, call 737-3085 (DSN) or 011-822-7917-3085(commercial) or visit http://www.korea.amedd.army.mil.

Off-post medical facilities
USAG Casey / Red Cloud
Uijong Bu St. Mary’s Hospital http://www.cmcujb.or.kr/eng/main/index.jsp Address: 65-1, Geumo-Dong, Uijeongbu, Gyeonggi-Do Phone Number: 031-820-3636 Emergency Room: 031-820-5200 Woo and Shin Skin Clinic http://www.wooskin.co.kr/N_ENG/eng_1.asp Address: 15-3 Galwol-Dong, Yongsan-Gu, Seouly Phone Number: 02- 756-5118, 756-9121

USAG Humphreys
Dankook Hospital Address: #16-5 Anseo-Dong, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-715, Republic of Korea Phone Number: 041-550-6070 Emergency Room: 041-550-6839 Ajou University Hospital http://hosp.ajoumc.or.kr/eng/ Address: San 5 Wonchon-Dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-721, Korea Phone Number: 031-219-4312/4311 Emergency Room: 031- 219-7800 Wonju Christian Hospital Phone number: (033) 741-1675/1676

USAG Yongsan
Samsung Hospital http://english.samsunghospital.com/ Address: International Health Services, Samsung Medical Center 50 llwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul, Korea 135-710 Phone Number: 02-3410-0200/0226 Emergency Room: 02- 3410-2060 Severance Hospital http://www.yuhs.or.kr/en/ Address: International Health Care Center, Severance Hospital, 134Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 Phone Number: 02-2228-5800 Emergency Room: 010-9948-0982 Asan University Center http://www.amc.seoul.kr/eng/ Address: 388-1 Pungnap-2dong, Songpa-gu, 138-736 Phone Number: 02--3010-5001 Emergency Room: 02-3010-3333 Hanyang University Center http://hmc.hanyang.ac.kr/english/ Address: 17 Haendang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-792 Phone Number: 02-2290-9553 Emergency Room: 02-2290-8282/8283/8284 Cha General Hospital Address: 650-9 Yeok-Sam 1-Dong, Kang-Nam- Gu, Seoul Phone Number: 02-3468-3127 Emergency Room: 02-3468-3060/3061 Ilsan Paek Hospital http://www.paik.ac.kr/en Address: 2240 Daehwha-Dong, Ilsan-Gu, Koyang Si, Kyunggi-Do Phone Number: 031-910-7777 Fax Number: 031-910-7460 Emergency Room: 031-910-7119 EWHA Women’s University Hospital Phone Number: (02) 760-5457 CAMP EDWARD/JSA AND SEOUL AREA Kang Nam St. Mary’s Hospital www.cmckangnam.or.kr/eng/main/index.jsp Address: #505 Banpo-Dong, Seochu-Gu, Seoul, 137,040, Korea Phone Number: 02-590-2932 Yoido St. Mary’s Hospital Address: 62, Yeouido-dong, Yeongdeungpo-Gu, Seoul, 150-713 Phone Number: 02-3779-2212 Emergency Room: 02-3779-1199 Cheil Hospital Address: Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, 1-19, Mukejeong-dong, Jung-gu, Seoul 100-380 Phone Number: 02-2000-7114/7062

USAG Daegu
Dongsan Hospital https://www.dsmc.or.kr/e-dsmc/index.htm Address: Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University, #194 Dongsan Dong, Joong-gu, Daegu, 700-712- Korea Phone Number: DSN 768-7497, 053- 250-7359, 053 250-7303/7997, Emergency Room: 053-250-7167 Hyosung OB/GYN Hospital http://www.hshospital.co.kr/english.html Address: 105-2 Jung- Dong Susung-Gu, Daegu, Korea Phone Number: 053-766-7073 Emergency Room: 053-212-7971 Dong Eui Hospital http://www.demc.kr/english/ Address: San 45-1, Yangjeong-Dong, Jin-gu, Busan City, Korea Phone Number: 051- 863-7892 English Speaking Personnel: Available (016-856-8323) Kumi Cha General Hospital Address: 855 Hyungkok-dong, Gumi-si, Kyungsangbuk-do, Korea 730-728 Phone Number: 054-450-9997-9/ 054-450-9883 Emergency Room: 054-450-9869-70 Christian Hospital Kwangju Address: 264 Yanglim-dong Namgu, Kwangju , Korea Phone number: (062) 650-5691 Emergency Room: (062) 650-5300 English Speaking POC : Ms. Sen Mi and Mr. Kim Woo Young Yeungnam University Hospital http://www.yumc.ac.kr Address: 317-1 Daemyungdong, Namgu, Daegu, Phone Number: 053-623-4114/ 010-4786-8001 Emergency Room: 053-620-3191-2

TRICARE in Korea Upon arrival in Korea, active-duty Soldiers will participate in a TRICARE brief at the 1st Replacement Company. TRICARE Prime enrollment forms will be distributed for activeduty accompanied Soldiers who have their family with them in Korea, as well as forms for activeduty personnel who are unaccompanied. TRICARE Prime is not authorized for unaccompanied family members and coming to Korea will adversely affect family members’ medical coverage if they are not command sponsored. All active-duty Soldiers need to enroll in TRICARE Pacific. Also during this brief, the TRICARE representative will tell Soldiers how to enroll family members staying in the United States or in other locations what to do if visitors need medical attention while they are here, what to do when traveling and needing medical attention, and how to handle any medical claims Soldiers or family members might receive while stationed in Korea or residing in the United States. For information on TRICARE contact the TRICARE Service Center at 736-7236 or visit the TRICARE website at www.korea. amedd.army.mil. Dental, Veterinary Services Dental care for Soldiers, Civilian employees and Family member, and veterinary care for pets, is available at clinics across the peninsula. For additional information on dental service availability and eligibility requirements, please call 736-5051. Visit the 65th Medical Brigade website for pet adoption information. For information about bringing pets to Korea, logon to http://www.korea.amedd.army.mil.

Visit http://www.korea.amedd.army.mil for information on these facilities and specialties available. All facilities listed have English-speaking staff on hand.

PAGE 38 • WELCOME EDITION http://imcom.korea.army.mil

WELCOME TO KOREA

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The Red Cloud/Casey Castle Chapel offers worship services to the Area I community; The Daegu Chapel offers weekly services and is known for its holiday tree lighting celebration during the winter holidays; Stained glass at the Red Cloud/Casey Division Chapel is designed to evoke the spirit of service for its warrior community; Humphreys Garrison hosts weekly religious services like this Protestant gathering; The Catholic Youth ministry program hosted a worship service for young people throughout the region; Worship services and faith-based programs are available throughout the Korea Region, with some services even offered in Korean.

WELCOME TO KOREA

WELCOME EDITION • PAGE 39 http://imcom.korea.army.mil

Community members celebrate Purim together during one of the Korea Region’s many faith-based community activities.

Area I Worship Schedule
Protestant Services
Collective Collective Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday Sunday Gospel Sunday 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 10 a.m. 11 a.m. 11 a.m. 11 a.m. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Stone Chapel Stanley Chapel West Casey Chapel Warrior Chapel Crusader Chapel Hovey Chapel Memorial Chapel, Casey Camp Stanley Chapel CRC Warrior Chapel CRC Warrior Chapel Casey Memorial Chapel Camp Hovey Chapel

Area II Worship Schedule
Protestant Services
Sunday Sunday Sunday 9:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m. 8 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 11 a.m. 12:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m. Brian Allgood Hospital K-16 Chapel Hannam Village Chapel Memorial Chapel South Post Chapel South Post Chapel South Post Chapel South Post Chapel Memorial Chapel Memorial Chapel Brian Allgood Hospital Memorial Chapel Sunday

Area III Worship Schedule
Protestant Services
Collective 11 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 5 p.m. KATUSA 7 p.m. 7:30 p.m. Freedom Chapel Suwon Air Base Chapel Freedom Chapel Freedom Chapel Freedom Chapel Freedom Chapel Sunday

Area IV Worship Schedule
Protestant Services
Collective Protestant 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 5 p.m. 12:15 a.m. Contemporary 7 p.m. 7 p.m. KATUSA 7 p.m. 6:30 p.m. Camp Carroll Camp Walker Camp Walker Camp Walker Camp Carroll Camp Walker Camp Carroll Camp Walker

Liturgical Sunday Contemporary Sunday Traditional Sunday Gospel Sunday Mision Pentecostal Hispana Sunday United Pentecostal Sunday KATUSA Tuesday

Gospel Contemporary Tuesday Korean Wednesday

Church of Christ Gospel Wednesday Friday Tuesday Tuesday

COGIC Sunday KATUSA Sunday Tuesday Tuesday

Catholic Services
M, W, T, F Sunday Mass 11:45 a.m. 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Freedom Chapel Freedom Chapel Suwon Air Base Chapel Sunday

Catholic Services
Mass 9 a.m. 11:45 a.m. Camp Walker Camp Carroll

Seventh-Day Adventist Saturday Sunday

Episcopal

Catholic Services/Mass
Sunday Sunday Sunday 9 a.m. 12 p.m. 9:30 a.m. CRC Warrior Chapel West Casey Chapel Camp Hovey Chapel

Catholic Services
Catholic Mass Saturday Sunday Sunday M, W, T, F 1st Sat. 5 p.m. 8 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 11:45 a.m. 9 a.m. 7 p.m. Memorial Chapel South Post Chapel Memorial Chapel Memorial Chapel Memorial Chapel South Post Chapel

Jewish Jewish
Friday 6:30 p.m. West Casey Chapel

Friday

The Command Chaplain’s Office is here to perform, provide, or coordinate total religious support to the United Nations Command, U.S. Forces Korea and Eighth U.S. Army Servicemembers, their families and authorized civilians across the full spectrum of operations from armistice to war. Visit the U.S. Forces Korea Religious Support site at: http://www.usfk.mil/usfk/fkch.aspx for helpful links and information

Korea-wide Army chaplain points of contact
USAG Yongsan Chaplains Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Jeffrey D. Hawkins: [email protected], 738-3009 Chaplain (Maj.) Terry E. Jarvis: [email protected], 738-4043 USAG-Humphreys Chaplains Chaplain (Maj.) John Chun: [email protected], 753-7274 Chaplain (Capt.) Anthony Flores: [email protected], 753-7042 USAG-Red Cloud Chaplains 2ID Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Jonathan Gibbs: [email protected], 732-7998 Red Cloud Chaplain (Maj.) Alfred Grondski: [email protected] 732-6169 USAG Daegu Chaplains Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Kwon Pyo: [email protected], 764-5455 Chaplain (Capt.) Mike Jones: [email protected], 765-8991

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