Paper Boat

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International Contest

The Paper Boat
Construction of a Paper Boat with Maximum Deadweight Capacity

Deadline: April 5th 2013
st

1 Prize: 500 € !

For a new World Record 500 € extra !
Only 5 very simple conditions have to be fulfilled:

Mass of empty boat
Ratio length to breadth
Midship section coefficient
Waterplane area coefficient
Waterplane half angle of entrance

mLS
L/B
cM
cWL
α







10 g
2
0,95
0,85
30°

What else should be observed:
Boats should be built completely out of paper, any type of glue may be used.
Boats should not any air chamber
The design should allow for an even loading, otherwise precise loading instructions should
be supplied.
Shipbuilders are ask to christen their boat and to label it properly.
Everyone can take part in the contest: children, students, adults, either on its own or in
teams!
Up to two boats can be sent in by each individual shipbuilder or team.
How is the maximum deadweight capacity determined?
All boats will first be weighted by the jury, then thoroughly water proofed with a special
coating (spray) and finally loaded with small lead pellets (of about 4 mm in diameter) until
they sink or collapse.
Prizes will be awarded in the following categories:
Main prize: maximum deadweight capacity while observing all conditions!
Best ratio of deadweight to mass of empty boat
Most accurate prediction of maximum deadweight
Innovative design, best construction, most interesting documentation
Day and place of contest
th

25 April 2013
Foyer Large Lecture Hall – Albert-Einstein-Str. 2
18051 Rostock, Germany
Answers to further questions can be found here:

Boats are to be send to:
University of Rostock
Lehrstuhl Schiffbau
Albert-Einstein-Str. 2
18059 Rostock, Germany
where they should arrive before April 5th!

www.paperboat.de

Why should the 5 simple conditions have to be fulfilled?
The boats should be lightweight

mLS



10 g

The boats should be longer than wide
The boats should look like a boat, not a cuboid

L/B
cM




2
0,95

cWL



0,85

α



30°

The boats should have a nicely shaped bow

What is the “Midship section coefficient” cM?
Naval Architects use the value of the “Midship section coefficient” as
one measure to express the slenderness of the ship's hull form.
If a ship's hull is cut into two pieces by a vertical cut in the middle of
the ship's length (like in the middle of a loaf of bread), a cross
section is generated which is bounded by the hull form
and the draft of the ship: the midship section area AM.
The value of this midship section area AM is divided
by the draft T multiplied by the breadth B of the ship.
Only for a cuboid (like a shoe box) this quotient equals 1, for
beautiful, slender ships this quotient always equals less than 1.

AM
CM = B • T

br e
ad
th

B

Midship section area

AM

draft T

What is the “Waterplane are coefficient” cWL?
Here the same holds as for the midship section coefficient
except the hull is cut horizontally at the draft of the ship
(like a baguette cut into two halves to prepare a sub).
The value of the resulting waterplane area AWL is divided
by the length L multiplied by the breadth B of the ship.
Only for a cuboid this quotient equals 1, for beautiful,
slender ships this quotient always equals less than 1.

AWL
CWL = B • L

br

What is the “Waterplane half angle of entrance” α?

L

AW

h
dt
ea
B

t er
Wa

L
gt h
n
e
l
r ea
ea
n
pl a

Waterplane,
half angle of entrance

α

The Waterplane half angle of entrance is used as a
measure for the “sharpness” of a ship's hull form in the
bow region.
The angle α is measured between the waterline contour at
the draft T (neglecting the local shape of the stem) with
reference to the centerplane of the ship.
For a cuboid this angle is 90° but for beautiful, slender
ships this angle is always far less than 90°.

How to calculate the deadweight capacity DW ?
Archimedes of Syracuse (287 BC – 212 BC) has discovered
that the mass of a freely floating object equals the mass of
its displaced volume → Archimedes' Principle !
Based on this physical law, the deadweight capacity DW
can easily be calculated.

Answers to further questions can be found here:




= ρ∙∇ [t]
= mLS + DW [t]

DW

= ∆ - mLS = ρ∙∇ – mLS [t]


mLS

total mass of boat
mass of empty boat


ρ
DW

displaced fluid (water) volume [m³]
density of fluid (fresh water: 1.0 [t/m³])
mass of load = deadweight capacity

www.paperboat.de

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