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www.theprincetonsun.com
OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Obituary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Contract extension
Talks concerning municipal attorney
Ed Schmierer’s contract continue. PAGE 2
“Hispanics in Princeton,” a
cultural celebration co-spon-
sored by Princeton Public
Schools and the Latin
American Legal Defense and
Education Fund in honor of
Hispanic Heritage Month, will
be held on Oct. 10, from 6-8
p.m., at John Witherspoon
Middle School auditorium.
The program will feature poet-
ry, song and dance as well as
local speakers examining the
rich cultural heritage of
Hispanics past and present in
our area.
Hispanic Heritage Month is
recognized nationwide from
Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 to celebrate
the culture and traditions of
those who trace their roots to
Spain, Mexico and the Spanish-
speaking nations of Central
America, South America and
the Caribbean. According to
2012 estimates, more than
360,000 people identify them-
selves as Hispanic in Mercer
County.
“We recognize the impor-
tance of celebrating a very
large portion of our community
and incorporating the Hispanic
community into the Princeton
Community,” said Nina Lavado,
the newly named Parent
Education and Community
Outreach Coordinator for
Princeton Public Schools and
the coordinator for Latinos En
Progreso at PPS.
SPOTLIGHT
Cultural event
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
A large crowd packed the McAneny The-
atre at Princeton Day School on Oct. 2 to
hear Pulitzer Prize-winning author
Jhumpa Lahiri speak about her new novel
“The Lowland.”
The event, hosted by the Princeton Pub-
lic Library, featured a reading from the
novel followed by an interview conducted
by fellow Pulitzer-winner Jeffrey Eu-
genides.
Set in both India and the United States,
“The Lowland” tells the tragic story of two
brothers, a woman haunted by her past, a
country in the midst of revolution and a
lasting love.
Lahiri said her first inspiration for the
novel came from a conversation she had
with her father 16 years ago about a pair of
young brothers who were executed by po-
lice for their involvement with a rebel
group called the Naxalites.
“I was just sort of getting my bearings as
Authors draw crowd at Day School
please see NIGHT, page 12
KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
Pulitzer Prize-winning
authors Jhumpa Lahiri
and Jeffrey Eugenides
discuss Lahiri’s new
book, ‘The Lowland,’ at
an Author Talk on Oct. 2.
2 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
Anita Benarde, a longtime
Princeton resident, is celebrating
the 40th anniversary of her clas-
sic children’s book “The Pump-
kin Smasher” with a first-ever
reprinting.
First released in 1972, the book
tells the story of the fictional
town of Cranbury, where all the
pumpkins are smashed on three
consecutive Halloweens. The
town almost decides to cancel
Halloween, but then they work to-
gether to discover the Pumpkin
Smasher.
Benarde said the setting of the
book is actually Princeton.
“In my head, this happened in
our neighborhood in Princeton,”
Benarde said. “I called the town
Cranbury because Princeton
sounds a little too scholarly, and I
thought Cranbury was more of a
holiday name.”
Benarde’s book, which quickly
became a bestseller, was also one
of the first children’s books on
the market to feature a multira-
cial cast of characters.
“One really interesting thing is
that one of the main characters
in ‘The Pumpkin Smasher’ is a
person of color,” Benarde said.
“People of color just were not in
children’s books at the time. I
don’t know why I did that at the
time. It was just part of living
here, and it seemed natural to
write it that way.”
Benarde, a fine artist whose
work has been exhibited in nu-
merous galleries in the United
States, as well as in England,
France and Moscow, drew all the
illustrations in the book.
“People loved those illustra-
tions,” Benarde said. “Johnson &
Johnson actually bought a few of
the originals for their educational
gallery.”
Benarde said she had no idea
how popular the book was
until her grandson did a Google
search last year, and discovered
that classic printings of the
book were selling for more than
$500.
“There were so many people
across the country who were on-
line talking about
the book, and how it was such a
precious childhood memory for
them. It was unbelievable,” Be-
narde said. “My grandson said,
‘you know, you have to do another
printing of this book, so many
people want it.’”
Benarde said she reached out
to several publishers, but found
that the world of children’s book
publishing has changed.
“I set out to get a publisher, and
you just end up dealing with so
many machines,” she said. “I
called my old publisher, and I
couldn’t even get to talk to a real
person there. So I decided to just
publish it myself.”
Benarde self-published the
reprinting, which is now avail-
able on Ama-
zon, but she
said that sev-
eral large
publishing
houses have
shown in-
terest in
picking up
the book.
Benarde
said she
was in-
spired to
write the
chil-
dren’s
book after becom-
ing a mother.
“I had three children and a
husband,” she said. “And I saw
how much fun Halloween is for
children. We lived in London for a
year, and even there they cele-
brate Halloween. It’s an excuse to
have fun, and an excuse to laugh.”
Benarde said she thinks the
book has stayed popular over the
last four decades because of its
universal message.
“The moral is really to work to-
gether, and to think twice before
you do something that will hurt
other people,” Benarde said. “It’s
fantastic that something like this
could make an impression on so
many children, then and now, be-
cause it really talks about bully-
ing, and a community getting to-
gether to solve the problem.”
Municipal attorney contract talks continue
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
An ongoing discussion among
Princeton Council members will
determine whether municipal at-
torney Ed Schmierer’s contract
will be extended through 2014.
Discussions have taken place in
closed session, including a session
after the Sept. 23 council meeting,
from which Schmierer recused
himself.
Schmierer was the municipal
attorney for Princeton Township
from 1980 until consolidation at
the beginning of 2013.
Schmierer was chosen as the at-
torney of the consolidated munic-
ipality by a majority council vote,
but Councilmembers Jenny Cru-
miller and Jo Butler voted against
the appointment.
At the Jan. 1 reorganization
meeting, Crumiller asked that the
attorney’s contract be subjected to
a closer review.
“It’s not anything personal, but
I haven’t seen a copy of the agree-
ment,” Crumiller said at that
meeting. “I made a pledge to my
former colleagues and the resi-
dents of Princeton to keep an eye
on legal costs, but I don’t have the
numbers or the terms, so I’d like
to make a motion to table it until
we can have more of a discus-
sion.”
Crumiller’s motion failed, but
concerns about rising legal costs
later in the year eventually
prompted Schmierer to adjust the
rate the town is charged for his
services.
The mayor and council are re-
viewing all of their one-year pro-
fessional service agreements, offi-
cials said. A closed session special
meeting was held on Sept. 26. Offi-
cials have remained tight-lipped
about the meeting’s subject, but
the notice indicated that the pur-
pose was simply, “personnel.”
Schmierer has worked closely
with the council throughout 2013,
and was designated the “conflict
of interest” attorney in June.
Since that appointment, he has is-
sued recommendations to council
members on multiple issues, in-
cluding a recommendation in Au-
gust that indicated that Council-
woman Heather Howard, a
Princeton University employee,
should recuse herself from nego-
tiations over the school’s volun-
tary contribution to the town.
Schmierer also issued an opinion
that Mayor Liz Lempert, whose
husband is a tenured professor at
the university, does not have a
conflict of interest in that same
matter. Officials expect that the
future of the attorney’s profes-
sional service agreement will be a
continuing discussion in the final
months of 2013.
Schmierer said he would like to
continue serving as the municipal
attorney.
COURTESY IMAGES
Fine artist and Princeton resident Anita Benarde illustrated her
children’s book, ‘The Pumpkin Smasher,’ in 1972. The first reprinting
is available now on Amazon.
Author celebrates anniversary of children’s book
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
34 Puritan Court
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Sold: $1,700,000
Real estate tax: $33,415 / 2012
Approximate Lot Size: 2.15 acres
This two-story colonial has six bedrooms
and five full and two half bathrooms.
Features include a stone turret with an
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equipped kitchen, full finished basement,
two fireplaces and security system.
10 Russell Road
Sold: 1,615,000
Real estate tax: $30,599 / 2012
Approximate Lot Square Footage: 35,284
This two-story Dutch colonial home has
five bedrooms and five full and two half
bathrooms. Features include dormer win-
dows dotting gambrel roofs, Brazilian
cherry floors, two Rumford fireplaces and
a professionally outfitted kitchen.
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BRIEFS
Federal application filed
for pipeline project
Oklahoma-based Williams
Company filed an official applica-
tion with the Federal Energy Reg-
ulatory Commission to build a
1.2-mile natural gas pipeline ex-
tension on the existing Transco
line that runs through Princeton.
The extension will be part of
the 6.36-mile Skillman Loop,
which runs along the Princeton
Ridge and into Montgomery.
FERC’s review of the applica-
tion process is expected to take
between eight and 10 months.
Williams Co. filed the application
on Sept. 30, giving the Princeton
Council 30 days from that date to
file to be an intervener in the
process. A town with intervener
status has the opportunity to re-
quest hearings and appeal deci-
sions on the project, according to
FERC’s website.
The Council is expected to hear
a resolution to become an inter-
vener at the Oct. 14 meeting.
Princeton names Hary
interim health officer
Princeton has named Robert
Hary as the interim health officer.
Hary will run the health depart-
ment while the town decides on a
permanent solution after former
health officer David Henry re-
signed in September.
Hary is a former president of
the state health officers associa-
tion, and worked as the health of-
ficer and town administrator of
West Windsor until his retire-
ment in July 2012.
The Princeton Council passed
a resolution on Sept. 23 designat-
ing Hary as the interim head of
department, “without competi-
tive bidding as a ‘professional
services’ contract because a serv-
ice will be rendered by a person
authorized by law to practice.”
Hary will bill the town at an
hourly rate of $75, with a $25,000
cap. Hary officially took over the
department on Sept. 24.
Town considers options
to reduce coyotes, foxes
Princeton is considering
adding coyotes and foxes to the
regular deer cull this upcoming
hunting season.
Officials have said the town
has received numerous com-
plaints about a growing coyote
population in the last two years,
and the larger animals have
killed several pets. A large fox
population in town is dangerous
for residential cats.
The coyote and foxhunt would
be the first for the municipality,
which regularly pays sharpshoot-
ers from licensed hunting firm
White Buffalo, Inc. to cull deer as
part of a population control ef-
fort. In 2012, bow hunters or
sharpshooters killed 160 deer, and
108 died in road accidents.
Bob Considine, a state Depart-
ment of Environmental Protec-
tion spokesman, said the state
does not issue permits to towns
for coyote or fox culls.
“There’s no mechanism in
place other than the general coy-
ote hunting season,” Considine
said. “For coyote and foxes, towns
don’t apply for a permit.”
Considine also said the DEP
would help Princeton find a hunt-
ing firm if it decides to go ahead
with the cull.
In Mercer County, hunters can
legally kill one coyote with a bow
and arrow from Sept. 14 to Nov. 8,
and unlimited coyotes with a
firearm or a bow from Nov. 9 to
March 15, 2014. The trapping sea-
son is Nov. 15 to March 15.
The Animal Control Advisory
Committee, chaired by Council
President Bernie Miller, met on
Oct. 3 to determine the town’s
plan. A resolution is expected to
come before the Council at the
Oct. 14 meeting.
BOE to announce
new superintendent
The Princeton Board of Educa-
tion scheduled a special meeting
on Oct. 8 to announce the new ap-
pointee to the position of superin-
tendent left vacant by the retire-
ment of longtime superintendent
Judith Wilson.
The school board hired recruit-
ing firm Hazard, Young Attea and
Associates in March to provide a
list of candidates for the position.
Board President Tim Quinn
said the process was in its final
stages.
“We fully expect to announce
the appointment at the meeting,”
Quinn said. “The contract won’t
have been signed, but we’ll have
the appointee with us, and we ex-
pect that everything will proceed
as planned.”
Quinn said that while the
terms of the contract have been
agreed upon, county and state of-
ficials had to give approval before
it could be officially signed.
“That might happen before the
meeting, but we don’t anticipate
it,” Quinn said.
Visit The Princeton Sun’s web-
site at www.theprincetonsun.com
for full coverage of the Oct. 8
meeting.
— Katie Morgan
Please recycle this
newspaper.
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
Princeton Day School senior Neeraj De-
vulapalli has set out to spread his love of
tennis around the world.
The 17-year-old South Brunswick resi-
dent, who plays singles at PDS, was in-
spired by his time as a volunteer for Nation-
al Junior Tennis and Learning of Trenton.
“I got so much out of my time there vol-
unteering with underprivileged kids,” De-
vulapalli said. “I was just disappointed that
I wasn’t able to take it further.”
Devulapalli founded “Game, Set,
Health,” a 501 c3 non-profit, his freshman
year at PDS. Devulapalli’s mission is to col-
lect used tennis equipment, and donate it to
organizations to give kids from low-income
areas an opportunity to play.
“I feel like you see lots of organizations
in low-income areas that give kids what
they need to play baseball and soccer,” De-
vulapalli said. “But you don’t really see a
lot of tennis. And I just thought, well, all
you really need is one friend, two rackets
and a ball.”
Devulapalli got the ball rolling by put-
ting a collection box in the Garden State
Tennis Academy, where he was training.
“I researched organizations, and at first
it was local, and it just got so much bigger,”
Devulapalli said. “There were so many peo-
ple willing to donate. I found four or five or-
ganizations in New Jersey, New York, Flori-
da and Canada. Then it spread even fur-
ther.”
Devulapalli eventually found the Victo-
ria Tennis Academy, an organization in
Kenya that didn’t have courts on which to
play. Devulapalli began sending packages of
equipment to Collins Agwanda, the acade-
my’s director.
in our opinion
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08042 and 08540 ZIP
codes.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
[email protected] For advertis-
ing information, call (609) 751-0245 or
email [email protected]
The Sun welcomes comments from readers –
including any information about errors that
may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to [email protected], via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too.
The Princeton Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
PRINCETON EDITOR Katie Morgan
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
ELECTION LETTERS
Letters to the editor regarding the
Nov. 5 election will not be printed in the
Oct. 30 edition. The Oct. 23 edition will
be the last edition before elections to
print these letters.
Student spreads love of tennis to world
please see COST, page 9
V
ote them out office – all of
them. That seems like an ap-
propriate response to the fed-
eral government shutdown that began
the first day of October and, as of this
writing, was still in effect.
It’s pathetic. It truly is. We the peo-
ple of the United States of America
voted these people into Congress to
represent our best interests. But in the
name of their political party, and not
in the name of those who they repre-
sent, they have failed to reach agree-
ments to balance the nation’s budget
and decided to shut down.
As a result, more than 2 million fed-
eral workers will see their paychecks
delayed, and it’s possible that 800,000 of
those people might never get repaid.
That is because, of course, as is typical
with our government, the politicians
aren’t affected by their own decisions,
while those whom they represent
must bear the brunt of it all.
A government “shutdown” in reali-
ty isn’t a complete closing of doors. By
law, certain agencies must operate
with unsalaried employees. That in-
cludes agencies that deal with nation-
al security and also those that manage
benefits such as Social Security pay-
ments. So, in effect, these people are
forced to work, with no pay, just be-
cause the politicians whom they chose
to represent them are deciding to play
party politics instead of coming to an
agreement for the good of the people.
This is just one example of how the
shutdown affects these politicians’
constituents. The longer it drags on,
the worse it will get. Veterans may not
receive benefits. The Centers for Dis-
ease Control and Prevention will halt
its flu program, right as flu season be-
gins. Small business financing could
be seriously damaged. And the list
goes on.
Politicians nowadays don’t seem to
care about what’s good for the people.
They only care about their own party
line – whether it be Republican, Demo-
crat, Tea Party or otherwise. That’s
sad, and it negatively affects all of us.
So the only response we, as citizens,
can make is to vote them out of office.
Bring in new people who care about
the people they represent and not the
party to which they belong. Bring in
new people with new ideas who want
change and welcome compromise.
This partisan political culture we
live in needs to stop.
Partisan politics at its worst
The government shutdown is a disgrace
Your thoughts
How is the political shutdown affecting
you, if at all? What are your thoughts on
the shutdown? Let your voice be heard
through a letter to the editor.
OCTOBER 9–15, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 7
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. *Ad-
ditional parts & labor in excess of one hour will be
billed at our scheduled rates. One coupon per cus-
tomer / per household. Expires 10/31/13.
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Not
accepted at time of installation. Not valid with any
other discounts, repairs or prior purchases. One
coupon per customer / per household. Coupon has no
cash value. Expires 10/31/13 .
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Not accepted at time of
installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases.
One coupon per customer / per household.
Coupon has no cash value. Expires 10/31/13.
93
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October 17th, 18th and 19th
The following are reports from
the Princeton Police Department.
On Sept. 18 at 1:26 p.m., an em-
ployee of CVS called police to re-
port that sometime between 11
p.m. on Sept. 17 and 7 a.m. on
Sept. 18, an unknown person or
persons removed approximately
300 plastic bins from the rear of
the building. The cost of the bins
was unknown at the time of the
report.
On Sept. 19 at 5:48 p.m., a 23-
year-old man presented himself
at police headquarters to satisfy a
warrant that had been issued for
his arrest out of Princeton Mu-
nicipal Court. The man was
processed and released after post-
ing $200 cash bail.
On Sept. 20 at 10:30 p.m., a 15-
year-old Princeton juvenile was
charged with possession of con-
trolled substances after a police
investigation revealed that they
were in possession of marijuana
under 50 grams. The youth was
released to a parent.
On Sept. 21 at 10:53 a.m., subse-
quent to a motor vehicle stop, a
67-year-old woman was discov-
ered to have consumed alcoholic
beverages prior to operating her
vehicle.
The woman was placed under
arrest and transported to police
headquarters. She was processed
and later released pending a
court date. She was additionally
charged with reckless driving
and careless driving.
On Sept. 21 at 4:16 p.m., the
manager of CVS reported that
two juveniles attempted to
shoplift an item from the store.
Upon patrol’s arrival, the manag-
er of the store advised that two ju-
veniles attempted to steal a box of
condoms valued at $6.99, and that
the two had been detained by
store personnel. The item was re-
turned to the store and the juve-
niles were subsequently turned
over to their respective parents.
On Sept. 21 at 10:40 a.m., during
a motor vehicle stop, an active
traffic warrant in the amount of
$100 was located for the 23-year-
old driver out of Trenton Munici-
pal Court. The driver was placed
under arrest, transported to po-
lice headquarters and was re-
leased after posting $100 cash
bail.
On Sept. 21 at 1:14 a.m., a vic-
tim reported to police that while
drinking with an acquaintance,
he was assaulted by that person.
The victim could not provide any
additional information about the
person. The victim was transport-
ed to UMCPP for treatment of
cuts and bruises to the face and
arms.
On Sept. 23 at 1:24 a.m., a vic-
tim called police to report that
sometime between Sept. 20 and
the time of the call, an unknown
person had scratched his vehicle,
which was parked in his drive-
way.
The damage was made to sever-
al areas on the vehicle, and the
cost to repair was unknown at the
time of the call.
On Sept. 24 at 11:26 p.m., subse-
quent to a motor vehicle stop, it
was discovered that two underage
males were in possession of alco-
holic beverages.
One, a passenger in the vehicle,
was also found to be in possession
of drug paraphernalia. The driv-
er was issued additional sum-
monses for speeding and having
an open container of alcohol in a
vehicle. Both were placed under
arrest, transported to police head-
quarters and processed. Both
were later released with a pend-
ing court date.
On Sept. 25 at 9:48 p.m., during
a motor vehicle stop, an active
warrant out of Plainsboro Munic-
ipal Court was discovered for a
62-year-old man in the amount of
$276. The man was placed under
arrest and transported to police
headquarters where he was later
released with a pending court
date in Plainsboro.
On Sept. 25 at 7:05 a.m., a vic-
tim called police to report that
someone had taken her cat. The
caller advised that the cat had
been secured on the porch of the
residence on the morning of Sept.
25 at approximately 5:30 a.m., and
by 6:45 a.m. the cat was gone. The
caller reported that indicators on
the porch were that the cat was
taken rather than had run away.
The cat, a one-year-old gray
Chartreaux, is valued at more
than $1,500.
police report
BIRTHS
Did you or someone you know recently welcome a baby into the
family? Send us your birth announcement and we will print it, free of
charge.
THURSDAY OCT. 10
Takacs String Quartet, Princeton
University Concerts, Richardson
Auditorium. (609) 258-2800. 8
p.m. The six Bartok string quar-
tets will be performed in two
evenings. Continues Friday, Oct.
11. $20 to $45. princetonuniversi-
tyconcerts.org.
The Acoustic Fogs, Alchemist &
Barrister. 28 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-5555. 10
p.m. 21-plus. www.theaandb.com.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books. 122
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 497-
1600. 5:30 p.m. Panel discussion
about 'When People Come First:
Critical Studies in Global Health.'
Panelists include Joao Biehl, pro-
fessor of anthropology at Prince-
ton University; Adriana Petryna,
professor of anthropology at
University of Pennsylvania; Didi-
er Fassin, professor social sci-
ence at the Institute for
Advanced Study; Vincanne
Adams, professor of medical
anthropology at the University of
California, San Francisco; and
Joseph J. Amon, director at the
Health Rights Watch.
Inside a Child's Mind Series,
Princeton Public Library. 65
Witherspoon St., Princeton.
(609) 924-9529. 7 p.m. 'The
Social Curriculum: Five People
Skills Every Child Needs to Learn'
presented by Eileen Kennedy-
Moore. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Hispanic Heritage Month Celebra-
tion, Princeton Regional Schools.
John Witherspoon Middle
School. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. 'Hispan-
ics in Princeton,' a cultural cele-
bration co-sponsored by the Lat-
in American Legal Defense and
Education Fund. Poetry, song,
dance and speakers.
www.prs.k12.nj.us.
For Men Only, Man to Man Talks.
Panera Bread, 136 Nassau St.,
Princeton. (609) 915-5873. 7
p.m. 'NJ Men's Better Marriage
and Relationship' group to dis-
cuss relationship issues and solu-
tions to have the best marriage
possible. Facilitated by Steve
Schloss, author of 'The Man's
Secret to a Happy and Sexy Mar-
riage in Less Than 10 Minutes a
Day' and blogger at www.man-
tomantalks.com.
FRIDAY OCT. 11
Edward T. Cone Concert Series,
Institute for Advanced Study.
Wolfensohn Hall, Einstein Drive,
Princeton. (609) 734-8228. 8
p.m. Cassatt String Quartet with
Muneko Otani and Jennifer Lesh-
nower on violin, Sarah Adams on
viola and Nicole Johnson on cel-
lo present music by Shostakovich
and Ravel, and a New Jersey pre-
miere of Bruce Adolphe's 'Mary
Cassatt: Scenes from Her Life.'
Register. Free. www.ias.edu.
In the Pink Fashion Show, YWCA
Princeton. Westin Hotel, Forre-
stal Village, Plainsboro. (609)
497-2100. 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Benefit for the Breast Cancer
Resource Center features a fash-
ion show of fall and winter collec-
tions modeled by breast cancer
survivors, their husbands, chil-
dren, doctors and nurses. Cock-
tail reception, silent auction and
floral centerpieces. Register.
$100 to $125. www.ywcaprince-
ton.org.
SATURDAY OCT. 12
Edward T. Cone Concert Series,
Institute for Advanced Study.
Wolfensohn Hall, Einstein Drive,
Princeton. (609) 734-8228. 8
p.m. Cassatt String Quartet with
Muneko Otani and Jennifer Lesh-
nower on violin, Sarah Adams on
viola and Nicole Johnson on cel-
lo present music by Shostakovich
and Ravel, and a New Jersey pre-
miere of Bruce Adolphe's 'Mary
Cassatt: Scenes from Her Life.'
Register. Free. www.ias.edu.
Princeton University Concert Jazz
Ensemble, Princeton University.
Richardson Auditorium. (609)
258-9220. 8 p.m. Concert fea-
tures the Freddie Hendrix Septet
with Henrix as solo trumpeteer.
Register. $15.
princeton.edu/~puje.
Highlight Tour, Princeton University
Art Museum. Princeton campus.
(609) 258-3788. 2 p.m. Free. art-
museum.princeton.edu.
24-Hour Play Festival, Theatre
Intime. Hamilton Murray Theater,
Princeton University. (609) 258-
1742. 8 p.m.
www.theatreintime.org.
Clean-up Day, Princeton Battlefield
Society. Princeton Battlefield.
(908) 295-3732. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Volunteer to help clean and
restore small portions of the
park. www.theprincetonbattle-
fieldsociety.com.
SUNDAY OCT. 13
Art Exhibit, Princeton University
Library. Firestone Library. (609)
258-2324. 1 p.m. Gallery tour of
'Egyptian Film Poster Designers
and Print Shops of Hassan
Mazhar Gassour and Sayed 'Ali
Ibrahim al-Nasr.' A second gallery
tour will be held on Sunday, Nov.
1, at 1 p.m. On view to February.
www.fpul.org.
Harvest and Music Festival, With-
erspoon Grill. Hinds Plaza, 57
Witherspoon St., Princeton.
(609) 924-6011. 11:30 a.m. to 5
p.m. Family-friendly outdoor
event features music, food, activ-
ities and more. Rain or shine.
Portion of proceeds from food
and activity sales benefit the
Trenton Area Soup Kitchen. Pie
eating contest. $5. www.wither-
spoongrill.com.
Walking Tour, Historical Society of
Princeton. Bainbridge House. 158
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 921-
6748. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Two-hour
walking tour of downtown
Princeton and Princeton Univer-
sity includes stories about the
early history of Princeton, the
founding of the university and
the American Revolution. $7; $4
for ages 6 to 12. www.princeton-
history.org.
MONDAY OCT. 14
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Cho-
rus. 1065 Canal Road, Princeton.
(732) 236-6803. 7:15 p.m. 'Music
Maker' workshop. New members
are welcome. www.jerseyharmo-
ny.org.
Poets at the Library, Princeton
Public Library. 65 Witherspoon
St., Princeton. (609) 924-9529.
7:30 p.m. Readers are Peter Mur-
phy, author of 'Stubborn Child'
and 'Thorough and Efficient;' and
Carolina Morales, author of
'Bride of Frankenstein and other
Poems,' 'In Nancy Drew's Shad-
ow,' and 'Dear Monster.' Open
mic follows. Free. www.princeton-
library.org.
Support Group, Princeton PFLAG.
Trinity Church. 33 Mercer St.,
Princeton. (732) 679-8812. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Parents provide sup-
port for parents and their chil-
dren who are coping with the
pressures and misunderstand-
ings associated with being gay,
lesbian, transgender or gender
variant people. E-mail mur-
[email protected] for informa-
tion. www.pflagprinceton.org.
Meeting, Women's College Club of
Princeton. All Saints Church. 16
CALENDAR PAGE 8 OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
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OCTOBER 9–15, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 9
G
ra
n
d
O
p
en
in
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Send news and photos to
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Tell us your news.
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Cost of shipping, customs issues are biggest
challenges, senior Devulapalli says
“It gives these kids something
they haven’t had access to before,”
Devulapalli said. “I get a real
sense of satisfaction from know-
ing I’m really helping.”
Devulapalli said he travels to
India every few years to visit fam-
ily. When his parents visited last
year, he sent some rackets with
them. Devulapalli said that was
the beginning of his connection
in India, where he now regularly
sends packages containing rack-
ets, grips, strings, clothing and
sneakers. Devulapalli said one of
the biggest challenges he’s faced
is the high cost of shipping and
customs issues.
“At first it was really difficult,
and the shipping companies were
sort of suspicious I think,” Devu-
lapalli said. “But I’ve been work-
ing really closely with UPS and
USPS, and they’ve been very sup-
portive. They see me coming with
my big boxes and they know ex-
actly what I’m doing.”
Devulapalli, who is the head of
the Model UN team and the Young
Entrepreneurs’ Society at PDS,
said he hasn’t yet decided on a col-
lege, but he has given a lot of
thought to his career path.
“Community service is an inte-
gral part of my lifestyle,” Devula-
palli said. “I’m definitely leaning
toward a career in social entrepre-
neurship.”
Devulapalli said his focus now
is spreading awareness about
“Game, Set, Health” and growing
his charitable network. He can be
contacted via email at neera-
[email protected], and a web site
for the non-profit will be available
soon.
COST
Continued from page 6
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at [email protected] Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
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PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.
10 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
1.) The issue of transparency in Council
dealings has come up again and again in
2013. If you are elected to Council this
year, how will you work to ensure an in-
crease in transparency?
Transparency is essential for demo-
cratic governance. It allows the public to
be informed of the issues, how decisions
are made and by whom, and it also gener-
ates an atmosphere of cooperation and
participation, since a well-informed pub-
lic which knows how their elected repre-
sentatives stand on the issues is also a
public which can believe that the same
elected representatives are answerable to
the public.
In Princeton we have, for years now,
had hundreds of citizens speak out on is-
sues affecting their daily lives and their
financial future, only to have their elected
representatives on Council proceed by
meeting behind closed doors and then
dictating a decision, with little
explanation about how the deci-
sion was made or under what
criteria.
This unfortunate tendency to
govern behind closed doors has
continued after consolidation.
For instance, last month the
Council voted for “action ori-
ented” minutes which record
only the outcome of Council
votes, in contradiction of New
Jersey’s Open Public Meetings
Act, which requires for “reason-
ably comprehensible” minutes
of meetings to be made available to the
public for inspection and copying. Prince-
ton residents would have to rely on Com-
munity TV videos that are not search-
able, in order to review public records.
The trend in Princeton is away from
transparency and toward making citi-
zens’ ability to review the record more
difficult.
I strongly oppose these ac-
tions. I will speak out for trans-
parency at every opportunity,
and work with residents toward
making our voices heard. I will
canvass Council members and
members of the many boards,
commissions and committees to
encourage ever greater trans-
parency. Accessibility to elected
officials and to public record
should not only be encouraged;
it is the duty of every elected
representative to facilitate open
government.
2.) What led you to the decision to run
for election?
Princeton is my home. I have lived in
Princeton since 1989. My son was born
and raised here. He attended local
schools. I have many friends in the com-
munity, who come from all backgrounds,
from New Jersey, from other states, from
Latin America and from other parts of
the world.
As a candidate, I see multiple opportu-
nities for constructive engagement with
not only the Latino community, but with
every resident, on the three most impor-
tant issues affecting us today: High prop-
erty taxes, traffic congestion and the
long-standing turmoil in the police de-
partment.
I want Princeton for Princetonians
new and old, so that we who have made
this town our home can continue to af-
ford to live here, in a thriving town where
we are all welcome to participate and con-
tinue to enjoy a high quality of life.
I believe in participation, transparency
and fiscal responsibility. That's why I am
running.
Vote for me on Nov. 5.
1.) The issue of transparency in Council
dealings has come up again and again in
2013. If you are elected to Council this
year, how will you work to ensure an in-
crease in transparency?
Transparency is a priority for me. I in-
sisted that the new Council make all
meeting documents available in advance
to the public both online and at meetings.
I recently pushed for a faster turnaround
of our meeting minutes, so we are now
making them available for adoption by
the following meeting. We are linking
meeting videos to meeting min-
utes online. Going forward, I
would like to make an invest-
ment in software and training
to update the municipality's
technological capabilities, facil-
itated by posting more of our
documents online.
I am working to have our
Planning Board meetings tele-
vised. But I also believe the
press has an important role to
play in a healthy democracy. I
try to make myself accessible to re-
porters and to be open with
them.
2.) What led you to the deci-
sion to run for reelection?
Having been elected just last
year to the newly consolidated
Princeton Council (Patrick and
I drew the short straws for the
first year of staggered terms), I
feel as though we have only just
begun. I would like to continue
my work building a new and improved
government. Some of the ongoing proj-
ects I hope to continue are working on
our new ordinances, improving the com-
posting program, creating advisory plan-
ning districts, developing a new Master
Plan, studying options for streamlining
our public works operations and updat-
ing the public works facilities to house
equipment that is currently stored out-
doors.
I also hope to continue to serve on the
Planning Board and support the Shade
Tree and Environmental Commissions
as liaison.
JENNY CRUMILLER
FAUSTA
RODRIGUEZ WERTZ
Every week, The Sun will ask candidates in the Nov. 5
election for Council seats to respond to questions pertinent to local
issues. You can find all the responses online at www.theprincetonsun.com. This week’s questions:
1.) The issue of transparency in Council dealing has come up again and again in 2013.
If you are elected to Council this year, how will you work to ensure an increase in transparency?
2.) What led to you the decision to run for reelection or election?
MEET THE
CANDIDATES
OCTOBER 9–15, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 11
1.) The issue of transparency in Council
dealings has come up again and again in
2013. If you are elected to Council this year,
how will you work to ensure an increase in
transparency?
This year, the governing body has
worked to advance transparency in sever-
al key areas. The open session goal setting
meetings at the start of the year set the
priorities for Princeton’s municipal gov-
ernment for the entire year. We identified
the goals to work on, and prioritized them
and set up a timetable to meet them. The
mayor and Council have followed up on
the vast majority of those goals, and we
have publicly reviewed our progress to-
ward fulfilling them.
The Citizens’ Finance Advisory Com-
mittee has played a key role in making the
municipal budget more accessible to the
public, continuing a best practice we car-
ried over from the township. The mayor
and Council also review munici-
pal spending versus the budget
each quarter, one of the best
practices we carried over from
the borough.
The mayor and Council have
also made our governing body
meetings more open and trans-
parent. We publish the open
meeting agenda and the full
backing material ahead of the
meetings. As I recall, when we
looked into that as an option at
the start of the year, we did not find any
other municipality in New Jersey doing
so. We also publish all written reports and
presentations with the minutes of each
meeting, substantially enhancing the pub-
lic record of those meetings. There is
room for further improvement here, most
notably, the municipality has fallen be-
hind in publishing meeting minutes, a sit-
uation we are working to remedy this fall.
I have and will continue to
promote transparency at a per-
sonal level as well. In Council
meetings as well as in gather-
ings with constituents, I consis-
tently explain my own reason-
ing for my decisions, as well as
the relevant facts and priorities
that helped shape them. I hope
that by doing so, I have helped to
make the facts and competing
priorities more clear for mem-
bers of the public, on various is-
sues facing our municipal government.
2.) What led you to the decision to run
for reelection?
Three years ago, I was selected by the
Princeton Borough Council to serve as a
citizen member of the Joint Consolida-
tion and Shared Services Study Commis-
sion. My tenure on the commission awak-
ened in me a call to community service
and leadership, and I ran for Council last
year because I felt I could make a real con-
tribution to our community as our two
municipalities combined to become one. I
started out with a few key goals: to imple-
ment the recommendations of the com-
mission and the Transition Task Force to
fully realize the intended benefits of con-
solidation, to work to improve local emer-
gency planning and management, and to
improve the working relationship be-
tween the municipality and the universi-
ty.
I was successful in my bid for a seat on
the Council. I was sworn in on Jan. 1 of
this year, and I have worked the past nine
months to follow through on each of those
goals.
I chose to run this year simply to have
the opportunity, if the voters in Princeton
approve, to continue to work on these and
other important issues for the community.
PATRICK SIMON
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Friends of Mary Jacobs Library
Cordially invites you to attend our 8th Annual Fundraiser
FOOD AND WINE
FROMSOUTHAFRICA
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Live Music, Silent Auction
Saturday, November 2, 2013
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a writer back then, and hadn’t
published any of my books. I was
searching for things to write
about,” Lahiri said. “My dad
came to visit me, and on a walk I
asked him to explain to me what
happened to these two brothers.
Even though he wasn’t there
when these brothers were killed,
he’d heard a version of what had
happened from a family mem-
ber.”
Lahiri said her father told her
the brothers were killed during a
religious festival in the neighbor-
hood in India where Lahiri’s
grandparents lived.
“I was really disturbed by this,
needless to say,” Lahiri said. “It’s
disturbing in and of itself to
think about, but also because I’d
spent so much time as a child in
that neighborhood, walking
through the streets where they’d
been walking and knowing that
landscape – knowing that particu-
lar area well. The police had come
and these two brothers had
sought refuge in a lowland, a sea-
sonally flooded area, hoping to es-
cape from the police, but they
were found and executed. My dad
gave me this scene, and I tried to
work with it.
“I wrote the scene, and I got
about two or three pages in, and
honestly I just didn’t know what
to do with it. I felt that it was be-
yond me in every way, as a writer
and as a person.”
Lahiri said she did not revisit
the scene again until after her
last collection of short stories,
“Unaccustomed Earth,” was pub-
lished in 2008.
“It was still something I want-
ed to work with,” she said. “So fi-
nally in 2008 after my last book
was finished, I went back to the
scene and I thought, ‘OK, it’s now
or never.’ It’s been a very long ges-
tation.”
Eugenides, the author of “The
Virgin Suicides,” “Middlesex”
and “The Marriage Plot,” asked
Lahiri to explain the messages
contained within her story, and
the development of the tone
throughout the novel.
After an hour of conversation,
Eugenides opened the talk up to
the audience. Audience members
asked Lahiri about her writing
schedule, and how she chooses
the names of her characters.
Lahiri discussed the importance
of character names, and how they
help her get to know her charac-
ters.
“In this book there was one
character, and I couldn’t settle on
her name,” Lahiri said. “She’s a
minor character that one of the
brothers is involved with at one
point.
Her name is Holly. But before
that, her name was Meredith.
And it was funny because as soon
as she became Holly, everything
about her became believable to
me. And before she was Holly, I
didn’t feel comfortable around
her.”
Lahiri ended the night with a
book signing, where audience
members thanked her for her in-
sights and gushed about her
newest novel.
The Princeton Public Library’s
Author Talk series will culminate
on Nov. 15 at the John Wither-
spoon Middle School auditorium
with a talk by New Jersey native
Matthew Quick, who will discuss
his novel “The Silver Linings
Playbook.” More information is
available on the library’s website
at www.princetonlibrary.org.
12 THE PRINCETON SUN — OCTOBER 9–15, 2013
*0% APR with payment
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obituary
Grover C. Tash Jr.
Sept. 27, 2013
Grover C. Tash, Jr., 94,
passed away Friday, Sept. 27, at
University Medical Center of
Princeton at Plainsboro as a re-
sult of injuries suffered from a
fall.
Tash was a lifelong Princeton-
ian who operated Grover Tash
Liquors in downtown Princeton
for more than 55 years. He was
known as “Sonny” to his cus-
tomers and friends.
Up until his death, Tash re-
mained active and above all en-
joyed his independence. At the
age of 77, Tash survived a five-by-
pass heart surgery and soon after-
ward he continued his favorite
past time of playing golf at
Princeton County Club three to
four times a week.
Son of the late Grover Tash Sr.
and Florence Tash, he was prede-
ceased by his sister Ann Tash-
Rosso and brother William. He is
survived by a nephew, William
Rosso of Skillman, a niece,
Jacque Rosso of Santa Anna,
Calif., four great nieces; Jennifer,
Mia, Gianna and Charli Rosso, as
well as his great nephew Michael
Rosso.
Cremation services were pri-
vate. A memorial service was
planned for a later date.
Extend condolences at
TheKimbleFuneralHome.com.
Night ends with book signing
NIGHT
Continued from page 1
OCTOBER 9–15, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 13
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All Saints Road, Princeton. (609)
924-9181. 1 p.m. Guest speaker is
Tony Sala, a composer, who per-
forms a concert with a mix of
Latin Spanish music peppered
with some American music.
Refreshments. Free.
TUESDAY OCT. 15
Keith Franklin Jazz Group, Wither-
spoon Grill. 57 Witherspoon St..
(609) 924-6011. 6:30 p.m. to 10
p.m.
Art Exhibit, Princeton Day School.
The Great Road, Princeton. (609)
924-6700. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Artist's reception for 'Extrava-
gant Media,' an exhibit featuring
the works by visual arts and
design faculty. www.pds.org.
Art Exhibit, Princeton University
Art Museum. McCosh 50, Prince-
ton campus. (609) 258-3788. 7
p.m. 'Spirit House Players' pre-
sented by Amiri Baraka in con-
junction with 'New Jersey as
Non-Site,' an exhibit reconstruct-
ing the symbiotic relationship
between New Jersey and the
postwar avant-garde. More than
100 works of art including pho-
tography, collage, mixed media,
found objects, film, audio, books,
magazines, posters and more,
created between 1952 and 1976.
'Insider's View' presented by Kel-
ly Baum, on Thursday, Nov. 7, at
McCormick 101, at 5:30 p.m. art-
museum.princeton.edu.
The White Snake, McCarter The-
ater. 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 7:30 p.m.
www.mccarter.org.
International Folk Dance, Prince-
ton Folk Dance. Riverside School.
58 Riverside Drive, Princeton.
(609) 921-9340. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Ethnic dances of many countries
using original music. Beginners
welcome. Lesson followed by
dance. No partner needed. $3.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
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609-924-2610
Scott Mulhern
Fine Work in Fine
Homes & Businesses
Office:(609)466-7875
Cell:(908)342-4493
CUSTOM PAPERHANGING
Tutoring
Piano & Flute Lessons
for Children & Adults
Experienced Teacher
Please Call 609-683-5518
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care Paperhanging
Roofing
$1,000 BFF
Any new complete roofing or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Expires 10/31/13.
30 Years Experience • Family Owned & Operated
High Quality Products • Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics
Professional Installation • Serving the Tri-State area
NEW SHINGLE ROOF SPECIALISTS • SLATE ROOF REPAIRS • RUBBER ROOFS
SEAMLESS GUTTERS • SIDING • WINDOWS & DOORS • CAPPING • SOFFITS
EMERGENCY TARP SERVICE AVAILABLE • RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
FREE
ESTIMATES
FAST
EMERGENCY
SERVICE!
IP
TB
AHERIIA'S BEST
RBBFIXB & SIBIXB EXPERTS
8õß·1õ1·00ß0
ß09·924·ß0ß0
Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: [email protected]
Wow! Totally custom, remodeled
4 bedroom 2 bath corner 1st floor
property located on a great block and
only a short walk to the beach and
boards. Upgrades include new kitchen
with s/s appliances, granite, tile
backsplash with under cabinet lighting.
This unit also features hardwood floors,
vented custom stack stoned gas fireplace,
Bose surround system, new hall bath
featuring air bubble soaking tub, master
bath with frameless glass stall shower,
and corian counter tops. Brand new a/c
installed in 2013, high efficiency heater in
2007 and hot water heater in 2012. New
bedding throughout, new Trex front deck
and landing decking. This is a one of a
kind property! $649,900
JUST REDUCED! 1560 ASBURY AVE
CLASSIFIED OCTOBER 9-15, 2013 - THE PRINCETON SUN 15
LET
THE SUNS
WORK
FOR YOU!
Call
609-751-0245
for
Advertising Info.
If you’re reading your
competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money…
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Considering a home
in South Florida?
Whether you're considering a move
to a better climate, or just a second
home, or investment property, Rena
Kliot of Pulse International Realty is
the broker for buyers who want a
dependable expert in the exciting
South Florida market.
Call today to start your search
for that coastal home!
Rena Kliot, Broker | Owner
Pulse International Realty - Miami
305.428.2268
[email protected]
www.pulseinternationalrealty.com
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900

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