Princeton 1211

Published on May 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 36 | Comments: 0 | Views: 252
of x
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content


www.theprincetonsun.com
DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Unique market
Shoppers flood downtown area for
Small Business Saturday. PAGE 2
Celebrate music, joy and
friendship with the PSO and
the Princeton High School
Choir this holiday season.
PSO Holiday POPS! is a
Princeton tradition that shim-
mers with wintertime
favorites.
This year’s holiday concert
marks the 10th year of the
PSO’s seasonal collaboration
with the PHS Choir. The choir
performs at least one choral
work at every Holiday POPS!
concert, and joins PSO Music
Director Rossen Milanov in
leading the annual, festive
sing-a-long!
This year’s concert will be
held Dec. 14 at 4 p.m. in
Richardson Auditorium.
Program selections, more
information and tickets are
available at www.princeton-
symphony.org. Tickets are
$40 for adults and $25 for
students 17 and younger.
SPOTLIGHT
Holiday POPS!
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Several thousand people flooded Palmer
Square on Nov. 29 to celebrate the start of
the holiday season.
Princeton’s annual tree lighting cere-
mony, hosted by Palmer Square Manage-
ment, has become a flawlessly executed
event that’s been hosted for more than 30
years in town.
“We’ve worked really hard to make it
perfect,” Anita Fresolone, marketing di-
rector at Palmer Square Management,
said. “We’ve tweaked it throughout the
years.”
The ceremony began with a perform-
ance from the Princeton High School
Choir, followed by rock-influenced carols
performed by the Alice Project, a local
band.
“Of course, we love having the Prince-
ton High School students here,” Fresolone
said. “And this is the second year the Alice
Project has performed. In past years, we’ve
Princeton hosts
tree lighting
please see TREE, page 3
2 THE PRINCETON SUN — DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
Shoppers hit downtown for Small Business Saturday
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
On Nov. 30, shoppers flooded
Princeton’s downtown area to
show their support for Small
Business Saturday.
Peter Crowley, president and
CEO of the Princeton Regional
Chamber of Commerce, which re-
cently formed a subgroup called
the Independent Business Al-
liance, said Small Business Satur-
day works in a community like
Princeton.
“One of the things that makes
Princeton such a unique market
is our ability to sustain independ-
ent retail businesses in the down-
town area,” Crowley said. “Small
Business Saturday is about keep-
ing those independent retail busi-
nesses in mind while you’re
doing your holiday shopping.”
Hilary Morris, founder of local
independent business group Cof-
fee Talk, said that while Small
Business Saturday helps remind
people of the value of shopping
local, Princeton’s small business-
es should be bustling every day.
“I think we’re just so inundat-
ed, and so consumed by con-
sumerism,” Morris said. “It’s the
holidays, there are these huge
sales, and all these brands and
big-box stores are clambering to
have the better sale, the longer
sale. It takes away the job of holi-
day shopping. But Princeton has
so much to offer, and you can real-
ly take your time and actually
enjoy a day of shopping when it’s
done leisurely, in Princeton with
your family.”
Morris said the designated
shopping day is just a reminder
that local stores can provide the
same items big-box stores like
Target and Walmart do.
“The reason small businesses
need to make a big noise, and do
things like Small Business Satur-
day, is that there is so much com-
petition,” Morris said. “It needs
to be special for our small busi-
nesses to survive. When you
make it a special day, it reminds
people that it’s fun to shop local.”
Morris said the biggest benefit
to shopping local, particulary
when shopping for gifts around
the holidays, is the individuality
of Princeton’s small shops and
boutiques.
“In Princeton, we really have
so many independent business-
es,” Morris said. “There are bou-
tiques and specialty stores for
clothing, jewelry, toys, paper,
shoes – anything you could want.
And a lot of times, you’ll find
more unique, one-of-a-kind
pieces. Basically, everything is a
limited edition.”
Crowley said that while people
believe shopping local is more ex-
pensive, the prices generally bal-
ance out when the investment in
the local economy is factored in.
“There’s always a tendency to
look at price,” Crowley said. “But
most independent businesses are
priced competitively, and when
you shop there, you’re reinvesting
in the community.”
Morris believes that invest-
ment in the community is the
most important aspect of Small
Business Saturday.
“Independent retailers tend to
reinvest back into the communi-
ty,” Morris said. “Big chains don’t
do that. They don’t have a person-
al connection to the community. I
think what some people don’t re-
alize is the cyclical kind of re-
sponse you get when you’re shop-
ping local. Think about the
money you’re pumping back into
your own community. A vibrant
local economy is good for real es-
tate and home prices – it’s really a
no-brainer.”
Crowley said Small Business
Saturday serves as an important
celebration of independent retail-
ers in a world that increasingly
depends on the internet for its
shopping needs.
“This year on Cyber Monday,
people spent something like $1.75
billion,” Crowley said. “That just
shows you the impact the inter-
net is having on our shopping and
how we do things. That’s why it’s
even more important that people
understand that when you do
your shopping online, you’re not
supporting your community.
Take a walk downtown! I don’t
mean to say you have to do all
your shopping offline, but you
need a nice balance of both.”
Natural gas pipeline negotiations continue
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
Negotiations between munici-
pal officials and Williams Compa-
ny, the operator of the Transco
natural gas pipeline that intends
to undertake a 1.2-mile expansion
of the line along the Princeton
Ridge, have resulted in commit-
ments from Williams, Co. that
would increase safety during con-
struction.
Willams Co. has confirmed
that it will avoid blasting at all
costs during excavation. The
threat of blasting has been a
huge concern of both municipal
officials and citizen groups, as
the project proposes to lay a 42-
inch diameter pipeline alongside
an existing 36-inch line.
Concerns were raised that
blasting so close to an existing,
operational pipeline could result
in a rupture.
“We have said that we’re going
to do everything possible to avoid
blasting,” Chris Stockton,
Williams Co. spokesman, said.
“Based on our geo-analysis, blast-
ing is not going to be necessary.”
The Princeton Ridge is a
known boulder field, and resi-
dents of nearby homes have
questioned how Williams Co.
plans to excavate the boulders
without blasting.
“There is a lot of rock there,”
Stockton said. “But we’re going
to do everything we can to avoid
it, and it does not look like we’ll
have to turn to blasting.”
Williams Co. filed its applica-
tion for the $600 million Leidy
Southeast project with the Feder-
al Energy Regulatory Commis-
sion at the end of September. If
FERC approves the project, con-
struction could begin in the
spring of 2015.
The FERC application involved
in-depth analyses of the project’s
impact on surrounding ecosys-
tems, and also included plans for
an alternate route for the
pipeline expansion.
Stockton said the inclusion of
a potential alternate route was
simply protocol, and Williams,
Co. is still very confident that the
best place to lay the pipe is paral-
lel to the existing line.
“As part of the FERC process
we’re required to evaluate a
route alternative,” Stockton said.
“It’s standard procedure. But we
are very confident that the route
we have is the best route. Based
on what we know, routing the
new pipe along the existing
pipeline has a lot of advantages.
From an environmental stand-
point, it’s definitely preferred, be-
cause we won’t be tearing up any
new land or anything unneces-
sary.”
The Princeton Ridge Coalition,
a citizens group of residents who
live along the easement for the
Transco pipeline, has also sub-
mitted an alternative route to
FERC as comments on the
Williams Co. application.
Stockton said Williams Co. will
study the alternate provided by
the Princeton Ridge Coalition, to
see if it proves viable.
“That’s really what the whole
FERC process is designed to
do,” Stockton said. “We want to
solicit input from groups and or-
ganizations and others who feel
like there’s something they want
us to explore. As part of the
process, we’ll study that very
carefully.”
In addition to their commit-
ment to avoid blasting, Stockton
confirmed that Williams Co. will
turn off the flow of gas through
the existing pipeline for a win-
dow of four to six weeks during
construction, likely when heavy
rock is being excavated.
“We are shutting off the flow of
gas through that line, which is
something that is very important
to Princeton,” Stockton said.
“That is something we’re going
to attempt to do when we’re
doing construction in areas of
heavy rock. When we’re doing
any work where there’s heavy
rock, we’re going to attempt to
significantly reduce the pressure
in the line.”
The existing line, which is a
high-pressure natural gas
pipeline, operates at between 700
and 800 pounds of pressure per
square inch. Stockton explained
that even when the line is turned
off, ambient gas requires that a
low amount of pressure be main-
tained.
“We would reduce the pressure
to 100 psi, which is very low,”
Stockton said. “We have to main-
tain some pressure because the
ambient gas in that line is not
flowing.”
Stockton said Williams Co. is
happy with the level of commu-
nication it has experienced with
Princeton and the town’s resi-
dents.
“This is really good, this ongo-
ing dialogue with the town and
the Princeton Ridge Coalition,”
Stockton said. “We’re trying our
best to accommodate them where
we can and address their con-
cerns. We’ve shown we’re willing
to work in good faith.”
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at
[email protected]. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the edi-
tor at 609-751-0245.
DECEMBER 11–17, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 3
Jefferson's Does Right By You!
(609) 924-3624 · www.ncjefferson.com
Providing Quality Service for over 66 Years!
Full Service
Bathroom
Remodeling
Experts
NJSL# 7084 · HRCL# 13VH03224100
Please recycle this newspaper.
had more classic brass bands, but
this is a little more festive and
rocking. That’s definitely the di-
rection we want to go in.”
Fresolone said she thinks the
moment the crowd most looks for-
ward to each year is Santa Claus’
appearance on the roof of the
Nassau Inn.
“The star of it all is how Santa
appears,” Fresolone said. “That
just takes so much coordination
and trust in the people on the roof,
in the Nassau Inn and on the
ground.”
Fresolone said the man who
has played Santa at the tree light-
ing for many years was ill this
year, so a new Santa took his
place.
“This year, our long-time Santa
had health problems, and that was
worrisome,” Fresolone said. “But
our Santa this year did a fantastic
job, though I do think he was
slightly shocked by the size of the
crowd.”
The giant spruce tree in Palmer
Square, illuminated at 5:30 p.m.
with the help of Santa, boasts
32,000 individual lights.
“We’ve heard it has more lights
than the tree in Manhattan,”
Fresolone said. “It rivals Rocke-
feller Center. The lights will come
down at the end of the first week
in January. They went up a few
days before Thanksgiving.”
Fresolone said it took a crew in
a cherry picker two to three days
to string the 32,000 lights on the
tree.
“I think there were a lot of
happy people out there,”
Fresolone said. “When the weath-
er is on our side, it’s always a good
thing. It’s really nice timing be-
cause it’s the night after Thanks-
giving, and sometimes family is
still in from out of town. The tree
lighting acts like a reunion for
people. The Nassau Inn was more
bustling than I’ve ever seen it. It’s
a really great vibe afterward.
We’ve gotten a lot of great feed-
back.”
Fresolone said the event has
gotten more exciting each year,
and she expects it to continue to
draw huge crowds in coming
years.
TREE
Continued from page 1
Tree has 32,000 individual lights
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
Judge makes decision
on AvalonBay building
Superior Court Judge Mary C.
Jacobson issued a decision Dec. 6
on a case that sought to block de-
veloper AvalonBay from building
a 280-unit apartment complex on
the former Witherspoon Street
site of the University Hospital.
Visit www.theprincetonsun.com
for an in-depth look at Judge Ja-
cobson’s decision and the future
of the downtown Princeton.
Princeton Pro Musica
to hold concert Dec. 22
On Sunday, Dec. 22, the majes-
tic Patriots Theater at the War
Memorial in Trenton will re-
sound with the 90-voice chorus of
Princeton Pro Musica, profes-
sional orchestra, and vibrant
young soloists in a performance
of the complete “Messiah” by
Georg Frideric Handel.
“This astonishing piece of
music is truly an ever-renewing
font of musical inspiration, capa-
ble of showing us something new
each time we revisit it…Messiah
owes its unparalleled ubiquity
and resilience to a powerful mar-
riage of music and message,”
said Dr. Ryan James Brandau,
artistic director of Princeton Pro
Musica.
The soloists are all rising stars
of the New York concert scene
and have received stellar reviews
from the NY Times.
Princeton Pro Musica invites
everyone to take a break from
shopping and connect to the en-
during music of Handel’s “Messi-
ah” that has touched so many
people the world over.
The concert will take place on
Sunday, Dec. 22 at 2 p.m. in the
Italian Renaissance Revival
splendor of the Patriots Theater
at the War Memorial in Trenton.
Ticket prices range from $25 to
$55 and may be purchased at
www.princetonpromusica.org. A
20 percent discount is available to
groups of 10 or more and can be
arranged by calling Mary at (609)
683-5122. Student tickets will be
available for $10 at the door with
student ID.
BRIEFS
DECEMBER 11–17, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 5
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
856-524-2814 856-524-2814
Theatre staffer charged
in embezzlement
Thomas John Muza, McCarter
Theatre’s general manager, has
been suspended without pay after
he was charged with embezzling
more than $100,000 from the
Princeton Triangle Club.
Muza has worked for McCarter
since 1990, and took the position
as the Triangle Club’s accountant
in 1993. The Triangle Club dis-
missed Muza on Nov. 19, the same
day he was suspended from Mc-
Carter.
A statement issued by the of-
fice of New Jersey’s Acting Attor-
ney General John Hoffman said
Muza has been charged with sec-
ond-degree theft.
The statement said the law
firm serving as the Triangle
Club’s counsel uncovered the
theft, and passed the information
on to the Division of Criminal
Justice for further investigation.
To date, the investigation has
revealed that Muza allegedly stole
more than $100,000 since 2010 by
depositing Triangle Club checks
into his personal account.
Representatives from Mc-
Carter Theatre did not comment
on the matter.
The second-degree theft charge
carries a sentence of five to 10
years and a fine of up to $150,000.
The charges will be presented to a
grand jury.
Gas line rupture
prompts evacuation
About 500 people were evacuat-
ed from 11 buildings on the
Princeton University campus
after a backhoe struck a gas line
on Dec. 1.
Shortly before 10 a.m., a back-
hoe being used by a crew of uni-
versity employees to make im-
provements to the storm
drainage system near the Mc-
Cosh Health Center struck and
ruptured a 2.5-inch high-pressure
natural gas line.
Students and staff were evacu-
ated from the surrounding build-
ings. The Princeton Fire Depart-
ment, Princeton First Aid and
Rescue Squad, the University De-
partment of Public Safety and
PSE&G responded to the scene.
Close to noon, PSE&G workers
were able to crimp the gas line
and stop the leak. Officials
cleared the evacuated buildings
and normal campus activities re-
sumed around 12:40 p.m.
No injuries were reported, and
the gas line rupture did not spark
a fire.
University sets dates
for distribution vaccine
A meningitis vaccine that is
unlicensed for use in the United
States will have a limited distri-
bution at Princeton University in
an effort to combat the school’s
outbreak of bacterial meningitis.
Bexsero, a vaccine currently li-
censed in Europe and Australia,
protects against meningococcal
serotype B bacteria, which has
caused eight cases of meningitis
at the university since March.
Though all students who live in
on-campus housing are required
to be vaccinated for meningitis,
vaccines given in the United
States do not protect against
serotype B. In an email sent to the
university community on Nov. 26,
the school announced that the
first round of Bexsero vaccines
would be available from Dec. 9-12.
The Centers for Disease Con-
trol has recommended that all un-
dergraduate students, graduate
students living in on-campus dor-
mitories and members of the uni-
versity community with specific
health conditions receive the vac-
cine.
A second dose of the Bexsero
vaccine, necessary for maximum
effectiveness, will be available in
February.
Council will select a new
municipal attorney
Princeton-based law firm
Mason, Griffin & Pierson has rep-
resented Princeton since 1955. Ed
Schmierer, a director of the firm,
served as Princeton Township’s
attorney from 1980 to 2012 before
becoming the attorney of the con-
solidated municipality in 2013.
In a closed session meeting on
Nov. 25, the Princeton Council re-
viewed formal interest state-
ments from five law firms, includ-
ing Mason, Griffin & Pierson,
which are vying to be chosen as
the town’s representative firm in
2014.
If the Council decides to re-
main a client of Mason, Griffin &
Pierson, Schmierer will not con-
tinue as the town’s attorney. An-
other director of the firm, Trish-
ka Waterbury Cecil, would take
over the position.
The Council is expected to
speak publicly about the matter
and make a decision regarding
the town’s future legal represen-
tation before the end of the year.
– Katie Morgan
BRIEFS
SPORTS SCORES
Did you know The Sun will
print sports scores, free of
charge? Send them on in.
in our opinion
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08042 and 08540 ZIP
codes.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
[email protected]. For advertis-
ing information, call (609) 751-0245 or
email [email protected].
The Sun welcomes comments from readers –
including any information about errors that
may call for a correction to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to [email protected], via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too.
The Princeton Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
PRINCETON EDITOR Katie Morgan
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
Officials receive police department audit
By KATIE MORGAN
The Sun
A public safety consulting firm hired by
the municipality in July to conduct an
audit of the police department issued its re-
port to municipal officials on Dec. 3.
The report, issued by The Rodgers
Group, recommends that the Princeton
Council appoint someone within the police
department to police chief.
“Stability of leadership within the de-
partment has to be established,” the report
reads. “There were strong feelings among
officers who were interviewed that the
head of the agency should be a chief of po-
lice. If the governing body chooses to go in
another direction, swift and effective com-
munication with organizational members
will be required to mitigate the impact of
further change to the agency which has op-
erated with uncertainty for more than two
years.”
Capt. Nick Sutter has led the department
since early 2013, when former Chief Dave
Dudeck went on a medical leave that ended
with his official retirement in September.
The Rodgers report included feedback
from officers on a variety of topics. When
asked about the current leadership, one of-
ficer was quoted as saying, “what the cur-
rent leader has done for this department in
the past six months is nothing short of a
miracle.”
While the majority of officers’ responses
praised Sutter’s work, there are other is-
sues that the report said produce “anxiety”
within the department.
“An element of distrust between the [Po-
lice Benevolent Association] and the Town
Council is evident,” the report read. “Some
PPD members felt that they were under the
eye of the politicians.”
The Rodgers Group went on to recom-
mend increased communications between
municipal officials and the police depart-
ment, and suggested creating a “ride-a-
long” program for officials to “build under-
standing.”
The full audit program run by The
Rodgers Group, which is headed by Frank
Rodgers, former deputy superintendent of
the state police, included focus group meet-
ings with officers, police officials and mu-
nicipal administration.
The original contract between the town
and the consulting firm was for $11,495,
with the potential to add focus groups as
necessary at a cost of $1,000 per day.
“I think we ended up paying for one addi-
tional day, or maybe a half a day,” Bob Br-
uschi, town administrator, said.
Bruschi said he felt the town’s money
was well-spent on the audit, and he felt the
firm’s recommendations could ultimately
be employed within the town’s administra-
tion.
“I think there’s potential for use for these
recommendations within the leadership of
the town,” Bruschi said. “There are a lot of
training opportunities, and I think we can
use some components of this in the admin-
istration.”
The full Rodgers Report is available at
www.princetonnj.gov.
Y
ou’ve heard it time and again
lately, but it’s worth repeating:
Shop local this holiday season!
We’re already two weeks into this
shortened holiday shopping season –
since Thanksgiving was so late this
year – but if you haven’t already fin-
ished your shopping, you should
strongly consider buying as local as
you possibly can.
Keeping your spending dollars in
your hometown, or at least in the re-
gion, has immense benefits on the
local economy.
Even companies as large as Ameri-
can Express are touting the impor-
tance of shopping local. The company
started the now well-known Small
Business Saturday – the Saturday
after Thanksgiving, the day after
Black Friday – in 2010 to promote
small businesses. Just last year, a
study reported an estimated $5.5 bil-
lion was spent at small businesses on
that day in 2012!
A vibrant and successful local busi-
ness community has a trickle-down ef-
fect on our own pockets. Just think:
• Successful local businesses make
other businesses want to locate in our
town.
• More businesses equals more rata-
bles, which, in turn, lowers our taxes.
• The more ratables we have, and the
lower our taxes are, the more attrac-
tive our community becomes to future
residents.
It all starts with you. If you have a
choice between buying a gift at a big
box store or a local mom-and-pop, sup-
port your neighbors by making that
purchase locally.
Our small businesses are already
struggling with a still-rebounding
economy and a holiday shopping sea-
son that is six days shorter than nor-
mal. Let’s all help them out by opening
their doors and opening our wallets to
them. We can make it a truly happy
holiday season.
Shop local!
This holiday season, support local businesses
Your thoughts
How are you playing your part this holiday
season? Share your shopping stories with
our readers through a letter to the editor.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
Heating, Plumbing,
Cooling and Fuel
SINCE 1925
Licensed On-Staff
PIumbers FuIIy Insured
16 Gordon Ave. · Box 6097 · Lawrence, NJ 08648
609-896-0141 IawrenceviIIefueI.net
S50 OFF
Separate Hot Water Heaters
Must present this coupon at the time of purchase.
May not be combined w/ any other offer. Expires 12/31/13.
10% OFF
Any Service
Up to $100. Must present this coupon at the time of purchase.
May not be combined w/ any other offer. Expires 12/31/13.
S100 OFF
Heating/Air Conditioning InstaIIation
Must present this coupon at the time of purchase.
May not be combined w/ any other offer. Expires 12/31/13.
Lic. #13VH00927200
* Getting married?
* Engaged?
* Expecting?
* Need to thank someone?
Send news and photos to
The Princeton Sun via email
to [email protected].
Tell us your news.
We’ll tell everyone else.
WEDNESDAY DEC. 11
An Evening of Christmas, Prince-
ton Theological Seminary,
Library. (609) 497-7963. 7 p.m.
'That Holy Night: Christmas Sto-
ries in Song' presented by a quar-
tet with sacred and secular
Christmas carols. Refreshments.
Free. www.ptsem.edu.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister, 28
Witherspoon St., Princeton. (609)
924-5555. 10 p.m. 21 plus.
www.theaandb.com.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Prince-
ton University, Berlind Theater,
McCarter Theater, 91 University
Place, Princeton. (609) 258-1500.
8 p.m. 'Making Theater Without a
Script' presented by Princeton
Atelier students. Reception. Free.
www.princeton.edu/arts
Bernadette Devlin, Garden Theater,
Nassau Street, Princeton. (202)
577-3998. 4:30 p.m. Screening of
'Bernadette: Notes on a Political
Journey.' Post film discussion
with Lelia Doolan, the film's direc-
tor. $15.
Documentary, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. 6:30 p.m. Screening
of 'Brooklyn Castle.', www.prince-
tonlibrary.org.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country
Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Cen-
ter, Monument Drive, Princeton.
(609) 924-6763. 7:30 p.m. to
10:30 p.m. Instruction followed
by dance. $8. www.princeton-
countrydancers.org.
Cornerstone Community Kitchen,
Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton. (609) 924-
2613. 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Hot
meals served, prepared by TASK.
Free. www.princetonumc.org.
Holiday Open House, Drumthwack-
et Foundation, 354 Stockton St.,
Princeton. (609) 683-0057. 11
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tour the official
residence of the Governor of New
Jersey featuring theaters from
the New Jersey Theater Alliance
in coordination with garden clubs
throughout the state. Registra-
tion required. $5 donation.
www.drumthwacket.org.
Ask a Lawyer, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. 7 p.m. Free private
consultations in immigration and
general legal issues. www.prince-
tonlibrary.org.
Meeting, Princeton Photography
Club, Johnson Education Center,
D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1
Preservation Place, Princeton.
(732) 422-3676. 7:30 p.m. 'Great
Sports Shots' presented by Ron
Wyatt, a sports photographer.
Refreshments. Free. www.prince-
tonphotoclub.org.
Open House, Princeton Academy of
the Sacred Heart, 1128 Great
Road, Princeton. (609) 924-8143.
9 a.m. Program and tours. Junior
kindergarten to grade 8 for boys.
Register. www.princetonacade-
my.org.
Open House, The Lewis School, 53
Bayard Lane, Princeton. (609)
924-8120. 1 p.m. Open house for
alternative education program
for learning different students
with language-based learning dif-
ficulties related to dyslexia,
attention deficit, and auditory
processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. Summer
study available. www.lewiss-
chool.org.
Princeton Public Library, 65 With-
erspoon St. (609) 924-8822. 7
p.m. Free private consultations in
immigration and other legal
issues. www.princetonlibrary.org.
THURSDAY DEC. 12
A Christmas Carol, McCarter The-
ater, 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 7:30 p.m. Holiday clas-
sic by Charles Dickens. $20 to
$60. www.mccarter.org.
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
948-4448. 8 p.m. Beginner and
intermediate dance lessons. No
partner needed. $12 includes
refreshments. vivatango.org.
Winter Market, Princeton Farmers'
Market, Princeton Public Library.
(609) 655-8095. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Produce, cheese, cakes, crafts,
and more. www.princetonfarm-
ersmarket.com..
FRIDAY DEC. 13
A Child's Christmas in Wales, The
Princeton Singers, Trinity Church,
33 Mercer St., Princeton. (866)
846-7464. 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Holi-
day concert narrated by Christo-
pher Coucill. $25. www.prince-
tonsingers.org.
An Evening of Readings and Car-
ols, Westminster Choir College,
Princeton University Chapel.
(609) 921-2663. 8 p.m. Holiday
music for choir, organ, and brass.
Register. $40 to $70.
www.rider.edu.
The Bad Plus, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place. (609) 258-2787.
8 p.m. Jazz trio. $50,
www.mccarter.org.
Sarah Donner, Jeannette Lynne,
John Anealio, and Sheltered Tur-
tle, Arts Council of Princeton, 102
Witherspoon St. (609) 924-8777.
8 p.m. Sound Bites concert
includes holiday themed music.
$10. www.artscouncilofprince-
ton.org.
Gallery Talk, Princeton University
Art Museum, Princeton campus.
(609) 258-3788. 12:30 p.m. 'Fra
Angelico's 'The Penitant Saint
Jerome in the Dessert'' present-
ed by Paolo Barbosa, museum
docent. Free. artmuseum.prince-
ton.edu.
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
912-1272. 8 p.m. to 11 p.m. Begin-
ners welcome. Lesson followed
by dance. No partner needed. $5.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Divorce Recovery Seminar, Prince-
ton Church of Christ, 33 River
Road, Princeton. (609) 581-3889.
7:30 p.m. 'Clash of Values.' Non-
denominational support group
for men and women. Free.
www.princetonchurchofchrist.co
m.
Lunch and Learn, Princeton Senior
Resource Center, Suzanne Patter-
son Building, 45 Stockton St.
(609) 924-7108. Noon. 'Motor
Vehicle Services and ID' present-
ed by Sandy Grossman from
DMV. Bring your own lunch. Bev-
erages and desserts provided.
Register. Free. www.princetonse-
nior.org.
SATURDAY DEC. 14
Holiday Concert, Voices Chorale,
Trinity Church, 33 Mercer St.,
Princeton. (609) 799-2211. 3 p.m.
'Christmastide: Choral Gems
Through the Centuries' features
holiday music by Rutter, Biebl,
Britten, and Haydn. Rochelle Ellis,
soprano, is the featured guest
artist. She will perform 'Sweet
Little Jesus Boy' and 'This Christ-
mastide.' A professor of music at
Westminster Choir College, she is
a vocal instructor at Princeton
University. $25. www.voic-
eschorale.org.
Holiday POPS!, Princeton Sympho-
ny Orchestra, Richardson Audito-
rium, Princeton University. (609)
497-0020. 4 p.m. The Princeton
High School Choir performs with
the orchestra under conductor
Rossen Milanov. A program of
marches, dances, and a sing a
long. $25 to $45. www.princeton-
symphony.org.
Nellie McKay, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place. (609) 258-2787.
8 p.m. $45. www.mccarter.org.
Russian Winter Carnival, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
St. (609) 924-8822. 2 p.m. A cel-
ebration of the heritage and cul-
ture of Russia through music,
dance, and song. www.princeton-
library.org.
A Christmas Carol, McCarter The-
ater, 91 University Place. (609)
please see CALENDAR, page 9
DECEMBER 11–17, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 9
HOMEMADE CHOCOLATES • FAVORS • BASKETS • PARTY TRAYS
2503 NOTTINGHAM WAY
HAMILTON, NJ 08619
609-586-5136
CARELLASCHOCOLATES.COM
Alex and Ani Bracelets make the Perfect Gift!
Vera Bradley, Willow Tree, Yankee Candle and so much more available.
56 Princeton Ave.
RECENTLY
SOLD HOMES
Sold: $975,000
Real estate tax: $17,829 / 2012
Approximate Lot Square Footage: 11,060
This two-story colonial has three bed-
rooms and two full and one half bath-
rooms. Features include an open floor
plan, center hall staircase, perennial gar-
den, single-car garage and full unfinished
basement.
6 Madison St.
Sold: $552,128
Real estate tax: $10,167 / 2012
Approximate Lot Square Footage: 6,109
This two-story colonial has three bed-
rooms and one full and one half bath-
rooms. Features include a stucco facade,
updated kitchen, hardwood floors, kitchen
with granite counters, walk-up attic and
full basement.
258-2787. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Holiday classic by Charles Dick-
ens. $20 to $60.
www.mccarter.org.
Ballroom Blitz, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Unitarian Univer-
salist Congregation. 50 Cherry
Hill Road, Princeton. (609) 945-
1883. 7 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Cha cha
lesson with Candace Woodward-
Clough followed by open dancing.
No partner needed. $12. E-mail
[email protected]
g. for information. www.central-
jerseydance.org.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books, 122
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 497-
1600. 1 p.m. 'For the Record:
Women Writing About Music and
Girls Making Music' is a book cele-
bration and benefit for Willie Mae
Rock Camp for Girls. Authors
Farah Jasmine Griffin, Alexandra
Vazquez, and Emily Lordi show-
case their new books.
Christmas at Witherspoon, Wither-
spoon Street Presbyterian
Church, 124 Witherspoon St.,
Princeton. (609) 924-1666. 5 p.m.
Choirs and soloists perform
music of the season.
Festival of Trees, Morven Museum,
55 Stockton St., Princeton. (609)
924-8144. Noon. to 4 p.m. Holi-
day trees decorated by area busi-
ness, garden clubs, and organiza-
tions. $6. On view Wednesdays to
Sundays through Sunday, Janu-
ary 5. www.morven.org.
A Morning with Santa, Morven
Museum, 55 Stockton St., Prince-
ton. (609) 924-8144. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Children get the opportuni-
ty to meet with Santa. Milk and
cookies included.
www.morven.org.
Mercer County Math Circle, Prince-
ton Public Library, 65 Wither-
spoon St. (609) 924-8822. 3:14
p.m. Princeton University Math
Club students share with stu-
dents in grades 6 to 12.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning
Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton. (609) 638-6552. 10
a.m. Three-mile walk on the tow-
path. Bad weather cancels. Free.
Open House, The Lewis School, 53
Bayard Lane, Princeton. (609)
924-8120. 10 a.m. Information
about alternative education pro-
gram for learning different stu-
dents with language-based learn-
ing difficulties related to dyslexia,
attention deficit, and auditory
processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. www.lewiss-
chool.org.
SUNDAY DEC. 15
String Quartet Family Concert,
Princeton Symphony Orchestra,
Princeton Public Library. (609)
497-0020. 2 p.m. Musicians
demonstrate the versatility of
their instruments. Q&A with
musicians. Free. www.princeton-
symphony.org.
Home for the Holidays, American
Boychoir, Richardson Auditorium,
Princeton University, 888-BOY-
CHOIR. 4 p.m. Family friendly
afternoon with Canadian Brass
features performance of choir,
brass, and organ, as well as a car-
ol sing along. $20 to $45.
www.americanboychoir.org.
Anthony Branker and Word Play,
Arts Council of Princeton, 102
Witherspoon St. (609) 924-8777.
7 p.m. Pre-recording session con-
cert performance of a new suite
by Anthony Branker for his
upcoming 'Forward' CD project.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.
A Christmas Carol, McCarter The-
ater, 91 University Place. (609)
258-2787. 1 p.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Holiday classic by Charles Dick-
ens. $20 to $60.
www.mccarter.org.
Service of Lessons and Carols,
Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
St. (609) 924-2613. 7:30 p.m.
Chancel, handbell, and youth
choirs. Christopher McWilliams
on organ with musicians John
Enz, Bill Gardner, Joshua Im, and
Paul Manulik. Yvonne MacDonald
and Hyosang Park direct.
www.princetonumc.org.
Walking Tour, Historical Society of
Princeton, Bainbridge House, 158
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 921-
6748. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Two-hour
walking tour of downtown Prince-
ton and Princeton University
includes stories about the early
history of Princeton, the founding
of the University, and the Ameri-
can Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6
to 12. www.princetonhistory.org.
MONDAY DEC. 16
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony Chorus,
1065 Canal Road, Princeton.
(732) 469-3983. 7:15 p.m. New
members are welcome. www.har-
monize.com./jerseyharmony.
International Folk Dance, Princeton
Folk Dance, Riverside School, 58
Riverside Drive, Princeton. (609)
921-9340. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Ethnic
dances of many countries using
original music. Beginners wel-
come. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $3.
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books, 122
Nassau St., Princeton. (609) 497-
1600. 5 p.m. Sandor Ellis Katz,
author of 'The Art of Fermenta-
tion: A Workshop.'
TUESDAY DEC. 17
Lunchtime Talk, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon St. (609)
924-8822. Noon. 'Is Science Irra-
tional?' presented by Michael
Strevens, professor of philosophy
at New York University.
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Meeting, Princeton Photography
Club, Johnson Education Center,
D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1
Preservation Place, Princeton.
(732) 422-3676. 7:30 p.m. 'Once
the Shutter Closes...Your Rights
Begin' with Lori Patrick Esq. Dis-
cussion on the creation and pro-
tection of photographs in the dig-
ital age as well as your rights and
restrictions when taking photo-
graphs of adults, children, people
on a public street; or at a public
event, public bridges, train sta-
tions, or monuments on Federal
property, private property, pri-
vately owned buildings; and
issues with secured areas.
Refreshments. Free. www.prince-
tonphotoclub.org.
Capital Networking Group, Prince-
ton United Methodist Church, 7
Vandeventer Avenue, Princeton.
(609) 635-1411. 7 a.m. weekly
networking, free.
JobSeekers, Trinity Church, 33 Mer-
cer St. (609) 924-2277. 7:30 p.m.
Networking and job support, free.
www.trinityprinceton.org.
calendar
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
10 THE PRINCETON SUN — DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
The following are reports
from the Princeton Police Depart-
ment.
On Nov. 26 at 10:08 p.m., a pa-
tient at Princeton House called to
report that he was harassed and
assaulted by two other patients at
the facility. The victim advised
that while arguing with one pa-
tient, he was punched from be-
hind by a second patient. The vic-
tim complained of pain as a re-
sult of the assault. No charges
were filed at the time of the re-
port.
On Nov. 26 at 3:29 p.m., a repre-
sentative of the church called po-
lice to report that sometime after
mass on Sunday, Nov. 24, an enve-
lope containing the church collec-
tion was stolen from the rectory.
The loss was estimated to be ap-
proximately $2,800.
On Nov. 26 at 7:53 a.m., during a
motor vehicle stop, active war-
rants totaling $175 were located
for the driver. She was placed
under arrest, transported to po-
lice headquarters, and was later
released after a friend posted her
bail.
On Nov. 29 at 10:19 p.m., while
investigating a vehicle parked
near Lake Carnegie after park
hours, an officer discovered that
the driver of the vehicle was in
possession of suspected marijua-
na. The driver was placed under
arrest, transported to police head-
quarters and was processed. He
was later released to a relative on
his own recognizance.
On Nov. 29 at 12:30 p.m., the vic-
tim called police to report that
while visiting an address in the
first block of Mercer Street, they
had parked a baby carriage out-
side the doorway of the building.
Upon returning to retrieve the
carriage 50 minutes later, the car-
riage, valued at $350, was gone.
The incident occurred on Nov. 28
between 1:30 p.m. and 2:20 p.m.
On Dec. 1 at 4:38 p.m., an em-
ployee of Indigo called police to
report that between 1 p.m. and
3:30 p.m., someone had shoplifted
a ring from the store. The ring, a
Kynamite and diamond combina-
tion, is valued at just more than
$1,900. The suspect in the theft is
described as a female in her mid-
40s, slender build with brown
hair in the company of a male
and a teenage female. Anyone
with information about the theft
is urged to contact the Princeton
Police Detective Bureau at (609)
921-2100.
police report
BIRTHS
Did you or someone you
know recently welcome a baby
into the family? Send us your
birth announcement and we
will print it, free of charge.
with purchase of 5 or more
Glide-Outs
¹
. Expires 12/31/13. *
12 THE PRINCETON SUN — DECEMBER 11–17, 2013
The fifth graders at Princeton
Academy held a two-day bake sale
last week that raised $441 for the
Children’s Hospital of Philadel-
phia’s Research for Crohn’s Dis-
ease fund.
In brainstorming for their
community service project, the
students were inspired when a
fellow classmate shared that his
sister suffered from Crohn’s Dis-
ease. After he explained the diffi-
culties she experiences and how
his family was involved with
CHOP, his peers wanted not only
wanted to help his sisters, but
others like her too.
“It was like a no-brainer,” said
Kim Carter-Trinacria, the reli-
gion teacher at the Academy. “It
was really nice to see the boys
rally around him.”
Carter-Trinacria added that
the students also want to form a
team and participate in a local 5k
in the spring, which will also ben-
efit the Research for Crohn’s Dis-
ease fund at CHOP.
“The boys just have a natural
curiosity on how they can help
others,” said Carter-Trinacria.
“And it’s not just about the money,
they just want to help those in
need.”
Princeton Academy of the Sa-
cred Heart is the only independ-
ent school for boys in junior
kindergarten through eighth
grade in New Jersey and is ac-
credited by Middle States Associ-
ation of Colleges and Schools. Lo-
cated in Princeton, Princeton
Academy is a member of the Na-
tional and International Network
of Sacred Heart Schools.
Bake sale proceeds
to go toward research
OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries,
free of charge.
1330 State Rd (Rt 206) Ste 211 | Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245 | [email protected] | www.elauwit.com
Hopewell
Lawrence
Montgomery
Princeton
West Windsor
HeIp Wanted
MARKETING REP
New wireless company.
Full or part time. Unlimited income.
See our website for details.
www.getfreeceIIservicenow.com
856-524-2814
Concrete Masonry
Firewood
FIREWOOD
908-359-3000
Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: [email protected]
WHAT A STEAL!! This spectacular
townhome boasts 2400 sq ft of living
space sitting on a huge 50x120 ft lot.
Amenities feature direct ocean views,
vinyl cedar impression siding, vaulted
ceilings, hardwood, upgraded kitchen
with granite tops, stainless steel
apps, high end furnishings, two
master suites, oversized bedrooms,
large front & rear decks, just a few
steps to the start of the boardwalk
and beautiful Gold Coast beach.
THE LOCATION IS PHENOMENAL.
THE PROPERTY AND PRICE ARE
EVEN BETTER!! Don't miss it!
$1,029,000
2310 WESLEY AVENUE
classified
T HE P R I N C E T O N S U N
DECEMBER 11-17, 2013 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: [email protected]
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
[email protected]
Auto SaIes
Call Matt 856-275-4943
$1,800 0f 080
204K Miles but runs GREAT!
Perfect Work Truck
FOR SALE
2000 CHEVY ASTRO VAN
Dog Boarding
Your Dog
In A Loving Home…
NOT A KENNEL!
Call Steven:
856-356-2775
OUR HOME
DOG BOARDING.com
MisceIIaneous
DID YOU PICK THE WRONG
FUNDS INSIDE YOUR
401(k)?
www.SavingsPlanNavigator.com
CALL 856-316-7080
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
CLASSIFIED
DECEMBER 11-17, 2013 - THE PRINCETON SUN 15
Identity
Print
Web
Tom Engle
www.spectdesigns.com
If you’re reading your
competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money…
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Considering a home
in South Florida?
Whether you're considering a move
to a better climate, or just a second
home, or investment property, Rena
Kliot of Pulse International Realty is
the broker for buyers who want a
dependable expert in the exciting
South Florida market.
Call today to start your search
for that coastal home!
Rena Kliot, Broker | Owner
Pulse International Realty - Miami
305.428.2268
[email protected]
www.pulseinternationalrealty.com
$1,000 BFF
Any new complete roofing or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Expires 12/31/13.
30 Years Experience • Family Owned & Operated
High Quality Products • Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics
Professional Installation • Serving the Tri-State area
NEW SHINGLE ROOF SPECIALISTS • SLATE ROOF REPAIRS • RUBBER ROOFS
SEAMLESS GUTTERS • SIDING • WINDOWS & DOORS • CAPPING • SOFFITS
EMERGENCY TARP SERVICE AVAILABLE • RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
FREE
ESTIMATES
FAST
EMERGENCY
SERVICE!
IP
TB
AHERIIA'S BEST
RBBFIXB & SIBIXB EXPERTS
8õß·1õ1·00ß0
ß09·924·ß0ß0
Roofing
EXPERIENCED COOK
FOR ELDERLY COUPLE
Princeton Area
(609) 333-9300
E|der|y coup|e in Princeton/Ski||man
area is seeking an experienced person
to prepare and cook |ight mea|s.
Responsibi|ities inc|ude on|y shopping,
preparing and serving |ight mea|s
3 or 4 hours per day for five (5}
weekdays per week.
Senior Care

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close