Project Management Guidelines and Templates

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Project Management Guidelines

July 2013 

 

FOREWORD

I have pleasure to present these BDT Project Management Guidelines 2013 that now supersedes the April 2008 version. These Guidelines are drawn up in accordance with Resolution 17 (Rev. Hyderabad, 2010) adopted by the World Telecommunication Development Conference addressing implementation of regional approved initiatives, at the national, regional, interregional and global levels. It also implements the Plenipotentiary Conference Resolution 157 (Rev. Guadalajara, 2010), which focuses on strengthening the project execution function of the ITU. These Resolutions also noted the need to maintain a level of expertise to permit the BDT to manage projects effectively and in a timely and efficient manner. These Guidelines aim to develop a common language and understanding of the main phases of the life cycle of a project, as well as the processes involved in and the key aspects of project design and implementation, while providing templates that will facilitate the work of project managers

These Guidelines take into account the ongoing efforts of the BDT in the adoption of the results-based management approach, and will improve the implementation of projects by the BDT in close collaboration with its various partners. The drafting Guidelines also took into account the latest international standards for project management, such as "ISO 21500" which was announced in October 2012.

The Guidelines and Annex serve as reference for all those involved in the implementation of projects in the BDT. This will no doubt improve our efficiency and effectiveness in implementing, monitoring and evaluating projects.

Brahima Sanou, Director Telecommunication Development Bureau

 

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INTRODUCTION

The Plenipotentiary Conference in 2006 approved Resolution 157, which was subsequently revised by the Plenipotentiary Conference in 2010. Resolution 157 (Rev. Guadalajara, 2010) commits the ITU to strengthen its project execution functions. Resolves 1 and 2 of Resolution 157 (Rev. Guadalajara, 2010) provide, respectively, for the review of the experience of ITU-D in discharging its responsibility for implementing projects by identifying lessons learned and by developing a strategy for strengthening this function in the future, and for the review of best practices in the area of technical cooperation (which includes project management) within the United Nations systems and other organizations external to the United Nations, and to adapt such practices to the circumstances prevailing within the ITU. With respect to the aforementioned Resolves of Resolution 157 and in line with the trends in project management, from an activity-based approach to results-based methodology, the BDT carried out a thorough review on project management practices of the United Nations, other development agencies and private sector organizations. The findings of the study, together with the assessment of BDT’s procedures in project management, demonstrated that Results-Based Management (“RBM”) approach should be reinforced in strengthening of the project execution function of ITU. In this respect, in 2008 the BDT developed Project Management Guidelines which take into account RBM best practices, methodologies and tools of other organizations as well as the specific kind of ITU-D project portfolio. In 2011, a restructuring took place which redefined the roles and responsibilities of the Project Support Division (PRJ). Within the Project Support and Knowledge Management Department (PKM), the PRJ strengthens the project execution function of the Telecommunication Development Bureau (BDT), is responsible for providing support for the development of regional initiatives and other projects, coordinates the drafting and finalization of project documents, directs the development of the supporting operational, reporting, and evaluation frameworks (including related procedures, best practices, systems, databases, tools, templates, reporting documents and performance indicators) for the consistent monitoring, implementation, evaluation and reporting of all BDT projects, monitors and evaluates project implementation, carries out and reports on impact assessments of BDT projects, coordinates the preparation of documentation for the closure of projects with partners, submits and ensures timely definitive closure of projects, participates, provides inputs and contributes to the processing of outputs of connect the world series of events, and develops guidelines for the effective project execution at all stages of the project cycle. In this context, the PRJ Division has updated the Project Management Guidelines published in 2008 to reflect the restructuring and best practices contained in the latest project management standards (ISO 21500:2012 th

launched on October 2012 and PMBoK 5  Edition announced on December 2012). These Guidelines aim to provide clarification and guidance on a selected set of tools to be used by project managers based on the results-based management approach and project management lifecycle, the latter of which consists of three phases:  Formulation, Implementation and Evaluation. 

 

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Table of Contents 1 PROJECT MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE AT GLANCE ....................  ................................. .......................... .......................... ....................... .......... 7  2 RBM AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT ........................................................................................ 9  2.1 Results-Based 2.1 Results-Based Management .......................................................................................................................................... 9   .......................................................................................................... 9

2.2 Project 2.2 Project management aligned on RBM approach

 

3 FORMULATION PHASE ......................................................................................................... 12  3.1 Identification 3.1 Identification ................................................................................................................................................................ 12  3.2 Fundraising 3.2 Fundraising ................................................................................................................................................................... 13  3.3 Finalization 3.3 Finalization ...................................................................................................................................................................

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4 IMPLEMENTATION PHASE ............. .......................... .......................... .......................... .......................... .......................... .......................... ..................... ........ 17  4.1 Planning 4.1 Planning ........................................................................................................................................................................ 17  4.1.1 Work Breakdown Structure .................................................................................................................................. 18  4.1.2 Project Schedule ................................................................................................................................................... 18  4.1.3 Procurement Plan ................................................................................................................................................. 18  4.1.4 Quality Plan ........................................................................................................................................................... 18  4.1.5 Risk Plan ................................................................................................................................................................ 18  4.1.6 Communication Plan ................................................................................................................................ ................................................................ ............................................................................. ............. 18  4.2 Executing 4.2 Executing and Monitoring ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ............ 19  4.2.1 Build Deliverables ................................................................................................................................ ................................................................ .................................................................................. .................. 19  ................................................................ ............................................................................................... ............................... 19  4.2.2 Executing ................................................................................................................................ 4.2.3 Reporting ................................................................................................................................ ................................................................ ............................................................................................... ............................... 20  4.3 Closing 4.3 Closing .......................................................................................................................................................................... 21  4.3.1 Project operationally completed........................................................................................................................... 21  ................................................................ ................................................................ 22  4.3.2 Project financially completed ................................................................................................................................

5 EVALUATION PHASE ............................................................................................................ 23  5.1 Post 5.1 Post Implementation Review  ......................................................................................................................................

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5.2 Impact 5.2 Impact Analysis and Sustainability .............................................................................................................................. 25  5.3 Lessons 5.3 Lessons Learned and Best Practices ............................................................................................................................

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6 IMPROVEMENT PROCESS ........................... .............. .......................... .......................... .......................... .......................... .......................... ..................... ........ 27  7 ANNEX : TEMPLATES  ........................................................................................................... 28  7.1 Logical Framework Template ................................................................. ............................................................... ................................................................ ........ 29  7.2 Project Document Template ................................................................ ................................................................ ......... 31  7.3 Project Management Plan Template ............................................................................................................................ 41 

 

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7.4 Project Manager Log Template ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ..... 45  7.5 Meeting Minutes Template .......................................................................................................................................... 46  7.6 Risk Monitoring Form ...................................................................................................................................................

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7.7 Change Request Form ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ ................... 49  7.8 Progress Report Template ............................................................................................................................................ 50   .................................................................................................................... 53

7.9 Assessment / Feedback Report Template

 

7.10 Closure Report Template ................................................................ ................................................................ ............ 55  7.11 Transfer of Title to Equipment ................................................................ ................................................................ ................................................................ .... 60  7.12 Post Implementation Review Template......................................................................................................................  ......................................................................................................................

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7.13 Impact Analysis Report Template ................................................................ ............................................................... 66  7.14 Lessons Learned Report Template ................................................................ ................................................................ .............................................................. 68  

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Figures and Tables

Figure 1: Project Management Life Cycle Figure 2: RBM Approach for Project Management Figure 3: Formulation Phase Figure 4: Implementation Phase Figure 5: Evaluation Phase Figure 6: Learned Lessons and Best Practices

Table 1: Project Management Standards Table 2: SMART Description

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Project Management Guidelines 2013 2013  

1 PROJECT MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE AT GLANCE A Project Lifecycle is defined as a series of phases undertaken to provide a proper project outcome. Each phase includes a number of activities and supporting tools to be utilized in order to achieve the best results. results. 1

th

The project management standards  ISO 21500:2012, PMBoK 5  Edition (Project Management Institute) and Prince 2 suggest managing project under five groups of processes (Table 1). Taking into account the recommendations of standards and specifications of the BDT portfolio of projects, we have grouped these processes in two phases titled «Formulation Phase» and «Implementation Phase». Given that these standards do not include the evaluation and impact analysis processes, the project life cycle has been completed with an «Evaluation Phase». Thus, these Guidelines propose a Project Management Life Cycle grouped into three phases, each with three distinct stages, as depicted the diagram below:

Figure 1: Project Management Life Cycle

3- Lessons 1-Identification

Learned and Best Practices

2-Impact Anal Anal si siss

2-Fundraising

1-Post Implementa tion Review 

3-Finalization

3-Closing

1-Planning 2-Executing & Monitoring

The first phase focuses on identification of key problems and needs of beneficiaries through a situation analysis, and clarification of roles and responsibilities of parties involved. This phase presents stages to be used to prepare and develop a project proposal. This phase also provides information on how to facilitate the fundraising process in coordination with the partnership and resource mobilization strategies for approaching donors. Once funds are secured, the responsible project manager should complete the Project Document (ProDoc).

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 Comparing PMBOK Guide 5th Edition and ISO 21500. – STS Sauter Training & Simulation SA. December December 2012.



 

In the remainder of this document, the project manager is responsible of the project implementation from ProDoc until the submission of closure report, and the project coordinator is a member of the PRJ team responsible for supporting the project manager, as well as monitoring and evaluation of projects. When the ProDoc is approved and signed by the stakeholders, the project manager is responsible for the second phase (implementation); that is to plan, execute, control and close all project activities to achieve the objectives. The first stage is essential for the planning of all activities to achieve the expected results, and those related to risk communication and acceptances. Proper planning is the critical factor for the success of the project. The next stage is to achieve the planned activities and monitor their implementation by different stakeholders. The last stage of this phase is related to the closure of all project activities and the transfer of results to those concerned. The evaluation phase is performed by project coordinator. The first stage will be the post-implementation review that should be performed immediately after the implementation phase is finished; in this review, the achievement of the objectives and outcomes will be measured. The second stage is estimated to take place between 1 and 3 years after the project finishes, and will analyze the impact on the environment. The last stage is to take into account performance indicators already established and to consolidate the lessons learned in order to provide best practices for future projects.

Table 1: Project Management Standards

ISO-21500:2012

PMBoK 5th Edition

October 2012 

December 2012 

Initiating 

Initiating 

Starting up a Project 

Planning 

Planning 

Initiating a Project 

Implementing 

Executing 

Managing a Stage Boundary 

Controlling 

Monitoring and Controlling 

Controlling a Stage 

Closing 

Closing 

Closing a Project 

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Prince2

 

2 RBM AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT 2.1 Results-Based Management In an organization, Results-Based Management (RBM) aims to ensure that activities and resources contribute to the achievement of desired results, in terms of outputs, outcomes and the expected impact. A key component of RBM is monitoring the performance that helps to measure objectively how well the results are being achieved, and report on measures taken to improve them. «It is said that if you do not know where you are going to, any road will take you there. This lack of direction is what Results-Based Management is supposed to avoid. It is about choosing a direction and destination first, deciding on the route and the milestones, checking progress with a map and making direction adjustments as 2

required in order to achieve the desired objectives.»   The various stages in the implementation of Results-Based Management (RBM) and Results-Based Budget (RBB) in ITU include the following:

  RBB and RBM were first introduced in ITU in 2001 for the 2002-2003 budget;   Since then, RBM and its components have been progressively introduced and extended to other





planning tools (Operational planning, Strategic planning, Financial planning);

  The adoption of Resolution 71 (Rev. Guadalajara, 2010), regarding the Strategic Plan of the Union for



2012-2015, with a 100% compliant RBM structure was a significant achievement to move towards Enterprise Performance Management (EPM) for ITU;

During the different phases of the life cycle of a project, the RBM approach ensures that the components necessary for the achievement achievement of expected results will be available. Monitoring, in this case, implies implies the definition of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that will help measure the achievement of the goals initially assigned to the project through it i t implementation.

2.2 Project management aligned on RBM approach For application of the RBM approach to project management, it is suggested to adopt the following terminology based on the definitions proposed by UN Development Group:

«Results-based management (RBM) Results-based management is a management strategy by which all actors, contributing directly or indirectly to achieving a set of results, ensure that their processes, products and services contribute to the desired results (outputs, outcomes and higher level goals or impact) and use information and evidence on actual results to inform decision making on the design, resourcing and delivery of the project and activities as well as for accountability and reporting.

Results  Results are changes in a state or condition that derive from a cause-and-effect relationship. There are three types of such changes - outputs, outcomes and impact - that can be set in motion by a development intervention. The changes can be intended or unintended, positive and/or negative.

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 Results-Based Programming, Management and Monitoring (RBM) approach as applied at UNESCO- Guiding

Principles – June 2011

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Impact Impact implies changes in people’s lives. This might include changes in knowledge, skill, behavior, health or living conditions for children, adults, families f amilies or communities. Such changes are positive or negative long- term effects on identifiable population groups produced by a development intervention, directly or indirectly, intended or unintended. These effects can be economic, socio-cultural, institutional, environmental or technological. Positive impacts should have some relationship to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), internationally-agreed development goals, national development goals (as well as human rights as enshrined in constitutions), and national commitments to international conventions and treaties.

Goal A specific end result desired or expected to occur as a consequence, at least in part, of an intervention or activity. It is the higher order objective that will assure national capacity building to which a development intervention is intended to contribute.

Outcome Outcomes represent changes in the institutional and behavioral capacities for development conditions that occur between the completion of outputs and the achievement of goals.

Outputs Outputs are changes in skills or abilities and capacities of individuals or institutions, or the availability of new products and services that result from the completion of activities within a development intervention within the control of the organization. They are achieved with the resources provided and within the time period specified.

Activity Actions taken or work performed through which inputs, such as funds, technical assistance and other types of resources, are mobilized to produce specific outputs.

Inputs The financial, human, material, technological and information resources which are used for development interventions.

Performance indicator  A performance indicator is a unit of measurement that specifies what is to be measured along a scale or dimension but does not indicate the direction or change. Performance indicators are a qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of a 3

project or investment. »  

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 UNDG-Results-Based  UNDG-Results-Bas ed Management Handbook-Harmonizing RBM concepts and approaches for improved development results at country level – October 2011

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The pyramid below describes the adaptation of the RBM approach to Project Management and defines the various features of a project, from the resources to the expected impact.

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Figure 2:RBM approach for Project Management   

Measures the long-term and widespread development changes in society, economy and environment to which the project contributes 

IMPACT

An overall desired achievement involving a process of change and aimed at meeting needs of end-users within a given period of time. 

Objective

Final products or services delivered to beneficiaries 

Outputs/Results

Activities taken to transform resources/inputs into outputs/results 

Activities 

Personnel & resources necessary for producing outputs/results

Resources/Inputs 

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 ITU - Result-Based Management – Result-Based Budget Training - Seminar - PwC - June 2012

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3 FORMULATION PHASE This phase integrates the general approach of identification of needs to finalize the project document through the stage of fundraising. Depending on the context and the kind of project, it will be necessary to scroll through all the stages, or to go directly to the finalization of the Project Document. Document. 

Figure 3: Formulation Phase

1-Identification

2-Fundraising

3-Finalization

3.1 Identification 5

During this first stage, the project proponent or the project manager should prepare a «Concept Note»   to be shared with stakeholders and donors. The identification stage intends to find answers to the question “what does the project need to achieve?” The first stage in project management is:

  To perform a situation analysis in a particular political and socio-economic context;   To identify what are the problems on the ground and needs of beneficiaries;   To analyze the capacities of main stakeholders to be involved in the process of the project







implementation;

  To assess the sustainability of the project;   To have an impact on ITU-D’s programs, objectives, strategies and on ongoing Action Plan.

• •

In developing the project, it should identify the benefits that are designed to target a market or a population. The expected short-and long-term results must be clearly identified in order to assess the impact they will have on beneficiaries

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 https://intranet.itu.int/bdt/Docum https://intranet.itu.int/bdt/Documents/ConceptNoteG ents/ConceptNoteGuidelinesTemplate.pdf uidelinesTemplate.pdf

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This stage looks for a general assessment of problems that have been identified in an initial analysis. The key to identify the problems successfully is to understand the causes of the problems or constraints. Therefore is critical that project managers and project coordinators understand the root (cause) of the problem and its effect on the target population, before formulating any objective. In this stage it is essential to identify, consult and try to involve all stakeholders from the beginning of the process, so they will assume ownership over the project and its results. Roles and responsibilities should be clearly identified and assigned to the stakeholders. The stakeholders in a project are all parties who have an interest to be involved i nvolved (partners) in or are affected by the project, or get benefits from the project (beneficiaries). They include among others governments, agencies, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, civil society associations and citiz citizens. ens. Key questions to be answered in the identification i dentification process include:

  What are the main challenges in a given political and socio-economic context?   Who are the main domestic stakeholders and what have they experienced in this field? Describe the

• •

current strategies to deal with identifying problems and of beneficiary needs.

  In order to avoid duplication of efforts, specify which other international/regional organizations are



working in this field. What are their lessons learned and strategies used to address similar issues?

  Which stakeholders would like to contribute to the project? Describe their roles and responsibilities



during the implementation process. What is ITU’s experience in addressing similar problems? • 

  How will the project be executed in comparison with existing or similar projects in ITU-D sector?



To facilitate the analysis above, it is recommended to use the template of Logical Framework presented in Section 7.1 of Annex.

3.2 Fundraising This stage seeks to answer answer the question: who can invest in the imple implementation mentation of the project and become a partner? The fundraising process is performed in line with the BDT’s resource mobilization strategy. «Convincing donors is obviously a matter for resource mobilization (RM), but it is also a communication exercise. RM, communication and branding focal points must therefore work hand in hand to serve the capital formation needs of colleagues involved in programme and project management. The purpose of this Concept Note is to introduce a new communication and branding tool, as well as a vehicle to approach potential donors and expose our products, projects and initiatives in a harmonized way: the new concept note. A Concept Note (CN) is a synopsis or a (brief) preliminary description of a project or an initiative that aims at engaging potential donors deeper into a partnership/collaboration conversation. Concept Notes are used as an initial outline for potential partners’ consideration/review and as a guide for discussion, prior to the development and submission of a more complete proposal (as required according to donors’ mechanisms) or as part of formal submission processes. CN is therefore considered a critical tool during the initial stage of resource mobilization. The purpose of a concept note is to capture the interest of the donor and demonstrate that the project or initiative is worth further considering. It helps donors to determine if the described project or initiative fits with their goals and strategy and is likely to be accepted for fund allocation.

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Partnership Building Division has introduced a new Concept Note Template to be used by all BDT colleagues looking for extra-budgetary funding. This template has been designed to fit a variety of templates and guidelines published by donors. It is accompanied by Guidelines to facilitate the preparation o off the notes. Objectives The specific objectives of a Concept Note are: - To provide tools to support BDT Resource mobilization efforts by all BDT staff (as recommended in the resource mobilization strategy for BDT); - To have harmonized documents to be presented to potential partners, clearly stating and justifying the need for support for the proposed project or initiative; - To permit existing or potential partners to explore the possibility of partnering with ITU in a proposed project or initiative (including allocating resources); - To use the concept notes to develop (more) effective and powerful external communication and promotion 6

policy, as well as supporting material to approach partners. »  

3.3 Finalization As soon as sources of funds are secured and requirements and obligations of donors are clarified, a full-scale project proposal, in the form of a Project Document, can be prepared. A Project Document is a more comprehensive document that includes all available information gathered in the previous stages. The budget and work plan should be attached to the project document. The first activity is to determine the impact and objectives to be reached and to to identify results. The second activity is to define indicators to measure performance of impact, objectives and results. In this stage, the logical framework tool should be developed to include data that would verify whether developed indicators are effective to measure the achievement of the best results. Finally, it is necessary to consolidate all information in the ProDoc, a template of which is presented under Section 7.2 of Annex.

1.  Defining Project This analysis corresponds to the preparation of the content of the various sections of the ProDoc:

a.  Background and Context   This section presents information and explanations related to the project, and in particular why it should be implemented.

b.  Objective Objective   Taking into account the context and needs of the beneficiaries, the objective must be clearly defined and shared with stakeholders. Expected results (as defined below) must contribute to the achievement of this objective. In order to develop well-constructed objective, the following foll owing issues should be taken into account:

  Objective should be articulated based on realistic and identified effects of problems;   Objective is not equivalent to strategies, activities, processes and results;

• •

  Provide a clear distinction between the formulation of objective and results.



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 https://intranet.itu.int/bdt/Docum https://intranet.itu.int/bdt/Documents/ConceptNoteG ents/ConceptNoteGuidelinesTemplate.pdf  uidelinesTemplate.pdf  

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c.  Expected Results In order to define results, a clear vision should be elaborated of what the project hopes to achieve. Results are desired outputs (short-term) and impacts (long-term), and include tangible or non-tangible benefits to beneficiaries or end-users. Results can be expressed in quantitative or qualitative standard, value or rate. In other words, results are the direct consequences or effects generated by by   activities and lead towards the  the   achievement of stated objectives. The Impact measures the long-term and widespread development changes in the society, economy and environment to which the project contributes.

d.  Project Activities Activities should be selected on the basis of:

         



A clear understanding of the problems;



An analysis of the opportunities;



An evaluation of the risks of the situation;



An evaluation of available or expected resources and capabilities;



The impact on ITU-D’s mission and goals.

e.  Inputs The inputs include financial and in kind contributions (premises, equipment, staff ...) of each partner.

 f.  Roles and Responsibilities It is necessary to clearly define the roles and responsibilities of the parties in the main activities of the project, as this avoids misunderstandings and problems in implementation phase.

g.  Risk In this section, indicate relevant risks that can negatively affect the success of a project, and mention remedial actions foreseen in order to mitigate these risks.

h.  Project Management Provide an overall description of the project management. In this regard, elaborate management structure and terms of reference agreed upon by project partners.

i.  Monitoring and Evaluation Provide an overall description of the project monitoring and evaluation activities. In this regard, elaborate reporting requirements and frequency of such reports.

 j.  Sustainability Elaborate on how the sustainability of the project is to be achieved. If applicable, describe sustainability measures, such as the self-financing mechanisms, that will be put in place upon the completion of the project.

k.  Budget and Work plan At the end of each Project Document, it will be accompanied by two annexes. The first one defines the budget with details about the contributions of each party, as well as lines for expenditure. The second annex provides the schedule of major activities and their sequence for the implementation of project.

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2.  Defining Key Performance indicators Once the Project impact, objective, results and activities have been clarified and agreed by stakeholders, the next stage is to develop indicators to measure the performance of each result, each objective and the overall impact. If results are clearly stated, it is easier to select indicators. An indicator is a mean of measuring actual results against planned or expected results in terms of quantity, quality and timeliness. The quantitative indicators are defined as numerical value, usually expressed in specific numbers or a percentage, but the qualitative indicators reflect perceptions, judgments, satisfaction or opinions. In order to select a good indicator, a participatory process of discussions amongst all stakeholders should apply. Most commonly used criteria to assess indicators are “SMART”.

Table 2: SMART description

 



Specific: Sufficiently precise to enable an objective assessment and measurement of the results achieved by project;

 



Measurable:  qualitatively or quantitatively, and formulated to facilitate comparisons between predictions and achievements;

 



Attainable: defined at a level that can be achieved and that represents activities that allow to achieve a particular result;

 



Realistic: measures should be determined in a realistic manner, given the respective project time and resources frame;

 



Time-based: express benefits or changes that a project aims to achieve by the end of the implementation period.

3. 

Project Document

The Project Document (ProDoc) is a key document that finalizes the formulation phase. It must contain all information about the context in which the project must be completed, its impact on the social and economic environment, the objectives and expected results, definition of roles and responsibilities of stakeholders, as well as the budget for its implementation. The details of the contents of this ProDoc are in set forth in Section 7.2 of Annex, which includes explanations and examples that will facilitate its drafting.

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4 IMPLEMENTATION PHASE This phase seeks to answer the question of «what needs to be done in order for the project to be implemented successfully? ». The first stage of implementation involves the planning of project activities to facilitate the allocation of resources to and the monitoring of such activities. Executing and Monitoring stages include a continuous process of controlling that planned activities take place and results are achieved as anticipated. The third stage is related to closure of the project activities The Project Coordinator could monitor the implementation of the project and ensure appropriate guidance where necessary, including providing feedback after reception of quarterly progress report. This also will facilitate the project evaluation phase, and prevent potential problems in implementation.

Figure 4: Implementation Phase

3-Closing 1-Planning 2-Executing & Moni Mo nito tori rin n

4.1 Planning The key to a successful implementation depends on the quality of the planning that is done by the project manager before the start of activities. The main objective in the Planning phase involves the creation of a

Project Management Plan, a mandatory document a template of which is proposed under Section 7.3 of Annex. The Project Management Plan provides a basis for evaluating the performance of the project during its implementation. It includes a complete list of the activities required to complete the project: Work Wo rk Breakdown Structure, Schedule, and Procurement, Quality, Risks and Communication Plans.

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4.1.1 Work Breakdown Structure  The Work Breakdown Structure lists all the Outputs/Results and activities required to be achieved and undertaken, respectively, under the project.

4.1.2 Project Schedule As specified in Section 7.3 of Annex, the project manager should list necessary activities to achieve each deliverable defined as outputs/results. For each of the activities, the project manager will determine the workload and duration necessary to its realization, taking into account the interdependencies between them.

4.1.3 Procurement Plan The project manager should concentrate on definition of requirements (terms of reference for services, technical specifications for equipment). To estimate the delivery taking into account the needs, and to develop a preliminary schedule of purchases, the project manager must coordinate with the Procurement Division which is responsible for the relationship with suppliers. The project manager must plan the acquisition of products and services needed to achieve the project deliverables. Control and monitoring of the plan will allow the project manager to mitigate risks related to the non-mastery of suppliers and external service providers.

4.1.4 Quality Plan The quality control is to determine the quality criteria that must be achieved by the deliverables to be produced by the project in order to meet the needs of the beneficiary, and to plan the verification required. Quality assurance will check whether the processes proc esses to achieve the quality criteria of the deliverables are met. Thus, the project manager must plan the activities to be undertaken during the project to deal with the control quality and assurance quality.

4.1.5 Risk Plan This planning is to identify the key risks and lists the actions that will reduce their impact on the project. As indicated in Section 7.3 of Annex, the project manager must be: •  Identify the potential risks;

       



Define for each risk a priority ratio (e.g. likelihood score * impact score);



Select risks that will be followed;



Identify activities that will mitigate the impact of risks on the project;



Create an activities schedule related to risks mitigation.

4.1.6 Communication Plan Lack of communication is often at the root of the difficulties encountered during the project. This communication involves the steering committee, the project team, the beneficiary and other stakeholders. The project manager must plan specific activities to carry out effective communication, including the following:

  Define the list of stakeholders who should be informed about the progress of the project;



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  Identify the type of information to be transmitted to each group of stakeholders;   Identify methods of communication to be used;   Build a communication plan as proposed in Section 7.3 of Annex.



• •

4.2 Executing and Monitoring 4.2.1 Build Deliverables The first and more important activity in the Executing and Monitoring stage is the development of each of the project deliverables/Results specified within the ProDoc. The deliverables are then reviewed to ensure that quality criteria are met. If all the quality criteria have been met, then the deliverables are signed off by the beneficiary. Title and ownership to tthe he equipment and othe otherr assets which form part of the deliverables deliverables of a project should be effected in accordance with Section 4.3.1 of these Guidelines and the Transfer of Title to Equipment template referred to in such section.

4.2.2 Executing The Executing process is to perform all the activities defined in the planning. The project manager must be able to assign activities to each person responsible for their implementation, while ensuring the monitoring and controlling of their execution. Executing the implementation of the project should be through regular meetings planned by the project manager. These meetings should be reported according to the meeting Minutes template provided in Section 7.5 of Annex. Monitoring is to make continuous assessments for judging the gaps between the schedule and the budget planned and the realizations. Monitoring aims to ensure effectively managed results through measurement and assessment of performance. The overall objective of monitoring is to enable project manager to take corrective actions. Executing is an internal management responsibility and can be performed by a project manager through these activities:

a)  Perform Time Management Time management will monitor the time spent for each activity, in order to prevent delays that will impact the delivery of the project.

b)  Perform Budget Monitoring The Project Manager must accede to the data or information regarding the project budget utilization (contributions received, commitments and expenditures). Budget monitoring is an essential aspect of good project management to ensure that expenditures and commitments remain within established allocations and the overall project budget. Close follow-up with appropriate financial services is the key to monitoring costs and forecasting any potential deviation from the original budget plans. Project partners and especially donors should be kept informed through financial fi nancial reports, and substantive deviations from the original origi nal budget plans should be reflected in budgetary reviews each quarter. 

c)  Perform Procurement Management After the definition of requirements for the project, the whole process of procurement of goods and services is the responsibility of the Procurement Division.

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Therefore, the project must be monitored regularly with the Procurement Division assistance.

d)  Perform Quality Management Quality management is to ensure that the quality criteria previously agreed with the beneficiary beneficiary are met. It will also achieve a quality control to ensure that the processes designed to achieve the desired quality criteria of the project deliverables are met.

e)  Perform Risk Management Risk management is to achieve the following activities: • Take into account the risks identified during the assessment at the planning stage; • Develop a detailed sheet for each of these risks using the Risk Monitoring Form F orm template attached

under Section 7.6 of Annex; • Follow up activities related to the mitigation of each risk;   • Review the risk matrix for updates.

f)  Perform Communications Management This will entail the regular monitoring of communication activities, as they were defined at the Project Management Plan (Section 7.3 of Annex), and the carrying out of the following: • Prepare the content of each communication action;  • Prepare the necessary materials; • Communicate information to stakeholders according to the expected timing.

g)  Perform Change Control The process of change management is very important, as it can control the flow of change requests that usually come from the beneficiary. These requests may involve minor changes but they can also involve major changes that have a significant impact on time and on budget. Keeping a good track changes will prevent delays in project development and budget overruns. The process of change control is to perform the following actions: • Receipt of request for change in the format provided in the Change Request Form set forth in Section

7.7 of Annex; • Analysis of the opportunity to support the change request;  • Submit the request to the S teering Committee or Management Committee when the impact is

significant (duration, budget); • Modify activities and the action plan accordingly.

4.2.3 Reporting The Reporting is the formal presentation of controlling information using the Project Progress Report template that is proposed in Section 7.8 of Annex. The aims of reporting are:

  To inform stakeholders on the progress of the project, as well as of arrangements to ensure proper



development of the project;

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  To provide a formal documentation of the activities of the period, in order to facilitate audits and



evaluations;

  To serve as a reference to future projects in order to ensure that lessons learned (project successes,



failures, best practices) through implementation are available for consideration when formulating and implementing similar projects;

  To promote transparency and accountability;



  To report to the donors on the project’s progress.



The  Project Progress Report  (a template of which is set forth in Section 7.8 of Annex) is required for all projects and is prepared by the Project Manager on a quarterly basis. The reports provide a framework for assessing status and a record of project implementation at any given time. Its primary aim is to ensure that supervisors of the project coordinator or project manager formally assess the status of project implementation. The progress reports should be prepared quarterly and be submitted in the second week of the following quarter. To facilitate the preparation of such report, it is recommended to use the Project Manager Log (a template of which is set forth in Section 7.4 of Annex), which integrates the main events and information related to the project, as well as specific columns to each report. The project manager can sort and retrieve information using the column for the report to be developed. Assessment/Feedback Report (a template of which is set forth in Section 7.9 of Annex) is prepared by the project coordinator based on the quarterly project progress reports produced by the project manager, and in some cases (e.g., difficulties encountered, timeout, insufficient budget ), decisions are proposed for approval by managers. In this assessment, the Project Coordinator must ensure that decisions have been implemented correctly and documented as useful. During the life of the project, it may be necessary to provide a mid-term evaluation to be conducted by the internal project team or by an external consultant depending on the importance of the project.

4.3 Closing The narrative and financial closures are determined by the dates indicated in the original agreement signed with the donor, or in subsequent approved project extensions. Narrative closure refers to completion of all operational activities and financial closure includes termination of all financial transactions. Closure should be performed immediately after completion of all activities of the project. It’s important to distinguish between the two stages of project closure: the closure of activities (i.e., narrative closure) and financial closure.

4.3.1Project operationally completed To ensure that the project was finished on the operational level, the Project Manager shall check the following activities: a)  All activities listed in the project document are satisfactory completed; b)  The envisaged results are produced; c)  Closure Report and Post Implementation Review are prepared;

21

 

d)  Contracts with personnel, suppliers and service providers are terminated; e)  All rights, titles and ownership in and to all equipment and other assets that were acquired under the project for the beneficiary thereof are disposed and/or ownership have been transferred and assigned by ITU to, and have been accepted and assumed by, such beneficiary) (using the Transfer of Title to Equipment Template which is set forth in Section 7.11 of Annex). It is understood that the transfer will be made during the development of the project and the project manager will incorporate the evidence in the closing portfolio. The timing at which such transfer of title should occur will depend on the type of asset sought to be transferred (i.e., tangible asse assets ts vs. intangible assets). For more information concerning such timing, please refer to the “General Instructions” paragraph that is included in the Transfer of Title to Equipment Template; f)  Products have been delivered to the satisfaction of the beneficiary; g)  Decisions have been taken regarding the residual funds of the project, if any. The Closure Report (a template of which is set forth in Section 7.10 of Annex) is required upon completion of all project activities and contains information on the achievements of objectives, results and activities of the project. It should clearly explain any variances from the originally approved project in terms of duration, budget, results and delivered services. The closure report should be submitted within 30 to 60 days of the operational completion of the project, unless a different specific time frame is stipulated in the relevant agreements with project partners.

4.3.2 Project financially completed The financial closure is the responsibility of Finance. They must check all the points mentioned below before proceeding for the final closure. a)  All requested funds have been received; b)  Bills have been fully paid and liquidated; c)  Expenditures have been recorded;

 

d) The final budget revision has been carried out; e)  The final financial report has been prepared and submitted to the donor; f)  The final signed statement of account has been prepared and received by the donor; g)  The final financial explanatory report has been prepared and submitted to the donor; h)  The remaining funds, if any, have been returned to donors or re-allocated to other projects following donors’ approval.

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5 EVALUATION PHASE Before the end of the project, the project coordinator should supervise two assessments: 1. Ex-ante evaluation of the project through the ProDoc, to be completed at the end of the formulation phase; 2. Mid-term evaluation to be carried out by the project coordinator or by an external consultant, depending on the size of the project. This evaluation is undertaken approximately half-way through project implementation. Mid-term evaluation analyses if the development of the project is carried out as planned, and identifies the difficulties to be overcome either in-depth or through desk evaluations. The evaluation phase is in addition to the ex-ante and a mid-term evaluation described above, and takes place after the completion of a project or main activities within the project. Several stages are involved in the preparation of the evaluation process, such as to plan evaluation with assistance of a Post Implementation Review Plan, to report on the outcomes of evaluation using the relevant report templates, and to describe lessons learned and best practices. Evaluation involves financial resources that should be incorporated in the budget planning before the project would commence.

Figure 5: Evaluation Phase

3-Lessons Learned and Best Practices

2-Impact Analysis

1-Post Implementation Review 

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5.1 Post Implementation Review This stage will be performed after completion of the project according to a schedule previously established by management. Depending on the kind of project, the evaluation will be done on site or through desk review, and in some cases PRJ could make use of external consultants. Based on the key performance indicators defined on the ProDoc, this review assesses whether the objectives and results were achieved in an effective and efficient manner, and provides recommendations from project implementation. The following criteria are used in the process of designing the review plan:

  Relevance outlines the appropriateness of project objectives to the problems that it had planned to



address. The review plan must integrate the quality assessment of the definition and formulation of the project.

  Efficiency provides the factual information that the project results have been achieved at a reasonable



cost, i.e. how well the results have been achieved in terms of quality, quantity and time. To ensure that the most adequate process has been adopted, it would be useful to analyze if it was possible to implement alternative approaches.

  Effectiveness examines the contribution made to achieve the best results. This is designed to assess



the benefits for the different categories of the population (women, children, elderly, disabled and vulnerable groups). 

A - Planning review The review plan outlines what is to be evaluated, by when, and with whom. It should also provide resources and budgets necessary to carry out these assessments. The assessor should pay particular attention to strategic and useful information for ITU and its partners in decision-making. In order to serve its purpose, the evaluation plan should take into account the following factors: 1.  Choice of evaluation: management is responsible for the choice of results and projects to be evaluated. 2.  Timing of evaluation: the plan should specify timing of each evaluation. 3.  Stakeholders of Each Planned Evaluation: should identify the stakeholders who were involved in the project and who are affected by the results of the evaluation. 4.  Financial Requirements: the evaluation plan should estimate the financial requirements for each evaluation. Dissemination of information should also be included in the budget plan.

B - Reporting This review aims to assess the relevance, efficiency and effectiveness of the implementation of the projects and results achieved. As an outcome, the evaluation provides recommendations and a lesson learned for improving future policies and projects, and establishes a basis for accountability. The Post Implementation Review (a template of which is set forth in Section 7.12 of Annex) This review will allow an objective basis that reflects the results achieved and decisions taken, in order to draw lessons learned that may help to improve the implementation of projects. A good evaluation report communicates findings, lessons learned and recommendations clearly, accurately and appropriately, and while being an objective

24

 

presentation of the project, ensures that the concerns and comments of the involved parties are correctly reflected. Once the Post Implementation Review is prepared, it should be published and disseminated to all stakeholders.

5.2 Impact Analysis and Sustainability The contribution of a project on the development of a market or population must be measured several years after the end of it. Unlike the evaluation to be carried out a few months after the closure of the project to ensure that the objectives and expected results are achieved, the impact analysis is usually conducted one to three years after the project has been completed.  The impact analysis assesses the level of success of the project and, in particular, its durability and the extent of the impact of such criteria which have been defined in the ProDoc. To perform this analysis, one must return to the indicators identified in the project document. The impact analysis allows evaluating the effects on the socio-economic environment, the general policy or sectorial objectives. A project can be said to be sustainable as long as it continues to deliver benefits to the project target groups. Therefore, for the monitoring of sustainability, quality factors (such as ownership by beneficiaries, appropriate technology, institutional and management capacity, socio-cultural issues, environmental factors and damages) should be considered. The Sustainability Analysis assesses the project's ability to continue its activities without external funding, as well as the beneficiaries' ability to manage their project in an independent manner. The impact evaluations focus on the entire range of a project’s results, including unforeseen and longer-term impacts as well as sustainability and impacts on affected people outside the immediate target groups. The realization of this analysis should include the following considerations: 1 - From the previously established indicators, define the scope of the analysis to obtain useful information for the ITU and its partners; 2 - Determine the schedule of actions to be taken and who should carry them out; 3 - Estimate the budget needed to achieve ac hieve the mission; 4 - Prepare media collection of information; 5 - Collect data with project stakeholders; 6 - Develop an Impact Analysis Report using the template that is presented under Section 7.13 of Annex.

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5.3 Lessons Learned and Best Practices The last stage of the life cycle of the project is to analyze and consolidate those lessons learned for projects that have been identified during the implementation and evaluation phases, by using the template that is presented under Section 7.14 of Annex. This analysis will provide examples of best practices which are concluded in an effective and efficient manner. Projects that delivered concrete and sustainable benefits/impact to the beneficiaries will be identified at this stage to be stored in the best practice database. To this end, best practices of projects will be consolidated in a database that will be available to all managers and focal points to enable them work out project solutions to address similar types of problems in other regions/countries and replicate best practices where appropriate. This database will also allow BDT to report back to Membership on success stories and achievements made through implementation of projects.

Figure 6: Lessons Learned and Best Practices

Less ons Le Less Learned arned Clos ure Report Report

Less Le ss ons Le Learned arned Evaluation Report

Updating

Best Practices Data Base

Less ons Le Less Learned arned Impact Analysis Report

An organization’s best practices process includes the tasks, as follows: 1.  Collection: of relevant materials, which could include not only projects’ reports but also other internal or external sources of information; 2.  Verification: focuses on validating lessons according to selected standards (relevance, significance, credibility of information and others) and identifies systemic issues and improvement opportunities; 3.  Storage: provides a database for categorization, indexing, and formatting of lessons’ representation; 4.  Dissemination: includes different avenues informing relevant parties on o n best practices; 5.  Reuse: focuses on encouraging/promoting best practices to be used by project managers. As a tool, the best practices database aims to bring together any lessons learned that have been gathered during the project implementation and that can be usefully applied to other projects. The content of this Database should be discussed with stakeholders so that they may benefit from best practices.  

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6 IMPROVEMENT PROCESS To ensure continuous improvement of the Project Management Guidelines, it is necessary to implement adequate mechanisms for flexibility, revision, adjustment and learning. The mechanisms will be put into place to ensure this, including:

•  • 

Establish and support data collection and analysis at the community level; Utilize biannual meetings to review Project Management performance;

• 

Establish electronic systems to post questions, share technical information and offer assistance to facilitate knowledge sharing and exchange;

• 

Organize cross-regional learning processes, such as workshops and retreats, to take stock and analyze results;

• 

Actively participating in ‘communities of practice’ –many of which are online – to share best practices and seek advice for ongoing challenges from peers and experts.

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7

ANNEX : TEMPLATES

Among the fourteen (14) templates presented under the various subsections of this Annex, eight (8) are mandatory and the other six (6) (6 ) are optional, but should nevertheless be afforded adequate consideration as they can help project managers in achieving a chieving their mission. Four Four (4) mandatory reports will be elaborated by the project coordinator. coordinator. In some templates, explanations are given to allow the user to complete the document without returning to the information contained in the Project Management Guidelines.

1 Logical Framework 2 Project Document

(mandatory)

3 Project Management Plan

(mandatory)

4 Project Manager Log 5 Meeting Minutes 6 Risk Monitoring Form 7 Change Request Form 8 Progress Report

(mandatory)

9 Assessment / Feedback Report

(mandatory)

10 Closure Report

(mandatory)

11 Transfer of Title to Equipment 12 Post Implementation Review

(mandatory)

13 Impact Analysis Report

(mandatory)

14 Lessons Learned Report

(mandatory)

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7.1 Logical Framework Template

LOGICAL FRAMEWORK  [Identify the key indicators for evaluating the resources used and the impact of the project, as well as the data sources to verify the achievement of indicators. Following the examples of problem and objectives trees, a logical frame is given below for illustration.] Narrative Summary

Performances Indicators

Means of Verification

Risks and Assumptions

Overall Impact: Socio-economic development in X region of country Z due to increase i ncrease access to information  information 

N % reduction in the percent of population lacking access in region X by 2 years after the start of the project  

Survey Report on reach to ICT  

Enhanced and sustainable infrastructure for X region of

N% increase in teledensity by 6 months after project

ITU publications

country Z

implementation   implementation

Statistical Survey of Statistics Department Universal service of Country Z    funding is in place  place 

Objective: Tariffs are maintained at an affordable level

Outcomes: 1. Infrastructure extended to Infrastructure is in  provide coverage of rural operation by the end of the  parts of region X  project 2. Reliable infrastructure operated and maintained by qualified staff  

Upward trend in the number of subscriptions 6 months after completion of the project Increase in traffic originating from or terminated in region X 6 months after completion of the project Increase in overall traffic volume 6 months after completion of the project Reduced rate of faults by the end of the project Reduced maintenance and operation costs Increased capacity of staff to perform technical  functions

Site visits Yearly statistics  provided by the operators Financial records of the operators  Attendance lists of trainings participants

Service providers and implementation  partners fulfill legal and contractual obligations in agreed time-frame Equal amount of M/F took part in a training  programme Stable economic situation allowing reduction of maintenance and operation costs

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Activities

Resources

Costs

Risks and Assumptions

1. Output/Result 1 1.1. Perform a Feasibility study

Senior expert on economic analysis

1.2. Prepare a network  planning

Telecommunications experts

1.3. Procure necessary equipment and install

Missions Training arrangements

2. Output/Result 2

Equipment Project office

2.1. Carry out gap analysis and needs assessment on existing network 2.2. Provide training for technical staff on network maintenance and operation

Feasibility study results in favor of the investment Required information is available, accurate and up to date No compatibility  problem for the  procured equipment High level of  participation in the trainings There are no delays due to land expropriation 

2.3. Procure necessary equipment and install

Preconditions: Readiness of project partners input. Security in the region is maintained

30

 

7.2 Project Document Template Logo <Partner name>

Project Number SUMMARY OF CONTRIBUTION

Project Title

Internet Exchange Points (IXPs): keeping local Internet traffic

Estimated Start Date

 January 20xx  

Estimated End Date

December 20xx  

U.N. Specialized Agency

International Telecommunication Union (ITU)  (ITU) 

Government Cooperation Agency

…   Ministry of …

Beneficiary Country(ies)

…..

Project Manager

…..

OF THE PARTIES  PARTIES  Project Budget (in CHF) Description

Total

Partner In-cash

Partner

Staff Costs Missions External Services Training Equipment Miscellaneous Sub-Total ITU AOS (-- %) Total   Total Grand Total Comments :

Brief Description Example: To achieve the objective of keeping local Internet traffic local, some countries have established national Internet Exchange Points (IXPs) and Internet Service Provider (ISP) peering has emerged as one of the most important and effective ways for ISPs to improve the efficiency of operation and to further reduce Internet access costs. This project will provide a <Beneficiary Country> to improve its Internet Connectivity. The overall aim is to  provide affordable Internet access and connectivity through the implementation of national and regional Internet exchange points .

For the

Signature

Date

 __ / __ / ___

 __ / __ / ___

Name/Title

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[In each section, written explanations and examples are set forth in blue text in order to facilitate the writing of the Project Document.  All blue text should be deleted deleted from the final document.] document.]

1. 

BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT

[In this part, provide description of the proposed solution. Provide available information and explanation related to the project; regarding its origins and why it is being undertaken. Any information related to the details of the proposed solution that does fit into other sections can be elaborated in this section.]

1.1 Introduction Example: Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are cost-effective in providing a powerful engine to help achieve development goals. For example, they can be used to reduce poverty, build bui ld capacities, enrich skills, and inspire new approaches to governance and conflict resolution. The Information Technology contributes for  promoting the development d evelopment of many countries, but this project will enhance connectivity with reasonable cost to achieve other kind of activities. Many countries have yet to build the basic infrastructures needed to take advantage of the information age, and would face a formidable challenge to build a pathway that would reduce the gap between them and the rest of the world.

1.2 Problem Statement and Justification Example:  As a follow-up to the Connect Africa Summit (Kigali, Rwanda, 29 30 October 2007) in line with the creation of national Internet Exchange Points (IXPs) and implementing competition in the provision of international Internet connectivity (Connect Africa, Goal 3), this project aims to significantly increase access to affordable ICTs for all people, in both urban and rural areas, are able to gain maximum benefit from the opportunities offered by ICTs. The primary objective of the project, therefore, is to strengthen the ability of countries to keep their internet traffic locally, while ensuring an affordable cost for access.

1.3  Project Scope and Strategy Example: The project aims to share experiences, knowledge and benefits relating to the establishment of IXPs centers to other developing countries. Under this arrangement, the project will: • 

Identify case studies that have been successful, particularly in similar situations;

• 

Provide scientific and expert support to present processes of infrastructure development for IXP

• 

and access in <Beneficiary country>. Provide IXP equipment and put into operation and transfer the IXP to the local partner institution.

32

 

• 

Promote public and private sector partnership in the development of IXP policies and for actions. Stakeholders in <Beneficiary country> are to be involved from the start, and the project will encourage sharing of responsibilities and clear definition of roles among key stakeholders.

1.4 Impact [Impact = Development objective  As part of the overall objectives of developing a population or market, the project will will contribute to some of them. The criterion of the impact of the project on the beneficiaries will assess the achievement of these objectives several years later according to the type of project. Impact Indicators These indicators should measure the evolution of the situation of a market or population, following the implementation of the project. In some cases, it’s possible to make a qualitative description of the expected impact. Impact Indicators are essentially used during evaluation of Impact analysis.] Example: These technologies are already making an important contribution to the economic and social development of  African countries; African populations can multiply this contribution several times over by increased connectivity and cost-effective access to the Internet. Many African countries have yet to build the basic infrastructures needed to take advantage of the information age, and would face a formidable challenge to build a pathway that would reduce the gap between them and the rest of the world. The gap could widen and become self-perpetuating as the technologies become more advanced. The project will significantly increase access to affordable ICTs in <Beneficiary country> in order to facilitate a technological environment in which all people, in both urban and rural areas, are able to gain maximum benefit  from the opportunities offered by ICTs. ICTs. In line with the creation of national IXPs and implementing competition in the provision of international Internet connectivity (Connect Africa, Goal 3), the project project will strengthen the ability of countries countries to keep their internet traffic locally, while ensuring an affordable cost for access..

2. 

PROJECT OBJECTIVE

[The project must achieve a primary goal. This section should clearly define the sustainable benefits expected by a market or population.] Example: The objective of the project is to strengthen the capacity of <Beneficiary country> by providing cost-effective access and implementing competition in the provision of international Internet connectivity to the Internet by keeping local Internet traffic local through Internet Exchange Points.

[Assumptions/Preconditions To ensure a harmonious development of the project, it should be analyzing the assumptions and  preconditions that will will achieve the objective]  

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3. 

EXPECTED RESULTS [Expected Results are products and services produced, or competences and capacities established, directly as a result of project activities.] 3.1  RESULTS 1 3.2  RESULTS 2 3.3  RESULTS 3 [The Result indicators are predominantly used during monitoring and evaluation. Provide Key Performance Indicators for each result that are specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and time bound in order to allow measurement of expected results in terms of quantity, quality and timeliness.]  

Result 1 

Key Performance Indicators

Target

1.a  < enter indicator> 1.b  < enter indicator>

2

2.a  < enter indicator> 2.b  < enter indicator>

3

3.a  < enter indicator> 3.b  < enter indicator>

4. 

PROJECT ACTIVITIES

[Project Activities: Specific activities performed using resources and methods in order to achieve the expected Results. Implementation of activities depends on the availability of skilled human resources and the capacity of stakeholders to support the development of the project. Describe the main activities required for achieving expected Result.]   Result 1 

2

3

Activity Description 1.1 <enter <enter activity > 1.2 < enter activity > 1.3 < enter activity > …  2.1 < enter activity > 2.2 < enter activity > 2.3 < enter activity > …  3.1 < enter activity >

Responsible Party(ies) ITU/Partner/beneficiary ITU/Partner/beneficiary ITU/Partner/beneficiary

3.2 < enter activity > 3.3 < enter activity > … 

ITU/Partner/beneficiary ITU/Partner/beneficiary

ITU/Partner/beneficiary ITU/Partner/beneficiary ITU/Partner/beneficiary ITU/Partner/beneficiary

34

 

5. 

INPUTS

[Inputs: Resources (personnel, equipment) and finance necessary to perform the planned activities and manage the project.]  

5.1  ITU IN CASH CONTRIBUTION IN KIND CONTRIBUTION

5.2  Partner IN CASH CONTRIBUTION IN KIND CONTRIBUTION

 

5.3 Beneficiary Country IN CASH CONTRIBUTION IN KIND CONTRIBUTION

Example:

  Contribution from <partner name>: specific computer hardware and software, pre-defined funds for



the learning centre to maintain itself, training programme, cost of training of trainers;

  Contributions from ITU (in kind but some contributions in cash may be made available);   Contributions from the Government Agency (in kind): Provides a coordinator and premises for hosting

• •

the project.

6. 

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 6.1 ITU

Example: ITU will:

  Provide staff resources for the coordination and management of the project and be responsible for the



overall management of the project implementation, supervision, monitoring, coordination and evaluation;

  Provide its expertise and international experience to enable realization of the project objectives in an



effective and efficient manner;

   Allocate the experts for the project project as per contract and terms terms of reference;   Correspond with the relevant parties to make sure that project is successful;

• •

  Etc.



35

 

6.2  Partner Example: Partner will:

  Provide staff resources for the coordination and management of the project;



  Correspond with relevant parties to make sure that project is successful;   Etc.

• •

6.3  Beneficiary country Example: Country will:

   provide all permissions necessary or required to carry out project activities, including, without



limitation, all authorizations, permits, certificates, visas and other instruments necessary or required  for ITU and/or any of its personnel personnel (including experts) to implement the project; project;

   provide all exemptions from any and all prohibitions, restrictions on imports, custom duties, direct and



indirect taxes, and any other fees in respect of imported items that may be required under the project;

   provide administrative support and staff required during the Project implementation and any other



assistance to the Project;

  Etc.



7. 

RISK MANAGEMENT

[This section describes the relevant risks that can negatively affect the success of a project. In addition, this section rates the Likelihood and Impact of each risk should it occur, using a scoring (High, Medium, Low) and suggests the mitigation actions for reducing risks to the project.]

Risk Description

Likelihood

Impact

The lack of control over the local resources   resources

H*

H*

The collection of information necessary to complete the project  

L*

M*

* H= High, M=Medium, L=Low

Mitigation Action collaboration of Government agency  

the

relevant

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8. 

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

[In this section, provide an overall description of the project management. In this regard, elaborate the management structure and terms of reference agreed upon by project partners. Provide information on roles and responsibilities of the steering committee, its composition and working methods as well as the roles and responsibilities of the parties. The implementation of of project management depends on the size(<ofCHF the 500’00) project and complexity. There are three kinds project sizes: smallstructures (< CHF 150’000), medium andits large (> CHF 500’000).]

8.1  Steering Committee / Management Committee [For large projects, the establishment of a "steering committee" is strongly recommended and its composition, the roles and responsibilities of its members and the frequency of its meetings should all be clearly defined under this section. For small and medium projects, it is recommended to set up a management committee composed of a manager from ITU and a decision maker for each stakeholder. This committee will oversee the work done by the project manager and take the necessary decisions.] Example: The role of the Steering Committee/ Management Committee will include: •

 

Approve the Project Management Plan as defined by the Project Manager;



 

Approve changes have a significant impact on the project and presented by the Project Manager;



 

Provide advice and directives concerning the progress of the Project.

The Steering Committee/ Management Committee will consist of: •

 

Representative of the Partner/Beneficiary;



 

ITU Regional Director;



 

Chief of related Departments

8.2  Project Manager Example: The project will be implemented by the assigned Project Manager in close coordination with beneficiary Member States’ Focal Point(s) and Partner. ITU as the implementing agency will supervise and administer overall implementation of the project in accordance with ITU rules, regulations and procedures.

8.3  Project Management Team Example: The complexity of the project will need a dedicated Project Management Team for its implementation. This team will consist of: manager in charge of studies;    An assistant project manager manager in charge of implementing;    An assistant project manager

• •

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9. 

MONITORING AND EVALUATION

[In this section, provide an overall description of the project monitoring and evaluation activities. In this regard, elaborate reporting requirements and frequency of such reports.]   Example: Quarterly reports will be prepared to describe the progress of the project. Syntheses will be for stakeholders to keep them informed of project development. At the end of the project, the ITU project manager will submit a report to ITU and “Partner”. The final project report will include, among other things, reasonably detailed descriptions of the activities, achievements towards expected outcomes, lesson learned and recommendations  for future actions. ITU together with the “Partner” will monitor and evaluate the project based on the expected results and key  performance indicators.

10. 

SUSTAINABILITY

[In this section, elaborate on how the sustainability of the project is to be achieved. If applicable, describe sustainability measure, such as the self-financing mechanisms, that will be put in place upon the completion of the project. ] Example:  At the end of the project, the recipient country will establish a business model that t hat will enable it to sustain the  project.

11. 

BUDGET

[The budget for this project is set forth in Annex 1 attached hereto.]

12. 

WORKPLAN

[The work plan for this project is set forth in Annex 2 attached hereto] 

38

 

 Annex 1: BUDGET  

ESTIMATED BUDGET (in CHF) DESCRIPTION STAFF COSTS

Subtotal: MISSION

Subtotal EXTERNAL SERVICES

Subtotal: EQUIPMENT

Subtotal:

OTHER CHARGES  Miscellaneous

Subtotal SUBTOTAL  AOS (-- %)

Total  Grand Total Comments :

Total

Partner In-Cash

Partner

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 Annex 2: WORK PLAN PLAN

[The work plan should be detailed during planning stage and reviewed during project implementation, as required.]

Result



Activity Description

1.1 < enter activity > 1.2 < enter activity > 1.3 < enter activity > … 

2

2.1 < enter activity > 2.2 < enter activity > 2.3 < enter activity > … 

3

3.1 < enter activity > 3.2 < enter activity > 3.3 < enter activity > … 

Duration

M 1

M 2

M 3

M 12

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7.3 Project Management Plan Template

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN  Project Number

Project Manager

Project Title Start date

End Date

Budget

Brief Description

Prepared by

Date

[The first stage in the Project Planning phase involves the creation of a Project Plan. This plan includes all the criteria that will be used to evaluate the performance of the project. It defines a complete list of the activities required to complete the project, as well as the milestones, resources and timeframes involved in undertaking the project. The actions involved in creating a Project Plan are the following:]

1.  Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) The Work Breakdown Structure lists all the Outputs/Results and Activities required undertaking the project.

Outputs/Results Result

Description

Activities Result

Activity

Human Resources

1

Workload

Duration

Activity Sequence

1.1 1.2 1.3

2

2.1 2.2

1.1;1.2   1.1;1.2

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2.  Schedule Result

Activity Description



Duration

M 1

M 2

M

M 3

12

1.1 < enter activity > 1.2 < enter activity > 1.3 < enter activity > … 

2

2.1 < enter activity > 2.2 < enter activity > 2.3 < enter activity > … 

3

3.1 < enter activity > 3.2 < enter activity > 3.3 < enter activity > …  Milestone

3.  Procurement Plan [The project manager should identify the list of requirements and coordinate with the Procurement Division to supplement the budget estimates. The estimated delivery date will set the launch date d ate of the purchase process, taking into account the time recommended by the Procurement Division.]

Result



Activity Description

1.1 < enter activity > 1.2 < enter activity > 1.3 < enter activity > … 

2

2.1 < enter activity > 2.2 < enter activity > 2.3 < enter activity > … 

3

3.1 < enter activity > 3.2 < enter activity > 3.3 < enter activity > … 

Equipment

Quantity

or service

and unit

Estimated Budget (CHF)

Estimated delivery Date

Start date purchase process

42

 

 

4.  Quality Plan Quality Target [Identify the deliverables to be produced by the project, as well as the quality criteria that each deliverable is to achieve.] Deliverable

Quality Criteria

5.  Risk Management Plan [This plan identifies the foreseeable risks, assesses their likelihood and impact, and classifies them according to the method proposed below, to provide mitigation measures for risks that will be supported.]

Priority [Use the following table to assign the Likelihood and Impact scores for each risk.] 1 Very Low

2 Low

3 Medium

4 High

5 Very High

mpact score.] [The priority ratio is the Likelihood score times the IImpact Description

Likelihood

Impact

Priority

Score

Score

ratio

R01

3

4

12

2

R02

4

5

20

1

R03

2

4

8

3

R04 

2

2

4

4

Risk ID

Rating

Risk Schedule [After analysis of all risks, it may be necessary to accept certain risks for which the ratio is low. For risks that are supported, the Project Manager should use the following table to identify the preventive actions required to mitigate the level of risk to the project.]   Risk Rating

Risk ID / description

1

R02

2

R01

Preventative Actions

Resource

Action Date

43

 

 

6.  Communication Plan [The project manager must plan specific activities to carry out effective communication, including the  following:

       

• •

Define the list of stakeholders who should be informed about the progress of the project; Identify the type of information to be transmitted to each group of stakeholders;

• •

Identify methods of communication to bebelow.] used; Build a communication plan as proposed

Communications Activities Activity ID

C01

Information (what) 

Kick of Scope / Outputs / Results / planning / Project Management Team / etc.

C02

Progress Report

Stakeholders (who) 

Timeframes  (when) 

Stakeholder representatives

To start project

Steering Committee

First week after the quarter

Methods (how) 

Meeting  ppt presentation

Meeting + document (to send 5 days before meeting)

44

 

 

7.4  7.4 Project Manager Log Template

45

 

 

7.5 Meeting Minutes Template Start

End

Location

Date: -- / -- / ----  

HH:MM

HH:MM

xxxx

Next Meeting: : -- / -- / ---- 

HH:MM

HH:MM

xxxx

Prepared by: XXX XXX   Minutes prepared on: -- / -- / ----  ---- 

Dead line for validation: -- / -- / ----, HH:MM HH:MM  

Mailing List:   Name



Entity

Trigram XXX   XXX

E-mail

Participation

For info

Approval



Subject

Matter Discussed

Action

Responsible(s) Responsible (s)

Deadline

Responsible(s) Responsible (s)

Deadline

46

 



  Subject

Matter Discussed

Action

1

2

3

4

5

6

47

 

 

7.6 Risk Monitoring Form

FORM   RISK MONITORING FORM

Project Number

Title

Risk ID*

Project Manager

*Unique identifier for the Risk in the “Risk Register”  

Risk Details  Risk Description

[Description of the identified risk and the consequences it will have on the project, in terms of time, budget and quality.]

Risk Likelihood

[Describe the likelihood of risk on the project and estimate the level (i.e. 1-very low to 5-very high).]

Risk Impact

[Describe the impact of risk on the project and estimate the level (i.e. 1-very low to 5-very high).]

Risk Mitigation  Mitigation  Recommended Preventative Actions

[Describe briefly the actions to be taken to prevent the risk from materializing.]

Recommended Contingent Actions

[Describe briefly the actions to be taken if the risk materializes, to minimize its impact on the project.]

Prepared by

Date

Signature

48

 

 

7.7 Change Request Form

CHANGE REQUEST FORM Project Number

Title

Change ID*

Project Manager

*Unique identifier for the Change in the “Change Register”  

Change Details  Change Urgency 

[Level of urgency for undertaking the change. (i.e., 1-No urgent to 5-Very urgent)]  

Change Description

Change Drivers

[Provide a complete description of the requested change.]

[List the factors that justify this change]

Change Benefits

Change Costs

[Define the benefits for the project after implementing this change.]

[Describe the costs associated with implementing this change].  change]. 

Impact Details  Details  Project Impact [Describe the impact on the project if this change is / is not implemented.]

Approval Details  Details  Supporting Documentation

[Any documentation to support this change should be attached to this document.]

Submitted by

Approved by

Name/Title

Name/Title

Signature

Signature

Date

Date

49

 

 

7.8 Progress Report Template

PROJECT PROGRESS REPORT REPORT   Period from Project Number

--/--/----

to

--/--/---- 

Project Manager

Project Title Start Date

Brief Description

--/--/----

End Date

--/--/----

Budget

Prepared by

Date

Approved by Regional Director

Date

--/--/----

or Chief of Department

7.  Expected Results Result

Key Performance Indicators

Target

% of achievement

1.a  < enter indicator>



1.b  < enter indicator>

2.a  < enter indicator>

2

2.b  < enter indicator>

3.a  < enter indicator>

3

3.b  < enter indicator>

50

 

 

8.  Project Activities Result 1 

Activity Description 1.1 < enter activity > 1.2 < enter activity > 1.3 < enter activity > … 

2

2.1 < enter activity > 2.2 < enter activity > 2.3 < enter activity > … 

3

3.1 < enter activity >

Status (*)

Expected Deadline

Explanations for Deviations from Work Plan

3.2 < enter activity > 3.3 < enter activity > …  (*) N = Not initiated / O = Ongoing / C = Completed

9.  Financial Status Main Questions

Response

Explanations

Project cash contributions received as planned? (Y/N/Not applicable) 

The level of expenditure is at the expected level? Percentage (%) 

Any funds remaining unused? Amount 

*Quarterly Financial Situation attached.

51

 

 

10. Risk Management Risk Description

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation Action Achieved

New Risk Detected

Likelihood

Impact

Mitigation Action Planned

11. Key challenges 12. 

Challenge

Action Taken

13. Proposals Proposal

Description

Additional Comments

Additional Comments 

52

 

 

7.9 Assessment  Assessment / Feedback Report Template

REPORT  PROJECT ASSESSMENT / FEEDBACK REPORT  Period from

--/--/---- to

--/--/----

Project Manager 

Project Number Project Title Start Date

Brief Description

--/--/---- 

End Date 

--/--/---- 

Budget 

Name of Assessing PRJ Staff

Date

Reviewed by

Date

Head, PRJ Division

1.  Challenges/Issues

2.  Risks

53

 

 

3.  Recommended Actions

4.  Recommendation to Regional Director/Chief of Department

Chief PKM Department

Date

54

 

 

7.10 Closure Report Template

PROJECT CLOSURE REPORT  REPORT  Project Number Project Title Brief Description

Project Manager

Partners Prepared by

Date

1.  Objectives Achievement  Achievement  Objective

Description

KPI

Initial Target

Achieved

Remarks

2.  Results Achievement Result

Description

1

KPI a

Initial

Achieved

Remarks

Target

b

2

a b

55

 

 

3.  Project Activities  Activities 

Result 1 

Activity Description 1.1 < enter activity > 1.2 < enter activity > 1.3 < enter activity >

2

…  2.1 < enter activity > 2.2 < enter activity > 2.3 < enter activity > … 

Initial End Date

Carried out in accordance with the work plan? (Y/N)

Explanations for Deviations from Work Plan

3

3.1 < enter activity > 3.2 < enter activity > 3.3 < enter activity > …

4.  Financial Status  Status  Main Questions

Response

Explanations

Project cash contributions received as planned? (Y/N/Not applicable) 

The level of expenditure is at the expected level? Percentage (%) 

Any funds remaining unused? Amount 

NB: Financial Situation (FinSit) should be attached.

56

 

 

5.  Lessons learned  Description

Recommendation

6.  Attached Documents  No.

Title

57

 

 

Decision   7.  Decision <Partner> and ITU agree to close this Project. ITU will submit the final financial situation of the Project. The Project’s remaining balance, which will be reflected in the final financial situation, will be:  be:  

Transferred to other BDT projects

…………………

to:  Reimbursed to: 

Account Number: Account Name: Bank: SWIFT Code:

For the

Signature

Date

Name/Title

 __ / __ / ___

 __ / __ / ___

58

 

 

Closure File / Check List

# 1

Document Final Project Report

2

Photos (if available)

3

Transfer of title to equipment

4

End of contract staff

5

Financial situation a date

6

Closure report

7

Decision on the remaining funds

8

Explanation of the use of budget

9

Post implementation Review

Y/N

Comment

59

 

 

7.11 Transfer of Title to Equipment

[GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS: As a general rule, transfer of title and ownership of assets under a project

should occur at the following times:  

Tangible Assets:  Transfer of title and ownership of tangible assets (such as hardware and equipment) should be effected immediately following the delivery to the beneficiary of such tangible assets.

 

Intangible Assets:  Transfer of title and ownership of intangible intangible assets (such as software and other intellectual property) should be effected only after the following two (2) conditions have been satisfied:





(1) The acceptance of such intangible assets by the beneficiary (which acceptance should occur if there are no major errors/defects in respect of the use, functioning and operation of such intangible assets, even if there are one or more minor errors/defects); and (2) The payment in full of the licenses or other rights of use or ownership in respect of such intangible assets.

 



The foregoing general instructions/rules should nevertheless be reviewed and, if necessary,

adjusted on a case-by-case basis depending on the specifics of each project.]

60

 

 

TRANSFER OF TITLE TO EQUIPMENT  EQUIPMENT  Project Number

Project Manager

Project Title Brief Description of the Project

Description of Agreement(s) under which Project Document was signed

(hereinafter collectively referred to as the “Agreement(s)”) “Agreement(s)”)

Name of U.N.

International Telecommunication Union

t he umbrella agreements [Include the full title, date and names of parties to the under which the Project Document for the relevant Project was entered into— e.g., Cooperation Agreements, Memoranda of Understanding, Voluntary Contribution Agreements, etc.]  

Specialized Agency

(hereinafter referred to as “ITU”)

Name of Project Beneficiary

(hereinafter referred to as “Beneficiary”) Name(s) of Other Project Partners (if different from Project Beneficiary) Prepared by

(hereinafter collectively referred to as “Partner(s)”) Date

1.  In accordance with the project document for the above referenced Project (the “Project Document”), the question of transferring title to Equipment (as defined below) from the ITU to Beneficiary has been considered, and it has been agreed that such title should be transferred subject to and in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Agreement(s), the Project Document and this Form of Transfer of Title to Equipment (this “Form”). 2.  For purposes of this Form, the term “Equipment” means all of the hardware, software, materials, tools, furniture, machinery, inventory and/or equipment, as the case may be, which is expressly set out in the List of Equipment to be Transferred attached as Annex 1 to this Form (which Annex forms an integral part of this Form), and which was acquired and made available to the Project through funds contributed to the ITU pursuant to the Agreement(s) and the Project Document. 3.  By this Form, ITU does hereby transfer and assign to Beneficiary any and all of ITU’s rights, titles, interests, duties, liabilities and obligations in, to and under all of the Equipment.

61

 

  4.  By this Form, the Beneficiary hereby accepts and assumes all of ITU’s rights, titles, interests, duties, liabilities and obligations in, to and under the Equipment, and undertakes to ensure the proper operation and maintenance of the Equipment, and vouches and agrees that the Equipment will be used solely for the purposes set out in the Project Document. 5.  The Beneficiary will indemnify, defend and hold harmless ITU and its officials, employees, contractors, agents and other representatives from and against any actions, claims, demands, proceedings, damages, losses, liabilities, obligations, fees, costs and expenses (including, without limitation, reasonable attorneys’ fees) arising from or relating to the Equipment or its use or operation. 6.  The Partner(s), if any, join in this Form for the purpose of evidencing in writing their respective acknowledgment and agreement to the assignment by ITU, and assumption by the Beneficiary, of the Equipment as contemplated under this Form. 7.  This Form, together with its Annex (which forms an integral part of this Form), will be effective upon its signature by all of the parties hereto and, upon such effectiveness, will form an integral part of the Agreement(s). Accordingly, this Form will be subject to and construed in accordance with the terms terms and conditions—including, without limitation, those relating to Settlement of Disputes, Governing Law, and Privileges, Immunities and Facilities of ITU—which are set forth in the Agreement(s) and the Project Document.

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