Statistics

Published on June 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 24 | Comments: 0 | Views: 481
of 45
Download PDF   Embed   Report

Comments

Content

AB1202: Statistical &  Quantitative Methods
Lecture 1 Introduction & Data Presentation 2013‐2014, S2 Dr Michael Li

Outline
• Course Briefing     • Introduction 
– – – – What is Statistics  Data & Data Sources Populations and Samples Examples

• Tabular & Graphical Methods of Data Presentation 
– Frequency Distribution – Histograms & Pareto Charts  – Stem Plots & Scatter Plots  
2

Course Information
• COURSE INSTRUCTORS
Dr. Michael Li Dr. Chen Shaoxiang S3-B1A-19 S3-B2A-30 67904659 67906143 [email protected] [email protected]

• COURSE ASSESSMENT
Components
Coursework Final Examination (Open-book) Total

Marks
40% 60% 100%

Coursework Components
Class Participation Case Study (Group) Two In-Class Quizzes Sub-Total

Marks
20% 30% 50% 100%

• COURSE DELIVERY 
– 12 lectures + 12 tutorials (please pay attention to MI – mobility initiative) – Two in‐class quizzes: during Tutorial 7 (week 9, after recess) & Tutorial 11  (week 13) respectively   – Statistical software knowledge (required): SPSS (a very powerful/useful  statistics software), Excel (add‐on for statistical analysis), TreePlan (decision  trees) 
3

Course Coverage
• Making Sense of Data and Summarizing Data • Concept of Probability – Bayes Theorem  • Random Variables & Probability Distributions – Binomial,  Uniform, Normal, Covariance (Appendix B)  • Decision Analysis • Sampling Distributions • Statistical Inference: Confidence Intervals & Hypothesis Testing • Design of Experiment & Analysis of Variance • Regression Models – Simple & Multiple Regressions  • Required textbook
– Bruce L. Bowerman, Richard T. O’Connell and Emily S. Murphree.  “Business Statistics in Practice, Sixth Edition” McGraw‐Hill/Irwin, 2012
4

What Is Statistics?
1. 2. 3. Collecting Data
e.g., Survey

Presenting Data
e.g., Charts & Tables

Data  Analysis

Why?

Characterizing Data
e.g., Average

Statistics is the science of data. It involves collecting, classifying, summarizing, organizing, analyzing, and interpreting numerical information.
© 1984‐1994 T/Maker Co.

Decision‐ Making

5

Basic Concepts
• Data: facts and figures from which 
conclusions can be drawn – Data set: the data that are collected for a  particular study



Elements: may be people, objects,  events, or other entries




Variable: any characteristic of an  element Measurement: A way to assign a value  of a variable to the element
– Quantitative: the possible measurements  of the values of a variable are numbers  that represent quantities – Qualitative: the possible measurements  fall into several categories

Cross‐sectional data: Data collected at  the same or approximately the same  point in time
– Example: mobile phone bills of  employees at a bank during a particular  month 





Time series data: data collected over  different time periods
– Most economics data are time‐series  data, e.g., inflation, unemployment  rate, CPI, exchange rate, etc.  Periodic (monthly, quarterly, or yearly)  corporate sales figures are also time‐ series data 
6



Cross‐Sectional Data – SG Example 

Source: Singapore Population 2012 (Department of Statistics)

A moment of pondering:  • Any insights from the data?  • Any impact on you?  

Time Series Data – SG Example

Source: Singapore Population 2012 Live‐Births refer to all live‐births occurring within Singapore and its territorial waters.  Total Fertility Rate refers to the average number of live‐births each female would have  during her reproductive years. 
8

Data Sources
• Existing sources (secondary): data already gathered by  public or private sources
– – – – Library Government Data collection agency Internet

• Experimental and observational studies (primary): data  that we collect ourselves for a specific purpose
– Response variable: the main variable of interest, e.g., salary  – Factors: other variables related to response variable, e.g.,  education, experiences, etc. 
9

Data Sources from NTU Library 
• NTU Library Business Databases (some examples): 
– Compustat Global 
• Currency, statement, balance sheet, flow of funds, and supplemental  data items data of listed global companies from 1989 onwards

– Business Monitor International
• Country risks and business environment 

– Datamonitor 360
• Intelligences in companies, industries, products and countries, etc.

– Global Market Information Database (GMID)
• Business intelligence on countries, consumers and industries  

– International Financial Statistics (IMF)
• Statistics on exchange rates, international reserves, banking, balance  of payments, government finances, prices, etc for most countries in  the world
10

Singapore Government Data Sources
• Statistics Singapore
– Economic data, sector‐level data, demographic data,  household survey data, national census data 

• Housing Development Board (HDB)
– Resale flat prices

• Urban Redevelopment Board (URA) 
– Private residential transactions 

• Land Transport Authority (LTA) – Onemotoring
– Vehicle population, COE prices, real‐time traffic etc 

• Singapore Tourism Board (STB) 
– Annual, quarterly and monthly tourism statistics 
11

Key Concepts: Populations and Samples
Population The set of all elements about which we wish  to draw conclusions (people, objects or  events) An examination of the entire population of  measurements A selected subset of the units of a  population

Census

Sample

12

Statistical Methods
Statistical Methods

Descriptive Statistics

Inferential Statistics

the science of describing  the important aspects of  a set of measurements

the science of using a sample of  measurements to make  generalizations about the  important aspects of a  population of measurements
13

Example 1: Estimating Cell Phone Costs (p.8)
• A bank wishes to decide whether to hire a cellular  management service to choose its employees’ calling  plans. 
– Over 10,000 employees, on different types of calling plans

• The cellular service company suggests studying the  calling patterns of mobile users on 500‐minute‐per‐ month plans
– Purpose: whether cellular costs can be substantially reduced  – The bank has 2,136 employees on a variety of 500‐minute‐ per‐month plans, with different basic monthly rates, different  coverage charges, and different additional charges for long‐ distance calls and roaming. 
14

Cell Phone Costs (cont.)
• Selecting a random sample (from 2,136 employees)
– A random sample of 100 employees on 500‐minute plan  – Key observation: many overages and underage

Data file:  Lect01‐Data.xlsx  Worksheet: CellUse

Excel function:  • Countif(range, criteria)

15

Example 2: Rating a New Design
• A branding company is studying to see if changes should  be made in the bottle design for a popular soft drink. 
– Respondents are shoppers from a large shopping mall on a  particular Saturday – Exposed to the new bottle design and asked to rate: 
• Five items  with a 7‐point “Likert scale” (survey instrument)  • A composite score is the sum of all five items  • Rule of thumb:  a score of 25 is the smallest score for a success 

16

Rating a New Design (cont.)
• Sampling method: “interception method”
– Not a completely random sample, but can generate an  approximately random sample (how?) – A sample size of 60
Worksheet:   Design 

– Key observations: 57 of 60 (i.e., 95%%) composite scores are at least 25

17

Example 3: Estimating Car Gas Mileage
• Study of tax credit offered by the federal government to  automakers for improving fuel economy of gasoline  powered midsize cars  • Automaker has introduced a new model and wishes to  demonstrate it qualifies for the tax credit • US EPA Fuel Economy: 
– http://www.epa.gov/fueleconomy/ – Market average: 26 miles per gallon (mpg) (year 2009)  – Tax incentive goal: an improvement of 5 mpg, i.e., at least 31  mpg

18

Estimating Car Gas Mileage (cont.)
• An approximately random sample of 50 cars
– One car from each of 50 consecutive production shifts  – Each selected car is subject to an EPA test 
• 7.5‐mile city driving trip & a 10‐mile highway driving   • A combined mileage for the car

• Vary from 29.8 mpg to 33.3 mpg  • 38 our of 50 (76%) of the mileages are greater than 31 mpg.   
19

Data Presentation Techniques
• Graphically Summarizing Qualitative Data
– Frequency distribution, bar chart, pie chart, Pareto chart 

• Graphically Summarizing Quantitative Data
– Frequency distribution, histograms, ogives

• Stem‐and‐Leaf Displays • Crosstabulation Tables • Scatter Plots

20

Frequency Distribution for Qualitative Data
• With qualitative data, names identify the different  categories • This data can be summarized using a frequency  distribution
– Frequency distribution: 
• A table that summarizes the number of items in each of several non‐ overlapping classes

21

Example 2.1:  2006 Jeep Purchasing Patterns
• Table 2.1 lists all 251 vehicles sold in 2006 by the Jeep dealers
– It does not reveal much useful information

• A frequency distribution is a useful summary
– Simply count the number of times each model appears in Table 2.1

Worksheet: JeepSales

22

Relative Frequency and Percent Frequency
• Relative frequency summarizes the proportion of  items in each class
– For each class, divide the frequency of the class by the total  number of observations – Multiply by 100 to obtain the percent frequency

Worksheet: JeepSales
23

Bar Charts and Pie Charts
• Bar chart: A vertical or horizontal rectangle represents  the frequency for each category
– Height can be frequency, relative frequency, or percent  frequency

• Pie chart: A circle divided into slices where the size of  each slice represents its relative frequency or percent  frequency • Using Excel to draw bar chart and pie chart – easy  

24

Excel Bar and Pie Chart of the Jeep Sales Data

Worksheet: JeepSales
25

Pareto Chart
• Pareto chart: A bar chart having the different kinds of  defects listed on the horizontal scale
– Bar height represents the frequency of occurrence – Bars are arranged in decreasing height from left to right – Sometimes augmented by plotting a cumulative percentage  point for each bar

Worksheet: Labels
26

Graphically Summarizing Quantitative Data
• Often need to summarize and describe the shape of  the distribution • One way is to group the measurements into classes  of a frequency distribution and 
– “Classify and count” – The frequency distribution is a table

• Then display the data in the form of a histogram
– The histogram is a picture of the frequency distribution
27

Constructing a Frequency Distribution
Steps in making a frequency distribution:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Find the number of classes Find the class length Form non‐overlapping classes of equal width Tally and count Graph the histogram

Example 2.2: Payment time  • A sample of 60 observations, min = 10 days, max = 65 days 
28

Number of Classes & Class Length
• Number of Classes 
– Group all of the n data into K number  of classes – K is the smallest whole number for  which 2K  n (a guide only) – In Examples 2.2 n = 65
• For K = 6, 26 = 64, < n • For K = 7, 27 = 128, > n • So use K = 7 classes

• Class length 
– Find the length of each class as the  largest measurement minus the  smallest divided by the number of  classes found earlier (K) – For Example 2.2, (29‐10)/7 = 2.7143
• Because payments measured in days,  round to three days
29

Histogram – Using Excel

25 20 15 10 5 0 10 < 13 13<16 3 14

Histogram
23

12 8 4 1 16<19 19<22 22<25 25<28 28<31 30

Histogram – Using SPSS

SPSS data file:  Lect01‐PaymentTime.sav
Note: Most statistical software generates histograms automatically – so there is  no unique histogram so long as the graph shows the data pattern.  

Histograms: Three General Cases
Symmetrical:  The right and  left tails of the  histogram  appear to be  mirror images  of each other

Skewed to the  right: The right  tail of the  histogram is  longer than  the left tail

Skewed to the  left: The left tail  of the  histogram is  longer than the  right tail
32

Cumulative Distributions
• Another way to summarize a distribution is to construct a  cumulative distribution • To do this, use the same number of classes, class lengths, and  class boundaries used for the frequency distribution • Rather than a count, we record the number of measurements  that are less than the upper boundary of that class, in other  words, a running total. 

33

Ogive
• Ogive: A graph of a cumulative  distribution
– Plot a point above each upper  class boundary at height of  cumulative frequency – Connect points with line segments – Can also be drawn using
• Cumulative relative frequencies • Cumulative percent frequencies

Worksheet: PayTime

34

Stem‐and‐Leaf Displays
• Purpose is to see the overall pattern of the data, by  grouping the data into classes
– the variation from class to class – the amount of data in each class – the distribution of the data within each class

• Best for small to moderately sized data distributions

35

• The stem‐and‐leaf display:
29 + 0.8 = 29.8 29  8 30  13455677888 31  0012334444455667778899 32  01112334455778 33 + 0.3 = 33.3 33  03

Car Mileage Example
Looking at the stem‐and‐leaf  display, the distribution appears  almost “symmetrical” • The upper portion (29, 30, 31) is  almost a mirror image of the lower  portion of the display (31, 32, 33) • But not exactly a mirror reflection

SPSS data file:  Lect01‐GasMiles.sav
36

Constructing a Stem‐and‐Leaf Display
• No rules that dictate the number of stem values
– Can split the stems as needed – Use SPSS (Excel cannot generate stem plots)

SPSS data file: Lect01‐PaymentTime.sav
37

Stem‐and‐Leaf Display ‐ SPSS

Stem‐and‐leaf display for  Payment Time data

Stem‐and‐leaf display for  Car Mileage data

Note: Step‐and‐leaf displays are NOT unique! 

Cross‐tabulation Tables

– –

Classifies data on two dimensions
Rows classify according to one dimension Columns classify according to a second dimension


1. 2. 3.

Requires three variables
The row variable The column variable The variable counted in the cells



SPSS can easily create cross‐tabulation tables  
39

Example 2.5: Investor Satisfaction
• The raw data: fund type & satisfaction level 

40

Investor Satisfaction: Cross‐tabulation 
• A cross tabulation table of fund type vs. satisfaction level 

41

Cross‐tabulations – Using SPSS
• Analyze → Descrip ve Sta s cs → Crosstabs

SPSS data file:  Lect01‐Invest.sav

42

Scatter Plots
• Used to study relationships between two variables
– Place one variable on the x‐axis – Place a second variable on the y‐axis – Place dot on pair coordinates 

• Software
– Excel: easy & simple – SPSS: easy & sophisticated!    

• Types of Relationships 
– Linear: A straight line relationship between the two variables
• Positive: When one variable goes up, the other variable goes up • Negative: When one variable goes up, the other variable goes down

– No Linear Relationship: There is no coordinated linear movement between  the two variables

43

Scatter Plots – Using Excel
Worksheet “SalesPlot”

44

End of Lecture 1

NEXT LECTURE: CHAPTER 3 DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS
45

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close