Sustainability Report 2011

Published on December 2016 | Categories: Documents | Downloads: 50 | Comments: 0 | Views: 328
of 78
Download PDF   Embed   Report

sustainability report

Comments

Content

RasGas Company Limited Sustainability Report 2011

Sustainability Report 2011

About this report
This report is RasGas’ third annual sustainability
report, building on our previous two sustainability
reports, issued in 2009 and 2010.
It describes activities in the financial and calendar
year 2011 and provides an account of actions and
performance data relating to a range of business,
economic, environmental and social issues which
make up our sustainability performance. It has
been prepared in accordance with guidelines on
sustainability reporting from Qatar Petroleum, which
adopts guidance specific to the oil and gas industry
prepared by the International Petroleum Industry
Environmental Conservation Association (IPIECA), and
cross-references the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).
Further details, including a description of the process
for defining report content, is provided in the ‘Our
approach to reporting’ section.
This report builds on the foundation of sustainability
reporting that we have established within the
company and provides further information and new
perspectives on performance. In particular, and in
line with guidance from the HSE Regulations and
Enforcement Directorate within Qatar Petroleum,
we have focused on the themes of safety and
climate change in this year’s report – two topics of
immediate and long-term importance for everyone
in our industry.
RasGas believes sustainability reporting to be
a valuable tool in building relationships with
stakeholders; we hope you find this report of interest
and value. If you have feedback on it, please contact
us at: [email protected]

RasGas Company Limited, PO Box 24200, Doha, State of Qatar
T (+974) 4473 8000 F (+974) 4473 8480
www.rasgas.com

2011 performance against commitments: at a glance
Sustainability issue

Our commitment

Management and governance
Committing to integrity, accountability
and transparency

RasGas will maintain the highest ethical standards, achieving full legal compliance
and operational integrity in the conduct of its business.

Achieving operational excellence

RasGas is committed to becoming a world-class global energy supplier striving for
excellence. Sustainability represents a key component of our drive for operational
excellence.

Strengthening relationships and
partnerships

RasGas works with its employees, stakeholders and shareholders to strengthen
relationships and partnerships, address mutual needs and improve performance.

Driving sustainability

RasGas works together with all stakeholders to deliver business success, while
protecting the natural environment, promoting economic and social benefit, and
developing the capability of our people. These goals, which align with the Qatar
National Vision 2030, are underpinned by policies, procedures and performance
management.

Operations
Protecting the environment

RasGas is committed to managing the environmental impact of its operations and
conducting its business in a manner that protects the environment. It continues to
use and develop new technologies that promote energy efficiency.

Supporting our people

RasGas is committed to sustaining and developing a competent workforce, which
includes creating employment and development opportunities for nationals.

Ensuring health and safety

RasGas is committed to ensuring the safety of its people and its operations.
RasGas aims to apply industry leading health and safety practices, and
continuously strives to improve its performance.
Further information on these key performance indicators is available on pages 26
to 29, unless stated otherwise.

Maintaining strong community
relationships

RasGas is committed to investing in the society in which it operates, and has
provided funds to a wide range of community, environmental, educational, health
related and cultural initiatives. The company’s CSR programme provides the
structured framework for RasGas’ long-term commitments.

*Quoted rates are per 200,000 hours worked

Key performance indicators
2007

Performance
2009

2008

2010

2011

57 GRI
24 GRI
17 IPIECA 26 IPIECA

Number of sustainability indicators publicly reported on
(based on the 33 IPIECA and 88 GRI indicators, see page 64)

-

-

24 GRI
-

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) capacity in million tonnes per year

20.7

20.7

28.5

37.1

37.1

Employee engagement index score (percentage): average score
from six employee climate survey questions on motivation
(see page 53)

-

76

-

78

80

Average number of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
engagement activities (events/sponsorships) per
month – page 56

-

-

6.3

8.2

10.5

9.4

9.3

8.9

16.8

18.8

17.8

12.1

9.5

11.8

11.8

5.5

5.7

5.9

11.1

1.2

14.3

9.4

12.2

44.6

18.2

62

62

65

50

43

2,262

2,669

2,875

2,946

3,061

31.1

30.4

31.2

30.5

33.0

38

61

65

43

27

Total recordable injury rate* (employees)

0.08

0.03

0.09

0.10

0.03

Total recordable injury rate* (contractors)

0.18

0.12

0.13

0.16

0.09

0

0.03

0

0

0

0.04

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.02

15

7

7

2

2

Fatalities – employees

0

0

0

0

0

Fatalities – contractors

0

0

1

0

0

Number of heat stress incidents – page 33

9

6

1

0

1

Total recordable occupational illness rate – page 32

-

-

-

0.00

0.01

% of CSR activities that were proactive
(i.e. non-solicited) – page 56

-

-

-

47

39

Total greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 equivalent emissions in
tonnes) – page 37
Nitrogen oxides emissions (kilo tonnes) – pages 39, 40
Volatile organic compound emissions (kilo tonnes) – pages 39, 41
Sulphur oxides emissions (kilo tonnes) – pages 39, 40
Total waste recycled (%) – page 43
Total workforce (number) – page 48
Qatarization (% Qatari employees in total workforce) – page 50
Number of reported safety observations per person

Lost-time injury rate* (employees)
Lost-time injury rate* (contractors)
Lost-time injuries

About this report
This report is RasGas’ third annual sustainability
report, building on our previous two sustainability
reports, issued in 2009 and 2010.
It describes activities in the financial and calendar
year 2011 and provides an account of actions and
performance data relating to a range of business,
economic, environmental and social issues which
make up our sustainability performance. It has
been prepared in accordance with guidelines on
sustainability reporting from Qatar Petroleum, which
adopts guidance specific to the oil and gas industry
prepared by the International Petroleum Industry
Environmental Conservation Association (IPIECA), and
cross-references the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).
Further details, including a description of the process
for defining report content, is provided in the ‘Our
approach to reporting’ section.
This report builds on the foundation of sustainability
reporting that we have established within the
company and provides further information and new
perspectives on performance. In particular, and in
line with guidance from the HSE Regulations and
Enforcement Directorate within Qatar Petroleum,
we have focused on the themes of safety and
climate change in this year’s report – two topics of
immediate and long-term importance for everyone
in our industry.
RasGas believes sustainability reporting to be
a valuable tool in building relationships with
stakeholders; we hope you find this report of interest
and value. If you have feedback on it, please contact
us at: [email protected]

Sustainability Report 2011 3

Contents
Foreword by His Excellency Dr Ibrahim B Ibrahim

4

Introduction by Hamad Rashid Al Mohannadi, Managing Director 5
About RasGas

6

Governance

12

Delivering a lower-carbon future

18

Safety and health

24

Environment

34

People

46

Community engagement

54

Our approach to reporting

62

IPIECA and GRI content index

64

Glossary

73

4 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Foreword
RasGas continued its outstanding business performance in
2011, fulfilling its commitments to customers while operating
safely and reliably. Our rigorous approach to safety for our
workforce and our plant is fundamental to meeting our
commitments, and will remain so in the future.
In 2008, the Qatar National Vision 2030 laid out a progressive and ambitious roadmap for
the country’s economic, environmental, social and human development. RasGas is aligned to
this vision and will continue on the path to making it a reality.
The Barzan Gas Project, initiated in 2011, will be managed and operated by RasGas.
This major investment is an important element of the Qatar National Vision 2030 and is
strategically important for the long-term sustainable development of Qatar.
When the project’s two new gas processing trains are in operation in 2014 and 2015, their
output will combine with that of other RasGas liquefied natural gas (LNG) and pipeline sales
gas trains to make a staggering total production capacity of around 11 billion standard cubic
feet per day, the equivalent of almost two million barrels of oil. This will make RasGas one of
the largest gas processors in the world.
In thinking about the future, we are all aware of the global challenge of climate change.
The 18th Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate
Change will take place in Doha in November 2012 and will involve many organisations in
Qatar, including RasGas. Thousands of international participants will meet to address and
discuss global issues such as population growth, sustainable economic development and
resource management, which are vital to our future national prosperity. As a key supplier of
LNG, RasGas is already contributing to cleaner fuel use worldwide.
During a time of global economic uncertainty, our agenda aims to provide stability and enable
progress by seeking to ensure harmony between our business success and protection of
the environment, the community, and the development of people. We are committed to
sustainable development, in full support of the Qatar National Vision 2030.
His Excellency Dr Ibrahim B Ibrahim
Economic Adviser to the Emir of Qatar
Vice Chairman of RasGas Board of Directors

As a key supplier
of LNG, RasGas
is contributing to
cleaner fuel use
worldwide

Sustainability Report 2011 5

Introduction
RasGas had a remarkable 2011, with its best ever
safety record, strong operational results and excellent
environmental progress. This year’s Sustainability Report
focuses on how we operate to deliver superior health,
safety and environmental performance, while developing
our people and supporting the local community.

Our 2011 operational
results highlight our
key strength: the
ability to safely and
reliably deliver on
our commitments

Across all our activities, our priority has been safety. I am pleased, therefore, to report that
in 2011 our total recordable injury rate of 0.07 was the lowest in RasGas’ history, while
maintaining a low lost-time injury rate of 0.01. The total number of injuries was almost
half that of 2010 and one-sixth of the number in 2009. We also significantly improved
our process safety performance. Every employee and contractor can take genuine pride
in this achievement.
Our 2011 operational results once again highlight our key strength: the ability to safely and
reliably deliver on our commitments. Based on our LNG capacity of 37.1 Mta, our output
from Ras Laffan was a historic maximum of 36.5 Mta of LNG in 2011, demonstrating
excellent utilisation and reliability of our plant. Our ability to consistently market, sell and
deliver LNG around the world continues to grow. Our reputation and commitment to
customers resulted in new sales and purchase agreements being signed in 2011, while
we continue to strengthen our relationships with existing customers.
Strong safety and operational performance underpins good environmental performance.
We invested more than $49 million in 2011 in projects that reduce emissions and enhance
our waste management performance. Through its new greenhouse gas policy, RasGas
commits to implementing emission reduction programmes based on principles of energy
efficiency, sound technology and cost-effectiveness.
This progress in 2011 has been recognised by recent accolades for our energy-saving initiatives
and business performance. In February 2012, Euromoney’s Project Finance magazine bestowed
its Global Deal of the Year award to recognise the outstanding achievement represented by the
financing of the Barzan Gas Project in a very challenging market. In March 2012, our new office
headquarters gained Qatar’s first Gold level Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design
certification for Commercial Interiors – a significant reward for our 2011 efforts to protect the
environment and save energy through excellence in design.
Our achievements in 2011 are the product of the skill and dedication of our people. I have
worked in the oil and gas industry for more than 30 years and I am proud to be part of
a company which has so much team spirit and which continually strives for excellence and
improvement. I invite you to read about all we have achieved in the pages of this report.
We look forward to continuing to enhance and excel in 2012 and beyond.
Hamad Rashid Al Mohannadi
Managing Director of RasGas

About
RasGas

Sustainability Report 2011 7

About RasGas

About RasGas
RasGas Company Limited (RasGas) is one
of the world’s premier integrated LNG
enterprises and has an enviable reputation
for being a safe and reliable supplier of LNG
that has transformed a regional resource into
a key component of the global energy mix.
RasGas is a Qatari joint stock company
with more than 3,000 employees, owned
by Qatar Petroleum (70 per cent) and
ExxonMobil (30 per cent). Located in Qatar,
with its headquarters in Doha, RasGas has
production facilities in Ras Laffan to extract,
treat, liquefy and export LNG around the
world. RasGas has seven LNG trains in
operation, with a total production capacity
of 37.1 million tonnes per annum (Mta).
RasGas also produces liquefied petroleum
gas (LPG), gas condensate, liquefied helium
and natural gas.
The company has entered into long-term
agreements with customers in South Korea,
India, Italy, Spain, Belgium, Taiwan and
the Americas.
RasGas is a member of the International
Association of Oil and Gas Producers
(OGP), the International Petroleum Industry
Environmental Conservation Association
(IPIECA), the British Safety Council, the Qatar
Chamber of Commerce, and the International
Chamber of Commerce – Qatar.

RasGas’ vision, mission,
winning proposition and values
Vision
To be a world-class global energy supplier
striving for excellence.
Mission
To develop, produce and sell hydrocarbons
from the world’s largest non-associated
gas field in a safe and environmentally
responsible manner for the welfare of
the State of Qatar and the satisfaction
of RasGas’ customers while maximising
shareholder value.
Winning proposition
Safe, reliable production and delivery
of products to a worldwide portfolio
of customers, and superior execution
of projects and technical services for
and on behalf of RasGas’ shareholders
and stakeholders.
Values
• People: they are central to our success;
we care, listen to and develop our
people.
• Safety: we protect our people, assets
and the environment by upholding
high standards for process and safety
behaviours.
• Integrity: we do business ethically and
with integrity.
• Excellence: we strive for excellence in
all business aspects.
• General interest: we are partners in the
common interest we share: the success
of our company.

Ras Laffan LNG
production plant

8 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Our approach to sustainability
RasGas believes that sustainable practices
and business success are inseparable, with
a strong commitment to accountability and
transparency in its business practices. By
applying this sustainability framework to its
strategic planning, business and operational
activities, RasGas seeks to position itself as
a transformative organisation and a driver of
change in Qatar.
Our approach to sustainability is linked to
the four pillars that underpin the Qatar
National Vision 2030. Key to our approach
is a commitment to:
• Improving performance – becoming
a more profitable and competitive
organisation by increasing the social and
economic benefits of our activities and
reducing their environmental impact
• Strengthening relationships – working
with shareholders and other stakeholders
to address mutual needs and, by sound
corporate advocacy with regulators,
ensuring that regulations supporting
sustainable development are practical
and capable of implementation
• Integrity – maintaining the highest
standards in all our operations and in
the conduct of our business
• Integrating sustainable practices –
by accounting for performance
using quantitative measures in an
informed and transparent manner,
we seek to demonstrate success in
implementing environmental, social
and economic programmes that also
meet socio-economic, eco-efficiency
and socio-environmental goals

• Revenues
• Net cash flow
• Earnings
• Shareholder return

 Jobs created

• Skills enhancement
• Local economic
impacts
• Social investments
• Business ethics
• Taxes/royalties

• Resource efficiency
• Product stewardship
• Life-cycle analysis

Economic growth

Socioeconomic

Ecoefficiency

Sustainability
Social
progress

• Diversity
• Employee
satisfaction
• Human rights
• Community dialogue
• Labour standards

Socioenvironment

Environmental
stewardship

 Safety and health

• Global climate change
• Local environmental impact
• Resource management

• Spill prevention
• Waste minimisation
• Emissions reduction
• Regulatory

compliance
• Ecosystem services
• Biodiversity

Figure 1. The RasGas approach to sustainability
Source: Oil and Gas Industry Guidance on Voluntary Sustainability Reporting,
International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association (2010)

Monitoring offshore
production plant on the
RasGas Alpha complex

Sustainability Report 2011 9

About RasGas

Stakeholder engagement
RasGas recognises that it is accountable to stakeholders for its performance and acknowledges that its success depends upon understanding
stakeholder interests and needs, and finding the most effective responses in collaboration with its stakeholders. The table below lists RasGas’ key
stakeholders, how they are engaged and their priority issues. It also provides an introduction to how RasGas is responding to these issues.
Stakeholder

How we engage with them

Stakeholder’s priority issues

Our response in 2011

Regulators and
government

Regular meetings.
Official visits and audits.
Capacity-building events,
forums, awareness and training.

Compliance with national regulations of
the Ministry of Environment; industry
regulations of the HSE Regulations and
Enforcement Directorate;
international treaties; and Ras Laffan
Industrial City requirements.

International
organisations

Participation at conferences and
exhibitions.
Participation in industry working
groups.
Corporate profile and a range of
corporate publications.
Management meetings and Board
of Directors meetings.

Contribution to public policy development
across various issues (such as climate
change, safety, environmental protection).
Benchmarking.
High performance.
High return on investment.
Minimisation of operating risks.

Prepared for UNFCCC Conference of the Parties, supporting
Qatar Petroleum climate change initiatives.
Won the GCC Award for ‘Best Industrial Organisation
Complying with Regulations’.
Supported national regulators in the development of
approaches to road safety, process safety, greenhouse gas
(GHG) and other environmental reporting, carbon capture
and storage, among others.
Sponsor, exhibitor and presenter for 20th World Petroleum
Congress.
Continuing participation in IPIECA and OGP industry
association working groups.
Achieved a historical maximum output of 36.5 Mta of both
rich and lean LNG, demonstrating reliability and utilisation
versus a production capacity of 37.1 Mta.
Celebrated the symbolic stone-laying of the major Barzan
Gas Project.
Continued to enhance positive working relationship through
mutual projects, including the jetty boil-off gas project to
minimise GHG emissions.
Signed new long-term LNG sale and purchase agreement
with CPC Corporation, Taiwan, for the supply of an
additional 1.5 Mta of LNG for 20 years.
Reached in principle agreement with KOGAS of South Korea
for new long-term sales.
Executed a new agreement with EDF Trading, strengthening
our ties to European customers.
Best annual personal safety performance since RasGas was
established.
Set up new job families and professional development forums.
Positive employee climate survey outcomes and actions.
Higher proportion of Qatari nationals in the business.
Continuing use of open tenders.
Preferential terms for local suppliers built on tender
evaluation processes.
Hosted a forum for suppliers to outline RasGas aims and
expectations.
Supplier training initiatives, including guidance on RasGas
Elements for Excellence.
Sustainable procurement process embedded within the
Green Office policy launched.
Year of the Community, involving diverse initiatives
throughout the year.

Investors /
shareholders

Qatar Petroleum Exchange and cooperate on HSE
affiliates
and related issues.

Excellent management relationships.
Consistent application of operating
principles.
On time and safe product delivery,
of required quality.
Long-term business relationships.

Customers

Ongoing process through
business interactions.

Employees

Day-to-day involvement with
management such as meetings,
presentations, and departmental
engagement.
Employee development projects.
Visits to suppliers and meeting
with management.
Transparent tendering process.

Safe and healthy working environment.
Learning and development.
Performance-based evaluation.

Collaboration with civil society
organisations.
Direct interaction with community.
Environmental management
system and department.
Environmental protection
programmes.

Impacts of operations.
Local hiring.

Suppliers

Community

Environment

Table 1. Stakeholder engagement

On time payment.
Long-term and reliable business
relationships.
Support for local suppliers.

Protection of biodiversity and marine life.
Minimisation of negative environmental
impact.
Reduction of flaring and other operational
impacts.

Developed and launched new GHG strategy and policy.
Reduced SO2,VOC and NOx emissions.
Achieved LEED – Commercial Interiors certification at Gold
level for our new office headquarters, awarded in 2012.

10 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Our products and operations

RasGas’ corporate structure
and main operations

Under the direction of Qatar Petroleum (QP),
the national company responsible for all oil
and gas industry activities in Qatar, RasGas
is responsible for the development of a large
concession area in the North Field.

North Field

Ras Laffan

The North Field covers more than 6,000
square kilometres and has recoverable gas
reserves of more than 900 trillion standard
cubic feet (approximately 10 per cent of the
world’s known reserves). The primary export
product is LNG, which is processed in Ras
Laffan Industrial City through 14 LNG trains,
seven of which are operated by RasGas.
Since 2001, RasGas has grown rapidly, most
recently with the completion of two LNG
‘mega-trains’, each with capacity of 7.8 Mta,
a further large sales gas train and current
expansion of its helium production facility.
RasGas continues to consolidate its position
in global LNG and helium markets, and is
set to become one of the world’s leading
helium producers. RasGas also produces
comparatively small volumes of by-products
such as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG),
ethane, sulphur and natural gas liquids (NGL).

Doha
Qatar

Persian Gulf

Saudi Arabia

Figure 2. Map of Qatar, showing the location of the
North Field

RasGas Company Limited (RasGas)
is a Qatari joint stock company owned
by Qatar Petroleum (70 per cent) and
ExxonMobil (30 per cent). On behalf of
the shareholders, it acts as the operating
company for:
Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas
Company Limited ‘RL’
Established in 1993 to produce LNG
and related products from its two trains:
Trains 1 and 2, which each have
a capacity of 3.3 Mta.
Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas
Company Limited (II) ‘RL (II)’
Established in 2001 to produce LNG and
related products, RL (II) owns Trains 3,
4 and 5, which each have a production
capacity of 4.7 Mta.
Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas
Company Limited (3) ‘RL (3)’
Established in 2005 to produce LNG and
related products, RL (3) owns Trains 6
and 7, which each produce 7.8 Mta.

Ras Laffan operations

1.0%

0.7%
5.0%

19.5%

54.9%

18.9%

Figure 3. Our principal products, 2011
LPG and NGL
Sulphur
LNG

Sales gas
Condensate
Ethane

Sustainability Report 2011 11

About RasGas

RasGas customers
RasGas has long-term sales and purchase agreements with its customers to supply LNG to many locations around the world.

United
Kingdom
Portugal
United States

Belgium
France
Italy
Spain

Turkey

South Korea
Qatar
Taiwan

Mexico
India

Brazil

Argentina

Chile

0.2

7.8

7.0

3.4
7.5
2.1

0.8
3.1

4.6

Figure 4. 2011 – customer base (Mta)
CPC
Distrigas
EDFT
Edison
Endesa

ExxonMobil
KOGAS
Petronet
Spot

RasGas continues to
consolidate its position in
the global LNG and helium
markets, and is set to
become one of the world’s
leading helium producers

Governance

Sustainability Report 2011 13

Governance

Governance structure
The Managing Director of RasGas has
ultimate responsibility for the day-to-day
management, direction and operation of
the company, and oversees the operational
decisions affecting the business, such as
the selection of personnel using direct hires,
secondees or contractors.
Shareholders appoint the Board
members. His Excellency Dr Mohammed
Saleh Al Sada, the Chairman, and His
Excellency Dr Ibrahim B Ibrahim, the Vice
Chairman, are non-executive members of
the Board, and provide leadership for the
highest governance body of the company.
All major RasGas projects, as well as budgets,
are reviewed by the Board of Directors. The
Joint Venture Agreements and the Articles
of Association ensure that Board members
avoid any potential conflict of interest.

Board meetings are held, at which
shareholders and senior management have
the opportunity to offer recommendations
and communicate with the Board. The
members of the Board are provided with
monthly reports from management to
enable regular evaluation of the company’s
performance. Committees created by
the Board focus on specific corporate
governance areas. For example, the
Board has adopted an audit charter that
allows its audit committee to oversee the
effectiveness of corporate governance and
management of RasGas’ business activities.
Seeking continuous improvement
Through its management systems, RasGas
strives continuously to improve in all its
activities. It has developed and implemented
a number of programmes to achieve this,
from enhanced business integrity controls to
refining its safety, health and environment
processes and procedures.

RasGas Board of Directors at end 2011: (standing, left to right) Taieb Belmahdi, Saad Al Kaabi, Bryan Wesselink,
Abdulrahman Al Suwaidi, Jos Evens, Dr Marwan Musleh; (seated, left to right) Said Al Mohannadi,
HE Dr Ibrahim B Ibrahim, HE Dr Mohammed Saleh Al Sada, Hamad Rashid Al Mohannadi, Barton Cahir

14 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

The internal controls framework
The RasGas internal controls framework
(see Figure 5) exists to make sure that
business is conducted in a disciplined way
in accordance with laws and regulations
and RasGas’ policies, procedures and
financial authorities. A sound framework
and system of internal controls assists
compliance and reliable reporting, and
enables risks to be managed, company
assets to be safeguarded, and shareholders’
investments to be protected. There are six
main components in the controls framework,
which work together to ensure an effective
controls environment is maintained.
RasGas’ business conduct policies (see
page 15) lie at the heart of this framework.
They define requirements for the conduct
of company business and include policies
on ethics; information and disclosure;
harassment and intimidation in the
workplace; and other challenges that might
occur in the work environment. Further
information on these policies is provided
later in this section.

RasGas’ Basic Standards of Control set
out management principles, concepts
and standards for an effective system of
control. Their emphasis is on financial and
accounting matters, but the standards are
all-embracing and prescribe the minimum
controls that should be embedded in policies
and procedures.
A system of authorisation, in which
delegations of authority and the limits of
financial authorities are set out, ensures clear
accountability for financial transactions and
effective decision-making.
Policies and procedures describe what should
be done and how to follow our business
processes. They form an integral part of each
employee’s day-to-day activities.

Compliance checks include audit and
self-assessments, which evaluate the
effectiveness of the controls framework
and drive continuous improvement.
Audits are performed by the Internal Audit
department, which reports to the RasGas
Board, and bi-annually by the shareholders’
audit teams. Self-assessments are
conducted by people from within the same
group with knowledge of their particular
scope of work.
SEVENTH SENSE, the final component, is our
‘umbrella’ controls management system that
ensures controls are proportionate to the
risk and allows management to evaluate the
effectiveness of the whole framework.

Ras Laffan control room

Lead
ing

ys

an

gi

al

Ch

in g

ing
Risk

Reporting

g
ssin
se
s
A

An

ng
Training

Figure 5. Internal controls framework
Business conduct policies
Basic standards of control
Authorisation
Policies and procedures
Compliance checks
SEVENTH SENSE

Sustainability Report 2011 15

Governance

SEVENTH SENSE

Business conduct policies

In 2011, RasGas continued to embed
SEVENTH SENSE as its primary tool for
identifying and managing business, financial,
regulatory, information sensitivity and
reputational risks.

RasGas has adopted a collection of business
conduct policies which define requirements
for the conduct of company business. They
are applicable to all employees, consultants
and secondees. Employees must declare
each year, in a formal certification process,
that they understand their responsibility to
comply with the policies. Table 2 below lists
the 14 business conduct policies.

Its aim is to mitigate business risks to
acceptable levels. SEVENTH SENSE provides
a structured, consistent approach to controls
leadership, assessing business process risk,
analysing controls steps required to mitigate
specific exposures, ensuring appropriate
controls training, managing changes
in personnel and processes, checking
compliance with policies and procedures,
and reporting concerns to management.
It contains seven elements:
•M
 anagement leadership, commitment and
accountability
•R
 isk assessment
•B
 usiness process analysis and improvement
•T
 raining and development
 anagement of change
•M
•R
 eporting and resolution of control
weaknesses
 elf-assessment
•S
A controls committee, chaired each month
by the Finance Group Manager, reviews
SEVENTH SENSE status and actions. The
outcome is presented to the Managing
Director and his Executive Leadership Team.
Work to consolidate the implementation
of SEVENTH SENSE continued in 2011. This
included the launch of a ‘controls minute’
initiative to promote controls awareness
in staff meetings, and of an introductory
training programme for new hires, and the
development and roll-out of a business
process management of change procedure.
A post-implementation ‘element assessment’
was performed to establish benchmark
scores for each group and to assess how
well the elements of the system are working.
Element assessments will continue on a
two-year cycle.

Ethics policy
RasGas’ approach is one of strict observance
of laws applicable to its business. But the
policy does not stop there. Even where the
law is permissive, RasGas chooses the course
of highest integrity. It recognises that
a well-founded reputation for honest dealing
is itself a valuable company asset.
RasGas seeks to ensure that employees
understand that the company cares how
results are obtained, not just that they are
obtained. Through the policy, employees are
encouraged to act in an honest and ethical
manner, to record all business transactions
accurately and to be honest and open with
RasGas’ internal and external auditors.
RasGas expects its employees to report
suspected violations of law or RasGas’
policies to management. When an employee
has reason to believe that his or her
colleague is not complying with company
policies, he or she can contact the company’s
Ethics Committee or the Managing Director
in confidence. The role of the Ethics
Committee is to provide guidance and make
recommendations when issues of concern
arise. Violations of the policies and defined
security incidents are formally reported
to the committee, which determines
whether an investigation is required. The
committee also manages the conduct
of any investigations. In accordance with the
committee’s approach to grievance reporting
and non-retaliation, a belief or concern
expressed by an employee will not be held
against them when reporting a possible
ethical problem.

RasGas expects compliance with its standard
of integrity throughout the organisation
and will not tolerate the achievement of
results at the cost of breaking laws or
dealing unethically. RasGas supports,
and expects everyone to support, any
employee who declines an opportunity
or advantage for RasGas that would
compromise ethical standards.
Equally important, RasGas expects open and
honest communications from employees
at all levels, and compliance with RasGas
policies, accounting rules and controls.
Input to public policy
RasGas contributes to public policy
development in areas such as climate
change, where its expertise is valuable. For
example, the company’s experience of acid
gas reinjection has contributed to Ministry
of Environment studies on the potential
for future emissions capture and storage.
RasGas has also provided expertise in the
development of road safety policy to the
Ministry of Interior in 2011.

Table 2. RasGas’ business conduct policies

1

Ethics

2

Conflicts of Interest

3

Gifts and Entertainment

4

Financial Controls

5

Tendering and Contracting

6

Safety, Health, Environment and Quality

7

Information Disclosure

8

Safeguarding Information and Assets

9

Employee Relations

10 Legal Compliance
11 Political Activities
12 International Operations
13 Drugs and Alcohol
14 Harassment and Intimidation in the
Workplace

16 Sustainability Report 2011

Preventing bribery and corruption
RasGas also recognises the need to identify
and manage the risks of bribery and
corruption. RasGas’ policies on conflicts of
interest, gifts and entertainment, tendering
and contracting, as well as its policy and
systems of financial control, provide
a framework for identifying and managing
such risks.
Transparency is a vital guiding principle. For
example, employees must declare instances
of actual, potential or perceived conflicts
of interest, and must report all offers and
acceptances of gifts and entertainment to
or from contractors, suppliers or customers
where the actual or estimated value exceeds
the amount stated in the policy guidelines.
Political contributions using company funds,
resources or premises are not permitted and
cannot be made directly or indirectly to any
political candidate or party in the State of
Qatar or anywhere else in the world, except
where such contributions are permitted by
law and have been approved by the Board
of Directors.

RasGas Company Limited

Human rights
While RasGas does not have a separate
human rights policy, as a responsible
corporate citizen, it adheres to the basic
human values of dignity and respect for all
individuals, and complies with all laws and
regulations in force in the State of Qatar
that apply to it.
RasGas does not tolerate harassment or
intimidation in the workplace, and the
company’s employee relations policy
supports the provision of a mutually
supportive, respectful and productive work
environment. A non-retaliation and grievance
system is in place to enable employees to
raise instances of alleged mistreatment.
RasGas has a programme to train all its
employees on its business conduct policies.
As a check on compliance with these
policies, the annual internal self-certification
process seeks to ensure that employees
acknowledge their responsibilities under
company policies on business conduct and
that they will comply with them.
RasGas complies with the laws of the State
of Qatar, including complying with laws
prohibiting child or forced labour. RasGas is
also committed to conducting its business in
compliance with all governmental laws, rules
and regulations applicable to its operations
outside the State of Qatar.

RGEE: operations integrity
In its corporate Safety, Health, Environment
and Security Policy, RasGas commits to
safeguarding human safety and health,
conserving the environment and ensuring
the security of its assets. This policy is
put into practice through the RasGas
Elements for Excellence (RGEE), which is
a proven management system framework
of processes and procedures to address
the inherent operational risks that could
potentially cause harm to our people, our
plant or our environment.
The thinking behind RGEE is that risks can be
minimised by a systematic risk assessment
approach and management techniques.
Effective leadership is vital, as are
commitment and accountability. Accordingly,
RasGas managers from the highest level
down are charged with visibly supporting
and leading RGEE.
RGEE addresses all operational activities
within RasGas’ business with underlying
principles and a set of expectations. Key
focus areas include managing interfaces,
process safety, regulatory compliance,
stewardship of actions to closure, and
embedding lessons learned from incidents.
Figure 6 below sets out the 11 elements of
the RGEE framework and the relationship
between them.

Driver

1 Management,
leadership
commitment and
accountability

RasGas has a programme
to train all its employees on
its business conduct policies

2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

Evaluation

Risk assessment and management
Facilities design and construction
Information/documentation
Personnel and training
Operations and maintenance
Management of change
Third-party services
Incident investigation and analysis
Community awareness and emergency
preparedness

Feedback
Figure 6. Eleven elements of the RGEE framework

11 Operations
Integrity
Assessment and
improvement

Sustainability Report 2011 17

Governance

All RGEE systems have a defined scope
and objectives, roles and responsibilities,
procedures, measurement indicators
and a feedback loop to drive continuous
improvement in operations integrity
performance.
RGEE has provided the organisation with
a means to carry out its businesses safely,
efficiently and cost-effectively, to enhance
technical integrity, and to share best
practices. To demonstrate visible leadership
and commitment from senior management,
RasGas has established a committee,
chaired monthly by the Managing Director,
to monitor and measure the performance
of RGEE. Key performance indicators,
covering all RGEE systems, are also regularly
monitored by nominated ‘System Owners’.
An important validation of the performance
and effectiveness of RGEE is independent
external assessment. An assessment was
carried out in 2011 which demonstrated
substantial improvements had been
achieved within RGEE since the previous
assessment. The assessment also provided
recommendations that are now being
pursued to further strengthen the system.
The RGEE system manages operations
integrity risks and therefore complements
the SEVENTH SENSE management system,
which controls business and financial risks
(see page 15).

Linking everything we do to RGEE
“RGEE Academy Level 2 truly
demonstrated how the RGEE elements,
expectations, guidelines and systems
affect our day-to-day activities at
RasGas. It is amazing how, after the
course, people started to link everything
they do to RGEE. This is not limited to the
work environment in RasGas but extends
to the entire world around us. The course
successfully delivered the ‘Applied RGEE
Management’ statement written on the
handout binder.”
Ali A R Dashti
Specialist (Production Engineering)
Train 6/7 Asset

The RGEE Academy
RasGas has continued to help its workforce
at all levels understand that RGEE is the way
people work at RasGas by providing training
within the RGEE Academy, launched in 2010.
The academy courses target senior level
leadership, line managers and supervisors,
as well as providing a foundation course
for all staff. Courses cover a wide range
of topics, including personal and process
safety awareness; leadership, commitment
and accountability; contractor safety
management; and how various elements
of RGEE combine together to provide a
comprehensive risk management framework.
In order to build in best practices developed
over the past five years within the company
and in the industry more widely, the RGEE
system is being reviewed during 2012. The
revision will take account of assessments
carried out on individual system elements in
the past which have resulted in operational
improvements. Where appropriate, system
requirements or intentions will be clarified,
which in turn will help to drive better
performance.

RGEE in practice – monitoring offshore operations on the RasGas Alpha complex

Delivering a
lower-carbon
future

Sustainability Report 2011 19

Delivering a lower-carbon future

Energy needs and climate change

The challenge of climate change

The provision of reliable, affordable and clean
energy is fundamental to tackling the many
and diverse challenges of sustainability.
Energy companies have a vital role to play
in helping people meet basic needs for
heating, transport and light, and in enabling
the development of health, wealth and
living standards. However, the world is now
recognising that the environmental risks
associated with producing and using energy
need to be addressed and that sustainable
pathways need to be found for future
generations to follow.

Meeting the growing demand for energy
presents many complex challenges, not
least the global concern of climate change.
Over the next 50 years, without action,
atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations
will be more than triple those of preindustrial levels, creating climate change
risks with the potential for socio-economic
and ecological impacts. As a gas producer,
RasGas recognises that the world needs
to address these global risks of climate
change. One way to address this challenge
is to reduce the average carbon intensity
of the energy by shifting from fuels rich
in carbon, such as coal, to fuels lower in
carbon, particularly gas. The increasing
demand for gas discussed above is in part
driven by its lower carbon content. The IEA’s
gas scenario reflects this shift, recognising
that gas can act as a lower carbon ‘bridge’
towards a future energy mix that will include
economical renewable alternatives to further
reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

A future of rising energy demand
Demand for energy continues to rise.
It has grown steadily for several decades
and continues to increase as worldwide
populations grow and economies expand.
As we reported in our 2010 Sustainability
Report, authoritative forecasts (including
those of the International Energy Agency)
suggest that fossil fuels will remain the
dominant form of primary energy over
the next two decades, with gas making
an increasing contribution to world energy
supplies. In addition, as part of its World
Energy Outlook 2011, the International
Energy Agency (IEA) published a special
report that introduces a ‘gas scenario’ which
suggests an even stronger role for gas in
the future energy mix (see Figure 7).

5

Fossil fuels will remain the
dominant form of primary
energy over the next two
decades, with gas making
an increasing contribution
to world energy supplies

Billion tonnes of oil equivalent

4

3

Oil
Coal

2
Gas
1

Biomass
Nuclear
Hydro
Renewables

0
1980

1990

2000

2010

2020

2030

Figure 7. World primary energy demand
Source: World Energy Outlook © OECD/IEA, 2011
special report: ‘Are We Entering a Golden Age of Gas?’

20 Sustainability Report 2011

Qatar also faces these energy and climate
change challenges. Economically, its natural
gas resource provides both lower-carbon
fuel for the nation and prosperity through
its exports, contributing more than 55 per
cent of the national gross domestic product.
However, the risks of global climate change
on the country’s natural environment are
potentially serious. The Qatar National
Development Strategy 2011–2016,
published in 2011, states that the warmer
sea temperatures and higher sea levels that
arise from climate change will inevitably
disrupt marine ecosystems in ways that
could create biodiversity stress for future
generations. Rising temperatures could also
lead to further desertification, increased
water needs and poorer air quality.
Qatar recognises the importance of
climate change risks for the nation and the
positive contribution the country can make
as a provider of lower carbon fuel. This
recognition will be reinforced when Qatar
hosts the 18th Conference of the Parties
to the United Nations Framework
Convention on Climate Change (COP 18)
in Doha in November 2012, which will
involve many Qatari organisations,
including Qatar Petroleum with RasGas.
This is the most important forum globally
for climate change policymakers and will
focus attention on the actions that the
world’s nations need to pursue for energy
and environmental sustainability.

RasGas Company Limited

The path ahead
The widely accepted forecasts of increased
energy use make it clear that governments,
business and society at large will need great
commitment and significant investment over
decades to reduce carbon emissions and
ultimately stabilise greenhouse gas (GHG)
concentrations in the atmosphere.
The Carbon Mitigation Initiative’s
‘stabilisation wedges’ concept, shown in
Figure 8, sets out a path to avoid
a doubling of the world’s emissions 50 years
from now. By initially stabilising carbon
emissions at the current level of 8 billion
tonnes per year, the most severe risks of
climate change may be mitigated, and it
takes the first step towards the long-term
goal of reducing emissions to levels which
are sustainable for the planet’s ecosystems.
The concept recognises that there is no
single solution to reduce emissions and that
a combination of different actions is
required. Each stabilisation wedge offers
a strategic technology option to reduce
global carbon emissions by at least 1 billion
tonnes by 2060. Of the eight wedges
suggested, apart from tackling deforestation
and increasing solar, wind and nuclear
energy use, there are four options of more
immediate importance to the oil and gas
industry: carbon capture and storage,

biofuels, energy efficiency and fuel switching
(from coal to gas). The wedges together
form a ‘stabilisation triangle’: the carbon
savings required to keep emissions flat for
the next 50 years.
Today, policymakers around the world
continue to develop policy responses,
including to try to stabilise emissions and
mitigate climate change risks. Internationally,
starting with the Kyoto Protocol, a wide
range of policies and measures are evolving
to encourage action, including emissions
trading systems, carbon taxes and a variety
of voluntary incentives and measures.
In Qatar, the framework of voluntary
measures to limit the growth of GHG
emissions includes a GHG accounting and
reporting scheme, a flare-reporting initiative,
and consideration of carbon capture and
storage. A national plan for energy efficiency
and conservation has been proposed to drive
greenhouse gas mitigation. A national action
framework is being developed to strengthen
technical and institutional capacity and
raise public awareness of climate change.
These and other measures are set within the
context of the Qatar National Vision 2030
and the shorter-term National Development
Strategy 2011–2016, which foresee the
responsible and strategic use of hydrocarbon
resources for the benefit of the current
generation and those that follow.

16

Billion tonnes of carbon emissions

A national plan for energy
efficiency and conservation
has been proposed to drive
greenhouse gas mitigation

8

h

at

tp

n
rre
Cu

Stabilisation ‘wedges’

Flat path

Goal
0
1950

2000

2050

Figure 8. Illustration of how carbon emissions could be managed to achieve stabilisation
Source: Carbon Mitigation Initiative, Princeton University, 2011

2100

Sustainability Report 2011 21

Delivering a lower-carbon future

Addressing the challenge though
Qatar’s oil and gas sector
Qatar’s oil and gas sector generates
approximately half of the country’s total
GHG emissions from energy and industry,
and so has a central role to play in optimising
energy use and minimising wasted energy.
Within this, QP plays a leading role in
translating national strategy into action
for the industry. RasGas fully supports the
initiatives being taken by QP.
In an environment where demand for fossil
fuels will continue to rise, demand for LNG,
RasGas’ principal product, is projected to
grow particularly strongly, representing well
over half the growth in traded gas. LNG and
renewables together are expected to be the
fastest-growing fuel sources in the next two
decades, as illustrated by Figure 7
on page 19.
This projected growth in demand for
LNG relates to its practical benefits and
environmental advantages. While all fossil
fuels have a carbon footprint, LNG is cleaner
burning, with lower carbon emissions per
unit of heat generated than coal or oil. It also
produces significantly lower levels of localised
pollutants such as sulphur dioxide and other
air-borne particulates.

In shipping, larger vessels
fitted with reliquefaction
facilities have reduced the
number of voyages required
and cut emissions per
nautical mile

RasGas initiatives
RasGas has launched initiatives to reduce
emissions across the value chain of its LNG
production, particularly initiatives to reduce
flaring. In 2011, RasGas completed a five-year
flare minimisation programme, which was the
first of its kind in Qatar. In 2005, RasGas was
flaring 1.37 per cent of its intake gas at its Ras
Laffan facilities. As a result of the measures
detailed on page 38, flaring had been reduced
to only 0.47 per cent of gas by 2010, an
overall reduction of 66 per cent over the five
years.The programme aligned with Qatar’s
goal of reducing flaring and contributed to the
country’s participation in the World Bank-led
Global Gas Flaring Reduction (GGFR) initiative.
In shipping, RasGas and Qatargas have
supported the use of larger vessels fitted
with reliquefaction facilities, not only reducing
the number of voyages required but cutting
emissions per nautical mile by using gas more
efficiently. Older vessels have been retrofitted
to use clean LNG as a fuel, thus reducing both
harmful direct emissions from the vessels
themselves and the indirect emissions from
the refinery production of residual fuels. In
addition, new hull coatings have been used to
cut fuel consumption.

In terminal operations, the jetty boil-off gas
recovery project, which is being undertaken
with QP and Qatargas, is designed to
minimise RasGas’ and Qatargas’ flaring at
the loading terminal in Ras Laffan to the
minimum practicable limit.
While LNG has inherent advantages,
delivering the quantities of energy the
market needs will continue to require
a clear strategy and operational excellence.
RasGas’ business strategy plots a route to
meeting future customer demand, just as the
company has successfully met its production
targets and commitments in the past. In
recognition of the importance of tackling
GHG emissions, RasGas has developed
a GHG policy and management strategy.
This work has been going on for two years
and will be completed in 2012.

A range of environmental initiatives are improving the efficiency of Qatar’s LNG shipping fleet

22 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

RasGas GHG management strategy
and policy
In developing its position, RasGas has
taken account of the current and future
international policy framework, covering
key national and international regulatory
and voluntary initiatives. The company has
also considered competitor benchmarking
conducted in 2010. Insights from the work
within industry associations (such as the
IPIECA climate change working group) and
participation in task forces (such as the
QP task force on GHG and climate change)
have fed into the strategy’s development.
Throughout the process, account has been
taken of the views of stakeholders inside
and outside Qatar, including meetings in
2011 with the Ministry of Environment, QP,
ExxonMobil and Ras Laffan Industrial City.
The GHG management strategy, shown in
Figure 9, sets out the policy and strategy
components. These provide the context
for action over the next five years and
beyond. Delivering the strategy requires
responsiveness to key drivers, and
identifying and using human and technical
resources available. The approach
is underpinned by a philosophy of
continuous improvement.
The RasGas GHG policy was developed
in 2011 and approved in May 2012. The
statement is provided opposite and sets
out the company’s overall approach and
commitments, as well as the interrelated
components of the policy.

RasGas presented papers on climate change strategy, corporate social responsibility and sustainability
reporting, as well as this paper on technological advances in LNG, at the 20th World Petroleum Congress in Doha,
December 2011

Identification of goals defined
by the GHG policy

Adoption of GHG policy
or position statement
by critical stakeholders

Policy

5-year plan

Components

RasGas GHG
management
strategy

Initiatives

Activities

RasGas has launched
initiatives to reduce
emissions across the value
chain of its LNG production

Management tool
that defines roles,
responsibilities and time
frames to achieve GHG
initiatives

Implementation of action
items, tasks and projects to
manage, measure and reduce
GHG emissions

Figure 9. RasGas GHG management strategy

Identification of
GHG initiatives and
programmes to achieve
goals in GHG policy

Sustainability Report 2011 23

Delivering a lower-carbon future

A framework for future plans
The four principal components of the GHG
policy provide a framework for initiatives that
will help us achieve its goals. These include
activities we are planning to undertake in
2012–13, such as independent third-party
GHG verification, screening of emission
reduction opportunities, engaging with local
stakeholders (including but not limited to
preparation for the 2012 COP 18 meeting in
Doha), and assessing options for developing
our voluntary reporting. More information
on these activities, our initiatives and
performance is provided on pages 34–45,
in the Environment section of this report.
The development of this strategy provides
RasGas with a robust foundation for tackling
current and future GHG challenges. It will enable
us to build on the steps we are already taking
to minimise our own GHG emissions, defining
roles, responsibilities and timeframes within
which we can achieve our GHG policy goals.

RasGas Greenhouse Gas Policy
May 2012

RasGas approach

RasGas believes that it is prudent to develop strategies that address potential risks to society arising from
climate change impacts associated with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

RasGas commitments

RasGas is committed to developing and implementing programmes to reduce emissions that contribute to
the greenhouse effect and climate change; promoting the agenda of the Qatar National Vision 2030
and managing its activities so that there is harmony between social development, economic growth and
environmental stewardship.
RasGas will develop and implement a GHG management strategy that includes the identification, evaluation,
implementation and management of initiatives in relation to GHG in accordance with the three key principles
of energy efficiency, sound technology and cost effectiveness.
RasGas will work towards continual improvements in GHG management and engage its internal resources
within the framework of the RasGas Elements of Excellence (RGEE).

Interrelated policy components

The GHG policy and RasGas’ commitments will be achieved by implementing the following components:
• Accounting and reporting RasGas will measure and report GHG emissions following regulatory requirements
and best management practices. GHG emissions will be measured and managed to evaluate RasGas’ emissions
profile and achieved reductions.
• Mitigation GHG emission reduction projects, including but not limited to flare minimisation, carbon capture
and storage, and energy efficiency improvements, will be evaluated considering the potential access to carbon
markets and implemented in accordance with the three key principles: energy efficiency, sound technology and
cost effectiveness.
• Transparency RasGas is committed to providing clear and sufficient information for its stakeholders to assess
the credibility and reliability of RasGas’ GHG reduction efforts, through its ongoing sustainability reporting.
RasGas is committed to continual improvement in external reporting and performance benchmarking, in
addition to examining life-cycle GHG emissions.
• Advocacy RasGas will implement a GHG advocacy plan to proactively engage stakeholders to understand
climate change risks and opportunities within the organisation, as well as with the local and global community.
RasGas will participate in regional and global dialogue and will facilitate a joint industry approach to enhance the
GHG management strategy dialogue.

Hamad Rashid Al Mohannadi
Managing Director

Management of flaring: an opportunity to reduce GHG
emissions both offshore and onshore

Safety and
health

Safety and health

RasGas has maintained a determined focus on incident
prevention and improving operating practices, which
have made the company an industry leader in safety
performance.
In this section, we:
• Outline our management approach and commitment
• Summarise our personal and process safety
performance in 2011
• Provide information on our performance in comparison
to industry peers
• Outline important initiatives, such as those on safety
training, that drive the creation of a positive safety culture
• Set out the actions we take to protect the health and
wellbeing of our workforce

Sustainability Report 2011 25

Management approach
RasGas is committed to safeguarding
human safety and health, protecting the
environment and ensuring the security of
its assets. RasGas work locations range
from offshore installations to onshore LNG
facilities to our headquarters in Doha. The
safety and health challenge is substantial,
but our steady focus on incident prevention
and improving operating practices has made
the company an industry leader in safety
performance.
Safety is one of our five core values (see
page 7). It is of paramount importance at
RasGas, whether in day-to-day operations
or special projects. Our company-wide
target of zero lost-time injuries (LTIs)
continues to drive better safety and health
performance for every RasGas team every
day. This applies to contractors as well as
employees. The safety value is embodied
in the company’s policies and management
systems.

26 Sustainability Report 2011

Safety, Health, Environment
and Security Policy
The Safety, Health, Environment and Security
Policy is approved by the Managing Director.
The Safety, Health, Environment & Quality
(SHE&Q) Group is responsible for providing
the tools to create a healthy and safe
working environment for all employees and
contractors, including the protection of all
RasGas personnel, assets and property, and
providing a rapid and complete response in
the event of an emergency. Everyone who
works for RasGas is responsible for safety and
security, and management, ultimately the
Managing Director, has accountability for the
company’s performance against the policy.
RasGas sets clear objectives for performance
against its policy. Measurement and
reporting are required, as is benchmarking
against comparable organisations.
The policy is implemented through the
RasGas Elements for Excellence (RGEE)
management system, which has been
certified to International Standard OHSAS
18001:2007 (Occupational Health and
Safety Assessment Series). Conformance
to these standards is verified by inspections
and external audits. The system was
successfully reviewed in 2011 with no
non-conformances. The system also
includes procedures relating to the design,
construction, operation and maintenance of
facilities. A commitment to best practice and
continuous improvement is central to the
company’s policy and management system.

RasGas Company Limited

Safety and health performance
For many years, managers in the oil and
gas industry have collectively directed their
companies to reduce and eliminate incidents
involving workplace hazards. This refers
to recordable ‘personal safety’ incidents
resulting in injuries from accidents such
as trips or falls, and ‘occupational’ illness
resulting from exposures, such as heat stress
due to hot weather. Despite great success
in reducing these types of incidents, the oil
and gas industry has recently experienced a
number of major safety incidents. There has
therefore been a corresponding emphasis
on minimising the risk of such low probability
but high consequence incidents.
Indicator

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Fatalities (employees)

0

0

0

0

0

Fatalities (contractors)

0

0

1

0

0

Tier 1 process safety incidents

-

-

-

2

0

Tier 2 process safety incidents

-

-

-

11

2

Safety observations per person

38

61

65

43

27

Total recordable incidents (entire workforce)

79

78

67

21

11

Total recordable injury rate (TRIR): employees*

0.08

0.03

0.09

0.10

0.03

TRIR: contractors*

0.18

0.12

0.13

0.16

0.09

TRIR: entire workforce*

0.18

0.11

0.13

0.15

0.07

Lost-time injuries (LTI): entire workforce

15

7

7

2

2

Lost-time injury rate (LTIR): employees*

0.00

0.03

0.00

0.00

0.00

LTIR: contractors*

0.04

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.02

LTIR: entire workforce*

0.03

0.01

0.01

0.01

0.01

First aid incident rate*

0.47

0.32

0.87

0.77

0.39

Number of heat stress incidents

9

6

1

0

1

Total recordable occupational illness rate (TROIR)

-

-

-

0.00

0.01

Mandatory safety training compliance (%)

-

77

90

92

98

Number of industrial hygiene audits/ inspections

-

-

24

36

45

89.1

136.9

104.2

28.6

29.7

Hours worked (millions)

RasGas, in common with
other leading companies,
has maintained its priority
on personal safety, but
has increased its focus
on process safety

The systematic approach to preventing
events with the potential for fires, explosions
and major spills is referred to as ‘process
safety’. RasGas, in common with other
leading companies, has maintained its
priority on personal safety, but has increased
its focus on process safety to make certain
that its facilities have high integrity, that
procedures are robust and plant operators
are appropriately trained.

*Quoted rates are per 200,000 hours.
Lost-time injuries include any injury or illness resulting in one or more days away from work, and includes fatalities,
if any are recorded.
Total recordable injuries include any injury requiring medical treatment or resulting in restricted work or any losttime injury or fatality.
First aid incidents are not part of total recordable incidents but are events requiring simple first aid and no
medical treatment.
Occupational illnesses are those that result from exposure to health risks in the workplace resulting in illness that
requires medical treatment.
Table 3. RasGas safety and health performance 2011

Sustainability Report 2011 27

Safety and health

Performance monitoring
We monitor our performance against a
range of indicators. These include traditional
lagging indicators to track unplanned events
(such as lost-time injuries), but more often
we are introducing leading indicators to
monitor our planned efforts to prevent
these events. We use lagging indicators to
understand past performance and trends,
and leading indicators to test the strength
of our controls and encourage good safety
behaviour. For example, we monitor the
number of safety observations as a leading
indicator, because this can reduce risk
by strengthening our safety culture and
increasing awareness of potentially harmful
conditions or practices in the workplace.
One area where we focused attention on
the management of safety in 2011 was
shutdown safety (see Figure 10). Experience
across the industry has shown that
shutdowns, in which an area of the plant or
process equipment is intentionally taken out
of service for planned maintenance, and its
subsequent start-up in which the equipment
is brought back on stream, are higher-risk
processes. The case study describes our
shutdown management system, which we
reviewed and improved in 2011.

Case study: shutdown management system
With seven LNG trains, two Al Khaleej Gas
(AKG) domestic gas plants and a helium
plant, three to four planned shutdowns
take place each year at the Ras Laffan site.
The shutdown management system, a
clearly defined, staged process, is designed
to ensure the smooth, timely shutdown and
start-up of process equipment.
A dedicated team carries out planning,
preparation, implementation and review
of shutdown activity on site. A system
manual sets out the framework for
managing shutdowns, supported by
a specific plan containing information
relevant to the specific shutdown being
undertaken. A hazards-based criticality
assessment is carried out to make sure that
the right levels of controls, resources and
supervision are in place.

A wide range of factors need to be
considered when managing a shutdown,
including access control, traffic, waste
management, job safety, heat stress,
exposure to hazards such as chemical
substances or noise, emergency response
and rescue plans, and communication.
Training and effective communication are
vital – not only for the employees and
contractors directly involved, but for all
those working on the site.
Once the required maintenance activities
are complete, pre-start-up safety reviews
are carried out to verify that the equipment
is ready to be restarted safely. Lessons
learned are also an important element of
the management system.

The process environment at Ras Laffan, where RasGas’ shutdown management system minimises risk

Gate 1
Business Planning
Identifying safety
lead

Gate 2
Evaluation,
definition and
screening
Understanding scope
related to safety

Figure 10. Shutdown management system

Gate 3
Detailed scoping
and planning
Develop plan
including resources
and logistics

Gate 4
Final readiness
checks and
preparation for
shutdown
Safety readiness
including emergency
preparedness

Gate 5
Shutdown,
work execution,
recommissioning
and start-up
Implementation
and monitoring of
the plan

Gate 6
Start-up, follow-up
analysis, lessons
learned and
improvement
Lessons learned
with action plan
and action owners

28 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Personal safety
We are pleased to report that we suffered no
fatalities in our operations in the course of
2011. This performance was achieved while
working a total of 29.7 million hours. Figures
11–13 demonstrate our performance
record in reducing incidents which result
in recordable injuries (requiring medical
treatment or restricted work or lost time
of more than one day).
Our total recordable injury rate (TRIR) of
0.07 was the lowest we have achieved
since RasGas began operations in 1999,
reducing the number of injuries by more
than half compared to 2010. However, as
in 2010, two of the injuries in 2011 were
more severe and resulted in lost-time injuries
(more than a day away from work). One of
these involved a facial injury to a contractor
when he was struck by an item of equipment
being repaired. The other involved the
fracture of a contractor’s toe when it was
run over by a scaffold trolley.
Of the other recordable injuries, a total of five
incidents resulted in a worker being unable
to perform his or her work fully for a period
following the injury (known as a restricted
work case) and four further incidents required
medical treatment. While this remains a
commendable performance for the upstream
industry, we will not be satisfied until we
consistently meet our target of zero lost-time
injuries. Even then we will strive to have a
workplace where no injuries occur.

Operator wearing protective gloves during maintenance work at Ras Laffan

We continued to encourage all those who
work for us to be mindful of their own safety
and that of others. This included continuing
to embed near-miss reporting, following a
campaign to promote ‘safety observations’
in 2010. Near-miss reporting involves
the reporting of events that did not result
in recordable injury, illness or physical or
environmental damage but had the potential to
do so. The average number of reported safety
observations per person in 2011 was 27.

If an incident does occur, we record and
analyse it to learn lessons and prevent
re-occurrence. Our recordable incident
analysis continues to show a high proportion
of hand and finger injuries. In July 2011, we
started a hand safety programme, which
contributed to a 30 per cent decrease in
the hand injury rate by the end of the
year. This has continued into 2012 with an
encouraging 60 per cent improvement
to the end of the first quarter.

1.2

3.5

1

3

2.68

2.5

2.08

2

1.75

1.68

1.76

1.5
1

0.9
0.55

0.64

0.73
0.37

0.5
0

2007

RasGas TRIR

2008

2009

2010

2011

OGP benchmark average TRIR

Figure 11. Total recordable injury rate (TRIR)

0.8

50
1st
2nd
0.66
0.55

0.6

0.45

0.42

0.43

0.4
0.2
0

1st

1st

40

0.17

2007

RasGas LTIR

Companies

4
LTIR per million hours worked

TRIR per million hours worked

Figures 11–13. Performance trends for RasGas versus oil and gas industry average injury rates for 2007–2011

30
20

3rd

3rd
4th

4th

4th

4th

2008

2009

2010

2011

10
0.05

0.07

0.07

0.07

2008

2009

2010

2011

OGP benchmark average LTIR

0

2007

Number of OGP Companies
RasGas LTIR

RasGas TRIR

Figure 12. Lost-time injury rate (LTIR)

Source: Safety performance indicators – 2011 data; OGP, May 2012

Figure 13. OGP benchmark: RasGas ranking

Sustainability Report 2011 29

Safety and health

In February 2011, our Projects Department,
within the Operations Group, celebrated
10 million hours worked without a single
lost-time injury. This reflected the strong
and successful relationship we have built
with four contractors over the past four
years on projects in Ras Laffan. In our view,
strong safety leadership, dedication, and full
engagement and training with our contractors
contributed to this record.
We compare our safety performance
globally against other companies in the
upstream oil and gas industry, participating
in benchmarking analysis undertaken by
the International Association of Oil and Gas
Producers (OGP), which collected data from
44 upstream companies in 2011.
Analysis of our performance in 2011 has
shown that RasGas’ safety performance
continues to be in the top 10 per cent
of companies surveyed. Based on rates
expressed per million hours worked, it can be
seen from Figures 11–13 on the previous
page that the RasGas lost-time injury rate (at
0.07) is still one-sixth of the industry average
(0.43) while the improved performance in
2011 for the total recordable injury rate (at
0.37) is now about one-fifth of the average
industry rate (at 1.76). Based on these key
performance indicators, RasGas is proud to be
among the top safety leaders in the industry
in 2011 but still recognises the need to
continuously improve its performance.

Process safety
Process safety is a disciplined framework
for managing the integrity of operating
systems and processes that involve handling
hazardous substances by applying good
design principles, engineering, and operating
and maintenance practices. It deals with the
prevention and control of incidents that have
the potential to release hazardous materials
and energy. In the oil and gas industry,
the presence of flammable hydrocarbons
and toxic substances is an intrinsic hazard.
Releases have the potential to result in
significant harm to people, the economy
or the environment.

In 2010, we introduced a four-tier
hierarchy of process safety indicators to
track and prevent hydrocarbon releases,
which are referred to as ‘loss of primary
containment’ (LOPC). We are already
identifying improvements by applying this
industry-wide framework, which RasGas
helped to establish.
With this framework in place, we began work
to ensure that the most serious categories
of process safety events were reported
and investigated formally by the respective
functions, with root cause findings shared
among line management and incorporated in
the respective work processes. This included
a major effort in 2011 to check small
bore pipework connections across all
LNG trains, which were the source of two
Tier 1 incidents in 2010. This focus on
learning from process safety events has
contributed to better performance in 2011,
with no Tier 1 process safety events and
just two Tier 2 incidents, a considerable
improvement compared with 2010.

Our aim is to develop a strong process
safety culture across RasGas in which we
apply inherently safe design principles and
undertake comprehensive operational
maintenance programmes. We also analyse
process safety events from the oil and gas
industry to apply any lessons to our own
operations. To make sure that our actions
address the right areas, we have identified
and assessed our process safety risks and
sought measures to mitigate these risks to a
level ‘as low as reasonably practicable’, known
as ALARP, across industry. We continue to
conduct periodic risk re-evaluations.

Lag
ng
s
tor

ica

Tier 3
LOPC events of minimal consequence
and challenges to safety systems

ind

Fourteen leading indicators based on critical
maintenance, risk management and action
closures, management of change, temporary
system defeats and actions to learn from
process safety events

rs
ato
dic

In February 2011, our
Operations Group’s Projects
Department celebrated
10 million hours without
a single lost-time injury

Ten indicators to measure system trips, shutdowns and
safety device activations in the plant, as well as near
misses such as minor leaks or fires

Tier 2
LOPC events of
minor consequence

di
Lea

Recording of other process safety events such as smaller gas
releases or leaks with lower actual or potential harm

Tier 1
LOPC events
of significant
consequence

g in
gin

Indicators of serious process safety failures, including gas releases
even if no injuries or damage resulted

Tier 4
Operating discipline and
management system performance indicators

Figure 14. Four-tier indicator framework based on American Petroleum Institute Recommended Practice 754-2010.

30 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

We are continuing to build our in-house
process safety capability by improving data
capture and reporting systems for all types
of process safety indicators, especially at the
Tier 3 and Tier 4 levels, to align our efforts
with emerging industry practice. In 2011,
RasGas piloted and reviewed a number
of new indicators and, as a result, our
operations will use 10 Tier 3 indicators and
14 Tier 4 indicators from 2012.
The triangular four-tier framework (see
Figure 14, previous page) illustrates the
new combination of indicators. Of particular
importance is the demand on safety systems
(DOSS) Tier 3 indicator, which records, for
example, instances when the fully automated
instrumentation systematically takes a
pre-determined action to protect the plant.
This is an important ‘inherently safe’ design
feature of the plants at Ras Laffan. The Tier
3 level is complemented by Tier 4 indicators
that check the health of the system – for
example, maintenance of safety critical
equipment or ensuring incidents have been
formally investigated and reported.

We have identified and
assessed our process
safety risks, and sought
measures to mitigate these
risks to a level as low as
reasonably practicable

RasGas Alpha complex

Safety offshore
In accordance with developing national
regulation, we will also prepare safety cases
for our onshore and offshore facilities. There
are specific risks that need to be managed
to prevent incidents involving gas and oil
releases, particularly because gas releases
in the confined spaces of a rig could result
in fire or explosion damage and potential
impacts to the marine environment. To
minimise risk, only one offshore installation,
the RasGas Alpha complex, is permanently
manned. In early 2012, a number of safety
improvements were recommended for the
Alpha complex, including the installation of
lifeboats on all remote wellhead platforms
for rapid evacuation in an emergency. Other
measures included replacing the helicopter
decks on two remote wellhead platforms to
accommodate the newer helicopters now
being used offshore.

The industry-leading safety performance
of our Subsurface Group was recognised
in 2011 with the award of the ExxonMobil
Development Company’s annual President’s
SHE Award. This is the second time
the Subsurface team has received this
prestigious award. The award recognises
best in class safety, security, health and
environmental performance, against
three criteria: management leadership
and employee/contractor involvement;
use of management systems and incident
prevention-focused processes; and controls
that address leading and lagging metrics. In
addition to outstanding safety performance,
the team’s commitment to environmental
protection was demonstrated by reductions
in flaring and the use of speciality couplings
on fuel transfer lines to reduce the
risk of spills.

Sustainability Report 2011 31

Safety and health

Road safety
As recognised in the QNV 2030, road safety is
a challenging issue in Qatar. The Vision refers
to the need for road safety, accident reduction,
traffic management and casualty reduction.
We transport many hundreds of our
employees and contractors every day by road.
In 2010, we began to fit the fleet of buses
and mini-buses with in-vehicle monitoring
systems (IVMS), which are recognised as
valuable in making sure that driving behaviour
matches appropriate standards. By tracking
vehicle mileage and monitoring how the
vehicle has been driven (logging instances
of excessive speed, hard braking or overrevving for example), safer driving is
encouraged. In addition, the information
gathered enables vehicle maintenance to be
undertaken precisely when necessary, and
the vehicles to be kept in a safe condition.
In line with our plans, we installed monitoring
units on 103 vehicles in 2011, bringing the
total to 301 IVMS units in the current fleet
(which was consolidated in 2011 to reduce
vehicle numbers). We plan to install 80 more
units in 2012. RasGas contractors are now
encouraged to install IVMS in their vehicles.
We also audited RasGas vehicles in 2011 to
make sure high-quality tyres are fitted, and
have developed a vehicle examiners’ course to
enhance the rigour of vehicle examinations.
Defensive driver training has been enhanced,
with the provision of a bus drivers’ course for
all coach drivers. When recruited, shuttle bus
drivers receive additional practical training.
We are supporting the efforts of the Ministry
of Interior and the police to improve road
safety across Qatar in line with QNV goals. For
example, we are developing suggestions for
enhancing road safety , which we will provide
to the National Road Traffic Committee.
We are also working with community
representatives to increase awareness of road
safety risks in Ras Laffan Industrial City and
neighbouring areas. We are, for example, taking
part in a schools programme in the Al Khor
area, where we will be delivering road safety
messages to more than 30 infant schools.

Safety training
We recognise the importance of visible
and strong safety leadership, particularly
in setting the right example for our entire
workforce, whether they are employees or
contractors. We have therefore launched
a safety leadership programme, targeted
initially at group managers, managers,
section heads and supervisors. The course,
which consists of 13 modules, is designed
to develop the existing skills and knowledge
of our leadership team members. The course
modules are linked to the elements of RGEE
and the behavioural competencies outlined
in the company’s job families. A second
element of the programme focuses
on supervisory positions and
safety fundamentals.
Safety Passport for the RasGas SHE&Q Group Manager

The RasGas Safety Passport
The Safety Passport has been developed
to maintain a record of employee and
contractor behavioural and technical
competencies.
The Safety Passport acts as a compliance
monitoring tool, as well as a guideline
for individuals to track their own safety
training. It is a system which ensures people
consistently maintain their competencies,
through accurate record management, and
documents the safety competencies required
for their role.
The passport is a powerful tool on site,
because it enables compliance monitoring
for both safety training and behavioural
competencies. It is used to monitor high-risk
tasks and permit-to-work authorisations.
For example, it is used for access control
to high-risk areas of the plant, following
the simple rule ‘no training, no access’. The
Safety Passport system is overseen by
a coordinator whose records ensure the
correct training has been carried out.

Contractor safety
Our contractors, and their contractors in turn,
need to operate to high safety standards and
their approaches must be consistent with
our own. We hold monthly meetings with
contractors on safety and run safety forums
for contractors throughout the year. These
meetings, which take place in our Ras Laffan
facilities as well as offshore and in our project
offices, provide an opportunity to review
safety performance, examine and learn from
incidents, and share good practice.

32 Sustainability Report 2011

Health
RasGas responds to workplace health risks
by providing dedicated occupational health
support to its employee and contractor
workforce.
This includes primary healthcare and
emergency medical services, support
services to offshore medical facilities, worker
wellness programmes, safety-critical task
assessments, and community medical and
dental services to employees’ families.
For example, our approach to fitness at work
involves pre-employment assessments,
periodic health assessments for workers,
and health promotion campaigns.

RasGas Company Limited

United States, with long experience in this field.
The JCI assessment helps ensure a safe and
efficient patient care process, and has already
resulted in improved quality and credibility of
our medical services.
Health risk assessments
RasGas carries out annual health risk
assessments (HRA), conducted in accordance
with the Occupational Health and Working
Environment system within RGEE. Our
methodology is in line with IPIECA and OGP
industry guidance and recognised professional
practice. The independent external
assessment of RGEE carried out in 2011 (see
page 17) commended the HRA process.

exposure to them faced by workers. This
analysis is captured in a health risk rating.
Controls to manage the risks, including
training, are then reviewed.
For example, noise exposure can be a
hazard in areas of our working environment
onshore and offshore. We therefore
monitor exposure to noise among groups of
workers in roles identified as having higher
than average levels of exposure. We raise
awareness of noise risks, use engineering
and administrative controls and personal
protective equipment to protect workers
from excessive noise, and carry out regular
hearing checks by trained occupational
health professionals.

As described in the Community engagement
section of this report, RasGas provides
financial, practical and personal support to
address various community health needs.

The HRA process aims to identify and
evaluate health hazards in the workplace.
It takes into account existing or proposed
control measures and, where appropriate,
identifies the need for further measures to
control exposure to health risks.

RasGas’ Medical Services department became
the first primary healthcare facility in Qatar to
receive JCI (Joint Commission International)
accreditation, in 2011. JCI is one of the largest
accreditors of healthcare organisations in the

The process involves identifying the hazards
associated with process units and plant
areas (such as exposure to noise or toxic
substances such as benzene), characterising
those hazards, and assessing the potential

‘RasGas Donates Blood to Make a Difference’ initiative

Particulates and dust are periodically monitored to assess air quality for health protection

Health performance indicators
In the same way that we record injury rates,
since 2010 we have also monitored illness
rate as a key performance indicator (KPI)
called total recordable occupational illness
rate (TROIR). Compared with a rate of zero in
2010, our illness rate in 2011 was 0.01 as
a result of a single heat stress incident. Due
to its importance, the number of heat stress
incidents is also a KPI (see page 33).

Sustainability Report 2011 33

Safety and Health

Heat stress
RasGas’ operating conditions present unique
challenges for securing the health of all
its employees. Ambient air temperatures
generally average 35°C between May
and September with daily maximum
temperatures often in excess of 40°C, and
relative humidity ranges from 25–100 per
cent. August is generally the most humid
month of the year, and creates a potentially
dangerous situation for those exposed to
the heat. This poses the greatest health risks
and a need for heat stress management,
especially when Ramadan falls within these
hottest periods.
We have developed and applied a work
programme designed to reduce the risk
of heat-related illnesses (such as heat
exhaustion, cramp and heat stroke). The
programme posts information on appropriate
intervals for work and rest and required
amounts of water to drink. This guidance
is available to workers in various languages

and is based on heat index monitoring, which
assesses indicators such as relative humidity
and ambient temperature. Monitoring
information is communicated by the plant’s
public address system, text messaging,
electronic boards, and colour-coded flags
which indicate the degree of hazard.
The heat stress prevention programme has
been effective for the past five years, during
which time the rate of heat stress incidents
has been significantly reduced. However, we
suffered one heat-stress recordable incident
in 2011, and we revised the heat stress
prevention procedure to take account of the
lessons learned.
Ergonomics
We have carried out initiatives to raise
awareness of the importance of good
ergonomics in our work environments.
When specifying for office equipment for
the new RasGas headquarters building, we
placed emphasis on obtaining the most

ergonomically suitable office furniture.
We have followed this up by providing
ergonomics training and carrying out
a comprehensive ‘human factors’ study
that focused on improving the layout
of the offices.
Our focus on ergonomics has extended
beyond the office environment to consider
risks that arise in our production facilities,
where posture and repetitive tasks can
also be important in determining health
and wellbeing.
Food safety and hygiene
We have an established procedure governing
food and water safety. Audits are scheduled
to ensure the integrity of the food chain,
and our catering contractors use approaches
that incorporate hazard analysis critical
control point (HACCP) concepts, which are
commonly used in the food industry.

RasGas combats heat stress using a range of measures, including automated heat index monitoring equipment and mandatory
carrying of water bottles as personal protective equipment (PPE) when working on Ras Laffan operations in summer months

Environment

Environment

RasGas is committed to the long-term sustainability
of Qatar’s natural environment, in the context of its
commitment to the Qatar National Vision 2030.
RasGas has developed a corporate culture in which
environmental management is integrated into its
processes and behaviours.
In this section, we:
• Summarise our approach to environmental
management
• Provide information on our environmental expenditure
in 2011
• Outline our greenhouse gas emissions and other
emissions to air, and the initiatives we are taking to
reduce them
• Set out our approach and performance on waste
management and energy use
• Describe our approach to the management of water
and biodiversity

Sustainability Report 2011 35

Our approach to environmental
management
RasGas’ commitment to conserving the
environment is essential to its long-term
success. RasGas maintains a comprehensive
Environmental Management System
integrated within RGEE (see page 16)
and certified to ISO 14001:2004, the
internationally accepted standard for
environmental management. RGEE enables
RasGas to take a rigorous and structured
approach to addressing environmental issues.
Conformance to standards is verified
annually by inspections and external audits.
To date, RasGas has successfully undergone
these inspections, including a recertification
audit completed for ISO 14001 in 2011,
with zero non-conformances and only minor
suggested improvements.

36 Sustainability Report 2011

In the course of 2011, RasGas undertook
a range of activities that promote
better environmental management in its
day-to-day operations, as well as carrying
out audits that check how well the system
is functioning. Highlights included:
• Developing a greenhouse gas policy and
management strategy, completing work
begun in 2010
• Reducing our air emissions of NOx, VOCs
and SO2 by implementing various projects
and initiatives
•C
 ompleting a dedicated flare minimisation
programme
•W
 orking to minimise absolute levels of
waste generated and to continue our
programme of waste recycling. This
included beginning the recycling of
electronic waste
•C
 ompleting independent third-party
verification of our greenhouse gas
inventory. This was done for the first time,
and was carried out in accordance with
international standards
• E nsuring that our new office headquarters
building in Doha achieved LEED
certification in March 2012 (see case
study on page 42)
 ompleting 10 asset-specific internal
•C
environmental compliance audits and
securing positive feedback from external
audits on our management systems from
independent ISO auditors and from our
shareholder ExxonMobil. This included
achieving the best possible audit score
for the audit of the environmental
management system under RGEE
 inning a Gulf Cooperation Council
•W
(GCC) award for the best industrial
organisation complying with
environmental requirements

Corporate Social
Responsibility: RasGas
employees, hard at work
cleaning Qatar’s beaches

RasGas Company Limited

Environmental expenditure

Greenhouse gas emissions

Table 4 sets out RasGas’ environmental
expenditure in 2011, showing a total of
more than US$49 million. The majority of
spending (in the air category) related to
major capital expenditure on NOx retrofit
projects on gas turbines and utility boilers.
Spending on waste related to disposal and
transport, as well as design work for new
waste management options.

A strategic response
As outlined in the section of this report
discussing energy needs and climate change
(pages 18–23), RasGas has developed
a corporate greenhouse gas (GHG)
management strategy.

More information on the projects undertaken
is provided in the relevant sections below.
Category
Air

Expenditure
(US$ million)
46.88

Waste

1.49

Water

0.40

Corporate programmes

0.25

Other

0.15

Total

The strategy provides a framework for the
action we have already taken and will take
in future to minimise emissions from our
own operations, and provides a platform to
consider mitigation opportunities along the
supply chain.

49.17

Table 4. RasGas environmental expenditure 2011

RasGas environmental
expenditure in 2011 totalled
more than $49 million

Sustainability Report 2011 37

Environment

Our performance
Our direct GHG emissions totalled 18.4
million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2)
equivalent in 2011, compared with 16.4
million tonnes in 2010. A number of factors
contributed to the increased level of
emissions, such as higher reported emissions
from flaring due to the introduction of a new
reporting basis which includes emissions
related to jetty storage tank and flaring
operations. Emissions from venting and
combustion also increased, mainly as a result
of the inclusion of a full year of data from
the new Train 7.

Greenhouse gas emissions
(million tonnes)

We benchmark our emissions with 10 other
LNG producers by normalising emissions in
tonnes as a percentage of the total weight
of gas intake from the production reservoir.
Direct GHG emissions as a percentage of
intake increased marginally compared with
2010, but our performance on this measure
is still better than the industry average, as
it has been over the past six years. When
compared with other companies on this
measure, RasGas’ performance was ranked
third out of the 11 companies in the
2011 benchmark.

Nitrous oxide (N2O) (tonnes)

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Total greenhouse gas emissions of
CO2 equivalent

9.4

9.3

8.9

16.8

18.8

Total direct greenhouse gas emissions

9.0

9.2

8.6

16.4

18.4

Indirect greenhouse gas emissions
(from purchased electricity)

0.3

0.1

0.3

0.4

0.4

CO2 from flaring

1.4

1.5

1.1

1.4

1.7

CO2 removal from feed and vented

0.7

0.8

0.8

2.1

2.4

CO2 from combustion

6.6

6.6

6.4

12.4

13.8

Total CO2

8.7

8.8

8.3

15.9

17.9

0.010

0.010

0.008

0.010

0.010

435

449

432

860

945

Tonnes GHG per tonne LNG

0.468

0.440

0.418

0.510

0.519

Tonnes GHG per tonne hydrocarbon

0.286

0.269

0.248

0.280

0.287

Methane (CH4)

Greenhouse gas intensities

Table 5: RasGas GHG emissions 2007–2011

Our GHG emissions data was audited and
verified by an independent third party for
the first time in 2011, in accordance with
international best practice and methodology.

23.9

We benchmark our emissions with 10
other LNG producers. Much of the text
and several graphs in this Environment
section (pages 34-45) use benchmarking
information, including LNG industry
average data, from these producers,
drawn from the following source:
‘Operational Performance Review –
RasGas 2006–2011’. Information is also
drawn from previous reports 2006–
2010, Shell Global Solutions and Philip
Townsend Associates Inc.

Weight % of total intake

25

Benchmarking

40

27.4
22.8

23.7

35

24.1

21.2

Weight % of total intake

30

20
15
10
5

30

32

30

29

30

28

28

24

24

2010

2011

27
24

25

23
21

20
15
10
5

0
2006

2007

2008

CO2 removed from feed
Direct CO2 from
combustion/flaring/other
sources

2009

2010

2011

GHG from direct N2O
Indirect GHG
GHG from direct
methane

Figure 15. GHG emissions 2006–2011 (all sources),
RasGas trend

0

2006

2007

RasGas

2008

2009

LNG industry average

Figure 16. GHG emissions 2006-2011 versus worldwide
LNG industry average

38 Sustainability Report 2011

Flaring of excess gas is one of the most
significant contributors to national GHG
emissions, accounting for 13 per cent of
national energy GHG emissions.
In 2010, RasGas completed a five-year flare
minimisation programme, which was the first
of its kind in Qatar when introduced in 2005.
The initiative aligns with Qatar’s goal of
reducing flaring and makes a contribution
towards the country’s participation in the World
Bank-led Global Gas Flaring Reduction (GGFR)
initiative, a partnership that seeks to overcome
the barriers to reducing gas flaring by sharing
global best practices and implementing
country-specific programmes. We have sought
to use industry best practices and innovative
planning to include improved facility designs,
introduce new operating procedures, and use
waste gas for power generation.
In 2011, the efforts continued, with the
RasGas in-house flare minimisation team
including process engineers and specialists
from Environment, Production and Operations
facilities, and Business Planning. A holistic
approach was adopted, with the development
of a new flare-reporting model encompassing
all sources of flaring from the onshore receiving
facilities to the product-loading facilities located
in Ras Laffan port. The model incorporates
advanced measurement devices (ultrasonic
meters) to quantify all volumes flared.

Flaring reduction initiatives undertaken in
2011 included:
• F urther optimising fuel gas consumption
and as a result reducing excess fuel gas
flared by using interconnection between
different production trains
• Initiating a pilot study to monitor passing
equipment (a passing valves management
programme)
• Initiating a study to identify 2012–16
planning options for gas recovery
technology to minimise continuous flaring
•A
 chieving reduced flaring during drilling
operations through revised well clean-up
criteria
•P
 rogressing with construction on the jetty
boil-off gas recovery project, which is
designed to recover gas flared at the jetty,
using compression and reuse in RasGas and
Qatargas fuel gas and production facilities

In 2011, absolute levels of flaring increased
principally as a result of the adoption of
a new reporting model, in line with best
practice. Table 6 below sets out flaring
emissions per unit of volume of gas intake,
showing figures calculated according to the
previous and new methodologies.

3.00
Flaring volume per total gas intake (%)

Reducing flaring

RasGas Company Limited

2.50

2.51%

200
1.50
1.00

1.37%

1.47%

1.25%

0.95%

1.03%

0.99%
0.67%
0.93%

0.50
0.00

0.48%
0.64%

2005

2006

% Flaring actual

2007

2008

% Flaring target

(target for 2005–2010 only)

0.55%

0.47%

2009

2010

2011

Gas intake (relative indication)

Figure 17. RasGas on-site flaring performance per total gas intake (2005–2011)

Flaring

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Flaring % per unit volume of gas intake
(on plot facilities only, with measurement
at the sources)

1.03

0.99

0.64

0.47

0.55

Flaring % per unit of volume of gas: new
basis (on plot facilities plus tankage, plus
jetty flare, with measurement at the flare)

2.48

2.15

1.74

1.54

1.26

Table 6. Flaring

Sustainability Report 2011 39

Environment

Acid gas capture and injection
Since 2005, RasGas has operated an acid
gas injection (AGI) scheme that stores CO2
and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and thereby
reduces emissions of CO2 and sulphur
dioxide (SO2) from production processes.
These gases, which are present in the gas
from the North Field, must be separated
from the main gas stream during LNG
production to meet product specifications.
About 1 million tonnes per year of CO2
are reinjected onshore into a saline aquifer
formation. The injection of acid gases also
eliminates the emission of about 11,000
tonnes of SO2 each year. The reservoir
formation is monitored using the latest
microgravity surveying techniques,
which were determined to be the best
monitoring strategy.
Together with QP, RasGas is continuing to
study the possibility of enlarging the current
scope of activity: either to capture, purify
and deliver CO2 to QP for enhanced oil
recovery, or to capture and inject CO2 from
other trains that do not currently inject into
the existing reservoir.
As the operator of the only AGI facility in
the region, RasGas plays an active role in
assessing and contributing to the broader
development of carbon capture and
storage (CCS), which is widely recognised
as having a potentially significant role to
play in mitigating GHG emissions. RasGas
participates in the International Petroleum
Industry Environmental Conservation
Association (IPIECA) Climate Change
Working Group, in national research
and engineering forums (such as Qatar
University and Texas A&M in Qatar) and
continues advocacy effort on CCS issues
with regulators. This includes monitoring
the progress of CCS application as a Clean
Development Mechanism under the United
Nations Framework Convention on
Climate Change.

Carbon capture and storage
CO2 injected (million tonnes per year)

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

1.01

1.08

1.10

1.04

1.03

Table 7. Carbon capture and storage: annual CO2 injected
Source: RasGas Environmental Affairs

Other gases
Air emissions from oil and gas industry
operations may contribute to local or regional
environmental impacts such as haze, and can
affect human health, flora and fauna. These
releases include nitrogen oxides and sulphur
dioxide, emissions during combustion that
contribute to the formation of smog and acid
rain. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs),
which are organic compounds (excluding
methane) that vaporise in the atmosphere
and may participate in the formation of
ground-level ozone, are also emitted.
RasGas has a number of programmes in place
to minimise the release of these emissions
into the atmosphere. These include:

Non-GHG air emissions (tonnes)

• Retrofitting existing installations with a
DLN (dry low NOx) system to control the
release of NOx from gas turbines. Two
additional sources were retrofitted with
DLN in 2011
• Optimising the flue gas recirculation
systems that are installed in all steamgenerating units. Two further sources were
retrofitted with this in 2011
• Implementing a plant-wide leak detection
and repair (LDAR) programme to control
VOC emissions
• Implementing VOC recovery and destruction
at the condensate loading facilities
• Upgrading the existing continuous
emissions monitoring system (CEMS)
in Trains 1–5 and AKG-1 for improved
monitoring and accounting of emissions

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

NOx

17,796

12,085

9,514

11,810

11,779

SOx

14,342

9,424

12,181

44,633

18,243

5,549

5,670

5,923*

11,109

1,201

VOCs

* in 2009, reporting included CO2 which was previously excluded
Table 8. Non-greenhouse gas air emissions

Ras Laffan LNG product
storage tanks and
associated flares

40 Sustainability Report 2011

Dry low NOx retrofit and flue gas
recirculation
As a result of national concerns about air
quality, RasGas, in cooperation with the
Ministry of Environment (MoE), developed
a retrofit programme to introduce low NOx
technology to its turbines and boilers built
before 2005. Since 2007, RasGas has been
implementing the $275 million NOx retrofit
programme to ensure that all existing and
applicable combustion units will meet and
be even lower than the MoE limits for
NOx emissions by 2014. We believe the
retrofit programme was the first of its kind
in the region. RasGas’ NOx emissions have
decreased substantially since 2006, and
remained stable in 2011, as shown in Figure
18. This was due to the increase in emissions
(with the reporting of a full year’s emissions
from Train 7) offset by the decrease in
emissions resulting from the additional
retrofit activities in 2011.

RasGas Company Limited

In 2007, RasGas conducted two engineering
studies and identified that in most cases
achieving an emission level well below
the regulatory requirements was viable.
The emission levels were deemed as best
environmental practice for its combustion
units. Boilers 1 and 2 were equipped with
a flue gas recirculation system in 2011
to ensure they were achieving the new
standard.
RasGas’ NOx emissions in 2011, in terms
of mass, were very similar to those in 2010
(see Figure 18), following three years of
gradual decline brought about by the retrofit
programme. Emissions from gas turbines and
boilers, which generate more than 90 per
cent of these emissions, were stable due to
the retrofit programme. There was a minor
increase in emissions from other sources,
such as boilers, but this was offset by the
decreases in major sources. As in 2010,
RasGas’ NOx emissions, expressed in
weight percentage of total intake, remained
better than the LNG industry average,
with RasGas ranking fourth of the
11 benchmarked companies.

Sulphur oxides emissions
Emissions of sulphur oxides (known as SOx,
but mainly sulphur dioxide – SO2) result
largely from the combustion of sulphur
in hydrocarbons. In 2011, overall SOx
emissions from RasGas operations decreased
significantly – by approximately 60 per cent.
Figure 19 shows the weight percentage of
SOx emissions by total intake from 2006
to 2011.
RasGas took a number of actions to achieve
this improvement. The reduction was
primarily due to higher reliability in Trains
6 and 7 and AKG-2, resulting in fewer
unplanned acid gas releases through flaring.
The total acid/sour gas flaring decreased by
54 per cent to 701 million standard cubic
feet (mmscf), compared with 1,502 mmscf
in 2010. Efforts to improve the performance
of recently installed sulphur recovery units
(SRU) resulted in a decrease in emissions due
to better performance.

0.07

In 2011 RasGas retrofitted
two additional sources with
dry low NOx technology to
minimise emissions

0.06

0.06

0.064

0.045

0.05

0.035

0.049

0.032

0.039

0.028

0.025

0.017

0.015

2010

2011

Weight % of total intake

NOx weight % of total intake

0.10

0.05
0.04

0.04
0.03
0.02

0.03

0.03
0.023
0.02

0.030
0.023

0.01

0.00
2006

2007

RasGas

2008

2009

0.00
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

LNG industry average

Figure 18. NOx emissions 2006–2011 trend (all sources)

Figure 19. SOx emissions 2006–2011 RasGas trend
(all sources)

Sustainability Report 2011 41

Environment

Volatile organic compounds:
leak detection and repair

RasGas was the first company in Qatar to
use this technology, which is able to monitor
piping and process equipment for leaks of
VOCs with greater detection efficiency than
conventional methods and equipment. We
also monitor the control effectiveness of the
programme – a measure of the overall leak
rate reduction. RasGas achieved 92.8 per
cent in 2011. The programme has surpassed
the US Environmental Protection Agency
(USEPA) control effectiveness thresholds
of 70 per cent (gas) and 61 per cent
(light liquid).

12,000

VOC emissions in tonnes

10,000

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
contribute to low-level ozone formation,
which can damage the health of humans,
animals, trees and plants. Total VOC
emissions reduced significantly in 2011
compared with 2010, by approximately
66 per cent. This performance put RasGas
well below the LNG industry average, as
shown in Figure 20. RasGas ranked third out
of 11 companies in the industry benchmark.

8,000
6,000
4,000
2,000
0
2010

In RasGas facilities, most of the VOCs are
emitted during loading of the condensate
products at the berths. In 2011, RasGas
handed over the condensate and LPG
product storage and loading facilities to
Ras Laffan Terminal Operations (RLTO).
This accounted for most of the decrease in
2011 VOC emissions profile. VOC recovery
and destruction units are now installed at
the condensate loading berths, contributing
to a reduction in indirect emissions
associated with RasGas products. Further
reductions were achieved on RasGas sites
due to fewer unplanned flaring incidents
from debutaniser units.

Flaring
Fugitives
(Compressor seals)

2011

Combustion
Loading
Storage

Figure 21. RasGas VOC emissions by source, 2010–2011

RasGas has implemented a plant-wide
LDAR programme since 2007 that uses
technologically advanced hand-held infrared
(IR) cameras for leak identification of VOCs.
The camera technology delivers real-time
thermal images of gas leaks, which would
otherwise be invisible but which are seen
through the camera as black or white
‘smoke’ images.
The RasGas environmental monitoring
team has successfully identified, tagged
and monitored more than 17,000 LDAR
components covering Trains 1–5 and AKG-1.
The programme not only enables effective
monitoring, but drives operational efficiency
by highlighting components in need of repair,
which reduces product loss and improves
process safety.

0.030

RasGas is currently formalising these LDAR
initiatives. The plan will include actions
designed to improve leak detection and
repair and improve management information.
In 2011, RasGas initiated discussions with
the ExxonMobil research centre in Qatar
on the development of remote sensing
applications that could minimise future LDAR
monitoring requirements, provide more
accurate information on fugitive emissions
as well as other applications in the field of
process safety.

Oil spills
The production and transport of oil and gas
poses a risk of accidental spills or losses that
could harm the environment. For RasGas,
where the predominant materials handled
are gases, the risk of spills is lower. However,
we record and report oil spills as a key
performance indicator (see Table 9).

VOC weight % of total intake

0.025
0.020

0.020

0.045
0.016

0.016

0.015
0.014

0.014

0.014

2007

2008

2009

0.010

0.010
0.015

0.005
0.002

0
RasGas

2010

2011

LNG industry average

Figure 20. Direct VOC emissions 2007–2011 trend
(all sources)

Oil spills
Number of oil spills
Table 9. Number of oil spills

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

7

2

1

0

1

0

42 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Emissions monitoring

Energy use

The RasGas environment team monitors
all emission sources at least twice every
quarter, a rate which is twice the operating
permit requirement. Over the years, we have
consistently met regulatory requirements for
NOx and SO2 emissions.

RasGas generates its own power using
fuel gas-driven turbine generators located
at the Ras Laffan plant and also sources a
small proportion (less than 6 per cent) of
its energy as imported electricity from the
national grid. Most of the energy used on
the plant is for compression to liquefy gases
for transportation as well as separation
of the intake gas received from offshore
operations to produce the RasGas range of
products (see page 10).

In 2011:
• Work progressed on engineering issues
associated with a project to install new and
upgrade existing CEMS
• An independent third-party evaluation was
initiated, examining the CEMS installed in the
latest RasGas trains (Trains 6 and 7, and AKG-2)
using the US Environmental Protection
Agency ‘Gold Standard’. At the same time, a
third-party performance testing campaign
was conducted to provide external assurance
on the compliance of emissions sources
with MoE regulatory limits

11
10
Energy use % of total intake

We have introduced continuous emissions
monitoring for the new sources in Trains 6 and
7, and AKG-2, and in the future will retrofit
equivalent technology to the older Trains 1–5
and AKG-1. We are currently developing an
improved approach to quality assurance linked
to continuous emissions monitoring.

9.2
8.9

9
8

8.6

7

8.5

8.9

8.2

We measure energy use performance against
a range of efficiency measures. Similar to
the previous GHG measures, the industry
benchmark in Figure 22 is based on the
intake of gas. If RasGas uses less of this
intake gas as fuel, then more gas is available
as product. In 2011, including the small
amount of electricity imported, RasGas
operations used the equivalent of 8.6 per
cent of the available primary energy in its
intake of reservoir gas as fuel or imported
electricity. Comparison with other LNG
producers shows that RasGas was broadly in
line with the industry average performance
in 2011 and ranked seventh of 11 LNG
companies on energy use.

8.6
8.5

7.8

6

7.7
6.4

6.9

5
4
3
2
1
0

2006

2007

RasGas

2008

2009

2010

2011

LNG industry average

Figure 22. Energy-use benchmark: comparison of
energy use between 11 LNG production companies

Case study: Environmental excellence in our new headquarters
We sought to ensure that the design of
our new headquarters in Doha incorporated
excellent environmental performance.
Among the energy-saving features
integrated into the office design were
automated control systems to ensure that
the heating, ventilation, air conditioning
and lighting systems operate at
optimum efficiency.
We completed the project in October
2011, having made a submission to the
Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design (LEED) programme in March 2010
to have the building’s energy efficiency
certified. LEED is an internationally
recognised rating system developed
by the US Green Building Council. This
certification, to Gold Level, was achieved

in March 2012. The building was the
first LEED-certified Commercial Interiors
project in Qatar.
In 2011, RasGas launched a Green
Office policy, which defines performance
measures, goals and strategies to
drive environmental excellence in all
our buildings. The policy allocates
responsibility for action to specific roles,
while encouraging heightened awareness
of the need for resource efficiency
among all employees. The policy covers
transportation, energy use, water, solid
waste management, indoor air quality,
sustainable procurement, cleaning and pest
management. It includes requirements
for verification and measurement and for
feedback and continuous improvement.

Sustainability Report 2011 43

Environment

Waste management
The total volume of waste from RasGas’
operations increased in 2011 to 5,544
tonnes, an increase of 14 per cent on
2010. Total waste disposed per million
tonnes of total intake (Figure 23) was
the best in the industry benchmarking
comparison.
RasGas’ corporate waste management
programme, launched in 2009, provides
a cradle-to-grave framework for waste
minimisation, collection, treatment, storage,
reuse, recycling and final disposal. It also
seeks to address the fact that the markets in
which to sell recyclables in the Middle East
are still developing. We strive to minimise
waste arising, and volumes of total waste
(per million tonnes of total intake) are
considerably lower than industry averages,
as shown in Figure 24.

In 2011, a review was initiated of how to
treat molecular sieves with significant levels
of aromatic hydrocarbons, some of which
may be harmful. In 2012, RasGas will begin
construction of two weathering pads for the
decontamination of molecular sieves with
low levels of aromatics. We have validated
the concept for new sludge treatment units,
which will use biological degradation.
Waste (tonnes)*

RasGas is required by its environmental
permits to establish waste reuse, recycling
and minimisation programmes, and to report
to the MoE on the quantity and types of
waste recycled.

Total waste disposed per
million tonnes of total intake
was the best in the industry
benchmark

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

35

62

72

125

87

Incineration
Landfill

1,065

896

918

620

451

Recycling

2,965

2,872

3,382

2,443

2,383

741

817

848

1,671

2,623

4,805

4,647

5,520

4,859

5,544

62

62

65

50

43

Storage
Total amount
Percentage of total waste recycled
* Onshore operations only
Table 10. Waste volumes and disposal methods

140

180
124.3

122.5

120

113.9

100
80

68.6

71

60
40
20

Tonnes waste/million tonnes of total intake

RasGas and Qatargas have also supported
the introduction of fuel-efficiency measures
in the Qatar LNG shipping fleet. To reduce
emissions, an anti-fouling coating has been
used on the hulls of new-build, larger vessels
and also introduced on existing conventional
vessels. This reduces drag, decreases fuel
consumption and minimises the transfer of
marine organisms to or from Qatar.

Significant volumes of waste – including
catalyst waste, spent molecular sieves and
process sludges, which represent the most
significant waste streams – must be dealt
with on a continuous basis and at peak times
(for example, during shutdowns). Waste is
separated into 22 different waste streams.

Tonnes waste/million tonnes of total intake

Energy-efficiency initiatives carried out
in 2011 included the launch of a steam
trap-monitoring programme using infrared
camera technology to detect leaks of steam
in process equipment. Eliminating leaks not
only saves energy, water and CO2 emissions,
but also improves production efficiency,
increases safety and generates financial
savings with short payback times.

152

160
144

140 136
122

120
100

122

123

124
114

80
69

60

71

40
20
0

0
2007

2008

Landfill
Recycled

2009

2010

Storage

Figure 23. Waste disposal in tonnes per million
tonnes of gas intake

2011

2007

2008

RasGas

2009

2010

2011

LNG industry average

Figure 24. Waste disposal trend (all sources),
2007–2011

44 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

RasGas has undertaken various initiatives
to enhance waste management, including
completing the installation in 2011 of new
waste collection points throughout the plant
to improve waste identification, segregation,
collection and containment. The roll-out
of a new waste information system was
also completed, which enables automated
waste identification, collection, record
and report generation using a web-based
database and hand-held tablets. RasGas
also completed the first export of electronic
waste for recycling. As in-country facilities
for disposing of this type of hazardous waste
are developing, RasGas currently sends
most of this waste to the Netherlands for
recycling, in line with the Basel Convention
requirements for the transboundary
transportation of hazardous waste.
RasGas’ recycling rate remains the best
in the benchmark comparison with LNG
industry averages, as shown in Figure 25.
However, RasGas’ rate of recycling declined
in 2011. This was the result of having
higher levels of aromatic compounds in the
spent molecular sieve waste that could not
be recycled (see previous page). This also
accounts for the significant increase in stored
waste materials in 2011.

70
62

Waste recycled % of waste disposal

60

65

59

50
48

50

43

Coral relocation has been
carried out, following
a seabed survey of the
Barzan Gas Project
pipeline corridor

Water

Biodiversity

Water management is an increasingly
important issue in the oil and gas industry,
and in particular the use of fresh water in
operations. This is especially sensitive in
regions and countries such as Qatar, where
fresh water resources are scarce.

The Qatar National Vision 2030 recognises
the need to balance development needs with
environmental protection, including the need
to preserve and protect biological diversity.

RasGas’ primary process water source is
sea water, which is used for cooling process
equipment through a once-through cooling
water system. The water is returned to two
cooling water channels used by Ras Laffan
Industrial City (RLIC) that subsequently
discharge into the sea. As in previous
years, our total water discharges in 2011
amounted to approximately 4 million
tonnes per day.
In addition, RasGas has installed a network
of 25 ground water monitoring wells
throughout its facility. These maintain
continual vigilance on the presence and
transport of potential contaminants.

40
30
20

23

25

10

Water discharges
(tonnes/day)
Once-through cooling water
Other

0
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
RasGas

Total

2007

2008

2009

4,037,638

4,015,790

4,085,142

861

997

1,231

4,038,499

4,016,767

4,086,373

LNG industry average

Figure 25. RasGas waste recycled: trend 2006–2011

A significant proportion of Qatar’s energy
deposits lie in the shallow waters near
the coastline, and development of these
offshore reserves is integral to supplying
the energy needed to power the country’s
economic and industrial growth. RasGas is
addressing this through its Environmental
Management System, which lists biodiversity
aspects and impacts associated with its
operations, along with adequate mitigation
and monitoring measures. A special emphasis
is placed on biodiversity while developing
new facilities, as detailed in the following
case study. Finally, RasGas is advancing the
biodiversity agenda through its Corporate
Social Responsibility programme (for
example via annual beach clean-up efforts)
and its participation as a founding member
of the Ras Laffan Environment Society,
which conducts annual turtle monitoring
surveys and studies on marine water quality
in the Ras Laffan area.

Table 11. RasGas water discharges, 2007–2011

2010

2011

4,007,911 4,070,306
1,286

1,641

4,009,197 4,071,947

Sustainability Report 2011 45

Environment

Case study: Biodiversity protection in the Barzan Gas Project
The Barzan Gas Project is strategically
important for the long-term development
of Qatar. Gas from the new plant will be
produced by RasGas from Qatari natural
resources in the North Field. Barzan will
meet the country’s growing need for
clean-burning natural gas, and so will
play a vital role in fuelling industrial and
human development.
The project will have two development
phases, with Barzan Gas Processing Train 1
producing its first gas in 2014, and
Barzan Gas Processing Train 2 beginning
production in 2015. The two trains will
together produce approximately 1.4 billion
standard cubic feet per day of sales gas, or
the equivalent of 300,000 barrels of oil per
day. A high proportion of the Barzan trains’
output will be used by Qatar’s power and
water sectors. RasGas is project manager
and operator of the development.

The natural world: RasGas is comitted to playing its
part in protecting and preserving the environment
for future generations

Qatar’s marine ecosystems, which include
mangroves, coral formations, deep sea coral
assemblages and shallow seagrass beds, are
highly sensitive. RasGas and its joint venture
partners are taking care to make sure that
biodiversity considerations are being built into
work processes as the new energy resources
are developed. Initiatives include a turtle
nesting and hatchling survey, a near-shore
coral and seagrass baseline study, and an
archaeological survey undertaken as part of
the project’s environmental, socio-economic
and health impact assessment (ESHIA). The
ESHIA also included a turtle management plan
and a coral management plan.

Initiatives include a turtle
and hatchling survey,
a coral and seagrass
baseline study, and an
archaeological survey

In 2011, we completed the seabed
survey of the Barzan pipeline corridor and
potential relocation sites. This involved
documenting any significant ecological
changes in the pipeline corridor since
the original ESHIA baseline survey in
2008 and confirming coral density
estimates and the number of hard corals
for potential relocation. Coral habitats
were delineated and characterised, and
data on oceanographic conditions (such
as temperature, salinity, turbidity) was
gathered. Locations were assessed for
coral relocation, a transplant plan and coral
management plan was developed, and
recommendations made. Coral relocation
was completed in February 2012 and
included the creation of man-made reef
development to create suitable sites.
In addition, RasGas has drafted marine
mammal observation and coastal protection
and restoration plans for the project.

A hawksbill turtle in the waters off the Qatari coast, one of the many species to benefit from RasGas’ efforts to
maintain the marine environment following pipeline-laying for the Barzan Gas Project

People

People

RasGas recognises that its continued success depends
upon the skills and dedication of its people. To this end,
we seek to attract, retain and develop a high-performing
workforce and provide a caring and inclusive work
environment that will enable RasGas to meet its current
and future business needs through an effective set
of integrated people processes and a high-quality
Qatarization programme.
In this section, we:
• Describe the composition of our workforce
• Set out our approach to managing our people
• Outline key developments in 2011 in the areas of
resource planning, Qatarization and performance
management
• Outline our approach to training and development
• Describe the results of our 2011–12 organisational
climate survey

Sustainability Report 2011 47

A performance-driven organisation
Our aim is to establish a high-performance
culture by providing clarity about what is
required in a job and how it should be done.
We aim to identify development needs, and
create an open working environment that
facilitates feedback.
The performance management process sets
out the need to plan, manage and review
employee performance. The key outcome
is to ensure that employees are clear
about RasGas’ priorities and to drive the
desired behaviours which result in improved
business results with employees being better
equipped to achieve their career aspirations.
The process is underpinned by clear, direct
and regular communication between those
giving and those receiving appraisals. In
2011, performance management appraisals
were held with 3,029 RasGas employees.
Performance evaluation is an important
determinant of remuneration for every
RasGas employee.
Succession planning is an important part
of building a business that can prosper
over the long term. It aims to ensure a
seamless transition of people in roles and
to ensure that individuals who move on
to fill managerial or technical expert roles
have the experience and skills necessary.
We progressed with succession plans for all
leadership positions in 2011.

48 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Workforce composition

Comprehensive training
programmes enable
RasGas staff to develop
their professional and
personal skills

The size of our workforce continued to
grow in 2011, increasing by 4 per cent.
The RasGas workforce now numbers more
than 3,000, including full-time employees
and contractors.
The increase in our employee numbers
reflects the successful growth of our
business, achieved despite the competitive
labour market, where the skills and
experience we require are in short supply.
Although reliable information about the
labour market is lacking, our experience
has made it clear that there is strong
competition for recruits within and outside
the energy and industry sector.
Once we recruit people, our aim is to give
them challenging and rewarding careers in
a working environment that is supportive
and motivating. We provide people with the
opportunity to develop their professional
and personal skills, offering a range of
development opportunities and training
courses. We are committed to creating
a working environment where everyone
has the opportunity to learn, develop and
contribute. Our employee attrition rate,
which includes individuals who left the
organisation voluntarily and involuntarily,
was 7.1 per cent in 2011, compared with
4.9 per cent in 2010. We recognise that
retaining staff, especially Qatari nationals
who have completed a programme of good
quality training, is increasingly challenging
as more opportunities arise from economic
diversification.

Hiring at RasGas
In 2011, RasGas recruited 183 new
staff. We fill vacant positions through
the promotion or transfer of existing
staff whenever possible, and priority is
given to Qatari nationals. The company’s
Qatarization programme, described in detail
on page 50, seeks to create employment
and development opportunities for Qatari
nationals.
Workforce diversity and inclusion
RasGas places a high value on the diversity
of perspectives, ideas and backgrounds that
its employees bring to the organisation.
At the end of 2011, RasGas’ direct
hires included people from 59 different
nationalities and cultural backgrounds.

Given the diversity of the workforce, as well
as the company’s aspiration for long-term
business success, we have placed emphasis
on a set of core organisational values that
unite us: People, Integrity, Safety, Excellence
and General Interest – being partners in the
common interest we share: the success of
the company. We believe these five values
have been the underlying principles that
have driven the organisation’s success so far
and will continue to do so in future. In 2011,
we continued to reinforce to our people how
the values should guide their day-to-day
activities. The organisational climate survey
undertaken in 2011 showed that 85 per
cent of respondents believed that they live
the RasGas values in their everyday work.
RasGas aims to be an employer of choice,
empowering employees through professional
development programmes and implementing
other initiatives to attract and retain the
best talent. For women, RasGas has put in
place measures, including maternity leave
arrangements, that go beyond the statutory
minimum in Qatar. The number of female
employees at RasGas has gradually increased
since 2007.

Table 12. Workforce composition

Workforce composition

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

Full-time employees

2,077

2,453

2,726

2,865

2,883

0

0

0

0

0

185

216

149

81

178

Females (number and % of total)

218
(10%)

274
(10%)

303
(11%)

312
(11%)

342
(11%)

Total

2,262

2,669

2,875

2,946

3,061

Part-time employees
Contractors

At the end of 2011, RasGas’
direct hires included
people from 59 different
nationalities and cultural
backgrounds

Sustainability Report 2011 49

People

The People Master Plan
To meet its current and future staffing
needs, RasGas has developed a long-term
People Master Plan that seeks to build and
maintain an environment and culture of
learning and growth to ensure that we have
the human resources in place to meet and
exceed the challenges of the future.
Guiding principles
The People Master Plan is founded on the
following guiding principles:
• RasGas clearly communicates its identity
internally and externally
• RasGas will effectively retain required
expertise and capabilities
• Business strategy drives the People
strategy
• RasGas is a performance-based
organisation
• People processes are owned by the line,
and supported by the internal Employee
Development and Welfare Group
• Employee development is for everyone
• Employees are treated consistently
and fairly
• RasGas continues to support an effective,
quality Qatarization programme
Components
In 2011, we continued to create ‘job
families’ – groupings of roles that require
similar types of training, skills, knowledge
and abilities. Creating these groupings has
enabled us to define required capabilities,
and to make sure that employees have the
skills, knowledge and behaviours for their
role that enable them to help the company
achieve its objectives. Job families have
also helped us to define technical and
behavioural competency requirements
for individual positions, and to develop
clearer performance measures. These,
in turn, help to clarify learning and
development needs. Approximately 80 per
cent of our employee population is now
grouped within a job family.

In 2012, our goal is to continue to embed
all these frameworks across our organisation.
Longer term, we are working to introduce
clearer performance measures, using the
organisational climate survey to monitor
employee engagement, enhancing the
systems, tools and information available to
employees and managers, and continuing
to automate our processes and workflows.

We also created professional development
forums in 2011, a concept similar to the
job family but designed for smaller groups
of employees. These cover approximately
a further 10 per cent of the RasGas
population. For the remaining 10 per cent
of people – individuals with specialised roles
that cut across several functions – we are
creating individual development frameworks.
Job families
2009

2010

2011

Finance

Manufacturing

Administration

Subsurface Engineering

Maintenance

IT

Procurement

Marketing and Commercial

Safety, Fire and Security

Professional Development Forum

Human Resources
Facilities Engineering
Table 13. RasGas job families

We are ensuring we have the tools to
measure and assess accomplishments
and capabilities and facilitate the career
development process.

na l
rso
Pe

We will apply
a succession
planning process
to ensure
business
continuity and
support our
retention strategy.

development fo

Performance
Management

Succession
Planning

We are defining the strategy for attracting
people with the right skills and behaviours.

s

Recruiting

Employee and
National
Development

RasGas
values

Training and
Education

ru m

Rewards

We are refreshing
processes and
tools to ensure
national
capability and
ensure that it is
consistent with
other elements
of the project.

Job family

Establish a clear training strategy to support
training needs of all employees and our
leadership levels, e.g. training curriculum.

We will review our long-term reward strategy
and ensure the right incentives are in place to
support the environment we are trying to build.

Figure 26. RasGas job families and personal development forums

50 Sustainability Report 2011

Qatarization
Qatarization is the process of identifying,
attracting, and developing suitable Qatari
candidates to assume permanent positions
in RasGas. We are fully committed to Qatar’s
vision to develop technical and managerial
industry leaders. Our objective is not only
to achieve this, but to have a high-quality
approach in which recruitment, training,
development and retention are part of a
well-integrated process.
There are a number of key themes in our
programme, illustrated in Figure 27:
•Strengthening partnerships and
relationships with educational institutions
to raise awareness of RasGas and our
long-term Qatarization needs
•Creating employment and development
opportunities for nationals to support the
overall Qatarization targets
•Establishing and maintaining a well-defined
national career development framework to
ensure a clear and guided career planning
progression
•Building strong mentoring and coaching
capabilities to develop highly-qualified and
competent nationals
•Developing and institutionalising an
integrated planning process to manage
and steward the national employment
cycle effectively
The success of our programme requires the
support and commitment of experienced
Qatari and expatriate staff at all levels to
attract, train, develop, and retain young
Qataris and help them gain valuable
on-the-job experience. Among the initiatives
carried out in 2011 were our annual
sponsorship of the Qatar Career
Fair, which attracted approximately
2,500 applicants, and the annual recognition
ceremony, which brings trainees, coaches
and mentors together with senior managers
and the Managing Director. On a continuing
basis, we hold quarterly and half-yearly
meetings with group managers to make
sure we are on track for meeting our
targets. We also made improvements in the
focus, procedures and monitoring of our
training and development programmes for
Qatari trainees.

RasGas Company Limited

The number of Qataris working in
the business has grown each year since
2007 and in 2011 the Qatarization rate
increased to 33 per cent. This was primarily
the result of significantly higher levels of
national recruitment in the year. In 2011,
we successfully recruited 187 Qatari
nationals, compared with 155 in 2010,
an increase of more than 20 per cent.
Of the Qataris within the workforce,
53 per cent hold permanent positions.
The remainder are either on development
programmes or engaged in academic studies.
We continue to develop our relationships with
the education sector, and in 2011 awarded
54 new scholarships to high school and
university students to assist them in their
studies. Our scholarship programme now
extends to some 94 students, not including
our summer internship initiative, through
which we hosted a further 56 high school and
university students in 2011. The programme
provides interns with valuable work experience
that helps them bridge the gap between their
studies and real-life applications.

The diversity of the RasGas workforce is
a valuable asset

Table 14. Qatarization at RasGas

Qatarization

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Number of Qataris

563

619

735

830

948

Percentage of total
workforce

31.1

30.4

31.2

30.5

33.0

Vision: To achieve 50 per cent Qatarization in permanent positions by 2022
1. Educational
partnerships
Strengthen partnerships
and relationships with
education and training
institutions.

2. Opportunities
for nationals
Creation of employment
and development
opportunities
for Qatari nationals

3. National
development
framework
Establish an effective
national development
framework (completed)

5. Develop an integrated planning process
Figure 27. Qatarization strategy: five strategic themes

4. Mentoring
and coaching
Building strong mentoring
and coaching capabilities

Sustainability Report 2011 51

People

Qatarization milestone achieved
We achieved a milestone in our
Qatarization strategy in January 2011,
when we announced that more than half
the operators at our Train 1 and 2 LNG
production facilities were Qatari nationals.
“We are proud that almost 60 per cent
of our employees working on Train 1
and 2 production facilities, in operations
in particular, are Qataris. We recognise
that these people are behind our success
and we are committed to providing the
world-class training they need to fully
optimise their skills and potential. RasGas
strives to provide customised learning
opportunities for its employees to
enhance their professional development.”
Hamad Mubarak Al Muhannadi
RasGas Operations Group Manager

Employee training and development
RasGas offers its employees a portfolio of
development opportunities and training
courses. Our internal guideline is that
development should be 80 per cent
on-the-job learning, 10 per cent mentoring
and 10 per cent classroom training. We
encourage all our people to take personal
responsibility for their own training and
development – encapsulated in the message
‘Your development, in your hands’.
In support, we provide a learning and
development web portal that provides
access to training information in an easy and
clear format, and which links roles within
job families to the technical and behavioural
competencies required as well as to the
annual performance development process.
This approach is captured in the learning and
development cycle (see Figure 28).

Table 15. Training hours

Average training
hours

2011

National staff

28

30.6

Non-national staff

15

29

21.5

29.8

Overall

Our training course catalogue, which
was recently redeveloped to incorporate
improvements suggested by employees,
includes a range of orientation courses
on topics such as the LNG business,
safety, business controls, performance
management and managers’ essentials.
It also covers behavioural competency
courses, in areas such as working in a
multicultural environment, communication
skills, interpersonal skills, assertiveness,
problem solving and leadership. A range of
supplementary courses are also available,
covering topics such as professional
writing skills, personal development
management, cultural diversity, and
stress and time management.
The majority of training is carried out
internally, with internal courses now being
held at the training centre at our new
headquarters building in Doha.

Figure 28. The RasGas learning and development (L&D) cycle
Employee
• Annual development focus

discussion with supervisor
m

be

r

Oc

er

Annual
development
focus

Corporate Training
• Budget estimation report
to Job Family Council
Job Family Council
• Approve annual
development plan
• Inform approved annual
development plan to
managers and supervisors

L&D portal
preparation

r

m
ce

Annual
development
plan execution

Planning and
approval

r



Au

m

be

be

De

Employee
• Development activities
booking
• C
 omplete competency
granting assessment form

t
ob

focus to Corporate Training
• Prebook in L&D portal

pt
e

• Submit annual development

Se

RasGas staff take responsibility for their own training

2010

For on-the-job learning, process operators
receive training at the RasGas Vocational
Training Centre in Ras Laffan Industrial City.
They may also be selected to study for
qualifications such as higher national diplomas
and engineering degrees. Vocational training
schemes include the on-the-job training
programme and the maintenance training
programme, in conjunction with the College
of the North Atlantic – Qatar.

gu

st

ve
No

Corporate Training
• Create courses and
schedule dates in the
L&D portal, based on
the approved annual
development plan

52 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Mentoring
A feature of 2011 has been our focus on
our mentoring programme for national
employees. The organisational climate
survey in 2011 found that more than
80 per cent of mentors and mentees viewed
the programme favourably, a finding which
was supported by the results of a survey
we conducted among the two groups
which also sought opinion on the national
development programme. The survey gives
us the opportunity to improve and, as a
result, a number of actions are being taken
to address the feedback, including increasing
management engagement with trainees.
The average number of hours of training per
employee in 2011 was 29.8, as shown in
Table 15. This marked an increase in training
hours of 38 per cent when compared with
the previous year. The focus on providing
internal courses resulted in lower total
costs, despite the overall increase in training
provided.
More than a quarter of the total training
in 2011 was provided to Qatari nationals.
The majority of this training was provided
to national staff working in the
Operations function.

The mentoring programme has a positive effect

Mentoring and the national
development programme:
a snapshot of opinion
The following observations came from
a 2011 survey of mentors and mentees:

88 per cent of mentees agreed or strongly agreed that
their mentor was responsive to their concerns
98 per cent of mentors believed they had a good working
relationship with their mentee
88 per cent of mentees thought that their mentor helped
them to network and understand RasGas culture
75 per cent of mentors agreed or strongly agreed that
they had been given appropriate tools to enable them
to be good mentors

“There needs to be proper movement
between sections within a department,
so that people in the national
development programme can gain insight
into the company as a whole”
“It would be appreciated if senior
management could meet face to face on
a regular basis with Qatari trainees so that
they can hear about our needs and our
goals for learning”
“There is a strong drive from all quarters,
including leadership, to focus on national
development, which augurs well for
RasGas’ long-term future”

Sustainability Report 2011 53

People

Engaging our employees
Our People core value embodies a
commitment to care, listen to and develop
our employees. We use a range of tools to
engage with our employees, such as regular
briefings on key issues, departmental and
team meetings, newsletters, electronic
circulars, DVDs and use of the corporate
intranet. Suggestion schemes and employee
forums provide avenues for employees to
raise issues with supervisors and managers.
An important tool in our communications
approach is the organisational climate
survey for all employees. The survey seeks
to understand our employees’ views of
our strengths and identify opportunities
for improvement. Its overarching goal is
to develop and sustain a culture that will
ensure success, progression and prosperity
for RasGas and its employees. The survey
is web-based and administered by a third
party, so confidentiality is guaranteed.

Seventy-eight per cent of RasGas
employees participated in the 2011
organisational climate survey, the same
response rate as in the 2010 survey.
As in the previous two surveys, undertaken
in 2008 and 2010, the 2011 survey found
that employees consider we have particular
strengths in our safety culture, in the
responsibility of our business practices, and
in our organisation’s leadership and vision.
We make a concerted effort to act on
the survey results and address the areas
where action is desired. The company’s
leadership team reviews the survey results,
departmental managers discuss the findings
with employees and key themes are identified
for action. Action plans are then developed,
with individual items tracked to completion.

Employees are engaged through tools including e-circulars, DVDs and the company intranet

The survey results in 2011 showed
improved scores in 11 of the 13 survey
dimensions, with just two (reward for
performance, and service delivery and
efficiency) scoring the same as in the
previous survey in 2010. High scores (above
75 per cent) were achieved in most survey
dimensions. Areas for improvement from this
year’s survey were reward for performance,
employee development and interaction
with immediate managers. RasGas is now
taking action to address the issues raised
in the survey.

Community
engagement

Community engagement

Social responsibility is integral to our business.
Our Corporate Social Responsibility programme provides
financial and practical support to a wide range of worthy
causes in the community, and seeks to make a positive
and lasting impact.
In this section, we:
• Summarise our approach to Corporate Social
Responsibility
• Provide an overview of our activities
• Describe our 2011 Year of the Community campaign
• Outline the initiatives we have taken to support the four
cornerstones of community, education, environment
and health

Sustainability Report 2011 55

Our approach to Corporate
Social Responsibility
RasGas’ Corporate Social Responsibility
(CSR) programme seeks to make a positive
and lasting impact on a range of good
causes across the broad spectrum of social,
environmental and economic development.
Our programme is aligned to Qatar’s National
Vision 2030 (QNV) and the Qatar National
Development Strategy 2011–16 (QNDS),
which provide a clear direction for the use
of the country’s energy resources to help
Qatar further develop and diversify over
the long term.
The RasGas CSR programme has four
cornerstones:
• Community: we support and develop
new initiatives to advance the social
wellbeing of the communities in which
we live and work
• Education: we believe that education
is an essential element for economic
and social development and that every
child is entitled to an education and the
opportunity to develop his or her potential
• Environment: we are fully committed to
preserving and developing the natural
environment for generations to come
•H
 ealth: we advocate healthy living and are
particularly active in support of wellbeing
and sports initiatives
Each year, CSR activity focuses on one
cornerstone, while maintaining support
across the full programme. During our 2011
Year of the Community campaign a wide
range of initiatives were launched, involving
employees and members of the community.

56 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas engages and supports the
community by providing a wide range of
financial and practical support, such as
in-kind assistance (including the use of
equipment, facilities or labour) and involving
our employees in capacity building and skills
transfer programmes.
Our Corporate Social Responsibility policy
and procedure set out clear criteria and
a sustained framework for developing our
community engagement activities, including
considerations such as alignment with our
four cornerstones approach, the Qatar
National Vision 2030 and the National
Development Strategy 2011–2016, respect
for local cultural values and traditions, and
opportunity for employee involvement
and participation.

RasGas Company Limited

Our CSR activities: overview

2011: Year of the Community

The number of CSR-related activities we
supported increased by more than
25 per cent in 2011, to an average of more
than 10 per month. Figure 29 shows our
activity by cornerstone for the past three
years. Although the level of environmental
activities decreased after our special focus
in 2010, we maintained a similar number
of community activities and initiated new
activities on education and health.

RasGas nominated 2011 as its Year of
the Community, to raise awareness and
implement long-term projects to support
the development of our local community.
As part of the campaign, RasGas undertook
initiatives and projects, including financial
sponsorships, charity fundraising events,
employee volunteering, philanthropic
donations and training courses.
The RasGas Annual Charity Gala Dinner seeks
to raise money for individuals and families
in need of practical and financial healthcare
support. The event, held for the sixth
consecutive year in 2011, raised funds for
the RasGas Sunduk Al Kheir charity fund, and
donated QR1.3 million to three beneficiaries:
the Qatar Society for Rehabilitation of
Special Needs, Hamad Medical Corporation
(HMC) Paediatric Unit, and the Qatar
Foundation for Elderly People Care. The
three organisations represent society across
all generations and circumstances, helping
people lead a healthier and active life.

Our programme is also dynamic in nature,
and we are committed to carrying out
research to identify projects aimed at
meeting the changing needs of the
communities in which we live and work.

Supporting local suppliers
In addition to our CSR programme, RasGas
supports local suppliers by giving preference
to local goods and services in all RasGas
contracts, providing certain criteria are met.
Our approach is to use open tenders and to
publish opportunities widely in local media,
including on our website. We seek to build
positive long-term relationships with local
suppliers by outlining our expectations to
them and listening to their views, including
holding a regular suppliers forum. We provide
suppliers with training on RGEE and provide
guidance on our expectations in areas such
as safety and business conduct.

60
49%

50

% of CSR activity

44%
40

41%
35%

33%

30
19%

20

20%

22%
16%
10%

9%

10
2%
0

2009
Community

2010
Education

Figure 29. Corporate Social Responsibility activity by cornerstone, 2009–11

2011
Environment

Health

Sustainability Report 2011 57

Community engagement

In March 2011, RasGas launched a yearlong training and development programme
for women, in partnership with the Ministry
of Social Affairs and Al Fursan Centre for
Training and Consultation. The Tamkeen
Al Mar’at project further demonstrates
RasGas’ commitment to community
development, positively highlighting the
role of women in society.
RasGas was the strategic sponsor of the
Second Annual Qatar International Business
Women Forum in May, which focused on
the important commercial role women play
in Qatar and internationally, highlighting
the increasingly significant impact of
businesswomen and female entrepreneurs
on economies in the Arab world.

RasGas dedicated
2011 as its Year of
the Community

Led by RasGas’ Managing Director, members of RasGas senior management demonstrate corporate commitment
to community engagement, inaugurating the Al Khor Red Crescent building

Highlights from a year of support for the community
January
Inauguration of the Qatar Red Crescent
Society branch in Al Khor, funded
by RasGas
February
RasGas Annual Charity Gala Dinner and
Pro-Am Golf tournament raise funds for
three community causes
March
Launch of the Safety Ambassadors Scheme
in collaboration with the British Safety
Council, and the School Backpack campaign
at the annual Employee Forum
April
RasGas employees organise an
environmental awareness session at
the Sumaisma school
Educational field trip for Qatar Geological
Society students

May
Support for the second Qatar Business
Women Forum and Life is Engineering skills
transfer scheme, in collaboration with Qatar
University College of Engineering
June
Job shadow programme conducted with
Al Risala Independent Secondary School
for girls
July
Launch of the second training course as part
of the Tamkeen Al Mar’at programme to
empower women
August
Garangao evening with the children of
Hamad Medical Corporation
Support for the annual Umra Trip of Ebad
Al Rahman Holy Qur’an Centre
Launch of the social awareness-raising
Ramadan TV commercial

September
School backpacks are donated to the
Al Noor Institute for the Blind and the
Dhreima Orphanage
RasGas is the main sponsor of the annual
Corporate Social Responsibility Conference
of the Ministry of Business and Trade
October
Safety Ambassadors scheme graduation
ceremony is held
November
RasGas makes annual financial contribution
to the Al Khor Society Development
Centre’s Eid Al Adha festival
Donation of special Braille learning devices
to the Gaza Blind Institute, as part of
RasGas’ partnership with Al Noor Institute
for the Blind
December
Volunteer support for the elderly at the
Qatar Foundation for Elderly People

58 Sustainability Report 2011

Education
RasGas is committed to supporting
education and empowering young
generations. We believe that if communities
are enabled in ways that have a sustained
development impact, through empowering
and educating people, and fostering the
construction of cohesive communities, they
can make a valuable contribution.
Our support for education encompasses
practical help for schools and school children,
as well as engagement with universities and
institutions of higher education, with a focus
on the development of vocational skills
and experience.
For schools, we continued with the tradition
of linking a social activity to the annual
Employee Forum by asking employees to
donate backpacks filled with stationery
supplies for schoolchildren. The backpacks
were distributed to Dhreima (Qatar Orphan
Foundation) and the Al Noor Institute for
the Blind.

Students participating in the Life is Engineering
programme workshop

RasGas Company Limited

Our continued support for the Life is
Engineering programme is an example of
our commitment to quality and diverse
education in high schools, encouraging
students to pursue careers in engineering.
The initiative, organised by Qatar University,
involved more than 100 students in a six
month skills transfer programme in which
RasGas employees were able to share their
experience with students and professors.
RasGas continued to support educational
institutions in Qatar by donating computers,
computer equipment and laptops to the
United Nations Educational, Scientific
and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO).
Equipment was distributed to local schools
throughout 2011.

During our 2011 Year of
the Community campaign
a wide range of initiatives
were launched, involving
employees and members
of the community
RasGas employees donate school backpacks

Students attending a lecture at RasGas as part of its
skills transfer programme

Sustainability Report 2011 59

Community engagement

Empowering women
RasGas launched the year-long Tamkeen
Al Ma’rat programme to empower women
in March 2011, as a key element in its
Year of the Community campaign. The
programme, under the patronage of
the Ministry of Social Affairs, includes
three training courses run by Al Fursan
Training and Consultancy Centre. The
programme seeks to support the
development of Qatar’s human capital by
building expertise and equipping national
females of every age with the skills and
knowledge to develop and improve their
career opportunities.
The initiative targeted three groups
of women in society: homemakers,
professional women and young women.
More than 160 candidates participated
and learned ways to improve their
communication skills, and build their
self-esteem while gaining proficiency in
areas such as project management and
budgeting, which can be used both at
home and in the workplace.
“RasGas continuously works to support
the development of the economy and
society to provide the means for women
to learn from one another, be inspired and
balance their careers while retaining their
central role in maintaining a strong family
environment,” said Erhama Al Kaabi,
RasGas’ Employee Development and
Welfare Group Manager, speaking at the
graduation ceremony. “The course aims to
enhance women’s capacity to participate
fully in the social and economic sphere of
our society in line with the Qatar National
Vision of 2030.”

The Tamkeen Al Ma’rat programme
RasGas Managing Director Hamad Rashid Al Mohannadi at the Qatar International Business Women Forum

60 Sustainability Report 2011

Environment
RasGas’ environmental commitment built on
the activities carried out in 2010, which was
dedicated as the Year of the Environment
and during which we conducted a wide range
of events, activities, training and outreach
projects. The idea was to communicate the
need for businesses, employees and Qatar’s
residents to think and act sustainably, to
balance economic and social progress with
protection of the environment.
In March 2011, members of our SHE&Q
group took part in recycling awareness
sessions at the Sumaisma Independent
Primary School for Boys and Doha English
Speaking School. More than 500 children,
aged 6–12, learned in a fun way about
the importance of recycling. In the same
month, RasGas participated for the second
consecutive year in the International Earth
Hour, organised by WWF.

Children attending a recycling awareness lecture

RasGas Company Limited

RasGas is also a long-term supporter
and participant in the Qatar Petroleum
Environment Fair. During the 2011 event,
RasGas Friends of the Environment Centre
shared their expertise by presenting to
children and their families.
The Qatar Geological Society, in collaboration
with RasGas volunteers, offered local
students the chance to learn by organising
a cave trip aimed at unveiling the hidden
treasures of Qatar. The initiative provided
students with an interesting overview of the
surface geology that defines the peninsula
of Qatar. The trip examined history and
environmental preservation, promoting a
multidisciplinary activity that culminated in a
cave descent to see the characteristic dahal
phenomena. Students explored the Dahal Al
Mesfer cave, located in the southern region
of Qatar, a geological phenomenon created
by the erosion by underground water of
carbonate layers deep in the ground.

Educational trip to Dahal Al Mesfer Cave

Sustainability Report 2011 61

Community engagement

Health
RasGas understands the crucial role of
improved health standards in any nation’s
wellbeing. We also understand that the
success of the company depends on having
a healthy workforce working in a safe
environment.
RasGas has contributed to the youth sports
teams (for those aged 5–15) of Al Khor
and Al Shamal Sports Clubs as part of its
contribution to the community. More than
600 children will benefit from this support,
which seeks to promote a healthier and more
active society with sports as a means to
self-development.
In February 2011, RasGas launched the
Safety Ambassador programme. The
initiative, in partnership with the British
Safety Council, trains high school students
and teachers across a spectrum of safetyrelated topics. The course involves lectures,
practical demonstrations and site visits to
the RasGas Safety Training Centre in Ras
Laffan. RasGas employees from the SHE&Q
Group have been fully involved in the
programme by offering their expertise and
skills. RasGas considers the development of
safety and health awareness among young
people to be a necessary life skill and in
2012 this scheme will be extended to local
Arabic-speaking schools.

The Garangao event at Hamad Medical Corporation

In 2011, RasGas continued its bi-annual
blood donation drives. Since 2009, more
than 300 employees have shared ‘the gift
of life’ and more than 130 litres of blood
have been contributed to Hamad Medical
Corporation Blood Bank to support needy
individuals in our community.
We also supported a Garangao
(mid-Ramadan children’s festival) event
at the Hamad Medical Corporation, in
which more than 200 hospitalised children
and their families participated.
RasGas has dedicated 2012 as its Year of
Health, to raise awareness of the importance
of living a healthier lifestyle.

Following the RasGas’
Annual Charity Gala Dinner,
the Sunduk Al Kheir charity
fund donated QR1.3 million
to three beneficiaries
Safety ambassadors visit RasGas’ Safety Training Centre

Supporting Qatar Red Crescent
RasGas is a committed supporter and
partner of the mission and projects of
the Qatar Red Crescent Society (QRCS).
In January 2011, RasGas celebrated the
opening of the new Qatar Red Crescent
Al Khor branch office. The new office is
housed in a three-storey building and
contains a number of offices, halls and
lecture rooms. As well as providing
funds to cover the construction and
fitting-out of the centre, RasGas has
donated equipment including personal
computers, laptops and printers.
“We are very proud to have played
an active role in the construction and
fitting-out of this new building,” said
Hamad Rashid Al Mohannnadi, RasGas
Managing Director, speaking at the
inauguration ceremony. “It will serve as
a focal point for QRCS’ charity work in
the area and, being at the heart of the
community, it will enhance the services
and social programmes provided in the
northern region of Qatar.”

62 Sustainability Report 2011

Our approach to reporting
To make its reporting as valuable as possible, RasGas
reports in line with good reporting practice in the oil and
gas industry, using domestic and international guidelines.
For RasGas, sustainability reporting represents a valuable
tool in building relationships with stakeholders and in
helping to drive better business performance.
In this section, we:
• Set out how we report against five key reporting
principles
• Provide insight into how we determine the content
of our report
• Include a detailed index showing how this report
aligns with international good practice guidelines
on sustainability reporting
• Provide a glossary of terms and sources of further
information

RasGas Company Limited

How we report
In producing this report, RasGas has
taken account of the 2010 Guidelines on
Sustainability Reporting issued by HSE
Regulations and Enforcement Directorate
(Qatar Petroleum), which:
• Adopt the International Petroleum
Industry Environmental Conservation
Association/American Petroleum Institute/
International Association of Oil and Gas
Producers (IPIECA/API/OGP) ‘Oil and
Gas Industry Guidance on Voluntary
Sustainability Reporting (2010)’ as a basis
for report content and industry-specific
indicators
• Reference the broader principles and
indicators of the Global Reporting
Initiative (GRI) G3 Sustainability
Reporting Guidelines
We have also taken into account additional
guidance from HSE Regulations and
Enforcement Directorate in the areas of
safety and climate change to reflect priority
areas for 2011 reporting.
This section of the report sets out how
RasGas has reported against five general
reporting principles set out in the IPIECA
sustainability reporting guidance. In the
discussion of these principles, information
is also provided on important concepts in
reporting such as stakeholder engagement,
determining report boundaries and covering
material issues. An IPIECA and GRI content
index is also provided.

Relevance
RasGas has sought to ensure that the report
appropriately reflects the sustainability
issues facing the company as well as the
views of external stakeholders. RasGas
believes that the material issues have
been covered and prioritised – that is,
the topics and associated indicators that
reflect significant economic, environmental
and social impact, or would substantively
influence the assessments and decisions
of stakeholders concerning the company’s
sustainability performance.

Sustainability Report 2011 63

Our approach to reporting

The content of this report has been
determined primarily through internal
discussions among management and
employees about the issues of most
importance in the course of the reporting
period. In response to guidance issued by a
key stakeholder, QP, the report highlights the
themes of safety and climate change.

Completeness

RasGas believes it has identified its
stakeholders and outlines in this report
its understanding of their interests and
expectations, and how the company
has responded. The stakeholder analysis
has been informed by the day-to-day
interactions of RasGas employees with its
many different stakeholders.

The boundary of this report covers offices,
onshore and offshore operations, and
projects such as the Barzan Gas Project,
but excludes any supplier operations related
to transport and use of products, including
transport of LNG by ship. Data on people
includes employees only, except in the
case of safety data, where contractors
working within the operations are included.
Workforce composition data includes
contract employees in occupied direct hire
approved positions.

In addition to assessing and responding to
the issues of importance to stakeholders,
RasGas has taken account of the issues and
performance data reported on by the wider
oil and gas industry. The content of the
report is relevant to the issues arising in its
business and in the industry at large.

Transparency
Throughout the report, RasGas has sought
to disclose information on its activities
in the reporting period in a balanced
manner, providing information on both the
achievements in the reporting period and the
challenges faced now and in the future. The
report aims to show this information in a clear,
understandable, factual and coherent manner.

Consistency
The qualitative and quantitative information
provided in this 2011 report builds on that
provided in RasGas’ two previous annual
sustainability reports. Where possible,
the data provided enables comparison to
be made between performance in 2011
and 2010. In many cases, it is provided
over a five-year period or longer to help
identify trends. The use of analysis from
benchmarking surveys also facilitates
comparison with industry competitors.
By following the IPIECA and GRI indicator
protocols, the report seeks to enable ready
comparison against other organisations
inside and outside the oil and gas industry.

The report focuses on RasGas’ activities
during the period 1 January to 31 December
2011 and provides information on
RasGas’ performance in this period. Some
information on activities in 2012 is also
provided where relevant.

Environment emissions are drawn from the
Philip Townsend Associates Incorporated
(PTAI) report. The PTAI benchmark scope is
specific to:
 nshore, from receiving to product•O
loading facilities
 perated facilities (excluding the Barzan
•O
Gas Project)
 
For 2011, all RasGas LNG and sales gas
production trains have been included. In
2010, Train 7 was included from June 2010
onwards. For 2011, common condensate
and LPG facilities have been excluded. Those
facilities were handed over to Ras Laffan
Terminal Operations (RLTO) in March 2011.
Other common facilities used by RasGas but
operated by RLTO or other operators – such
as common sulphur, common VOC thermal
oxidiser, LNG storage Lot N facilities and the
Laffan Refinery – are not included.
 
Waste and emissions from Doha-based
facilities are not included in 2011.
Other than developments in the normal
course of business and described in this
report, there were no significant changes to
the size, structure or ownership of RasGas
in the reporting period. RasGas believes the
information within the report is consistent
with this reporting boundary and there

were no major organisational changes which
would affect the data in 2011 compared
with 2010. The About RasGas section of
the report provides an overview of the
company’s operations. 

Accuracy
Quantitative metrics and qualitative
descriptions are provided to demonstrate the
effectiveness of policies, programmes and
practices. Performance data is drawn from
RasGas internal management information
systems. Where indicated, performance
data is shown by reference to benchmarking
surveys which compare performance to that
of others in the industry.
The sources of environment data are as
follows:
• Greenhouse gases emissions: the
methodology used is from the QP GHG
Accounting & Reporting Guidelines,
which are based on the European Union
measurement and reporting guidelines
for CO2 and the IPCC Guidelines for
CH4 and N2O
• Direct measurement (eg water and energy
consumption, flaring or waste-water
discharge from meter readings)
• Calculations based on emission factors and
standards (for NOx and other non-GHG air
emissions)
Most environmental data are reported in
metric units. Financial information is reported
in US dollars unless otherwise stated.
RasGas has IT systems in place to collect
all the data in this report. In producing
the report, the aim has been to achieve
maximum accuracy. Where estimates or
other limitations to the data are involved,
these are identified. The report has been
subject to processes of internal review.
At this stage in sustainability reporting,
RasGas has not sought independent external
assurance for the information provided
within this report. Options for gaining
further assurance on the report content are
being considered, including the development
of internal processes for reviewing report
content prior to publication.

64 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

IPIECA and GRI content index
The tables on the following pages indicate
how RasGas has reported against the
indicators within the IPIECA/API/OGP Oil
and Gas Industry Guidance on Voluntary
Sustainability Reporting (published in
December 2010) and shows where this
information is included in the report. The
table also maps the IPIECA indicators to
comparable indicators and disclosures
on management approach in the Global
Reporting Initiative (GRI) G3.1 Sustainability
Reporting Guidelines as well as the GRI
Oil and Gas Sector Supplement G3.1
Guidelines (OGSS), launched in February
2012. Indicators OG1 to OG14 are new
GRI sector-specific indicators, which are
additional to the original GRI set.

A second table provides information on the
standard disclosures included within GRI,
and covers those indicators not specifically
covered by the IPIECA guidance.
While IPIECA and GRI use different
approaches to develop and structure
their guidance, the organisations have
the same overall aim: to encourage
consistent and high-quality sustainability
reporting as an enabler of stakeholder
engagement, transparency and performance
improvement. The IPIECA Guidance and GRI
Guidelines also enable RasGas to meet the
framework provided by the 2010 Guidelines
on Sustainability Reporting issued by HSE
Regulations and Enforcement Directorate
(Qatar Petroleum).

Self-assessment of reporting
against IPIECA and GRI

We have self-assessed the extent to which
this report is aligned with the intent of the
IPIECA Guidance and the GRI Guidelines.
The self-assessment confirms that RasGas
has addressed all 33 IPIECA indicators in
this report. RasGas also responded to all GRI
G3.1 standard disclosures and disclosures
on management approach (DMA), together
with all 47 core and 27 additional GRI
indicators, as well as the recently issued
14 OGSS performance indicators (with
due regard to materiality and reasons for
omissions). This report therefore meets the
GRI requirements for Application Level A. 

We recognise that our reporting is continuing
to evolve and improve. Therefore, for all
indicators of relevance to RasGas, we
also judge the completeness of our public
reporting based on whether the information
and data fully or partially meet the indicator
intent and definitions. On this basis we have
assessed that we fully address 26 of the
33 IPIECA indicators and 57 of the 88 core,
additional and OGSS GRI indicators, which
is a significant increase on 2009 and 2010
(see page 2). The remaining indicators are
partially addressed such that each indicator
has a response in terms of data and/or
content, but that there are aspects of the
indicator which we recognise are not fully
reported yet, giving us scope for future
improvement.

Table key
Key to indicator categories
DMA

Disclosures on management approach

EC

Economic

EN

Environmental

HR

Human rights

LA

Labour practices and decent work

PR

Product responsibility

SO

Society

Sustainability Report 2011 65

IPIECA and GRI Content Index

IPIECA 2010 indicators GRI 3.1 and OGSS indicators
Code

Title

Code

Description

Where reported
(or brief explanation if not addressed in the 2011 report)

Page

Environmental indicators
Issue

E1

Climate change
and energy

DMA EN

Disclosure on management approach – environment, energy

Delivering a lower-carbon future

18–23

EC2

Delivering a lower-carbon future

18–23

Greenhouse gas
emissions

Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for
the organisation’s activities due to climate change
Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight

Environment (greenhouse gas emissions)

36–37

EN17

EN16

EN3

Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight Relevant emissions include CO2, CH4 and N2O.
Environment (greenhouse gas emissions)
Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and
Environment (greenhouse gas emissions; reducing flaring)
reductions achieved
Environment (energy use)
Significant environmental impacts of transporting
products and other goods and materials used for the
organisation’s operations, and transporting members of
the workforce
Direct energy consumption by primary energy source
Environment (energy use)

EN4

Indirect energy consumption by primary source

Environment (energy use)

42

EN5

Environment (energy use)

42

Environment (energy use)

42

OG2

Energy saved due to conservation and efficiency
improvements
Initiatives to reduce indirect energy consumption and
reductions achieved
Total amount invested in renewable energy

-

OG3

Total amount of renewable energy generated by source

EN6

Initiatives to provide energy-efficient or renewable
energy-based products and services, and reductions in
energy requirements as a result of these initiatives
Volume of biofuels produced and purchased meeting
sustainability criteria
Volume of flared and vented hydrocarbon

As a company whose principal operations are in gas
processing, RasGas does not currently invest in renewable
energy
At present, RasGas does not generate energy from
renewable sources
Delivering a lower-carbon future

RasGas does not produce or purchase biofuels

-

Environment (flaring)

38

Environment (biodiversity)

44

EN18
EN29

E2

Energy use

EN7
E3

Alternative
energy sources

OG14
E4

Flared gas

OG6

Issue

Ecosystem
services
Biodiversity
and ecosystem
services

DMA EN

E5

EN11

EN12

EN13
EN14
OG4
EN15

EN25

Disclosure on management approach – environment –
ecosystem services, including biodiversity
Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or
adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity
value outside protected areas

Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of
water bodies and related habitats significantly affected by
the reporting organisation’s discharges of water and run-off

36–38
42

42

18–23

44–45
RasGas leases land within RLIC. The industrial city covers
295 sq.km. RasGas also has operations within the Ras
Laffan port, which covers 56 sq.km. RasGas supports RLIC
in its monitoring and protection programmes. The land is
arid desert with limited biodiversity however there is rich
marine biodiversity in the coastal waters of the Persian
Gulf
Environment (biodiversity)
44–45

Description of significant impacts of activities, products,
and service on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of
high biodiversity value outside protected areas
Habitats protected or restored
Environment (Barzan Gas Project case study)
Strategies, current actions, and future plans for managing
impacts on biodiversity
Number and percentage of significant operating sites in
which biodiversity risk has been assessed and monitored
Number of IUCN Red List species and national
conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by
operations, by level of extinction risk

36–37

Our approach to environmental management
(biodiversity)
Risk has been assessed and monitoring continues for the
whole RLIC
Two important species are on the International Union for
the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List. The Arabian
oryx in Qatar was endangered but regional population
has recovered and is stable, though vulnerable, and is
monitored via RLIC partner companies. In the marine/
coastal environment protection is given to hawksbill sea
turtles (Red List critically endangered), which have been
monitored with protection measures since 2002 by RLIC
partner companies. Protection of coral species is also a
concern and is discussed in the report
Environment (water)

44–45
44–45
44–45
44–45

44

66 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

IPIECA 2010 indicators GRI 3.1 and OGSS indicators
Code

Title

Code

Description

E6

Fresh water

EN8

Total water withdrawal by source

Issue

E7

E8

Local
environmental
impact
Other air
emissions

Spills to the
environment

EN9
EN10
DMA EN

Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight

EN20

NOx, SOx, and other significant air emissions by type and
weight
Total number and volume of significant spills

EN29

E9

E10

Discharges to
water

Waste

Vast majority used in operations is sea water for cooling,
as reported
Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water Environment (water)
Percentage and total volume of water recycled and reused Virtually all water extracted is returned to the sea
Disclosure on management approach – environment,
Our approach to environmental management
materials

EN19

EN23

Where reported
(or brief explanation if not addressed in the 2011 report)

Significant environmental impacts of transporting
products and other goods and materials used for the
organisation’s operations, and transporting members of
the workforce

EN 21

Total water discharge by quality and destination

OG5

Volume and disposal of formation or produced water

EN25

Identity, size, protected status, and biodiversity value of
water bodies and related habitats significantly affected
by the reporting organisation’s discharges of water and
run-off
Percentage of materials used that are recycled input
materials

Page
44
44
44
35–36

Emissions of ozone depleting substances from RasGas
operations are not significant
Environment (other air emissions)

-

The predominant materials handled are gases, therefore
the risk of spills is lower. Environment (spills)
RasGas products are exported from the jetty operations
for tranport by vessels owned and operated by others.
However, RasGas has put in place initiatiatives to reduce
voyages and cut emissions during transport. See Delivering
a lower-carbon future
Environment (water discharges)

41

Produced water is treated to required levels prior to
discharge to the marine environment. Environment (water
discharges)
Environment (water and biodiversity)

-

39

21

44

44

EN22

Total waste by type and disposal method

The principal material used as an input to RasGas’ activities is natural gas. RasGas does not collect information on the
recycled content of other materials used in its operations
Environment (waste management)
43–44

OG7

Amount of drilling waste (drill mud and cuttings) and
strategies for treatment and disposal
Weight of transported, imported, exported, or treated
waste deemed hazardous under the terms of the Basel
Convention, Annexes I, II, III, and VIII, and percentage of
transported waste shipped internationally

Drill cuttings are cleaned to meet required levels to minimise impact before disposal offshore
In general, the RasGas production processes do not
generate hazardous wastes, except for materials
contaminated with aromatics, which are segregated and
treated on-site. See Environment (waste management)

-

Disclosure on management approach – labour practices
and decent work, occupational health and safety
Percentage of total workforce represented in formal joint
management-worker health and safety committees that
help monitor and advise on occupational health and safety
programmes

Our approach to health and safety management

25–26

EN2

EN24

43–44

Health and safety indicators
Issue
HS1

Workforce
protection
Workforce
participation

DMA LA
LA6

LA9

HS2

Workforce health LA8

HS3

Occupational
injury and illness
incidents

LA7

All of the workforce, employees and contractors, are
represented in formal meetings on safety on a monthly
basis, with representatives from all meetings sitting on
more senior committees that meet also every month. At
the highest level, the meeting is chaired by the Managing
Director
Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements
Not applicable but see LA6 above. It is RasGas’ policy to
with trade unions
comply with all applicable, laws, rules and regulations in
the State of Qatar
While RasGas provides comprehensive health programmes Education, training, counselling, prevention and riskcontrol programmes in place to assist workforce members, for employees and their dependants, the incidence of
serious disease within Qatar is low
their families or community members regarding serious
diseases
Health and safety (performance data)
26–30
Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and
absenteeism, and total number of work-related fatalities
by region

Sustainability Report 2011 67

IPIECA and GRI Content Index

IPIECA 2010 indicators GRI 3.1 and OGSS indicators
Code

Title

Code

Description

HS4

Product
stewardship

EN26

Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products
and services, and extent of impact mitigation

PR1

PR2

PR3

PR4

PR6

PR7

HS5

Process safety

OG13

Where reported
(or brief explanation if not addressed in the 2011 report)

No formal initiatives to mitigate the impact of LNG when
used by clients have been undertaken. However, the
comparative environmental benefits of LNG are described
in ‘Delivering a lower-carbon future’
RasGas has contributed to life cycle studies of the
Life-cycle stages in which the health and safety
environmental impact of its principal product, LNG but
impacts of products are assessed for improvement, and
percentage of significant products and services categories this work has not specifically covered life-cycle health and
safety impacts. RasGas provides health and safety guidance
subject to such procedures
for all products (including Material Safety Data Sheets) and
on business continuity to mitigate impacts from incidents
(see PR3 below)
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations RasGas has not experienced incidents of non-compliance
and voluntary codes concerning health and safety impacts of with regulations or voluntary codes linked to its products
or services
products and services by type of outcome
RasGas provides health and safety guidance for all products
Type of product and service information required by
(including Material Safety Data Sheets). To support longprocedures, and percentage of significant products and
term contract customers, RasGas applies BS25999 to the
services subject to such information requirements
British Standard for Business Continuity Management for its
liquefied natural gas production, marketing, sales, loading
and supporting functions
RasGas has not experienced incidents of non-compliance
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with
with regulations or voluntary codes linked to its products
regulations and voluntary codes concerning product and
or services
service information and labelling, by type of outcome
By the nature of RasGas long-term product contracts,
Programmes for adherence to laws, standards and
RasGas does not market product information to the public.
voluntary codes related to marketing communications,
It is RasGas’ policy to comply with all applicable, laws, rules
including advertising, promotion and sponsorship
and regulations in the State of Qatar
Total number of incidents of non-compliance with regulations See PR6 above. It is RasGas’ policy to comply with all
and voluntary codes concerning marketing communications, applicable, laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar
including advertising, promotion and sponsorship by type of
outcome
Number of process safety events, by business activity
Safety and health: safety performance

Page
18–23

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

Social and economic indicators
Incorporating
financial data

EC1

OG1

LA1

Issue
SE1

Direct economic value generated and distributed, including
revenues, operating costs, employee compensation,
donations and other community investments, retained
earnings, and payments to capital providers and
governments
Volume and type of estimated proved reserves and
production

Total workforce by employment type, employment
contract and region, broken down by gender
LA2
Total number and rate of new employee hires and
employee turnover by age group, gender and region
Community and DMA SO Disclosure on management approach – society, local
society
communities
Percentage of operations with implemented local
Local community SO1
community engagement, impact assessments and
impacts and
development programmes
engagement
SO9
Operations with significant potential or actual negative
impacts on local communities
SO10
Prevention and mitigation measures implemented in
operations with significant potential or actual negative
impacts on local communities
OG10
Number and description of significant disputes with local
communities and indigenous peoples

While RasGas provides elements of this information
throughout this report, the company is not publicly listed
and does not therefore report comprehensive financial
data except to its shareholders

-

5, 10
RasGas extracts gas from the North Field, which is
considered to be the largest single non-associated gas
reservoir in the world with total proven reserves of 900
trillion standard cubic feet (see Qatar Petroleum Annual
Report). RasGas production capacity and 2011 production
performance are contained within this report
Our people (workforce composition)
48
Our people (hiring at RasGas)

48

Our approach to community engagement

55–56

Operations in the vicinity of communities are based in Ras
Laffan and Doha. See Community engagement section

55–56

Operations in the vicinity of communities are based in Ras
Laffan and Doha. See Community engagement section
Our approach to community engagement

55–56

No significant disputes with local communities have
occurred. Indigenous peoples are not applicable (see SE2/
OG10 below)

-

55–56

68 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

IPIECA 2010 indicators GRI 3.1 and OGSS indicators
Code

Title

Code

Description

SE2

Indigenous
peoples

HR9

Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of
indigenous peoples and actions taken

OG9

Operations where indigenous communities are present
or affected by activities, and where specific engagement
strategies are in place
Number and description of significant disputes with local
communities and indigenous peoples

SE3

Involuntary
resettlement

OG10

OG12

SE4

Social
investment

EC1

EC8

Issue

Local content:

DMA EC

SE5

Local content
practices
Local hiring
practices

EC6

SE6

SE7

Issue

Local
procurement
and supplier
development
Human rights

Operations where involuntary resettlement took place,
the number of households resettled in each and how their
livelihoods were affected in the process
Direct economic value generated and distributed, including
revenues, operating costs, employee compensation,
donations and other community investments, retained
earnings, and payments to capital providers and
governments
Development and impact of infrastructure investments
and services provided primarily for public benefit through
commercial, in-kind or pro-bono engagement
Disclosure on management approach – economic market presence, including local content

Where reported
(or brief explanation if not addressed in the 2011 report)

Page

Indigenous peoples (as defined by IPIECA SE2) is not
relevant within the context of Qatar and therefore not
applicable
Not applicable – see SE2/OG10 above

-

No significant disputes with local communities have
occurred. Indigenous peoples are not applicable (see SE2/
OG10 above)
Within the context of RLIC and offshore gas operations,
involuntary resettlement is not applicable

-

While RasGas provides elements of this information
throughout this report, the company is not publicly listed
and does not therefore report comprehensive financial
data except to its shareholders

-

Environment (Barzan case study). The Barzan gas project
represents a major national infrastructure project

45

About RasGas (Our products and operation, RasGas
customers); Community engagement (Supporting local
suppliers)
Community engagement (Supporting local suppliers)

10–11,
56

Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally
based suppliers at significant locations of operation
Our people (Qatarization)
EC7
Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior
management hired from the local community at significant
locations of operation
EC9
Understanding and describing significant indirect economic RasGas has not undertaken specific studies into the
impacts, including the extent of impacts
indirect economic impact of its activities but discusses
its economic impacts within this report, for example
in Delivering a lower-carbon future and Community
engagement (supporting local suppliers)
EC6
Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally
RasGas has a positive programme to engage local.
based suppliers at significant locations of operation
suppliers. There are over 1,000 active suppliers to the
company with an estimated share of total expenditure at
70-80 per cent with local suppliers
See Governance (human rights)
DMA HR Disclosure on management approach – human rights –
freedom of association and collective bargaining, child
labour, prevention of forced and compulsory labour
LA4
Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining RasGas’ employee relations policy has the goal of providing
agreements
a mutually supportive,respectful and productive work
environment. While collective bargaining is not applicable
to Qatari companies, it is RasGas’ policy to comply with all
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar
HR5
Operations and significant suppliers identified in which the See LA4 above
right to exercise freedom of association and collective
bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and
actions taken to support these rights
See Governance (human rights)
HR6
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having
significant risk for incidents of child labour, and measures
taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labour
See Governance (human rights)
HR7
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having
significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory
labour, and measures to contribute to the elimination of all
forms of forced or compulsory labour

-

56
50

20,56

56

17

-

-

17

17

Sustainability Report 2011 69

IPIECA and GRI Content Index

IPIECA 2010 indicators GRI 3.1 and OGSS indicators
Code

Title

Code

Description

SE8

Human rights
due diligence

LA4

Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining
agreements
Percentage and total number of significant investment
agreements that include human rights clauses or that have
undergone human rights screening

HR1

HR3

HR4

HR5

HR6

HR7

HR10

SE9

SE10

Issue
SE11

Human rights
and suppliers

Operations and significant suppliers identified in which the
right to exercise freedom of association and collective
bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and
actions taken to support these rights
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having
significant risk for incidents of child labour, and measures
taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labour
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having
significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory
labour, and measures to contribute to the elimination of all
forms of forced or compulsory labour
Percentage and total number of operations that have
been subject to human rights reviews and/or impact
assessments

HR2

Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have
undergone screening on human rights and actions taken
HR5
Operations and significant suppliers identified in which the
right to exercise freedom of association and collective
bargaining may be violated or at significant risk, and
actions taken to support these rights
HR6
Operations and significant suppliers identified as having
significant risk for incidents of child labour, and measures
taken to contribute to the effective abolition of child labour
Security and
HR8
Percentage of security personnel trained in the
human rights
organisation’s policies or procedures concerning aspects of
human rights that are relevant to operations
Business ethics
DMA HR Disclosure on management approach – economic –
and transparency
indirect economic impacts, corruption, public policy
Preventing
SO2
Percentage and total number of business units analysed
corruption
for risks related to corruption

SO3
SO4

SE12

Total hours of employee training on policies and procedures
concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to
operations, including the percentage of employees trained
Total number of incidents of discrimination and corrective
actions taken

SO2
Preventing
corruption
involving
business partners
SO4

Percentage of employees trained in organisation’s
anti-corruption policies and procedures
Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption

Percentage and total number of business units analysed
for risks related to corruption

Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption

Where reported
(or brief explanation if not addressed in the 2011 report)

Page

See LA4 above

-

In general, RasGas does not have significant investment
agreements. On all commercial matters, it is RasGas’ policy
to comply with all applicable laws, rules and regulations in
the State of Qatar
RasGas has a programme to train all its employees on its
17
business conduct policies
No data available. It is RasGas’ policy to comply with all
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar
and will investigate any reported incidents of discrimination
in accordance with its business conduct policies
See LA4 above

16–17

-

See Governance (Business conduct policies, human rights) 16

See Governance (Business conduct policies, human rights) 16

16
RasGas’ business conduct policies are applied rigorously
within all operations. Human rights are addressed generally
within the RasGas business conduct policies and it is
RasGas’ policy to comply with all applicable laws, rules and
regulations in the State of Qatar
RasGas provides its main suppliers with guidance on
56
business conduct policies and other policies
See LA4 above
-

See Governance (Human rights) and HR2 above

17

Security personnel are trained in, and subject to, the
RasGas business conduct policies

16

See Governance (business conduct policies)

16–17

16
RasGas does not specifically analyse business units for
corruption risk, but its internal control framework and
business conduct policies cover corruption-related risk.
See Governance (business conduct policies)
RasGas conducts business conduct policies sessions for all
its employees. See Governance (business conduct policies)
Any allegation of corruption will be investigated in
accordance with existing policies and procedures. See
Governance (business conduct policies)
RasGas does not specifically analyse business units for
corruption risk, but its internal control framework and
business conduct policies address corruption-related risk.
See Governance (business conduct policies)
See Governance (business conduct policies). Any allegation 16
of corruption will be investigated in accordance with
existing policies and procedures

70 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

IPIECA 2010 indicators GRI 3.1 and OGSS indicators
Code

Title

Code

SE13

Transparency of EC1
payments to host
governments

EC4
SE14

Public advocacy
and lobbying

EC1

SO5
SO6
SE15

Workforce
diversity and
inclusion

EC5

LA1
LA2
LA13

LA14

SE16

Workforce
engagement

LA4
LA5

LA9

SE17

Workforce
training and
development

LA10
LA11

LA12
SE18

Non-retaliation
and grievance
systems

HR4

HR11

Description
Direct economic value generated and distributed, including
revenues, operating costs, employee compensation,
donations and other community investments, retained
earnings, and payments to capital providers and
governments
Significant financial assistance received from government

Where reported
(or brief explanation if not addressed in the 2011 report)

Page

While RasGas provides elements of this information
throughout this report, the company is not publicly listed
and does not therefore report comprehensive financial
data except to its shareholders

-

RasGas does not receive significant financial assistance
from government
Direct economic value generated and distributed, including While RasGas provides elements of this information
throughout this report, the company is not publicly listed
revenues, operating costs, employee compensation,
and does not therefore report comprehensive financial
donations and other community investments, retained
data except to its shareholders
earnings, and payments to capital providers and
governments
Public policy position, and participation in public policy
See Governance (business conduct policies)
development and lobbying
Total value of financial and in-kind contributions to political See Governance (business conduct policies)
parties, politicians and related institutions by country
Not applicable to Qatari companies
Range of ratios of standard entry-level wage by gender
compared to local minimum wage at significant locations
of operation
Total workforce by employment type, employment
See Our People (Workforce composition)
contract and region, broken down by gender
Total number and rate of new employee hires and
See Our People (Hiring at RasGas)
employee turnover by age group, gender and region
See Governance; Our People (Workforce diversity and
Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of
inclusion)
employees per category according to gender, age-group,
minority group membership and other indicators of diversity
Data not available
Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to
men by employee category, by significant locations of
operation
Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining See LA4 above
agreements
In line with Qatar’s Labour Law, RasGas has minimum
Minimum notice periods regarding significant operational
notice periods and these vary depending on contractual
changes, including whether it is specified in collective
terms and length of service
agreements
Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements
There are no trade unions in Qatar, however all RasGas
with trade unions
staff are represented through formal health and safety
meetings
Average hours of training per year per employee by
Our People (Learning and development)
gender, and by employee category
RasGas has staff learning and development programmes
Programmes for skills management and lifelong learning
in place through a structured People Master Plan and
that support the continued employability of employees
‘job families’ approach, and extensive employee training
and assist them in managing career endings
opportunities.
See Our People
Percentage of employees receiving regular performance
Our People (A performance-driven organisation)
and career development reviews, by gender
Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions
No data available. It is RasGas’ policy to comply with all
taken
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar
and the company will investigate any reported incidents
of discrimination in accordance with its business conduct
policies
A non-retaliation and grievance system is in place
Number of grievances related to human rights filed,
to enable employees to raise instances of alleged
addressed and resolved through formal grievance
mistreatment. No grievances related to human rights have
mechanisms
been filed

-

16–17
16–17
-

48
48
48

-

-

-

51
49–51

47
16

16

Sustainability Report 2011 71

IPIECA and GRI Content Index

GRI standard disclosures and indicators not addressed by the IPIECA guidance
Standard disclosures
Strategy and analysis

Organisational profile

Report parameters

Page
1.1
1.2

Statement from the most senior decision-maker in the
organisation
Description of key impacts, risks and opportunities

2.1

Name of the organisation

Vice-Chairman’s foreword and Managing Director’s
introduction
Vice Chairman’s foreword and Managing Director’s
introduction
About RasGas

2.2

Primary brands, products and services

About RasGas

10

2.3

Organisational structure of the organisation

About RasGas

10

2.4

Location of organisation’s headquarters

About RasGas

7

2.5

Number of countries where the organisation operates

About RasGas

7

2.6

Nature of ownership and legal form

About RasGas

7

2.7

Markets served

About RasGas

7, 11

2.8

Scale of the reporting organisation

About RasGas

7, 11

2.9

Significant changes during the reporting period

Our approach to reporting

63

2.10

Awards received during the reporting period

Managing Director’s introduction

5

3.1

Reporting period

Our approach to reporting

63

3.2

Date of most recent previous report

About this report

1

3.3

Reporting cycle

About this report

1

3.4

For further information

74

3.5

Contact point for questions regarding the report or its
contents
Process for defining report content

Our approach to reporting

62–63

3.6

Boundary of the report

Our approach to reporting

63

3.7

Specific limitations on the scope or boundary of the report

Our approach to reporting

63

3.8

Basis for reporting on joint ventures, subsidiaries etc

Our approach to reporting

63

3.9

Our approach to reporting

63

Our approach to reporting

63

3.11

Data measurement techniques and the bases of
calculations
Explanation of the effect of any restatements of
information
Significant changes from previous reporting period

Our approach to reporting

63

3.12

Table identifying the location of the standard disclosures

Our approach to reporting

64–72

3.13

Policy and current practice with regard to seeking external
assurance of the report
Governance structure of the organisation

Our approach to reporting

63

Governance

13

4.2

Indicate whether the chair of the highest governance body
is also an executive officer

-

4.3

Independent and/or non-executive members of the board

4.4

Mechanisms for shareholders and employees to provide
recommendations or direction to the highest governance
body
Linkage between compensation and the organisation’s
performance
Processes in place to ensure conflicts of interest are
avoided
Qualifications and expertise of the board

The Board Chairman and Vice-Chairman are non-executive
positions. The Managing Director is an executive member
of the Board
The majority of the Board have non-executive/
independent positions
Governance

People (a performance-driven organisation)

47

Governance

13

3.10

Governance,
commitments and
engagement

4.1

4.5
4.6
4.7

4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11

RasGas Board Members are experienced individuals with
skills and knowledge relevant to the oil and gas business,
drawn from national and international government and
industry
Internally developed statements of mission or values, codes Governance (business conduct policies), People Master
of conduct and principles
Plan
Identification and management of economic, environmental Governance
and social performance, conduct and principles
Processes for evaluating the highest governance body’s
Governance
own performance
Explanation of whether and how the precautionary
RasGas’ approach to risk management (for example as
approach or principle is addressed by the organisation
applied to to climate change and general HSE management)
demonstrates that RasGas has embedded the
precautionary principle within its Governance approach

4–5
4–5
7

13

13

15–16,
49
13–17
13
-

72 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

GRI standard disclosures and indicators not addressed by the IPIECA guidance
Standard disclosures

Page
RasGas management systems are based on and follow a
number of externally developed charters including ISO
14001 and OSHAS 18001. Its approach to sustainability
reporting is guided by the IPIECA and GRI reporting
principles and guidelines
About RasGas
About RasGas (stakeholder engagement)
About RasGas (stakeholder engagement)

-

About RasGas (stakeholder engagement)
About RasGas (stakeholder engagement)

8–9
9

Not applicable to RasGas

-

RasGas is a natural resource (gas extraction) company.
Production capacity data is provided. See OG1 above
This indicator is not applicable to RasGas, as it refers
primarily to refined transport fuels. RasGas issues Material
Safety Data Sheets for its LNG and other products that
document the product content
This indicator is not applicable to RasGas

-

No data available. It is RasGas’ policy to comply with all
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar.

-

Environment (environmental expenditure)

36

Medical, dental and other awards are available to all
sponsored employees, full or part time, though certain
benefits depend on length of service
People (workforce composition)

-

No sites have been or are in the process of being
decommissioned
No data available. It is RasGas’ policy is to comply with all
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar

-

No data available. It is RasGas’ policy is to comply with all
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar

-

More than 95 per cent of RasGas products are supplied
through long-term contracts to its customers worldwide.
Regular meetings are held with all of these customers to
ensure satisfaction
Total number of substantiated complaints regarding
RasGas responds to any customer concerns through its
breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data meetings as outlined for PR5 above. Given the nature of
the contracts, data is not formally collected
Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with No data available. It is RasGas’ policy is to comply with all
applicable laws, rules and regulations in the State of Qatar
laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of
products and services

-

4.12
Governance,
commitments and
engagement (continued)

Externally developed economic, environmental and social
charters, principles

4.13
4.14
4.15

EN1

Membership of associations
List of stakeholder groups engaged by the organisation
Basis for identification and selection of stakeholders with
whom to engage
Approaches to stakeholder engagement
Key topics and concerns that have been raised through
stakeholder engagement and how the organisation has
responded to these key topics
Coverage of the organisation’s defined benefit plan
obligations
Materials used by weight or volume

OG8

Benzene, lead and sulphur content in fuels

EN27

Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials
that are reclaimed, by category
Monetary value of significant fines and total number
of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with
environmental laws and regulations
Total environmental protection expenditures and
investments by type
Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not
provided to temporary or part-time employees, by major
operations
Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by
gender
Number of sites that have been decommissioned and sites
that are in the process of being decommissioned
Total number of legal actions for anti-competitive
behaviour, anti-trust and monopoly practices, and their
outcomes
Monetary value of significant fines and total number of
non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and
regulations
Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results
of surveys measuring customer satisfaction

4.16
4.17

Performance indicators

EC3

EN28

EN30
LA3

LA15
OG11
SO7

SO8

PR5

PR8

PR9

7
9
9

-

-

48

-

-

-

Sustainability Report 2011 73

Glossary

Glossary
AGI

Acid gas injection

LEED

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

AKG-1 and 2

Al Khaleej Gas project (1 and 2)

LOPC

Loss of primary containment

API

The American Petroleum Institute

LNG

Liquefied natural gas

BBS

Behaviour-based safety

LPG

Liquefied petroleum gas

CCS

Carbon capture and storage

LTI

Lost-time injury

CEMS

Continuous emissions monitoring system

LTIR

Lost-time injury rate

CO2

Carbon dioxide

MoE

Ministry of Environment of the State of Qatar

COP

Conference of the Parties (to the United Nations
Framework Convention on Climate Change)

Mta

Million tonnes per year

CSR

Corporate Social Responsibility

NOx

Nitrogen oxides

CH4

Methane

OECD

Organisation for Economic Cooperation and
Development

DLN

Dry low NOx retrofit programme

OGP

International Association of Oil and Gas Producers

DOSS

Demand on Safety Systems

OHSAS

Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series

EMS

Environmental management system

QNV

Qatar National Vision 2030

GCC

Gulf Cooperation Council

QP

Qatar Petroleum

GGFR

Global gas flaring reduction

RGEE

RasGas Elements for Excellence

GHG

Greenhouse gases

RL

Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas Company Limited

GRI

Global Reporting Initiative

RL3

Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas Company Limited (3)

H2S

Hydrogen sulphide

RL II

Ras Laffan Liquefied Natural Gas Company Limited (II)

HACCP

Hazard analysis critical control point

RLIC

Ras Laffan Industrial City

HRA

Health risk assessment

SHE

Safety, health and environment

HSE

Health, safety and environment

SHE&Q

Safety, health, environment and quality

IEA

International Energy Agency

SSH&E

Safety, security, health and environment

IPIECA

Global oil and gas industry association for
environmental and social issues

SOx

Sulphur oxides

IR

Infrared

TRIR

Total recordable injury rate

ISO

International Organisation for Standardisation

UNFCCC

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

IVMS

In-vehicle monitoring system

VOCs

Volatile organic compounds

JCI

Joint Commission International

WWF

A global environmental conservation organisation
(formerly World Wildlife Fund)

LDAR

Leak detection and repair programme

74 Sustainability Report 2011

RasGas Company Limited

Cautionary statement
This sustainability report by RasGas
Company Limited contains forward-looking
statements relating to the manner in which
RasGas intends to conduct its activities,
based on management’s current plans and
expectations. These statements are not
promises or guarantees of future conduct
or policy and are subject to a variety of
uncertainties and future circumstances,
many of which are beyond our control.
Therefore, the actual conduct of our
activities, including the development,
implementation or continuation of any
programme, policy or initiative discussed
in this report, may differ materially in the
future. The statements of intention in this
report speak only as of the date of this
report. RasGas undertakes no obligation to
publicly update any statements in this report.

For further information
More information about RasGas is
available at our website:
www.rasgas.com
We welcome your feedback on this
report. If you have comments, please
contact us by email at:
[email protected]
Designed and produced by
East Publishing Limited, Norwich, UK
Published by RasGas Company Limited
©2012 All Rights Reserved

References in this report to other reports or
materials, such as a website address, have
been provided to direct the reader to other
sources of information which may be of
interest, but such information does not form
part of this report.

CBP0007781607124406

By carbon balancing the paper on this
production we have saved 1084kgs of
carbon and preserved 91.06 metres of land.

This Sustainability Report is
printed on 100% Recycled, FSC®
certified, Greencoat 100 Offset.
This paper has been independently
certified according to the rules of
the Forest Stewardship Council
(FSC®) and was manufactured
at a mill that holds ISO 14001
certification. It was printed at
an FSC®-certified printer using
vegetable based inks.

2011 performance against commitments: at a glance
Sustainability issue

Our commitment

Key performance indicators
2007

Performance
2009

2008

2010

2011

Management and governance
57 GRI
24 GRI
17 IPIECA 26 IPIECA

Committing to integrity, accountability
and transparency

RasGas will maintain the highest ethical standards, achieving full legal compliance
and operational integrity in the conduct of its business.

Number of sustainability indicators publicly reported on
(based on the 33 IPIECA and 88 GRI indicators, see page 64)

-

-

24 GRI
-

Achieving operational excellence

RasGas is committed to becoming a world-class global energy supplier striving for Liquefied natural gas (LNG) capacity in million tonnes per year
excellence. Sustainability represents a key component of our drive for operational
excellence.

20.7

20.7

28.5

37.1

37.1

Strengthening relationships and
partnerships

RasGas works with its employees, stakeholders and shareholders to strengthen
relationships and partnerships, address mutual needs and improve performance.

Employee engagement index score (%): average score from
six employee climate survey questions on motivation
(see page 53)

-

76

-

78

80

Driving sustainability

RasGas works together with all stakeholders to deliver business success, while
protecting the natural environment, promoting economic and social benefit, and
developing the capability of our people. These goals, which align with the Qatar
National Vision 2030, are underpinned by policies, procedures and performance
management.

Average number of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
engagement activities (events/sponsorships) per
month – page 56

-

-

6.3

8.2

10.5

Operations
Protecting the environment

RasGas is committed to managing the environmental impact of its operations and Total greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 equivalent emissions in
conducting its business in a manner that protects the environment. It continues to tonnes) – page 37
use and develop new technologies that promote energy efficiency.
Nitrogen oxides emissions (kilo tonnes) – pages 39, 41

9.4

9.3

8.9

16.8

18.8

17.8

12.1

9.5

11.8

11.8

Volatile organic compound emissions (kilo tonnes) – page 41

5.5

5.7

5.9

11.1

1.2

14.3

9.4

12.2

44.6

18.2

62

62

65

50

43

2,262

2,669

2,875

2,946

3,061

31.1

30.4

31.2

30.5

33.0

38

61

65

43

27

Total recordable injury rate* (employees)

0.08

0.03

0.09

0.10

0.03

Total recordable injury rate* (contractors)

0.18

0.12

0.13

0.16

0.09

0

0.03

0

0

0

0.04

0.01

0.01

0.02

0.02

15

7

7

2

2

Fatalities – employees

0

0

0

0

0

Fatalities – contractors

0

0

1

0

0

Number of heat stress incidents – page 33

9

6

1

0

1

Total recordable occupational illness rate – page 32

-

-

-

0.00

0.01

% of CSR activities that were proactive
(i.e. non-solicited) – page 56

-

-

-

47

39

Sulphur oxides emissions (kilo tonnes) – pages 39, 40
Total waste recycled (%) – page 43
Supporting our people
Ensuring health and safety

RasGas is committed to sustaining and developing a competent workforce, which
includes creating employment and development opportunities for nationals.

Total workforce (number) – page 48

RasGas is committed to ensuring the safety of its people and its operations.
RasGas aims to apply industry leading health and safety practices, and
continuously strives to improve its performance.

Number of reported safety observations per person

Further information on these key performance indicators is available on pages 26
to 29, unless stated otherwise.

Lost time injury rate* (employees)

Qatarization (% Qatari employees in total workforce) – page 50

Lost time injury rate* (contractors)
Lost time injuries

Maintaining strong community
relationships

RasGas is committed to investing in the society in which it operates, and has
provided funds to a wide range of community, environmental, educational, health
related and cultural initiatives. The company’s CSR programme provides the
structured framework for RasGas’ long-term commitments.

*Quoted rates are per 200,000 hours worked

RasGas Company Limited Sustainability Report 2011

Sustainability Report 2011

About this report
This report is RasGas’ third annual sustainability
report, building on our previous two sustainability
reports, issued in 2009 and 2010.
It describes activities in the financial and calendar
year 2011 and provides an account of actions and
performance data relating to a range of business,
economic, environmental and social issues which
make up our sustainability performance. It has
been prepared in accordance with guidelines on
sustainability reporting from Qatar Petroleum, which
adopts guidance specific to the oil and gas industry
prepared by the International Petroleum Industry
Environmental Conservation Association (IPIECA), and
cross-references the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI).
Further details, including a description of the process
for defining report content, is provided in the ‘Our
approach to reporting’ section.
This report builds on the foundation of sustainability
reporting that we have established within the
company and provides further information and new
perspectives on performance. In particular, and in
line with guidance from the HSE Regulations and
Enforcement Directorate within Qatar Petroleum,
we have focused on the themes of safety and
climate change in this year’s report – two topics of
immediate and long-term importance for everyone
in our industry.
RasGas believes sustainability reporting to be
a valuable tool in building relationships with
stakeholders; we hope you find this report of interest
and value. If you have feedback on it, please contact
us at: [email protected]

RasGas Company Limited, PO Box 24200, Doha, State of Qatar
T (+974) 4473 8000 F (+974) 4473 8480
www.rasgas.com

Sponsor Documents

Or use your account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Forgot your password?

Or register your new account on DocShare.tips

Hide

Lost your password? Please enter your email address. You will receive a link to create a new password.

Back to log-in

Close