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WORKFORCE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT
Delivering Construction Workforce Training and Development to Gulf Coast Areas Impacted by Hurricane Katrina
The total reconstruction cost resulting from hurricane Katrina is estimated to be at least $200 Billion1. With an estimated 90,000 square miles impacted and 400,000 individuals displaced, the devastation from this hurricane is unprecedented. The response by the federal government in the first 100 days after the disaster has been remarkable2: Approximately 40,000 travel trailers and manufactured housing units have been deployed as temporary homes for Katrina victims Nearly 53 million cubic yards of debris have been removed in Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana Nearly $190 million in unemployment assistance has been obligated for eligible victims in Alabama, Louisiana, Florida and Mississippi More than $4.2 billion has been paid directly to Katrina victims for financial and housing assistance Cleaning up and reconstructing the devastated areas will introduce new challenges. One of the most significant of these challenges will be to recruit and train the construction workforce required to perform the work. Throughout the gulf coast region, labor shortages are being felt and contractors are struggling to find skilled construction workers. Ironically, the area is also saddled with high unemployment. Many of the unemployed are capable of taking on construction jobs but do not have the skills required to be employed.

“The Federal Emergency Management Agency said insurance claims totaled some $23 billion. Reconstruction costs are estimated to be at least $200 billion, making Katrina the costliest storm in history.” Reported by CNN November 30, 2005. 2 By the Numbers: First 100 Days - FEMA Recovery Update for Hurricane Katrina

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CURRENT APPROACHES TO THE PROBLEM Recognizing the problem, a number of industry consortia and trade associations have begun to map out potential solutions. In general, the efforts to date have been fragmented and have lacked consolidated focus and leadership. As a result: The skills and qualifications of the people working on reconstruction efforts is steadily declining as more untrained workers enter the workforce The number of Hispanic guest workers employed in reconstruction is on the rise while unemployment of US workers in the region remains high3 A number of construction training facilities in the region remain under utilized One merit shop construction industry leader in the southeast recently noted some of the training challenges he sees today: When untrained laborers can earn $20-$22 per hour, plus per deim and overtime to work on FEMA cleanup, there is little short-term motivation to attend training. At least one owner has waived requirements to pass Interactive Construction Safety Training (ICST)4 in English and now accepts Spanish only examination results. This may be an indication of a future trend that may extend into skills training as well. The insulator and painting trades today are comprised of a high percentage of Hispanic guest workers. Many owners require skills testing but there are few controls in place. Workers can take and re-take the exam until they pass the exam even though they have never gone to training. AN INTEGRATED SOLUTION IS ESSENTIAL To address the problem, it is essential that government and industry work together to implement a comprehensive construction workforce training and development program which would train and deploy up to 20,000 construction workers in the next four years. To do this: Federal, state and local governments should directly task its existing contractors to train and employ people recruited from the devastated areas.
Louisiana unemployment rate for November 2005 was 12.4% as compared to a rate of 5.8% in November 2004 and the Mississippi unemployment rate for November 2005 was 9.5% as compared to a rate of 6.9% in November 2004. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data updated December 16, 2005. 4 ICST is a computer-based safety and health training program used in the construction industry.
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Private industry and government should provide the seed money required to begin the training process and must encourage its contractors to hire newly trained workers. Contractors must develop and implement a local workforce training and recruitment plan which is consistent with national goals. To ensure that workforce training and development efforts are executed in a coherent and consistent manner, it is essential that efforts of government agencies, private industry owners and construction contractors are integrated into a consistent strategy with common goals. To do this, a Business Roundtable sponsored integrator in partnership with the government should: Mobilize a training program based on stakeholder input Provide oversight of the program’s implementation Monitor the program’s progress

OTHER INITIATIVES PATHWAYS TO CONSTRUCTION INITIATIVE One recent development was the announcement of the U.S. Department of Labor's Employment and Training Administration Pathways to Construction Employment Initiative5 intended to support economic revitalization in Louisiana and Mississippi. The initiative provides two $5 million grants to engage each state's workforce agency and the local community college system to establish and operate construction career systems to prepare local residents for new construction jobs. The initiative calls for Louisiana and Mississippi to establish Reconstruction Centers of Excellence in community colleges to support workforce development in construction trades and associated skills. Assessments will be conducted and workers referred to appropriate training for construction employment. This project will make every effort to collaborate with this initiative. CONSTRUCTION USERS ROUNDTABLE The Construction Users Roundtable (CURT) was formed in 2000 as an owner’s voice in the construction industry. The organization is comprised of 53 corporate members, 13 associate
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Department of Labor Press release dated November 30, 2005.

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construction contractor members and 8 associate association representatives. CURT has recognized the imminent labor shortages immediately following Hurricane Katrina. The organization is currently working on three initiatives: Assessment of the problem Communications Workforce Development and Training This project will make every effort to collaborate with this initiative. SOUTHEAST MANPOWER TRIPARTITE ALLIANCE (SEMTA) This informal alliance of owners, contractors, labor unions and associations was formed after Hurricane Katrina to share information on construction manpower requirements and availability in the southeast region. All parties that participate in alliance meetings by providing data on labor demand projections and/or labor supply information are provided a compilation of the results. This project will participate in SEMTA activities to stay informed of their labor demand and supply projections.

UNION CONSTRUCTION To make the optimum use of available resources, any workforce training and development program needs to address the requirements of both union and merit-shop contractors. Nationwide, approximately 16% of the construction workforce is unionized. While the exact percentage of union construction workers in the area impacted by Hurricane Katrina is not known, it is certainly lower than the national average. It would be reasonable to assume that no more than 8% of the local workforce was unionized at the time of the disaster. UNION CONSTRUCTION APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAMS The unions affiliated with the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO6 provide apprentice training to new construction workers. Apprenticeship and training programs are administered by local Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committees (JATCs) which are
The BCTD coordinates 13 affiliated trades unions in the construction industry. Created in 1908, it has 386 state, local and provincial councils in the United States and Canada.
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comprised of local union and contractor representatives. Local training trust funds operate over 2,000 training centers throughout the United States. Apprenticeship training programs are very mature and there are reported to be over 35,000 registered union apprenticeship programs in place.7 Apprenticeship programs are negotiated as part of the local collective bargaining agreement. Program funds are administered by an Apprenticeship Trust Fund Committee, and are then allocated to the Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee (JATC). Apprentices in these programs incur no costs for their training. In some cases, union sponsored apprenticeship programs receive grants from the Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The length of union apprenticeship programs vary by trade and generally take three to five years to complete. As an example, the union electrician apprenticeship program jointly administered by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) and the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) takes 5 years to complete. BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION TRADES COUNCILS IN THE AFFECTED AREA As listed in Attachment 1, there are a total of 23 Union Building and Construction Trades Councils in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas. Of the 23 councils, 9 are located in or near the area impacted by Hurricane Katrina. The breakdown by state is as follows: Total BCTC 5 2 7 9 23 BCTC in Impacted Area 1 2 5 1 9

Alabama Mississippi Louisiana Texas Total

The capability and condition of the union training facilities located in the nine impacted Building and Construction Trades Councils is not known at this time. While there have been unconfirmed reports of instructor shortages and some instances of training facilities being used

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Data provided by the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO; http://www.buildingtrades.org/

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as emergency relief centers, the international unions have indicated that they will provide whatever support is required to get local training centers up and running.8 Regardless of their intention to support the reconstruction effort, organized labor does not control a significant amount of construction in the area impacted by Hurricane Katrina. Unionized construction is generally limited to specialized construction trades such as electricians and pipefitters and to work performed at larger facilities such as government installations, nuclear power stations, and some refineries. To survive, many local unions have allowed their membership to take jobs with merit shop contractors when work is slow with the proviso that they will quit the merit shop job when a union job comes available. Commensurate with a smaller membership base, the union training facilities in this region of the country are not as elaborate as those found in other parts of the country. While this may suggest less capability, it is also an indication that the local unions are more accustomed to providing training in a simple setting which may be important in the coming months. RECOMMENDED PATH FORWARD FOR UNION CONSTRUCTION TRAINING Each of the unions associated with the Building and Construction Trades Department has a mature workforce training and development process in place and given the unions’ reluctance to take on rapid change, there is little value in attempting to introduce a new or modified training program to the unions. A better strategy is to work collaboratively with the unions to achieve common goals. Specifically: Establish hiring goals in construction procurements with union contractors which favor the recruitment of local residents as first year apprentices. The local labor unions could then utilize their current recruitment and training processes to broaden the base of their workforce. Work with international union leadership to provide training support to local unions in the impacted area. This support may include loaned instructors, mobile training facilities or funds to procure replacement training equipment. In some instances, the international unions may apply for federal grants to support these activities. Since union construction in the affected area is estimated to represent approximately 8% of the total construction workforce, it would be reasonable to target 8% of the 20,000 person goal
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Meeting notes from October 2005 Southeast Regional Tripartite Committee Meeting, Atlanta, GA

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as new union construction workers. This would equate to the introduction of 1,600 craft apprentices over a four year period or approximately 45 additional craft apprentices per affected Building Construction Trade Council per year between 2006 and 2009. This would seem to be a reasonably paced goal within the unions’ current training capability. The role of the Business Roundtable in making this goal a reality would be to provide a liaison between government, private industry and the international labor unions to develop a consensus hiring goal and mutually beneficial construction procurement language.

MERIT SHOP CONSTRUCTION MERIT SHOP TRAINING AND ACCREDITATION PROGRAMS The Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC)9 recognizes apprentices and craft students in more than 20 construction crafts through its national network and chapter offices. The ABC previously developed its own training materials, however, now works closely with its educational affiliate, the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER)10, in the development, revision and publication of training materials. The training materials are competency-based and craft specific. In addition to providing training materials, NCCER also provides worker skills assessments, training facility accreditation, instructor certification services, and a national registry of worker training. While not as rigid as union apprenticeship programs, the merit shop worker training and development process is mature and effective in supporting the industry. NCCER has 525 sponsors nationwide and 3000-4000 accredited training centers including local community colleges. There are 47 accredited technical colleges in Louisiana alone11.

The ABC was founded in 1950 and is a national association representing 23,000 merit shop construction and construction-related firms in 79 chapters across the United States. 10 The NCCER is a not-for-profit education foundation founded in 1995 by open-shop construction companies to develop standardized construction, maintenance and pipeline training curricula. NCCER is an affiliate organization with the University of Florida M.E. Rinker, Sr. School of Building Construction. 11 I have requested NCCER to provide a specific list of training facilities, their status and their current capacity.

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NCCER TRAINING NCCER training programs are offered in a variety of construction trades and specialties including: Boilermaking Carpentry Carpentry, Residential Concrete Finishing Construction Craft Laborer Construction Technology Core Curriculum: Introductory Craft Skills Electrical Electrical, Residential Electrical Topics, Advanced Electronic Systems Technician Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Heavy Equipment Operations Highway/Heavy Construction Instrumentation Insulating Ironworking Masonry Millwright Mobile Crane Operations Painting Pipefitting Pipelayer Plumbing Scaffolding Sheet Metal Site Layout Sprinkler Fitting Welding

Each specialty is provided with training Levels with advancing degrees of proficiency. In the case of the Carpentry specialty, four levels of training are provided:

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Level 1: General Orientation, Safety, Power Tools, and Basic Framing - 197.5 hours Level 2: Reading Plans, Site Layout, and Formwork – 160 hours Level 3: Exterior Siding, Roofing, Stairs and Drywall Installation – 202.5 hours Level 4: Instrument Layout, Advanced Floors and Walls, and Welding – 176 hours In most cases, this training is provided as evening classes for working adults. For example, classes at the Associated Builders & Contractors of Southeast Texas training facility are taught two nights a week between 6 pm and 9 pm. Most courses are taught over 8 to12 ten week quarters so that it would take 2-3 years to complete the entire series in one specialty. Student tuition cost varies by subject but is nominally $75 per quarter. Tuition for a 12 quarter course of study would therefore cost $900. To pass a course, students must pass an accredited assessment exam which confirms their mastery of the courses learning objectives. Students who have developed on-the-job skills also have the option to take the assessment examination without taking the course. RECOMMENDED PATH FORWARD FOR MERIT SHOP CONSTRUCTION TRAINING Given the predominance of merit shop construction in the impacted area, it is essential to the project’s success to implement an effective merit shop training program. While many options may be viable, it is proposed that the reconstruction workforce training and development project be undertaken with a sense of national urgency and a call to action. A key element of this proposal would be to recruit qualified candidates from the devastated areas to attend focused four week construction training “boot camps”. Each four week boot camp session would focus on one of the modules described above. This would allow multiple weeks of evening instruction to be completed in four weeks. As shown in the training schedule below, each four week training session would be followed by three months of employment with a sponsoring merit shop contractor utilizing the skills obtained during the training session. The three month employment period would be followed by a second 4 week training session and the cycle repeated.

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2006

2007 Oct Nov Dec Jan

ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Task Name Begin Training Program Training Session 1 Work Assignment 1 Training Session 2 Work Assignment 2 Training Session 3 Training Program Complete - Employee Reports to Work Full-Time

Start 5/1/2006 5/1/2006 5/29/2006 8/21/2006 9/18/2006 12/11/2006 1/5/2007

End 5/1/2006 5/26/2006 8/18/2006 9/15/2006 12/8/2006 1/5/2007 1/5/2007

Duration
May Jun Jul Aug Sep

0w 4w 12w 4w 12w 4w 0w

The length of time that trainees would remain in the program is dependent on the chosen specialty. Scaffold builders can complete their training in a single 4 week session whereas skilled trades such as carpenters and electricians will take 3 sessions to reach basic proficiency. For the carpenter training example shown above, three four week sessions would allow the student to complete Level 3 training. If the student elects to complete Level 4, he/she may do so by enrolling in the regular evening classes. This project would be focused on basic skills only. INCENTIVES Both the student and the contractor have incentives to make this training process work. A previously untrained student has the incentive to enter this program because he/she can achieve proficiency and thus a higher rate of pay faster. Unskilled labor normally enters a construction job as a helper or general laborer. Those who wish to better themselves are then faced with several years of evening classes in addition to 40+ hour work weeks to achieve proficiency. This program would allow an unskilled worker to enter his/her first construction job within 4 weeks after completing the first Level of training and after one year, complete three levels of skills training. In addition to the fast-track training, the intervening three month work periods would allow the worker to gain on-the-job experience making subsequent training easier and more meaningful. In the case of the contractor, this program would allow the employer to develop a longer term working relationship with a student/worker than would be afforded by hiring someone off the street. By conditioning reimbursement of a student’s tuition to successful completion of the training session and the following three months of work, the employer verifies that the worker has the skills required to achieve proficiency and the work ethic to be successful on the job.

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Additionally, contractor costs incurred in training the new worker during the entire 9 month training program are considered to be tax deductible. Deductible expenses would include trainee salary, tuition expenses and practical skills training during work assignments. The contractor is motivated to get the new worker to complete the training program to obtain the tax deduction. ASSUMPTIONS To ensure successful implementation, the following assumptions are made regarding the program: Federal and state procurements for hurricane reconstruction will require contractors to develop a workforce training and development plan which trains and employs personnel from the impacted area. Qualified training candidates will be tested for basic reading, writing and mathematics skills prior to acceptance in the program. Training candidates will be responsible for an initial pre-defined set of construction tools appropriate for the specialty when accepted in the program. These tools will be used during the training session and will be available for use on the first work assignment12. Since many training candidates have not worked in construction before, the initial set of tools for the first 4 week training session includes personal clothing such as sturdy work boots, leather gloves, and safety glasses. Tools specific to their specialty trade will also be included. While the cost of tools will vary by specialty, an average investment of $500 is typical. Training candidates would be screened and hired by the sponsoring merit shop contractor prior to the first four week training session. Students would be responsible for course tuition but would be eligible for reimbursement of tuition and tool purchase costs by the sponsoring contractor after successfully completing training and meeting employment requirements. Students are paid at a lower “apprentice rate” by the sponsoring merit shop contractor while they are enrolled in the program13. After completing the number of training

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It is a standard practice in merit shop construction for workers to provide the tools of their trade on the job. This practice is typical of those used in work-study programs in many industries.

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sessions to achieve basic proficiency in a selected specialty, the student becomes a regular employee of the sponsoring merit shop contractor at a full time rate of pay. After completing the program, the worker may elect to continue with other NCCER accredited training by enrolling in established courses. All training is conducted using NCCER accredited trainers, training materials, and skills testing. All merit shop contractors participating in this program must sign the NCCER National Training Service Agreement (NTSA) to fund project training and to maintain training and skills assessment materials. The merit shop goal of adding up to 20,000 newly trained workers by 2009 will not be reduced by those added by union contractors. PROGRAM COSTS To estimate program costs, the following assumptions are made: Current NCCER training materials will be used and no new training materials will be developed. Four week training sessions are run 4 days per week, 10 hours per day. This is the same work schedule that the training candidates will most likely see when they enter the workforce. Current NCCER accredited training classes are subsidized by NTSA fees and by private industry contributions. For example, a $75 tuition for 60 hours of NCCER accredited instruction at the Associated Builders & Contractors of Southeast Texas training facility equates to a student cost of $1.25 per instruction hour. As shown in Attachment 2, the estimated cost of providing a 4 week training session is over $8 per instruction hour. Since this project assumes the use of existing training facilities, administrative staff, and training materials, it would be reasonable to assume that a 4 week training session could be provided with a tuition of approximately $1000 per student14. Students are assumed to be responsible for tuition, however, low income students may qualify for low interest loans, scholarships or grants provided by government, private industry or contractor companies to pay for part or all of the tuition. Alternatively, sponsoring merit shop

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Tuition cost estimate will be validated with NCCER

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contractors may agree to pay part or all of the tuition for students who successfully complete the training course and who remain employed by the contractor. Students are also responsible for a set of pre-defined construction tools valued at approximately $500 when accepted into the program. Since many of the people recruited for the program have never worked in construction before, the initial purchase of tools may include personal clothing such as sturdy work boots, leather gloves and safety glasses. To help low income students, grants or low interest loans are provided by private industry or contractor companies or the government to pay for part or all of the tool cost. Instructors are employees of the training institution and their salaries are paid with proceeds from student tuitions. Instructor to student class size ratios will average 1 to 10. Wherever possible, the program will utilize existing NCCER accredited training facilities, equipment and materials. In locations where an existing training facility is not available, an existing accredited institution will be recruited to sponsor the remote location. This will speed the process and avoid the expense of certifying the new location. To reach the goal of 20,000 trained workers, the following intermediate milestones are established: 2006: 2,500 students enrolled 2007: 10,000 cumulative students enrolled or completed training 2008: 17,500 cumulative students enrolled or completed training 2009: 20,000 cumulative students enrolled or completed training End of 2009: project completed

As seed money for the program, government, private industry and contractors provide scholarships and grants to qualified candidates to participate in the training program. Note: In some instances, sponsoring merit shop contractors may agree to reimburse students for the cost of tuition and/or tools upon successful completion of the four week training session and the three month work assignment rather than providing an upfront loan, scholarship or grant.

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Tuition and tool purchase costs are assumed to be covered for reimbursement by the Montgomery GI Bill, the Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP), and the Survivors' and Dependents' Educational Assistance Program (DEA) On average, students will complete 3 four week training sessions over a 12 month period to complete their training. As summarized on Attachments 3 & 4, the total cost of the workforce training and development program described above is $70 million and can be broken down as follows: Tuition Costs: 20,000 students x $1,000 per session x 3 sessions Student Supplied Tool Costs: 20,000 students x $500 Total = = $10,000,000 $70,000,000 = $60,000,000

Assuming that private industry and contractor scholarships cover 50% of the tuition costs for the first 12 months of the program, 25% through the end of 2008 and 10% in 2009, the private industry and contractor cost commitment for this program would be as follows:

Tuition Scholarships 2006 2007 2008 2009 Total $1,250,000 $8,125,000 $5,625,000 $1,500,000 $16,500,000

Program Management $3,000,000 $900,000 $450,000 $150,000 $4,500,000

Total Commitment $4,250,000 $9,025,000 $6,075,000 $1,650,000 $21,000,000

Program management costs include program definition, coordination with involved personnel and organizations, development of communications materials, assistance with startup of training, and progress monitoring.

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PROGRAM ADVANTAGES The proposed construction workforce training and development program has the following advantages: The program is structured to provide a helping hand but is not a handout. Students make several rotations from the classroom to the work place which allows them to apply their skills in real world applications. Classroom schedules mirror real world work hours. The program makes maximum use of existing training facilities, materials, assessments and accreditation. The project has a fixed duration and specific training objectives. The program is responsive to the needs of owners and contractors in the reconstruction area. By requiring students to be responsible for purchase of their personal tools and in some cases their tuition, they are motivated to be successful. ACTION PLAN Obtain project authorization to proceed by February 8, 2006.

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ATTACHMENT 1 DIRECTORY OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TRADE COUNCILS IN LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA AND TEXAS
Louisiana Building & Construction Trades Councils Alexandria B.C.T.C Johnny Gypin, President, UA 1211 Rapids Ave. Alexandria, LA 71301 Office: (318) 442-9923 Fax: (318) 442-9891 Baton Rouge B.C.T.C Joseph Ardoin Jr., President, C 6755 Airline Hwy. Baton Rouge, LA 70805 Office: (225) 356-2468 Fax: (225) 356-4561 Carlos Benoit, Secretary - Treasurer, OE 6755 Airline Hwy. Baton Rouge, LA 70805 Office: (225) 356-2468 Fax: (225) 356-4561 Lafayette B.C.T.C Roy Guidry, President, C P.O. Box 90055 Lafayette, LA 70509 Office: (337) 234-1798 Fax: (337) 234-1798 Wilbert "Bish" LeJeune, Secretary Treasurer, OE 130 West 18th Street Lake Charles, LA 70601 Office: (337) 436-7878 Fax: (337) 433-6986 Northeast Louisiana B.C.T.C John Hopkins, President, EW 1601 Southern Ave. Monroe, LA 71202 Office: (318) 323-3350 Fax: (318) 361-0906 [email protected] John Thomas, Treasurer, LBR 1900 Pine Street Monroe, LA 71201 Office: (318) 322-4520 Fax: (318) 324-1034 [email protected] Jerry Wilson, Secretary, IW 1601 Southern Ave. Monroe, LA 71202 Office: (318) 388-0288 Fax: (318) 388-0289 [email protected] Shreveport B.C.T.C Thomas Norris, President, EW 5510 Buncombe Rd. Shreverport, LA 71129 Office: (318) 983-0703 Fax: (318) 688-2038 Robert Watts, Secretary - Treasurer, T 5510 Buncombe Rd. Shreveport, LA 71129 Office: (318) 683-0709 Fax: (318) 688-2038 Southeast Louisiana B.C.T.C Joseph Bertucci, Executive Secretary, EW 2540 Severn Avenue, Suite 300 Metairie, LA 70002 Office: (504) 482-0197 Fax: (504) 482-6958 [email protected] Donald Denese, President, L 2540 Severn Avenue, Suite 300 Metairie, LA 70002 Office: (504) 482-0197 Fax: (504) 482-6958 Southwest Louisiana B.C.T.C Francis Bellow, Secretary Treasurer, LBR 1300 3rd Street Lake Charles, LA 70601 Office: (337) 439-2702 Fax: (337) 439-0200 Wilbert Lejeune, President, C 130 West 18th Street Sulphur, LA 70601 Office: (337) 436-7878 Fax: (337) 433-6986 Mississippi Building & Construction Trades Councils Central Mississippi B.C.T.C David Newell, President, UA PO Box 20265 Jackson, MS 39289 Office: (601) 695-1203 Fax: (601) 786-3258 lu619oruanet.org Randy Thomason, Secretary Treasurer, SM PO Box 20265 Jackson, MS 39289 Office: (601) 695-1203 Fax: (601) 786-9258 Mississippi Gulf Coast B.C.T.C Donald Denese, Secretary Treasurer, IW 2417 32nd St Gulfport, MS 39501 Office: (228) 863-9881 Fax: (228) 863-9901 [email protected] Curtis Murphy, President, EW 2417 32nd St. Gulfport, MS 39501 Office: (228) 863-9881 Fax: (228) 863-9901 Alabama Building & Construction Trades Councils Central Alabama B.C.T.C Sammy Dodson, President, OE 4924 Airport Highway Birmingham, AL 35212 Office: (205) 592-8136 Fax: (205) 424-9672 John Eaves, Secretary - Treasurer, UA 4924 Airport Highway Birmingham, AL 35212 Office: (205) 591-2721 Fax: (205) 591-2729 Coosa Valley B.C.T.C Jerry Keenum, Secretary Treasurer, EW 3803 W. Meigham Blvd. Gadsden, AL 35904 Office: (256) 546-9041 Fax: (256) 547-6330 Don Nelms, President, UA 3803 W. Meigham Blvd. Gadsden, AL 35904 Office: (256) 546-5422 Fax: (256) 547-6330 [email protected] Mobile, Alabama-Pensacola, Florida B.C.T.C (AL) Donnie Adams, Secretary, EW 2244 Halls Mills Rd. Mobile, AL 36606 Office: (251) 476-0275 Fax: (334) 450-0957 Larry Fincher, President, OE 801 Springhill Avenue Mobile, AL 36602 Office: (251) 432-3328 Fax: (251) 438-9342

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ATTACHMENT 1 DIRECTORY OF BUILDING CONSTRUCTION TRADE COUNCILS IN LOUISIANA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA AND TEXAS
North Alabama B.C.T.C Charles Boyd, President, UA PO Box 683 Sheffield, AL 35660 Office: (256) 383-7900 Fax: (256) 383-4803 Lance Stover, Secretary - Treasurer, C PO Box 683 Sheffield, AL 35660 Office: (256) 929-7032 Fax: (256) 929-7036 Tuscaloosa B.C.T.C Ronnie Barton, President, UA 3888 Greensboro Ave. Tuscaloosa, AL 35405 Office: (205) 758-6236 Fax: (205) 349-4608 [email protected] Milton Husley, Secretary - Treasurer, EW 3888 Greensboro Ave. Tuscaloosa, AL 35405 Office: (205) 752-7395 Fax: (205) 349-4608 Texas Building & Construction Trades Councils Central Texas B.C.T.C Gordon Byram, Secretary Treasurer, EW 2201 Riverside Farms Road Austin, TX 78741 Office: (512) 326-9540 Fax: (512) 326-9596 Ira Crofford, President, IW 2201 Riverside Farms Rd. Austin, TX 78741 Office: (512) 385-2500 Fax: (512) 385-2506 Dallas B.C.T.C Joe Hall, President, UA 3629 West Miller Road Garland, TX 75040 Office: (214) 341-8606 Fax: (214) 341-2223 [email protected] Canuto Martinez, Jr., Secretary Treasurer, P 7940 Northaven, Suite 4 Dallas, TX 75230 Office: (214) 363-6246 Fax: (214) 373-3220 [email protected] El Paso B.C.T.C Hector Arellano, President, EW P.O. Box 3006 El Paso, TX 79923 Office: (915) 778-6463 Fax: (915) 778-6502 Martha Sanchez, Secretary Treasurer, T P.O. Box 3006 El Paso, TX 79923 Office: (915) 562-3738 Fax: (915) 562-3767 Fort Worth B.C.T.C Steve Anthony, President, IW 604 N. Great Southwest Pkwy Arlington, TX 76011 Office: (817) 640-0202 Fax: (817) 649-4157 [email protected] Thomas Parrott, Secretary Treasurer, UA 2640 E. Lancaster Fort Worth, TX 76103 Office: (817) 563-1979 Fax: (817) 563-1970 Houston Gulf Coast B.C.T.C Mike Cunningham, President, AW 2704 Sutherland Street Houston, TX 77023 Office: (713) 926-4433 Fax: (713) 926-4918 [email protected] Ronald Raspberry, CEO, EW 2704 Sutherland Street Houston, TX 77023 Office: (713) 926-4433 Fax: (713) 926-4918 [email protected] Sabine Area B.C.T.C Carlo Ballard, President, OE P.O. Box 817 Nederland, TX 77627 Office: (409) 727-2331 Fax: (409) 727-2333 [email protected] Ronald Witt, Executive Secretary, OE PO Box 817 Nederland, TX 77627 Office: (409) 727-2331 Fax: (409) 727-2333 [email protected] San Antonio B.C.T.C Tim McGrath, Secretary - Treasurer, SM 130 Ave Del Ray San Antonio, TX 78216 Office: (210) 349-6584 Fax: (210) 349-6557 Bob Salvatore, President, IW 311 South St. Mary Street, 15th Fl., Suite 15E San Antonio, TX 78205 Office: (210) 226-8447 Fax: (210) 226-6285 [email protected] South Texas B.C.T.C Mike Carranco, Secretary Treasurer, EW 2301 Saratoga Corpus Christi, TX 78417 Office: (361) 855-1084 Fax: (361) 855-3110 [email protected] Eddie Long, President, UA 2811 S. Highway 83 Harlingen, TX 78550 Office: (956) 423-5210 Fax: (956) 428-2377 [email protected] West Texas B.C.T.C James Brookes, President, C 702 S. Madison Street Amarillo, TX 79101 Office: (806) 373-4574 Fax: (806) 374-4437 [email protected] Jerrod Strange, Secretary Treasurer, IW 702 S. Madison Street Amarillo, TX 79101 Office: (817) 371-7574 Fax: (817) 649-4157
1

Note: Building Construction Trades Councils located in area impacted by Hurricana Katrina are boxed.

17

ATTACHMENT 2 FOUR WEEK TRAINING SESSION TUITION COST ESTIMATE
Assumptions: - One instructor for each 10 students - 200 square feet of facility per student - One administrator for each 50 students - Training sessions provided 10 hours per day, 4 days per week for 4 weeks - Each training session will include 2 field trips to local construction sites - Estimate based on a facility with 5, 10 student classes - Instructors and administrative staff employed full-time by the training facility

Cost Estimate: 1. Instructor Class Time 2. Administrator Time 3. Field Trips 4. Facilty Cost 5. Training Materials

5 instructors x 160 hours x $60 per hour 1 admin x 160 hours x $35 per hour 2 trips x $400 per trip 50 students x 100 SF/student x $1.00/SF/Mth 50 students x $200 Total: Cost per Student: Cost per Instruction Hour:

$48,000 $5,600 $800 $5,000 $10,000 $69,400 $1,388 $8.68

Current ABC/NCCER Training Tuition Costs: 1. Average $75 per 10 week quarter with two 3 hour evening classes per week Cost per Instruction Hour:

Cost difference subsidized $75 $1.25

Cost Estimate for Instructor Time Only: 1. Instructor Class Time 5 instructors x 160 hours x $60 per hour Total: Cost per Student: Cost per Instruction Hour:

$48,000 $48,000 $960 $6.00 Assume $1000

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Workforce Training and Development Project

ATTACHMENT 3 WORKFORCE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM PLAN

Number of Students in Each 4 Week Session Year 2006 2007 Group 1 1 2 3 4 2008 3 4 5 6 7 2009 6 7 8 Total Number of Students: 2,500 20,000 2,500 2,500 20,000 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 20,000 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 Session I 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 2,500 Session II Session III

Draft 3, January 26, 2006

19

Workforce Training and Development Project

ATTACHMENT 4 WORKFORCE TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM SCHEDULE
Group 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Number of Students 2500 2500 2500 2500 2500 2500 2500 2500 2006 May-Aug 2007 May-Aug III II I III II I III II I III II I III II I III II I III II III 2008 May-Aug 2009 May-Aug

Jan-Apr

Sep-Dec I

Jan-Apr II I

Sep-Dec

Jan-Apr

Sep-Dec

Jan-Apr

Sep-Dec

Number of Students: Tuition Costs (x$1000): Tool Costs (x$1000):

2500 $2,500 $1,250

5000 $5,000 $1,250

7500 $7,500 $1,250

7500 $7,500 $1,250

7500 $7,500 $1,250

7500 $7,500 $1,250

7500 $7,500 $1,250

7500 $7,500 $1,250

5000 $5,000 $0

2500 $2,500 $0

Total Cost $60,000 $10,000 $70,000

Scholarships (x$1000):

<- - - Assume 50% of Tuition - - -> $1,250 $2,500 $3,750

<- - - Assume 25% of Tuition - - -> $1,875 $1,875 $1,875 $1,875

<- - - Assume 10% of Tuition - - -> $750 $500 $250
1

$16,500

Tool Grants (x$1000):

$0

<- - - Personal Tool Costs Assumed to be Student Responsibility for Duration of Program - - -> $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

$0

$0

$0

Program Management: Total Commitment per Year: Number of Students per 4 Week Session: Number of Instructors: Number of Training Facilities: (50 Students per Facility) Number of Instructors per Facility:

<- - - Business Roundtable Program Management includes activity coordination, communications, and monitoring- - -> $3,000 $300 $300 $300 $150 $150 $150 $50 $50 $4,250 625 63 13 1250 125 25 1875 188 38 $9,025 1875 188 38 1875 188 38 1875 188 38 $6,075 1875 188 38 1875 188 38 1250 125 25

$50 $1,650 625 63 13

$4,500 $21,000

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

Notes:

1

Student personal tool costs may be subsidized by federal grants, personal loans or contractor reimbursement but are not coverd by the Business Roundtable workforce development and training project.

Draft 3, January 26, 2006

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