The Morning Calm Korea Weekly - Jan. 6, 2006

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The Morning Calm Weekly is a U.S. Army Command Information newspaper primarily targeted towards the U.S. Military community serving, working and living at U.S. Army Installations in the Republic of Korea.

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Volume 4, Issue 12

P UBLISHED F OR T HOSE S ERVING

IN THE

R EPUBLIC

OF

KOREA

Jan. 6, 2006

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Look inside for a look back at the stories that shaped each Area in Korea during the past year

The Morning Calm Weekly is

nline
Visit http://ima.korea.army.mil

The Army in 2005: A look back at the past year
By Col. Randy Pullen
Army News Service

WASHINGTON — As is usual at this time of year, most organizations take a look back at what events shaped the year just ended. The Army is no different. So what made news for the Army in 2005? You could almost sum it up in three words: war, hurricanes and elections. Almost. January The Army started 2005 just as it ends 2005 – as an Army at war. Soldiers were fighting for freedom in Iraq and Afghanistan throughout the year. It wasn’t just Iraqi insurgents and Taliban remnants that Army men and women battled. The after-effects of the ravages of Nature also kept the Army busy in 2005. As the year began, U.S. Army Soldiers joined their fellow American servicemen and women to help the people of south Asia following the devastating tsunami that struck that

The year ended much as it began, with our Army at war. Soldiers like Capt. Steve Hommel from the 3rd Battalion, 15th Infantry, shown here handing out hats and toys to Iraqi children, Dec. 24 in Sadr City, Baghdad, Iraq, have been in Iraq and Afghanistan throughout 2005. region the final week of 2004, killing more than a quarter of a million people.

PFC. WILLIAM SERVINSKI II

medical and logistics units, Forward Engineering Support Teams, civil affairs teams, and transportation and signal units. January came to an end with the successful election in Iraq in which voters elected a national assembly to write the new Iraqi constitution and council members to represent each of the 18 provinces in Iraq. Despite threats from the insurgents and some attacks on polling places, millions of Iraqis cast their votes, a tribute to their courage and desire to move toward freedom as well as a tribute to the vigilance and determination of U.S. and Coalition Soldiers and Iraqi security forces to provide a secure voting environment. February In February, the Army released new Strategic Planning Guidance for 2005 that includes three new focus areas:

Among the Army units deployed to assist were mortuary affairs teams,

See 2005, Page 3

New 754 telephone prefix in use at Humphreys
Area III Public Affairs CAMP HUMPHREYS — A new telephone switch will come online Jan. 25, that will support all activities in the vicinity of the “walk-thru gate” and the Zoeckler Station area on Camp Humphreys. The prefix for telephone numbers in the affected areas will change to “754,” with the last four digits of current telephone numbers remaining unchanged. The new prefix was implemented Nov. 18. Translations are set up to automatically complete calls when the 753 prefix is used. Anyone calling an affected number using the 753 prefix will hear the following announcement: “The prefix for the number you have called has changed to “754.” Please use 754 the next time you call this number. Your call will now be completed.” This will remain in effect until the new switch, Jan. 25. After that date, calls will not be completed if the “753” prefix is used. Calls originating from a commercial carrier, including cell phones, must use 0505-754-xxxx. The traditional 031-690-xxxx will not work after Jan. 25 for numbers with a 754 prefix. A new prefix has not been established by KT Telecom at this time.

Rumsfeld announces reduction in Iraq troop level during 2006
By Jim Garamone
Army News Service

CAMP FALLUJAH, Iraq — The United States will have two fewer brigades in Iraq in 2006, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld said here Dec. 23. Rumsfeld announced before a cheering group of Marines that the United States will drop from 17 to 15 brigades in the coming year. The change will drop the number of Americans in the country under the 138,000-level baseline, officials said. The decision reflects the proper balance between coalition and Iraqi forces, the secretary said. The coalition footprint must be large enough to help maintain security and allow the Iraq forces to train up, Rumsfeld explained, yet not so large as to be intrusive or to antagonize the Iraqi people. The force also must not be so large as to take initiative from the Iraqi security forces, he said. The reduction is possible because of the growing strength and capabilities of the Iraqi security forces, the secretary said. In the coming months, he added, more and more Iraqi army and police units will take over battlespace from coalition forces. Iraqi brigades and divisions are standing up, Rumsfeld said, and

American trainers will continue to work with Iraqi units. Rumsfeld said President Bush approved the troop reduction in consultation with coalition allies and Iraqi officials. “The size and composition of U.S. forces, of course, will continue to fluctuate as commanders continue to shift focus to emphasize training and supporting the Iraqi security forces,” Rumsfeld said. In other words, U.S. force size and composition will remain situation-dependent, officials traveling with the secretary said. If the situation warrants, Army Gen. George W. Casey Jr., commander of Multinational Force Iraq, and Army Gen. John Abizaid, commander of U.S. Central Command, may recommend further reductions. The number of American forces that will train Iraqi forces and help them develop intelligence and logistics capabilities will increase, Rumsfeld said. Multinational Force Iraq officials said much of the training will shift to the Iraqi police. The public order and special police units under the Interior Ministry are rated well, but the local Iraqi police are far below the standard they need to meet, officials said.

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Jan. 6, 2006

Commentary
By Lt. Col. Jeremy M. Martin
Army News Service

The Morning Calm Weekly

MP Blotter
The following entries were excerpted from the past several weeks military police blotters. These entries may be incomplete and do not determine the guilt or innocence of any person. Subject One and Subject Two were involved in a verbal altercation that turned physical when Subject One slapped Subject Two on the face. Subject Two retaliated by slapping and scratching Subject One on the face. Subject One was transported to the Camp Casey Provost Marshal Office and administered a Field Sobriety Test, which he failed and was released to his unit. Dec. 26, Subject One reported to the Camp Casey PMO, where he rendered a sworn statement admitting to the offense. This is a final report. ! A subject exited the Osan Air Base Exchange with various makeup items without rendering proper payment. The subject was detained and transported to the Osan SFCC, where subject was advised of his/her rights with the subject’s sponsor present. Subject declined counsel and refused to make a statement. The subject was released to his/her sponsor. ! Subject One and Subject Two were involved in a verbal altercation which turned physical when Subject One grabbed Subject Two around the neck in a choking manner. Subject One was apprehended and transported to the Camp Humphreys MP Station where he was not advised of his legal rights due to his suspected level of intoxication. Subject One was further processed and released to his unit. Dec. 24, Subject One returned to the MP Station where he was advised of his rights, which he invoked, requesting a lawyer. Subject Two sustained no visible injuries and declined medical attention. Investigation continues by MPI. ! Security Forces observed a subject at Rex Bar, Songtan Entertainment District, with his pants unbuttoned and pulled down, and his underwear exposed, with two Korean women standing to his left and right touching him through his underwear. Subject was transported to SFCC for further processing. The subject was administered a Portable Breathalyzer Test, resulting in a .128 percent blood alcohol content. The subject was advised of his rights, requested legal counsel and declined to make a statement. The subject was released to his unit.
!

Christmas at Joint Task Force Guantanamo
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba – During the holidays, American families gather to share in the celebrations of the Christmas season and also reflect on the events of the past year. Military families are truly unique; they share a very special bond, a genuine understanding of the selfless service and sacrifice which often requires separation during the holidays. During this Christmas season over 300,000 military men and women are deployed in over 100 countries, defending freedom on behalf of the American people. In Iraq and Afghanistan, military personnel have helped to liberate millions of people, and given the citizens of those nations an opportunity for freedom and democracy. There are over 2000 men and women deployed as members of the Joint Task Force at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on behalf of the American people in support of the Global War on Terror. Many of the Troopers are on year-long deployments, and will be away from their loved ones during the holidays. Quite a few of the Troopers have had children born back in the states during this deployment that they’ll certainly miss during the holidays. Many of the Troopers currently serving at the Joint Task Force are combat veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan, serving and sacrificing now in Guantanamo. They are skillfully performing the vital mission of providing safe, secure and humane custody to all detainees, and gathering intelligence, which has proved invaluable in support of the Global War on Terror. Many of these detainees are sworn enemies of the US and our allies, and many issue threats daily to the guards, nurses and doctors (and their families back home), who so professionally administer care and custody to all detainees. Troopers at Guantanamo are Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force, Coast Guard, Civilians, National Guard, Reserves, and are jointly accomplishing a critical mission in support of the Global War on Terror. Guantanamo Troopers are well trained, well equipped and very well led in accomplishing this challenging detention mission. They are committed to running a professional camp in accordance with service values, and all applicable policy and law. The Troopers who serve at Guantanamo come from cities and towns all across America. Most have had the opportunity to go home on leave during this deployment for a two-week period. When the Troopers return to duty they recount with pride how they’ve been received as heroes in their communities, all across America. As usual, the American people get it right. It’s the sons and daughters of America who are serving at Guantanamo. They enjoy, and have earned, the overwhelming support of a grateful nation. (Editor ’s note; LTC Jeremy M. Martin serves as Director, Joint Task Force Guantanamo Public Affairs.)

COLA survey begins Monday

Buster’s Battery Buster’s Battery Buster’s Battery Buster’s Battery Buster’s Battery
Morning Calm
Installation Management Agency-Korea Region Office
Director/P ector/Publisher Director/Publisher Public Affairs Officer Editor

YONGSAN GARRISON — Eighth U.S. Army announced the next Living Pattern Survey will be Monday thru Feb. 8, to determine if Cost Of Living Allowance should be increased, decreased or remain the same. This survey is important to all U.S. Forces Korea personnel and their families. Servicemembers are directed to take 15-20 minutes to complete this survey before the deadline. COLA is intended to allow Soldiers the same buying power they are accustomed to in the United States. This buying power is in relationship to the 120 market basket items listed in the LPS, to include appliances, automotive expenses, household help, food, clothing (men, women, and children), and electronics. Analysis of buying patterns and percentage of off-post shopping of servicemembers throughout the peninsula have been a significant reason for Soldiers serving in Korea receiving COLA since June 2003. The LPS will be a Web-based survey available through the 175th Financial Management Center Web site: 175fmc.korea.army.mil.

Published by IMA-Korea Region
This Army newspaper is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Contents of The Morning Calm Weekly are not necessarily official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, Department of Defense, or Department of the Army. The editorial content of this weekly publication is the responsibility of the IMA-Korea Region, Public Affairs, APO AP 96205. Circulation: 12,500 SUBMISSIONS OR COMMENTS: Phone: DSN 738-3355 Fax: DSN 738-3356 E-mail: MorningCalmWeekly @korea.army.mil

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age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation, or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or rejection of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the printer shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. President: Charles Chong Commercial Advertising Telephone: 738-5005 723-4253 (02) 790-5795 Fax: E-mail: [email protected] Mail address: Oriental Press, PSC 450, Box 758, APO AP 96206-0758

Area I

Commander Public Affairs Officer

Col. Forrest R. Newton Margaret Banish-Donaldson

Area III

Commander Public Affairs CI Officer Staff Writer

Area II

Commander Public Affairs Officer CI Officer Staff Writers

Col. Ron Stephens Steve Davis David McNally Sgt. Christopher Selmek

Area IV

Commander Public Affairs CI Officer Staff writer

Support and Defend

Printed by Oriental Press, a private firm in no way connected Brig. Gen. H.T. Landwermeyer Jr. with the U.S. Government, under exclusive written contract with John A. Nowell the Contracting CommandStaff Sgt. Mark Porter Korea. The civilian printer is responsible for commercial advertising. The appearance of Col. Michael J. Taliento Jr. advertising in this publication, Officer Susan Barkley including inserts or supplements, F. Neil Neeley does not constitute endorsement Roger Edwards by the U.S. Army or Oriental Press of the products or services advertised. Col. Donald J. Hendrix Everything advertised in this Officer Kevin Jackson publication shall be made Galen Putnam available for purchase, use or Steven Hoover patronage without regard to race, religion, gender, national origin,

The Morning Calm Weekly

2005
EEO Reps Sought The Equal Employment Opportunity Office is currently recruiting U.S. civilian employees intersted in serving as collateral duty EEO counselors. Army Regulation 690-600 EEO Discrmination Complaints, requires the use of command assets in support of EEO Program initiatives to train and appoint counselors. These individuals play a critical role in EEO Program execution of the discrimination complaints process. Although EEO counseling is voluntary with respect to the interest of the employee, managers are required to encourage and to promote collateral duty EEO counseling by providing employment incentives to attract and to maintain interest in EEO counseling. EEO counselors are currently needed in all areas. EEO Counselor Training will be held in Daegu Feb. 6-10. Those interested in filling the role may call 768-7839 for information on the program and for details about the training. DHL Rooms Available During Winter The Dragon Hill Lodge on Yongsan Garrison has guest rooms available throughout the first few months of 2006. At present, rooms are available through Feb. 28. The hotel also offers many package trips and tours. Call 738-2222, Ext. 6210, for information or to make reservations. Re-enlistment Incentives for Soldiers with FY06 ETS Date In support of the 8th U.S. Army retention program, the 8th Army Commanding General has approved a special threeday pass to be given to those Soldiers whose Estimated Termination of Service is on or before Sept. 30, 2006, and who re-enlist prior to April 30, 2006. The special three-day pass is designed to allow qualifying Soldiers to take three days off after a regular duty day. For example, the Soldier can request the pass be taken after duty Monday and report back to duty Friday. Soldiers should contact their servicing career counselor from the list below for more details on this special reenlistment incentive. Second Infantry Division Soldiers, call 730-3139 8th Military Police Brigade Soldiers, call 723-8512 18th Medical Command Soldiers, call 737-7254 35th Air Defense Artillery Brigade Soldiers, call 784-7877 19th Sustainment Command (Expeditionary) Soldiers, call 764-7926 United States Army Special Troops Command Soldiers, call 723-7245 For informaiton on the policy, call the Eighth Army Retention Office at 724-3724. TMCW Submissions Send stories and other items for use in The Morning Calm Weekly to

News

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Jan. 6, 2006

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from Page 1

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homeland defense, irregular challenges, and stability operations. The Army Strategic Planning Guidance had been approved by Secretary of the Army Francis J. Harvey Jan 15. The 2005 ASPG can be found online at www.army.mil/references/. Also in February, Spc. Jeremy Church of the 724th Transportation Company became the first Army Reserve Soldier in the Global War on Terrorism to receive a Silver Star. He was presented the Army’s third-highest medal for valor during a Feb. 27 homecoming ceremony at Fort McCoy, Wis. March The Army Reserve created a new program to help reintroduce Army Reserve Soldiers returning from military operations to civilian life: The Welcome Home Warrior-Citizen Program. Army Reserve Soldiers are given an incased, S S .R C folded, American flag to honor their President George W. Bush presents the Medal of Honor (posthumous) to Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. service while supporting military Smith’s family—(from left) daughter Jessica, 18; wife, Birgit; and son David, 11—at the White operations such as Operation Iraqi House, Apr. 4. Freedom. The 1st Infantry Division Detachment Rear Operation Center, an Kelly Support Center, Pa. commemoration activities worldwide. Army Reserve unit located in Bamberg, In addition to closing these The weeklong birthday culminated with was the first Army Reserve unit in installations, the commission the Army Birthday Ball in Washington, Europe to receive this prestigious award. recommended closing 176 Army DC, attended by Vice President Richard April Reserve and 211 Army National Guard Cheney. President George W. Bush honored facilities. These will be replaced by 125 Cheney said that the United States Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. Smith by multi-component Armed Forces Reserve came very close to losing its dream of presenting his family the Medal of Honor Centers. being an independent country in the dark on April 4, the second anniversary of May 24, Lt. Gen. Roger Schultz days of 1776. The Army was on its last Smith’s courageous actions during the stepped down as the 17th director of legs when Gen. George Washington Battle of Baghdad Airport. the Army National Guard. He had been made a final appeal to what was left of The president presented the Medal of in the position since June 1998, making it in December of that year. Somehow Honor to David Smith, Smith’s 11-year- him the Army National Guard’s longest those Soldiers found the strength to go old son, in the East Room of the White serving director. Maj. Gen. Walter on and followed Washington through the House. Smith was killed April 4, 2003, Pudlowski Jr. became the acting director ice and snow to victory at Trenton. as he manned the .50-caliber machine until June 20, when Lt. Gen. Clyde “From that day to this,” Cheney said, gun on top of an armored personnel Vaughn, a veteran of more than 30 years “our country has always been able to carrier in order to defend a courtyard of military service, assumed the duties count on the Army to answer the call to while his men from the 11th Engineer as the 18th director of the Army Guard. duty.” Battalion, 3rd Infantry Division, June Also June 14, the Army released a withdrew and evacuated wounded. The Army marked its 230th birthday new Field Manual-1, providing an Later in the action, he died after being June 14 with celebrations and updated overview of the Army, its struck by enemy fire. organization and employment. The The president quoted a letter previous FM-1 had been released in June Smith wrote to his parents, but 2001, just four months before the never mailed, saying he was terrorist attacks on the World Trade willing to “give all that I am” Center and the Pentagon. so that his men would return “Sept. 11, 2001 changed forever the home. world in which we live,” said Gen. Peter May J. Schoomaker, Army chief of staff. Major Army installations “The change in the strategic environment slated for closure by the has forced us to review how we do Defense Department’s Base business – to better counter those Realignment and Closure evolving threats.” recommendations announced The new FM-1 reflects the “depth in May were: Fort Monroe, and urgency” of the Army’s involvement Va.; Fort McPherson, Ga.; Fort in the War on Terrorism, according to Gillem, Ga.; Fort Monmouth, Schoomaker. N.J.; Newport Chemical “FM-1 emphasizes transformation, Depot, Ind.; Kansas Army the warrior ethos, a culture of innovation, Ammunition Plant, Kan.; and joint interdependence, rather than Selfridge Army Activity, Mich.; just joint interoperability,” Schoomaker Mississippi Army Ammunition said. “In short, it contains a true Plant; Hawthorne Army Depot, operational concept about how the Army Nev.; Umatilla Chemical Depot, will operate across a spectrum of Ore.; Lone Star Army conflict both at home and abroad.” Ammunition Plant, Texas; Red At a June 29 Pentagon ceremony, the S .M P River Army Depot, Texas; Spc. Ronald Turner, from the 82nd Airborne Division, climbs Army chief of staff awarded the Army’s Deseret Chemical Depot, Utah; to a cave, possibly used as a weapons cache, near new Combat Action Badge for the first Riverbank Army Ammunition Mianashin, Afghanistan. See 2005, Page 4 Plant, Calif.; and Charles E.
BY TAFF GT EEBA RITSER PC IKE RYOR

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Jan. 6, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

Soldiers from the 212th Mobile Army Surgical Hospital, prepare an earthquake victim for helicopter transport at Muzaffarabad, Pakistan.

AIRMAN 1ST CLASS BARRY LOO

AD GOES HERE

2005
time to five Soldiers who engaged in combat with the enemy. The CAB, approved by Schoomaker in May, was created by the Army’s leadership to recognize all Soldiers in combat. Soldiers engaged in the War on Terrorism since Sept. 18, 2001, are retroactively eligible to receive the award. July Retired Gen. William Childs Westmoreland, former Army chief of staff and commanding general of U.S. forces in Vietnam during the Vietnam War, died July 18 at a nursing home in Charleston, S.C. He was 91. As part of its largest restructuring since World War II, the Army announced its plan July 27 for stationing its active component modular Brigade Combat Teams. The plan announced at a Pentagon press briefing conducted by Special Assistant to the Secretary of the Army Raymond F. DuBois and Army Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Richard Cody, includes new organizations being formed and other units being returned from overseas locations. The return of the overseas units adds up to 50,000 Soldiers and 150,000 family members being brought back to bases in the United States. In the end state, the number of active modular BCTs will increase from 33 to 43, enhancing the active Army’s combat power by 30 percent. August Aug. 8, the Army chief of staff directed that Gen. Kevin P. Byrnes be relieved Aug. 8 from his position as commander of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, based on an investigation into Byrnes’ personal conduct. Byrnes was replaced by the deputy commander of TRADOC, Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Jones, who served as acting commander until Gen. William Wallace took command in October. September Hurricanes Katrina and Rita hit and devastated the Gulf Coast at the end of August and mid-September. The scenes of a totally-flooded New Orleans will be one of the haunting images of 2005. In September, tens of thousands of active Army and Army National Guard troops deployed to the region to assist the hundreds of thousands of American

from Page 3
citizens affected by this tragedy. While the fate of our fellow citizens along the Gulf Coast was on the minds of all Americans, so, too, did many Americans stop Sept. 16 during National POW/MIA Recognition Day to remember other Americans held captive or who are still listed as missing. Sept. 18, millions of Afghans went to the polls to vote in the country’s historic first parliamentary elections. As with the successful Afghan presidential election in Oct. 2004, these elections took place in large measure due to the combined efforts of the Afghan, U.S. and Coalition security forces as well as the determination of the Afghan people not to be deterred from voting by the terrorists. October The month of October found U.S. forces assisting with rescue, recovery and relief operations in Pakistan following an earthquake that killed between 20,000 and 30,000. Five CH-47 Chinook and three UH60 Black Hawk helicopters with U.S. Soldiers and supplies from Afghanistan arrived in Islamabad, Pakistan, Oct. 10 to assist with recovery operations in the wake of Saturday’s devastating earthquake. The helicopter crews were from the 3rd Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment and 2nd Battalion, 6th Cavalry Regiment at Bagram Airfield and Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. December Millions of Iraqi citizens flocked to the polls Dec. 15 to vote under the new Iraqi Constitution, giving birth to a Middle East democracy. Gen. George W. Casey, Multi National Force-Iraq commanding general, said Iraq’s transition into democracy “has not come about by accident or coincidence, but by shear will power and the determination of the Iraqi people.” As every year is, it was a time of tragedy and triumph, of hardships and achievements. What will happen in 2006 is not in our power to foresee but one thing you can count on is that the U.S. Army will meet that unknown future with the same expertise and success that they displayed in meeting every challenge in 2005.

Jan. 6, 2006

Page 5

PHOTOS

BY

DAVID MCNALLY

Soldiers bid farewell to Camp Page, Chuncheon
By Pfc. Amanda Merfeld
Second Infantry Division Public Affairs

Aviators perform a final overflight of Camp Page Tuesday, as Soldiers of the 1st Battalion, 2nd Aviation Regiment stand in formation at the installation’s official closing ceremony.

CAMP PAGE (April 1, 2005) — The somber notes of retreat played for a final ceremony Tuesday

as Army officials closed Camp Page after 54 years of use. In early January, the order to vacate and close the installation was met with mixed emotions. “We were sad to leave this community,” said Lt. Col. Chandler Sherrell, 1st Battalion, 2nd Aviation Regiment commander, “but, proud that our mission here has been successfully accomplished.” Camp Page covered 145 acres with 173 buildings, 1,067 servicemembers and civilians in 15 tenant units. “All were vacated safely and efficiently within 78 days,” Sherrell said. The Korean employees of the base faced the biggest challenge. “About 90 percent of the Camp Page Korean workforce has found employment elsewhere,” said Yi Un-sang, Camp Page Korean Labor Union president. “But, they have had to move far from

Camp Page officially closes after 54 years of use. home, and face challenges integrating into a new job.” “We think it is a success story that these employees stayed with U.S. Forces Korea,” said William Kapaku, U.S. Army Garrison, Camp Red Cloud deputy to the commander. “We have a lot invested in them.” In 1951, 8th U.S. Army engineers prepared the runway in a burned out section of a newly recaptured town, at what would become Camp Page. “Three months later, the first aircraft touched down on an asphalt runway delivering supplies to the city and the Soldiers,” Sherrell explained. Nobody envisioned that 54 years later, U.S. forces would still be stationed in Chuncheon, he said. Sherrell said in remembering the moment, it represents all that is right with the Korean-American alliance. “We are thankful to the Korean people for allowing us to have served here,” he said.

The Morning Calm Weekly

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Jan. 6, 2006

When is bankruptcy the right answer
By Capt. Tobias Hunziker
Camp Casey Legal Assistance

13

ould you use a .357 Magnum to kill a mosquito? Many Soldiers are doing the financial equivalent, when they use bankruptcy to solve their financial problems. In my seven months as a legal assistance attorney, I have found that a disturbingly high number of Soldiers have declared or want to know how to declare bankruptcy. Declaring bankruptcy is a powerful tool in eliminating what you owe, but it is not for everyone. While declaring bankruptcy can temporarily reduce your debt, it also can carry serious long term consequence. So, what is bankruptcy? Bankruptcy is a legal proceeding which helps people who cannot make ends meet get a fresh start by temporarily, or permanently, preventing creditors from collecting on debts. There are several types of bankruptcy, known by chapters of the Federal Bankruptcy Code. The two main types are Chapter 13 bankruptcy and Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Chapter 13 bankruptcy lets a person restructure their debts and keep most of their property (like a big flat-screen television). The court comes up with a repayment plan, normally stretched over three to five years. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a much more powerful debt reduction tool, but also much more brutal. Chapter 7, or straight bankruptcy, involves selling all assets (say good bye to your flat-screen television) except certain

W

exempt property. The exempt property usually can affect your ability to get higher security includes a house, car and some household clearances and to advance in rank. Bankruptcy items. Different states have different also can prevent a person from being able to exemptions; for example, Texas treats certain join a professional organization (like being a farm animals and firearms as exempt property. doctor, lawyer or pharmacist). You can only file Chapter 7 bankruptcy once Filing for bankruptcy stays on your credit every six years. records for a long time, affecting your ability So when should you file bankruptcy? Only to get loans and mortgages. Not only that, the as a last resort. Too often Soldiers come and loans or credit that you do receive will tell me that they declared bankruptcy over a undoubtedly be at a brutally high interest rate. few thousand dollars. In the United States, The bottom line with bankruptcy is that it is many lawyers a big warning sign from you to encourage lenders and employers saying, “I “ A filing of bankruptcy can cannot honor my debts.” people to file bankruptcy, affect your ability to get higher There are several tools available but that is so security clearances and to advance to Soldiers who need help in the lawyer can reducing their debt that do not have in rank. ” collect a fee. the nasty side effects of Lawyer’s fees bankruptcy. The local legal for filing bankruptcy can exceed $1,000. assistance can assist individuals by informing In reality, very few people actually require their creditors of their rights under the the protection of bankruptcy. For example, if Servicemembers Civil Relief Act of 2003, the Fair you have tremendous debts and no way of Debt Collection Practices Act, the Fair Credit earning any money at all, that might be a Reporting Act and a variety of state laws. situation that calls for filing for bankruptcy. ACS offers a variety of classes and personal On the other hand, owing a few thousand services, including debt counseling and classes dollars to a credit card company normally does on money management, to help individuals not require a bankruptcy filing. improve their personal finance and debtThe local installation legal assistance office handling skills. Army legal assistance personnel and local Army Community Service office can are also available to advise servicemembers on work out alternative approaches to resolving legal matters regarding debt. that kind of debt. If anyone is having financial problems, they The problem with filing bankruptcy is that it should contact the local legal assistance office can cripple your future. A filing of bankruptcy and local ACS office.

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Jan. 6-12

Jan. 6, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

North Country
R

The Weather Man R No Listing King Kong
PG-13

King Kong
PG-13

King Kong
PG-13

The Weather Man R No Listing

Dreamer
PG

Dreamer
PG

No Listing King Kong
PG-13

No Listing King Kong
PG-13

No Listing

No Listing The Weather Man R No Show The Weather Man R No Show

No Listing The Weather Man R No Show The Weather Man R The Legend of Zorro PG-13

Prime PG-13

Prime PG-13

The Chronicles of Narnia PG

In Her Shoes
PG-13

Elizabethtown
PG-13

No Show Prime PG-13 No Show

No Show King Kong
PG-13

The Fog
PG-13

King Kong
PG-13

Prime PG-13 Prime PG-13

Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13

Aeon Flux
PG-13

No Show

Exorcism of Emily Rose -- In an extremely rare decision, the Catholic Church officially recognized the demonic possession of a 19 year-old college freshman. Told in flashbacks, ‘The Exorcism of Emily Rose’ chronicles the haunting trial of the priest accused of negligence resulting in the death of the young girl believed to be possessed and the laywer who takes on the task of defending him.

The Weather Man Popular Chicago weatherman, Dave Spritz, has a shot at the big time when a national morning television show calls him for an audition. Professionally, Dave is on the top of the world, but his personal life is in complete disarray. Dave’s painful divorce, his dad’s illness and trouble with his kids have him poised on the knife’s edge between stability and disaster. The harder he tries to control events, the more he finds life, like the weather, is completely unpredictable.

King Kong -- While filming on location at the mysterious Skull Island a group of filmmakers discover a giant gorilla named Kong, living in a massive jungle where creatures from prehistoric times have been protected and hidden for millions of years. It is the attention of a beautiful human woman that soothes Kong long enough for him to be subdued and shipped back to New York, where his bleak future involves being put on display in front of humans.

A History of Violence Tom is a loving family man and well-respected citizen of a small Indiana town. But when two savage criminals show up at his diner, Tom is forced to take action. Suddenly heralded as a hero who took the courage to stand up to crime, people look up to Tom as a man of high moral regard. But all that media attention has the likes of mobsters showing up at his doorstep, charging that Tom is someone else they’ve been looking for. Is it a case of mistaken identity or does Tom have a history that no one knows about? Either way, someone’s about to find out if there’s a history of violence.

Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire In his fourth year at Hogwarts, Harry faces his greatest challenges and dangers yet. When he is selected under mysterious circumstances as a contestant in the Triwizard Tournament, Harry must compete against the best young wizards from schools all over Europe. But as he prepares, signs begin to point to the return of Lord Voldemort. Before long, Harry is playing not just for the Cup, but for his life.

Fun with Dick and Jane -- Dick Harper’s years of hard work finally pay off when he is promoted to vice president at Globodyne, a worldwide leader in the consolidation of media properties. But after exactly one day in his new job, Globodyne is destroyed by an Enron-like calamity — and he is left holding the bag. After playing by the rules and working single-mindedly to build a comfortable life for his family, Dick and his wife Jane hit on a brilliant idea: If stealing was good enough for his boss, then it’s good enough for them.

Harry Potter & the Goblet of Fire

No Show The Weather Man R North Country
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Walk the Line
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Lord of War R Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Dreamer
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No Show Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Prime PG-13 No Show Prime PG-13 A History of Violence R Doom
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No Show Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 No Show Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Prime PG-13 A History of Violence R Elizabethtown
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No Show The Fog
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The Weather Man R King Kong
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PG-13

Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 The Weather Man R The Weather Man R Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Dreamer
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Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 The Weather Man R A History of Violence R Into the Blue
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North Country
R

North Country
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Dreamer
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Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Exorcism of Emily Rose
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Fun with Dick and Jane PG-13 Dreamer
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Prime PG-13 A History of Violence R Doom
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Exorcism of Emily Rose
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Exorcism of Emily Rose
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Elizabethtown
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Sticks and stones, and mending bones
By Chaplain (Maj.) Robert Warden
Eighth Army and IMA-KORO

The Morning Calm Weekly

http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Jan. 6, 2006

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“Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never harm me.” Most probably know the childhood ditty and those with children may have recited it to them. The problem: it is a lie. Words do harm. Ask the emotionally abused or those living through the oppressive barrage of endless criticism. They well understand the destructive power of words. Words break but they also mend. As I write this the day after Christmas, the message of peace on earth and goodwill to all lingers. The holiday season seems to elicit positive behavior from us. No matter if our celebration is Hannukah or

Christmas or neither, observations suggest the season extracts the best from us. Words and acts of kindness are in the air. This is good since our “broken bones” desperately need mending. Over the year, individuals and society have borne the bruises, hurts and destruction of too many “sticks and stones” of personal loss, personal challenge, natural disaster and war. Individuals grieve from the loss of friend and/or family member. Some struggle to overcome ridicule and abuse. Reconstruction and recovery continue following the December 2004 tsunami, multiple hurricanes including Katrina and Rita, the Pakistan earthquake, and too many disasters to

list. We carry the heartache of fallen 2nd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division, Soldiers and the many Armed Forces servicemembers who sacrificed themselves for us. Many need mending. There is incredible healing power in words and acts of kindness. I’ve witnessed many over the year. You’ve given money. Through Army chapels, you gave $65,099.15 for Tsunami relief, $78,874.59 for Katrina relief and $24,866.46 for wounded Soldiers’ basic needs at hospitals. Not as easy to quantify, but real nonetheless, are the many poeple you invited into your homes for meals during holidays and other times of the year. There were phone calls, cards and e-mails that encouraged. You helped

mend “broken bones.” However, we must carry the season’s attitude and your generosity forward. It is too easy to regress. An example is falling in love. After a year or two, maybe seven, 20, or 40, one or both says, “I don’t love you.” Often, what is really said is: “I don’t feel love any longer.” Steven Covey, in his book “The 8th Habit,” encourages us to not be duped by Hollywood’s version of love. Love is a feeling (a noun) but it is also a verb. What does he mean? We discover or re-discover the feeling of love as we do love. In 2006 we will have our share of “sticks and stones” so let us commit to using our words to build up and not tear down.

Area II Worship Services
Catholic Mass Sunday 8 a.m. South Post Chapel 11:30 a.m. Memorial Chapel Tuesday 12:05 p.m. 121 Hospital Chapel Mon.-Wed., Thur.-Fri. 12:05p.m. Memorial Chapel Saturday 5 p.m. Memorial Chapel Friday 6 p.m. South Post Chapel Memorial Chapel Memorial Chapel South Post Chapel Memorial Chapel Collective Korean 9:30 a.m. 121 Hospital Chapel 9:30 a.m. Hannam Village Chapel (Korean) 10:30 a.m. K-16 Community Chapel 11 a.m. Hannam Village Chapel noon South Post Chapel (Gospel) Sunday 10 a.m. South Post Chapel 6 p.m. South Post Chapel Thursday 6:30 p.m. Memorial Chapel KCFA Lutheran Latter-Day Saints 2nd Tues. 3rd Tues. Sunday Sunday 11:45 a.m. Memorial Chapel 11:45 a.m. Memorial Chapel 5 p.m. Memorial Chapel 10 a.m. Multi-Purpose Training Facility For information on services, call 738-3011

Jewish Protestant Services Episcopal Sunday 10 a.m. United Pentecostal Sunday 1:30 p.m. Church of Christ Church International Sunday 2 p.m. Collective Sunday 8 a.m.

Chaplain (Lt. Col.) James King [email protected] or DSN 738-3011 Chaplain (Maj.)Samuel Cabrera [email protected] 725-2955 Chaplain (Maj.)Eric J. Albertson [email protected] 738-3009

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Year In Review

Jan. 6, 2006

Page 9

Progress, transition dominate 2005 community news
By David McNally
Area II Public Affairs

YONGSAN GARRISON — The Area II community saw many positive changes in the past year. At K-16 Air Base, 2nd Infantry Division Aviation Brigade Soldiers moved in from a camp north of the Han River. Camp Colbern Soldiers said farewell and then closed the installation’s gates. The Area II Support Activity welcomed a new commander. Good Neighbor projects increased as more Soldiers, civilians and family members learned about Korean culture and went on tours. The community celebrated holidays in style with spectacular Fourth of July, Labor Day and Columbus Day celebrations and Christmas tree lightings. Hannam Village residents invited Korean neighbors for a 2005 Fall Festival. Throughout the year, Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Armed Forces Entertainment and the USO sponsored entertainment venues. Some of the

more memorable shows included the professional wrestlers, the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders, and various musical groups like Shaggy, Quiet Riot and Skid Row. The Yongsan Garrison 2008 move to Pyeongtaek came closer to reality as the U.S. Forces Korea positioned a general officer at Camp Humphreys to pave the way. Korean Augmentation to the U.S. Army Soldiers enjoyed a week of

competitions with U.S. Soldiers during the 2005 KATUSA Week. Area II hosted U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, for a special town hall meeting Oct. 21. Army and Air Force Exchange Service taxi prices went up in 2005 and so did the price of gasoline. However, Congress approved a pay raise for U.S. servicemembers and government employees. Firefighters trained with local Korean

departments, participated in a mass casualty exercise and put out a South Post residential fire. Yongsan Garrison Heliport reopened in a new location. Knight Field was the site of Republic of Korea repatriation ceremonies early last year. The 121st General Hospital underwent some dramatic renovations that left the community with a new hospital wing and front entranceway. Force protection officials got a workout during an anti-terrorism exercise called “Adaptive Focus.” Security officials also welcomed a new tool to their arsenal, the Backscatter X-ray truck. The vehicle can scan other vehicles as it drives by. The gate barrier project also put new security measures at each Yongsan access control point. The local Army-Navy flag football game did not mirror the results of the real game. Here, Army beat Navy, 12-6. The events of the past year highlight the spirit of the Area II community. The following articles are a glimpse of life during 2005. E-mail [email protected]

Defense secretary holds Yongsan town hall meeting
Area II Public Affairs YONGSAN GARRISON — Cheers erupted in Collier Field House as more than 1,500 Korea-based servicemembers, civilians and their families heartily welcomed the U.S. secretary of defense to a special town hall meeting Oct. 21. During a speech, followed by a question and answer session, Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld praised the important work servicemembers do on the “frontiers of freedom.” Flag-waving Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines, Department of Defense civilians and family members had waited hours packed into bleachers and folding chairs to hear the secretary of defense speak. “I was very excited,” said Staff Sgt. Milda Ortiz-Lawas, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 8th Military Police Brigade. “There was a lot of preparation for the visit.” Ortiz-Lawas said she was happy the secretary of defense came to visit. “I know the Soldiers in Iraq are on the top of everybody’s list,” she said. “It’s good to see he didn’t forget about us because we’re doing an important mission too.”

Soldiers say farewell to Camp Colbern friends
By Steve Davis
Area II Public Affairs

Pilots inaugurate new Yongsan Garrison heliport
Area II Public Affairs

YONGSAN GARRISON — The U.S. Army opened a new Yongsan Garrison heliport May 9. Area II Support Activity Commander Col. Timothy McNulty and Col. David Abramowitz, 17th Aviation Brigade commander, opened the new heliport near Collier Field House with a ribbon cutting ceremony. Military officials relocated the landing pad from H-208 VIP Heliport near Gate 17 to the area across from Collier Field House and named it H-264 VIP Heliport. The new site can accommodate a single UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter. At the request of the Republic of Korea Ministry of Culture and Tourism, U.S. Forces Korea agreed to turn over the former landing pad near the National Museum of Korea.

The new heliport near Collier Field House features 20-foot high, 24-inch thick walls to reduce noise from landing helicopters. A USFK press release said that the inconveniences of military activities on turnover is evidence of the continued neighbors. Pilots practiced landing routes for close relationship the United States enjoys as an alliance. Officials said they three to four weeks before the grand will take every opportunity to reduce the opening ceremony.

PHOTO ARCHIVE

YONGSAN GARRISON — Camp Colbern Soldiers moved to Camp Stanley in late October, but 304th Signal Battalion Soldiers returned Nov. 9 to bid a formal farewell to Korean employees and local friends. Camp Colbern is closing as part of the consolidation of U.S. bases in the Republic of Korea. Soldiers paid homage to a relationship forged 41 years ago when Camp Colbern opened as an artillery base. The post switched missions May 31, 1977 when the 304th Signal Battalion moved in to provide communications for 8th U.S. Army. For more than three decades, the tactical signal battalion had called Camp Colbern – located in the village of Hanam-shi outside of Seoul – its home station. Hanam-shi Mayor Lee Gyo-bum presented a plaque of appreciation to the battalion. “Your dedication to peace and stability on the Korean peninsula is truly appreciated,” read the inscription. “The friendship ... will not be forgotten.” “I hope all of the American Soldiers enjoyed the beautiful nature of Korea and felt the generous hospitality of the Korean people during their service here in Hanam City,” the mayor told the Soldiers. E-mail [email protected]

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NEWS & NOTES

Yongsan celebrations draw thousands
Area II Public Affairs

Area II

The Morning Calm Weekly

MLK Jr. Commemoration All Area II community members are invited to the Area II Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemoration Ceremony 11:30-1 p.m. Monday at the Dragon Hill Lodge Naija Ballroom. Guest speaker is Col. LaWarren V. Patterson, 1st Signal Brigade commander. For information, call 738-5950. MLK Candlelight Vigil Honor the vision and celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at a candlelight vigil beginning at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 15 Collier Field House on Yongsan South Post. The candlelight walk will be followed by a 6 p.m. ceremony at Seoul American High School Auditorium. For information, call 738-5950. Passport Services The Yongsan Legal Office passport section will not process applications for passports and Reports of Birth while its staff attends training thru Jan. 13. Regular passport services will resume Jan. 16. Customers needing passports may apply at the U.S. Embassy or wait until Jan. 16 to apply on base. Family NBC Mask Training Area II family members can learn how to fit, wear and maintain their NBC mask during two hours of training. Choose a session convenient for you. Training will be held 9-11 a.m. or 13 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday in Building T4832. For details, call 7383658 or 4544. Protestant Women Join Protestant Women of the Chapel for Bible studies 9-11:15 a.m. Wednesdays at South Post Chapel. Includes food, fun, fellowship, childcare and home school rooms. Evening Bible study is also held 6-8 p.m. Thursdays. For information, call 795-4073 or visit yongsanpwoc.com. Volunteer of the Quarter The community is invited to attend the Area II Support Activities Volunteer of the Quarter Ceremony 3-4:30 p.m. Jan. 20 in the Community Services Building, Room 118, on Yongsan South Post. Organizations and individuals who contributed to Community of Sharing Holiday Project 2005 will be honored, along with Area II youth and adult volunteers. For information, call 738-8977. Red Cross Classes - The Yongsan American Red Cross will offer a free New Volunteer Orientation 9 a.m.-noon Jan. 19. - Baby-sitting training will be conducted 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jan. 27. Cost is $25. For information, call 738-3670. Red and White Ball The Delta Sigma Theta Sorority cordially invites you to attend their annual Red and White Ball 6 p.m. Feb. 11 at the Dragon Hill Lodge Naija Ballroom. Social begins at 6 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. Attire is formal. Donation of $30 goes to the ROK Scholarship Fund. For information, 010-8671-6723 (Daegu) or 010-8671-6050 (Seoul).

YONGSAN GARRISON — Area II set up holiday celebrations for the community to enjoy KATUSA Week, July Fourth, Labor Day and Columbus Day. Monsoon rains could not stop the July Fourth celebration. Though events had to be moved indoors July 2-3, the show went on, ending under clear skies July 4 with a grand finale of patriotic music and the colorful flash of fireworks. “We knew rain was moving in and we were monitoring it closely,” said Mario Farrulla, chief of recreation for the Area II Support Activity. As a result, a community carnival, performances by reggae artist Shaggy and country star Ty England – were moved inside Collier Field House. Shaggy drew an enthusiastic crowd of about 1,000. England attracted about 500 people. Attracted by food, games and loads of entertainment, about 1,100 people were drawn to the Area II Labor Day Block Party Sept. 4. Nearly 700 people attended the Tito Puente Jr. show. During the day, Child and Youth Services became a heavy focus of the event, hosting such events as a Hapkido demonstration, a hula hoop contest and a limbo contest, but the intent of Labor Day remained the same, to give recognition to the American worker. “Labor Day celebrates the workers of America and is

STEVE DAVIS

Area II community members celebrate July Fourth at Yongsan Garrison. The event was one of many 2005 community celebrations. meant to be a day of relaxation,” said Morale, Welfare and Recreation Director Paul Robinson. “Everybody gets a day off in recognition for their hard work, and for the Soldiers we expand it into a four-day weekend. “This is the end of the summer and the weather is going to get worse from here,” he said. Thousands of Yongsan community members and Korean neighbors gathered Oct. 8 to honor Christopher Columbus with a day of festivities. “We are very happy with the way things turned out,” said Mario Farrulla, Area II recreation director. “It was a really enjoyable event. Everything went smoothly.” Farrulla estimated about 3,500 people attended the event. The day began with a parade, that started at the commissary parking lot and ended at the Collier Field House. “The parade was outstanding,” Farrulla said. “We even had honor guards and drill teams from the Korean military.”

Korean groups donate to events
Super Bowl Party KATUSA Week July Fourth Columbus Day Hurricane Relief $11,500 $4,000 $20,000 $29,000 $60,000

Korean civic groups also donated free entertainment valued at more than $130,000 for Yongsan Garrison events.

Good Neighbor Program brings people together
By Steve Davis
Area II Public Affairs

SEONGNAM — Thirty-seven Area II Soldiers got a high-tech view of the city surrounding K-16 Air Base Dec. 1 during a tour hosted by the Seongnam city government. The Soldiers were from units at or near K-16 Air Base, an installation colocated in Seongnam with the Republic of Korea Air Force’s Seoul Air Base. They included 2nd Battalion, 2nd Aviation Regiment; 164th Air Traffic Services Group; 595th Maintenance Company; and Soldiers from the Command Post Tango security force.

They toured two Korean companies fast becoming powerhouses in the Republic of Korea’s international hightech export business. “It was really impressive,” said Spc. Tammy Hedgepeth, 595th Maint. Co. “I really liked the sports car with the global navigation system.” The group also toured a Korean company known for robotics and automation for educational and communications industries, as well as international consulting. “This is the first time U.S. Soldiers have come to our company,” said tour guide Pak Man-su. “We are very glad

K-16 Air Base Soldiers tour a local Seongnam high-technology company Dec. 1.

STEVE DAVIS

to have you here.” Pak took the group to a large showroom full of robotic and automation trainers and explained for nearly an hour how each was improving workplace efficiencies. The Soldiers then boarded their tour bus for a short ride to the Blue Diamond Chinese restaurant, where they were greeted by Seongnam Vice Mayor Yang In-kwon and treated to a formal eightcourse lunch. “This is the first time Seongam has hosted a tour for American Soldiers,” Yang said during a welcome speech before lunch. “We want you to understand our city and enjoy a close, tight relationship.” Yang toasted the group, which included Multifunction Aviation Brigade Deputy Commander Col. Benjamin Williams. Williams thanked the mayor for Seongnam’s hospitality. Spc. David Lee, 21, who speaks fluent Korean, told the vice mayor about his life in America and in the Army. Lee, whose Korean parents immigrated to the United States before he was born, said he had only visited Korea a few times before being assigned to Company B, 58th Aviation Regiment in May. He said he was impressed by Korea’s high-tech advances. “You can even pay for a meal using your cell phone,” he said. E-mail [email protected]

The Morning Calm Weekly
Area II Public Affairs

Area II welcomes new commander
YONGSAN — Col. Ronald C. Stephens assumed command of the Area II Support Activity during a July 14 ceremony at Knight Field. On a gleaming parade field under bright skies, Stephens took over from Col. Timothy McNulty, who commanded both the 34th Support Group and the Area II Support Activity during his twoyear tenure. “I’ve have big shoes to fill, but I will work hard to maintain your many successful programs,” Stephens said in his speech following the passing of the unit colors.

Area II
By Joe Campbell
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District

Jan. 6, 2006 http://ima.korea.army.mil/area2

11

Col. Ronald C. Stephens addresses Soldiers and guests at the Area II Support Activity change of command ceremony July 14 at Knight Field.

Stephens, who holds a master’s degree in telecommunications from the University of Colorado and a master’s in national resource strategy from the National Defense University, is an Operation Desert Storm veteran who has served in a variety of leadership positions. “Let me say what a pleasure it is to be back in Korea,” said Stephens. “I was very fortunate to have served in the 2nd Infantry Division in 1983.” Installation Management AgencyKorea Region Office Director Brig. Gen. H.T. Landwermeyer Jr. commended McNulty and his wife Kathy for their leadership of Area II. “Today we bid farewell to an outstanding command team and family, Col. Tim McNulty and his wife Kathy and their five children,” Landwermeyer said. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen a garrison command team that got as much sincere enjoyment out of the daily challenges of this mission.” “We’ve enjoyed such phenomenal success over the past two years,” said McNulty. “Thank you for allowing me to serve you. It is through all our efforts that we have made Yongsan and Area II, now repeat after me . . . THE assignment of choice.” After many of those gathered repeated “the assignment of choice,” McNulty bowed graciously as the ceremony concluded.

Landmark construction project debuts
K-16 AIR BASE — Quality of life for U.S. Forces Korea Soldiers took another giant step forward with the groundbreaking of an unaccompanied officers’ and senior noncommissioned officers’ quarters at K-16 Air Base Dec. 9. The $26 million, 144-unit project is the first of its kind for USFK. It will be constructed at virtually no cost to the U.S. Army. “This facility will be constructed, owned and operated by the private sector for the exclusive use of U.S. military personnel authorized to reside at K-16,” said Build-to-Lease Program Manager Richard Byron, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Far East District. The U.S. Army will lease the housing project on a pay-as-you-go basis for up to 15 years, renewable for up to another 15 years. The approximately $3.5 million annual lease cost will represent a 40 percent savings over off-post housing at the full Overseas Housing Allowance entitlements, Byron said. “This project is one of the cornerstones of the master plan to make this installation both enduring and a community of excellence for our warfighters,” said Area II Commander Col. Ronald C. Stephens. “It is also a tangible symbol of the resolve and cooperation that continues to define the Republic of Korea — United States Alliance.” A Korean construction company began work at the project site in November.

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Security officials X-ray Yongsan vehicles
By Sgt. Christopher Selmek
Area II Public Affairs

Area II

The Morning Calm Weekly

YONGSAN GARRISON — Security officials hailed the arrival of a new mobile scanning system Sept. 23 with a technology demonstration at the Area II headquarters parking lot. The $790,000 Mercedes-Benz Sprinter truck scans vehicles it passes and produces high-resolution, real-time X-rays. “We simply turn it on and have cars drive past us so we can scan them,” said Robert Britton, a technical training specialist with American Science and Engineering, the developer and contractor for the technology. “It sends X-rays out into the vehicles and examines the signals we get back to create a complete digitized map of the interior of the vehicle,” he explained. Britton said parts of the technology have been around for at least 15 years; however, his company developed patented a unique “back-scatter technique,” which allows for unprecedented mobility. Back-scatter technology involves the ability to create X-ray images without using a detector on the other side. The current model fits into one side the van. It can X-ray vehicles while driving through a parking lot, or as vehicles drive past it. “This is very useful,” said Korean Security Guard Kim Ku-hyun. “I

could not have imagined this type of technology existed.” Kim said he learned how regular X-ray technology uses transmissions instead of reflection techniques. The Korean guards are two of six Yongsan security officials who attended a two-day training session Sept. 26-27 with the mobile scanner manufacturer. “We feel very excited to learn about this technology,” said Kim Kwang-su, one of the guards. The class was challenging, Britton said, because of the language barrier. “However, our systems are very graphical,” he explained. “We designed the interface to be easy to use.” Britton said the mobile scanner is an important part of providing force protection to the U.S. military. “The system prescreens vehicles,” he said, “but, it is part of a multilayer approach to security.” This technology will be useful in searching for bombs, smuggled goods and other contraband, Britton said. The mobile system is already being used for U.S. Government force protection in Iraq and Afghanistan, but this is the first time the technology has appeared in Korea. Britton said only about 100 systems have been built so far. E-mail [email protected]

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KSC employees hone decon skills
By David McNally
Area II Public Affairs

CAMP KIM — The chemical alarm caused teams of Korean Service Corps workers to immediately put on protective masks and chemical gear Oct. 14. “They have eight minutes to go to MOPP 4,” said Kim Chun-hon, KSC Headquarters Nuclear, Biological and Chemical operations manager. “We practice all the time. We’re good at it.” The high-protective posture, level four, includes the maximum protection from a chemical or biological attack - boots, mask and suit. It is something these KSC employees are used to as specialists at site decontamination. A 40-hour course Oct. 10-14 taught 19 Area II, III and IV KSC employees the latest in decontamination techniques. The employees are now at their units to train fellow employees on the tasks they learned. “The KSC employees play a very vital role,” said Maj. Chris Fland, KSC Battalion executive officer. “It’s important for them to do their battle task mission of performing ‘decon’ operations.” Friday, the classroom and onsite training culminated in a practical exercise. While in MOPP 4, the employees mounted four Falcon fixedsite decontamination systems - otherwise known as Ford 350 pick-up trucks with trailers full of decontaminants. The vehicle can carry about 1,000 gallons of decontamination solution,

Korean Service Corps Nuclear, Biological and Chemical specialists practice sitedecon techniques at Camp Kim. said Choe Chun-yong, the mobile training team chief instructor. “With that much solution we can decontaminate one mile of a two-lane road, or one four-story building,” Choe said. For the exercise, the KSC workers used a soapy water-based solution to wash down Camp Kim roads and the KSC headquarters. “It was difficult,” said O Chi-ung, 6th KSC Company. “But, this is what we have practiced before. It is important to experience this for our wartime mission.” E-mail [email protected]

PHOTOS BY DAVID MCNALLY

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Jan. 6, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

STEVE DAVIS

Soldiers of the 52nd Medical Battalion march against the clock from Camp Humphreys to the nearby rifle range during the unit’s Soldier Team Challenge April 25.

Sgt. Louis Davis, 2nd Infatry Division Tae Kwon Do Team (right), faces off with a Republic of Korea Army opponent at the Korean-American tournament at Camp Casey’s Carey Fitness Center April 14. Soldiers from three U.S. units and five ROKA divisions competed at the event.

PFC. GIANCARLO CASEM

Revisit events of the past year through ...

Images of 2005

SPC. VAN M. TRAN

First Sergeant Michael Barnes, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 8th Military Police Brigade, squares off with a young resident of the Sung Ro Won Orphanage during the unit’s visit to the facility Aug. 27.

DAVID MCNALLY

Above: Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld greets servicemembers at an Oct. 21 town hall meeting at Yongsan Garrison. Rumsfeld addressed the crowd of thousands and answered questions at the meeting, then later that night attended the Navy Ball with Sailors stationed on the peninsula. At Left: Staff Sgt. Teresa Dyson, Headquarters Platoon, Company B, 532nd Military Intelligence Battalion, rolls a ball during the unit’s Gas Mask Bowling.

Sgt. Nickola Noble takes part in a traditional wedding during the Hannam Village fall festival Sept. 24.

CPL. SEO KI-CHUL

STEVE DAVIS

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Jan. 6, 2006

The Morning Calm Weekly

Korea artists dominate at MWR Arts & Crafts
By Cara Masterson
Korea Region MWR

Comedy ROKs Comes to Area I Comedy ROKs with MWR, featuring Dean Cole, Erika Edwards and Redbone, will have performances at Camp Casey’s Gateway Club Friday; Camp Red Cloud’s Mitchell’s Club Jan. 20; Camp Stanley’s Reggie’s Club Jan. 24; and the Camp Hovey Iron Triangle Club Jan. 25. Admission is free, with each show beginning at 8 p.m. For information, call 732-6819. Osan Shopping Trip Set for Saturday Osan Shopping Tour- Area I Community Activity Center is offering a day of shopping at the famous Osan market just outside the Osan Air Force Base main gate Saturday. You’ll find a wide variety of products at the lowest prices anywhere in Korea. Explore the many narrow streets and alleyways filled with hundreds of colorful vendors willing to bargain with you for the Best Price. Also, enjoy the AAFES Exchange and Food Court just inside the base. Transportation cost is $15 (Minimum 25 seats required). Buses depart from the Camp Casey CAC at 7 a.m.; Camp Red Cloud CAC at 8 a.m.; and Camp Stanley CAC at 8:30 a.m. For information, call 732-6190. Lemme Brings R&B to Mitchell’s Club R&B artist Lemme will perform live in person at Camp Red Cloud Mitchell’s Club Wednesday. The performance begins at 7 p.m. and it is free to all. Come out early with your friends and get the best seats in the house. For information, call 732-6819. Drowning Pool, Tantric Rock Casey, Stanley Heavy metal band Drowning Pool, featuring Tantric, is scheduled to perform live at Camp Casey’s Carey Fitness Center Jan. 13 and at the Camp Stanley Fitness Center Jan. 14. Showtime is 7 p.m. both nights and admission is free. For information, call 732-6819. Basketball Jamboree Set for Jan. 14 Area I MWR and BOSS presents the Hoop-It-Up Slam Jam Basketball Jamboree Extravaganza 11 a.m. – 8: 30 a.m. Jan. 14, at Camp Casey’s Carey Fitness Center. The event includes a three-on-three Contest, Slam Dunk Contest, 3-Point Shoot Out, Hot Shot Contest, Free Throw Contest, Chili Cook-Off Contest, Hip Hop Exhibition and Double Dutch Exhibition. Participants and spectators will enjoy hip hop music, door prize giveaways throughout the day and delicious food and beverages. For information, call 732-7079 or 732-7167.

Drowning Pool, Tantric ready to rock Korea
Heavy metal, rock groups Drowning Pool & Tantric will be performing at 5 locations throughout Korea. Drowning Pool first rose to stardom with the release of their 2001 album, Sinner. Louisville, Ky.-based Todd Whitener, Matt Taul, & Jesse Vest (formerly of Days of New) joined with Detroit-native Hugo Ferreira (formerly of Merge) to form Tantric. The Drowning Pool and Tantric concerts are presented by MWR. All performances are open to ID cardholders and free of charge. Schedule for concerts in Korea include: Jan. 13, Camp Casey’s Carey Fitness Center, 7 p.m. Jan. 14, Camp Stanley Gym, 7 p.m. Jan. 15, Area IV, 7 p.m. Jan. 17, Camp Humphreys’ CAC, 7 p.m.

Drowning Pool

Undercover Santa Operation surprises signal Soldiers
Smith, executive administrative assistant/Protocol noncommissioned officer in charge, 1st Sig. Bde. YONGSAN GARRISON – Seven Now in its second year, lucky Soldiers from the 1st Signal Brigade were pleasantly surprised with Undercover Santa Operation is a program sponsored by the USO and balloons and a $200 Army Air Force AT&T, that recognizes outstanding Exchange Service gift certificate, service members during the holiday during an unannounced visit by season. Senior enlisted personnel were members of the USO’s Undercover asked to nominate their Santa Operation team, Dec. 12. “I felt honored to have received the servicemembers by writing a letter to award,” said Sgt. Tivory Reed, who is the USO detailing why they believe that member should receive the a driver for the 1st Sig. Bde. recognition. commander. “I was just doing my job Not only did winners receive $200 so I was also very surprised by the gift certificates from AAFES, but they presentation.” got a chance to win two round-trip Reed, along with six other signal tickets to the United Soldiers, “This a great opportunity States. received their for Koreans and Americans to “We started this surprise have a closer relationship and program last year,” said Chris awards better understanding of each Beenhouwer, USO during the weeks Korea program other.” leading up to ROKA Maj. Han Hee Lee manager, “to Christmas. recognize those “I nominated Sgt. Reed because outstanding servicemembers who serve their community, in addition to he’s an NCO who works numerous hard hours and I felt he doesn’t get performing their jobs well.” the recognition he deserves. This was The 1st Sig. Bde. Soldiers received one way to reward him for his hard seven of the 11 awards presented in work,” said Sgt 1st Class Barbara L. Yongsan.
1st Signal Brigade Public Affairs

By Gwendolyn R. Smalls

YONGSAN GARRISON –Korea Region took home 11 awards at the 2005 All Army Arts & Crafts Contest. In total, 306 entries were submitted from all seven regions. The annual competition of twodimensional and three-dimensional artwork was held in both novice and advanced levels. Novice level was designed for those who have received no formal art training, nor earned any college credit in art study. Advanced level is for individuals who have taken formal art training through a collegelevel class or an art school or have received awards in previous competitions. Categories included ceramics, wood, fibers and textiles, glass, metals and jewelry, drawings, prints, waterbased painting, oil base painting, mixed media (2D and mixed media), and 3D. Judging took place at CFSC in Alexandria, Va. Judging criteria was based on originality and creativity of the work, and technical skill in execution. All winners received a memo of congratulations. In addition, cash awards were presented to the top three winners in each category. Winners from Korea Region include: Novice Ceramics, Honorable Mention, Eunyong Y. Reynolds, Area II Novice Drawing, 1st Place, 2nd Lt. Bert I Uyenco, Camp Casey; 2nd Place, Yayek Deburgh, Area II Novice Water Base Painting 1st Place, Marisa M. Johnson, Area II Novice Mixed Media (3D) 2nd Place, Jane E. Byos, Area II; 3rd Place, Sgt. 1st Class Rory K. Eldridge, Camp Red Cloud Novice Metals and Jewelry 1st Place, Alfred R. J. Ellerbee, Area II; Honorable Mention, Jennifer L. H. Schripsema, Area II Accomplished Water Base Painting 3rd Place, Spc. Casey C. Taylor, K-16 Accomplished Drawing 2nd Place, Staff Sgt. Ricky R. Melton, Camp Humphreys Accomplished Mixed Media (3D) 1st Place, Un Cha Haney, Area II Contest was open to all authorized MWR patrons with the exception of Arts & Crafts program employees. This included active duty service members, family members, reservists, retirees, contractors, & DoD civilians. Winners selected to represent Korea were determined at the May 11, 2005, Korea Region MWR Arts & Crafts Contest. Twenty-eight submissions advanced to the All Army competition.

YEAR IN REVIEW

Jan. 6, 2006

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Change marks 2005 at Camp Humphreys, Area III
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – The year just ended has been one of change and growth for Area III and Camp Humphreys. 2006 promises more of the same. Units that were fixtures have left for new homes or have been inactivated. New units have arrived or been created as part of Transformation. Operational activities continued at a high pace. Camp Humphreys’ evolution into the premier American military installation in Korea has accelerated. New and remodeled buildings and facilities designed to provide improved quality of life are under construction. Two of the largest barracks complexes on the peninsula are being built at M.P. Hill and Zoeckler Station. Each complex will feature a dining facility and offices. In addition construction has begun on new gyms in both the Zoeckler Station and M.P. Hill areas. Additional facilities are planned. A new recreational facility is being created with the construction of a multipurpose athletic field and family aquatics park next to the newly remodeled “Alaska Mining Company”

Other improvements at Camp Humphreys include an upgrade to the base sewer system, and new curbing and sidewalks. restaurant near the Camp Humphreys main gate. The new Camp Humphreys commissary opened in 2005, bringing with it more space, more choices and additional parking for the “Downtown” area. The three fields of Camp Humphreys’ Soldier’s Park are getting a coating of Astroturf for spring, after having sod taken to landscape other projects during 2005. Early in 2005 Moral, Welfare and Recreation inaugurated a new paintball field, moved to its current location from Beacon Hill. The field was expanded during the summer and dedicated to 72year-old Community Activity Center employee Byrn “Pappy” Everitt in an October ceremony. Using the motto “All gave some; some gave all,” Camp Humphreys dedicated the Beacon Hill Memorial Park in June. The park is a special project undertaken by Area III and Camp Humphreys Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Frace, with So Chong-hwan from the Department of Public Works, to gather historical plaques into one place. “I saw

PHOTOS

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ROGER EDWARDS

all these memorial plaques around the installation, dedicated to the Soldiers who had gone before us here in Korea,” said Frace. “But they were not very well maintained or appropriately displayed.” Frace had the idea of moving the plaques into a park where they could be more easily viewed and maintained, and where everyone could cherish the memory of fallen comrades. The park was built from materials being removed from current construction sites. The student body and teaching staff at Humphreys American Elementary School continues to increase, bringing the need for additional space. HAES opened the 2005-2006 school year with

The new Camp Humphreys commissary brings more room, more choice and more parking.

When completed, the interim elementary school campus will have three buildings.

six more classrooms than were available at the close of the previous year, and with a remodeled cafeteria. Remodeling and construction has begun for a new interim school complex to accommodate future growth. Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers has become a fixture of dayto-day life at Camp Humphreys and in Area III. BOSS volunteers can be found at most community activities; operating games, manning the grills and lending a hand where its needed. BOSS sponsors recreational activities and trips that range from all night movies on Friday night to trips to BigBungee for Soldiers who enjoy an adventure. The Camp Humphreys walk through gate was remodeled in 2005, as were the main gate and CPX gate. Safety and processing speed were addressed. In addition, the Quarry gate on the east side of Camp Humphreys has been opened for one-way use, on and off base, during morning and evening drive time. Area III and Camp Humphreys continue to cultivate the valued relationships shared with local communities; participating in programs such as Common Values with Pyeongtaek University, the Sisterhood program with ShinHan High School, and support for People-to-People International. On a more personal level, Soldiers continue to volunteer to help cleanup Anjung-ri, and participate in community sponsored athletic and social events. Soldiers also enjoy the free tours and entertainments sponsored by local officials.

New units arrive in Area III as transformation continues
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

CAMP HUMPHREYS – One of the major organizational changes in Area III during 2005 occurred when the 2nd Multifunctional Aviation Brigade was created in a June 24 ceremony. During the ceremony, the 17th Aviation Brigade was inactivated and the 6th Cavalry Brigade was reflaged as the new brigade. This ceremony merged the assets of both units: the AH-64D Apache Longbows, CH-47 Chinooks, UH-60 Black Hawks and C-12 Huron fixed-wing aircraft and the personnel and equipment needed to operate them; under the command of Col. Peter W. Foremen, previously the 6th Cavalry Brigade commander. Later in the year, Area III became the new home of the 602nd Aviation Support Battalion, which moved to Camp Humphreys from Camp Stanley. “We started our move in May,” said Battalion Command Sgt. Maj. Franz Philippe, “as part of the reorganization.” According to Philippe, Army aviation maintenance traditionally belonged to a different commander than the commander who owned the aircraft. But now both belong to the same commander. “It’s great for the battalion and great for the Army,” he said. The Headquarters for U.S. Forces Korea Advance

Element opened its doors at Camp Humphreys May 20, with Brig. Gen. Steven M. Anderson, deputy commanding general, at the helm. The move is among the first steps in transforming Camp Humphreys into the primary Army installation in South Korea, with the general overseeing facility expansion and the movement of USFK and other units

and organizations from Seoul and other locations through Korea. Among the major moves for 2005, is the 1st Battalion (Attack), 2nd Aviation Regiment “Gunfighters” from Camp Page in Area I, to Camp Eagle and Area III. The move required transporting more than $485 million worth of organizational property including 18 Apache Longbow helicopters, 150 tactical vehicles, trailers and associated ground support equipment. There were also more than 400 U.S. and KATUSA Soldiers and all of their belongings, and all of the battalion’s equipment and supplies to move. “We held the ceremony closing our former home R E on March 30,” said Maj. Brig. Gen. Steven M. Anderson, Headquarters U.S. Forces Korea Advanced Element deputy Steven Morris, battalion commanding general, addresses those gathered at Camp Humphreys Memorial Park to honor executive officer. “It was and remember POWs and MIAs in a Sept. 16 ceremony. a big job.”
OGER DWARDS

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Humphreys builds towards better future
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

Area III

The Morning Calm Weekly

CAMP HUMPHREYS – New construction was everywhere at Camp Humphreys during 2005. Construction will continue to be a fact of life in the future, as the camp becomes the major base for the U.S. Army in Korea.

Among the projects completed in the last few years include a new Child Development Center, new classrooms at Humphreys American Elementary School and the new Humphreys commissary. As one project is completed, another is begun. Among the major construction projects now being built are family housing, Phase II; new barracks/dining facility complexes at M.P. Hill and Zoeckler Station; new gyms at both M.P. Hill and Zoeckler Station; a new BOQ and high rise parking facility; and a new aquatic recreation park. Previously constructed barracks are being remodeled to provide greater habitability and quality of life.

Humphreys American Elementary School added six new classrooms over the summer to accommodate the expanding student body.

FILE P HOTOS

The new Humphreys commissary increased both the amount of room and the selection of items available. to shoppers.

The new barracks buildings going up at M.P Hill and Zoeckler . Station are among the largest such structures in the Army.

People working together
By Roger Edwards
Area III Public Affairs

Volunteers, communities become Area III “Good Neighbors”
schools, teaching English and helping those in need. In May, KATUSAs took the lead and sponsored KATUSA Friendship Week, a three-day event with cultural demonstrations and displays, sport and a concert, sponsored by the provential government, that introduced Americans to some of the best known entertainers in Korea. More than 2,000 people attended the concert.

CAMP HUMPHREYS – Soldiers, KATUSAs, civilians (family members and employees) and Korean citizens, official and unofficial, all are responsible for making the past year a success. The Area III volunteer program gave those interested the opportunity to devote hundreds of hours to the service of their community. Volunteers worked at the clinic, the Red Cross, chapel, youth center – providing services that might not have otherwise been available. Provincial and local government officials worked to provide Soldiers, family members and civilians the opportunity to explore their greater community. Units undertook projects that took Americans to orphanages and

Fourteen Soldiers gather at the entry of the main building of the Mangi-sa Buddhist Temple while touring Pyeongtaek during the first such trip sponsored by Pyeongtaek City and Peopleto-People International. The Soldiers saw the sights and were treated to a Korean lunch. The trips have become a regular event at Camp Humphreys.

Everyone wanted to volunteer to be a part of the Anjung-ri clean up in June.

Heather Didier was named the Area III Volunteer of the Year for 2005 in an April 29 Camp Humphreys ceremony. She logged more than 500 hours volunteering as a youth swimming coach and with the Girl Scouts of American during the previous 12 months.

About 300 Area III Soldiers volunteered to joined with their on- and off-base civilian counterparts in June to clean up Anjung-ri. They picked up litter, trash and debris in the community and, at Nongsung Fortress, they shared a combination Korean/American cookout.

Volunteers from the 6th Cavalry Brigade volunteered to plant trees at Shin Han High School in Pyeongtaek City as part of the Korea wide Arbor Day Celebration in April.

More than 2,000 people (top) were exposed to some of the best known Korean entertainers during the KATUSA Friendship Week Concert in May. One of the performers, In Soo-ni, brought the audience to its feet with her rendition of rock favorites.

FILE PHOTOS

The Morning Calm Weekly

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CAMP HUMPHREYS:
Remembering the past while building the future
By Command Sgt. Maj. Robert Frace
Area III and Camp Humphreys Command Sergeant Major

CAMP HUMPHREYS – As we move into the New Year and continue to transform this installation, we must also continue to remember the historical past. Camp Humphreys is an installation with two distinct histories. First the airfield was originally constructed by the Japanese during their occupation of Korea from 1910-1945. Observers can still see the remains of old hangars and bunkers built around the airfield during that period. Then, in 1950 during the outbreak of the Korean War, the installation was used as a runway for U.S. Forces. Its key attraction was that it was one of six fields that had short sod runway strips. Airfields in Korea that were used by United Nations forces were renamed with a “K” designator followed by a number. A total of 55

of these airfields were used during the war and afterwards. The Pyeongtaek Airdrome or K-6 was the designated airfield when the U.S Air Force 931st Engineer Aviation Group repaired the installation and built a new runway to

provide support for the VMF-121 Sky Raiders and T6 Mosquito aviation wings. The 6147th Tactical Air Command Group, commanded by Col. Robert A. Trennert was located at K-6. The installation was abandoned in

Jim Carpenter poses with the K-6 headquarters sign in this Korean War era photograph.

JIM CARPENTER

PICTURE

ON DISPLAY AT WWW.BOB-WEST.COM

During the Korean war, someone thought of using the Bell OH-13 Sioux helicopter to lift wounded soldiers from the front lines and delivering them directly to the hospitals. The H-13s became the image of Army aviation and troop rescue.

PICTURE

ON DISPLAY AT WWW.BOB-WEST.COM

Originally built as a trainer, the T-6 Texan was the best aircraft available to fill the forward observer and low level reconnaissance missions during the Korean War. These were among the aircraft assigned to K-6. Remains of protective barriers can still be seen at Humphreys.

April of 1952 with units moving to K47 in Chunchon. Improvements to the airstrip were made using concrete and pierced steel planking, leading to an 8,000-ft. hardened runway. With these improvements, U.S. Marine Air Group 12 moved from K-18’s Kangnun (Koryo) Airdrome to take advantage of the longer runway for its new F-3D jet fighter. K-6 also housed the 1st Shoran Beacon Squadron. To this day many of the local Koreans in Anjung-ri and Pyeongtaek still refer to Camp Humphreys as K-6. In 1961, K-6 was renamed in honor of Chief Warrant 0fficer Benjamin K. Humphreys, of the 6th Transportation Company, who died in a helicopter accident near Osan-ri, Korea. In 1964 the Humphreys District Command was established as a separate installation command of Eighth United States Army. In the early 70s the airfield itself was renamed Desiderio Airfield (A511) after Medal of Honor winner Capt. Reginald B. Desiderio, who died during the Korean War on Nov. 27, 1950. Each piece of Camp Humphreys: its units, equipment and people; has a historical past. In future articles I will talk about the significance of these areas and how they played a role in our history here in Korea. STAY TUNED! (Editor’s Note: This is the first of an continuing series of articles on the history of our installation by Frace. Look for his articles every other week in The Morning Calm Weekly.)

Spor ts:
Area III and Camp Humphreys is becoming a destination for sporting events in Korea. Eighth Army has sponsored boxing smokers and weight lifting completions among other events during 2005. In addition, the local sporting scene is active.

BOSS active in Area III, Camp Humphreys
CAMP HUMPHREYS – Former Better Opportunity for Single (and unaccompanied) Soldiers Area III coordinator and Camp Humphreys BOSS president Spc. Christopher Mastromarino, announce Sept. 17, during the first Area III BOSS Ball and Change of Responsibility ceremony, that the Area III BOSS program had won two awards in Department of the Army completion. Camp Humphreys was name second place in Army wide competition for a medium size installation, and Suwan was named second for a small installation. “Area III installations won because of the outstanding Soldiers active in our programs,” said Mastromarino.

PHOTOS

BY

ROGER EDWARDS

Spc. Michelle Bruner, President of the Camp Humphreys BOSS program displays the BOSSmobile, the vehicle assigned the orgnazation by MWR.

The trip to "Big Bungee," the 190 foot bungee tower at Cheongpung Land, became a regular event in 2005 as “Better Opportunities for Single (and unaccompanied) Soldiers (BOSS) became more visible in helping provide suitable entertainment and recreational activities at Camp Humphreys.

YEAR IN REVIEW

Jan. 6, 2006

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Task Force Warfighter returns from tour in Iraq
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP WALKER (Feb. 11, 2005) – Escorted by blaring fire engines, 68 Military Police clad in tan desert battle dress uniforms returned to Camp Walker following their 101-day deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom for a welcome home ceremony Feb. 4 at Kelly Fitness Center. Task Force Warfighter was comprised of soldiers from the 57th Military Police Company (Centurians) from Camp Carroll and the 552nd Military Police Company (Peacekeepers) from Camp Hialeah, both of the 728th Military Police Battalion, and the 249th Military Police Company (Guardian Knights), 94th Military Police Battalion, headquartered at Camp Humphreys. The task force departed the peninsula Oct. 21, 2004 and returned to Osan Air Base Feb. 1. “I got to see a whole new aspect of the Army. We learned detention operations which is a completely different mission from what we do here in Korea,” said 1st Lt. Megan Pascoe, Task Force Warfighter officer in charge and 1st platoon leader, 552nd MP Co. “It was definitely a learning experience

GALEN PUTNAM

Col. Michael J. McKinley, deputy commanding officer, 19th Theater Support Command, welcomes members of Task Force Warfighter following their welcome home ceremony Feb. 4 at Kelly Fitness Center on Camp Walker. and leadership challenge. All in all, it was actually an enjoyable experience.” While in Iraq, Task Force Warfighter conducted internment operations at Camp Bucca, a facility housing more than 5,000 detainees in Southern Iraq. Notably, there were no successful escape attempts while the task force was at Camp Bucca. The task force was also credited with conducting more than 2,000 successful detainee convoy escorts between Baghdad and the camp. The deployment was notable in another sense as it marked the first time Soldiers from the 728th Military Police Battalion have deployed off the peninsula into a combat zone. “Warfighters, there is no doubt that you have made history and did it in an impressive way that has made me and many others very proud of you,” said Lt. Col. Steven L. Crowe, 728th Military Police Battalion commander. “We live in turbulent times where global events have

changed and continue to change the way we conduct out business. …We sent you into a hostile environment and there you executed mission after mission and did them all well.” The task force returned with all of the members who departed in October except one, who departed Iraq for emergency leave in the United States. Most importantly, Soldiers of the task force weathered the deployment unscathed. “Everyone who went over also came back; no deaths or injuries and that is a true blessing,” Crowe said to the hundreds of comrades, dignitaries and other well wishers gathered for the ceremony. A highlight of the homecoming ceremony was the furling of the guidon that was originally unfurled at the task force’s departure ceremony on Kelly Field in October. According to army tradition, the unit’s colors represent the honor and integrity of the organization symbolizing glories of the past, standing guard over the present and providing inspiration for the future. The furling of the colors signified the successful completion of the unit’s mission and the deactivation of the task force.

Area IV community relations programs lauded
KORO ORO’s PAO garners KORO ’s first DA level awards
Area IV Public Affairs CAMP WALKER (March 11, 2005) – Three units in the Republic of Korea have won awards in the Department of the Army Community Relations Excellence Awards Program competition, the Army Chief of Public Affairs announced today. A Korean national employee was also honored with an individual award. The Good Neighbor Programs for the Area IV Support Activity with its headquarters at Camp Henry in Daegu and the 8th U.S. Army from Yongsan Garrison in Seoul tied for first place in the “program” category. Third place was awarded to the 55th Military Police Company from Yongsan Garrison. Pak Chong-ku, the Area IV Support Activity – Camp Carroll community relations officer, took third place in the individual category. “This is a tremendous accomplishment for our collective Public Affairs team from Camp Carroll, Camp Hialeah and Daegu, and individually for Mr. Pak Chongku,” said Col. Donald J. Hendrix, Area IV Support Activity commander. “These dedicated professionals worked extremely hard this past year to conduct events that improve cross-cultural understanding between the people on our installations and our Korean neighbors. “We’re proud these accomplishments are shared with the many wonderful Korean people in the communities outside our Area IV Support Activity installations,” he continued. Significant contributors to the award-winning Area Chong-ku; Pak To-yong, community relations officer, Area IV Support Activity – Busan; and Kevin Jackson, public affairs officer, Headquarters, Area IV Support Activity. The coordinator for the Army-wide competition, Maureen Ramsey said, “Judges recognized the results, as well as the number of entries from Korea, reflected positively on the emphasis the command places on relationships with their Korean hosts.” Commanders throughout Korea acknowledge the correlation between their mission and sustaining good relations with the citizens of the Republic of Korea. Good Neighbor Programs throughout the ROK reinforce the bonds formed during the past 50 years and serve as a foundation for building mutual respect and understanding of the ROK-US Alliance, particularly among the younger generations of both nations. “We applaud the accomplishments of the 8th Army, the Area IV (Support Activity) and the 55th Military Police Company, and my congratulations to Mr. Pak Chongku of Area IV for his individual achievement,” said Lt. Gen. Charles C. Campbell, 8th Army commanding general. “The results of this competition underscore the hard work and dedication of many people and it’s great for our efforts to be recognized by the entire Army.” K J This is the fifth annual competition to recognize the Cho Mu-ho, senior superintendent of the Nam-bu Police Station, best of the U.S. Army’s worldwide Community Relations assisted by Cpl. Yang Tae-ju, 3rd Platoon, 188th Military Police initiatives in three categories: programs, special events Company, checks out an M68 Close Combat Optic Sight and individual accomplishments. mounted on an M4 rifle with M203 grenade launcher during a The Office of the Chief of Public Affairs Community tour of the Daegu enclave Aug. 12. Relations and Outreach Division received 30 entries IV Support Activity Good Neighbor Program are Chong from Army Major Commands, the Installation Yong-kon, community relations officer, Headquarters, Management Agency, Field Operating Agencies and Area IV Support Activity at Camp Henry in Daegu; Pak Direct Reporting Units.
EVIN ACKSON

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By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

Jan. 6, 2006

Area IV

The Morning Calm Weekly

TAS Cheerleaders take 2nd at nationals
CAMP HENRY (April 20, 2005) – After the disappointment of earning a bid to a national competition in December, but being unable to attend for funding reasons, the Taegu American School Varsity Cheerleading Team got a second chance and made the most of it by taking second place in the small school co-ed division at the National Cheerleading Association U.S. Championships held in Daytona Beach, Fla., April 10. It has been a wild ride for the Taegu American School’ cheerleaders who racked-up a number of high profile championships in the past year. “It was really exciting. Being my first year and all it was a great new experience,” said first-year cheerleader Lance Shirley, a junior. “Going to the competition was probably the best part even though we were in Daytona Beach during spring break. The competition was really exhilarating.” The accomplishment was meaningful to old-timers as well. “Since it’s my senior year, I’m glad we were able to accomplish as much as when they took first place in the small school category at the Department of Defense Dependant Schools Far East Cheerleading Competition at Camp Zama, Japan, Nov. 8 – 12, 2004. The team accomplished the feat with a 10member contingent that included four first-year cheerleaders. The Warriors’ Cheerleaders also won a number of additional team awards at the competition and eight of the team’s 10 members were nominated for AllAmerica honors for their outstanding individual display of skill, leadership ability and attitude. By winning, the team earned a bid to attend the National Cheerleading Championships, sponsored by the National Cheerleading Association, slated for Dec. 27 – 28 in Dallas. “Unfortunately the team was unable to raise the funds to pay for the trip to Dallas given the brief time period between the two competitions,” said Tonya Hagander, who has been a Taegu American School cheerleading co-coach for three years. “We only had a month to raise funds so we decided to use our bid to compete at Daytona.” That setback didn’t slow the team down, however, as they not only regrouped but added boys to the squad in order to compete at the co-ed level. They then went on to an impressive follow-up victory as both the varsity and junior varsity squads swept the Korean American Interscholastic Activities Conference Cheerleading Competition at Seoul International School Feb. 18. In addition to the two championship titles, TAS cheerleaders took six of ten varsity all-star nominations. Both squads also took first place in the 2004 KAIAC championship. The Far-East and KAIAC championships were gratifying but competing at the national level, not to mention visiting Daytona Beach during spring break, was even more meaningful. “It was really exciting. I didn’t really expect to make it that far but we did so I’m really proud. I’ve learned so much this year I can’t even begin to describe it,” said junior Megan Gardner, another first-year cheerleader. “(Besides the competition) we got a chance to go to a mall, which a lot of us haven’t been able to do for a long time, and we went to the beach every day so that was nice too. The best thing about the trip though was the competition.”

GALEN PUTNAM

Aimee Hildenbrand, TAS sophomore, reaches for the rafters as the Taegu American School Warriors Varsity Cheerleading Squad demonstrate one of their signature stunts. we did this year,” said senior Andrea Paulson who is in her sixth year of cheering for TAS. “This was a really good way to finish my career.” The Warriors’ winning ways started

Showcase Teen Center & CAC open on Camp Walker
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP WALKER (May 24, 2005) – After years of planning and anticipation, two sparkling facilities offering an array of amenities to the Daegu community have opened on Camp Walker within a week’s span. Following an extensive, $1.5 million top-to-bottom renovation, the Community Activities Center reopened to the public in a ceremony held May 16. In addition, the new 6,475 square foot Teen Center, an addition to the Child and Youth Services Center, was unveiled in a ceremony May 20. The CAC, once referred to in a Stars and Stripes article as Camp Walker’s “off-duty heart” underwent a complete makeover. The building was stripped down to its bare bones and rebuilt into a gleaming new showcase boasting an array of top shelf features. Upgrades include converting the former television lounge area to a state of the art media room; providing new soundproof booths for playing musical instruments; creating an area for matting and framing awards, art and photographs; and adding a space for community meetings. In addition, the CAC features three new pool tables, three new ping-pong tables, two new foosball tables and a new air hockey table and stacks of new board games. The key word here is new; virtually everything other than the building’s frame is fresh from the carton. From the Ludwig drum set in one of the three soundproof music rooms to the gigantic flat screen televisions with Bose sound systems in the viewing and meeting rooms to the tips on the pool cues, everything is new. “This is awesome,” said Pfc. Park Yong-kam, Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 19th Theater Sustainment Command. “The (pool) tables are really nice. Even the cues have never been used.” The CAC, originally opened in November 1983, had been slated for renovation on several occasions over the past couple of years but funding constraints and other issues sidetracked the effort until now. According to patrons, the wait has been well worth it. “I’m surprised. The rooms are really big and there is

GALEN PUTNAM

Pfc. Park Yong-kam (left) and Pvt. Kim Pil-koo, both from Headquarters, Headquarters Company, 19th Theater Sustainment Command, shoot a game of pool at the newly renovated Camp Walker Community Activities Center. a good atmosphere,” said Pvt. Kim Pil-koo, HHC, 19th TSC. “I think I would like to come here every day.” Others agreed. “I really like it. It is nice having new equipment,” said Pfc. Steven Smith, also from HHC, 19th TSC. “The style is really new and fresh. It is something young adults can relate to.” The Camp Walker library, housed on the second floor of the building, was fully renovated as well in a separate but related project. The library reopened March 1, 2005. “The Community Activities Center is an integral and important part of life for our Soldiers, civilians and their family members,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Larry C. Taylor, 19th TSC command sergeant major, at the reopening ceremony. “It provides us with a place to relax, meet with our friends and engage in a variety of offduty activities.” For the community’s not-quite-young-adults, the new $1.8 million Child and Youth Services Teen Center offers a dedicated space for teens to hold events and just hang out. The new wing offers dramatically improved amenities for the teens in the community. It includes two new multipurpose rooms for dances, ballet classes, training

and a variety of other programs; a disc jockey booth; a separate computer lab for homework; and a television lounge room. The new wing also creates more storage space in the gymnasium and provides the CYS staff with more office and training space. “A major problem in the past has been not having a place to go. About the only place teens could hang out was at the gym,” said Betsy Lubuag, 16, Keystone Club president. “This has so much more to offer than the places we had to go before. This will give us a good place to meet, have dances and lock-ins and do all kinds of other things.” Adding the new Teen Center wing also provides reciprocal relief for the community, which has a very limited amount of space for groups to meet to conduct their business. The old Images Teen Center will now be converted to and used as space for community meetings. “The important thing is that the teens not only have a place to call their own, they have complete say as far as setting the rules and determining what kind of events they would like to hold,” said Tiffany Harris, Child and Youth Services middle school and teen education technician. “That gives them a lot of responsibility and a sense of ownership. This is a fantastic facility and it is going to open a lot of doors for our teens.” Speaking of doors, the center has been dubbed “The Back Door” by members of the Keystone Club, a teen group that falls under the auspice of the Boys and Girls Clubs of America and 4H. The name alludes to the informality of entering a friend or relative’s home through the back door, welcomed as a member of the immediate family. “This is really big. There is a lot of space for us to hold activities, hang out and have fun,” said Vicki Herrmann, 16, Keystone Club vice president. “When people learn about how nice it is here, more people will start coming.” “There are a lot of resources for teens here,” said Brittani Ferguson, 16. They really did a good job. I don’t think we could have asked for anything more.”

The Morning Calm Weekly

4th Quartermaster Detachment wings its way to Alaska
By Steven Hoover
Area IV Public Affairs

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Jan. 6, 2006

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CAMP HIALEAH (Dec. 6, 2005) – Saying goodbye is never easy, but that is what members of the 4th Quartermaster Detachment (Airborne), a unit assigned here since September 1989, are currently doing. Effective Dec. 15, the unit is being relocated to Fort Richardson, Alaska, in support of the Army’s plan of stationing that provides necessary support elements for the new modular brigades, ensuring the Army is properly postured to fully support all of its strategic commitments. A departure ceremony, conducted Monday at the Camp Hialeah Fitness Center, was an opportunity to highlight

both the unit’s history and the achievements of the Soldiers who currently make up the unit. About 20 of the unit’s 52 members are being reassigned to Alaska. “The unit and its legacy, represented by the fine warriors standing before you today, has helped to ensure stability for the past 22 years while serving as the only forward deployed aerial delivery unit on the peninsula,” said Col. George K. Washington, 20th Area Support Group commander. “Few things remain status-quo these days. Our Army is transforming into a joint and expeditionary force, our enemies are volatile and our international challenges remain uncertain, complex and

ambiguous. However, one thing is for certain – the 4th Quartermaster Detachment will continue to provide rock-steady mission support to our joint and combined military forces worldwide as we continue to transform and fight and win our Global War on Terrorism.” “As we speak, our last container of equipment is moving to the port,” Capt. Jonathan Ackiss, 4th Quartermaster Det. commander, told those in attendance. “During the past week, vehicles, pieces of rolling stock and containers have been cleaned, inspected, loaded and moved to port. In less than two weeks time, the unit will depart this great country knowing that we did our part to help preserve and maintain peace and democracy.”

Both Washington and Ackiss mentioned Soldiers in the unit who excelled both in uniform and as volunteers in the community: Staff Sgt. Christopher Emmons became the units’ first graduate of the Army’s Jumpmaster School at Fort Bragg, N.C.; Sgt. Timothy Perrill and Staff Sgt. Gregory Courtney were recently named Camp Hialeah Volunteers of the Quarter. Together, they ran the Camp Hialeah post theater. Besides the quarterly awards, Courtney and Perrill, along with Chief Warrant Officer Kelvin Thompson, Spc. Imari Trice, Spc. Donald Collins, and Spc. Heliberto Manzolua were presented with Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medals.

Defense Distribution Depot Korea opens shop at Camp Carroll
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Public Affairs

CAMP WALKER (Jan. 18, 2005) – Defense Distribution Center, New Cumberland, Pa., activated Defense Distribution Depot Korea, its 26th distribution site and first in Korea, during a ceremony Jan. 28 at Building #620 on Camp Carroll. Lt. Col. James E. Lippstreu, assumed command of the facility at the ceremony. “The Defense Distribution Depot Korea will benefit USFK by reducing customer wait time and overall cost,” said Pete Halseth, DDDK deputy commander. The facility cost approximately $3.6 million to

renovate. The depot consists of two warehouses redesigned by DLA engineers to maximize space and efficiency. Phase I of the depot’s opening includes its stand-up and activation to provide its initial capability. Later in the year, phase II will enhance the facility’s capabilities to bring it up to par with its other depots operating around the world. By pre-positioning demanded supported supplies, customers can receive their orders more quickly and it is more cost effective than having to airlift supplies from outside Korea. Currently, when orders are needed quickly, they are shipped by airfreight from a DDC Depot in the United States. By anticipating

customer needs and estimating future requisitions, DDD Korea will use surface transportation to preposition fast moving supplies, providing DOD a significant savings. With the nearly 14,000 items already on-hand, delivery time will be reduced as well. “The entire process should be fairly transparent to the customer other than items will show up a lot quicker,” Lippstreu said. “This will reduce a lot of ‘doublehandling,’ which is important because every time an item changes hands it takes time and costs money.” The depot will be staffed with 32 Korean national, 11 Korean Service Corps and eight U.S. Army civilian employees and one servicemember – Lippstreu.

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28 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly
By Cpl. Oh Dong-keun
Area IV Public Affairs

Jan. 6, 2006

Area IV

The Morning Calm Weekly

32nd KSC Company named best in battalion for 3rd straight year
CAMP HENRY (Feb. 14, 2005) – The 32nd Korean Service Corps Company at Camp Henry was named the top company in the Korean Service Corps Battalion for the third year in a row, and fourth of the last five, at the battalion’s annual awards dinner Jan. 28 at the Republic of Korea Ministry of National Defense Club in Seoul. The annual awards recognize and pay respect to the Korean Service Corps organization and its personnel and to express appreciation to all those involved in the successful accomplishment of the KSC Battalion’s missions during the past year. KSC employees contribute to military readiness by performing combat support and combat service support functions for U.S. Army units across the peninsula. Competing with 14 other KSC companies from throughout the peninsula for the calendar year 2004 awards, the 32nd KSC Company also took home the best company award in the training category. “(This award) is the result of all the hard work from every member of the company this past year,” said Pak Chan-U, commander of the 32nd KSC Company. “Teamwork was the key to our success. All of us here gave our best to everything we do from beginning to end, and I am very proud of what we have accomplished.” The 32nd KSC Company is one of only four KSC companies with a mission to deploy, set-up, and operate a mobilization station in the event of hostilities. The KSC Battalion, comprised of noncombatant civilians, was activated July 26, 1950, by presidential decree with a goal of providing each U.S. corps with 500 men. Originally named the Civilian Transportation Corps, the unit was formally reorganized as the KSC May 15, 1951. The KSC reached strength of more than 100,000 in November 1952.

PAS student participates in prestigious Youth Senate Program in D.C.
By Galen Putnam
Area IV Support Activity Public Affairs

CAMP HENRY (March 23, 2005) – A Pusan American School student was one of only two Department of Defense Education Activity students world-wide selected to attend the 43rd Annual United States Senate Youth Program Feb. 26 – March 5 in Washington D.C. Senior Brieanna Carroll, best known for her athletic prowess as captain of the Pusan Panthers cross-country, basketball and soccer teams, put the determination she exhibits on the field into her application packet. “It was a lot to do,” said Carroll, who is also a Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps company commander. “There were interview questions I had to answer on tape, a test, an essay. I did a great deal of research and put a lot of time into it. It wasn’t just putting in your name.” Carroll’s mother Corina said the family and community are proud of Brieanna’s accomplishment. “This really tops off all the hard work she’s done in the

last four years. Academics don’t come easily to her so you can see how much work she put into this,” she said. “The school is very proud. Mr. Toth (Department of Defense Dependant School System Korea District superintendent) said, ‘Brie has put PAS on the map with her athletics and now her academics. She sets a good example for the other students.’” Brieanna, who’s father works for Nike has lived in Indonesia and Korea and visited several other countries, said the experience was a life-changing event. “This experience has changed me forever. I have a new respect for my country, and I feel proud to be an American for the first time in my life. Living overseas I’ve always had this rebellion against being American, I’ve wanted to be Australian or English or something, but after seeing the core of our country, and listening to its leaders, I want nothing more than to be an American,” she said. “I want to do everything in my power to keep our country strong and better for the future. I want to join the military to serve my

great country and after that perhaps get into government. I now know I can make a difference, and it’d be a waste to sit around and not do my part for the United States of America.” The program, sponsored by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, brings together 104 of the nations brightest student leaders for a week of intense activities in the nation’s capitol. The all-expenses-paid exploit includes visits to the Senate, House of Representatives, Supreme Court, the Pentagon and various Smithsonian museums. Participants also met and dine with senators, representatives, cabinet members and officials from the Department of State, Department of Defense and others. In addition, each delegate receives a $5,000 scholarship for college. Each year two juniors or seniors from each state, the District of Columbia and DoDEA are selected for the program. For more information about the program visit www.ussenateyouth.org.

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30 http://ima.korea.army.mil/morningcalmweekly

Jan. 6, 2006

Korean Language

The Morning Calm Weekly

Learn Korean Easily

Language Instructor Kwon Min-sook

Word of the week

‘boo-jah’
The phrase of the week

year.” “ I wish you wealth in the new year. ”

.

Seh-heh-eh boo-jah-dweh-sey-yo.
the New Year I wish you wealth

Conversation of the week
Long time no see.
O-reh-gahn-mahn-eem-nee-dah.

Yes, it is.
Joeng-mahl-eem-nee-dah.

Is your family doing well?
Gah-johk mo-du ahn-nyoung-hah-sheem-nee-ggah?

Yes, they are fine, thank you.
Neh. Go-mahp-suem-nee-dah.

Seh-heh-eh-doh jahl heh bohp-shee-dah.

Let’s do better in the new year.

Alright!
Jo-suem-nee-dah.

parents

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